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Sample records for experimental muscle pain

  1. Experimental knee pain reduces muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Pain is the principal symptom in knee pathologies and reduced muscle strength is a common observation among knee patients. However, the relationship between knee joint pain and muscle strength remains to be clarified. This study aimed at investigating the changes in knee muscle strength following...... experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and if these changes were associated with the pain intensities. In a crossover study, 18 healthy subjects were tested on 2 different days. Using an isokinetic dynamometer, maximal muscle strength in knee extension and flexion was measured at angular velocities 0....... Knee pain reduced the muscle strength by 5 to 15% compared to the control conditions (P knee extension and flexion at all angular velocities. The reduction in muscle strength was positively correlated to the pain intensity. Experimental knee pain significantly reduced knee extension...

  2. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  3. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees...... -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles...

  4. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0A degrees......-105A degrees) at a speed of approximately 120A degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder...

  5. Bilateral experimental neck pain reorganize axioscapular muscle coordination and pain sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, S W; Hirata, R P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-04-01

    Neck pain is a large clinical problem where reorganized trunk and axioscapular muscle activities have been hypothesised contributing to pain persistence and pain hypersensitivity. This study investigated the effects of bilateral experimental neck pain on trunk and axioscapular muscle function and pain sensitivity. In 25 healthy volunteers, bilateral experimental neck pain was induced in the splenius capitis muscles by hypertonic saline injections. Isotonic saline was used as control. In sitting, subjects performed slow, fast and slow-resisted unilateral arm movements before, during and after injections. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from eight shoulder and trunk muscles bilaterally. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed bilaterally at the neck, head and arm. Data were normalized to the before-measures. Compared with control and post measurements, experimental neck pain caused (1) decreased EMG activity of the ipsilateral upper trapezius muscles during all but slow-resisted down movements (p < 0.001), and (2) increased EMG activity in the ipsilateral erector spinae muscle during slow and fast movements (p < 0.02), and in the contralateral erector spinae muscle during all but fast up and slow-resisted down movements (p < 0.007). The PPTs in the painful condition increased at the head and arm compared with post measurements and the control condition (p < 0.001). In the post-pain condition, the neck PPT was decreased compared with the control condition (p < 0.001). Acute bilateral neck pain reorganized axioscapular and trunk muscle activity together with local hyperalgesia and widespread hypoalgesia indicating that acute neck pain immediately affects trunk and axioscapular function which may affect both assessment and treatment. Bilateral clinical neck pain alters axioscapular muscle coordination but only effects of unilateral experimental neck pain has been investigated. Bilateral experimental neck pain causes task-dependent reorganized

  6. Effect of experimental chewing on masticatory muscle pain onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Rodrigues Conti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of a chewing exercise on pain intensity and pressure-pain threshold in patients with myofascial pain. METHODS: Twenty-nine consecutive women diagnosed with myofascial pain (MFP according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria comprised the experimental group and 15 healthy age-matched female were used as controls. Subjects were asked to chew a gum stick for 9 min and to stay at rest for another 9 min afterwards. Pain intensity was rated on a visual analog scale (VAS every 3 min. At 0, 9 and 18 min, the pressure-pain threshold (PPT was measured bilaterally on the masseter and the anterior, medium, and posterior temporalis muscles. RESULTS: Patients with myofascial pain reported increase (76% and no change (24% on the pain intensity measured with the VAS. A reduction of the PPT at all muscular sites after the exercise and a non-significant recovery after rest were also observed. CONCLUSION: The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. there are at least two subtypes of patients with myofascial pain that respond differently to experimental chewing; 2. the chewing protocol had an adequate discriminative ability in distinguishing patients with myofascial pain from healthy controls.

  7. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, Henning; Hodges, P W

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function and t...... and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals.......Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function...

  8. Reorganized trunk muscle activity during multidirectional floor perturbations after experimental low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain changes the trunk muscle activity after external perturbations but the relationship between pain intensities and distributions and their effect on the trunk muscle activity remains unclear. The effects of unilateral and bilateral experimental low back pain on trunk muscle activity...... each perturbation was extracted and averaged across perturbations. The difference (ΔRMS-EMG) and absolute difference (absolute ΔRMS-EMG) RMS from baseline conditions were extracted for each muscle during pain conditions and averaged bilaterally for back and abdominal muscle groups. Bilateral compared...... with unilateral pain induced higher VAS scores (P pain areas (P pain (P back (P

  9. Experimental muscle pain changes the spatial distribution of upper trapezius muscle activity during sustained contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeleine, Pascal; Leclerc, Fredéric; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Ravier, Philippe; Farina, Dario

    2006-11-01

    To investigate the effect of local excitation of nociceptive muscle afferents on the spatial distribution of muscle activity. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the upper trapezius muscle of 10 healthy volunteers with a 5 x 13 electrode grid during 90-s isometric contractions before, during, 15 and 30 min after intramuscular injection of hypertonic (painful) or isotonic (non-painful) saline. From the multi-channel EMG recordings, two-dimensional maps of root mean square and mean power frequency were obtained. The centre of gravity of the root mean square map was used to quantify global changes in the spatial distribution of muscle activity. During sustained contractions, average root mean square increased, average mean frequency decreased and the centre of gravity moved cranially. During experimental muscle pain, compared to before injection, the average root mean square decreased and there was a caudal shift of the centre of gravity. Fifteen minutes after the painful injection the centre of gravity returned to its original position. Short-term dynamic reorganization of the spatial distribution of muscle activity occurred in response to nociceptive afferent input. The study furnishes an extension of the pain adaptation model indicating heterogeneous inhibition of muscle activity.

  10. Experimental quadriceps muscle pain impairs knee joint control during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Alkjaer, Tine; Lund, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Pain is a cardinal symptom in musculoskeletal diseases involving the knee joint, and aberrant movement patterns and motor control strategies are often present in these patients. However, the underlying neuromuscular mechanisms linking pain to movement and motor control are unclear. To investigate......, and EMG activity in the VM and VL muscles was reduced. Compressive forces, adduction moments, knee joint kinematics, and hamstring EMG activity were unaffected by pain. Interestingly, the observed changes persisted when the pain had vanished. The results demonstrate that muscle pain modulated the function...

  11. Patterns of experimentally induced pain in pericranial muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt-Hansen, Peter Thede; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    (VAS) and the perceived area of pain was drawn on anatomical maps. The pain areas were measured and the localization determined by a new centre-of-gravity method. The PPTs were lowest on the sternocleidomastoid muscle (anova: P VAS pain scored highest following injection...

  12. Masseter motor unit recruitment is altered in experimental jaw muscle pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minami, I.; Akhter, R.; Albersen, I.; Burger, C.; Whittle, T.; Lobbezoo, F.; Peck, C.C.; Murray, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Some management strategies for chronic orofacial pain are influenced by models (e.g., Vicious Cycle Theory, Pain Adaptation Model) proposing either excitation or inhibition within a painful muscle. The aim of this study was to determine if experimental painful stimulation of the masseter muscle

  13. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of muscle or tendons.4,14. Management of muscle pain. Non-Pharmacological Management. The non-pharmacological treatments for muscle pain are illustrated in Figure 1. Treatment modalities include the following. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS). TENS is a non-invasive procedure used in rehabilitation to.

  14. Effects of experimentally induced pain and fear of pain on trunk coordination and back muscle activity during walking.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, C.J.C.; Daffertshofer, A.; Meijer, O.G.; Moseley, G.; Wuisman, P.I.J.M.; Beek, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of experimentally induced pain and fear of pain on trunk coordination and erector spinae EMG activity during gait. DESIGN: In 12 healthy subjects, hypertonic saline (acute pain) and isotonic saline (fear of pain) were injected into erector spinae muscle, and

  15. No release of interstitial glutamate in experimental human model of muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, M.; Jørgensen, M.; Stallknecht, Bente

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate may be released from muscle nociceptors and thereby contribute to mechanisms underlying acute and chronic muscle pain. In vivo concentration of glutamate during muscle pain has not previously been studied in either animals or humans. In the present study, we aimed to study the in vivo...... flow increased significantly over time in response to infusion of chemical mixture and placebo (p = 0.001). However, we found no difference in changes in muscle blood flow between chemical mixture and placebo (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates no signs of increased release...... of glutamate from myofascial nociceptors during and after acute experimentally induced muscle pain and tenderness....

  16. Effects of experimental muscle pain on shoulder-abduction force steadiness and muscle activity in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas Quaade; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per

    2007-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the steadiness of shoulder abduction is reduced in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), which might be related to shoulder pain associated with the SIS. The aim of the present study was to examine the acute effects of experimental shoulder muscle...... pain on shoulder motor function in healthy subjects. The fluctuations in exerted force (force steadiness) and electromyographic (EMG) activity from eight shoulder muscles were determined during sub-maximal isometric and dynamic contractions with the shoulder abductors in nine healthy subjects (27.......7 +/- 4.2 years, mean +/- 1 SD) before, during and after experimental pain induction. Experimental pain was induced by bolus injections of 6% hypertonic saline into the supraspinatus muscle. Experimental muscle pain reduced shoulder-abduction force steadiness on average by 21% during isometric...

  17. Effects of experimental muscle pain on force variability during task-related and three directional isometric force task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mista, Christian Ariel; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Experimentally muscle pain induces changes in the distribution of muscle activity and affects the muscle coordination. The force steadiness is impaired during muscle pain in the task-related force direction as well as in the tangential directions. In addition, pain lead to a mismatch between the ...

  18. Women with dysmenorrhea are hypersensitive to experimental deep muscle pain across the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovides, Stella; Baker, Fiona C; Avidon, Ingrid; Bentley, Alison

    2013-10-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea is a common painful condition in women that recurs every month across the reproductive years. The recurrent nociceptive input into the central nervous system that occurs during menstruation each month in women with dysmenorrhea is hypothesized to lead to increased sensitivity to painful stimuli. We investigated whether women with primary dysmenorrhea are hyperalgesic to deep muscle pain induced by a cleanly nociceptive method of hypertonic saline injection. Pain stimulation was applied both within an area of referred menstrual pain (lower back) and at a remote site outside of referred menstrual pain (forearm) in 12 healthy women with severe dysmenorrhea and 9 healthy women without dysmenorrhea, at 3 phases of the menstrual cycle: menstruation and follicular and luteal phases. Women rated their pain severity on a 100-mm visual analog scale every 30 seconds after injection until the pain subsided. In both groups of women, menstrual cycle phase had no effect on the reported intensity and duration of muscle pain. However, women with dysmenorrhea had increased sensitivity to experimental muscle pain both at the site of referred pain and at a remote nonpainful site, as assessed by peak pain severity visual analog scale rating, area under the visual analog scale curve, and pain duration, compared to women without dysmenorrhea. These data show that women with severe primary dysmenorrhea, who experience monthly menstrual pain, are hyperalgesic to deep muscle pain compared to women without dysmenorrhea. Our findings that dysmenorrheic women are hyperalgesic to a clinically relevant, deep muscle pain in areas within and outside of referred menstrual pain indicates lasting changes in pain sensitivity outside of the painful period during menstruation. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Movement does not promote recovery of motor output following acute experimental muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schabrun, Siobhan M.; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Thapa, Tribikram

    2018-01-01

    Objective.:  To examine the effect of motor activity on the magnitude and duration of altered corticomotor output following experimental muscle pain. Design. : Experimental, pre-post test. Setting. : University laboratory. Subjects. : Twenty healthy individuals. Methods.:  Participants were rando....... Understanding corticomotor depression in the postpain period and what factors promote recovery has relevance for clinical pain syndromes where ongoing motor dysfunction, in the absence of pain, may predispose to symptom persistence or recurrence....

  20. Experimental Muscle Pain Impairs the Synergistic Modular Control of Neck Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzi, Leonardo; Muceli, Silvia; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A motor task can be performed via different patterns of muscle activation that show regularities that can be factorized in combinations of a reduced number of muscle groupings (also referred to as motor modules, or muscle synergies). In this study we evaluate whether an acute noxious stimulus induces a change in the way motor modules are combined to generate movement by neck muscles. The neck region was selected as it is a region with potentially high muscular redundancy. We used the motor modules framework to assess the redistribution of muscular activity of 12 muscles (6 per side) in the neck region of 8 healthy individuals engaged in a head and neck aiming task, in non-painful conditions (baseline, isotonic saline injection, post pain) and after the injection of hypertonic saline into the right splenius capitis muscle. The kinematics of the task was similar in the painful and control conditions. A general decrease of activity was noted for the injected muscle during the painful condition together with an increase or decrease of the activity of the other muscles. Subjects did not adopt shared control strategies (motor modules inter subject similarity at baseline 0.73±0.14); the motor modules recorded during the painful condition could not be used to reconstruct the activation patterns of the control conditions, and the painful stimulus triggered a subject-specific redistribution of muscular activation (i.e., in some subjects the activity of a given muscle increased, whereas in other subjects it decreased with pain). Alterations of afferent input (i.e., painful stimulus) influenced motor control at a multi muscular level, but not kinematic output. These findings provide new insights into the motor adaptation to pain.

  1. Experimental muscle pain challenges the postural stability during quiet stance and unexpected posture perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Rogério Pessoto; Ervilha, Ulysses Fernandes; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Musculoskeletal pain impairs postural control and stability. Nine subjects stood as quietly as possible on a moveable force platform before, during, and after experimental pain in the right leg muscles. A moveable force platform was used to measure the center of pressure and provided unexpected perturbations. Lower limb muscle activity, joint angles, and foot pressure distributions were measured. Hypertonic saline was used to induce pain in the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, or biceps femoris muscle of the right leg. Compared to baseline and control sessions, pain in the knee extensor muscles during quiet standing evoked: 1) larger sway area, greater medial-lateral center of pressure displacement and higher speed (P increased sway displacement in the anterior-posterior direction (P increased electromyography (EMG) activity for left tibialis anterior and left erector spinae muscles (P < .05). Pain provoked longer time to return to an equilibrium posture after forward EMG activity for, and pain in vastus medialis muscle decreased the time for the maximum hip flexion during this perturbation (P < .05). These results show that muscle pain impairs postural stability during quiet standing and after unexpected perturbation, which suggest that people suffering from leg muscle pain are more vulnerable to falls. This article presents the acute responses to leg muscle pain on the postural control. This measure could potentially help clinicians who seek to assess how pain responses may contribute to patient's postural control and stability during quiet standing and after recovering from unexpected perturbations. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of experimental low back pain on lumbar muscle activity in people with a history of clinical low back pain: a muscle functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danneels, Lieven; Cagnie, Barbara; D'hooge, Roseline; De Deene, Yves; Crombez, Geert; Vanderstraeten, Guy; Parlevliet, Thierry; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    In people with a history of low back pain (LBP), structural and functional alterations have been observed at several peripheral and central levels of the sensorimotor pathway. These existing alterations might interact with the way the sensorimotor system responds to pain. We examined this assumption by evaluating the lumbar motor responses to experimental nociceptive input of 15 participants during remission of unilateral recurrent LBP. Quantitative T2 images (muscle functional MRI) were taken bilaterally of multifidus, erector spinae, and psoas at several segmental levels (L3 upper and L4 upper and lower endplate) and during several conditions: 1) at rest, 2) upon trunk-extension exercise without pain, and 3) upon trunk-extension exercise with experimental induced pain at the clinical pain-side (1.5-ml intramuscular hypertonic saline injections in erector spinae). Following experimental pain induction, muscle activity levels similarly reduced for all three muscles, on both painful and nonpainful sides, and at multiple segmental levels (P = 0.038). Pain intensity and localization from experimental LBP were similar as during recalled clinical LBP episodes. In conclusion, unilateral and unisegmental experimental LBP exerts a generalized and widespread decrease in lumbar muscle activity during remission of recurrent LBP. This muscle response is consistent with previous observed patterns in healthy people subjected to the same experimental pain paradigm. It is striking that similar inhibitory patterns in response to pain could be observed, despite the presence of preexisting alterations in the lumbar musculature during remission of recurrent LBP. These results suggest that motor output can modify along the course of recurrent LBP. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Experimental low back pain decreased trunk muscle activity in currently asymptomatic recurrent low back pain patients during step tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients demonstrate reorganized trunk muscle activity but if similar changes are manifest in recurrent LBP patients (R-LBP) during asymptomatic periods remains unknown. In 26 healthy and 27 currently asymptomatic R-LBP participants electromyographic activity (EMG) was recorded...... experimental NRS scores were higher (Ppain conditions (Ppain decreased Delta-RMS-EMG in m. iliocostalis and bilateral pain decreased Delta-RMS-EMG in all back and gluteal muscles during step tasks...... from trunk and gluteal muscles during series of stepping up and down on a step bench before and during experimentally intramuscular induced unilateral and bilateral LBP. Pain intensity was assessed by numeric rating scale (NRS) scores. Root-mean-square EMG (RMS-EMG) normalized to maximal voluntary...

  4. Experimental pain in human temporal muscle induced by hypertonic saline, potassium and acidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Norup, M

    1992-01-01

    The study was aimed at developing a reference model for experimental pain and tenderness in the human temporal muscle by the local injection of hypertonic saline, potassium chloride and acidic phosphate buffer, using isotonic saline as control. The design was randomized and double-blind. Twenty...

  5. Psychological Factors Predict Local and Referred Experimental Muscle Pain: A Cluster Analysis in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer E.; Watson, David; Frey-Law, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest an underlying three- or four-factor structure explains the conceptual overlap and distinctiveness of several negative emotionality and pain-related constructs. However, the validity of these latent factors for predicting pain has not been examined. Methods A cohort of 189 (99F; 90M) healthy volunteers completed eight self-report negative emotionality and pain-related measures (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised; Positive and Negative Affect Schedule; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; Pain Catastrophizing Scale; Fear of Pain Questionnaire; Somatosensory Amplification Scale; Anxiety Sensitivity Index; Whiteley Index). Using principal axis factoring, three primary latent factors were extracted: General Distress; Catastrophic Thinking; and Pain-Related Fear. Using these factors, individuals clustered into three subgroups of high, moderate, and low negative emotionality responses. Experimental pain was induced via intramuscular acidic infusion into the anterior tibialis muscle, producing local (infusion site) and/or referred (anterior ankle) pain and hyperalgesia. Results Pain outcomes differed between clusters (multivariate analysis of variance and multinomial regression), with individuals in the highest negative emotionality cluster reporting the greatest local pain (p = 0.05), mechanical hyperalgesia (pressure pain thresholds; p = 0.009) and greater odds (2.21 OR) of experiencing referred pain compared to the lowest negative emotionality cluster. Conclusion Our results provide support for three latent psychological factors explaining the majority of the variance between several pain-related psychological measures, and that individuals in the high negative emotionality subgroup are at increased risk for (1) acute local muscle pain; (2) local hyperalgesia; and (3) referred pain using a standardized nociceptive input. PMID:23165778

  6. Increased trunk muscle activity during gait after bilateral experimental pain induction in recurrent low back pain patients during a pain-free period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Sørensen, Brian Østergaard; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    Introduction: Trunk muscle control is consistently altered in persistent low back pain patients during a variety of functions but the effect of experimental pain induction in recurrent low back pain patients during a pain-free period remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate...... activity during swing phases in patients compared with control participants indicated persistent sensorimotor changes in recurrent low back patients during a pain-free period. Acknowledgement: The study was supported by Center for Neuroplasticity and Pain (CNAP), SMI, Department of Health Science...

  7. Reorganized Trunk Muscle Activity During Multidirectional Floor Perturbations After Experimental Low Back Pain: A Comparison of Bilateral Versus Unilateral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Low back pain changes trunk muscle activity after external perturbations but the relationship between pain intensities and distributions and their effect on trunk muscle activity remains unclear. The effects of unilateral and bilateral experimental low back pain on trunk muscle activity were compared during unpredictable multidirectional surface perturbations in 19 healthy participants. Pain intensity and distribution were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and pain drawings. Root mean square (RMS) of the electromyographic (EMG) signals from 6 trunk muscles bilaterally after each perturbation was extracted and averaged across perturbations. The difference (ΔRMS-EMG) and absolute difference (absolute ΔRMS-EMG) RMS from baseline conditions were extracted for each muscle during pain conditions and averaged bilaterally for back and abdominal muscle groups. Bilateral compared with unilateral pain induced higher VAS scores (P pain areas (P pain (P back (P back (P pain. Bilateral pain caused greater absolute ΔRMS-EMG changes in the back (P pain. This study provided novel observations of differential trunk muscle activity in response to perturbations dependent on pain intensity and/or pain distribution. Because of complex and variable changes the relevance of clinical examination of muscle activity during postural tasks is challenged. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimentally induced masseter-pain changes masseter but not sternocleidomastoid muscle-related activity during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasinato, Fernanda; Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa C; Zeredo, Jorge Luis Lopes; Macedo, Sergio Bruzadelli; Corrêa, Eliane C R

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of induced masseter-muscle pain on the amplitude of muscle activation, symmetry and coactivation of jaw- and neck-muscles during mastication. Twenty-eight male volunteers, mean age±SD 20.6±2.0years, participated in this study. Surface electromyography of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles was performed bilaterally during mastication of a gummy candy before and after injections of monosodium glutamate solution and isotonic saline solution. As a result, we observed a decrease in the amplitude of activation of the masseter muscle on the working side (p=0.009; d=0.34) and a reduction in the asymmetry between the working and the balancing side during mastication (p=0.007; d=0.38). No changes were observed either on the craniocervical electromyographic variables. In conclusion, experimentally induced pain reduced the masseter muscle activation on the working side, thereby reducing the physiological masseters' recruitment asymmetry between the two sides during mastication. No effects on SCM activity were detected. These results may partly explain the initial maladaptative changes underlying TMD conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of unilateral and bilateral experimental low back pain on trunk muscle activity during stair walking in healthy and recurrent low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    Aim To explore the trunk muscle activity in healthy and recurrent low back pain (R-LBP) patients with no present pain during stair ascent and descent before and after unilateral and bilateral experimental low back pain (LBP). Methods Twenty-five healthy controls and 25 pain-free R-LBP patients...... in m. rectus abdominis during all phases, with larger decrease during bilateral compared with unilateral pain (Ppain in the back muscles (P....04). Conclusions The impact of unilateral and bilateral experimental LBP on trunk muscle activity was different between healthy participants and R-LBP patients. Pain resulted in increased trunk muscle activity in healthy, while R-LBP patients decreased the back and increased the abdominal muscle activity. However...

  10. An increased response to experimental muscle pain is related to psychological status in women with chronic non-traumatic neck-shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Neck-shoulder pain conditions, e.g., chronic trapezius myalgia, have been associated with sensory disturbances such as increased sensitivity to experimentally induced pain. This study investigated pain sensitivity in terms of bilateral pressure pain thresholds over the trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles and pain responses after a unilateral hypertonic saline infusion into the right legs tibialis anterior muscle and related those parameters to intensity and area size of the clinical pain and to psychological factors (sleeping problems, depression, anxiety, catastrophizing and fear-avoidance). Methods Nineteen women with chronic non-traumatic neck-shoulder pain but without simultaneous anatomically widespread clinical pain (NSP) and 30 age-matched pain-free female control subjects (CON) participated in the study. Results NSP had lower pressure pain thresholds over the trapezius and over the tibialis anterior muscles and experienced hypertonic saline-evoked pain in the tibialis anterior muscle to be significantly more intense and locally more widespread than CON. More intense symptoms of anxiety and depression together with a higher disability level were associated with increased pain responses to experimental pain induction and a larger area size of the clinical neck-shoulder pain at its worst. Conclusion These results indicate that central mechanisms e.g., central sensitization and altered descending control, are involved in chronic neck-shoulder pain since sensory hypersensitivity was found in areas distant to the site of clinical pain. Psychological status was found to interact with the perception, intensity, duration and distribution of induced pain (hypertonic saline) together with the spreading of clinical pain. The duration and intensity of pain correlated negatively with pressure pain thresholds. PMID:21992460

  11. An increased response to experimental muscle pain is related to psychological status in women with chronic non-traumatic neck-shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Ann L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck-shoulder pain conditions, e.g., chronic trapezius myalgia, have been associated with sensory disturbances such as increased sensitivity to experimentally induced pain. This study investigated pain sensitivity in terms of bilateral pressure pain thresholds over the trapezius and tibialis anterior muscles and pain responses after a unilateral hypertonic saline infusion into the right legs tibialis anterior muscle and related those parameters to intensity and area size of the clinical pain and to psychological factors (sleeping problems, depression, anxiety, catastrophizing and fear-avoidance. Methods Nineteen women with chronic non-traumatic neck-shoulder pain but without simultaneous anatomically widespread clinical pain (NSP and 30 age-matched pain-free female control subjects (CON participated in the study. Results NSP had lower pressure pain thresholds over the trapezius and over the tibialis anterior muscles and experienced hypertonic saline-evoked pain in the tibialis anterior muscle to be significantly more intense and locally more widespread than CON. More intense symptoms of anxiety and depression together with a higher disability level were associated with increased pain responses to experimental pain induction and a larger area size of the clinical neck-shoulder pain at its worst. Conclusion These results indicate that central mechanisms e.g., central sensitization and altered descending control, are involved in chronic neck-shoulder pain since sensory hypersensitivity was found in areas distant to the site of clinical pain. Psychological status was found to interact with the perception, intensity, duration and distribution of induced pain (hypertonic saline together with the spreading of clinical pain. The duration and intensity of pain correlated negatively with pressure pain thresholds.

  12. Experimental tooth clenching. A model for studying mechanisms of muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of this thesis was to broaden knowledge of pain mechanisms in myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). The specific aims were to: Develop a quality assessment tool for experimental bruxism studies (study I). Investigate proprioceptive allodynia after experimental tooth clenching exercises (study II). Evaluate the release of serotonin (5-HT), glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate in healthy subjects (study III) and in patients with M-TMD (study IV), after experimental tooth clenching exercises. In (I), tool development comprised 5 steps: (i) preliminary decisions, (ii) item generation, (iii) face-validity assessment, (iv) reliability and discriminative validity testing, and (v) instrument refinement. After preliminary decisions and a literature review, a list of 52 items to be considered for inclusion in the tool was generated. Eleven experts were invited to participate on the Delphi panel, of which 10 agreed. After four Delphi rounds, 8 items remained and were included in the Quality Assessment Tool for Experimental Bruxism Studies (Qu-ATEBS). Inter-observer reliability was acceptable (k = 0.77), and discriminative validity high (phi coefficient 0.79; P muscle blood flow. Two hours after the start of microdialysis, participants were randomized to a 20-min repetitive experimental tooth clenching task (50% of MVCF) or a control session (no clenching). Pain intensity was measured throughout the experiment. Substance levels and blood flow were unaltered at all time points between sessions, and between genders in each session. Pain intensity was significantly higher after clenching in the clenching session compared to the same time point in the control session. In (IV), 15 patients with M-TMD and 15 healthy controls participated in one session and the methodology described above was used. M-TMD patients had significantly higher levels of 5-HT and significantly lower blood flows than healthy controls. No significant differences for any substance at any

  13. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Shiozawa

    Full Text Available Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP displacement in a reaction time task condition.Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated.Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05. Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05.The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered.

  14. Does experimental low back pain change posteroanterior lumbar spinal stiffness and trunk muscle activity? A randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arnold Y L; Parent, Eric C; Prasad, Narasimha; Huang, Christopher; Chan, K Ming; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2016-05-01

    While some patients with low back pain demonstrate increased spinal stiffness that decreases as pain subsides, this observation is inconsistent. Currently, the relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of experimental low back pain on temporal changes in posteroanterior spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle activity. In separate sessions five days apart, nine asymptomatic participants received equal volume injections of hypertonic or isotonic saline in random order into the L3-L5 interspinous ligaments. Pain intensity, spinal stiffness (global and terminal stiffness) at the L3 level, and the surface electromyographic activity of six trunk muscles were measured before, immediately after, and 25-minute after injections. These outcome measures under different saline conditions were compared by generalized estimating equations. Compared to isotonic saline injections, hypertonic saline injections evoked significantly higher pain intensity (mean difference: 5.7/10), higher global (mean difference: 0.73N/mm) and terminal stiffness (mean difference: 0.58N/mm), and increased activity of four trunk muscles during indentation (Ppain subsided. While previous clinical research reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between spinal stiffness and low back pain, our study revealed that experimental pain caused temporary increases in spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle co-contraction during indentation, which helps explain the temporal relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain observed in some clinical studies. Our results substantiate the role of spinal stiffness assessments in monitoring back pain progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of spinal manipulation on deep experimental muscle pain in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Søren; Ødegaard-Olsen, Øystein; Søvde, Beate

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation is commonly used in the treatment of spinal pain syndromes. The mechanisms by which HVLA-manipulation might reduce spinal pain are not well understood, but often assumed to relate to the reduction of biomechanical dysfunction....... It is also possible however, that HVLA-manipulation involves a segmental or generalized inhibitory effect on nociception, irrespective of biomechanical function. In the current study it was investigated whether a local analgesic effect of HVLA-manipulation on deep muscle pain could be detected, in healthy...... individuals. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Local, para-spinal muscle pain was induced by injection of 0.5 ml sterile, hyper-tonic saline on two separate occasions 1 week apart. Immediately following the injection, treatment was administered as either a) HVLA-manipulation or b) placebo treatment, in a randomized...

  16. The association between dry needling-induced twitch response and change in pain and muscle function in patients with low back pain: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Walker, Michael J; Rettig, Charles; Davis, Joel; Nelson, Chenae; Su, Jonathan; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Hebert, Jeffrey J

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between dry needling-induced twitch response and change in pain, disability, nociceptive sensitivity, and lumbar multifidus muscle function, in patients with low back pain (LBP). Quasi-experimental study. Department of Defense Academic Institution. Sixty-six patients with mechanical LBP (38 men, 28 women, age: 41.3 [9.2] years). Dry needling treatment to the lumbar multifidus muscles between L3 and L5 bilaterally. Examination procedures included numeric pain rating, the Modified Oswestry Disability Index, pressure algometry, and real-time ultrasound imaging assessment of lumbar multifidus muscle function before and after dry needling treatment. Pain pressure threshold (PPT) was used to measure nocioceptive sensitivity. The percent change in muscle thickness from rest to contraction was calculated to represent muscle function. Participants were dichotomized and compared based on whether or not they experienced at least one twitch response on the most painful side and spinal level during dry needling. Participants experiencing local twitch response during dry needling exhibited greater immediate improvement in lumbar multifidus muscle function than participants who did not experience a twitch (thickness change with twitch: 12.4 [6]%, thickness change without twitch: 5.7 [11]%, mean difference adjusted for baseline value, 95%CI: 4.4 [1 to 8]%). However, this difference was not present after 1-week, and there were no between-groups differences in disability, pain intensity, or nociceptive sensitivity. The twitch response during dry needling might be clinically relevant, but should not be considered necessary for successful treatment. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. No effect of experimental occlusal interferences on pressure pain thresholds of the masseter and temporalis muscles in healthy women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michelotti, A; Farella, M; Steenks, MH; Gallo, LM; Palla, S

    It has been suggested that occlusal interferences may lead to pain and tenderness of the masticatory muscles. Tender jaw muscles are more sensitive to pressure pain, as assessed by means of pressure algometry. We tested the effects of occlusal interferences on the pressure pain threshold of the jaw

  18. Experimental muscle pain during a forward lunge--the effects on knee joint dynamics and electromyographic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Alkjaer, T; Simonsen, Erik Bruun

    2009-01-01

    . Isotonic saline (0.9%) was used as control. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Three-dimensional movement analyses were performed and inverse dynamics were used to calculate joint kinematics and kinetics for ankle, knee and hip joints. Electromyographic (EMG) signals of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles were......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the knee joint dynamics during a forward lunge could be modulated by experimentally induced vastus medialis pain in healthy subjects. DESIGN: Randomised cross-over study. SETTING: Biomechanical movement laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: 20...... recorded. RESULTS: During and after pain, significant decreases in knee joint dynamics and EMG recordings were observed. CONCLUSION: The study shows that local pain in the quadriceps is capable of modulating movements with high knee joint dynamics. The results may have implications in the management...

  19. Jaw-motor effects of experimental jaw-muscle pain and stress in patients with deep bite and matched control subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Svensson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of experimental jaw-muscle pain and stress on masticatory muscle activity in TMD-patients has been discussed. Furthermore, associations between TMD and deep bite patients have been studied. Accordingly in the present study, comparison of EMG responses at rest, maximal...

  20. Effect of experimental muscle pain on the acquisition and retention of locomotor adaptation: different motor strategies for a similar performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Jason; Salomoni, Sauro Emerick; Mercier, Catherine; Tucker, Kylie J; Roy, Jean-Sebastien; van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Hodges, Paul W; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2018-01-24

    As individuals with musculoskeletal disorders often experience motor impairments, contemporary rehabilitation relies heavily on the use of motor learning principles. However, motor impairments are often associated with pain. While there is substantial evidence that muscle pain interferes with motor control, much less is known on its impact on motor learning, especially on locomotor learning. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of muscle pain on locomotor learning. Two groups (Pain and Control) of healthy participants performed a locomotor adaptation task (robotized ankle-foot orthosis perturbing ankle movements during swing) on two consecutive days. On Day 1 (acquisition), hypertonic saline was injected in the Tibialis Anterior (TA) muscle of the Pain group participants, while Control group participants were pain-free. All participants were pain-free on Day 2 (retention). Changes in movement errors caused by the perturbation were assessed as an indicator of motor performance. Detailed analysis of kinematic and electromyographic data provided information about motor strategies. No between-group differences were observed on motor performance measured during the acquisition and retention phases. However, Pain group participants had a residual movement error later in the swing phase and smaller early TA activation than Control group participants, thereby suggesting a reduction in the use of anticipatory motor strategies to overcome the perturbation. Muscle pain did not interfere with global motor performance during locomotor adaptation. The different motor strategies used in the presence of muscle pain may reflect a diminished ability to anticipate the consequences of a perturbation.

  1. Vitamin D Status Is Not Associated with Outcomes of Experimentally-Induced Muscle Weakness and Pain in Young, Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Ring

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D receptors have been identified in skeletal muscle; and symptoms of vitamin D deficiency include muscle weakness and pain. Moreover, increased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD concentrations have been associated with improved muscle function. To further clarify the importance of vitamin D to muscle, we examined the association between vitamin D status and exercise-induced muscle pain and weakness in healthy people. Muscle damage to the elbow flexors was induced with eccentric exercise (EE in 48 individuals (22.5 ± 3.2 yrs. Muscle pain ratings following unloaded movement and peak isometric force (IF were collected before EE and for 4 days post-EE. Linear regression was used to determine if serum 25(OHD was a predictor of any outcome. In males, R2-values from 0.48 to 1.00. R2 for IF ranged from 0 to 0.02 and P-values from 0.48 to 1.00. In females, R2 for pain ratings ranged from 0.01 to 0.11 and P-values from 0.14 to 0.59. R2 for IF ranged from 0 to 0.04 and P-values from 0.41 to 0.90. In conclusion, vitamin D status did not predict muscle pain or strength after EE-induced muscle damage in young healthy men and women.

  2. Exercise in muscle pain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-01

    Muscle pain disorders range from local or regional (myofascial pain) to widespread (fibromyalgia). Many people with muscle pain have decreased fitness. Exercise intolerance is a common feature as well, and yet exercise plays an important role in the treatment of muscle pain disorders. Results of studies have shown repeatedly, via multiple modes and methods of delivery, that exercise is at least as effective as the best pharmacologic treatments. An understanding by clinicians and their patients of the unique benefits of a carefully crafted exercise program is one step in the successful management of these often frustrating muscle pain disorders. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Induction and modulation of referred muscle pain in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, René Johannes

    Muscle pain is a major factor in many disorders such as injuries, degenerative diseases, and cancer. The mechanisms underlying muscle pain are not fully understood. A particular problem in muscle pain is the relationship between local and referred muscle pain. Experimental pain models are useful...... in basic pain research, because they allow a standardized activation of the nociceptive system and measurements of evoked responses. An electrical muscle pain model was constructed and applied on healthy subjects. The model was found suitable for inducing local (LP) and referred muscle pain (RF......). It was demonstrated that LP was elicited around the stimulation needles (proximal part of the tibial anterior muscle) and RP appeared at a distal site (the ventral part of the ankle). RP required significantly higher stimulus intensity compared with LP, and RP appeared later than LP. The sizes of LP and RP areas were...

  4. TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF PROPRIOCEPTIVE NEUROMUSCULAR FACILITATION ON BACK MUSCLE STRENGTH, PAIN AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trupti Jadeja

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Back pain is a prevalent and expensive problem in society. 60-80% of people will suffer at least one episode of low back pain sometime in their lives and 30-40% of these will experience low back pain each year. Therefore the need of the following study is to see the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on back muscle strength, pain and QOL in subjects with Chronic Low Back Pain. Methods: Ethical approval was taken before study. Forty patients with chronic low back pain (28 male, 12 female were included in the study and divided into two groups each containing 20 subjects. All the participants were signed written consent after being informed in detail about the study. Group A has been given the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises including Rhythmic Stabilization (RST and Combination of Isotonics (COI and Conventional back exercises. Group B was given conventional back exercises only. Outcome measures were taken at the end of one month i.e. after the treatment protocol. VAS, SF-36Questionnaire and Core stability gradation were taken in both groups. Results: There is significant improvement in VAS score in both groups but Group A was having more significant improvement than Group B. Also there is significant improvement in core stability grading and SF 36 score in Group A. Conclusion: It is concluded that proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercises on back is effective in reducing pain and improving core muscle strength in subjects with Chronic Low Back Pain.

  5. Changes in excitability of corticomotor inputs to the trunk muscles during experimentally-induced acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, H; Tucker, K J; Hodges, P W

    2011-05-05

    Acute low back pain (LBP) is associated with differential changes in motor coordination of deep and superficial trunk muscles. Whether this is related to differential changes in excitability of descending corticomotor inputs remains unclear and was investigated in nine healthy individuals. Fine-wire i.m. electrodes were inserted bilaterally into deep (transversus abdominis (TrA)) and superficial abdominal muscles (obliquus externus abdominis (OE)), and surface electrodes were placed bilaterally over obliquus internus abdominis (OI), rectus abdominis (RA) and lumbar erector spinae (LES) muscles. Corticomotor excitability was assessed as amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at a range of stimulator intensities, at rest and during voluntary abdominal contractions. Pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline into interspinous ligaments of the lumbar spine. Corticomotor excitability was examined before, during and after the induction of LBP. During pain, amplitude of TrA MEPs to contralateral cortical stimulation was reduced, whereas amplitudes of OE and LES MEPs contralateral and ipsilateral to the stimulated cortex were increased. The findings highlight differential changes in excitability of corticomotor inputs to trunk muscles during acute LBP. Further work is required to reveal whether such changes involve spinal and/or supraspinal centres and their consequence for spine control. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrical activity in muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, C R; deVries, H A; Urban, R T; Luekens, C A; Bagg, R J

    1975-04-01

    The concept of muscle pain-spasm-pain vicious cycle has been challenged on the basis of inability to find electrical activity in the presence of palpable changes in fibrositic muscle. We produced muscle pain in the wrist extensor and paravertebral muscle groups of seven healthy subjects by injection of hypertonic saline (0.3 ml of 6% NaCl solution). The time course of the integrated muscle action potentials, roughly paralleled the time course of the developed pain in all but one subject for each muscle group. EMG recordings were made on one subject using both surface electrodes with amplifier sensitivity of 10 muV/cm and needle electrodes with an amplifier sensitivity of 100 muV/cm. Sequential recording showed clear evidence of electrical activity from the surface electrode and high sensitivity whereas the combination of the needle electrode with lower sensitivity showed no electrical activity whatever. We conclude that even mild muscle spasm is accompanied by muscular hyperactivity which can be evaluated by appropriate EMG techniques. There appears to be no reason to challenge the widely accepted concept of pain-spasm-pain as stated by Travell, Rinzler and Herman.

  7. Muscle pain | Mogole | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muscle pain, also known as myalgia, is most commonly associated with sprains or strains. It frequently presents as redness at the site of injury, tenderness, swelling and fever. Muscle pain may occur as a result of excitation of the muscle nociceptor due to overuse of the muscle, viral infections or trauma. The most important ...

  8. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitakoji Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle, muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle. Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain.

  9. Adaptations in the gait pattern with experimental hamstring pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, M; Mortensen, Sara Rosager; Aaboe, J

    2011-01-01

    Pain changes movement but most studies have focused on basic physiological adaptations during non-functional movement tasks. The existing studies on how pain affects lower extremity gross movement biomechanics have primarily involved movements in which the quadriceps is the primary muscle...... and little attention has been given to how pain in other muscles affects functional movement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in the gait patterns of healthy subjects that occur during experimental muscle pain in the biceps femoris. In a cross-over study design, 14 healthy volunteers......, knee flexor and lateral rotator moments. No changes in lower extremity kinematics and EMG activity in any of the recorded muscles were observed. It is concluded that experimental muscle pain in the biceps femoris leads to changes in the gait pattern in agreement with unloading of the painful muscle...

  10. Motor responses to experimental Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    different days separated by 1 week, three-dimensional ground reaction forces, ankle joint kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) of the lower leg muscles were recorded during one-legged full weight-bearing ankle plantar (concentric) and dorsal (eccentric) flexion exercises. Measurements were done...... before, during and after either experimental Achilles tendon pain or a non-painful control condition. Pain was induced by intratendinous injections of hypertonic saline with isotonic saline injections as control. Joint kinematics, ground reaction force frequency contents and average EMG amplitudes were...... calculated. Results Compared with the control condition experimental Achilles tendon pain reduced the EMG activity in agonistic, synergistic and antagonistic muscles, and increased the ground reaction force frequency content around 10 Hz, during both eccentric and concentric movement phases. Conclusions...

  11. Muscle strength in patients with chronic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Akkerman, L.; Wieringa, J.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the influence of chronic pain on muscle strength. Design: Muscle strength of patients with unilateral nonspecific chronic pain, in an upper or lower limb, were measured according to a standardized protocol using a hand-held dynamometer. Before and after muscle strength

  12. Masticatory muscle pain: Causes, consequences, and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutris, M.

    2013-01-01

    Masticatory muscle pain is known as myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain. It has a prevalence of approximately 10% in the general population and affects women more than men. It is usually characterized by a dull, aching pain, which aggravates on function. The etiology of TMD pain is still

  13. Role of Muscle Relaxant (Tizanidine) In Painful Muscle Spasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate effectiveness and tolerability of Tizanidine in painful muscle spasm of various etiologies. Patients and ... Inclusion criteria included all the patients suffering from painful muscle spasm in back, neck, shoulder, knee or other anatomical sites with onset not more than two days prior to presentation.

  14. Neuroimaging of Muscle Pain in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Niddam

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging has provided important information on how acute and chronic pain is processed in the human brain. The pain experience is now known to be the final product of activity in distributed networks consisting of multiple cortical and subcortical areas. Due to the complex nature of the pain experience, a single cerebral representation of pain does not exist. Instead, pain depends on the context in which it is experienced and is generated through variable expression of the different aspects of pain in conjunction with modulatory influences. While considerable data have been generated about the supraspinal organization of cutaneous pain, little is known about how nociceptive information from musculoskeletal tissue is processed in the brain. This is in spite of the fact that pain from musculoskeletal tissue is more frequently encountered in clinical practice, poses a bigger diagnostic problem and is insufficiently treated. Differences are known to exist between acute pain from cutaneous and muscular tissue in both psychophysical responses as well as in physiological characteristics. The 2 tissue types also differ in pain sensitivity to the same stimuli and in their response to analgesic substances. In this review, characteristics of acute and chronic muscle pain will be presented together with a brief overview of the methods of induction and psychophysical assessment of muscle pain. Results from the neuroimaging literature concerned with phasic and tonic muscle pain will be reviewed.

  15. Effects of gabapentin on experimental somatic pain and temporal summation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Staahl, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Gabapentin is used for treatment of neuropathic pain, but its effect on different somatic pain modalities and integrative mechanisms are not completely understood. The aim of this double-blind, placebo-controlled experimental pain study, conducted on 20 healthy volunteers......, was to examine the effect of a single dose of 1200 mg gabapentin on multi-modal experimental cutaneous and muscle pain models. METHODS: The following pain models were applied: (1) pain thresholds to single and repeated cutaneous and intramuscular electrical stimulation (temporal summation to 5 stimuli delivered...

  16. Pain Recognition using Spatiotemporal Oriented Energy of Facial Muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Ramin; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a critical sign in many medical situations and its automatic detection and recognition using computer vision techniques is of great importance. Utilizes this fact that pain is a spatiotemporal process, the proposed system in this paper employs steerable and separable filters to measures e...... energies released by the facial muscles during the pain process. The proposed system not only detects the pain but recognizes its level. Experimental results on the publicly available pain database of UNBC show promising outcome for automatic pain detection and recognition.......Pain is a critical sign in many medical situations and its automatic detection and recognition using computer vision techniques is of great importance. Utilizes this fact that pain is a spatiotemporal process, the proposed system in this paper employs steerable and separable filters to measures...

  17. Differences in muscle pain and plasma creatine kinase activity after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the acute changes in muscle pain and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity following the 'up' and 'down' Comrades marathon. Design. This was a quasi-experimental design. Eleven male runners (39.7±9.3 years) completed the 'up' Comrades marathon, and 11 male runners ...

  18. Is myofascial pain in temporomandibular disorder patients a manifestation of delayed-onset muscle soreness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutris, Michail; Lobbezoo, Frank; Sümer, Nevruz Ceren; Atiş, Elif Sibel; Türker, Kemal S; Naeije, Machiel

    2013-08-01

    In a study to the possible role of overuse of the jaw muscles in the pathogenesis of jaw muscle pain, we used a protocol involving concentric and eccentric muscle contractions to provoke a state of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in the jaw muscles of healthy individuals. We tested whether the accompanying signs and symptoms would yield the temporary diagnosis of myofascial pain according to the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) in these individuals. Forty persons (mean age±SD=27.7±7.5 y) performed six, 5-minute bouts of eccentric and concentric jaw muscle contractions. Before and immediately after the exercise, and 24 hours, 48 hours, and 1 week later, self-reported muscle fatigue and pain, pain-free maximum mouth opening, pressure-pain thresholds, and the number of painful jaw muscle palpation sites were recorded. Significant signs and symptoms of DOMS in the jaw muscles were found, which all had resolved after 1 week. In 31 (77.5%) of the participants, these signs and symptoms also gave rise to a temporary diagnosis of myofascial pain according to the RDC/TMD. The results of this study demonstrate that an experimental protocol involving concentric and eccentric muscle contractions can provoke DOMS in the jaw muscles and the temporary diagnosis of myofascial pain according to the RDC/TMD. The results observed strengthen the supposition that the myofascial pain in TMD patients may be a manifestation of DOMS in the jaw muscles.

  19. The influence of induced shoulder muscle pain on rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscle activity during elevation of the arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Parlevliet, Thierry; Cagnie, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Altered recruitment of rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscles has been identified in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. To date, however, the cause-consequence relationship between pain and altered muscle recruitment has not been fully unraveled. The effect of experimental shoulder pain induced by injection of hypertonic saline in the supraspinatus on the activity of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, trapezius, and serratus anterior activity was investigated during the performance of an elevation task by use of muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging in 25 healthy individuals. Measurements were taken at 4 levels (C6-C7, T2-T3, T3-T4, and T6-T7) at rest and after the elevation task performed without and with experimental shoulder pain. During arm elevation, experimentally induced pain caused a significant activity reduction, expressed as reduction in T2 shift of the IS (P = .029). No significant changes in T2 shift values were found for the other rotator cuff muscles or the scapulothoracic muscles. This study demonstrates that acute experimental shoulder pain has an inhibitory effect on the activity of the IS during arm elevation. Acute experimental shoulder pain did not seem to influence the scapulothoracic muscle activity significantly. The findings suggest that rotator cuff muscle function (infraspinatus) should be a consideration in the early management of patients with shoulder pain. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Muscle Cramp - A Common Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscle under your control,” explains Carolyn Quist, DO, an osteopathic physician from Fort Worth, Texas. Dr. Quist adds ... normal, it's best to see your doctor for an evaluation. ​​​​ Share ... About Osteopathic Medicine Osteopathic physicians, or DOs, are fully licensed ...

  1. IB4(+) nociceptors mediate persistent muscle pain induced by GDNF

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedro Alvarez; Xiaojie Chen; Oliver Bogen; Paul G. Green; Jon D. Levine

    2012-01-01

    ...), which can produce mechanical hyperalgesia. Since some neuromuscular diseases are associated with both increased release of GDNF and intense muscle pain, we explored the role of GDNF as an endogenous mediator in muscle pain...

  2. Differences in muscle pain and plasma creatine kinase activity after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for a complete 30-second increment prior to fatigue. HRmax was recorded as the highest heart rate during the last 30 seconds of the treadmill test. Muscle pain. Muscle pain was measured daily for 1 day before, and for 7 days after the Comrades marathon. Muscle pain was measured subjec- tively, where subjects rated ...

  3. Muscle activity pattern dependent pain development and alleviation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Søgaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    of muscle pain. Focusing on muscle activity patterns and musculoskeletal health it is pertinent to elucidate the more specific aspects regarding exposure profiles and body regional pain. Static sustained muscle contraction for prolonged periods often occurs in the neck/shoulder area during occupational...... to the chronic muscle pain profile related to repetitive monotonous work tasks. The painful muscles show adverse functional, morphological, hormonal, as well as metabolic characteristics. Of note is that intensive muscle strength training actually may rehabilitate painful muscles, which has recently been......Muscle activity is for decades considered to provide health benefits irrespectively of the muscle activity pattern performed and whether it is during e.g. sports, transportation, or occupational work tasks. Accordingly, the international recommendations for public health-promoting physical activity...

  4. Familial dwarfism and painful muscle spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, R E; Espinoza, R; Benavente, O; Sanz, O P; Molina, H

    1995-01-01

    We report a family with a disorder characterized by limbs and truncal undulating painful muscle spasms, short stature, fine and sparse hair in the scalp, absence of body hair, low implanted ears, big nose, pitched voice, enlarged heart ventricles and increased fasting glucose levels. Symptoms began in childhood and did not progress after the third decade of life. This disorder represents a new clinical phenotype among the several forms of dwarfism associated with neurological manifestations already described in the literature.

  5. Response of the muscles in the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during the Active Straight Leg Raise in women with and without pelvic girdle pain: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödahl, Jenny; Gutke, Annelie; Ghaffari, Ghazaleh; Strömberg, Tomas; Öberg, Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between activation of the stabilizing muscles of the lumbopelvic region during the Active Straight Leg Raise test and pelvic girdle pain remains unknown. Therefore, the aim was to examine automatic contractions in relation to pre-activation in the muscles of the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during leg lifts, performed as the Active Straight Leg Raise test, in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Sixteen women with pelvic girdle pain and eleven pain-free women performed contralateral and ipsilateral leg lifts, while surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor and unilaterally from the lower lateral abdominal wall. As participants performed leg lifts onset time was calculated as the time from increased muscle activity to leg lift initiation. No significant differences were observed between the groups during the contralateral leg lift. During the subsequent ipsilateral leg lift, pre-activation in the pelvic floor muscles was observed in 36% of women with pelvic girdle pain and in 91% of pain-free women (P=0.01). Compared to pain-free women, women with pelvic girdle pain also showed significantly later onset time in both the pelvic floor muscles (P=0.01) and the muscles of the lower lateral abdominal wall (P<0.01). We suggest that disturbed motor activation patterns influence women's ability to stabilize the pelvis during leg lifts. This could be linked to provocation of pain during repeated movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental Sleep Restriction Facilitates Pain and Electrically Induced Cortical Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matre, Dagfinn; Hu, Li; Viken, Leif A; Hjelle, Ingri B; Wigemyr, Monica; Knardahl, Stein; Sand, Trond; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    Sleep restriction (SR) has been hypothesized to sensitize the pain system. The current study determined whether experimental sleep restriction had an effect on experimentally induced pain and pain-elicited electroencephalographic (EEG) responses. A paired crossover study. Pain testing was performed after 2 nights of 50% SR and after 2 nights with habitual sleep (HS). Laboratory experiment at research center. Self-reported healthy volunteers (n = 21, age range: 18-31 y). Brief high-density electrical stimuli to the forearm skin produced pinprick-like pain. Subjective pain ratings increased after SR, but only in response to the highest stimulus intensity (P = 0.018). SR increased the magnitude of the pain-elicited EEG response analyzed in the time-frequency domain (P = 0.021). Habituation across blocks did not differ between HS and SR. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) was reduced after SR (P = 0.039). Pressure pain threshold of the trapezius muscle region also decreased after SR (P = 0.017). Sleep restriction (SR) increased the sensitivity to pressure pain and to electrically induced pain of moderate, but not low, intensity. The increased electrical pain could not be explained by a difference in habituation. Increased response magnitude is possibly related to reduced processing within the somatosensory cortex after partial SR. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  7. Muscle strength, pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M. P.; Dekker, J.; van Baar, M. E.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Reduced muscle strength is regarded as a risk factor for pain and disability in osteoarthritis (OA). Currently, various indices for muscle strength are used when assessing determinants of pain and disability. The goal of the present study was to evaluate these indices of muscle strength. Isometric

  8. Inflammatory pain in experimental burns in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L

    2000-01-01

    demonstrated in animal models. Most often clinical pain is due to tissue damage leading to acute inflammation and hyperalgesia, but only few human pain models have examined pain responses in injured tissues. Therefore, models with controlled and reversible tissue trauma are needed. The human burn model......Human experimental pain models are important tools in pain research. The primary aims of pain research in normal man is 1) to provide insight in pain mechanisms, 2) to provide a rational basis for clinical trials of pain relieving interventions, and 3) to confirm the anti-nociceptive effects...... is an example of such a model, and several groups have performed studies of analgesics and pain mechanisms based on the model. The thesis aims to provide a critical review of the human burn model as a tool in pain research, and to give suggestions for development of the model and future research. The pain...

  9. Effects of Flotation-REST on Muscle Tension Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Kjellgren

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the floating form of the restricted environmental stimulation technique (REST may be applied within the field of pain relief. Flotation-REST consists of a procedure whereby an individual is immersed in a tank filled with water of an extremely high salt concentration. Thirty-seven patients (14 men and 23 women suffering from chronic pain consisting of aching muscles in the neck and back area participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to either a control group (17 participants or an experimental group (20 participants. The experimental group received nine opportunities to use the flotation-REST technique in the water tank over a three-week period. The results indicated that the most severe perceived pain intensity was significantly reduced, whereas low perceived pain intensity was not influenced by the floating technique. Further, the results indicated that circulating levels of the noradrenaline metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol were reduced significantly in the experimental group but not in the control group following treatment, whereas endorphin levels were not affected by flotation. Flotation-REST treatment also elevated the participants' optimism and reduced the degree of anxiety or depression; at nighttime, patients who underwent flotation fell asleep more easily. The present findings describe possible changes, for the better, in patients presenting with chronic pain complaints.

  10. Complex muscular adaptation to perturbations after induction of experimental low back pain in healthy participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Spine stability is affected in low back (LB) pain and potentially by muscle fatigue and soreness. This study assessed motor control responses to unexpected surface perturbations during stance during experimental LB muscle pain combined with fatigue and muscle soreness. Methods...... Nineteen healthy participants were examined day 1-3 before and after bilateral injections of hypertonic saline into m. longissimus. Pain intensity was scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Day 2 included injections during post-exercise LB muscle fatigue and day 3 during delayed onset back muscle......RMSabs) in the RMS-EMG from the baseline of the day were calculated and averaged among back and abdominal muscles. Results VAS scores during fatigue and DOMS were significantly higher compared with day-1 (PBack muscle RMS-EMG decreased and abdominal muscle RMS-EMG increased during DOMS, compared with pain...

  11. Local subcutaneous and muscle pain impairs detection of passive movements at the human thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, N S; Blouin, J S; Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2008-07-01

    Activity in both muscle spindle endings and cutaneous stretch receptors contributes to the sensation of joint movement. The present experiments assessed whether muscle pain and subcutaneous pain distort proprioception in humans. The ability to detect the direction of passive movements at the interphalangeal joint of the thumb was measured when pain was induced experimentally in four sites: the flexor pollicis longus (FPL), the subcutaneous tissue overlying this muscle, the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle and the subcutaneous tissue distal to the metacarpophalangeal joint of thumb. Tests were conducted when pain was at a similar subjective intensity. There was no significant difference in the ability to detect flexion or extension under any painful or non-painful condition. The detection of movement was significantly impaired when pain was induced in the FPL muscle, but pain in the FCR, a nearby muscle that does not act on the thumb, had no effect. Subcutaneous pain also significantly impaired movement detection when initiated in skin overlying the thumb, but not in skin overlying the FPL muscle in the forearm. These findings suggest that while both muscle and skin pain can disturb the detection of the direction of movement, the impairment is site-specific and involves regions and tissues that have a proprioceptive role at the joint. Also, pain induced in FPL did not significantly increase the perceived size of the thumb. Proprioceptive mechanisms signalling perceived body size are less disturbed by a relevant muscle nociceptive input than those subserving movement detection. The results highlight the complex relationship between nociceptive inputs and their influence on proprioception and motor control.

  12. Experimental Sleep Restriction Facilitates Pain and Electrically Induced Cortical Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matre, Dagfinn; Hu, Li; Viken, Leif A.; Hjelle, Ingri B.; Wigemyr, Monica; Knardahl, Stein; Sand, Trond; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep restriction (SR) has been hypothesized to sensitize the pain system. The current study determined whether experimental sleep restriction had an effect on experimentally induced pain and pain-elicited electroencephalographic (EEG) responses. Design: A paired crossover study. Intervention: Pain testing was performed after 2 nights of 50% SR and after 2 nights with habitual sleep (HS). Setting: Laboratory experiment at research center. Participants: Self-reported healthy volunteers (n = 21, age range: 18–31 y). Measurements and Results: Brief high-density electrical stimuli to the forearm skin produced pinprick-like pain. Subjective pain ratings increased after SR, but only in response to the highest stimulus intensity (P = 0.018). SR increased the magnitude of the pain-elicited EEG response analyzed in the time-frequency domain (P = 0.021). Habituation across blocks did not differ between HS and SR. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) was reduced after SR (P = 0.039). Pressure pain threshold of the trapezius muscle region also decreased after SR (P = 0.017). Conclusion: Sleep restriction (SR) increased the sensitivity to pressure pain and to electrically induced pain of moderate, but not low, intensity. The increased electrical pain could not be explained by a difference in habituation. Increased response magnitude is possibly related to reduced processing within the somatosensory cortex after partial SR. Citation: Matre D, Hu L, Viken LA, Hjelle IB, Wigemyr M, Knardahl S, Sand T, Nilsen KB. Experimental sleep restriction facilitates pain and electrically induced cortical responses. SLEEP 2015;38(10):1607–1617. PMID:26194577

  13. Muscle function and origin of pain in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, R M; Jacobsen, Søren

    1994-01-01

    It may be concluded that both peripheral and central mechanisms may operate in the pathophysiology of both impaired muscle function and pain in FM. These mechanisms may in part be attributable to physical deconditioning and disuse of muscle secondary to the characteristic pain and fatigue so ofte...

  14. Rehabilitative ultrasound measurement of select trunk muscle activation during induced pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Kyle B; Uhl, Tim; Underwood, Frank B; Nitz, Arthur J

    2008-05-01

    Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) is considered a valid method to measure muscle activation in key spinal muscles in asymptomatic subjects. Research measuring muscle activation with RUSI in painful subjects is limited. The aim of this study was to determine if changes in muscle activation from experimentally induced pain can be measured by RUSI. Six male subjects performed tasks known to activate the transverse abdominis (TrA) and lumbar multifidus (LM) while RUSI measurements of muscle thickness were obtained during control and hypertonic saline conditions. The abdominal draw-in maneuver was used to volitionally activate the TrA and a series of upper extremity lifting tasks were used to automatically activate the LM. Pain was induced by injecting 5% hypertonic saline into the longissimus muscle adjacent to the LM at the L4 level. The percent change in muscle thickness from rest to contraction represented muscle activation. Activation was significantly less (pRUSI can be used to measure pain-related changes in deep trunk muscle activation. Future research should include a larger sample size and women.

  15. Effects of muscle pain induced by glutamate injections during sustained clenching on the contraction pattern of masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelotti, Ambrosina; Cioffi, Iacopo; Rongo, Roberto; Borrelli, Roberta; Chiodini, Paolo; Svensson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the contraction pattern of masticatory muscles during sustained clenching tasks with or without experimental pain induced by glutamate injection into the masseter muscle. It was hypothesized that acute muscle pain could induce compensatory changes in the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masticatory muscles. Fifteen volunteers (seven males, mean age ± SD = 29.7 ± 1.1 years; eight females, mean age ± SD = 23.5 ± 1.2 years) were recruited in a crossover experimental study. All subjects participated in two randomized 20-minute experimental sessions. Each subject was asked to clench at 25% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). After 10 minutes, isotonic saline or glutamate was injected in random order into the right masseter. EMG activity (root mean square [RMS] and mean power frequency [MPF]) was assessed in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles on both sides. Pain and fatigue were assessed by 0-10 numeric rating scales (NRS) every minute. Differences between conditions (isotonic saline vs glutamate) for all the outcome parameters were analyzed by using a mixed effect model. The EMG activity of the masticatory muscles and pain and fatigue scores were not dependent on isotonic saline/glutamate injection (all P > .05). The RMS in the temporalis and masseter muscles increased with time (right masseter P = 0.001, left masseter P = .004, right temporalis P = .22, left temporalis P = .006), whereas the MPF decreased (right masseter P = .0001, left masseter P muscles during a sustained clenching task. This finding strongly suggests the adaptive capacity of the stomatognathic system in the presence of acute nociceptive inputs.

  16. Altered experimental pain perception after cerebellar infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Kühnel, Maria; Filippopulos, Filipp; Blum, Bernhard; Eggert, Thomas; Straube, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Animal studies have suggested that the cerebellum, in addition to its motor functions, also has a role in pain processing and modulation, possibly because of its extensive connections with the prefrontal cortex and with brainstem regions involved in descending pain control. Consistently, human imaging studies have shown cerebellar activation in response to painful stimulation. However, it is presently not clear whether cerebellar lesions affect pain perception in humans. In the present study, we used experimental pain testing to compare acute pain perception and endogenous pain inhibition in 30 patients 1 to 11 years after cerebellar infarction and in 30 sex- and age-matched healthy control subjects. Compared to controls, patients exhibited a significantly increased pain perception in response to acute heat stimuli (44 °C-48 °C, average pain intensity rating for patients 3.4±2.8 and for controls 1.5±1.7 [on a numeric rating scale of 0-10], Ppain intensity rating: 0.0%±15.8% vs. -16.9%±36.3%, Ppain intensity rating: -1.0±1.1 vs. -1.8±1.3 [0-10], Pcontrols. In contrast, heat and pressure pain thresholds were not significantly different between groups. These results show that, after cerebellar infarction, patients perceive heat and repeated mechanical stimuli as more painful than do healthy control subjects and have deficient activation of endogenous pain inhibitory mechanisms (offset and placebo analgesia). This suggests that the cerebellum has a previously underestimated role in human pain perception and modulation. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Objective markers of the analgesic response to morphine in experimental pain research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokjær, Anne; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2015-01-01

    of morphine on three objective pharmacodynamic markers (pupil diameter, prolactin concentration and resting electroencephalography (EEG)) and compare the changes from placebo with subjective analgesia on experimental muscle pain for convergent validation. METHODS: Fifteen healthy male participants received......INTRODUCTION: In experimental pain research the effect of opioids is normally assessed by verbal subjective response to analgesia. However, as many confounders in pain assessment exist, objective bed-side assessment of the effect is highly warranted. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effect...... placebo or 30mg rectal morphine at two separate sessions. At baseline and several time points after drug administration, the central effects of morphine were assessed by experimental muscle pain, pupil diameter, prolactin concentration and resting EEG. RESULTS: Morphine increased tolerance to muscle pain...

  18. Paraspinal muscle hypotrophy and chronic discogenic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truszczyńska-Baszak Aleksandra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: Low back pain is accompanied by deconditioning of trunk muscles due to pain limiting patients’ physical activity, but so far it has not been explained whether the changes in the structure of muscles are the cause of disc disease or its result. The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of segmental paraspinal muscle hypotrophy in patients with chronic low back pain and sciatica. Material and methods: The study involved magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of 40 patients: 20 women and 20 men aged from 30 to 47, mean 39.51 ± 3.73 years, with single level disc extrusion at L4-L5. The entire cross-sectional area of the par­aspinal muscles, the adipose tissue area in the paraspinal muscles and the extensor muscle tissue area at the level of L4-L5 were measured and compared with the healthy L3-L4 level. T2-weighted axial slices were used to facilitate distinguishing between the muscle and the fat tissue. Results: Fat tissue ingrowth and paravertebral muscle tissue hypotrophy at the disc extrusion level were highly statistically significant (p < 0.001 compared to the healthy level. Conclusions: 1. Ingrowth of the adipose tissue into the muscle tissue occurs only at the level of disc extrusion. 2. It seems rea­sonable to introduce strengthening exercises after the resolution of pain in order to rebuild the muscles of the spine.

  19. Characteristics of Myofascial Pain Syndrome of the Infraspinatus Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Junbeom; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Chunung; Lee, Sang Chul

    2017-08-01

    To report the characteristics of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle and evaluate the therapeutic effect of trigger-point injections. Medical records of 297 patients (221 women; age, 53.9±11.3 years) with MTrPs in the infraspinatus muscle were reviewed retrospectively. Because there were 83 patients with MTrPs in both infraspinatus muscles, the characteristics of total 380 infraspinatus muscles with MTrPs (214 one side, 83 both sides) were investigated. Specific characteristics collected included chief complaint area, referred pain pattern, the number of local twitch responses, and distribution of MTrPs in the muscle. For statistical analysis, the paired t-test was used to compare a visual analogue scale (VAS) before and 2 weeks after the first injection. The most common chief complaint area of MTrPs in the infraspinatus muscle was the scapular area. The most common pattern of referred pain was the anterolateral aspect of the arm (above the elbow). Active MTrPs were multiple rather than single in the infraspinatus muscle. MTrPs were frequently in the center of the muscle. Trigger-point injection of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased the pain intensity. Mean VAS score decreased significantly after the first injection compared to the baseline (7.11 vs. 3.74; pmyofascial pain syndrome of the infraspinatus muscle.

  20. Mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity in provoked vestibulodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witzeman K

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Witzeman,1 Ruby HN Nguyen,2 Alisa Eanes,3 Sawsan As-Sanie,4 Denniz Zolnoun51Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, 2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 3Pelvic Pain Research Unit, Division of Advanced Laparoscopy and Pelvic Pain, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center for Neurosensory Disorders, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: An estimated 8.3%–16% of women experience vulvovaginal discomfort during their lifetime. Frequently these patients report provoked pain on contact or with attempted intercourse, commonly referred to as provoked vestibulodynia (PVD. Despite the burden of this condition, little is known about its potential etiologies including pelvic floor muscular dysfunction and mucosal components. This knowledge would be beneficial in developing targeted therapies including physical therapy.Objective: To explore the relative contribution of mucosal versus muscle pain sensitivity on pain report from intercourse among women with PVD.Design: In this proof of concept study, 54 women with PVD underwent a structured examination assessing mucosal and pelvic muscle sensitivity.Methods: We examined three mucosal sites in the upper and lower vestibule. Patients were asked to rate their pain on cotton swab palpation of the mucosa using a 10-point visual analog scale. Muscle pain was assessed using transvaginal application of pressure on right and left puborectalis, and the perineal muscle complex. The Gracely pain scale (0–100 was used to assess the severity of pain with intercourse, with women rating the lowest, average, and highest pain levels; a 100 rating the

  1. Muscle activation during selected strength exercises in women with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Kjaer, Michael; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Muscle-specific strength training has previously been shown to be effective in the rehabilitation of chronic neck muscle pain in women. The aim of this study was to determine the level of activation of the neck and shoulder muscles using surface electromyography (EMG) duri...

  2. Muscle activation during selected strength exercises in women with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.L.; Kjaer, M.; Andersen, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Muscle-specific strength training has previously been shown to be effective in the rehabilitation of chronic neck muscle pain in women. The aim of this stud), was to determine the level of activation of the neck and shoulder muscles using surface electromyography (EMG) (lu...

  3. Modelling concentration-analgesia relationships for morphine to evaluate experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Foster, David John Richard; Upton, Richard Neil

    2015-01-01

    -blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 39 healthy volunteers received an oral dose of 30 mg morphine hydrochloride or placebo. Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to describe the plasma concentrations of morphine and metabolites, and the analgesic effect of morphine on experimental pain in skin......The aim of this study was to develop population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models for morphine in experimental pain induced by skin heat and muscle pressure, and to evaluate the experimental pain models with regard to assessment of morphine pharmacodynamics. In a randomized, double...... and muscle. Baseline pain metrics varied between individuals and occasions, and were described with interindividual and interoccasion variability. Placebo-response did not change with time. For both pain metrics, morphine effect was proportional to baseline pain and was described with a linear model...

  4. A human experimental model of episodic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi

    2014-01-01

    were subjected to 45 min of intense painful cutaneous electrical stimulation (episodic pain session), using a stimulus paradigm that in animals has been shown to induce long-term potentiation. These electrical stimulations produced a verbal pain rating of approximately 85 on a 0-100 verbal rating scale......An experimental model of daily episodic pain was developed to investigate peripheral sensitization and cortical reorganization in healthy individuals. Two experiments (A and B) were conducted. Experiments A and B consisted of one and five consecutive days, respectively, in which the participants...... (VRS). Physiological (blood flow and axon flare reflex), psychophysical (perception threshold and verbal pain ratings) and electrophysiological (128 channels recorded somatosensory evoked potential (SEP)) measurements were recorded. The stimulation evoked a visible axon flare reflex and caused...

  5. Kinesiophobia, Pain, Muscle Functions, and Functional Performances among Older Persons with Low Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Nor Azizah Ishak; Zarina Zahari; Maria Justine

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aims (1) to determine the association between kinesiophobia and pain, muscle functions, and functional performances and (2) to determine whether kinesiophobia predicts pain, muscle functions, and functional performance among older persons with low back pain (LBP). Methods This is a correlational study, involving 63 institutionalized older persons (age = 70.98 ? 7.90 years) diagnosed with LBP. Anthropometric characteristics (BMI) and functional performances (lower limb fu...

  6. The smart Peano fluidic muscle: a low profile flexible orthosis actuator that feels pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Shane Q.

    2015-03-01

    Robotic orthoses have the potential to provide effective rehabilitation while overcoming the availability and cost constraints of therapists. These orthoses must be characterized by the naturally safe, reliable, and controlled motion of a human therapist's muscles. Such characteristics are only possible in the natural kingdom through the pain sensing realized by the interaction of an intelligent nervous system and muscles' embedded sensing organs. McKibben fluidic muscles or pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) are a popular orthosis actuator because of their inherent compliance, high force, and muscle-like load-displacement characteristics. However, the circular cross-section of PMA increases their profile. PMA are also notoriously unreliable and difficult to control, lacking the intelligent pain sensing systems of their biological muscle counterparts. Here the Peano fluidic muscle, a new low profile yet high-force soft actuator is introduced. This muscle is smart, featuring bioinspired embedded pressure and soft capacitive strain sensors. Given this pressure and strain feedback, experimental validation shows that a lumped parameter model based on the muscle geometry and material parameters can be used to predict its force for quasistatic motion with an average error of 10 - 15N. Combining this with a force threshold pain sensing algorithm sets a precedent for flexible orthosis actuation that uses embedded sensors to prevent damage to the actuator and its environment.

  7. Effects of ethnicity and gender role expectations of pain on experimental pain: a cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabas, O A; Tashani, O A; Johnson, M I

    2013-05-01

    Gender role expectations of pain (GREP) have been shown to mediate sex differences in experimental pain. Few studies have investigated the role of ethnicity in shaping GREP. The aim of this study was to examine interactions between ethnicity and GREP on experimentally induced pressure and ischaemic pain in Libyan and white British students in their respective countries. Libyan (n = 124) and white British (n = 51) students completed a GREP questionnaire and their response to experimental pain was measured. Blunt pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured over the 1st interosseous muscle using algometry. Pain intensity and pain unpleasantness (100 mm visual analogue scale) were measured at 1-min intervals during a submaximal effort tourniquet test on the forearm. Multivariate analysis of variance detected significant effects for Sex and Ethnicity on pain measurements. Men had higher PPTs than women (p 0.05). Libyan participants had higher pain intensity (p gender stereotypical attitudes to pain account for differences in pain expression between men and women. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  8. Differences in pain perception in children reporting joint and orofacial muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, T C; Nagamine, H Martins; de Sousa, L Mêlo; de Oliveira, A Siriani; Regalo, S C Hallak; Grossi, D Bevilaqua

    2013-01-01

    To determine changes in orofacial pain perception in community-based children by assessing the pressure pain threshold (PPT) with an algometer and pain intensity by manual palpation (MP). A total of 100 children from the community aged 7 to 12 years were assessed. Thirty-eight children reported pain in the orofacial region. Of these children,10 reported joint pain (GJ), 12 reported joint and muscle pain (GJMM), 5 reported muscle pain (GMM), 11 reported pain during mastication (GMAST), and 62 reported no pain. An ANOVA (p muscle in the GJMM, GMAST and GJ groups compared to the remaining groups. The PPT values were significantly lower in the masseter temporalis muscles, TMJ and thenar region in the GJMM group compared to the other groups. MP more accurately differentiated symptomatic subjects from symptom-free TMD subjects, and PPT values were more sensitive to the discrimination of pain in the orofacial sites assessed. In addition, the changes in perception at a larger number of sites among children reporting mixed pain may suggest the presence of a possible mechanism of central sensitization.

  9. Comparison of Contraction Rates of Abdominal Muscles of Chronic Low Back Pain Patients in Different Postures

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Kang Hoon; Baek, Il-Hun; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the contraction rates of abdominal muscles in relation to the posture of chronic lumbar pain patients and normal subjects. [Subjects] The subjects were 17 chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients and 17 normal people between the ages of 20 and 59. [Methods] Experimental postures included a supine position, a sitting position, and a standing position. Measurements were taken at rest and during abdominal contraction. The measurement at rest was taken during expiration...

  10. Neural Mechanisms of Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Possible Role for Peripheral Glutamate Receptor Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, David K.; Sessle, Barry J; Cairns, Brian E.; Hu, James W.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present review is to correlate recent knowledge of the role of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in the temporomandibular joint and muscle pain from animal and human experimental pain models with findings in patients. Chronic pain is common, and many people suffer from chronic pain conditions involving deep craniofacial tissues such as temporomandibular disorders or fibromyalgia. Animal and human studies have indicated that the activation of peripheral ionotropic gl...

  11. Persistent orofacial muscle pain: Its synonymous terminology and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Egilius L H; Mulder, Maxim J H L

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to describe the presentation of persistent orofacial muscle pain, also commonly referred to as myofascial temporomandibular disorder. In this practice survey, the authors reviewed the demographic and clinical features of 34 patients who were evaluated and diagnosed personally. The majority of the 34 patients were women (82.4%), and their age at consultation averaged 44.6 ± 12.6 (SD) years. The median pain duration was 4.0 years (range: 0.2-34 years). In 97.1% of patients, the pain occurred daily and continuously, and in 51.9% it was unilateral. Chewing or eating made the pain worse in 50% of the patients, and talking in 29.4%. On examination, tightness of the masseter muscle(s) was present in 58.8%, and tenderness in 58.8%. Persistent orofacial muscle pain mostly affects women, generally occurs daily and continuously, and is equally often unilateral and bilateral. Chewing, eating, and talking are the most common aggravating factors, and tightness or tenderness of the masseter muscle(s) is often found on examination.

  12. Pain Related Fear and Catastrophizing Predict Pain Intensity and Disability Independently Using an Induced Muscle Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Jeffrey J.; Borsa, Paul A.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Tillman, Mark D.; Manini, Todd M.; Gregory, Chris M.; George, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    Timing of assessment of psychological construct is controversial and results differ based on the model of pain induction. Previous studies have not used an exercise induced injury model to investigate timing of psychological assessment. Exercise induced injury models may be appropriate for these investigations because they approximate clinical pain conditions better than other experimental stimuli. In this study we examined the changes of psychological constructs over time and determined whether timing of assessment affected the construct’s association with reports of pain intensity and disability. One-hundred twenty-six healthy volunteers completed the Fear of Pain Questionnaire (FPQ-III), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), and Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK) prior to inducing muscle injury to the shoulder. The PCS and TSK were measured again 48 and 96 hours post-injury induction. Pain intensity and disability were collected at 48 and 96 hours and served as dependent variables in separate regression models. Results indicated that the FPQ-III had the strongest prediction of pain intensity from baseline to 96 hours. After baseline the PCS and TSK were stronger predictors of pain intensity and disability, respectively. These data provide support for the use of psychological constructs in predicting outcomes from shoulder pain. However, they deviate from the current theoretical model indicating that fear of pain is a consequence of injury and instead suggests that fear of pain before injury may influence reports of pain intensity. Perspective The current study provides evidence that fear of pain can be assessed prior to injury. Furthermore, it supports that after injury pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia are independently associated with pain and disability. Overall these data suggest that timing of psychological assessment may be an important consideration in clinical environments. PMID:22424914

  13. Muscle injury: review of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Jaqueline de; Gottfried, Carmem

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in the human body. Its main characteristic is the capacity to regenerate after injury independent of the cause of injury through a process called inflammatory response. Mechanical injuries are the most common type of the skeletal muscle injuries and are classified into one of three areas strain, contusion, and laceration. First, this review aims to describe and compare the main experimental methods that replicate the mechanical muscle injuries. There are several ways to replicate each kind of mechanical injury; there are, however, specific characteristics that must be taken into account when choosing the most appropriate model for the experiment. Finally, this review discusses the context of mechanical injury considering types, variability of methods, and the ability to reproduce injury models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Is back pain during childhood or adolescence associated with muscle strength, muscle endurance or aerobic capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lardon, Arnaud; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Le Scanff, Christine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Back pain is a common condition during childhood and adolescence. The causes of back pain are largely unknown but it seems plausible that some physical factors such as back muscle strength, back muscle endurance and aerobic capacity may play a role in its development, in particular...... in the early years. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this review were to investigate in childhood and adolescence 1) if muscular strength in trunk extension is associated with back pain, 2) if muscular endurance in trunk extension is associated with back pain and 3) if aerobic capacity is associated with back...

  15. Experimental pain sensitivity in women with temporomandibular disorders and pain-free controls: the relationship to orofacial muscular contraction and cardiovascular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Christine; Vassend, Olav; Knardahl, Stein

    2008-05-01

    Chronic pain may result both from a generalized hypersensitivity to acute pain, suggestive of central sensitization processes, and dysfunction of the endogenous pain regulatory system. One purpose of this study was to compare experimental pain sensitivity at several anatomic sites in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients and pain-free controls during baseline and after standardized mechanical load of the orofacial region. A second purpose was to compare the pain-modulating effects of cardiovascular responses in TMD patients and pain-free controls. Experimental pain was induced by electrocutaneous stimulation of the dorsal left hand and pressure algometry at the right masseter muscle and the sternum. The pain sensitivity of the orofacial region was manipulated by isometric contraction of the masseter muscles. Elevations of mean arterial pressure and heart rate were induced by a simulated job interview. At baseline, the TMD patients exhibited a significantly higher electrocutaneous pain threshold. Relative to the healthy controls, the TMD patients reported increased electrocutaneous and pressure pain sensitivity after isometric contraction of the orofacial region. In addition, there were correlations between mean arterial pressure and pain sensitivity in the TMD group only. Significant increases in generalized pain sensitivity occurred in the TMD group, but not in the control group, after isometric contraction of the orofacial muscles, suggestive of a central sensitization process in TMD. Moreover, only in the TMD group there were significant associations between cardiovascular responsesand pain sensitivity, challenging previous assumptions of this relationship occurring mainly in pain-free individuals.

  16. Knee muscle forces during walking and running in patellofemoral pain patients and pain-free controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besier, Thor F; Fredericson, Michael; Gold, Garry E; Beaupré, Gary S; Delp, Scott L

    2009-05-11

    One proposed mechanism of patellofemoral pain, increased stress in the joint, is dependent on forces generated by the quadriceps muscles. Describing causal relationships between muscle forces, tissue stresses, and pain is difficult due to the inability to directly measure these variables in vivo. The purpose of this study was to estimate quadriceps forces during walking and running in a group of male and female patients with patellofemoral pain (n = 27, 16 female; 11 male) and compare these to pain-free controls (n = 16, 8 female; 8 male). Subjects walked and ran at self-selected speeds in a gait laboratory. Lower limb kinematics and electromyography (EMG) data were input to an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee, which was scaled and calibrated to each individual to estimate forces in 10 muscles surrounding the joint. Compared to controls, the patellofemoral pain group had greater co-contraction of quadriceps and hamstrings (p = 0.025) and greater normalized muscle forces during walking, even though the net knee moment was similar between groups. Muscle forces during running were similar between groups, but the net knee extension moment was less in the patellofemoral pain group compared to controls. Females displayed 30-50% greater normalized hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle forces during both walking and running compared to males (ppain-free subjects. The muscle force data are available as supplementary material.

  17. Influence of myofascial pain on the pressure pain threshold of masticatory muscles in women with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales Pinto, Lívia Maria; de Carvalho, João José Freitas; Cunha, Carolina O; Dos Santos Silva, Rafael; Fiamengui-Filho, Jorge Francisco; Rodrigues Conti, Paulo César

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of myofascial pain on the Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) of masticatory muscles in women with migraine. The sample comprised 101 women, ages ranging from 18 to 60 years, with an episodic migraine diagnosis previously confirmed by a neurologist. All patients were evaluated using Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders to determine the presence of myofascial pain and were divided into 2 groups: group I (n=56), comprising women with a migraine, and group II (n=45), comprising women with a migraine and myofascial pain. Two more groups (49 asymptomatic women and 50 women with myofascial pain), matched for sex and race, obtained from a previous study, were added to this study. The PPT values of masseter and temporalis (anterior, middle, and posterior regions) muscles were recorded bilaterally using a pressure algometer. One-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test for pairwise comparisons were used in statistical analysis with a 5% significance level. We found that all groups had significantly lower PPT values compared with asymptomatic women, with lower values seen in group II (women with migraine and myofascial pain). Women with a migraine and myofascial pain showed significantly lower PPT values compared with women with a migraine only, and also when compared with women with myofascial pain only. Migraine, especially when accompanied by myofascial pain, reduces the PPT of masticatory muscles, suggesting the importance of masticatory muscle palpation during examination of patients with migraine.

  18. Associations between psychological variables and pain in experimental pain models. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M S; Horjales-Araujo, E; Dahl, J B

    2015-01-01

    are predictive of the level of pain following experimental pain models. METHODS: A systematic search on the databases, PubMed, Embase, Cochcrane library, and Clinicaltrials.gov was performed during September 2014. All trials investigating the association between psychological variables and experimental pain...... and experimental pain. CONCLUSION: Psychological factors may have predictive value when investigating experimental pain. However, due to substantial heterogeneity and methodological shortcomings of the published literature, firm conclusions are not possible.......BACKGROUND: The association between pain and psychological characteristics has been widely debated. Thus, it remains unclear whether an individual's psychological profile influences a particular pain experience, or if previous pain experience contributes to a certain psychological profile...

  19. Assessment of the potential role of muscle spindle mechanoreceptor afferents in chronic muscle pain in the rat masseter muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Lund

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in "functional" pain syndromes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0 injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1-38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes, which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA, was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167 were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141, as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO, bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2(nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  20. Women with dysmenorrhoea are hypersensitive to experimentally induced forearm ischaemia during painful menstruation and during the pain-free follicular phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovides, S; Avidon, I; Baker, F C

    2015-07-01

    Monthly primary dysmenorrhoeic pain is associated with increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, particularly in deep tissue. We investigated whether women with dysmenorrhoea, compared with controls, have increased sensitivity to experimentally induced deep-tissue muscle ischaemia in a body area distant from that of referred menstrual pain. The sub-maximal effort tourniquet test was used to induce forearm ischaemia in 11 women with severe dysmenorrhoea and in nine control women both during menstruation and in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Von Frey hair assessments confirmed the presence of experimental ischaemia. Women rated the intensity of menstrual and ischaemic pain on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Women with dysmenorrhoea [mean (SD): 68 (20) mm] reported significantly greater menstrual pain compared with controls [mean (SD): 2 (6) mm; p = 0.0001] during the menstruation phase. They also rated their forearm ischaemic pain as significantly greater than the controls during the menstruation [dysmenorrhoeics vs. controls mean (SD): 58 (19) mm vs. 31 (21) mm, p menstruation phase and pain-free follicular phase. These findings suggest the presence of long-lasting changes in muscle pain sensitivity in women with dysmenorrhoea. Our findings that dysmenorrhoeic women are hyperalgesic to a clinically relevant, deep-muscle ischaemic pain in areas outside of referred menstrual pain confirm other studies showing long-lasting changes in pain sensitivity outside of the painful period during menstruation. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  1. Experimental pain leads to reorganisation of trapezius electromyography during computer work with active and passive pauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samani, Afshin; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2009-01-01

    in one day, with passive (relax) and active (30% maximum voluntary contraction of shoulder elevation) pauses given every 40 s without and with presence of experimental pain. Surface EMG signals were recorded from four parts of the trapezius. The centroid of exposure variation analysis along the time axis...... was lower during computer work with active pauses when compared with passive one in all muscle parts (P rest time decreased in ascending part. The results of this study showed a more variable...... trapezius activity pattern and increased activity with active compared with passive pauses, a lowered trapezius rest with presence of experimental pain, and increased activity in the transverse and ascending parts of trapezius due to experimental pain during computer work. Acute pain led to muscle...

  2. Kinesiophobia, Pain, Muscle Functions, and Functional Performances among Older Persons with Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Azizah Ishak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aims (1 to determine the association between kinesiophobia and pain, muscle functions, and functional performances and (2 to determine whether kinesiophobia predicts pain, muscle functions, and functional performance among older persons with low back pain (LBP. Methods. This is a correlational study, involving 63 institutionalized older persons (age = 70.98±7.90 years diagnosed with LBP. Anthropometric characteristics (BMI and functional performances (lower limb function, balance and mobility, and hand grip strength were measured. Muscle strength (abdominal and back muscle strength was assessed using the Baseline® Mechanical Push/Pull Dynamometer, while muscle control (transverse abdominus and multifidus was measured by using the Pressure Biofeedback Unit. The pain intensity and the level of kinesiophobia were measured using Numerical Rating Scale and Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, respectively. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficients and multivariate linear regressions. Results. No significant correlations were found between kinesiophobia and pain and muscle functions (all p>0.05. Kinesiophobia was significantly correlated with mobility and balance (p=0.038, r=0.263. Regressions analysis showed that kinesiophobia was a significant predictor of mobility and balance (p=0.038. Conclusion. We can conclude that kinesiophobia predicted mobility and balance in older persons with LBP. Kinesiophobia should be continuously assessed in clinical settings to recognize the obstacles that may affect patient’s compliance towards a rehabilitation program in older persons with LBP.

  3. Kinesiophobia, Pain, Muscle Functions, and Functional Performances among Older Persons with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This study aims (1) to determine the association between kinesiophobia and pain, muscle functions, and functional performances and (2) to determine whether kinesiophobia predicts pain, muscle functions, and functional performance among older persons with low back pain (LBP). This is a correlational study, involving 63 institutionalized older persons (age = 70.98 ± 7.90 years) diagnosed with LBP. Anthropometric characteristics (BMI) and functional performances (lower limb function, balance and mobility, and hand grip strength) were measured. Muscle strength (abdominal and back muscle strength) was assessed using the Baseline® Mechanical Push/Pull Dynamometer, while muscle control (transverse abdominus and multifidus) was measured by using the Pressure Biofeedback Unit. The pain intensity and the level of kinesiophobia were measured using Numerical Rating Scale and Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, respectively. Data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficients and multivariate linear regressions. No significant correlations were found between kinesiophobia and pain and muscle functions (all p > 0.05). Kinesiophobia was significantly correlated with mobility and balance (p = 0.038, r = 0.263). Regressions analysis showed that kinesiophobia was a significant predictor of mobility and balance (p = 0.038). We can conclude that kinesiophobia predicted mobility and balance in older persons with LBP. Kinesiophobia should be continuously assessed in clinical settings to recognize the obstacles that may affect patient's compliance towards a rehabilitation program in older persons with LBP.

  4. The effect of fear of movement on muscle activation in posttraumatic neck pain disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhand, Marcus Johannes; Hermens, Hermanus J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina Gerarda Maria; Turk, Dennis C.

    Studies using surface electromyography have demonstrated a reorganization of muscle activation patterns of the neck and shoulder muscles in patients with posttraumatic neck pain disability. The neurophysiologically oriented "pain adaptation" model explains this reorganization as a useful adaptation

  5. An overview of the management of muscle pain and injuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sport injuries and muscle pain can occur as a result of engagement in exercise and or organized sporting activities. These injuries affect all age groups and gender. The most common types of sporting activities known to cause these injuries include jogging, cycling, volleyball, swimming and heavy weight lifting. Lack of ...

  6. Muscle impingement: MR imaging of a painful complication of osteochondromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uri, D.S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dalinka, M.K. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kneeland, J.B. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of a newly recognized complication of osteochondromas. Two patients presented with pain and swelling over known osteochondromas. Plain radiographic studies were unrevealing. MR examinations were obtained to characterize the exostoses further and evaluate areas of palpable fullness. Increased signal was present in the muscles on T2-weighted images, which correlated with physical findings and was believed to represent muscle injury due to the osteochondroma. Pain and fullness may result from a number of osteochondroma-related complications, the most worrisome of which is malignant degeneration. Muscular impingement and injury should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain and swelling in the region of an exostosis. MR imaging allows distinction of this entity, which may be radiographically occult and confused clinically with fracture, bursitis, or malignant degeneration. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  7. Increased proportion of megafibers in chronically painful muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Suetta, Charlotte; Andersen, Jesper Løvind

    2008-01-01

    . The percentage of megafibers was positively related to age and weekly working hours, indicating an effect of long-term exposure. In conclusion, this study shows that trapezius myalgia is associated with a significantly higher percentage of grossly hypertrophied type I muscle fibers with poor capillarization......Trapezius myalgia - chronic pain from the upper trapezius muscle - is frequent in female employees in monotonous stressful jobs, potentially due to chronic overload of type I muscle fibers. In this study, we investigated the intra-individual distribution of trapezius muscle fiber size......, and hypothesized that females with myalgia compared with matched healthy controls have a higher percentage of grossly hypertrophied type I fibers with poor capillarization. Forty-two female office workers with trapezius myalgia (MYA) and 20 healthy matched controls (CON) participated in the study. Standard...

  8. The Associations between Pain Sensitivity and Knee Muscle Strength in Healthy Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate associations between muscle strength and pain sensitivity among healthy volunteers and associations between different pain sensitivity measures. Methods. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (21 females) participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were obtained from 1...

  9. Muscle relaxants for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bethan L; Whittle, Samuel L; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-01-18

    Pain management is a high priority for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Muscle relaxants include drugs that reduce muscle spasm (for example benzodiazepines such as diazepam (Valium), alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan) and non-benzodiazepines such as metaxalone (Skelaxin) or a combination of paracetamol and orphenadrine (Muscol)) and drugs that prevent increased muscle tone (baclofen and dantrolene). Despite a paucity of evidence supporting their use, antispasmodic and antispasticity muscle relaxants have gained widespread clinical acceptance as adjuvants in the management of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this review was to determine the efficacy and safety of muscle relaxants in pain management in patients with RA. The muscle relaxants that were included in this review are the antispasmodic benzodiazepines (alprazolam, bromazepam, chlordiazepoxide,cinolazepam, clonazepam, cloxazolam, clorazepate, diazepam, estazolam, flunitrazepam, flurazepam, flutoprazepam, halazepam, ketazolam, loprazolam, lorazepam, lormetazepam, medazepam, midazolam, nimetazepam, nitrazepam, nordazepam, oxazepam, pinazepam, prazepam, quazepam, temazepam, tetrazepam, triazolam), antispasmodic non-benzodiazepines (cyclobenzaprine, carisoprodol, chlorzoxazone, meprobamate, methocarbamol, metaxalone, orphenadrine, tizanidine and zopiclone), and antispasticity drugs (baclofen and dantrolene sodium). We performed a search of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 4th quarter 2010), MEDLINE (1950 to week 1 November 2010), EMBASE (Week 44 2010), and PsycINFO (1806 to week 2 November 2010). We also searched the 2008 to 2009 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) abstracts and performed a handsearch of reference lists of relevant articles. We included randomised controlled trials which compared a muscle relaxant to another therapy (active, including non

  10. Pelvic floor muscle examination in female chronic pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Colleen M; Neville, Cynthia E; Mallinson, Trudy; Badillo, Suzanne A; Hynes, Christina K; Tu, Frank F

    2011-01-01

    To determine if women with self-reported chronic pelvic pain (CPP) were more likely to have positive findings on two vaginal pelvic floor muscle (PFM) tests compared to women without CPP when the examiner was blinded to pain status. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study. Blinded examiners performed two vaginal pelvic floor tests (tenderness and strength) on 48 participants: 19 with self-reported CPP and 29 who were pain-free. Relative frequency of positive findings between groups and the total number of positive physical examination findings were calculated. Women with self-reported CPP were more likely to have PFM tenderness (63.2% with physician [M.D.] examiners [board certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation] and 73.7% with physical therapist [P.T.] examiners) as compared to pain-free participants (Fisher's exact test [FET]), 48 p examination across disciplines may be helpful in distinguishing subgroups and treating women with CPP.

  11. Experimental pain impairs recognition memory irrespective of pain predictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkmann, K; Schmidt, K; Schultz, H; Sommer, T; Bingel, U

    2016-07-01

    Pain is hardwired to signal threat and tissue damage and therefore automatically attracts attention to initiate withdrawal or defensive behaviour. This well-known interruptive function of pain interferes with cognitive functioning and is modulated by bottom-up and top-down variables. Here, we applied predictable or unpredictable painful heat stimuli simultaneously to the presentation of neutral images to investigate (I) whether the predictability of pain modulated its effect on the encoding of images (episodic memory) and (II) whether subjects remember that certain images have been previously presented with pain (source memory). Twenty-four healthy subjects performed a categorization task in which 80 images had to be categorized into living or non-living objects. We compared the processing and encoding of these images during cued and non-cued pain trials as well as cued and non-cued pain-free trials. Effects on recognition performance and source memory for pain were immediately tested using a surprise recognition task. Painful thermal stimulation impaired recognition accuracy (d', recollection, familiarity). This negative effect of pain was positively correlated with the individual expectation of pain interference and the attentional avoidance of pain-related words. However, the interruptive effect of pain was not modulated by the predictability of pain. Source memory for painful stimulation was at chance level, indicating that subjects did not explicitly remember that images had been paired with pain. Targeting negative expectations and a maladaptive attentional bias for pain-related material might help reducing frequently reported pain-induced cognitive impairments. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  12. Muscle pain sensitivity after glutamate injection is not modified by systemic administration of monosodium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Akiko; Castrillon, Eduardo; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Ghafouri, Bijar; Gerdle, Björn; Ernberg, Malin; Cairns, Brian; Svensson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is often thought to be associated with headache and craniofacial pains like temporomandibular disorders. This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was performed to investigate how ingestion of MSG affects muscle pain sensitivity before and after experimentally induced muscle pain. Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in 2 sessions with at least 1-week interval between sessions. In each session, two injections of glutamate (Glu, 0.5 M, 0.2 ml) and two injections of saline (0.9%, 0.2 ml) into the masseter and temporalis muscles, respectively, were undertaken, with a 15 min interval between each injection. Injections of saline were made contralateral to Glu injections and done in a randomized order. Participants drank 400 mL of soda mixed with either MSG (150 mg/kg) or NaCl (24 mg/kg, placebo) 30 min before the intramuscular injections. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT), autonomic parameters and pain intensity were assessed prior to (baseline) and 30 min after ingestion of soda, as well as 5 min and 10 min after the intramuscular injections and at the end of the session. Whole saliva samples were collected prior to and 30, 45, 60, and 75 min after the ingestion of soda. MSG administration resulted in a significantly higher Glu level in saliva than administration of NaCl and was associated with a significant increase in systolic blood pressure. Injections of Glu were significantly more painful than injections of NaCl. However, ingestion of MSG did not change the intensity of Glu-evoked pain. Glu injections also significantly increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but without an additional effect of MSG ingestion. Glu injections into the masseter muscle significantly reduced the PPT. However, pre-injection MSG ingestion did not significantly alter this effect. Interestingly, PPT was significantly increased in the trapezius after MSG ingestion and intramuscular injection of Glu in the jaw muscles. The main finding

  13. Neural Mechanisms of Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Possible Role for Peripheral Glutamate Receptor Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Lam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present review is to correlate recent knowledge of the role of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in the temporomandibular joint and muscle pain from animal and human experimental pain models with findings in patients. Chronic pain is common, and many people suffer from chronic pain conditions involving deep craniofacial tissues such as temporomandibular disorders or fibromyalgia. Animal and human studies have indicated that the activation of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in deep craniofacial tissues may contribute to muscle and temporomandibular joint pain and that sex differences in the activation of glutamate receptors may be involved in the female predominance in temporomandibular disorders and fibromyalgia. A peripheral mechanism involving autocrine and/or paracrine regulation of nociceptive neuronal excitability via injury or inflammation-induced release of glutamate into peripheral tissues that may contribute to the development of craniofacial pain is proposed.

  14. Inspiratory muscle training affects proprioceptive use and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Lotte; McConnell, Alison K; Pijnenburg, Madelon; Claeys, Kurt; Goossens, Nina; Lysens, Roeland; Troosters, Thierry; Brumagne, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that individuals with recurrent nonspecific low back pain (LBP) and healthy individuals breathing against an inspiratory load decrease their reliance on back proprioceptive signals in upright standing. Because individuals with LBP show greater susceptibility to diaphragm fatigue, it is reasonable to hypothesize that LBP, diaphragm dysfunction, and proprioceptive use may be interrelated. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether inspiratory muscle training (IMT) affects proprioceptive use during postural control in individuals with LBP. Twenty-eight individuals with LBP were assigned randomly into a high-intensity IMT group (high IMT) and low-intensity IMT group (low IMT). The use of proprioception in upright standing was evaluated by measuring center of pressure displacement during local muscle vibration (ankle, back, and ankle-back). Secondary outcomes were inspiratory muscle strength, severity of LBP, and disability. After high IMT, individuals showed smaller responses to ankle muscle vibration, larger responses to back muscle vibration, higher inspiratory muscle strength, and reduced LBP severity (P 0.05). No changes in disability were observed in either group (P > 0.05). After 8 wk of high IMT, individuals with LBP showed an increased reliance on back proprioceptive signals during postural control and improved inspiratory muscle strength and severity of LBP, not seen after low IMT. Hence, IMT may facilitate the proprioceptive involvement of the trunk in postural control in individuals with LBP and thus might be a useful rehabilitation tool for these patients.

  15. The Effect of Core Stabilization Exercises Using a Sling on Pain and Muscle Strength of Patientswith Chronic Low Back Pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoo, Young-Dae; Lee, Yeon-Seop

    2012-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the feasibility of using an intervention of core stabilization exercises using a sling to control pain and muscle strength of patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects...

  16. Prediction of postoperative pain: a systematic review of predictive experimental pain studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads Utke; Mjöbo, Helena N; Nielsen, Per R

    2010-01-01

    preoperative responses to experimental pain stimuli and clinical postoperative pain and demonstrates that the preoperative pain tests may predict 4-54% of the variance in postoperative pain experience depending on the stimulation methods and the test paradigm used. The predictive strength is much higher than...... previously reported for single factor analyses of demographics and psychologic factors. In addition, some of these studies indicate that an increase in preoperative pain sensitivity is associated with a high probability of development of sustained postsurgical pain....

  17. Effect of somatosensory amplification and trait anxiety on experimentally induced orthodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Iacopo; Michelotti, Ambrosina; Perrotta, Stefania; Chiodini, Paolo; Ohrbach, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The perception of pain varies considerably across individuals and is affected by psychological traits. This study aimed to investigate the combined effects of somatosensory amplification and trait anxiety on orthodontic pain. Five-hundred and five adults completed the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Somatosensory Amplification Scale (SSAS). Individuals with combined STAI and SSAS scores below the 20th percentile (LASA group: five men and 12 women; mean age ± SD = 22.4 ± 1.3 yr) or above the 80th percentile (HASA group: 13 men and seven women; mean age ± SD = 23.7 ± 1.0 yr) were selected and filled in the Oral Behaviors Checklist (OBC). Orthodontic separators were placed for 5 d in order to induce experimental pain. Visual analog scales (VAS) were administered to collect ratings for occlusal discomfort, pain, and perceived stress. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured. A mixed regression model was used to evaluate pain and discomfort ratings over the 5-d duration of the study. At baseline, the LASA group had statistically significantly higher PPT values for the masseter muscle than did the HASA group. During the experimental procedure, the HASA group had statistically significantly higher discomfort and pain. A significant difference in pain ratings during the 5 d of the study was found for subjects in the HASA group. Higher OBC values were statistically significantly positively associated with pain. Somatosensory amplification and trait anxiety substantially affect experimentally induced orthodontic pain. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  18. Experimental tonic hand pain modulates the corticospinal plasticity induced by a subsequent hand deafferentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, N; Gagné, M; Voisin, J I A V; Reilly, K T; Mercier, C

    2016-08-25

    Sensorimotor reorganization is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of phantom limb pain, but pain itself might modulate sensorimotor plasticity induced by deafferentation. Clinical and basic research support this idea, as pain prior to amputation increases the risk of developing post-amputation pain. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of experimental tonic cutaneous hand pain on the plasticity induced by temporary ischemic hand deafferentation. Sixteen healthy subjects participated in two experimental sessions (Pain, No Pain) in which transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess corticospinal excitability in two forearm muscles (flexor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis) before (T0, T10, T20, and T40) and after (T60 and T75) inflation of a cuff around the wrist. The cuff was inflated at T45 in both sessions and in the Pain session capsaicin cream was applied on the dorsum of the hand at T5. Corticospinal excitability was significantly greater during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.002) and increased similarly in both muscles (p=0.861). Importantly, the excitability increase in the Post-inflation phase was greater for the Pain than the No-Pain condition (p=0.006). Post-hoc analyses revealed a significant difference between the two conditions during the Post-inflation phase (p=0.030) but no difference during the Pre-inflation phase (p=0.601). In other words, the corticospinal facilitation was greater when pain was present prior to cuff inflation. These results indicate that pain can modulate the plasticity induced by another event, and could partially explain the sensorimotor reorganization often reported in chronic pain populations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Time discounting and pain anticipation. Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brañas Garza, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with pain anticipation experienced before medical procedures. our experimental results show that individuals with lower time discount factors are more prone to suffer pain in advance. We provide a framework to rationalize the connection between pain anticipation and impatience. in this set up, more impatient subjects, who only value very near events, mainly take into account the present negative effects of medical procedures (the costs, whereas more patient individuals have a net positive valuation of medical events, given that they are able to value both the cost incurred now and all the benefits to be accrued in the future.

    Este artículo trata de la anticipación del dolor experimentada antes de los procedimientos médicos. nuestros resultados experimentales muestran que los individuos con factor de descuento temporal más bajo son más proclives a sufrir dolor por adelantado. el artículo proporciona un marco en el que racionalizar la relación existente entre impaciencia y anticipación del dolor. en este marco, los sujetos más impacientes, que evalúan sólo los eventos muy próximos en el tiempo, focalizan su atención principalmente en los efectos negativos de los procedimientos médicos (sólo los costes, mientras que los individuos más pacientes tienen una valoración neta positiva de los actos médicos puesto que valoran tanto el coste en el que se incurre en el presente como los beneficios que se obtendrán en el futuro.

  20. Is myofascial pain in temporomandibular disorder patients a manifestation of delayed-onset muscle soreness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutris, M.; Lobbezoo, F.; Sümer, N.C.; Atis, E.S.; Türker, K.S.; Naeije, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In a study to the possible role of overuse of the jaw muscles in the pathogenesis of jaw muscle pain, we used a protocol involving concentric and eccentric muscle contractions to provoke a state of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in the jaw muscles of healthy individuals. We tested

  1. The Genetic Influences on Oxycodone Response Characteristics in Human Experimental Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Sato, Hiroe; Nielsen, Lecia Møller

    2015-01-01

    Human experimental pain studies are of value to study basic pain mechanisms under controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic variation across selected mu-, kappa- and delta-opioid receptor genes (OPRM1, OPRK1and OPRD1, respectively) influenced analgesic response...... PTT (n = 41) were included. Genetic associations with pain outcomes were explored. Nineteen opioid receptor genetic polymorphisms were included in this study. Variability in oxycodone response to skin heat was associated with OPRM1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs589046 (P ... to oxycodone in healthy volunteers. Experimental multimodal, multitissue pain data from previously published studies carried out in Caucasian volunteers were used. Data on thermal skin pain tolerance threshold (PTT) (n = 37), muscle pressure PTT (n = 31), mechanical visceral PTT (n = 43) and thermal visceral...

  2. Entropy of Masseter Muscle Pain Sensitivity: A New Technique for Pain Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrillon, Eduardo E; Exposto, Fernando G; Sato, Hitoshi; Tanosoto, Tomohiro; Arima, Taro; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Svensson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    To test whether manipulation of mechanical pain sensitivity (MPS) of the masseter muscle is reflected in quantitative measures of entropy. In a randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled design, 20 healthy volunteers had glutamate, lidocaine, and isotonic saline injected into the masseter muscle. Self-assessed pain intensity on a numeric rating scale (NRS) was evaluated up to 10 minutes following the injection, and MPS was evaluated after application (at 5 minutes and 30 minutes) of three different forces (0.5 kg, 1 kg, and 2 kg) to 15 different sites of the masseter muscle. Finally, the entropy and center of gravity (COG) of the pain sensitivity scores were calculated. Analysis of variance was used to test differences in means of tested outcomes and Tukey post hoc tests were used to adjust for multiple comparisons. The main findings were: (1) Compared with both lidocaine and isotonic saline, glutamate injections caused an increase in peak, duration, and area under the NRS pain curve (P entropy values (P entropy values when assessed with 0.5 kg and 1.0 kg but not with 2.0 kg of pressure; and (4) COG coordinates revealed differences between the x coordinates for time (P entropy measures. Entropy allows quantification of the diversity of MPS, which may be important in clinical assessment of pain states such as myofascial temporomandibular disorders.

  3. Pain-evoked trunk muscle activity changes during fatigue and DOMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, L H; Hirata, R P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-05-01

    Muscle pain may reorganize trunk muscle activity but interactions with exercise-related muscle fatigue and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is to be clarified. In 19 healthy participants, the trunk muscle activity during 20 multi-directional unpredictable surface perturbations were recorded after bilateral isotonic saline injections (control) and during unilateral and bilateral hypertonic saline-induced low back pain (LBP) in conditions of back muscle fatigue (Day-1) and DOMS (Day-2). Pain intensity and distribution were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) scores and pain drawings. The degree of fatigue and DOMS were assessed by Likert scale scores. Root-mean-square electromyographic (RMS-EMG) signals were recorded post-perturbation from six bilateral trunk muscles and the difference from baseline conditions (Delta-RMS-EMG) was extracted and averaged across abdominal and back muscles. In DOMS, peak VAS scores were higher during bilateral control and bilateral saline-induced pain than fatigue (p fatigue (p fatigue and DOMS, the back muscle Delta-RMS-EMG increased during bilateral compared with unilateral pain and control injections (p fatigue, the post-perturbation Delta-RMS-EMG in back muscles was higher during bilateral pain and lower during unilateral pain (p muscle responses to surface perturbations in bilateral and unilateral LBP, respectively, was more expressed during exercise-induced back muscle soreness compared with fatigue. Back muscle activity decreased during unilateral and increased during bilateral pain after unpredictable surface perturbations during muscle fatigue and DOMS. Accumulation effects of DOMS on pain intensity and spreading and trunk muscle activity after pain-induction. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  4. Association between neck muscle coactivation, pain, and strength in women with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrøm, Rene; Schomacher, Jochen; Farina, Dario; Rechter, Lotte; Falla, Deborah

    2011-02-01

    This study investigates the relationship between neck muscle coactivation, neck strength and perceived pain and disability in women with neck pain. Surface electromyography (EMG) was acquired from the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and splenius capitis (SC) muscles of 13 women with chronic neck pain and 10 controls as they performed 1) maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) in flexion, extension and left and right lateral flexion, 2) ramped contractions from 0% to 50% MVC in flexion and extension and 3) circular contractions in the horizontal plane at 15N and 30N force. Higher values of EMG amplitude were observed for the SC (antagonist) during ramped neck flexion and for the SCM during ramped extension in the patient group (Pdisability (R² 0.53, Pdisability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental Pain Responses Support Peripheral and Central Sensitization in Patients with Unilateral Shoulder Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; Simon, Corey B.; Valencia, Carolina; George, Steven Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to 1) examine the pattern of experimental pain responses in the affected and non-affected extremities in patients with shoulder pain and 2) explore the intra-individual association between sensitization states derived from experimental pain testing. Methods Experimental pain responses from 58 patients with shoulder pain (17 females, ages 18 to 52) were compared to those from 56 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (16 females, ages 21 to 58). Experimental pain responses included pressure pain threshold (PPT), thermal pain threshold and tolerance, and suprathreshold heat pain response (SHPR). Comparisons were made between the affected and non-affected extremity of clinical participants and the average response of extremities in healthy participants. Peripheral and central sensitization indexes were computed for clinical participants using standardized scores and percentile cut-offs based on the data from the healthy control sample. Experimental pain responses in clinical participants observed beyond the 25th and 75th percentile of healthy control sample responses were used for investigation of intra-individual association of sensitization states. Results PPT on the affected side acromion and masseter of clinical participants were diminished compared to their non-affected side (p shoulder pain present with variable patterns of peripheral and central sensitization. Conclusions Collectively, experimental pain responses supported peripheral and central sensitization in response to pressure and thermal stimuli. No clear association was made between individuals exhibiting peripheral or central sensitization and suggests heterogeneity in pain processing in this clinical population. PMID:23619203

  6. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  7. Effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Kjaer, Michael; Søgaard, Karen

    2008-01-01

    for the affected muscle, general fitness training performed as leg bicycling with relaxed shoulders, or a reference intervention without physical activity. The main outcome measure was an acute and prolonged change in intensity of neck muscle pain (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]). RESULTS: A decrease of 35 mm......OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of neck muscle pain has steadily increased and especially pain from the descending part of the trapezius muscle has been associated with monotonous work tasks such as computer work. Physical exercise is generally recommended as treatment, but it is unclear which type...... of training is most effective. Our objective was to determine the effectiveness of specific strength training of the painful muscle versus general fitness training without direct involvement of the painful muscle (leg bicycling) on work-related neck muscle pain. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled...

  8. Effects of microcurrent treatment on perceived pain and muscle strength following eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacci, J A; Higbie, E J

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of low-volt, microamperage stimulation (LVMAS) on perceived pain and muscle strength following an intense bout of eccentric exercise. An experimental pretest-posttest control group design was used for the study. The experiment was conducted in the Lower Extremity Research Laboratory at Georgia State University. Twelve females and six males (mean age 27 +/- 5 yr). Subjects, randomly assigned to experimental (EXP, n = 6), sham (SHAM, n = 6), and control (CON, n = 6) groups, were tested before, and at 24, 48, and 72 hours following, an intense bout of eccentric exercise. Three two-way (group x time) analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with repeated measures on the last factor were used to analyze the data. A significant time main effect was identified. Results indicated that perceived pain was not reduced in the EXP group as compared with the SHAM and CON groups. Muscle strength in the EXP group did not return to the initial baseline measure more rapidly than in the SHAM and CON groups. We conclude that the use of LVMAS alone is not effective in reducing pain and increasing muscle function following an exhaustive bout of eccentric exercise.

  9. Decreased thickness of the lower trapezius muscle in patients with unilateral neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthaikhup, Sureeporn; Pensri, Chalomjai; Kawsoiy, Kanokon

    2016-09-01

    Thickness of the lower trapezius muscle in patients with neck pain has not been established. We examined the thickness of the lower trapezius muscle in patients with and without unilateral neck pain. Twenty women with unilateral (right) neck pain and 20 matched controls participated in the study. Thickness of the lower trapezius muscles was measured bilaterally at rest (0 ° and 120 ° of shoulder abduction) and during contraction (120 ° of shoulder abduction) using ultrasound imaging. The neck pain group had smaller thickness of the lower trapezius muscle on the painful side compared with controls both at rest and during contraction (P  0.05). Patients with neck pain had smaller thickness of the lower trapezius muscle on the painful side compared with healthy controls. Muscle Nerve 54: 439-443, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Experimental human pain models: a review of standardised methods for preclinical testing of analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staahl, Camilla; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2004-09-01

    Treatment of pain is one of the major challenges in clinical medicine. However, it is often difficult to evaluate the effect of a treatment, as the many symptoms of the underlying diseases often confound this assessment. Furthermore, as the pain mechanisms in many diseases are poorly understood, the limited successful trial and error approach is most often used in the selection of analgesics. Hence, there is a need for new methods in the characterization and treatment of pain. Human experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. The models can also be used to screen the analgesic profiles of drugs targeted to treat pain. This review gives a brief introduction to the methods used to evoke and assess pain in the skin, muscle and viscera. New methods using multimodal stimulation and activation of central pain mechanisms can to a higher degree mimic the clinical situation, and such methods are recommended in the future screening of analgesics. Examples of the use of experimental pain models in the testing of analgesics are given. With these models the therapeutic spectrum may be defined from a differentiated knowledge on the effect of drugs on the pain system. Such information may be used in the future guidelines for trials and clinical use of analgesics.

  11. Effects of 12-week lumbar stabilization exercise and sling exercise on lumbosacral region angle, lumbar muscle strength, and pain scale of patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Ha, Gi-Chul; Yook, Young-Sook; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of lumbar stabilization exercise and sling exercise on lumbosacral region angle, lumbar muscle strength, pain scale of patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 29 chronic low back pain patient women who were selected among participants in exercise class at K Region Health Promotion Center in South Korea and were randomly assigned to the lumbar stabilization exercise group (n=10), sling exercise group (n=10), and the control group (n=9). Both lumbar stabilization and sling exercise programs were executed for 60 minutes, three times a week, for 12 weeks. Before and after exercise we measured lumbosacral region angle (lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle, sacral inclination angle), lumbar muscle strength, and pain scale in all subjects. Two-way analysis of variance was conducted to analyze experimental data. In order to analyze the interaction effect, we conducted paired t-test before and after treatment. [Results] Lumbar stabilization exercise group and sling exercises group did not affect lumbar lordosis angle, lumbosacral angle and sacral inclination angle. Whereas the lumbar flexion muscle strength and lumbar extension muscle strength significantly increased in the lumbar stabilization exercise group and sling exercise group. The flexibility increased in the lumbar stabilization exercise group and sling exercise group. The pain scale decreased in the lumbar stabilization exercise group and sling exercise group. [Conclusion] Both lumbar stabilization exercise and sling exercises are useful therapeutic approaches to chronic back pain.

  12. Relation Between Muscle Activation Pattern and Pain : An Explorative Study in a Bassists Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldendorp, Kees H.; van de Werk, Pieter; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Otten, Egbert

    Objective: To explore the muscle activation patterns in relation to pain complaints in bassists studied during a musical task. This study was based on the assumption that pain complaints are caused by increased muscle activation during playing or relaxation and/or faster onset of fatigue of muscles.

  13. Entropy as a new measure of mechanical pain sensitivity in the masseter muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillon, Eduardo; Sato, Hitoshi; Tanosoto, Tomohiro

    be utilized to assess the homogeneity of mechanical sensitivity in a given muscle adding more information to simply the magnitude of sensitivity. AIM: To test whether experimental manipulation of mechanical pain sensitivity in the masseter muscle pain would influence measures of spatial characteristics (i.......e., entropy). Methods: Twenty healthy and pain-free subjects (10 women 25.2±4.0 and 10 men 26.5±3.2 years old) volunteered for this study. Pain levels were assessed on a 0-10 electronic visual analog scale (VAS) and the sensitivity to mechanical palpation was assessed at 15 sites (3 x 5) marked and equally...... included 3 time points of mechanical sensitivity assessments: baseline, 5 min after injection and 30 min after injection. ANOVAs were used to test for differences between sites, time, force, session and sex. 3 Results: VAS peak pain intensity was 8.2±1.5 for the glutamate and 2.5±3.1 for isotonic saline...

  14. Clinical effects of deep cervical flexor muscle activation in patients with chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Kwag, Kwang Il

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical effects of deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscles exercise on pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and neck and shoulder postures in patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight patients with chronic neck pain were randomly assigned into either the general strengthening exercise (GSE) group or the DCF activation group as control and experimental groups, respectively. All exercises were performed three times per week over 4 weeks. NDI and numeric rating scale (NRS) score for pain were determined and radiological assessment of neck-shoulder postures (head tilt angle [HTA], neck flexion angle [NFA], and forward shoulder angle [FSA]) was performed before (baseline), 4 weeks after, and 8 weeks after exercise in order to directly compare the exercise effects between the groups. [Results] In the DCF group, the NDI, NRS score, and neck-shoulder postures (analyzed by uisng HTA, NFA, and FSA) were significantly improved. [Conclusion] DCF activation exercise was effective to alleviate pain, recover functions, and correct forward head posture in the patients with neck pain. Hence, it might be recommended in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic neck pain.

  15. Single cell morphology of muscle in patients with chronic muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Bartels, E M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1991-01-01

    In 119 patients referred with suspected fibromyalgia, biopsies from the quadriceps muscle were analyzed for "rubber band" morphology, and isokinetic quadriceps strength was measured. Eighty-four fulfilled the criteria for fibromyalgia, 26 had chronic myofascial pain (CMP) and 9 had other diseases...... in biopsy score was found between the two matched groups (P = 0.003); median biopsy score in fibromyalgia was 0.42 and 0.25 in CMP. A cut-off value at 0.33 gave a specificity of 71% and a sensitivity of 63%. Isokinetic muscle strength did not differ in the fibromyalgia and CMP groups and was not related...

  16. Contraction of the transverse abdominal muscle in pelvic girdle pain is enhanced by pain provocation during the task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, Jan M A; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding of the pathogenesis of pain in the lumbopelvic region remains a challenge. It is suggested that lumbopelvic pain is related to decreased contraction of the transverse abdominal muscles (TrA). OBJECTIVE: To investigate how pain provoked by a task influences TrA contraction

  17. Muscle strength analysis of hip and knee stabilizers in individuals with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Letícia Villani de; Saad, Marcelo Camargo; Felício, Lilian Ramiro; Grossi, Débora Bevilaqua

    2014-01-01

    The Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome is one of the most common disorders of the knee, characterized by pain in the frontal part of the knee, which is worsened by activities that increase compressive forces on the joint. Alterations in the muscle strength of the quadriceps and hip stabilizer muscles can change patellar biomechanics, increasing joint stress and exacerbating pain symptoms. The aim of the study was to compare the strength of the hip and knee stabilizing muscles of women without and w...

  18. Involvement of NGF in the Rat Model of Persistent Muscle Pain Associated With Taut Band

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun; Yi, Shuang-Qin; Wang, Heng-Xiao; Yi, Nozomi; Ogawa, Yuki; OZAKI, NORIYUKI; Itoh, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is an important clinical condition characterized by chronic muscle pain and a myofascial trigger point (MTrP) located in a taut band (TB). However, its pathogenic mechanism is still unclear. We developed an animal model relevant to conditions of MPS, and analyzed the mechanism of the muscle pain in this model. We applied eccentric contraction (EC) to a rat's gastrocnemius muscle (GM) for 2 weeks, and examined the mechanical withdrawal thresholds, histological ch...

  19. [Tetrazepam in the treatment of painful muscle spasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovicić, A; Ivanisević, V

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine myorelaxant and analgetic effects of tetrazepam using double-blind controlled random tests. The study comprised two groups of patients with 30 subjects in each with reflex muscle spasms in the lumbar and cervical spine. One group was treated with a nonsteroid analgetic and the another one with the combination of tetrazepam and a nonsteroid analgetic. The treatment lasted 15 days and the assessment using the standardized, graded scale was performed 0, 7 and 15 days after the onset of the treatment. More hematologic and biochemical parameters were analysed both at the beginning and completion of the treatment. The results of the study have shown that the combination of nonsteroid analgetics and tetrazepam achieved better and faster effects on pain and muscle spasms compared to nonsteroid analgetics with no significant side effects.

  20. Are preoperative experimental pain assessments correlated with clinical pain outcomes after surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangesland, Anders; Støren, Carl; Vaegter, Henrik B.

    2017-01-01

    was to evaluate whether assessment of experimental pain processing including measures of central pain mechanisms prior to surgery was associated with pain intensity after surgery. Methods Systematic database searches in PubMed and EMBASE with the following search components: QST, association, and postoperative......Background Pain after surgery is not uncommon with 30% of patients reporting moderate to severe postoperative pain. Early identification of patients prone to postoperative pain may be a step forward towards individualized pain medicine providing a basis for improved clinical management through...... treatment strategies targeting relevant pain mechanisms in each patient. Assessment of pain processing by quantitative sensory testing (QST) prior to surgery has been proposed as a method to identify patients at risk for postoperative pain, although results have been conflicting. Since the last systematic...

  1. Single cell morphology of muscle in patients with chronic muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Bartels, E M; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1991-01-01

    In 119 patients referred with suspected fibromyalgia, biopsies from the quadriceps muscle were analyzed for "rubber band" morphology, and isokinetic quadriceps strength was measured. Eighty-four fulfilled the criteria for fibromyalgia, 26 had chronic myofascial pain (CMP) and 9 had other diseases...... to the biopsy score. "Rubber band" morphology is seen more often in fibromyalgia patients than in CMP patients. The exact genesis of this phenomenon is still unknown but theories connected with the possible pathogenesis of the syndrome are presented....

  2. Profound Muscle Weakness and Pain after One Dose of Actonel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Badayan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO defines osteopenia as a bone density between 1 and 2.5 standard deviation (SD below the bone density of a normal young adult Iqbal 2000. Osteoporosis is defined as 2.5 SD or more below that reference point Iqbal 2000. Bisphosphonates are a group of medications used to treat osteoporosis, Padget's disease of bone, and osteopenia. We report a woman who developed profound muscle weakness and pain after one dose of Risedronate (Actonel.

  3. Meta-analysis on brain representation of experimental dental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C-S; Niddam, D M; Hsu, M-L

    2014-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used for investigating the brain representation associated with dental pain evoked by pulpal electrical stimulation. However, because of the heterogeneity of experimental designs and the small sample size of individual studies, the common brain representation regarding dental pain has remained elusive. We used imaging meta-analysis to investigate six dental pain-related fMRI studies (n = 87) and tested 3 hypotheses: (1) Dental pain is associated with the 'core' pain-related network; (2) pain-related brain activation is somatotopically organized in the somatosensory cortex; and (3) dental pain is associated with the cognitive-affective network related to pain. Qualitative and quantitative meta-analyses revealed: (1) common activation of the core pain-related network, including the somatosensory cortex, the insula, and the cingulate cortex; (2) inconsistency in somatotopically organized activation of the primary somatosensory cortex; and (3) common activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, suggesting a role of re-appraisal and coping in the experience of dental pain. In conclusion, fMRI combined with pulpal stimulation can effectively evoke activity in the pain-related network. The dental pain-related brain representation disclosed the mechanisms of how sensory and cognitive-affective factors shape dental pain, which will help in the development of more effective customized methods for central pain control.

  4. Negative affect, pain and disability in osteoarthritis patients: the mediating role of muscle weakness.

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, J.; Tola, P; Aufdemkampe, G.; Winckers, M.

    1993-01-01

    Negative affect has been shown to be associated with high levels of pain and disability in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. As an explanation of this association, it was hypothesized that muscle weakness is a mediating factor between negative affect, pain and disability. Accordingly, negative affect enhances the patient's tendency to avoid pain-related activities; a low activity level induces muscle weakness, instability of joints and thus pain and disability. This theory leads to the prediction...

  5. Reorganised motor control strategies of trunk muscles due to acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, R P; Salomoni, S E; Christensen, S W; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed how the low back motor control strategies were affected by experimental pain. In twelve volunteers the right m. longissimus was injected by hypertonic and isotonic (control) saline. The pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects were seated on a custom-designed chair including a 3-dimensional force sensor adjusted to the segmental height of T1. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from longissimus, multifidus, rectus abdominis, and external oblique muscles. Isometric trunk extensions were performed before, during, and after the saline injections at 5%, 10%, and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction force. Visual feedback of the extension force was provided whereas the tangential force components were recorded. Compared with isotonic saline, VAS scores were higher following hypertonic saline injections (Plow back pain reduced the EMG activity bilaterally of the rectus abdominis muscles during contractions at 10% and 20% MVC (Ppain compared with the non-painful condition (Ppain was sufficient to maintain the quality of the task performance; however the long-term consequence of such adaptation is unknown and may overload other structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prediction of postoperative pain: a systematic review of predictive experimental pain studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads Utke; Mjöbo, Helena N; Nielsen, Per R

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative testing of a patient's basal pain perception before surgery has the potential to be of clinical value if it can accurately predict the magnitude of pain and requirement of analgesics after surgery. This review includes 14 studies that have investigated the correlation between...... preoperative responses to experimental pain stimuli and clinical postoperative pain and demonstrates that the preoperative pain tests may predict 4-54% of the variance in postoperative pain experience depending on the stimulation methods and the test paradigm used. The predictive strength is much higher than...

  7. Skeletal muscle damage: a study of isotope uptake, enzyme efflux and pain after stepping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newham, D J; Jones, D A; Tolfree, S E; Edwards, R H

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the occurrence of skeletal muscle uptake of 99mtechnetium pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP), creatine kinase (CK) release and muscle pain in normal subjects after exercise. Five subjects stepped on and off a high bench in such a way that one leg stepped up and the other down. Pain only developed in the muscles used for descending: quadriceps, adductors and gluteal muscles of one leg and the calf muscle of the other. A large rise in plasma CK occurred in four subjects but no increased Tc-PYP muscle uptake was seen in the quadriceps. In the four subjects with high CK effluxes, increased isotope uptake was seen in the thigh adductors used when stepping down; in the two subjects with the largest CK effluxes there was extensive uptake into the gluteal muscles. Muscle pain preceded and was not well correlated with either the magnitude of the enzyme release or the amount and distribution of increased muscle isotope uptake. We conclude that delayed onset muscle pain, the cause of which remains unknown, is a poor indicator of muscle damage as indicated by circulating muscle enzymes and muscle isotope uptake. Tc-PYP uptake by skeletal muscle can provide useful information about the localisation and time course of muscle damage.

  8. The effects of experimental knee pain on lower limb corticospinal and motor cortex excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, David Andrew; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Lewis, Gwyn Nancy; McNair, Peter John; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2015-08-12

    Notable weakness of the quadriceps muscles is typically observed as a consequence of knee joint arthritis, knee surgery and knee injury. This is partly due to ongoing neural inhibition that prevents the central nervous system from fully activating the quadriceps, a process known as arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI). To investigate the mechanisms underlying AMI, this study explored the effects of experimental knee pain on lower limb corticospinal and motor cortex excitability. Twenty-four healthy volunteers participated in this study. In experiment 1, experimental knee pain was induced by the injection of hypertonic saline into the infrapatellar fat pad (n = 18). In experiment 2, isotonic saline was injected into the fat pad as a non-painful control (n = 8). Pain intensity was measured on a 10-cm electronic visual analogue scale. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography were used to measure lower limb motor-evoked potential amplitude and short-interval intracortical inhibition before and after the injection. The peak VAS score following hypertonic saline (5.0 ± 0.5 cm) was higher than after isotonic saline (p 0.05). There was no change in short-interval intracortical inhibition measured from vastus lateralis following injection (both p >0.05). Quadriceps corticospinal excitability increases during experimental knee pain, providing no evidence for a supraspinal contribution to quadriceps AMI.

  9. Pain-evoked trunk muscle activity changes during fatigue and DOMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Muscle pain may reorganize trunk muscle activity but interactions with exercise-related muscle fatigue and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is to be clarified.METHODS:In 19 healthy participants, the trunk muscle activity during 20 multi-directional unpredictable surface perturbations...... were recorded after bilateral isotonic saline injections (control) and during unilateral and bilateral hypertonic saline-induced low back pain (LBP) in conditions of back muscle fatigue (Day-1) and DOMS (Day-2). Pain intensity and distribution were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) scores...... and pain drawings. The degree of fatigue and DOMS were assessed by Likert scale scores. Root-mean-square electromyographic (RMS-EMG) signals were recorded post-perturbation from six bilateral trunk muscles and the difference from baseline conditions (Delta-RMS-EMG) was extracted and averaged across...

  10. Manipulation of pain catastrophizing: An experimental study of healthy participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel E Bialosky

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Joel E Bialosky1*, Adam T Hirsh2,3, Michael E Robinson2,3, Steven Z George1,3*1Department of Physical Therapy; 2Department of Clinical and Health Psychology; 3Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Health, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USAAbstract: Pain catastrophizing is associated with the pain experience; however, causation has not been established. Studies which specifically manipulate catastrophizing are necessary to establish causation. The present study enrolled 100 healthy individuals. Participants were randomly assigned to repeat a positive, neutral, or one of three catastrophizing statements during a cold pressor task (CPT. Outcome measures of pain tolerance and pain intensity were recorded. No change was noted in catastrophizing immediately following the CPT (F(1,84 = 0.10, p = 0.75, partial η2 < 0.01 independent of group assignment (F(4,84 = 0.78, p = 0.54, partial η2 = 0.04. Pain tolerance (F(4 = 0.67, p = 0.62, partial η2 = 0.03 and pain intensity (F(4 = 0.73, p = 0.58, partial η2 = 0.03 did not differ by group. This study suggests catastrophizing may be difficult to manipulate through experimental pain procedures and repetition of specific catastrophizing statements was not sufficient to change levels of catastrophizing. Additionally, pain tolerance and pain intensity did not differ by group assignment. This study has implications for future studies attempting to experimentally manipulate pain catastrophizing.Keywords: pain, catastrophizing, experimental, cold pressor task, pain catastrophizing scale

  11. Botulinum toxin a injection of the obturator internus muscle for chronic perineal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajraj, Noor M

    2005-05-01

    Chronic perineal pain is often a difficult condition to manage. Current treatments include pudendal nerve injections and pudendal nerve release surgery. The obturator internus muscle has a close relationship to the pudendal nerve and might be a potential target for therapeutic intervention. A case is presented of refractory perineal pain that was successfully treated by injecting the obturator internus muscle with botulinum toxin A.

  12. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Hansen, Klaus; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults...... with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain....

  13. Trunk muscle recruitment patterns in patients with low back pain enhance the stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dieen, J.H.; Cholewicki, J.; Radebold, A.

    2003-01-01

    Study Design. A comparative study of trunk muscle recruitment patterns in healthy control subjects and patients with chronic low back pain was conducted. Objective. To assess trunk muscle recruitment in patients with low back pain. Summary of Background Data. Conflicting evidence has been reported

  14. Relationship between foot pain, muscle strength and size: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latey, Penelope J; Burns, Joshua; Hiller, Claire E; Nightingale, Elizabeth J

    2017-03-01

    Foot pain is common and disabling and thought to be associated with muscle weakness. Understanding the relationship between pain and weakness may help identify effective treatment targets. To conduct a systematic review to evaluate the relationship between foot pain and foot muscle weakness, or muscle size as a proxy for weakness. Electronic databases and reference lists were searched for all years to April 2015. Full-text articles were retrieved based on the question 'Does the study evaluate an association between foot pain and foot muscle weakness or size?' Two reviewers independently screened eligible studies, extracted data and completed a methodological rating. Eight studies were identified evaluating the relationship between foot pain and foot muscle strength (n=6) or size (n=2). Four studies reported a significant relationship between pain and toe flexor force. One study reported a significant relationship between heel pain and reduced forefoot muscle size. One study reported an inconsistent association depending on measurement technique. One study reported no association between pain and hindfoot muscle size. One study reported no association between low to moderate pain and toe flexion force. Due to data heterogeneity, no data were pooled for meta-analysis. There is evidence of a significant association between foot pain and muscle weakness when foot pain is of high intensity and primarily measured by toe flexion force. However there is inconsistent evidence that lower intensity foot pain is associated with other measures of foot muscle weakness or size. Systematic Research Registry ID reviewregistry166. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Can Fear, Pain, and Muscle Tension Discriminate Vaginismus from Dyspareunia/Provoked Vestibulodynia? Implications for the New DSM-5 Diagnosis of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaie, Marie-Andrée; Amsel, Rhonda; Khalifé, Samir; Boyer, Stephanie; Faaborg-Andersen, Marie; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2015-08-01

    Fear has been suggested as the crucial diagnostic variable that may distinguish vaginismus from dyspareunia. Unfortunately, this has not been systematically investigated. The primary purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate whether fear as evaluated by subjective, behavioral, and psychophysiological measures could differentiate women with vaginismus from those with dyspareunia/provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) and controls. A second aim was to re-examine whether genital pain and pelvic floor muscle tension differed between vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD sufferers. Fifty women with vaginismus, 50 women with dyspareunia/PVD, and 43 controls participated in an experimental session comprising a structured interview, pain sensitivity testing, a filmed gynecological examination, and several self-report measures. Results demonstrated that fear and vaginal muscle tension were significantly greater in the vaginismus group as compared to the dyspareunia/PVD and no-pain control groups. Moreover, behavioral measures of fear and vaginal muscle tension were found to discriminate the vaginismus group from the dyspareunia/PVD and no-pain control groups. Genital pain did not differ significantly between the vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD groups; however, genital pain was found to discriminate both clinical groups from controls. Despite significant statistical differences on fear and vaginal muscle tension variables between women suffering from vaginismus and dyspareunia/PVD, a large overlap was observed between these conditions. These findings may explain the great difficulty health professionals experience in attempting to reliably differentiate vaginismus from dyspareunia/PVD. The implications of these data for the new DSM-5 diagnosis of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder are discussed.

  16. Electromyographic biofeedback training for reducing muscle pain and tension on masseter and temporal muscles: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Fuente, Antonio; Heredia, Margarita; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Criado, José-María

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the absence of agreement about an effective unified treatment for temporomandibular disorders, non-invasive therapies such as EMG-biofeedback generate a greater interest. Furthermore, most studies to the present show methodological deficiencies that must be solved in the future, which makes important to emphasize this line of studies. Material and Methods Fourteen patients were selected for this case series study, and replied to a questionnaire concerning awareness of bruxism, painful muscles, and muscle tension. They also practiced an intraoral exploration (occlusal analysis and mandibular dynamics), and an extraoral exploration of the head and neck muscles and the temporomandibular joint. Before each session, patients responded to a questionnaire about the subjective perceived improvement. In each session, a period of three minutes of pre-biofeedback EMG activity of right masseter and temporal muscles was registered, then patients performed 30 iterations of visual EMG-biofeedback training and finally, a period of three minutes of post-EMG activity was also registered for those muscles. Patients performed four sessions. Results A decrease in painful symptoms was found for all patients since the first session. EMG activity decreases (p<0,05) in both muscles during the biofeedback training stage, in the four sessions. It is also observed a decrease (p<0,05) in EMG activity in the masseter muscle at the post-biofeedback stage, in the second and third sessions. There is likewise a decrease in EMG post-biofeedback activity of the temporal muscle (p<0,05) in sessions two, three, and four. Conclusions EMG-biofeedback training produces a decrease in EMG activity in both masseter and temporal muscles during the session. This decrease persists during the post-biofeedback period since the second session. Also there is a decrease in painful symptoms for all patients. Key words:Muscle tension, muscle pain, EMG-biofeedback, masseter muscle, temporal muscle

  17. Effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patellofemoral pain syndrome patients: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Thiago R. T.; Oliveira, Bárbara A.; Ocarino, Juliana M.; Holt, Kenneth G.; Fonseca, Sérgio T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is characterized by anterior knee pain, which may limit the performance of functional activities. The influence of hip joint motion on the development of this syndrome has already been documented in the literature. In this regard, studies have investigated the effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patients with PFPS. Objectives: The aims of this systematic review were (1) to summarize the literature related to the effects of hip muscle strengthening on pain intensity, muscle strength, and function in individuals with PFPS and (2) to evaluate the methodological quality of the selected studies. Method: A search for randomized controlled clinical trials was conducted using the following databases: Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PEDro, LILACS, and SciELO. The selected studies had to distinguish the effects of hip muscle strengthening in a group of patients with PFPS, as compared to non-intervention or other kinds of intervention, and had to investigate the following outcomes: pain, muscle strength, and function. The methodological quality of the selected studies was analyzed by means of the PEDro scale. Results: Seven studies were selected. These studies demonstrated that hip muscle strengthening was effective in reducing pain. However, the studies disagreed regarding the treatments' ability to improve muscle strength. Improvement in functional capabilities after hip muscle strengthening was found in five studies. Conclusion: Hip muscle strengthening is effective in reducing the intensity of pain and improving functional capabilities in patients with PFPS, despite the lack of evidence for its ability to increase muscle strength. PMID:26039034

  18. Effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patellofemoral pain syndrome patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago R. T. Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is characterized by anterior knee pain, which may limit the performance of functional activities. The influence of hip joint motion on the development of this syndrome has already been documented in the literature. In this regard, studies have investigated the effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patients with PFPS. Objectives: The aims of this systematic review were (1 to summarize the literature related to the effects of hip muscle strengthening on pain intensity, muscle strength, and function in individuals with PFPS and (2 to evaluate the methodological quality of the selected studies. Method: A search for randomized controlled clinical trials was conducted using the following databases: Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PEDro, LILACS, and SciELO. The selected studies had to distinguish the effects of hip muscle strengthening in a group of patients with PFPS, as compared to non-intervention or other kinds of intervention, and had to investigate the following outcomes: pain, muscle strength, and function. The methodological quality of the selected studies was analyzed by means of the PEDro scale. Results: Seven studies were selected. These studies demonstrated that hip muscle strengthening was effective in reducing pain. However, the studies disagreed regarding the treatments' ability to improve muscle strength. Improvement in functional capabilities after hip muscle strengthening was found in five studies. Conclusion: Hip muscle strengthening is effective in reducing the intensity of pain and improving functional capabilities in patients with PFPS, despite the lack of evidence for its ability to increase muscle strength.

  19. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanisms of Osteoarthritic Pain. Studies in Humans and Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Eitner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pain due to osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most frequent causes of chronic pain. However, the mechanisms of OA pain are poorly understood. This review addresses the mechanisms which are thought to be involved in OA pain, derived from studies on pain mechanisms in humans and in experimental models of OA. Three areas will be considered, namely local processes in the joint associated with OA pain, neuronal mechanisms involved in OA pain, and general factors which influence OA pain. Except the cartilage all structures of the joints are innervated by nociceptors. Although the hallmark of OA is the degradation of the cartilage, OA joints show multiple structural alterations of cartilage, bone and synovial tissue. In particular synovitis and bone marrow lesions have been proposed to determine OA pain whereas the contribution of the other pathologies to pain generation has been studied less. Concerning the peripheral neuronal mechanisms of OA pain, peripheral nociceptive sensitization was shown, and neuropathic mechanisms may be involved at some stages. Structural changes of joint innervation such as local loss and/or sprouting of nerve fibers were shown. In addition, central sensitization, reduction of descending inhibition, descending excitation and cortical atrophies were observed in OA. The combination of different neuronal mechanisms may define the particular pain phenotype in an OA patient. Among mediators involved in OA pain, nerve growth factor (NGF is in the focus because antibodies against NGF significantly reduce OA pain. Several studies show that neutralization of interleukin-1β and TNF may reduce OA pain. Many patients with OA exhibit comorbidities such as obesity, low grade systemic inflammation and diabetes mellitus. These comorbidities can significantly influence the course of OA, and pain research just began to study the significance of such factors in pain generation. In addition, psychologic and socioeconomic factors may aggravate

  1. Differential effects of repetitive oral administration of monosodium glutamate on interstitial glutamate concentration and muscle pain sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Akiko; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Castrillon, Eduardo; Ghafouri, Bijar; Stensson, Niclas; Gerdle, Björn; Ernberg, Malin; Cairns, Brian; Svensson, Peter; Svensson Odont, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship of high daily monosodium glutamate (MSG) consumption with glutamate concentrations in jaw muscle, saliva, and serum, and muscle pain sensitivity in healthy participants. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was conducted to investigate the effect of repetitive consumption of high-dose MSG on glutamate concentration in the masseter muscles measured by microdialysis and muscle pain sensitivity. In five contiguous experimental daily sessions, 32 healthy participants drank MSG (150 mg/kg) or NaCl (24 mg/kg) diluted with a 400 mL soda. The concentrations of glutamate before and after the ingestion were assessed in dialysate and plasma samples on the first and last days. Saliva glutamate concentration was assessed every day. Pressure pain threshold, pressure pain tolerance, autonomic parameters (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures) and reported side effects also were assessed. No significant change was noted in the baseline concentration of glutamate in the masseter muscle, blood, or saliva, but the peak concentration in the masseter muscle increased significantly between day 1 and 5. A statistically significant increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressures after MSG administration was observed, as well as a significantly higher frequency of reports of nausea and headache in the MSG group. No robust effect of MSG on muscle sensitivity was found. Interstitial glutamate concentration in the masseter muscle is not highly disturbed by excessive repetitive intake of MSG in healthy man. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of contraction rates of abdominal muscles of chronic low back pain patients in different postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Kim, Kang Hoon; Baek, Il-Hun; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2013-08-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the contraction rates of abdominal muscles in relation to the posture of chronic lumbar pain patients and normal subjects. [Subjects] The subjects were 17 chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients and 17 normal people between the ages of 20 and 59. [Methods] Experimental postures included a supine position, a sitting position, and a standing position. Measurements were taken at rest and during abdominal contraction. The measurement at rest was taken during expiration with comfortable breathing, and the measurement during contraction was taken at maximum expiration of forced expiration. Muscle contraction rates (on contraction and at relaxation) were calculated. [Results] There were significant differences between CLBP patients and normal subjects in the transversus abdominis (TrA) in the standing position. [Conclusion] Changes in contraction rates of the abdominal muscles of normal subjects and CLBP patients were examined in different postures at maximum expiration. It was found that the contraction rate of TrA in CLBP patients in a standing position, is significantly lower than that of normal subjects.

  3. Clinical effectiveness of the obturator externus muscle injection in chronic pelvic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hyung; Kim, Do Hyeong; Yoon, Duck Mi; Yoon, Kyung Bong

    2015-01-01

    Because of its anatomical location and function, the obturator externus (OE) muscle can be a source of pain; however, this muscle is understudied as a possible target for therapeutic intervention in pain practice. In this retrospective observational study, we evaluated the clinical effectiveness of the OE muscle injection with a local anesthetic in chronic pelvic pain patients with suspected OE muscle problems. Twenty-three patients with localized tenderness on the inferolateral side of the pubic tubercle accompanied by pain in the groin, anteromedial thigh, or hip were studied. After identifying the OE with contrast dye under fluoroscopic guidance, 5 to 8 mL of 0.3% lidocaine was injected. Pain scores were assessed before and after injection; patient satisfaction was also assessed. Mean pain score decreased by 44.7% (6.6 ± 1.8 to 3.5 ± 0.9, P pain score before injection. In addition, 82% of patients (19 of 23 patients) reported excellent or good satisfaction during 2 weeks after injection. No patients reported complications from OE muscle injection. Fluoroscopy-guided injection of the OE muscle with local anesthetic reduced pain scores and led to a high level of satisfaction at short-term follow-up in patients with suspected OE muscle problem. The results of this study suggest that OE muscle injection may be a valuable therapeutic option for a select group of chronic pelvic pain patients who present with localized tenderness in the OE muscle that is accompanied by groin, anteromedial thigh, or hip pain. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  4. Motor adaptations to local muscle pain during a bilateral cyclic task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brøchner Nielsen, Niels-Peter; Tucker, Kylie; Dorel, Sylvain; Guével, Arnaud; Hug, François

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how unilateral pain, induced in two knee extensor muscles, affects muscle coordination during a bilateral pedaling task. Fifteen participants performed a 4-min pedaling task at 130 W in two conditions (Baseline and Pain). Pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline into the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of one leg. Force applied throughout the pedaling cycle was measured using an instrumented pedal and used to calculate pedal power. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from eight muscles to assess changes in muscle activation strategies. Compared to Baseline, during the Pain condition, EMG amplitude of muscles of the painful leg (VL and VM-the painful muscles, and RF-another quadriceps muscle with no pain) was lower during the extension phase [(mean ± SD): VL: -22.5 ± 18.9%; P W, P = 0.001) during Pain compared to Baseline. This decrease was compensated for by an 11.3 ± 8.1 W increase in pedal power applied by the non-painful leg during its extension phase (P = 0.04). These results support pain adaptation theories, which suggest that when there is a clear opportunity to compensate, motor adaptations to pain occur to decrease load within the painful tissue. Although the pedaling task offered numerous possibilities for compensation, only between-leg compensations were systematically observed. This finding is discussed in relation to the mechanical and neural constraints of the pedaling task.

  5. Effect of contrasting physical exercise interventions on rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Jesper L; Suetta, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    torque increased 18-29% (P muscle fibers hypertrophied 20% (P muscles is highly responsive......Rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles is inhibited markedly more than maximal force capacity and is therefore relevant to assess in rehabilitation settings. Our objective was to investigate the effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on rapid force capacity, as well...... as neural and muscular adaptations in women with chronic neck muscle pain. A group of employed women (n = 42) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia participated in a 10-wk randomized controlled trial; specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles, general fitness training performed as leg...

  6. Experimental and modelling evidence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kenneth; Han, June-Chiew; Crampin, Edmund John; Taberner, Andrew James; Loiselle, Denis Scott

    2017-10-01

    Heat associated with muscle shortening has been repeatedly demonstrated in skeletal muscle, but its existence in cardiac muscle remains contentious after five decades of study. By iterating between experiments and computational modelling, we show compelling evidence for the existence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle and reveal, mechanistically, the source of this excess heat. Our results clarify a long-standing uncertainty in the field of cardiac muscle energetics. We provide a revised partitioning of cardiac muscle energy expenditure to include this newly revealed thermal component. When a muscle shortens against an afterload, the heat that it liberates is greater than that produced by the same muscle contracting isometrically at the same level of force. This excess heat is defined as 'shortening heat', and has been repeatedly demonstrated in skeletal muscle but not in cardiac muscle. Given the micro-structural similarities between these two muscle types, and since we imagine that shortening heat is the thermal accompaniment of cross-bridge cycling, we have re-examined this issue. Using our flow-through microcalorimeter, we measured force and heat generated by isolated rat trabeculae undergoing isometric contractions at different muscle lengths and work-loop (shortening) contractions at different afterloads. We simulated these experimental protocols using a thermodynamically constrained model of cross-bridge cycling and probed the mechanisms underpinning shortening heat. Predictions generated by the model were subsequently validated by a further set of experiments. Both our experimental and modelling results show convincing evidence for the existence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle. Its magnitude is inversely related to the afterload or, equivalently, directly related to the extent of shortening. Computational simulations reveal that the heat of shortening arises from the cycling of cross-bridges, and that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is more sensitive to

  7. Analysis of scapular muscle EMG activity in patients with idiopathic neck pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Bostyn, Emma; Delemarre, Jolien; Lemahieu, Trees; Cagnie, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    It is proposed that altered scapular muscle function can contribute to abnormal loading of the cervical spine. However, it is not clear if patients with idiopathic neck pain show altered activity of the scapular muscles. The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature regarding the differences or similarities in scapular muscle activity, measured by electromyography ( = EMG), between patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain compared to pain-free controls. Case-control (neck pain/healthy) studies investigating scapular muscle EMG activity (amplitude, timing and fatigue parameters) were searched in Pubmed and Web of Science. 25 articles were included in the systematic review. During rest and activities below shoulder height, no clear differences in mean Upper Trapezius ( = UT) EMG activity exist between patients with idiopathic neck pain and a healthy control group. During overhead activities, no conclusion for scapular EMG amplitude can be drawn as a large variation of results were reported. Adaptation strategies during overhead tasks are not the same between studies. Only one study investigated timing of the scapular muscles and found a delayed onset and shorter duration of the SA during elevation in patients with idiopathic neck pain. For scapular muscle fatigue, no definite conclusions can be made as a wide variation and conflicting results are reported. Further high quality EMG research on scapular muscles (broader than the UT) is necessary to understand/draw conclusions on how scapular muscles react in the presence of idiopathic neck pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dry needling of the trapezius muscle in office workers with neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo-Téllez, Ester; Lacomba, María Torres; Fuentes-Gallardo, Isabel; Mayoral Del Moral, Orlando; Rodrigo-Medina, Beatriz; Gutiérrez Ortega, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Neck pain is a frequent complaint in office workers. This pain can be caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the trapezius muscle. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of deep dry needling (DDN) of active MTrPs in the trapezius muscle. A randomized, single blinded clinical trial was carried out at the Physical Therapy Department at Physiotherapy in Women's Health Research Group at Physical Therapy Department of University of Alcalá, in Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. Forty-four office workers with neck pain and active MTrPs in the trapezius muscle were randomly allocated to either the DDN or the control group (CG). The participants in the DDN group were treated with DDN of all MTrPs found in the trapezius muscle. They also received passive stretch of the trapezius muscle. The CG received the same passive stretch of the trapezius muscle only. The primary outcome measure was subjective pain intensity, measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes were pressure pain threshold (PPT), cervical range of motion (CROM) and muscle strength. Data were collected at baseline, after interventions and 15 days after the last treatment. Differences were found between the DDN group and the CG for the VAS (P stretch seems to be more effective than passive stretch only. The effects are maintained in the short term. The results support the use of DDN in the management of trapezius muscle myofascial pain syndrome in neck pain.

  9. Rehabilitative ultrasound measurement of trapezius muscle contractile states in people with mild shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Cliona; McCarthy Persson, Ulrik; Blake, Catherine; Stokes, Maria

    2012-04-01

    The utility of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) for assessing trapezius muscle contractile characteristics was investigated by examining whether muscle thickness changes during contraction (CT) differed between people with and without mild shoulder pain. In 18 subjects with mild shoulder pain (aged 28±8 years) and 18 matched controls, trapezius muscle thickness change was measured in prone at rest at 0° and during isometric CTs at 90° and 120° of shoulder abduction. Images were taken at four sites using a real-time ultrasound scanner (7-MHz linear transducer, 40 mm footprint). Percentage change in muscle thickness from rest was calculated. Differences between painful and non-painful shoulders and participant groups were examined by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t-tests. There were no significant differences between groups or sides in trapezius muscle thickness change during CT. There was no significant difference in trapezius muscle resting thickness (RT) between painful and non-painful shoulders in the same subjects. Contractile ability of the trapezius muscle, assessed using RUSI was not impaired in subjects with mild shoulder pain during the test manoeuvres used. Further research is warranted involving patients with different severity of symptoms, using other test manoeuvres before RUSI can be advocated for assessing scapular muscle dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Translational pain research: evaluating analgesic effect in experimental visceral pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2009-01-01

    facilitate minimizing the gap between knowledge gained in animal and human clinical studies. Combining experimental pain studies and pharmacokinetic studies can improve understanding of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of analgesics and, thus, provide valuable insight into optimal clinical...... analgesics in detail. In combination with pharmacokinetic studies and objective assessment such as electroencephalography, new information regarding a given drug substance and its effects can be obtained. Results from experimental human visceral pain research can bridge the gap in knowledge between animal......Deep visceral pain is frequent and presents major challenges in pain management, since its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. One way to optimize treatment of visceral pain is to improve knowledge of the mechanisms behind the pain and the mode of action of analgesic substances. This can...

  11. Effect of physical training on pain sensitivity and trapezius muscle morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed; Andersen, Lars L; Olsen, Henrik B

    2010-01-01

    activation. After 10 weeks, increased shoulder torque and PPT of the painful trapezius were observed in SST solely. The PPT of a pain-free reference muscle was increased in response to both SST and GFT, indicating a general effect of physical activity on pain perception. This study shows clinically relevant...

  12. Association between muscle trigger points, ongoing pain, function, and sleep quality in elderly women with bilateral painful knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alburquerque-García, Anabel; Rodrigues-de-Souza, Daiana P; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate if referred pain elicited by active trigger points (TrPs) reproduced the symptoms in individuals with painful knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to determine the relationship between the presence of active TrPs, intensity of ongoing pain, function, quality of life, and sleep quality in individuals with painful knee OA. Eighteen women with bilateral painful knee OA, aged 79 to 90 years, and 18 matched controls participated. Muscle TrPs were bilaterally explored in several muscles of the lower extremity. Trigger points were considered active if the elicited referred pain reproduced knee symptoms, and TrPs were considered latent if the elicited pain did not reproduce symptoms. Pain was collected with a numerical pain rate scale (0-10), function was assessed with Western Ontario and McMaster Universities, quality of life was assessed with the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 questionnaire, and sleep quality was determined with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Women with knee OA exhibited a greater number of active TrPs (mean, 1 ± 1; P latent TrPs (mean, 4 ± 2) than healthy women (mean, 4 ± 3; P = .613). A greater number of active TrPs were associated with higher intensity of ongoing pain (r = 0.605; P = .007). Higher intensity of ongoing knee pain was associated with lower physical function (P active TrPs in the lower extremity muscles contributed to pain symptoms in painful knee OA. A higher number of active TrPs was associated with higher intensity of ongoing knee pain. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender bias in the observation of experimental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael E; Wise, Emily A

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how men and women observe experimentally induced pain in male and female participants and to specifically determine the accuracy of observed pain ratings, the possible interactions between the sex of the viewer and the sex of the individual being observed, and the influence of gender role expectations on observed pain ratings. The sample comprised 29 participants (15 females). They each completed a battery of psychological questionnaires and viewed a presentation of 10 randomly ordered video clips. Each presentation consisted of 10 video clips, lasting 30s, of a participant (five males and five females) in the cold pressor task. The participants viewing the videos were asked to provide several ratings, including observed pain intensity and gender role related characteristics of the individual in the video. In terms of sex of the video participant, results indicated that viewers rated male videos as having less pain than female videos although the effect was small. Regarding sex of the viewer, results indicated that for both male and female videos, female viewers rated observed pain intensity significantly higher than did male viewers. In terms of accuracy, results indicated that on average, female video participants' pain was underestimated by 14 points, while male videos participants' pain was underestimated by 22 points (on a 0-100-point scale). Pain intensity ratings and pain tolerance from the participants in the videos did not differ significantly with respect to sex, though women had shorter tolerance times and higher pain ratings than men. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that expectations of gender related 'endurance of pain' significantly predicted ratings of both male and female videos. When endurance expectations were controlled, sex of the viewer no longer significantly predicted observed pain ratings. The 'willingness to report pain' variable was not a significant predictor of observed pain ratings. Our

  14. Fatty muscle atrophy: prevalence in the hindfoot muscles on MR images of asymptomatic volunteers and patients with foot pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Daniel T; Hodler, Juerg; Mengiardi, Bernard; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Espinosa, Norman; Zanetti, Marco

    2009-10-01

    To determine prevalence and degree of fatty muscle atrophy in plantar foot muscles in asymptomatic volunteers and in patients with foot pain. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. The prevalence and degree of fatty muscle atrophy were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in the abductor digiti minimi (ADM), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB), abductor hallucis (AH), and quadratus plantae (QP) muscles in 80 asymptomatic volunteers (mean age, 48 years; range, 23-84 years) and 80 patients with foot pain (mean age, 48 years; range, 20-86 years). Muscles were characterized as normal (grade 0) or as having mild (grade 1) or substantial (grade 2) fatty atrophy by two readers separately. Results of visual grading for both readers were compared by using the Mann-Whitney test. Associations between age and degree of fatty muscle atrophy were assessed by using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Readers 1 and 2 found substantial fatty atrophy of the ADM muscle in four (5%) and five (6%) volunteers, respectively, and in three (4%) and nine (11%) patients, respectively. One reader diagnosed substantial fatty atrophy of the AH muscle in three (4%) volunteers and of the FDB muscle in two (2%) volunteers. Prevalence for the QP muscle varied between 0% and 1%. An association between age and degree of fatty atrophy of the ADM muscle was found for volunteers by both readers and for patients by reader 1 (P muscle atrophy of the ADM muscle-classically considered to represent entrapment neuropathy-is between 4% and 11% in both asymptomatic volunteers and patients with foot pain, and it increases with age.

  15. Muscle pain induced by static contraction in rats is modulated by peripheral inflammatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Diogo Francisco da Silva Dos; Melo Aquino, Bruna de; Jorge, Carolina Ocanha; Azambuja, Graciana de; Schiavuzzo, Jalile Garcia; Krimon, Suzy; Neves, Juliana Dos Santos; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Oliveira-Fusaro, Maria Claudia Gonçalves

    2017-09-01

    Muscle pain is an important health issue and frequently related to static force exertion. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether peripheral inflammatory mechanisms are involved with static contraction-induced muscle pain in rats. To this end, we developed a model of muscle pain induced by static contraction performed by applying electrical pulses through electrodes inserted into muscle. We also evaluated the involvement of neutrophil migration, bradykinin, sympathetic amines and prostanoids. A single session of sustained static contraction of gastrocnemius muscle induced acute mechanical muscle hyperalgesia without affecting locomotor activity and with no evidence of structural damage in muscle tissue. Static contraction increased levels of creatine kinase but not lactate dehydrogenase, and induced neutrophil migration. Dexamethasone (glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory agent), DALBK (bradykinin B1 antagonist), Atenolol (β1 adrenoceptor antagonist), ICI 118,551 (β2 adrenoceptor antagonist), indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), and fucoidan (non-specific selectin inhibitor) all reduced static contraction-induced muscle hyperalgesia; however, the bradykinin B2 antagonist, bradyzide, did not have an effect on static contraction-induced muscle hyperalgesia. Furthermore, an increased hyperalgesic response was observed when the selective bradykinin B1 agonist des-Arg9-bradykinin was injected into the previously stimulated muscle. Together, these findings demonstrate that static contraction induced mechanical muscle hyperalgesia in gastrocnemius muscle of rats is modulated through peripheral inflammatory mechanisms that are dependent on neutrophil migration, bradykinin, sympathetic amines and prostanoids. Considering the clinical relevance of muscle pain, we propose the present model of static contraction-induced mechanical muscle hyperalgesia as a useful tool for the study of mechanisms underlying static contraction-induced muscle pain. Copyright © 2017 IBRO

  16. Topographical mapping and mechanical pain sensitivity of myofascial trigger points in the infraspinatus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hong-You; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Madeleine, Pascal; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2008-10-01

    To screen for the presence of latent and active myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in patients with unilateral shoulder and arm pain and perform topographical mapping of mechanical pain sensitivity bilaterally in the infraspinatus muscles. Nineteen patients with unilateral musculoskeletal shoulder pain participated in the study. The area overlying the infraspinatus on each side was divided into 10 adjacent sub-areas of 1cm(2), corresponding to the area of a pressure algometer probe. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured in each sub-area bilaterally in the infraspinatus muscles. Following PPT measurement, an acupuncture needle was inserted into each sub-area five times in different directions in order to induce local twitch response and/or referred pain. A significantly lower PPT level in the infraspinatus muscle was detected on the painful side compared with the non-painful side (P=0.001). PPT at midfiber region of the infraspinatus muscles was lower than that at other muscle parts (Pactive MTrPs were found in the infraspinatus muscle on the painful side and there were also multiple latent MTrPs bilaterally in the infraspinatus muscles. PPT at active MTrPs was much lower than the latent MTrPs and again lower than the non-MTrPs. There exists bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia in patients with unilateral shoulder pain. Further, the association of multiple active MTrPs with unilateral shoulder pain and the heterogeneity of mechanical pain sensitivity distribution suggest a crucial role of peripheral sensitization in chronic myofascial pain conditions. Additionally, the locations of MTrPs identified with dry needling correspond well to PPT topographical mapping, suggesting that dry needling and PPT topographical mapping are sensitive techniques in the identification of MTrPs.

  17. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on Pain Threshold and Effectiveness of Footballers’ Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworska Lilianna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Relaxing in the athlete’s training process is underutilized. Relaxation techniques, however, should be taught from the very beginning of the footballer’s training career. The main aim of this study was to present the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on pressure pain threshold levels and the effectiveness of the footballer’s training. Methods. A sample of 32 football players participated in the therapeutic program consisting of 8 PMR sessions. Before and after applying a pressure therapy, the pain threshold in the lumbar region was measured by a dolorimeter and the Cooper test was carried out to determine the footballers’ level of endurance. Results. PMR training did not increase significantly the pain threshold level in the experimental group (p > 0.05, but it increased significantly the distance covered in the Cooper test (p = 0.04. Analysis of the Spearman rank correlation was also carried out (p = 0.81. Conclusions. PMR does not lower pain perception threshold. PMR therapy increases the distance measured by the Cooper test. In order to determine the role of PMR in injury prevention, further research is necessary.

  18. The influence of working memory capacity on experimental heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Aya; Endo, Kaori; Adachi, Tomonori; Ikeda, Takashi; Hagihira, Satoshi; Mashimo, Takashi; Osaka, Mariko

    2013-10-01

    Pain processing and attention have a bidirectional interaction that depends upon one's relative ability to use limited-capacity resources. However, correlations between the size of limited-capacity resources and pain have not been evaluated. Working memory capacity, which is a cognitive resource, can be measured using the reading span task (RST). In this study, we hypothesized that an individual's potential working memory capacity and subjective pain intensity are related. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated 31 healthy participants' potential working memory capacity using the RST, and then applied continuous experimental heat stimulation using the listening span test (LST), which is a modified version of the RST. Subjective pain intensities were significantly lower during the challenging parts of the RST. The pain intensity under conditions where memorizing tasks were performed was compared with that under the control condition, and it showed a correlation with potential working memory capacity. These results indicate that working memory capacity reflects the ability to process information, including precise evaluations of changes in pain perception. In this work, we present data suggesting that changes in subjective pain intensity are related, depending upon individual potential working memory capacities. Individual working memory capacity may be a phenotype that reflects sensitivity to changes in pain perception. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of interferential therapy parameter combinations upon experimentally induced pain in pain-free participants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounavi, Myrto D; Chesterton, Linda S; Sim, Julius

    2012-07-01

    Little evidence exists regarding parameter selection for hypoalgesia using interferential therapy (IFT). This study investigated segmental and extrasegmental hypoalgesic effects of different IFT parameter combinations upon experimentally induced pressure pain threshold (PPT) in pain-free volunteers. The participants were randomly assigned to 6 groups: control, placebo, bipolar constant amplitude modulation frequency (AMF), bipolar sweep AMF, quadripolar constant AMF, and quadripolar sweep AMF. The study was conducted in a university laboratory. One hundred eighty adults who were healthy and pain-free participated in the study. Interferential therapy was delivered to all groups at high, to-tolerance intensity and at high AMF. Stimulation to the dominant forearm was delivered for 30 minutes, with monitoring for a further 30 minutes. Pain pressure threshold was measured at the area of first dorsal interosseous muscle of the dominant and nondominant hands (segmental measurements) and over the tibialis anterior muscle (extrasegmental measurement) at baseline and at 10-minute intervals using a pressure algometer. Square root transformed PPT data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance. There was a significant change in PPT over time, but no significant between-subjects difference in segmental or extrasegmental PPT between any of the IFT groups and the placebo or control group. Thus, IFT delivered in any of these parameter combinations did not significantly affect the PPT of pain-free participants compared with the control or placebo group. Success of blinding was not evaluated. This study showed that IFT delivered at high, to-tolerance intensity and high AMF does not produce significant segmental and extrasegmental hypoalgesic effects on PPT in participants who were healthy compared with a control or placebo group. Further research is warranted to investigate the hypoalgesic effect of different IFT parameter combinations and to explain its possible

  20. Electromyographic biofeedback training for reducing muscle pain and tension on masseter and temporal muscles: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Laura; de La Fuente, Antonio; Heredia, Margarita; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Criado, José-María

    2016-12-01

    Due to the absence of agreement about an effective unified treatment for temporomandibular disorders, non-invasive therapies such as EMG-biofeedback generate a greater interest. Furthermore, most studies to the present show methodological deficiencies that must be solved in the future, which makes important to emphasize this line of studies. Fourteen patients were selected for this case series study, and replied to a questionnaire concerning awareness of bruxism, painful muscles, and muscle tension. They also practiced an intraoral exploration (occlusal analysis and mandibular dynamics), and an extraoral exploration of the head and neck muscles and the temporomandibular joint. Before each session, patients responded to a questionnaire about the subjective perceived improvement. In each session, a period of three minutes of pre-biofeedback EMG activity of right masseter and temporal muscles was registered, then patients performed 30 iterations of visual EMG-biofeedback training and finally, a period of three minutes of post-EMG activity was also registered for those muscles. Patients performed four sessions. A decrease in painful symptoms was found for all patients since the first session. EMG activity decreases (pmuscles during the biofeedback training stage, in the four sessions. It is also observed a decrease (pmuscle at the post-biofeedback stage, in the second and third sessions. There is likewise a decrease in EMG post-biofeedback activity of the temporal muscle (pmuscles during the session. This decrease persists during the post-biofeedback period since the second session. Also there is a decrease in painful symptoms for all patients. Key words:Muscle tension, muscle pain, EMG-biofeedback, masseter muscle, temporal muscle.

  1. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-10-01

    A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes.

  2. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P < 0.05). Playing-related neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing.

  3. Association between Neck/Shoulder Pain and Trapezius Muscle Tenderness in Office Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Mikkel; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.

    2014-01-01

    the previous three months on a scale of 0–10 and palpable tenderness of the upper trapezius muscle on a scale of “no tenderness,” “some tenderness,” or “severe tenderness.” Odds ratios for tenderness as a function of neck/shoulder pain intensity were determined using cumulative logistic regression controlled......Background. Neck/shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder among adults.The pain is often assumed to be related to muscular tenderness rather than serious chronic disease. Aim. To determine the association between neck/shoulder pain intensity and trapezius muscle tenderness in office...... interval 1.70 to 2.04). Conclusion. In office workers, a strong association between perceived neck/shoulder pain intensity and trapeziusmuscle tenderness exists.The present study provides reference values of pain intensity among office workers with no, some, and severe tenderness of the trapezius muscle....

  4. The effect of inspiratory muscles fatigue on postural control in persons with and without recurrent low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Janssens, Lotte; Brumagne, Simon; Polspoel, Kathelijn; Troosters, Thierry; McConnell, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Study Design. A two-group experimental design. Objective. To determine postural stability and proprioceptive postural control strategies of healthy subjects and subjects with recurrent low back pain (LBP) during acute inspiratory muscles fatigue (IMF). Summary of Background Data. People with LBP use a more rigid proprioceptive postural control strategy than control subjects during postural perturbations. Recent evidence suggests that respiratory movements create postural instability i...

  5. Tinnitus and its relationship with muscle tenderness in patients with headache and facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzoli, M; Ugolini, A; Rota, E; Ferrero, L; Milani, C; Pezzoli, L; Pecorari, G; Mongini, F

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to examine tinnitus prevalence in patients with different types of headache and the relationship between tinnitus and the pericranial muscle tenderness and cervical muscle tenderness scores. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 1251 patients with migraine and/or myogenous pain, arthrogenous temporomandibular joint disorders and tension-type headache. Standardised palpation of the pericranial and cervical muscles was carried out and univariable and multivariable analysis was used to measure the odds ratio of suffering tinnitus by the different diagnoses and muscular tenderness grade. A univariable analysis showed that myogenous pain, pericranial muscle tenderness and cervical muscle tenderness scores, sex, and age were associated with tinnitus. When a multivariable model including only age, sex and a headache diagnosis was used, myogenous pain, migraine and age were found to be associated with tinnitus. When muscle tenderness scores were also included, only the cervical muscle tenderness and pericranial muscle tenderness scores were found to be significantly associated with tinnitus. In a population of patients with headache and craniofacial pain, tinnitus was related to increased cervical muscle tenderness and pericranial muscle tenderness scores, rather than to any particular form of headache.

  6. Stretch Injuries of Skeletal Muscles: Experimental Study in Rats` Soleus Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    PACHIONI, Celia Aparecida Stellutti; Mazzer, Nilton; Barbieri, Claudio Henrique; Camargo, Marcela Regina de [UNESP; Fregonesi, Cristina Elena Prado Teles [UNESP; Carmo, Edna Maria do; NOZABIELLI, Andrea Jeanne Lourenco; Martinelli, Alessandra Rezende

    2009-01-01

    The study aimed to verify the physiological injury behavior by stretching the soleus muscle of rats, using a noninvasive experimental model. Twenty-four rats were used and divided into three groups of eight animals: control group (A), group that performed tetanus followed by electrical stimulation and a sudden dorsiflexion of the left paw performed by a device equipped with a mechanism of muscle soleus rapid stretching (B); and a group that only received the tetanus (C). Three days later, the...

  7. Relationships among head posture, pain intensity, disability and deep cervical flexor muscle performance in subjects with postural neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun V. Subbarayalu, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Information Technology (IT professionals working with computers gradually develop forward head posture and, as a result, these professionals are susceptible to several neck disorders. This study intended to reveal the relationships between pain intensity, disability, head posture and deep cervical flexor (DCF muscle performance in patients with postural neck pain. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 84 IT professionals who were diagnosed with postural neck pain. The participants were recruited with a random sampling approach. A Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ, the Modified Head Posture Spinal Curvature Instrument (MHPSCI, and the Stabilizer Pressure Biofeedback Unit were used to measure neck pain intensity, neck disability, head posture, and DCF muscle performance, respectively. Results: The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a significantly strong positive relationship between the VAS and the NPQ (r = 0.734. The cranio-vertebral (CV angle was found to have a significantly negative correlation with the VAS (r = −0.536 and a weak negative correlation with the NPQ (r = −0.389. Conclusion: This study concluded that a smaller CV angle corresponded to greater neck pain intensity and disability. Furthermore, there is no significant relationship between CV angle and DCF muscle performance, indicating that head posture re-education through postural correction exercises would not completely correct the motor control deficits in DCF muscles. In addition, a suitable exercise regimen that exclusively targets the deep cervical flexor muscle to improve its endurance is warranted. Keywords: Craniovertebral angle, Disability deep cervical flexors muscle performance, Head posture, Postural neck pain

  8. Size and symmetry of trunk muscles in ballet dancers with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Jan E; Hides, Julie A; Hodges, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    Cross-sectional, observational study. To investigate the cross-sectional area (CSA) of trunk muscles in professional ballet dancers with and without low back pain (LBP). LBP is the most prevalent chronic injury in classical ballet dancers. Research on nondancers has found changes in trunk muscle size and symmetry to be associated with LBP. There are no studies that examine these changes in ballet dancers. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 14 male and 17 female dancers. The CSAs of 4 muscles (multifidus, lumbar erector spinae, psoas, and quadratus lumborum) were measured and compared among 3 groups of dancers: those without LBP or hip pain (n = 8), those with LBP only (n = 13), and those with both hip-region pain and LBP (n = 10). Dancers with no pain had larger multifidus muscles compared to those with LBP at L3-5 (Phip-region pain and LBP at L3 and L4 on the right side (Phip-region pain and LBP compared to those with LBP only (P.05). The CSAs of the other muscles did not differ between groups. The psoas (Pballet dancers, LBP and hip-region pain and LBP are associated with a smaller CSA of the multifidus but not the erector spinae, psoas, or quadratus lumborum muscles.

  9. Assessment of Muscle Pain Induced by Elbow-Flexor Eccentric Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J; Newton, Michael J; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-11-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common muscle pain that many people experience and is often used as a model of acute muscle pain. Researchers have reported the effects of various interventions on DOMS, but different DOMS assessment protocols used in these studies make it difficult to compare the effects. To investigate DOMS characteristics after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise to establish a standardized DOMS assessment protocol. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Ten healthy, untrained men (21-39 years). Participants performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Indirect muscle-damage markers were maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, and serum creatine kinase activity. Muscle pain was assessed before exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 to 5 days postexercise using (1) a visual analog scale (VAS), (2) a category ratio-10 scale (CR-10) when applying static pressure and palpation at different sites (3, 9, and 15 cm above the elbow crease), and (3) pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) at 50 sites (pain mapping). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and range of motion decreased and creatine kinase activity increased postexercise, indicating muscle damage. Palpation induced greater pain than static pressure, and longitudinal and transverse palpations induced greater pain than circular palpation (P muscles are assessed affects the pain level score. This finding suggests that pain level and pain threshold cannot be used interchangeably and that the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii should be included in DOMS assessment using the VAS, CR-10 scale, and PPT after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise.

  10. Pain by Association? Experimental Modulation of Human Pain Thresholds Using Classical Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Victoria J; Bellan, Valeria; Russek, Leslie N; Camfferman, Danny; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-10-01

    A classical conditioning framework is often used for clinical reasoning about pain that persists after tissue healing. However, experimental studies demonstrating classically conditioned pain in humans are lacking. The current study tested whether non-nociceptive somatosensory stimuli can come to modulate pain thresholds after being paired with painful nociceptive stimuli in healthy humans. We used a differential simultaneous conditioning paradigm in which one nonpainful vibrotactile conditioned stimulus (CS(+)) was simultaneously paired with an unconditioned painful laser stimulus, and another vibrotactile stimulus (CS(-)) was paired with a nonpainful laser stimulus. After acquisition, at-pain-threshold laser stimuli were delivered simultaneously with a CS(+) or CS(-) vibrotactile stimulus. The primary outcome was the percentage of at-threshold laser stimuli that were reported as painful. The results were as expected: after conditioning, at-threshold laser trials paired with the CS(+) were reported as painful more often, as more intense, and as more unpleasant than those paired with the CS(-). This study provides new evidence that pain thresholds can be modulated via classical conditioning, even when the stimulus used to test the threshold cannot be anticipated. As such, it lays a critical foundation for further investigations of classical conditioning as a possible driver of persistent pain. This study provides new evidence that human pain thresholds can be influenced by non-nociceptive somatosensory stimuli, via a classical conditioning effect. As such, it lays a critical foundation for further investigations of classical conditioning as a possible driver of persistent pain. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bilateral bony fusion around the supraspinatus muscle inducing muscle hypoplasia and shoulder pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, YeNa; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Department of Radiology, 892, Dongnam-ro, Gangdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 23 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We describe the case of a 30-year-old man who developed chronic bilateral shoulder pain that relapsed and remitted over the course of 1 year. The patient was diagnosed with congenital shoulder fusion anomalies. The right shoulder showed anomalous accessory articulation between the distal third of the clavicle and the acromion along with normal articulation of the shoulder on CT. At the left shoulder, bony fusions were present between the distal portion of the clavicle, the acromion, and the coracoid process, and between the coracoid process, upper portion of the glenoid, and upper body of the scapula, which formed a bony canal and was responsible for hypoplasia of the supraspinatus muscle on CT and MRI. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such congenital shoulder anomalies with extreme bony fusion and is an illustrative example of how imaging may be used to differentiate fusion from other congenital abnormalities of the shoulder to aid diagnosis. (orig.)

  12. The reliability of assessing sternocleidomastoid muscle length and strength in adults with and without mild neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulka, Michael T; Herren, Jessica; Kilian, Anne; Smith, Steven; Mahmutovic, Fatima; Dolles, Courtney

    2017-04-01

    The sternocleidomastoid (SCM) is an important cervical spine muscle. Weakness of the SCM muscle has been implicated with cervical problems. No studies have examined the reliability of assessing the SCM muscle length or strength. Also no studies exist that have looked to see if imbalances in SCM muscle length or strength exists between the left and right sides in those with and without neck pain. To determine the reliability of assessing the SCM muscle for length and strength and to see if SCM length could predict SCM strength in those with and without neck pain. Cross-sectional study. Fifty-one subjects with and without mild neck pain. Intratester reliability was assessed for SCM muscle length and SCM muscle strength. Differences in SCM length and strength were examined in those with and without neck pain. Intratester reliability was shown to be excellent (ICC (2,2) > 0.90) for the left and right SCM when assessing muscle length and muscle strength for those with and without neck pain. No differences were noted when comparing left to right SCM between those with and without neck pain regarding muscle length or muscle strength. Neither regression models were able to predict SCM muscle strength from SCM muscle length. SCM muscle length and SCM strength can be reliably assessed using a bubble goniometer and HHD. No differences were found when comparing left to right SCM muscle length or strength in those with or without mild neck pain.

  13. The effects of core muscle release technique on lumbar spine deformation and low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myounggi; Song, Changho; Jo, Younggwan; Ha, Donghun; Han, Dongwook

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the core muscle release technique on correction of lumbar deformation and alleviation of low back pain. [Subjects] Ninety patients diagnosed with lumbar deformation and low back pain participated in this study. [Methods] The participants were divided into three groups according to method of treatment. The first group was treated with the core muscle release technique (CRT), the second group was treated with general exercise, and the third group was treated with electrotherapy. The core muscle release technique group received 50-minute of the core muscle release technique 5 times a week for 2 weeks, and the participants in this group were instructed not to receive any other treatments. After the 2 weeks of treatment, the patients were reexamined. The general exercise group performed Williams flexion exercises and McKenzie extension exercises 5 times a week for 2 weeks. The electrotherapy group was treated by application of electrotherapy with an interferential current therapy machine (TM-301. TOPMED. Seongnam, Republic of Korea) to the abdominal muscles and back muscles of the lumbar region. [Results] The data suggest that the core muscle release technique, general exercise, and electrotherapy all helped to decrease the alignment angle and VAS score. Of these treatment methods, however, the core muscle release technique was the most effective for treatment of lumbar spine deformation and low back pain. [Conclusion] The core muscle release technique was most effective for correction of lumbar spine deformation and pain alleviation.

  14. Effect of contrasting physical exercise interventions on rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Jesper L; Suetta, Charlotte; Kjaer, Michael; Søgaard, Karen; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2009-11-01

    Rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles is inhibited markedly more than maximal force capacity and is therefore relevant to assess in rehabilitation settings. Our objective was to investigate the effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on rapid force capacity, as well as neural and muscular adaptations in women with chronic neck muscle pain. A group of employed women (n = 42) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia participated in a 10-wk randomized controlled trial; specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles, general fitness training performed as leg-bicycling; or a reference intervention without physical activity. Maximal voluntary shoulder abductions were performed at static angles of 35 degrees and 115 degrees with simultaneous recording of electromyography (EMG) in the trapezius and deltoid. Maximal muscle strength and activation (peak torque and peak EMG) as well as rapid muscle strength and activation [rate of torque development (RTD) and rate of EMG rise] were subsequently determined. Trapezius muscle fiber characteristics were determined with ATPase histochemistry. Significant changes were observed only in the specific strength training group. Whereas peak torque increased 18-29% (P muscle fibers hypertrophied 20% (P force capacity of chronically painful muscles is highly responsive to rehabilitation with specific strength training. The underlying mechanisms were related to both pain reduction and general neuromuscular adaptations to strength training. Potentially, the present method can be a useful clinical screening tool of muscle function in rehabilitation settings.

  15. Rapid muscle activation and force capacity in conditions of chronic musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Holtermann, Andreas; Jørgensen, Marie B

    2008-01-01

    muscle activation and force capacity of chronically painful muscles. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 42 women with chronic trapezius myalgia, and 20 healthy matched controls. Maximal capacity was determined as peak torque and peak EMG amplitude of the painful trapezius and painfree deltoid muscles......-analogue-scale. FINDINGS: Peak torque was 18% lower at 115 degrees shoulder joint angle in women with myalgia compared with healthy controls (Pmuscle (Ptorque development was 33-54% lower (P...BACKGROUND: The association between musculoskeletal pain and decreased maximal muscle strength capacity has been extensively studied, but knowledge about functional rapid force capacity in conditions of chronic musculoskeletal pain is lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate rapid...

  16. Isokinetic trunk muscle performance in pre-teens and teens with and without back pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernard, J-C; Boudokhane, S; Pujol, A; Chaléat-Valayer, E; Le Blay, G; Deceuninck, J

    2014-01-01

    To assess with an isokinetic dynamometer the force and endurance of the spinal flexor and extensor muscles in pre-teens or teens aged 11 to 13 and 14 to 16 years with and without low back pain (LBP...

  17. Effect of contrasting physical exercise interventions on rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Jesper L; Suetta, Charlotte; Kjaer, Michael; Sogaard, Karen; Sjogaard, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    ... ; accepted in final form 10 September 2009 Rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles is inhibited markedly more than maximal force capacity and is therefore relevant to assess in rehabilitation settings...

  18. Descending pain modulation and its interaction with peripheral sensitization following sustained isometric muscle contraction in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, H-Y; Nie, Hongling; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Sustained isometric muscle contraction (fatiguing contraction) recruits segmental and/or extrasegmental descending inhibition in healthy subjects but not in fibromyalgia (FM). We hypothesized that fatiguing contraction may shift descending pain modulation from inhibition towards...

  19. Resident Macrophages in Muscle Contribute to Development of Hyperalgesia in a Mouse Model of Noninflammatory Muscle Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei-Yi; Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Carvalho, Carolina S; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages play a role in innate immunity within the body, are located in muscle tissue, and can release inflammatory cytokines that sensitize local nociceptors. In this study we investigate the role of resident macrophages in the noninflammatory muscle pain model induced by 2 pH 4.0 preservative-free sterile saline (pH 4.0) injections 5 days apart in the gastrocnemius muscle. We showed that injecting 2 pH 4.0 injections into the gastrocnemius muscle increased the number of local muscle macrophages, and depleting muscle macrophages with clodronate liposomes before acid injections attenuated the hyperalgesia produced by this model. To further examine the contribution of local macrophages to this hyperalgesia, we injected mice intramuscularly with C34, a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist. When given before the first pH 4.0 injection, C34 attenuated the muscle and tactile hyperalgesia produced by the model. However, when given before the second injection C34 had no effect on the development of hyperalgesia. Then to test whether activation of local macrophages sensitizes nociceptors to normally non-nociceptive stimuli we replaced either the first or second acid injection with the immune cell activator lipopolysaccharide, or the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6. Injecting LPS or IL-6 instead of the either the first or second pH 4.0 injection resulted in a dose-dependent increase in paw withdrawal responses and decrease in muscle withdrawal thresholds. The highest doses of LPS and IL-6 resulted in development of hyperalgesia bilaterally. The present study showed that resident macrophages in muscle are key to development of chronic muscle pain. This article presents evidence for the role of macrophages in the development of chronic muscle pain using a mouse model. These data suggest that macrophages could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent transition of acute to chronic muscle pain particularly in tissue acidosis conditions. Copyright © 2016

  20. Torque-EMG-velocity relationship in female workers with chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Nielsen, Pernille K; Søgaard, Karen

    2008-01-01

    registered before and after the dynamometer test. The main findings were that shoulder abduction torque (at -60 and 60 degrees s(-1)) and trapezius EMG amplitude (at -60, 0 and 60 degrees s(-1)) were significantly lower in MYA compared with CON (pmuscle thickness...... trapezius muscle. The most consistent differences-in terms of both torque and EMG-were found during slow concentric and eccentric contractions. Activity of the synergistic pain free deltoideus muscle was not significantly lower, indicating specific inhibitory feedback of the painful trapezius muscle only......The present study investigated the effect of chronic neck muscle pain (defined as trapezius myalgia) on neck/shoulder muscle function during concentric, eccentric and static contraction. Forty-two female office workers with trapezius myalgia (MYA) and 20 healthy matched controls (CON) participated...

  1. The effects of core muscle release technique on lumbar spine deformation and low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Myounggi; Song, Changho; Jo, Younggwan; Ha, Donghun; Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the core muscle release technique on correction of lumbar deformation and alleviation of low back pain. [Subjects] Ninety patients diagnosed with lumbar deformation and low back pain participated in this study. [Methods] The participants were divided into three groups according to method of treatment. The first group was treated with the core muscle release technique (CRT), the second group was treated with general exercise, an...

  2. Torque-EMG-velocity relationship in female workers with chronic neck muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars L; Nielsen, Pernille K; Søgaard, Karen; Andersen, Christoffer H; Skotte, Jørgen; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of chronic neck muscle pain (defined as trapezius myalgia) on neck/shoulder muscle function during concentric, eccentric and static contraction. Forty-two female office workers with trapezius myalgia (MYA) and 20 healthy matched controls (CON) participated. Isokinetic (-60, 60 and 180 degrees s(-1)) and static maximal voluntary shoulder abductions were performed in a Biodex dynamometer, and electromyography (EMG) obtained in the trapezius and deltoideus muscles. Muscle thickness in the trapezius was measured with ultrasound. Pain and perceived exertion were registered before and after the dynamometer test. The main findings were that shoulder abduction torque (at -60 and 60 degrees s(-1)) and trapezius EMG amplitude (at -60, 0 and 60 degrees s(-1)) were significantly lower in MYA compared with CON (p<0.001-0.05). Deltoideus EMG and trapezius muscle thickness were not significantly different between the groups. While perceived exertion increased in both groups in response to the test (p<0.0001), pain increased in MYA only (p<0.0001). In conclusion, having trapezius myalgia was associated with decreased strength capacity and lowered activity of the painful trapezius muscle. The most consistent differences-in terms of both torque and EMG-were found during slow concentric and eccentric contractions. Activity of the synergistic pain free deltoideus muscle was not significantly lower, indicating specific inhibitory feedback of the painful trapezius muscle only. Parallel increase in pain and perceived exertion among MYA were observed in response to the maximal contractions, emphasizing that heavy physical exertion provokes pain increase only in conditions of myalgia.

  3. Experimental use of the obturator internus muscle as a functioning pelvic floor muscle in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, A; El-Sibai, O; Shafik, A A

    2001-10-01

    To investigate the possibility of using the obturator internus muscle instead of the levator ani as a pelvic floor muscle. Experimental study. Teaching hospital, Egypt. 7 male and 3 female mongrel dogs. Through a para-anal incision both muscles were exposed; the levator ani was excised and the lower border of the obturator internus was mobilised and sutured to the anorectal junction, the vesical neck, and the vaginal fornix. Rectal and anal pressures and electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded before and during transposition, and 1, 3, and 6 months later. Histological examination of biopsy specimens taken from the levator ani before, and from the obturator internus before, and 3, 6, and 12 months after, transposition. Stimulation of the levator ani caused anal pressure to decline significantly (p obturator internus did not change anal pressure before transposition but caused a decline after it. There was EMG activity in the levator ani at rest, but not in the obturator internus before transposition though it was evident by 6 months afterwards. Levator ani consisted of skeletal muscle fibres with smooth muscle fibres in places, whereas the obturator internus consisted of skeletal fibres alone. Six months after operation examination of the obturator internus showed the presence of some smooth muscle fibres. These results suggest that the obturator internus might be suitable both anatomically and physiologically to replace the levator ani. However, before it can be suggested as a treatment for levator dysfunction syndrome further experimental studies are necessary.

  4. Muscle Power Is an Independent Determinant of Pain and Quality of Life in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kieran F; Price, Lori Lyn; Harvey, William F; Driban, Jeffrey B; Hau, Cynthia; Fielding, Roger A; Wang, Chenchen

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. Baseline data on 190 subjects with knee OA (mean ± SD age 60.2 ± 10.4 years, body mass index 32.7 ± 7.2 kg/m(2) ) were obtained from a randomized controlled trial. Knee pain was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and health-related quality of life was assessed using the Short Form 36 (SF-36). One-repetition maximum (1RM) strength was assessed using the bilateral leg press, and peak muscle power was measured during 5 maximum voluntary velocity repetitions at 40% and 70% of 1RM. In univariate analysis, greater muscle power was significantly associated with pain (r = -0.17, P muscle power was a significant independent predictor of pain (P ≤ 0.05) and PCS scores (P ≤ 0.04). However, muscle strength was not an independent determinant of pain or quality of life (P ≥ 0.06). Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee OA. Compared to strength, muscle power may be a more clinically important measure of muscle function within this population. New trials to systematically examine the impact of muscle power training interventions on disease severity in knee OA are particularly warranted. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Trunk muscle recruitment patterns in specific chronic low back pain populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfies, Sheri P; Squillante, Dawn; Maurer, Philip; Westcott, Sarah; Karduna, Andrew R

    2005-06-01

    It is hypothesized that injury or degeneration of osteoligamentous spinal structures would require compensation by trunk musculature and alterations in motor control to maintain spine stability. While, biomechanical modeling has supported this hypothesis, studies of muscle recruitment patterns in chronic low back pain patients both with and without significant osteoligamentous damage have been limited. This study utilized a non-randomized case-control design to investigate trunk muscle recruitment patterns around the neutral spine position between subgroups of patients with chronic mechanical low back pain and asymptomatic controls. Twenty subjects with chronic low back pain attributed to clinical lumbar instability were matched to 20 asymptomatic controls. In addition 12 patients with non-specific chronic low back pain were studied. Surface EMG from five trunk muscles was analyzed to determine activation levels and patterns of recruitment during a standing reach under two different loading conditions. The chronic low back pain group with symptoms attributed to clinical instability demonstrated significantly higher activation levels of the external oblique and rectus abdominus muscles and lower abdominal synergist ratios than the control group. No significant differences were found between patient subgroups. While these data demonstrate altered muscle recruitment patterns in patients with chronic low back pain, the changes are not consistent with Panjabi's theory suggesting that these alterations are driven by passive subsystem damage. However, the higher activation of global abdominal musculature and altered synergist patterns may represent a motor control pattern that has consequences for continued dysfunction and chronic pain.

  6. Association of low back pain with muscle stiffness and muscle mass of the lumbar back muscles, and sagittal spinal alignment in young and middle-aged medical workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Mitsuhiro; Aoyama, Tomoki; Murakami, Takashi; Yanase, Ko; Ji, Xiang; Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-11-01

    Muscle stiffness of the lumbar back muscles in low back pain (LBP) patients has not been clearly elucidated because quantitative assessment of the stiffness of individual muscles was conventionally difficult. This study aimed to examine the association of LBP with muscle stiffness assessed using ultrasonic shear wave elastography (SWE) and muscle mass of the lumbar back muscle, and spinal alignment in young and middle-aged medical workers. The study comprised 23 asymptomatic medical workers [control (CTR) group] and 9 medical workers with LBP (LBP group). Muscle stiffness and mass of the lumbar back muscles (lumbar erector spinae, multifidus, and quadratus lumborum) in the prone position were measured using ultrasonic SWE. Sagittal spinal alignment in the standing and prone positions was measured using a Spinal Mouse. The association with LBP was investigated by multiple logistic regression analysis with a forward selection method. The analysis was conducted using the shear elastic modulus and muscle thickness of the lumbar back muscles, and spinal alignment, age, body height, body weight, and sex as independent variables. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that muscle stiffness of the lumbar multifidus muscle and body height were significant and independent determinants of LBP, but that muscle mass and spinal alignment were not. Muscle stiffness of the lumbar multifidus muscle in the LBP group was significantly higher than that in the CTR group. The results of this study suggest that LBP is associated with muscle stiffness of the lumbar multifidus muscle in young and middle-aged medical workers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  8. IL17 Mediates Pelvic Pain in Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen F Murphy

    Full Text Available Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS is the most common form of prostatitis, accounting for 90-95% of all diagnoses. It is a complex multi-symptom syndrome with unknown etiology and limited effective treatments. Previous investigations highlight roles for inflammatory mediators in disease progression by correlating levels of cytokines and chemokines with patient reported symptom scores. It is hypothesized that alteration of adaptive immune mechanisms results in autoimmunity and subsequent development of pain. Mouse models of CPPS have been developed to delineate these immune mechanisms driving pain in humans. Using the experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP in C57BL/6 mice model of CPPS we examined the role of CD4+T-cell subsets in the development and maintenance of prostate pain, by tactile allodynia behavioral testing and flow cytometry. In tandem with increased CD4+IL17A+ T-cells upon EAP induction, prophylactic treatment with an anti-IL17 antibody one-day prior to EAP induction prevented the onset of pelvic pain. Therapeutic blockade of IL17 did not reverse pain symptoms indicating that IL17 is essential for development but not maintenance of chronic pain in EAP. Furthermore we identified a cytokine, IL7, to be associated with increased symptom severity in CPPS patients and is increased in patient prostatic secretions and the prostates of EAP mice. IL7 is fundamental to development of IL17 producing cells and plays a role in maturation of auto-reactive T-cells, it is also associated with autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes. More recently a growing body of research has pointed to IL17's role in development of neuropathic and chronic pain. This report presents novel data on the role of CD4+IL17+ T-cells in development and maintenance of pain in EAP and CPPS.

  9. A Patient Developed Painful Muscle Cramps due to Overeating Mangos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Abe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old woman had a habit to eat a mango every night before sleep and experienced muscle cramps during sleep. Her muscle cramps may be resulted from potassium overload due to overeating mangos.

  10. Low back pain characterized by muscle resistance and occupational factors associated with nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Souza Petersen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the occupational factors associated with low back pain using a surveillance tool and to characterize the low back pain by the resistance of the extensor muscles of the vertebral column among nursing professionals at an Intensive Care Unit.METHODS: Cross-sectional study. The workers answered a questionnaire about occupational factors and participated in a resistance test of the extensor muscles of the vertebral column. Associations were established through Student's T-test or Mann-Whitney's U-test and correlations using Pearson's test.RESULTS: Out of 48 participants, 32 (67% suffered from low pain. For the resistance test, the subjects suffering from low back pain endured less time in comparison with asymptomatic subjects, but without significant differences (p=0.147. The duration of the pain episode showed a significant negative correlation (p=0.016 with the results of the resistance test though. The main factors identified as causes of low back pain were biomechanical and postural elements, conditions of the muscle structure and physical and organizational conditions.CONCLUSIONS: the main occupational factors associated with the low back pain were the posture and the characteristics of the physical and organizational conditions. In addition, the extensor muscles of the column showed a trend towards lesser resistance for workers in pain. This evidence is important when considering prevention and treatment strategies.

  11. Negative affect, pain and disability in osteoarthritis patients: the mediating role of muscle weakness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, J.; Tola, P.; Aufdemkampe, G.; Winckers, M.

    1993-01-01

    Negative affect has been shown to be associated with high levels of pain and disability in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. As an explanation of this association, it was hypothesized that muscle weakness is a mediating factor between negative affect, pain and disability. Accordingly, negative affect

  12. Two unusual cases of external rotator muscle pathology producing hip pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Thompson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two unusual cases of inflammation of the external rotator muscles of the hip are presented. In each case, the patient presented with acute hip pain. The diagnoses of acute calcific periarthritis involving the gluteus medius muscle, and pyomyositis of the obturator internus muscle secondary to a perianal fistula, were made with the aid of diagnostic imaging and histology. The importance of reviewing the pelvic viscera is highlighted.

  13. The Effect of Dry Needling Compared With Ischemic Pressure on Pain Intensity on Active Trigger Point in Upper Trapezius Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ziaeifar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Myofascial trigger point is one of the most common causes of musculoskeletal pain and disorders. Myofascial trigger point in upper trapezius has been reported as a frequent symptom in patients with neck and thoracic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dry needling compared with ischemic pressure on active trigger point in upper trapezius muscle. Materials & Methods: 32 women with active myofascial trigger point in upper trapezius muscle participated in this randomized clinical trial (RCT study. The subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: dry needling (N=15 and ischemic pressure (N=17. The visual analogue scale (VAS was used to assess the pain intensity before and after treatment in both groups. Paired t-test was used to determine any significant difference in pain intensity after treatment sessions compared with pre-treatment score in control and experimental group. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA was calculated to determine the significance of differences between the control and experimental groups in post-test scores, with pre-treatment scores used as covariates in the analysis. Results: Statistical analysis (paired t-test revealed significant decrease in pain intensity after treatment sessions in control and experimental group (P=0.00 compared with pre-treatment score. In the ANCOVA, controlling for pre-test scores, no significant difference was found between the two groups (P=0.8. Conclusion: It seems that that both dry needling and ischemic pressure are effective in improvement in the pain intensity in subjects with myofascial trigger points. However, dry needling can be used by clinicians and therapist in physiotherapy clinics.

  14. Superior Cluneal Nerve Entrapment Neuropathy and Gluteus Medius Muscle Pain: Their Effect on Very Old Patients with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Rinko; Kim, Kyongsong; Isu, Toyohiko; Morimoto, Daijiro; Iwamoto, Naotaka; Kobayashi, Shiro; Morita, Akio

    2017-02-01

    In the very elderly, their general condition and poor compliance with drug regimens can render the treatment of low back pain (LBP) difficult. We report the effectiveness of a less-invasive treatment for intractable LBP from superior cluneal nerve entrapment neuropathy (SCN-EN) and gluteus medius muscle (GMeM) pain. Between April 2013 and March 2015, we treated 17 consecutive elders with LBP, buttock pain, and leg pain. They were 4 men and 13 women ranging in age from 85 to 91 years (mean 86.6 years). We carefully ascertained that their symptoms were attributable to SCN-EN and GMeM pain. The median follow-up period was 21.5 ± 12.2 months (range 2-35 months). SCN-EN was diagnosed in 15 patients (28 sites) and GMeM pain in 14 (27 sites). In 5 patients, we obtained symptom control by local block (Numerical Rating Scale for LBP: declined from 7.8 to 0.8 [P pain postoperatively, they subsequently underwent peroneal nerve neurolysis and surgery for tarsal tunnel syndrome. These treatments resulted in significantly symptom abatement (Numerical Rating Scale: from 8.2 to 1.7, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score: from 12.8 to 8.6; P pain, and leg pain due to SCN-EN or GMeM pain can be treated successfully by peripheral block and less-invasive surgery under local anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A preliminary study to determine if a muscle pain protocol can produce long-term relief in chronic back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Norman J; Shrikhande, Allyson Augusta; McCarberg, Bill; Gracely, Edward

    2013-08-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a muscle protocol to treat patients diagnosed with neuraxial low back pain (LBP) before and after invasive treatments. Patients with chronic (>6 months) LBP-postinvasive treatment and pre-spine surgery-were assessed and treated. An electrical device rather than palpation was used to determine muscle(s) as possible sources of pain. Patients testing positive for muscle pain were treated with a comprehensive protocol and were followed for >3 months to determine the effect of treatment on pain severity and interference in function. Study 1: In 56 (postinvasive treatment) patients who had failed back surgery, epidural steroid injections, facet blocks, and/or trigger point injections, mean Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) pain severity dropped from 5.54 at baseline to 3.96 (P muscle protocol, canceled their surgeries, and obtained significant relief at the 16-19 month follow-up point. In patients thought to have neuraxial pain, identification and treatment of painful muscles had statistically significant long-lasting and clinically meaningful reductions in pain and improvement in function. Muscle and tendon attachments may be an important and treatable source of pain in patients diagnosed with pre and postsurgical neuraxial pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Structural Changes of Lumbar Muscles in Non-specific Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubert, Dorien; Oosterwijck, Jessica Van; Meeus, Mira; Danneels, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar muscle dysfunction due to pain might be related to altered lumbar muscle structure. Macroscopically, muscle degeneration in low back pain (LBP) is characterized by a decrease in cross-sectional area and an increase in fat infiltration in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. In addition microscopic changes, such as changes in fiber distribution, might occur. Inconsistencies in results from different studies make it difficult to draw firm conclusions on which structural changes are present in the different types of non-specific LBP. Insights regarding structural muscle alterations in LBP are, however, important for prevention and treatment of non-specific LBP. The goal of this article is to review which macro- and/or microscopic structural alterations of the lumbar muscles occur in case of non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP), recurrent low back pain (RLBP), and acute low back pain (ALBP). Systematic review. All selected studies were case-control studies. A systematic literature search was conducted in the databases PubMed and Web of Science. Only full texts of original studies regarding structural alterations (atrophy, fat infiltration, and fiber type distribution) in lumbar muscles of patients with non-specific LBP compared to healthy controls were included. All included articles were scored on methodological quality. Fifteen studies were found eligible after screening title, abstract, and full text for inclusion and exclusion criteria. In CLBP, moderate evidence of atrophy was found in the multifidus; whereas, results in the paraspinal and the erector spinae muscle remain inconclusive. Also moderate evidence occurred in RLBP and ALBP, where no atrophy was shown in any lumbar muscle. Conflicting results were seen in undefined LBP groups. Results concerning fat infiltration were inconsistent in CLBP. On the other hand, there is moderate evidence in RLBP that fat infiltration does not occur, although a larger muscle fat index was found in the erector spinae

  17. A Comparison of Self-Hypnosis Versus Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis and Chronic Pain1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P.; Barber, Joseph; Romano, Joan M.; Molton, Ivan R.; Raichle, Katherine A.; Osborne, Travis L.; Engel, Joyce M.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Kraft, George H.; Patterson, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and chronic pain we recruited into a quasi-experimental trial comparing the effects of self-hypnosis training (HYP) with progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) on pain intensity and pain interference; 8 received HYP and the remaining 14 participants were randomly assigned to receive either HYP or PMR. HYP-condition participants reported significantly greater pre- to postsession as well as pre- to posttreatment decreases in pain and pain interference than PMR-condition participants, and gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Most of the participants in both conditions reported that they continued to use the skills they learned in treatment and experienced pain relief when they did so. General hypnotizability was not significantly related to treatment outcome, but treatment-outcome expectancy assessed before and after the first session was. The results support the efficacy of self-hypnosis training for the management of chronic pain in persons with MS. PMID:19234967

  18. Pubic pain in athletes: a case due to an abscess in the obturator muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guis-Sabatier, S; Pieri-Balandraud, N; Garnier-Soumet, P; Coste, J; Roux, H; Mattei, J P

    1999-01-01

    Pubic pain is a common symptom in soccer players. Its cause can be difficult to determine. We report a case in a 19-year-old soccer player who had an abscess in the obturator internus muscle. We are aware of only one similar report in the literature. Painful limitation of internal rotation of the hip and evidence of infection suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. In a soccer player, a fever and groin pain do not always indicate osteitis pubis. Limitation of internal rotation of the hip should suggest a lesion in the obturator internus muscle.

  19. Referred pain from trapezius muscle trigger points shares similar characteristics with chronic tension type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Pareja, Juan A

    2007-05-01

    Referred pain and pain characteristics evoked from the upper trapezius muscle was investigated in 20 patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) and 20 age- and gender-matched controls. A headache diary was kept for 4 weeks in order to confirm the diagnosis and record the pain history. Both upper trapezius muscles were examined for the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in a blinded fashion. The local and referred pain intensities, referred pain pattern, and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were recorded. The results show that referred pain was evoked in 85% and 50% on the dominant and non-dominant sides in CTTH patients, much higher than 55% and 25% in controls (Pactive TrPs. CTTH patients with active TrPs in the right upper trapezius muscle showed greater headache intensity and frequency, and longer headache duration than those with latent TrPs. CTTH patients with bilateral TrPs reported significantly decreased PPT than those with unilateral TrP (Pactive TrPs. Our results suggest that spatial summation of perceived pain and mechanical pain sensitivity exists in CTTH patients.

  20. Human brain activity associated with painful mechanical stimulation to muscle and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Lynn; Ono, Mayu; Koyama, Tetsuo; Oshiro, Yoshitetsu; Sumitani, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi; Shibata, Masahiko

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the central processing of painful mechanical stimulation to muscle and bone by measuring blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twelve healthy volunteers were enrolled. Mechanical pressure on muscle and bone were applied at the right lower leg by an algometer. Intensities were adjusted to cause weak and strong pain sensation at either target site in preliminary testing. Brain activation in response to mechanical nociceptive stimulation targeting muscle and bone were measured by fMRI and analyzed. Painful mechanical stimulation targeting muscle and bone activated the common areas including bilateral insula, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), inferior parietal lobe, and basal ganglia. The contralateral S2 was more activated by strong stimulation than by weak stimulation. Some areas in the basal ganglia (bilateral putamen and caudate nucleus) were more activated by muscle stimulation than by bone stimulation. The putamen and caudate nucleus may have a more significant role in brain processing of muscle pain compared with bone pain.

  1. Changed activation, oxygenation, and pain response of chronically painful muscles to repetitive work after training interventions: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karen; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed

    2012-01-01

    assigned to: (1) general fitness training performed as leg-bicycling (GFT); (2) specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles (SST) or (3) reference intervention without physical exercise. Electromyographic activity (EMG), tissue oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy), and pain intensity were...... measured in trapezius during pegboard and stress tasks before and after the intervention period. During the pegboard task, GFT improved trapezius oxygenation from a relative decrease of -0.83 ± 1.48 μM to an increase of 0.05 ± 1.32 μM, and decreased pain development by 43%, but did not affect resting...... levels of pain. SST lowered the relative EMG amplitude by 36%, and decreased pain during resting and working conditions by 52 and 38%, respectively, without affecting trapezius oxygenation. In conclusion, GFT performed as leg-bicycling decreased pain development during repetitive work tasks, possibly due...

  2. Effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.L.; Kjær, Michael; Søgaard, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    trial and recruited subjects from 7 workplaces characterized by monotonous jobs (e.g., computer-intensive work). Forty-eight employed women with chronic neck muscle pain (defined as a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia) were randomly assigned to 10 weeks of specific strength training locally...... (similar to 79%; P strength training, whereas an acute and transient decrease in pain (5 mm; P strength training had high clinical relevance and led......Objective. The prevalence of neck muscle pain has steadily increased and especially pain from the descending part of the trapezius muscle has been associated with monotonous work tasks such as computer work. Physical exercise is generally recommended as treatment, but it is unclear which type...

  3. Clinical features in patients with chronic muscle pain--with special reference to fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Petersen, I S; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1993-01-01

    Clinical characteristics were studied in patients with chronic muscle pain, divided into three groups according to the characteristics of their pain; "fibromyalgia" (n = 23), "widespread muscle pain" (n = 21), and "regional muscle pain" (n = 28). Typical fibromyalgia features were also seen...... in the other groups of patients, but not to the same extent. In particular, sleep disturbance, subjective swelling, cold and exercise intolerance and low self-reported physical performance were significantly related to fibromyalgia. The major components of fibromyalgia were not wholly different compared...... with other European and North American studies, except for sleep disturbance and subjective swelling, which was somewhat more pronounced in this study. The most used medications in fibromyalgia patients at referral were analgesics, anxiolytic drugs and female sex hormones. Medication in fibromyalgia...

  4. Pressure pain threshold changes after repeated mechano-nociceptive stimulation of the trapezius muscle: possible influence of previous pain experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjölund, Bengt H; Persson, Ann L

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relation between repeated noxious pressure over the trapezius muscle and changes in pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in a before-after trial design. A conditioning series of 30 mechano-nociceptive stimuli was applied manually with a handheld algometer probe, and PPTs were measured...... who had given birth to 1 or several children (Preactions (r=0.527; P

  5. Differences in psychosocial functioning and sleep quality between idiopathic continuous orofacial neuropathic pain patients and chronic masticatory muscle pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Felipe; de Leeuw, Reny; Evans, Daniel R; Carlson, Charles R; Yepes, Juan F; Branscum, Adam; Okeson, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    To examine differences between idiopathic continuous orofacial neuropathic pain (ICONP) patients and chronic masticatory muscle pain (MMP) patients for psychosocial functioning and sleep quality. Archival data were used to compare 81 ICONP patients to 81 age- and sex-matched chronic MMP patients on pain severity, life interference, life control, and affective distress measures from the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI), a global severity index of psychological symptoms from the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C), and overall sleep quality from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). MANOVA, MANCOVA, and chi-square analysis were used to investigate differences between the two groups in the psychosocial and sleep variables. The ICONP group reported greater pain severity (P = .013) and more life interference (P = .032) than the MMP group, while the MMP group reported higher levels of global psychological symptoms (P = .005) than the ICONP group. After controlling for pain severity, however, the MMP group demonstrated greater affective distress (P = .014) than the ICONP group, and life interference was no longer significantly different between the groups. ICONP patients were more likely to report a traumatic life event (P = .007). Although ICONP patients are likely to present more intense pain and report that their pain causes more interference in their lives, MMP patients are more likely to present with higher levels of overall psychological symptoms. The greater levels of pain severity reported by ICONP patients appear to be partially responsible for their higher levels of reported life interference.

  6. Involvement of central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors on antinociceptive effect of tetrahydrocannabinol in muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagüés, Ana; Martín, M Isabel; Sánchez-Robles, Eva M

    2014-12-15

    Cannabinoid (CB) receptors have emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for pain management in recent years and the interest in the use of cannabinoids is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where conventional treatments fail. Muscle pain is a major clinical problem and new pharmacological approaches are being studied. Recently, we have demonstrated that cannabinoid synthetic agonists are useful to reduce muscular pain in two animal models, where the local administration is effective. Now, we want to know if tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabinoid natural derivative with therapeutic use in humans, is also effective in reducing acute muscle pain. The antinociceptive effect of THC by systemic (i.p.) and local (i.m.) administration was tested in two animal models of acute muscle pain, rat masseter and gastrocnemius, induced by hypertonic saline (HS) injection. The drugs used were the non-selective agonist THC and two selective cannabinoid antagonists, AM251 (CB1) and AM630 (CB2). THC, i.p. and i.m. administered, reduced the nociceptive behaviours induced by HS in both muscular pain models. The antinociceptive effect induced by the systemic administration of THC was mediated by CB1 receptors in the masseter muscle whereas in gastrocnemius both CB1 and CB2 receptors participated. When THC was administered locally, only CB2 receptors were involved in the antinociceptive effect in both muscles. This study suggests that THC could be a future pharmacological option in the treatment of muscle pain. The local administration of THC could be an interesting option to treat this type of pain avoiding the central adverse effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double...... hyperalgesia models (6 studies), 'pain' models (25 studies), summation models (2 studies), nociceptive reflex models (3 studies) and miscellaneous models (2 studies). A consistent reversal of analgesia by a MOR-antagonist was demonstrated in 10 of the 25 ITP-studies, including stress-induced analgesia and r......TMS. In the remaining 14 conditioning modulation studies either absence of effects or ambiguous effects by MOR-antagonists, were observed. In the STP-studies, no effect of the opioid-blockade could be demonstrated in 5 out of 6 secondary hyperalgesia studies. The direction of MOR-antagonist dependent effects upon pain...

  8. Muscle fatigue in relation to forearm pain and tenderness among professional computer users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, GF; Johnson, PW; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To examine the hypothesis that forearm pain with palpation tenderness in computer users is associated with increased extensor muscle fatigue. METHODS: Eighteen persons with pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness in the extensor muscle group of the right forearm...... and twenty gender and age matched referents without such complaints were enrolled from the Danish NUDATA study of neck and upper extremity disorders among technical assistants and machine technicians. Fatigue of the right forearm extensor muscles was assessed by muscle twitch forces in response to low...... stimulated twitch forces were equal in the case and the referent group. After the fatiguing contraction, a decrease in muscle average twitch force was seen in both groups, but the decrease was largest in the referent group: 27% (95% CI 17-37) versus 9% (95% CI -2 to 20). This difference in twitch force...

  9. Acute pulmonary injury induced by experimental muscle trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sombra, Márcia Andréa da Silva Carvalho; Vasconcelos, Marcelo Pinho Pessoa de; Guimarães, Sergio Botelho; Escalante, Rodrigo Dornfeld; Garcia, José Huygens Parente; Vasconcelos, Paulo Roberto Leitão de

    2011-01-01

    To develop an easily reproducible model of acute lung injury due to experimental muscle trauma in healthy rats. Eighteen adult Wistar rats were randomized in 3 groups (n=6): G-1- control, G-2 - saline+trauma and G-3 - dexamethasone+trauma. Groups G-1 and G-2 were treated with saline 2,0 ml i.p; G-3 rats were treated with dexamethasone (DE) (2 mg/kg body weight i.p.). Saline and DE were applied 2h before trauma and 12h later. Trauma was induced in G-2 and G-3 anesthetized (tribromoethanol 97% 100 ml/kg i.p.) rats by sharp section of anterior thigh muscles just above the knee, preserving major vessels and nerves. Tissue samples (lung) were collected for myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay and histopathological evaluation. Twenty-four hours after muscle injury there was a significant increase in lung neutrophil infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity and edema, all reversed by dexamethasone in G-3. Trauma by severance of thigh muscles in healthy rats is a simple and efficient model to induce distant lung lesions.

  10. Changes of sodium channel expression in experimental painful diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craner, Matthew J; Klein, Joshua P; Renganathan, Muthukrishnan; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2002-12-01

    Although pain is experienced by many patients with diabetic neuropathy, the pathophysiology of painful diabetic neuropathy is not understood. Substantial evidence indicates that dysregulated sodium channel gene transcription contributes to hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglion neurons, which may produce neuropathic pain after axonal transection. In this study, we examined sodium channel mRNA and protein expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes and tactile allodynia, using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry for sodium channels Na(v)1.1, Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.6, Na(v)1.7, Na(v)1.8, and Na(v)1.9. Our results show that, in rats with experimental diabetes, there is a significant upregulation of mRNA for the Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.6, and Na(v)1.9 sodium channels and a downregulation of Na(v)1.8 mRNA 1 and 8 weeks after onset of allodynia. Channel protein levels display parallel changes. Our results demonstrate dysregulated expression of the genes for sodium channels Na(v)1.3, Na(v)1.6, Na(v)1.8, and Na(v)1.9 in dorsal root ganglion neurons in experimental diabetes and suggest that misexpression of sodium channels contributes to neuropathic pain associated with diabetic neuropathy.

  11. Changes in Transversus Abdominis Muscle Thickness after Lumbo-Pelvic Core Stabilization Training among Chronic Low Back Pain Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J H; Paungmali, A; Sitilertpisan, P; Pirunsan, U; Uthaikhup, S

    2015-01-01

    Lumbo-pelvic core stabilization training (LPST) is one of the therapeutic exercises common in practice for rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. This study was carried out to examine the therapeutic effects of LPST on the muscle thickness of transversus abdominis (TrA) at rest and during contraction among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. A total of 25 participants (7 males and 18 females) with chronic non-specific low back pain participated in a within-subject, repeated measures, double-blinded, placebo-controlled comparisons trial. The participants received three different types of experimental therapeutic training conditions which includes the lumbo-pelvic core stabilization training (LPST), the placebo treatment with passive cycling (PC) and a controlled intervention with rest (CI). The interventions were carried out by randomization with 48 hours between the sessions. The effectiveness of interventions was studied by measuring the changes in muscle thickness of TrA at rest and during contraction using a real time ultrasonography. Repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated that the LPST provided significant therapeutic benefits as measured by an increase in the muscle thickness of the TrA at rest (ppain.

  12. Exercise despite pain – breast cancer patient experiences of muscle and joint pain during adjuvant chemotherapy and concurrent participation in an exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christina; Rørth, M; Ejlertsen, B

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-related pain is a well-known side effect in cancer patient receiving chemotherapy. However, limited knowledge exists describing whether exercise exacerbates existing pain. Aim of the research was to explore muscle and joint pain experienced by women with breast cancer receiving......-immediate exacerbation of pain and summarised into the essence of chemotherapy related muscle and joint pain in exercise breast cancer patients; exercise despite pain. Findings indicate that the patients' perception of sudden onset of chemotherapy-related muscle and joint pain was not aggravated by training. Pain...... adjuvant chemotherapy with epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel and factor support and concurrently participating in an exercise intervention. The study used individual semi-structured interviews (pre- and post-intervention). Fifteen women were interviewed. The multimodal group...

  13. Dysfunction of endogenous pain inhibition during exercise with painful muscles in patients with shoulder myalgia and fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannersten, Lisa; Kosek, Eva

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how exercise influenced endogenous pain modulation in healthy controls, shoulder myalgia patients and fibromyalgia (FM) patients. Twenty-one healthy subjects, 20 shoulder myalgia patients and 20 FM patients, all females, participated. They performed standardized static contractions, that is, outward shoulder rotation (m. infraspinatus) and knee extension (m. quadriceps). Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were determined bilaterally at m. infraspinatus and m. quadriceps. During contractions PPTs were assessed at the contracting muscle, the resting homologous contralateral muscle and contralaterally at a distant site (m. infraspinatus during contraction of m. quadriceps and vice versa). Myalgia patients had lower PPTs compared to healthy controls at m. infraspinatus bilaterally (ppain regulatory mechanisms in myalgia patients during contraction of the non-afflicted m. quadriceps, but a lack of pain inhibition during contraction of the painful m. infraspinatus. FM patients failed to activate their pain inhibitory mechanisms during all contractions. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Does pain in the masseter and anterior temporal muscles influence maximal bite force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Zuim, Paulo Renato Junqueira; Moreno, Amália; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas; de Caxias, Fernanda Pereira; Turcio, Karina Helga Leal

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in pain and muscle force, and the relationship between them, in patients with muscle pain and bruxism, prior to and after treatment. Thirty women with bruxism and myofascial pain (Ia) were included in this study. Sleep bruxism diagnosis was made based on clinical diagnostic criteria, and awake bruxism diagnosis was made by patient questionnaires and the presence of tooth wear. The diagnosis of myofascial pain was established according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC-TMD). Dentulous or partially edentulous patients (rehabilitated with conventional fixed prostheses) were included in the study according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The pain treatment protocol included occlusal splints, patient education, and physiotherapy for 30days. Bite force was measured using a dynamometer at the central incisor and the first molar regions on both sides. The exams were performed at baseline, after 7days, and 30days after treatment. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare patient pain level response among the periods analyzed in the study. Bite force data were submitted to two-way repeated-measures ANOVA, followed by the Tukey HSD test (pforce. Results revealed that there was a statistical difference in pain level over time for both muscles and sides (pforce exhibited significantly higher values after 30days of treatment, when compared with the baseline (pforce only for the temporal muscle in all periods analyzed (pforce. Pain level decreased and bite force increased in the molar region after treatment. No strong correlation or dispersion in the relationship between pain levels and bite force was seen in women with myofascial pain and bruxism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of core muscle strengthening exercise in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Tarun; Kumar, Suraj; Nezamuddin, Md; Sharma, V P

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is a common health problem in human being and about 5 to 15% will develop chronic low back pain (CLBP). The clinical findings of CLBP suggest that lumbar mobility is decreased and recruitment order of core muscles is altered. In literature, there is no data about the effect of core muscles strengthening in the chronicity (short duration, long duration) of CLBP. This study evaluated the effect of core muscle strengthening intervention on chronicity of chronic low back pain. Thirty patients were recruited from the outpatient department of the National Institute for the Orthopaedically Handicapped. These 30 patients divided into two groups: A and B on the basis of duration of low back pain. Group-A patients complain about pain duration for more than twelve months and Group B complains about pain duration from three to twelve months. Both the groups were received same intervention for six weeks. Assessment was done pre intervention and post intervention after six weeks for both the groups. %For both the groups the assessment was done after six weeks for pre and post intervention. The result described both the groups showed improvement in all the outcome measures including pain as well as in function using Numerical pain rating scale, Oswestry Disability Index, Sorensen test, Gluteus Maximus Strength, Activation of transversus abdominis and Modified-Modified Schober's Test. The improvement was statistically non-significant with inter groups and significant within group. This study concludes that core muscle strengthening exercise along with lumbar flexibility and gluteus maximus strengthening is an effective rehabilitation technique for all chronic low back pain patients irrespective of duration (less than one year and more than one year) of their pain.

  16. Muscle relaxation for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment: possible effects regarding anxiety and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Faye; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Chen, Ching; Hsieh, Yu-Lian; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Hung, Chi-Fa; Lin, Shu-Ching; Tsai, Hsiu-Huang; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2016-08-01

    Effectively managing pain is vital for the well-being and satisfaction of patients undergoing dermatologic treatments involving lasers. This study investigates the potential outcome of using muscle relaxation techniques to reduce pain among people having their tattoos removed with laser treatment. This study consists of 56 participants (mean age 18.1 ± 2.1 years) that had tattoos removed using the principle of selective photothermolysis. These participants underwent muscle relaxation before receiving the laser treatment. Their peripheral skin temperatures (PST) were measured both at the beginning and the end of the muscle relaxation period. Then, the Beck Anxiety Inventory was applied to evaluate anxiety levels. Once the laser treatment was completed, pain levels were measured using a visual analogue scale. A total of 125 person-sessions of laser treatment and psychometric assessments were performed in this study. The muscle relaxation method significantly increased the PST of the participants while reducing the levels of anxiety and pain throughout the course of the laser treatment procedure. The PST, anxiety scores, and pain scores all showed significant correlations with one another. According to the results obtained, this study proposes that muscle relaxation techniques be considered possibly auxiliary treatment options for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment. Additional studies with a comparison group and a larger sample size are required in the future to confirm the effectiveness of such intervention.

  17. Experimental orofacial pain and sensory deprivation lead to perceptual distortion of the face in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsdóttir, Lilja Kristín; Skyt, Ina; Vase, Lene; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Castrillon, Eduardo; Svensson, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Patients suffering from persistent orofacial pain may sporadically report that the painful area feels "swollen" or "differently," a phenomenon that may be conceptualized as a perceptual distortion because there are no clinical signs of swelling present. Our aim was to investigate whether standardized experimental pain and sensory deprivation of specific orofacial test sites would lead to changes in the size perception of these face areas. Twenty-four healthy participants received either 0.2 mL hypertonic saline (HS) or local anesthetics (LA) into six regions (buccal, mental, lingual, masseter muscle, infraorbital and auriculotemporal nerve regions). Participants estimated the perceived size changes in percentage (0 % = no change, -100 % = half the size or +100 % = double the size), and somatosensory function was checked with tactile stimuli. The pain intensity was rated on a 0-10 Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS), and sets of psychological questionnaires were completed. HS and LA were associated with significant self-reported perceptual distortions as indicated by consistent increases in perceived size of the adjacent face areas (P ≤ 0.050). Perceptual distortion was most pronounced in the buccal region, and the smallest increase was observed in the auriculotemporal region. HS was associated with moderate levels of pain VNRS = 7.3 ± 0.6. Weak correlations were found between HS-evoked perceptual distortion and level of dissociation in two regions (P pain and transient sensory deprivation evoked perceptual distortions in all face regions and overall demonstrated the importance of afferent inputs for the perception of the face. We propose that perceptual distortion may be an important phenomenon to consider in persistent orofacial pain conditions.

  18. Uncovering the biochemical milieu of myofascial trigger points using in vivo microdialysis: an application of muscle pain concepts to myofascial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jay P; Gilliams, Elizabeth A

    2008-10-01

    This article discusses muscle pain concepts in the context of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and summarizes microdialysis studies that have surveyed the biochemical basis of this musculoskeletal pain condition. Though MPS is a common type of non-articular pain, its pathophysiology is only beginning to be understood due to its enormous complexity. MPS is characterized by the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs), which are defined as hyperirritable nodules located within a taut band of skeletal muscle. MTrPs may be active (spontaneously painful and symptomatic) or latent (non-spontaneously painful). Painful MTrPs activate muscle nociceptors that, upon sustained noxious stimulation, initiate motor and sensory changes in the peripheral and central nervous systems. This process is called sensitization. In order to investigate the peripheral factors that influence the sensitization process, a microdialysis technique was developed to quantitatively measure the biochemical milieu of skeletal muscle. Biochemical differences were found between active and latent MTrPs, as well as in comparison with healthy muscle tissue. In this paper we relate the findings of elevated levels of sensitizing substances within painful muscle to the current theoretical framework of muscle pain and MTrP development.

  19. The effects of topical Arnica on performance, pain and muscle damage after intense eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumpa, Kate L; Fallon, Kieran E; Bensoussan, Alan; Papalia, Shona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if topical Arnica is effective in reducing pain, indicators of inflammation and muscle damage, and in turn improve performance in well-trained males experiencing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty well-trained males matched by maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 Max) completed a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial. Topical Arnica was applied to the skin superficial to the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles immediately after a downhill running protocol designed to induce DOMS. Topical Arnica was reapplied every 4 waking hours for the duration of the study. Performance measures (peak torque, countermovement and squat jump), pain assessments (visual analogue scale (VAS) and muscle tenderness) and blood analysis (interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein, myoglobin and creatine kinase) were assessed at seven time points over five days (pre-, post-, 4, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after the downhill run). Participants in the topical Arnica group reported less pain as assessed through muscle tenderness and VAS 72 hours post-exercise. The application of topical Arnica did not affect any performance assessments or markers of muscle damage or inflammation. Topical Arnica used immediately after intense eccentric exercise and for the following 96 hours did not have an effect on performance or blood markers. It did however demonstrate the possibility of providing pain relief three days post-eccentric exercise.

  20. Muscle fatigue in relation to forearm pain and tenderness among professional computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryger Ann I

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the hypothesis that forearm pain with palpation tenderness in computer users is associated with increased extensor muscle fatigue. Methods Eighteen persons with pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness in the extensor muscle group of the right forearm and twenty gender and age matched referents without such complaints were enrolled from the Danish NUDATA study of neck and upper extremity disorders among technical assistants and machine technicians. Fatigue of the right forearm extensor muscles was assessed by muscle twitch forces in response to low frequency (2 Hz percutaneous electrical stimulation. Twitch forces were measured before, immediately after and 15 minutes into recovery of an extensor isometric wrist extension for ten minutes at 15 % Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC. Results The average MVC wrist extension force and baseline stimulated twitch forces were equal in the case and the referent group. After the fatiguing contraction, a decrease in muscle average twitch force was seen in both groups, but the decrease was largest in the referent group: 27% (95% CI 17–37 versus 9% (95% CI -2 to 20. This difference in twitch force response was not explained by differences in the MVC or body mass index. Conclusion Computer users with forearm pain and moderate to severe palpation tenderness had diminished forearm extensor muscle fatigue response. Additional studies are necessary to determine whether this result reflects an adaptive response to exposure without any pathophysiological significance, or represents a part of a causal pathway leading to pain.

  1. Treatment Experience of Pulsed Radiofrequency Under Ultrasound Guided to the Trapezius Muscle at Myofascial Pain Syndrome -A Case Report-

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chung Hoon; Lee, Yoon Woo; Kim, Yong Chan; Moon, Joo Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injection treatment is an effective and widely applied treatment for myofascial pain syndrome. The trapezius muscle frequently causes myofascial pain in neck area. We herein report a case in which direct pulsed radiofrequency (RF) treatment was applied to the trapezius muscle. We observed that the RF treatment produced continuous pain relief when the effective duration of trigger point injection was temporary in myofascial pain.

  2. Effects of William training on lumbosacral muscles function, lumbar curve and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Rouholah; Javid, Marziyeh; Najafabadi, Ebrahim Moslehi

    2015-01-01

    There are many types of treatments and recommendations for restoring back deformities depending on doctors' knowledge and opinions. The purpose of the exercises is to reduce pain and to ensure stability of the lower trunk by toning the abdominal muscles, buttocks and hamstrings. Given the duration of flares and relapses rate, it is important to apply an efficient and lasting treatment. To evaluate the effects of 8 weeks of William's training on flexibility of lumbosacral muscles and lumbar angle in females with Hyperlordosis. Forty female students with lumbar lordosis more than normal degrees (Hyperlordotic) that were randomly divided into exercise and control groups were selected as the study sample. The lumbar lordosis was measured using a flexible ruler, flexibility of hamstring muscles was measured with the active knee extension test, the hip flexor muscles strength was measured using Thomas test, the lumbar muscles flexibility measures by Schober test, abdominal muscles strength measured by Sit-Up test and back pain was measured using McGill's Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) questionnaire. Data were compared before and post-test using independent and paired t-testes. Results showed that 8 weeks of William's exercise led to significant decreases in lumbar angle and back pain, increases in flexibility of hamstring muscles, hip flexor muscles flexibility, lumbar extensor muscles flexibility and abdominal muscles strength. The findings show that William's corrective training can be considered as a useful and valid method for restoring and refining back deformities like as accentuated back-arc and became wreaked muscles' performance in lumbar areas.

  3. The local and referred pain from myofascial trigger points in the temporalis muscle contributes to pain profile in chronic tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Pareja, Juan A

    2007-01-01

    To assess the local and referred pain areas and pain characteristics evoked from temporalis muscle trigger points (TrPs) in chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). Thirty CTTH patients and 30 age and sex-matched controls were studied. A headache diary was kept for 4 weeks to substantiate the diagnosis and record the pain history. Both temporalis muscles were examined for the presence of myofascial TrPs in a blinded fashion. The local and referred pain intensities, referred pain pattern, and pressure pain threshold were recorded. Referred pain was evoked in 87% and 54% on the dominant and nondominant sides in CTTH patients, which was significantly higher (Pactive TrPs in the temporalis muscle leading to their usual headache (17 patients on the right side; 12 on the left side, whereas 6 with bilateral active TrPs). CTTH patients with active TrPs in either right or left temporalis muscle showed longer headache duration than those with latent TrPs (P=0.004). CTTH patients showed significantly (Pactive TrPs in the temporalis muscle and its sensory characteristics shared similar patterns as their habitual headache pain. Local and referred pain from active TrPs in the temporalis muscles may constitute one of the sources contributing to the pain profile of CTTH.

  4. Suggestions to Reduce Clinical Fibromyalgia Pain and Experimentally Induced Pain Produce Parallel Effects on Perceived Pain but Divergent Functional MRI-Based Brain Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G; Whalley, Matthew G; Seah, Stanley T H; Oakley, David A

    Hypnotic suggestion is an empirically validated form of pain control; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Thirteen fibromyalgia patients received suggestions to alter their clinical pain, and 15 healthy controls received suggestions to alter experimental heat pain. Suggestions were delivered before and after hypnotic induction with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activity measured concurrently. Across groups, suggestion produced substantial changes in pain report (main effect of suggestion, F2, 312 = 585.8; p pain report in regions previously associated with pain, including thalamus and anterior cingulate cortex. In controls, BOLD response decreased with pain report. All changes were greater after induction. Region-of-interest analysis revealed largely linear patient responses with increasing pain report. Control responses, however, were higher after suggestion to increase or decrease pain from baseline. Based on behavioral report alone, the mechanism of suggestion could be interpreted as largely similar regardless of the induction or type of pain experience. The functional magnetic resonance imaging data, however, demonstrated larger changes in brain activity after induction and a radically different pattern of brain activity for clinical pain compared with experimental pain. These findings imply that induction has an important effect on underlying neural activity mediating the effects of suggestion, and the mechanism of suggestion in patients altering clinical pain differs from that in controls altering experimental pain. Patient responses imply that suggestions altered pain experience via corresponding changes in pain-related brain regions, whereas control responses imply suggestion engaged cognitive control.

  5. Influence of experimental pain on the perception of action capabilities and performance of a maximal single-leg hop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Thibault; Hug, François; Hodges, Paul W; Tucker, Kylie

    2014-03-01

    Changes in an individual's state-for example, anxiety/chronic pain-can modify the perception of action capabilities and physical task requirements. In parallel, considerable literature supports altered motor performance during both acute and chronic pain. This study aimed to determine the effect of experimental pain on perception of action capabilities and performance of a dynamic motor task. Performance estimates and actual performance of maximal single-leg hops were recorded for both legs in 13 healthy participants before, during, and after an episode of acute pain induced by a single bolus injection of hypertonic saline into vastus lateralis of 1 leg, with the side counterbalanced among participants. Both estimation of performance and actual performance were smaller (P action-scaled relationship between perception and ability during acute pain. This study demonstrates that the relationship between perceived physical ability and actual performance is effectively updated during acute muscle pain. This match between perceived ability and performance could be relevant during clinical pain assessment, with the potential to be a biomarker of transition from acute to chronic pain state. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation on shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, pain, and function in persons with stroke: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Somyung; Kim, Young; Jung, Kyoungsim; Chung, Yijung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of task-oriented electromyography-triggered stimulation for shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, pain and upper extremity function in hemiparetic stroke patients. Twenty participants with subacute hemiparetic stroke were recruited for this study and were randomly divided into two groups: experimental group (n = 10) and control group (n = 10). Subjects in the experimental group participated in task-oriented electromyography triggered stimulation for 30 minutes, five times a week for four weeks, whereas the control group received cyclic functional electrical stimulation for 30 minutes, five times a week for four weeks. Subjects in both groups received conventional physical therapy for four weeks (30 min/day, five times/week). Data collected included the degree of shoulder subluxation which had been confirmed by X-ray, muscle activation of the supraspinatus and posterior deltoid muscles by electromyography, pain by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and hand function by the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) before and after the four week exercise period. The results showed significant improvement in shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, and VAS results in the experimental group, compared with the control group(p electromyography-triggered stimulation improved shoulder subluxation, muscle activation, pain and upper extremity function. These results suggest that task-oriented electromyography-triggered stimulation is effective and beneficial for individuals with subacute stroke, and that further studies should be conducted on multivarious anatomical regions.

  7. Muscle Trigger Points and Pressure Pain Sensitivity Maps of the Feet in Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero-Caballero, Maria C; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Cigarán-Méndez, Margarita; Morales-Cabezas, Matilde; Madeleine, Pascal; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE : To investigate the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in feet musculature and topographical pressure sensitivity maps of the feet as well as the relationship between TrPs, pressure pain maps, and clinical variables in women with fibromyalgia (FMS). METHODS : Fifty-one FMS women and 24 comparable healthy women participated. TrPs within the flexor hallucis brevis, adductor hallucis, dorsal interossei, extensor digitorum brevis, and quadratus plantae, as well as external and internal gastrocnemius, were explored. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed in a blind manner over seven locations on each foot. Topographical pressure sensitivity maps of the plantar region were generated using the averaged PPT of each location. RESULTS : The prevalence rate of foot pain was 63% (n = 32). The number of active TrPs for each FMS woman with foot pain was 5 ± 1.5 without any latent TrPs. Women with FMS without foot pain and healthy controls had only latent TrPs (2.2 ± 0.8 and 1.5 ± 1.3, respectively). Active TrPs in the flexor hallucis brevis and adductor hallucis muscles were the most prevalent. Topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps revealed that FMS women with foot pain had lower PPT than FMS women without pain and healthy controls, and higher PPT on the calcaneus bone (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS : The presence of foot pain in women with FMS is high. The referred pain elicited by active TrPs in the foot muscles reproduced the symptoms in these patients. FMS women suffering foot pain showed higher pressure hypersensitivity in the plantar region than those FMS women without pain. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Evaluation of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulation (MENS) effectiveness on muscle pain in temporomandibular disorders patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuim, Paulo Renato Junqueira; Garcia, Alicio Rosalino; Turcio, Karina Helga Leal; Hamata, Marcelo Matida

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Microcurrent Electrical Nerve Stimulation (MENS) was evaluated and compared with occlusal splint therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients with muscle pain. Twenty TMD patients were divided into four groups. One received occlusal splint therapy and MENS (I); other received splints and placebo MENS (II); the third, only MENS (III) and the last group, placebo MENS (IV). Sensitivity derived from muscle palpation was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Results were submitted to analysis of variance (p<0.05). There was reduction of pain level in all groups: group I (occlusal splint and MENS) had a 47.7% reduction rate; group II (occlusal splint and placebo MENS), 66.7%; group III (MENS), 49.7% and group IV (placebo MENS), 16.5%. In spite of that, there was no statistical difference (analysis of variance / p<0.05) between MENS and occlusal splint therapy regarding muscle pain reduction in TMD patients after four weeks.

  9. Sleep Fragmentation Hypersensitizes Healthy Young Women to Deep and Superficial Experimental Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovides, Stella; George, Kezia; Kamerman, Peter; Baker, Fiona C

    2017-07-01

    The effect of sleep deprivation on pain sensitivity has typically been studied using total and partial sleep deprivation protocols. These protocols do not mimic the fragmented pattern of sleep disruption usually observed in individuals with clinical pain conditions. Therefore, we conducted a controlled experiment to investigate the effect of sleep fragmentation on pain perception (deep pain: forearm muscle ischemia, and superficial pain: graded pin pricks applied to the skin) in 11 healthy young women after 2 consecutive nights of sleep fragmentation, compared with a normal night of sleep. Compared with normal sleep, sleep fragmentation resulted in significantly poorer sleep quality, morning vigilance, and global mood. Pin prick threshold decreased significantly (increased sensitivity), as did habituation to ischemic muscle pain (increased sensitivity), over the course of the 2 nights of sleep fragmentation compared with the night of normal sleep. Sleep fragmentation did not increase the maximum pain intensity reported during muscle ischemia (no increase in gain), and nor did it increase the number of spontaneous pains reported by participants. Our data show that sleep fragmentation in healthy, young, pain-free women increases pain sensitivity in superficial and deep tissues, indicating a role for sleep disruption, through sleep fragmentation, in modulating pain perception. Our findings that pain-free, young women develop hyperalgesia to superficial and deep muscle pain after short-term sleep disruption highlight the need for effective sleep management strategies in patients with pain. Findings also suggest the possibility that short-term sleep disruption associated with recurrent acute pain could contribute to increased risk for future chronic pain conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. IS PAIN IN ONE KNEE ASSOCIATED WITH ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN THE CONTRALATERAL LIMB? - DATA FROM THE OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE (OAI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidle, E.; Wirth, W.; Glass, N.; Ruhdorfer, A.; Cotofana, S.; Eckstein, F.; Segal, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Knee pain and muscle weakness confer risk for knee osteoarthritis incidence and progression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether unilateral knee pain influences contralateral thigh muscle strength. Design Of 4796 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants, 224 (mean±SD age 63.9±8.9 years) cases could be matched to a control. Cases were defined as having unilateral knee pain (numerical rating scale (NRS)≥4/10; ≥infrequent pain) and one pain-free knee (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Controls were defined as having bilaterally pain-free knees (NRS 0–1; ≤infrequent pain; WOMAC≤1). Maximal isometric muscle strength [N] was compared between limbs in participants with unilateral pain (cases), and between pain-free limbs of cases and controls. Results Knee extensor/flexor strength in pain-free limbs of cases was lower than in bilaterally pain-free controls (−5.5%/–8.4%; p=0.043/p=0.022). Within cases, maximum extensor/flexor strength was significantly lower in the painful than in the pain-free limb (−6.4%/4.1%; ppain-free cases and matched bilateral pain-free controls was similar to that between limbs in persons with unilateral knee pain. Lower strength due to contralateral knee pain might be centrally mediated. PMID:25768069

  11. Infield masticatory muscle activity in subjects with pain-related temporomandibular disorders diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, S N; McCall, W; Dunford, R; Nickel, J C; Iwasaki, L R; Crow, H C; Gonzalez, Y

    2015-04-01

    Pain-related temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are the most prevalent conditions among TMDs. There is contrasting evidence available for association of pain-related TMD and masticatory muscle activity (MMA). The present investigation assesses the associations between MMA levels of masseter and temporalis muscles during awake and sleep among pain-related TMD diagnostic groups. The department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo. Twenty females and six males participated in this study. Using the diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC-TMDs), participants were diagnostically categorized. Subjects used a custom monitoring system, which recorded infield muscle activities. A factorial model tested for association between independent variable (muscle, time period, MMA level, and diagnostic group) effects and the logarithm of MMA. Greenhouse-Geisser test was used to determine any statistically significant associations (p≤0.003). No statistically significant association was found between four-way, three-way, and two-way analyses. However, among the main effects, range of magnitudes was the only variable to be statistically significant. Although the data suggest a trend of increased masseter MMA in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group both during awake and sleep time periods, such observation is not maintained for the temporalis muscle. In addition, temporalis MMA was found to be higher in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group only at extreme activity levels (<25 and ≥80% ranges). This data support the association between masticatory muscle hyperactivity and painful TMD conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. In-field masticatory muscle activity in subjects with pain-related TMD diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, S.N.; McCall, W.; Dunford, R.; Nickel, J.C.; Iwasaki, L.R.; Crow, H.C.; Gonzalez, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pain-related Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent conditions among TMDs. There is contrasting evidence available for association of pain-related TMD and masticatory muscle activity (MMA). The present investigation assesses the associations between MMA levels of masseter and temporalis muscles during awake and sleep among pain-related TMD diagnostic groups. Setting and Sample Population The department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, University at Buffalo. Twenty females and 6 males participated in this study. Material & Methods Using the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC-TMD), participants were diagnostically categorized. Subjects used a custom monitoring system, which recorded in–field muscle activities. A factorial model tested for association between independent variable (muscle, time period, MMA level, diagnostic group) effects and the logarithm of MMA. Greenhouse–Geisser test was used to determine any statistically significant associations (p ≤ 0.003). Results No statistically significant association was found among four-way, three-way, and two-way analyses. However, among the main effects, range of magnitudes was the only variable to be statistically significant. Although the data suggest a trend of increased masseter MMA in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group both during awake and sleep time periods, such observation is not maintained for the temporalis muscle. In addition, temporalis MMA was found to be higher in the pain-related TMD diagnoses group only at extreme activity levels (<25% and ≥80% ranges). Conclusion This data support the association between masticatory muscle hyperactivity and painful-TMD conditions. PMID:25865542

  13. Restorative Effect of Vitamin D Deficiency on Knee Pain and Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Heidari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Both vitamin D deficiency and quadriceps muscle weakness are associated with kneeosteoarthritis (KOA and pain. The aim of this study was to determine the restorative effect of vitamin Ddeficiency on pain and quadriceps muscle strength in knee osteoarthritis. Patients with KOA aged≥30years, the presence of knee pain for at least one month or longer and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin (25-OHDdeficiencies were recruited in the study. Participants with KOA compatible with Kellgren-Lawrence grade4, joint instability, and effusion, history of surgery or inflammatory arthropathies were excluded. Serum25-OHD was assessed by ELISA method and concentrationsQuadriceps muscle strength was measured by dynamometry method and intensity of knee pain by WesternOntario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis index scored by Likert scale and visual analog scale. Allparticipants received 50.000 IU oral cholecalciferol weekly for at least two months. The influence ofraising serum 25-OHD on quadriceps muscle strength and pain was assessed by calculation of meanchanges from baseline at the end of the treatment period using paired t-test. A total of 67 patients withmean age of 50±6.6 years of age were treated for 2 months. Serum 25-OHD reached to sufficient levels inall except one patient. At the end of the study period, serum 25-OHD and quadriceps muscle strengthincreased significantly as compared with baseline (P=0.007 and P=0.002, respectively, whereas knee paindecreased significantly based on Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis index (P=0.001as well as visual analogue scale scores (P=0.001.These findings indicated that correction of vitamin Ddeficiency in patients with KOA exerts a significant favorable effect on quadriceps muscle strength andknee pain.

  14. Effect of brief daily resistance training on rapid force development in painful neck and shoulder muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Schraefel, Mc; Andersen, Christoffer H

    2013-01-01

    performed maximal voluntary contractions at a static 90-degree shoulder joint angle. Rapid force development was determined as the rate of torque development and maximal muscle strength was determined as the peak torque. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, rate of torque development increased 31.0 Nm......OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of small daily amounts of progressive resistance training on rapid force development of painful neck/shoulder muscles. METHODS: 198 generally healthy adults with frequent neck/shoulder muscle pain (mean: age 43.1 years, computer use 93% of work time, 88% women.......05) for both training groups. Maximal muscle strength increased only ~5-6% [mean and 95% confidence interval for 2- and 12-min groups to control, respectively: 2.5 Nm (0.05-0.73) and 2.2 Nm (0.01-0.70)]. No significant differences between the 2- and 12-min groups were evident. A weak but significant...

  15. Restorative Effect of Vitamin D Deficiency on Knee Pain and Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Behzad; Javadian, Yahya; Babaei, Mansour; Yousef-Ghahari, Behnaz

    2015-08-01

    Both vitamin D deficiency and quadriceps muscle weakness are associated with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) and pain. The aim of this study was to determine the restorative effect of vitamin D deficiency on pain and quadriceps muscle strength in knee osteoarthritis. Patients with KOA aged ≥30 years, the presence of knee pain for at least one month or longer and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin (25-OHD) deficiencies were recruited in the study. Participants with KOA compatible with Kellgren-Lawrence grade 4, joint instability, and effusion, history of surgery or inflammatory arthropathies were excluded. Serum 25-OHD was assessed by ELISA method and concentrationsmuscle strength was measured by dynamometry method and intensity of knee pain by Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis index scored by Likert scale and visual analog scale. All participants received 50.000 IU oral cholecalciferol weekly for at least two months. The influence of raising serum 25-OHD on quadriceps muscle strength and pain was assessed by calculation of mean changes from baseline at the end of the treatment period using paired t-test. A total of 67 patients with mean age of 50±6.6 years of age were treated for 2 months. Serum 25-OHD reached to sufficient levels in all except one patient. At the end of the study period, serum 25-OHD and quadriceps muscle strength increased significantly as compared with baseline (P=0.007 and P=0.002, respectively), whereas knee pain decreased significantly based on Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis index (P=0.001)as well as visual analogue scale scores (P=0.001). These findings indicated that correction of vitamin D deficiency in patients with KOA exerts a significant favorable effect on quadriceps muscle strength and knee pain.

  16. The association between pelvic girdle pain and pelvic floor muscle function in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Colleen M; Mallinson, Trudy

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to determine pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in second trimester women with and without pelvic girdle pain (PGP). Fifty-five pregnant women with and without PGP were recruited in the second trimester who met inclusion for self-reported pain. Vaginal examination was performed assessing superficial and deep PFM tenderness, contract/relax patterns, and muscle strength. Fifty-one patients (26 with PGP and 25 without) were included in the final analyses. Significantly more patients in the PGP group had bilateral levator ani and obturator internus tenderness compared with the no pain group (Fisher's exact test (FET) P pregnancy. Lack of accompanying PFM dysfunction in PGP during pregnancy may reflect pain duration.

  17. Gender Differences in Response to Experimental Pain among Medical Students from a Western State of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik N Akhani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain is one of the most common reasons for patients to seek medical attention and it causes considerable human suffering. Pain is a complex perception that differs enormously among individual patients. Gender plays an important role in how pain is experienced, coped with and treated. Even young healthy individuals often differ in how they perceive and cope with pain. This study was done to investigate gender differences in response to experimental pain among medical students from a western state of India.Methods: A total of 150 medical students (86 boys and 64 girls participated in this interventional study. The Cold Pressor Test was used to exert experimental pain. To study the response, cardiovascular measures (radial pulse, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure and pain sensitivity parameters (pain threshold, pain tolerance and pain rating were assessed.Results: No significant difference was found in cardiovascular response to experimental pain between both the genders (p>0.05. Pain threshold and pain tolerance were found to be significantly higher in males whereas pain rating was found to be significantly higher in females (p<0.01. Pulse reactivity showed a negative relationship with pain threshold and pain tolerance whereas a positive relationship with pain rating, however no statistically significant relation was found between these measures.Conclusion: Females display greater pain sensitivity than men. Different pain perception might account for gender difference in pulse reactivity.

  18. Effects of experimental tooth clenching on pain and intramuscular release of 5-HT and glutamate in patients with myofascial TMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Andreas; Ghafouri, Bijar; Gerdle, Björn; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Ernberg, Malin

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that tooth clenching may be associated with local metabolic changes, and is a risk factor for myofascial temporomandibular disorders (M-TMD). This study investigated the effects of experimental tooth clenching on the levels of 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate, as well as on blood flow and pain intensity, in the masseter muscles of M-TMD patients. Fifteen patients with M-TMD and 15 pain-free controls participated. Intramuscular microdialysis was performed to collect 5-HT, glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate and to assess blood flow. Two hours after the insertion of a microdialysis catheter, participants performed a 20-minute repetitive tooth clenching task (50% of maximal voluntary contraction). Pain intensity was measured throughout. A significant effect of group (Prelease of other algesic substances that may cause pain.

  19. Masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhac, Ivone; Tariba, Petra; Kovac, Zoran; Simonić-Kocijan, Suncana; Lajnert, Vlatka; Mesić, Vesna Fugosić; Kuis, Davor; Braut, Vedrana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of masticatory muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in Croatian war veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The examined group consisted of 100 Croatian war veterans, in whom PTSD had previously been diagnosed. Patients were compared with 92 subjects who had not taken part in the war and in whom PTSD was excluded by psychiatric examination. The clinical examination consisted of palpation of the masticatory muscles, the prominent neck musculature, and TMJ. The examination technique used and the definition of items were previously tested for reliability and validity. 93% of the subjects with PTSD had masticatory muscle tenderness compared to 45.65% of the subjects in the control group (chi2 = 51.46, p TMJ tenderness compared to 3.26% of subjects in the control group (chi2 = 66.23, p TMJ in both groups was the left posterior capsule; in the PTSD group 38% and in subjects in the control group 2.17% of cases. The most painful location was the left posterior capsule in 28% of subjects with PTSD, while not one subject in the control group reported severe painful sensitivity. The very high frequency and intensity of pain in subjects with PTSD confirms the effect of stress on muscle and joint sensitivity, i.e. perception of pain.

  20. Does pelvic floor muscle contraction early after delivery cause perineal pain in postpartum women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neels, Hedwig; De Wachter, Stefan; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques; Wyndaele, Michel; Vermandel, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training is effective and necessary in the prevention and treatment of pelvic floor dysfunction during pregnancy and after childbirth. But because of the high prevalence of perineal pain observed in women after childbirth, many women and caregivers fear to start pelvic floor muscle training immediately after childbirth. However, it is unknown whether pelvic floor muscle contractions (PFMC) provoke perineal pain in women shortly after childbirth. Therefore, the main objective is to study whether PFMC performed immediately after childbirth is painful or not. Observational longitudinal study. Perineal pain was assessed (1-6 days and 9 weeks postpartum) using a visual analogue scale (VAS 0-10) during PFMC and during several activities of daily living (ADL), during micturition and defecation. Descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon and McNemar tests were used. A total of 233 women participated (148 primiparous and 85 multiparous). Immediately postpartum the prevalence and intensity of pain during ADL (73%; VAS 4.9 (±2.3)), micturition (47%; VAS 3.4 (±1.7)) and defecation (19%; VAS 3.6 (±2.2)) were significantly higher (all ppelvic floor muscle training shortly after childbirth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neck muscle endurance and head posture: A comparison between adolescents with and without neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Silva, Anabela G

    2016-04-01

    The main aims of this study were to compare the neck flexor and extensor endurance and forward head posture between adolescents with and without neck pain. The secondary aims were to explore potential associations between muscles endurance, head posture and neck pain characteristics and to assess intra-rater reliability of the measurements used. Adolescents with neck pain (n = 35) and age-matched asymptomatic adolescents (n = 35) had their forward head posture, neck flexor endurance and neck extensor endurance measured using clinical tests. Intra-rater reliability was also assessed. Forward head posture and neck flexor and extensor endurance tests showed moderate to almost perfect intra-rater reliability (ICC between 0.58 and 0.88). Adolescents with neck pain showed significantly less forward head posture (neck pain = 46.62 ± 4.92; asymptomatic = 44.18°± 3.64°, p > 0.05) and less neck flexor (neck pain = 24.50 ± 23.03s; asymptomatic = 35.89 ± 21.53s, p > 0.05) and extensor endurance (neck pain = 12.6.64 ± 77.94s; asymptomatic = 168.66 ± 74.77s, p > 0.05) than asymptomatic adolescents. Results suggest that changes in posture and neck muscle endurance are a feature of adolescents with neck pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quadriceps Muscle Strength Correlates With Serum Vitamin D and Knee Pain in Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadian, Yahya; Adabi, Marzieh; Heidari, Behzad; Babaei, Mansour; Firouzjahi, Alireza; Ghahhari, Behnaz Y; Hajian-Tilaki, Karim

    2017-01-01

    Quadriceps muscle weakness and vitamin D deficiency are associated with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between quadriceps muscle strength (QMS) and vitamin D in KOA. Patients with KOA aged 40 years and above were studied. QMS was assessed by the dynanometry method and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) by the ELISA method. Serum 25-OHDknee pain was determined by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index Pain Scale. The Pearson test was used for correlation analysis between QMS and serum 25-OHD as well as knee pain. A total of 92 patients (female, 80%) with a mean age of 49.6±11.7 years were studied. QMS was correlated positively with serum 25-OHD (r=0.304, r=9.24%, P=0.005) and negatively with knee pain (r=-0.232, r=5.3%, P=0.034). After adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index, the positive correlation increased to a higher level (r=0.496, r=24.9%, P=0.01). For each 1 ng/mL increase in serum 25-OHD, the value of QMS increased by 14.2%±3.5% (P=0.014). There was no significant correlation between serum 25-OHD and knee pain (P=0.13). These findings demonstrated a significant correlation between QMS with both serum vitamin D and knee pain, indicating a confounding role for quadriceps muscle in the association between serum vitamin D and osteoarthritis knee pain. On the basis of the findings of this study, vitamin D supplementation may affect pain by strengthening quadriceps muscle in KOA.

  3. Complex regional pain syndrome type I (RSD): pathology of skeletal muscle and peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, L; ter Laak, H J; Gabreëls-Festen, A; Gabreëls, F; Goris, R J

    1998-07-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) (recently reclassified as complex regional pain syndrome type I) is a syndrome occurring in extremities and, when chronic, results in severe disability and untractable pain. RSD may be accompanied by neurologic symptoms even when there is no previous neurologic lesion. There is no consensus as to the pathogenic mechanism involved in RSD. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RSD, we studied histopathology of skeletal muscle and peripheral nerve from patients with chronic RSD in a lower extremity. In eight patients with chronic RSD, an above-the-knee amputation was performed because of a nonfunctional limb. Specimens of sural nerves, tibial nerves, common peroneal nerves, gastrocnemius muscles, and soleus muscles were obtained from the amputated legs and analyzed by light and electron microscopy. In all patients, the affected leg showed similar neurologic symptoms such as spontaneous pain, hyperpathy, allodynia, paresis, and anesthesia dolorosa. The nerves showed no consistent abnormalities of myelinated fibers. In four patients, the C-fibers showed electron microscopic pathology. In all patients, the gastrocnemius and soleus muscle specimens showed a decrease of type I fibers, an increase of lipofuscin pigment, atrophic fibers, and severely thickened basal membrane layers of the capillaries. In chronic RSD, efferent nerve fibers were histologically unaffected; from afferent fibers, only C-fibers showed histopathologic abnormalities. Skeletal muscle showed a variety of histopathologic findings, which are similar to the histologic abnormalities found in muscles of patients with diabetes.

  4. EFFECT OF CAFFEINE ON THE AMOUNT OF PERCEIVED PAIN, JOINT RANGE OF MOTION AND EDEMA AFTER DELAYED MUSCLE SORENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Karabalaeifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed onset muscle soreness usually occurs after doing a new unusual physical activity, especially when, associated with repeated eccentric contractions and then it gradually disappears. There is not an extensive agreement in the case of treatment method of soreness signs quick reduction. This research was carried out with the aim of investigation caffeine consumption effect to find a good way in order to reduce the signs of delayed onset muscle soreness. In this semi-experimental with Double-blind design, 16 female volleyball player with an age average of 22.5+2.5 in 2 homogeneous 8 subject control and experimental group were studied. In this research, the effect of caffeine existing in coffee in 5 stages (24h before exercise, 12h before, immediately before exercise, after exercise and 12h after it and 1mg per 1kg of body weight on amount of perceived pain and range of motion of the joint and edema due to delay onset muscle soreness because of 50 jumps and lands of a 1 meter stage was investigated. The results showed that caffeine consumption has a meaningful effect on reduction of all the expressed signs after eccentric contractions. So it is recommended that physio thrapysts, doctors and athletes use this method to reduce delayed onset muscle soreness consequences after the injury.

  5. Neck disability is associated with masticatory myofascial pain and regional muscle sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Dayse Regina Alves; de Lima Ferreira, Ana Paula; Pereira, Thaís Alves Barreto; Porporatti, André Luís; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; Costa, Yuri Martins; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2015-05-01

    The primary aims of this study are to compare neck disability in masticatory myofascial pain subjects versus asymptomatic controls, and to evaluate the correlation between neck disability and muscle pain. Two groups composed this case-control study: a symptomatic group comprised of 27 subjects diagnosed with masticatory myofascial pain, as determined by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD), and a control group comprised of 28 asymptomatic subjects. The collected variables were pain intensity (visual analogue scale), pressure pain threshold of the temporomandibular joint, anterior temporalis, masseter, sternocleidomastoid muscle, upper trapezius and Achilles tendon (digital dynamometer, kgf/cm(2)), and neck disability (Neck Disability Index). Statistical analysis included Student's t-test and the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (5% significance level and 95% confidence interval). The symptomatic group showed greater neck disability with a mean (SD) of 11.8 (7), as compared with 2.8 (2.4) for the asymptomatic group (pcervical structures, insofar as subjects with masticatory myofascial pain reported greater neck disability, which, in turn, was correlated with regional muscle sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasonic Thickness of Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles in Response to Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction in women with stress incontinency with and without Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Dehghan-Manshadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Urinary Incontinence (UI as a common lower urinary tract dysfunction , results from Pelvic Floor Muscle's (PFM underactivity.Because of co-activation of PFM and the Lateral Abdominal Wall Muscles (LAWM, this study was aimed to investigate the changes in the ultrasonic thickness of the LAWM in response to PFM contraction in stress urinary incontinent (SUIwomen with and without Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. Materials & Methods: A total of 28 women, 10 healthy, 18 SUI with and without CLBP (9 in each group participated in this quasi-experimental study. After collecting demographic information and assessment of PFM function, changes in ultrasonic thickness of right LAWM were measured in response to PFM contraction. One way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson’s correlation tests were performed to analyze the data. Values of P0.05. There was a significant increase in thickness of the Traversus Abdominis Muscle (TrA during PFM contraction in control group comparing experimental groups (P=0.03. Women in control group showed significantly higher PFM strength and more intravaginal pressure (P=0.001. Conclusion: Changes in ultrasonic thickness of the TrA during PFM contraction revealed disturbance of co-activation of the LAWM and the PFM in women with and without SUI CLBP.

  7. A Comparison of the Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Thicknesses in Subjects with and without Neck Pain during Craniocervical Flexion Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ilsub; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the amount of change in the thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor (DCF) and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles in subjects with neck pain and subjects without neck pain during craniocervical flexion exercise (CCFE). [Subjects] The total number of subjects was 40, comprising 20 in the no-pain group (males 11, females 9) and 20 in the pain group (males 8, females 12). [Methods] Muscle images were obtained using ultrasound, and the thicknesses of the individual muscles were measured using the NIH ImageJ software. [Results] During CCFE, as pressure increased, the no-pain group recruited the DCF more than the pain group, while the pain group recruited the SCM more. [Conclusion] Selective DCF contraction exercises are considered very useful in the treatment of patients with neck pain.

  8. Postural strategy and trunk muscle activation during prolonged standing in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringheim, Inge; Austein, Helene; Indahl, Aage; Roeleveld, Karin

    2015-10-01

    Prolonged standing has been associated with development and aggravation of low back pain (LBP). However, the underlying mechanisms are not well known. The aim of the present study was to investigate postural control and muscle activation during and as a result of prolonged standing in chronic LBP (cLBP) patients compared to healthy controls (HCs). Body weight shifts and trunk and hip muscle activity was measured during 15 min standing. Prior and after the standing trial, strength, postural sway, reposition error (RE), flexion relaxation ratio (FRR), and pain were assessed and after the prolonged standing, ratings of perceived exertion. During prolonged standing, the cLBP patients performed significantly more body weight shifts (pback and abdominal muscles (p=.01) and similar temporal variability in muscle activation compared to HCs, while the cLBP patients reported more pain and perceived exertion at the end of prolonged standing. Moreover, both groups had a similar change in strength, postural sway, RE and FRR from before to after prolonged standing, where changes in HC were towards pre-standing values of cLBP patients. Thus, despite a more variable postural strategy, the cLBP patients did not have higher muscle activation variability, but a general increased muscle activation level. This may indicate a reduced ability to individually deactivate trunk muscles. Plausibly, due to the increased variable postural strategy, the cLBP patients could compensate for the relatively high muscle activation level, resulting in normal variation in muscle activation and normal reduction in strength, RE and FRR after prolonged standing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Trunk muscle recruitment patterns in patients with low back pain enhance the stability of the lumbar spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dieën, Jaap H; Cholewicki, Jacek; Radebold, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A comparative study of trunk muscle recruitment patterns in healthy control subjects and patients with chronic low back pain was conducted. OBJECTIVE: To assess trunk muscle recruitment in patients with low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Conflicting evidence has been reported

  10. Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, C.H. de; Heuvel, SP van den; Staal, J.B.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Hendriks, E.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neck pain is a significant health problem in modern society. There is evidence to suggest that neck muscle strength is reduced in patients with neck pain. This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle

  11. Effects of femoral rotational taping on pain, lower extremity kinematics, and muscle activation in female patients with patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chen-Yi; Huang, Han-Yi; Chen, Sheng-Chang; Lin, Jiu-Jenq; Chang, Alison H

    2015-07-01

    To explore the hip and knee joint kinematics as well as muscle activation between participants with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) and controls, and to investigate the immediate effect of proximal femoral rotational taping on pain, joint kinematics, and muscle activation during single-leg squat (SLS). Cross-sectional study. Sixteen female participants with PFPS, and eight healthy female controls participated. Three-dimensional hip and patellar kinematics measured by electromagnetic tracking system, hip (gluteus maximus and gluteus medius) and thigh (rectus femoris) muscle activation measured by EMG, and subjective report of pain were recorded during SLS in three randomized conditions of no tape, sham taping, and femoral rotational taping with kinesiotape. Without taping, compared with controls, PFPS group had increased hip adduction angle (23.5±11.3° vs. 15.8±7.3°) during SLS. Additionally, PFPS group exhibited lesser rectus femoris activity during the initial 0-15° of SLS. Application of both femoral rotational and sham tapes reduced pain for PFPS group. Compared with no tape or sham tape, femoral rotational tape significantly shifted the patella into more posterior (1.59±0.83cm in no tape vs. 1.54±0.87cm in sham tape vs. 1.32±0.72cm in femoral rotational tape) and distal (-2.49±0.95cm vs. -2.64±0.80cm vs. -3.11±0.77cm) positions in the PFPS group. Femoral rotational taping could alter patellofemoral kinematics and decrease pain in treatment of young female participants with PFPS. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High prevalence of shoulder girdle muscles with myofascial trigger points in patients with shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is reported to be highly prevalent and tends to be recurrent or persistent despite medical treatment. The pathophysiological mechanisms of shoulder pain are poorly understood. Furthermore, there is little evidence supporting the effectiveness of current treatment protocols. Although myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are rarely mentioned in relation to shoulder pain, they may present an alternative underlying mechanism, which would provide new treatment targets through MTrP inactivation. While previous research has demonstrated that trained physiotherapists can reliably identify MTrPs in patients with shoulder pain, the percentage of patients who actually have MTrPs remains unclear. The aim of this observational study was to assess the prevalence of muscles with MTrPs and the association between MTrPs and the severity of pain and functioning in patients with chronic non-traumatic unilateral shoulder pain. Methods An observational study was conducted. Subjects were recruited from patients participating in a controlled trial studying the effectiveness of physical therapy on patients with unilateral non-traumatic shoulder pain. Sociodemographic and patient-reported symptom scores, including the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire, and Visual Analogue Scales for Pain were compared with other studies. To test for differences in age, gender distribution, and education level between the current study population and the populations from Dutch shoulder studies, the one sample T-test was used. One observer examined all subjects (n = 72) for the presence of MTrPs. Frequency distributions, means, medians, standard deviations, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for descriptive purposes. The Spearman's rank-order correlation (ρ) was used to test for association between variables. Results MTrPs were identified in all subjects. The median number of muscles with MTrPs per subject was 6 (active MTrPs) and 4 (latent MTr

  13. High prevalence of shoulder girdle muscles with myofascial trigger points in patients with shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Carel; Dommerholt, Jan; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Wensing, Michel; Oostendorp, Rob A B

    2011-06-28

    Shoulder pain is reported to be highly prevalent and tends to be recurrent or persistent despite medical treatment. The pathophysiological mechanisms of shoulder pain are poorly understood. Furthermore, there is little evidence supporting the effectiveness of current treatment protocols. Although myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are rarely mentioned in relation to shoulder pain, they may present an alternative underlying mechanism, which would provide new treatment targets through MTrP inactivation. While previous research has demonstrated that trained physiotherapists can reliably identify MTrPs in patients with shoulder pain, the percentage of patients who actually have MTrPs remains unclear. The aim of this observational study was to assess the prevalence of muscles with MTrPs and the association between MTrPs and the severity of pain and functioning in patients with chronic non-traumatic unilateral shoulder pain. An observational study was conducted. Subjects were recruited from patients participating in a controlled trial studying the effectiveness of physical therapy on patients with unilateral non-traumatic shoulder pain. Sociodemographic and patient-reported symptom scores, including the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire, and Visual Analogue Scales for Pain were compared with other studies. To test for differences in age, gender distribution, and education level between the current study population and the populations from Dutch shoulder studies, the one sample T-test was used. One observer examined all subjects (n = 72) for the presence of MTrPs. Frequency distributions, means, medians, standard deviations, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for descriptive purposes. The Spearman's rank-order correlation (ρ) was used to test for association between variables. MTrPs were identified in all subjects. The median number of muscles with MTrPs per subject was 6 (active MTrPs) and 4 (latent MTrPs). Active MTrPs were most

  14. High prevalence of shoulder girdle muscles with myofascial trigger points in patients with shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensing Michel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder pain is reported to be highly prevalent and tends to be recurrent or persistent despite medical treatment. The pathophysiological mechanisms of shoulder pain are poorly understood. Furthermore, there is little evidence supporting the effectiveness of current treatment protocols. Although myofascial trigger points (MTrPs are rarely mentioned in relation to shoulder pain, they may present an alternative underlying mechanism, which would provide new treatment targets through MTrP inactivation. While previous research has demonstrated that trained physiotherapists can reliably identify MTrPs in patients with shoulder pain, the percentage of patients who actually have MTrPs remains unclear. The aim of this observational study was to assess the prevalence of muscles with MTrPs and the association between MTrPs and the severity of pain and functioning in patients with chronic non-traumatic unilateral shoulder pain. Methods An observational study was conducted. Subjects were recruited from patients participating in a controlled trial studying the effectiveness of physical therapy on patients with unilateral non-traumatic shoulder pain. Sociodemographic and patient-reported symptom scores, including the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH Questionnaire, and Visual Analogue Scales for Pain were compared with other studies. To test for differences in age, gender distribution, and education level between the current study population and the populations from Dutch shoulder studies, the one sample T-test was used. One observer examined all subjects (n = 72 for the presence of MTrPs. Frequency distributions, means, medians, standard deviations, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for descriptive purposes. The Spearman's rank-order correlation (ρ was used to test for association between variables. Results MTrPs were identified in all subjects. The median number of muscles with MTrPs per subject was 6 (active

  15. Voluntary activation of the trapezius muscle in cases with neck/shoulder pain compared to healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Katrine Tholstrup; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2017-01-01

    Subjects reporting neck/shoulder pain have been shown to generate less force during maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the shoulder muscles compared to healthy controls. This has been suggested to be caused by a pain-related decrease in voluntary activation (VA) rather than lack...... of muscle mass. The aim of the present study was to investigate VA of the trapezius muscle during MVCs in subjects with and without neck/shoulder pain by use of the twitch interpolation technique. Ten cases suffering from pain and ten age and gender matched, healthy controls were included in the study....... Upper trapezius muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonography and pain intensity was measured on a 100mm visual analog scale (VAS). VA was calculated from five maximal muscle activation attempts. Superimposed stimuli were delivered to the accessory nerve at peak force and during a 2% MVC following...

  16. Alterations in Masticatory Muscle Activation in People with Persistent Neck Pain Despite the Absence of Orofacial Pain or Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Marco; Geri, Tommaso; Gizzi, Leonardo; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    To assess whether patients with persistent neck pain display evidence of altered masticatory muscle behavior during a jaw-clenching task, despite the absence of orofacial pain or temporomandibular disorders. Ten subjects with persistent, nonspecific neck pain and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls participated. Maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of unilateral jaw clenching followed by 5-second submaximal contractions at 10%, 30%, 50%, and 70% MVC were recorded by two flexible force transducers positioned between the first molar teeth. Task performance was quantified by mean distance and offset error from the reference target force as error indices, and standard deviation of force was used as an index of force steadiness. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded bilaterally from the masseter muscle with 13 X 5 grids of electrodes and from the anterior temporalis with bipolar electrodes. Normalized EMG root mean square (RMS) was computed for each location of the grid to form a map of the EMG amplitude distribution, and the average normalized RMS was determined for the bipolar acquisition. Between-group differences were analyzed with the Kruskal Wallis analysis of variance. Task performance was similar in patients and controls. However, patients displayed greater masseter EMG activity bilaterally at higher force levels (Ppain despite the absence of orofacial pain or temporomandibular disorders.

  17. An overview of the management of muscle pain and injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lower limb. Weakness of the limb or joint. Inability to move joint through its full range of movement. Sport injuries may also be classified as mircotraumas and macrotraumas.6. • Microtraumas result from constant injury to a certain part of the body or overuse of a certain muscle, joint, tissue, etc. Further to this they include tears ...

  18. Brief relaxation training is not sufficient to alter tolerance to experimental pain in novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen E; Norman, Greg J

    2017-01-01

    Relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing and muscle relaxation, are aspects common to most forms of mindfulness training. There is now an abundance of research demonstrating that mindfulness training has beneficial effects across a wide range of clinical conditions, making it an important tool for clinical intervention. One area of extensive research is on the beneficial effects of mindfulness on experiences of pain. However, the mechanisms of these effects are still not well understood. One hypothesis is that the relaxation components of mindfulness training, through alterations in breathing and muscle tension, leads to changes in parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system functioning which influences pain circuits. The current study seeks to examine how two of the relaxation subcomponents of mindfulness training, deep breathing and muscle relaxation, influence experiences of pain in healthy individuals. Participants were randomized to either a 10 minute deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, or control condition after which they were exposed to a cold pain task. Throughout the experiment, measures of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system activity were collected to assess how deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation alter physiological responses, and if these changes moderate any effects of these interventions on responses to pain. There were no differences in participants' pain tolerances or self-reported pain ratings during the cold pain task or in participants' physiological responses to the task. Additionally, individual differences in physiological functioning were not related to differences in pain tolerance or pain ratings. Overall this study suggests that the mechanisms through which mindfulness exerts its effects on pain are more complex than merely through physiological changes brought about by altering breathing or muscle tension. This indicates a need for more research examining the specific subcomponents of

  19. Chronic pelvic pain arising from dysfunctional stabilizing muscles of the hip joint and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae Wook; Lim, Chang Hun; Han, Jae Young; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a very annoying condition that is responsible for substantial suffering and medical expense. But dealing with this pain can be tough, because there are numerous possible causes for the pelvic pain such as urologic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal problems. Of these, musculoskeletal problem may be a primary cause of chronic pelvic pain in patients with a preceding trauma to the low back, pelvis, or lower extremities. Here, we report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with severe chronic pelvic pain after a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accident that was successfully managed with image-guided trigger point injections on several pelvic stabilizing muscles.

  20. Pain and tenderness in human temporal muscle induced by bradykinin and 5-hydroxytryptamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kai; Tuxen, C; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U

    1990-01-01

    Pain was induced in 19 healthy individuals by double-blind injections into the temporal muscle of 0.2 ml of physiological saline with or without active substances added. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (2 nmol) caused pain similar to saline, bradykinin (2 nmol) only insignificantly more pain (0.05 less than p...... less than 0.1), while a mixture of the two substances in half dosage (1 nmol + 1 nmol) caused pain significantly above saline (p less than 0.01). Variations in the response to saline did not permit a conclusion to be made on the question of induced tenderness. However, the mixture of the two substances...... appeared to lower the pressure-pain threshold as measured by a pressure algometer (p less than 0.05)....

  1. Cervical-scapular muscles strength and severity of temporomandibular disorder in women with mechanical neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Pasinato

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Changes in cervical muscle function have been observed in patients with neck pain (NP and TMD. However, the relationship between TMD severity and neck muscle strength in the presence/absence of NP is unknown. Objective: To determine the prevalence of TMD in women with and without mechanical NP and assess the cervical-scapular muscle strength and its association with TMD severity. Methods: Fifteen volunteers without neck pain (CG and 14 women with mechanical neck pain (NPG took part and were selected by the Neck Disability Index. The diagnosis and severity of TMD were determined by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD and Temporomandibular Index (TI, respectively. The strength of the upper trapezius muscle, and cervical flexor and extensor muscles was measured by digital hand dynamometer. Results: 64.5% of women with NP and 33.3% without NP were diagnosed with TMD (p = 0.095. The NPG showed lower strength of the cervical flexor (p = 0.044 and extensor (p=0.006 muscles, and higher TI (p = 0.038 than in the CG. It was also verified moderate negative correlation between TI and the strength of dominant (p = 0.046, r = -0.547 and non-dominant (p = 0.007, r = -0.695 upper trapezius, and cervical flexors (p = 0.023, r = -0.606 in the NPG. Conclusion: There was no difference in the prevalence of TMD in women with and without NP. However, women with NP have lower cervical muscle strength - compared to those without NP - which was associated with greater severity of TMD. Thus, in women with NP associated with TMD, it is advisable to assess and address the severity of this dysfunction and identify the cervical-scapular muscles compromise.

  2. Myofascial trigger points in the masticatory muscles in patients with and without chronic mechanical neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-la-Llave-Rincon, Ana I; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Gil-Crujera, Antonio; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Svensson, Peter; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe differences in the presence of masseter and temporalis muscle trigger points (TrPs) and jaw opening between individuals with mechanical neck pain and healthy controls. Twenty patients with mechanical neck pain (60% women) without symptoms in the orofacial region, aged 20 to 37 years old, and 20 matched controls participated. Temporalis and masseter muscles were examined for the presence of TrPs in a blinded design. Trigger points were considered active if the subject recognized the pain as a familiar symptom, whereas the TrPs was considered latent if the pain was not recognized as a symptom. Jaw opening was assessed with a ruler. A greater number (P latent rather than active TrPs were found. The distribution of TrPs between groups was different for the masseter (left odds ratio [OR], 3.4; right OR, 8.1; P active jaw opening and the number of TrPs within the masticatory muscles (r(s) = -0.6; P latent TrPs in the masticatory muscles and reduced jaw opening compared to healthy controls. These findings may suggest the spread of sensitization from the cervical segment to the trigeminal brain stem sensory nuclear complex. Copyright © 2012 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pelvic floor muscle dysfunctions are prevalent in female chronic pelvic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loving, S; Thomsen, Thordis; Jaszczak, Poul P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No current standardized set of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) outcome measures have been specifically tested for their applicability in a general female chronic pelvic pain (CPP) population. We aimed to compare PFM function between a randomly selected population-based sample of women...

  4. Changes in the cervical FRR, shoulder muscle pain and position after continuous detailed assembly work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo And, In-Gyu; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Several risk factors for upper-extremity muscle injuries are known, including repetitive and continuous-flow assembly work. However, no study has investigated the changes in the cervical flexion-relaxation ratio (FRR) and scapular position after continuous detailed assembly work. This study investigated the changes in the cervical FRR, trapezius muscle pain, and acromion and scapular positions after continuous detailed assembly work. Fifteen male workers were recruited. The cervical FRR, pressure-pain threshold (PPT) of the upper and middle trapezius muscle, and acromion and scapular positions were measured in all subjects once before and once after detailed assembly work. The cervical FRR after detailed assembly work was significantly decreased compared with that before detailed assembly work. The PPT of the upper and middle trapezius muscle after detailed assembly work was significantly decreased compared with that before detailed assembly work. The acromion angle after detailed assembly work was significantly decreased compared with that before detailed assembly work. The scapular inferior distance after detailed assembly was significantly increased compared with that before detailed assembly work. Our findings suggest that detailed assembly work may cause the absence of FRR, upper trapezius and middle trapezius pain, and scapular malalignment associated with a potential risk of neck and shoulder pain.

  5. Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Smits-Engelsman Bouwien CM; Staal J Bart; Heuvel Sylvia; de Koning Chantal HP; Hendriks Erik JM

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Neck pain is a significant health problem in modern society. There is evidence to suggest that neck muscle strength is reduced in patients with neck pain. This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle strength or endurance in patients with non-specific neck pain, which can be used in daily practice. Methods A computerised literature search was performed in the Medline, CINAHL and Embase da...

  6. Effect of cycling on oxygenation of relaxed neck/shoulder muscles in women with and without chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed

    2010-01-01

    increases oxygenation of resting neck/shoulder muscles in women with and without trapezius myalgia, indicating acute positive effects of either neural or humoral factors on vascular beds of distant relaxed muscles. Although this beneficial response was observed in both groups, the post-exercise response......Work-related neck/shoulder muscle pain has been associated with increased anaerobic muscle metabolism. Thus, interventions to enhance oxygenation of painful muscles seem relevant. While cycling with relaxed shoulders has been shown to result in acute neck/shoulder muscle pain reduction, the effect......-maximal cycling in an upright position with relaxed shoulders. Near-infrared spectroscopy was used to measure trapezius muscle oxygenation during and 2 min after the cycling period. For both MYA and CON, oxygenation of the passive trapezius increased in a linear fashion over time, to values approximately 5 micro...

  7. Influence of shoulder pain on muscle function: implications for the assessment and therapy of shoulder disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Filip; Lluch, Enrique; Falla, Deborah; Meeus, Mira; Noten, Suzie; Nijs, Jo

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder pain is often a challenging clinical phenomenon because of the potential mismatch between pathology and the perception of pain. Current evidence clearly emphasizes an incomplete understanding of the nature of shoulder pain. Indeed, the effective diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain should not only rely upon a detailed knowledge of the peripheral pathologies that may be present in the shoulder, but also on current knowledge of pain neurophysiology. To assess and treat shoulder pain, a comprehensive understanding of the way in which pain is processed is essential. This review reflects modern pain neurophysiology to the shoulder and aims to answer the following questions: why does my shoulder hurt? What is the impact of shoulder pain on muscle function? What are the implications for the clinical examination of the shoulder? And finally, what are the clinical implications for therapy? Despite the increasing amount of research in this area, an in-depth understanding of the bidirectional nociception-motor interaction is still far from being achieved. Many questions remain, especially related to the treatment of nociception-motor interactions.

  8. Central projection of pain arising from delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Zimmermann

    Full Text Available Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS is a subacute pain state arising 24-48 hours after a bout of unaccustomed eccentric muscle contractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to examine the patterns of cortical activation arising during DOMS-related pain in the quadriceps muscle of healthy volunteers evoked by either voluntary contraction or physical stimulation. The painful movement or physical stimulation of the DOMS-affected thigh disclosed widespread activation in the primary somatosensory and motor (S1, M1 cortices, stretching far beyond the corresponding areas somatotopically related to contraction or physical stimulation of the thigh; activation also included a large area within the cingulate cortex encompassing posteroanterior regions and the cingulate motor area. Pain-related activations were also found in premotor (M2 areas, bilateral in the insular cortex and the thalamic nuclei. In contrast, movement of a DOMS-affected limb led also to activation in the ipsilateral anterior cerebellum, while DOMS-related pain evoked by physical stimulation devoid of limb movement did not.

  9. Effect of physical training on function of chronically painful muscles: A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Zebis, Mette K

    2008-01-01

    ) with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia participated in a 10 week randomized controlled intervention; specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles (SST), general fitness training performed as leg-bicycling (GFT), or a reference intervention without physical activity (REF). Torque.......01-0.05). While EMG activity of the unaffected deltoid remained unchanged during the maximal contractions, an increase in EMG amplitude (42-86%, Pmuscle. Correspondingly, torque increased 18-53% (P...Purpose: Pain and tenderness of the upper trapezius muscle is frequent in several occupational groups. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of three contrasting interventions on muscle function and pain in women with trapezius myalgia. Methods: A group of employed women (n=42...

  10. Elite swimmers with and without unilateral shoulder pain: mechanical hyperalgesia and active/latent muscle trigger points in neck-shoulder muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Lozano, A; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C; Calderón-Soto, C; Domingo-Camara, A; Madeleine, P; Arroyo-Morales, M

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to investigate the presence of mechanical hypersensitivity and active trigger points (TrPs) in the neck-shoulder muscles in elite swimmers with/without unilateral shoulder pain. Seventeen elite swimmers with shoulder pain; 18 swimmers without shoulder pain; and 15 elite athletes matched controls were recruited. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the levator scapulae, sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius, infraspinatus, scalene, subscapularis and tibialis anterior muscles. TrPs in the levator scapulae, upper trapezius, infraspinatus, scalene, sternocleidomastoid and subscapularis muscles were also explored. Swimmers with shoulder pain showed significant lower PPT in all muscles compared with controls (Pactive; 2.6 ± 1.4 latent) and 4.7 ± 1.3 (1.3 ± 1.3 active; 3.4 ± 1.5 latent), whereas healthy athletes only showed latent TrPs (2.4 ± 1.2). Elite swimmers with shoulder pain showed higher number of active TrPs than swimmers without pain, whereas it was the opposite for the number of latent muscle TrP (Pactive TrPs play a role in the development of shoulder pain in elite swimmers. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Ultrasonographic analysis of dorsal neck muscles thickness changes induced by isometric contraction of shoulder muscles: A comparison between patients with chronic neck pain and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Noureddin; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Rahnama, Leila; Noori-Kochi, Farhang; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2016-04-01

    Altered pattern of muscle activity is commonly seen with chronic neck pain (CNP). However, limited investigations have been done on dorsal neck muscles' activity pattern while performing upper limb tasks in patients with CNP. To investigate dorsal neck muscles' thickness changes during isometric contraction of shoulder muscles. Case-control study. This study investigated dorsal neck muscles' thickness changes during isometric contraction of shoulder muscles in 20 healthy participants (mean age 27 ± 4.37) and 17 patients with CNP (mean age 29 ± 5.50). Effects of isometric force of shoulder muscles on dorsal neck muscles' thickness changes were also evaluated. Significant muscle × group interaction was observed for the dorsal neck muscles thickness changes (p = 0.008) indicating different pattern of muscle activity in terms of changes in muscle thickness of two groups. Significant main effects of direction was observed (P = 0.003), with the abduction had the greatest impact on changing the dorsal neck muscles thickness. patients with CNP showed altered pattern of muscle thickness changes in comparison to healthy participants. Isometric abduction of shoulder muscles induced the greatest changes of dorsal neck muscles thickness among other force directions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasonography in Diagnosis of Myofascial Pain Syndrome and Reliability of Novel Ultrasonic Indexes of Upper Trapezius Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Navid; Okhovatian, Farshad; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Karami, Mehdi; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Mohammadi, Hosein Kouhzad

    2016-03-23

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a common non-articular musculoskeletal disorder. It is characterized by local and referred pain due to the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). MTrPs most commonly involve the upper trapezius muscle and can be visualized using ultrasound imaging. This study was designed to determine the inter-rater reliability of some new ultrasonographic indices of the upper trapezius muscle and the sensitivity and specificity of 2D ultrasound imaging in the diagnosis of MPS. This semi-experimental study enrolled 15 participants of both genders (mean age: 40.60 ± 5.74 years) with suspected symptoms of MPS. In the first step of the study, the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography for diagnosis of MPS was determined in a double blind manner. In the second step, some ultrasonographic measurements, such as muscle thickness, area of MTrPs in longitudinal view, echogenicity of MTrPs in longitudinal view, echogenicity of muscle with MTrPs in longitudinal and transverse views, and the pennation angle of the upper trapezius muscle were measured twice and their reliability was determined using the value of the mean of the two measurements. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonographic diagnosis were 91% and 75%, respectively. The inter-rater reliability of upper trapezius muscle thickness, pennation angle, area of MTrPs, echogenicity of active MTrPs in longitudinal view, echogenicity of muscle with MTrPs in transverse view and echogenicity of muscle with MTrPs in longitudinal view were 0.91, 0.96, 0.93, 0.83, 0.93, and 0.91, respectively. 1. Our findings indicated that ultrasonography is a useful method for the diagnosis of MPS owing to its high sensitivity. 2. Appropriate reliability of the quantitative ultrasonographic indices of interest, especially the area of MTrPs and their echogenicity, could be useful for long-term monitoring and designing interventional studies for better management of the syndrome.

  13. Myofascial trigger points in neck and shoulder muscles and widespread pressure pain hypersensitivtiy in patients with postmastectomy pain: evidence of peripheral and central sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Del-Moral-Ávila, Rosario; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    To describe the presence of widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia and myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in neck and shoulder muscles in patients with postmastectomy pain. Twenty-nine women (mean age: 50±8 y) with postmastectomy pain and 23 matched healthy controls (mean age: 50±9 y) participated. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were bilaterally assessed over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, the deltoid muscle, the second metacarpal, and the tibialis anterior muscle. TrPs in the upper trapezius, suboccipital, levator scapulae, sternocleidomastoid, scalene, infraspinatus, and pectoralis major muscles were explored. TrPs were considered active if the local and referred pain reproduced symptoms and the patient recognized the pain as familiar. Twenty-five (86%) patients reported neck pain whereas 20 (69%) patients showed shoulder/axillary pain. The results showed that PPT levels were significantly decreased bilaterally over the C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, deltoid muscle, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle in patients with postmastectomy pain as compared with controls (all sites, Pactive TrPs for each woman with postmastectomy pain was 5.4±1.8. Healthy controls only had latent TrPs (0.5±0.6). Patients with postmastectomy pain showed a greater number of TrPs than controls (Pactive TrPs in patients with postmastectomy pain as compared with controls (PActive TrPs in the pectoralis major (n=27, 93%), infraspinatus (n=23, 79%), and upper trapezius (n=19, 65%) muscles were the most prevalent in the affected side in the postmastectomy group. The number of active TrPs was positively correlated with neck (rs=0.392, P=0.036) and shoulder/axillary (rs=0.437, P=0.018) pain intensity. Our findings revealed bilateral widespread pressure pain hypersensitivity in patients with postmastectomy pain. In addition, the local and referred pain elicited by active TrPs reproduced neck and shoulder/axillary complaints in these patients. These results suggest peripheral and

  14. Influence of paravertebral muscles training on brain plasticity and postural control in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Preuss, Richard; Schneider, Cyril

    2016-07-01

    Isometric activation (ISOM) of deep multifidi muscles (MF) can influence postural adjustments and primary motor cortex (M1) function in chronic low back pain (CLBP). In order to better understand how ISOM impacts on CLBP condition, the present study contrasted ISOM after-effects on M1 function, MF postural activation and pain with another training, the global activation of paravertebral muscles (GLOB, hip extension). The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of ISOM and GLOB (3-week training each) on MF postural activation and M1 function in a CLBP population. Twenty-four people with CLBP were randomly allocated to ISOM and GLOB groups for a 3-week daily practice. Pre/post-training after-effects were assessed by the onset of superficial MF (MF-S) activation during ballistic limb movements (bilateral shoulder flexion in standing; unilateral hip extension in prine lying), MF-S corticomotor control tested by transcranial magnetic stimulation of M1, and assessment of pain, kinesiophobia and disability by standardized questionnaires. Both ISOM and GLOB improved pain and disability. However, only ISOM influenced M1 function (decreased corticospinal excitability and increased intracortical inhibition), fastened MF-S postural activation and decreased kinesiophobia. Changes of corticospinal excitability and of MF-S postural adjustments suggest that ISOM better influenced brain plasticity. Future studies should further test whether our novel findings relate to an influence of the exercises on the lumbopelvic control of different muscles and on cognitive function. Clinically, individual's evaluation remains warranted before prescribing one or the other of these two conventional exercises for reducing pain. This original study presents how motor control exercises can influence brain plasticity and postural control in chronic low back pain. This knowledge will impact on the decision of clinicians to prescribe specific exercises with a view of improving motor

  15. Referred pain elicited by manual exploration of the lateral rectus muscle in chronic tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Gerwin, Robert D; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the presence of referred pain elicited by manual examination of the lateral rectus muscle in patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). A case-control blinded study. It has been found previously that the manual examination of the superior oblique muscle can elicit referred pain to the head in some patients with migraine or tension-type headache. However, a referred pain from other extraocular muscles has not been investigated. Fifteen patients with CTTH and 15 healthy subjects without headache history were included. A blinded assessor performed a manual examination focused on the search for myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in the right and left lateral rectus muscles. TrP diagnosis was made when there was referred pain evoked by maintained pressure on the lateral corner of the orbit (anatomical projection of the lateral rectus muscle) for 20 seconds, and increased referred pain while the subject maintained a medial gaze on the corresponding side (active stretching of the muscle) for 15 seconds. On each side, a 10-point numerical pain rate scale was used to assess the intensity of referred pain at both stages of the examination. Ten patients with CTTH (66.6%) had referred pain that satisfied TrPs diagnostic criteria, while only one healthy control (0.07%) reported referred pain upon the examination of the lateral rectus muscles (P < 0.001). The elicited referred pain was perceived as a deep ache located at the supraorbital region or the homolateral forehead. Pain was evoked on both sides in all subjects with TrPs, with no difference in pain intensity between the right and the left. The average pain intensity was significantly greater in the patient group (P < 0.001). All CTTH patients with referred pain recognized it as the frontal pain that they usually experienced during their headache attacks, which was consistent with active TrPs. In some patients with CTTH, the manual examination of lateral rectus muscle TrPs elicits a referred pain that

  16. Age and side-related morphometric MRI evaluation of trunk muscles in people without back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia; Elliott, James

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluated lumbar spine muscle volume and Muscle Fatty Infiltrate (MFI) across two age groups of healthy adults. Twenty-four participants (young group - YG: age 18-25, n = 12; mature group - MG: age 45-60, n = 12) without low back pain underwent T1-weighted axial MRI. Muscle volume and MFI were obtained from the left and right lumbar erector spinae (ES), multifidus (M), rectus abdominis (RA) and psoas (PS) muscles. For MFI, mean pixel intensity (MPI) of muscles was reported as a percentage of subcutaneous fat MPI. Within-group comparison of left and right side muscle volume was not significantly different in the YG. In the MG, right RA and ES were significantly smaller than left (RA p = 0.049; ES p = 0.03). In both groups, left PS, M and ES MFI was significantly smaller compared to the right side and left RA MFI was significantly greater compared to right side (all p ≤ 0.001). For M volume, 81.7-84.6% of variance was explained by age, height and Body Mass Index (BMI). For ES volume, 81.6-82.8% of variance was explained by height and BMI. Age explained 18.1%-36.0% of variance in M and ES right MFI. Therefore, age and BMI are relevant factors for extensor muscle volume, but not for flexor muscle volume. Also, age significantly influences MFI for right-sided extensors only. The age effect is apparently independent of full subjective back functionality. For future spinal muscle research, the side-and muscle-specific effect of age on muscle morphology should be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Opioid and noradrenergic contributions of tapentadol in experimental neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meske, Diana S; Xie, Jennifer Y; Oyarzo, Janice; Badghisi, Hamid; Ossipov, Michael H; Porreca, Frank

    2014-03-06

    Tapentadol is a dual action molecule with mu opioid agonist and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake blocking activity that has recently been introduced for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. The effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) morphine (10mg/kg), tapentadol (10 or 30 mg/kg) or duloxetine (30 mg/kg), a norepinephrine/serotonin (NE/5HT) reuptake inhibitor, were evaluated in male, Sprague-Dawley rats with spinal nerve ligation (SNL) or sham surgery. Additionally, the effects of these drugs on spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NE levels were quantified. Response thresholds to von Frey filament stimulation decreased significantly from baseline in SNL, but not sham, operated rats. Duloxetine, tapentadol and morphine produced significant and time-related reversal of tactile hypersensitivity. Duloxetine significantly increased spinal CSF NE levels in both sham and SNL rats and no significant differences were observed in these groups. Tapentadol (10 mg/kg) produced a significant increase in spinal NE levels in SNL, but not in sham, rats. At the higher dose (30 mg/kg), tapentadol produced a significant increase in spinal CSF NE levels in both SNL and sham groups; however, spinal NE levels were elevated for an extended period in the SNL rats. This could be detected 30 min following tapentadol (30 mg/kg) in both sham and SNL groups. Surprisingly, while the dose of morphine studied reversed tactile hypersensitivity in nerve-injured rats, CSF NE levels were significantly reduced in both sham- and SNL rats. The data suggest that tapentadol elicits enhanced elevation in spinal NE levels in a model of experimental neuropathic pain offering a mechanistic correlate to observed clinical efficacy in this pain state. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Hemibridge with Ball and Balloon Exercise on Forced Expiratory Volume and Pain in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorida Fernandes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Suboptimal breathing patterns and impairments of posture and trunk stability are often associated with musculoskeletal complaints such as low back pain. Respiration is also affected by poor neuromuscular control of core muscles. Immediate effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise has been studied on chronic pain in athlete population. Objective: To evaluate the effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, forced expiratory volume and functional abilities in patients with chronic low back pain using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV and Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ. Methods: The present experimental study was conducted among 30 participants between the age of 21 to 55 years with chronic non-specific LBP. The participants were given a hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise. Pre-interventional and 3rd day Post-interventional outcome measurements were taken using VAS, FEV1 and FEV6 and MODQ. Results: The difference between pre-and post of VAS was statistically highly significant (p=0.0001. The p value of FEV6 and MODQ by paired t test was statistically significant with p value of 0.02 and 0.0007 respectively. Conclusion: The study concludes that there is an immediate effect of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, FEV6 and functional ability in patients with chronic LBP.

  19. Is Pain Perception Altered in People With Depression? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Experimental Pain Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Trevor; Correll, Christoph U; Gallop, Katy; Vancampfort, Davy; Stubbs, Brendon

    2016-12-01

    Although clinical studies suggest depressed patients may be more vulnerable to pain, experimental research is equivocal. This meta-analysis aimed to clarify whether depression is associated with altered pain perception in response to noxious stimulation and to identify factors that might influence this association. A search of major electronic databases was conducted to identify experimental studies investigating pain response in depressed participants versus healthy control participants using established pain outcome measures. Random effects meta-analysis of standardized mean differences was conducted on data from 32 studies (N = 1,317). For high-intensity noxious stimulation, overall pain tolerance was similar across depressed and control groups (Hedges g = .09, P = .71, studies = 10). For low-intensity stimulation, a small, but statistically significant higher mean sensory threshold (g = .35, P = .01, studies = 9) and pain threshold (g = .32, P = .02, studies = 25) was observed in depressed participants, suggesting diminished pain. However, considerable heterogeneity in the direction and magnitude of effects was observed, indicating a likely condition-specific effect of depression on pain. Subgroup analysis found that pain threshold/tolerance was increased in depression for exteroceptive (cutaneous) stimulation but decreased for interoceptive (ischemic) stimulation, but that substantial heterogeneity remained. Overall, results provide some support for altered pain processing in depression, but suggest this link is dependent upon modality and additional, unidentified factors. This meta-analysis of experimental studies suggests potential effects of depression on pain perception are variable and likely to depend upon multiple factors. The contrasting pattern for ischemic versus other noxious stimuli suggests that stimulus modality is a key factor, which could help explain discrepancies across clinical and experimental findings. Copyright

  20. Pain perception in people with Down syndrome: a synthesis of clinical and experimental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Brian E.; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    People with an intellectual disability experience both acute and chronic pain with at least the same frequency as the general population. However, considerably less is known about the pain perception of people with Down syndrome. In this review paper, we evaluated the available clinical and experimental evidence. Some experimental studies of acute pain have indicated that pain threshold was higher than normal but only when using a reaction time method to measure pain sensitivity. However, when reaction time is not part of the calculation of the pain threshold, pain sensitivity in people with Down syndrome is in fact lower than normal (more sensitive to pain). Clinical studies of chronic pain have shown that people with an intellectual disability experience chronic pain and within that population, people with Down syndrome also experience chronic pain, but the precise prevalence of chronic pain in Down syndrome has yet to be established. Taken together, the literature suggests that people with Down syndrome experience pain, both acute and chronic, with at least the same frequency as the rest of the population. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that although acute pain expression appears to be delayed, once pain is registered, there appears to be a magnified pain response. We conclude by proposing an agenda for future research in this area. PMID:26283936

  1. Cervico-mandibular muscle activity in females with chronic cervical pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathophysiological mechanisms behind pain in chroniccervical musculoskeletal conditions (MSC in office workers remainunclear. Chronic cervical pain has established links with temporomandibular(TM disorders. Yet there is no current published evidence to reportwhether individuals with cervical dysfunction exhibit altered masseterand cervical extensor (CE muscle activity. Objective: To explore CE andmasseter surface electromyographic (sEMG activity and teeth clenchinghabits in females with chronic cervical dysfunction and no TM disorder.Design: Descriptive cross-sectional correlational study with singleblinding.Participants: University students and staff with or without chroniccervical pain and no TM involvement. Methods: Descriptive and paindata captured from Research Diagnostic Criteria for TM disorders, NeckDisability Index, Computer Usage, Brief Pain Inventory, and EuroQoL-5Dquestionnaires. Female participants allocated to a chronic cervical (n = 20 and a control group (n = 22. Investigator blindedto the study groups recorded sEMG of bilateral masseter and CE muscles (C4/5 level at rest and during light teeth clenching.Results: No differences in socio-demographic profile; or in masseter or CE sEMG activity at rest or during light clench betweengroups. The pain group had higher scores for pain, reported a daytime teeth clenching habit, and had worse scores for the healthrelatedquality of life (HRQoL sub-sections for pain, anxiety/depression, and lower scores for perceived health status. Conclusion:No relationship established between cervico-mandibular sEMG activity and reported disability in females with chronic cervicaldysfunction and no TM disorder. Association between biopsychosocial factors of teeth clenching and anxiety/depression highlightscomplex pathophysiological mechanisms in chronic recurrent cervical pain.

  2. Individual differences in the cardiovascular responses to tonic muscle pain: parallel increases or decreases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure and heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Birznieks, Ingvars; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2012-10-01

    We recently showed that acute muscle pain, induced by bolus intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline, causes a sustained increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and a modest increase in blood pressure and heart rate. However, it is not known whether long-lasting (tonic) pain, which more closely resembles chronic pain, causes a sustained increase in MSNA and blood pressure. We tested this hypothesis by recording MSNA in 12 healthy subjects. Tonic pain was induced for ~60 min by slow intramuscular infusion of hypertonic saline (7%) into the ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle. Pain was sustained at a tolerable level (5/10 to 6/10 on a visual analog scale). Seven subjects showed progressive increases in mean MSNA amplitude during tonic pain, increasing to 154 ± 17% (SEM) at 45 min and remaining essentially constant for the duration of the infusion. In these subjects, blood pressure and heart rate also increased. Conversely, for the other five subjects MSNA showed a progressive decline, with a peak fall of 67 ± 11% at 40 min; blood pressure and heart rate also fell in these subjects. We conclude that tonic muscle pain has long-lasting effects on the sympathetic control of blood pressure, causing a sustained increase in some subjects yet a sustained decrease in others. This may have implications for individual differences in the cardiovascular consequences of chronic pain.

  3. Influence of specific muscle training on pain, activity limitation and kinesiophobia in women with back pain post-partum--a 'single-subject research design'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Johanna; Nilsson-Wikmar, Lena

    2008-03-01

    Many women suffer from back pain and experience activity limitation post-partum. To our knowledge the physiological factors and physiotherapy related to back pain post-partum have received limited evaluation and the effectiveness of specific physiotherapeutic approaches to exercise should be tested. In addition, there has been limited research on kinesiophobia in women with back pain post-partum. The purpose of the current study was to test the influence of specific trunk muscle training on pain, activity limitation and kinesiophobia in 10 subjects with back pain post-partum. The treatment consisted of specific deep muscle training of the transversus abdominus and multifidus muscles. Pain was rated based on the visual analogue scale (VAS) and pain drawings. Activity limitation was recorded using the Disability Rating Index. Kinesiophobia was evaluated using the Swedish version of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia. An A-B-A single-subject research design was used and a number of measurements were obtained during each phase. The analysis consisted of a visual inspection and a two standard deviation band test (2-SD). The visual analysis showed a trend towards reduced pain and activity limitation for all 10 subjects. The 2-SD test showed mixed results among all subjects. In addition, all subjects reported kinesiophobia before and after treatment. Individual specific deep muscle training of the transversus abdominus and multifidus muscles reduced pain and activity limitation in women with back pain post-partum. Further research is needed to determine more precisely how kinesiophobia affects women with back pain post-partum.

  4. Muscle trigger points and pressure pain hyperalgesia in the shoulder muscles in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement: a blinded, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Lozano, Amparo; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2010-05-01

    Our aim was to describe the differences in the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in the shoulder muscles and to investigate the presence of mechanical hypersensitivity in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement and healthy controls. Twelve patients with strictly unilateral shoulder impingement and 10 matched controls were recruited. TrPs in the levator scapula, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, pectoralis major, and biceps brachii muscles were explored. TrPs were considered active if the local and referred pain reproduced the pain symptoms and the patient recognized the pain as a familiar pain. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the levator scapulae, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis major, biceps brachii, and tibialis anterior muscles. Both explorations were randomly done by an assessor blinded to the subjects' condition. Patients with shoulder impingement have a greater number of active (mean +/- SD: 2.5 +/- 1; P latent (mean +/- SD: 2 +/- 1; P = 0.003) TrPs when compared to controls (only latent TrPs, mean +/- SD: 1 +/- 1). Active TrPs in the supraspinatus (67%), infraspinatus (42%), and subscapularis (42%) muscles were the most prevalent in the patient group. Patients showed a significant lower PPT in all muscles when compared to controls (P Active TrPs in some muscles were associated to greater pain intensity and lower PPTs when compared to those with latent TrPs in the same muscles (P active TrPs in the shoulder muscles, which reproduce their clinical pain symptoms. Our results suggest both peripheral and central sensitisation mechanisms in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome.

  5. Dental attrition models predicting temporomandibular joint disease or masticatory muscle pain versus asymptomatic controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, D A; Pullinger, A G

    2006-11-01

    To determine whether patients with temporomandibular joint disease or masticatory muscle pain can be usefully differentiated from asymptomatic controls using multifactorial classification tree models of attrition severity and/or rates. Measures of attrition severity and rates in patients diagnosed with disc displacement (n = 52), osteoarthrosis (n = 74), or masticatory muscle pain only (n = 43) were compared against those in asymptomatic controls (n = 132). Cross-validated classification tree models were tested for fit with sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and log likelihood accountability. The model for identifying asymptomatic controls only required the three measures of attrition severity (anterior, mediotrusive and laterotrusive posterior) to be differentiated from the patients with a 74.2 +/- 3.8% cross-validation accuracy. This compared with cross-validation accuracies of 69.7 +/- 3.7% for differentiating disc displacement using anterior and laterotrusive attrition severity, 68.7 +/- 3.9% for differentiating disc displacement using anterior and laterotrusive attrition rates, 70.9 +/- 3.3% for differentiating osteoarthrosis using anterior attrition severity and rates, 94.6 +/- 2.1% for differentiating myofascial pain using mediotrusive and laterotrusive attrition severity, and 92.0 +/- 2.1% for differentiating myofascial pain using mediotrusive and anterior attrition rates. The myofascial pain models exceeded the > or =75% sensitivity and > or =90% specificity thresholds recommended for diagnostic tests, and the asymptomatic control model approached these thresholds. Multifactorial models using attrition severity and rates may differentiate masticatory muscle pain patients from asymptomatic controls, and have some predictive value for differentiating intracapsular temporomandibular disorder patients as well.

  6. Delayed abdominal muscle onsets and self-report measures of pain and disability in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Paul; Murphy, Bernadette

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was the measure the onset time of the transverse abdominis (TA) muscle during rapid unilateral shoulder movements in individuals with chronic low back pain (LBP), and to evaluate the relationship between latency times and self-report measures of pain and disability. Descriptive cross-sectional study. University laboratory. Eighty individuals with chronic LBP of a non-specific origin (males n=44, females n=36). Responses of the right and left surface TA/internal obliques were measured using surface electromyography (EMG) during rapid unilateral shoulder flexion, abduction, and extension. Pain intensity was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), and disability with the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Seventy-five percent of individuals were identified as lacking feedforward activation. A significant sidexdirection main effect was identified, with the ipsilateral latency more delayed in flexion and abduction (F(2316)=58.2, plower ODI scores (23.2+/-6.9% vs 31.0+/-9.2%, mean difference 7.8%, 95% CI 3.9 to 11.6%, pmuscle onsets during rapid limb movement were significantly associated with self-rated pain scores. Seventy-five percent of individuals with chronic non-specific LBP exhibited delayed activation. No evidence has been provided in this study to support, or refute the use of specific localized deep abdominal contractions for exercise rehabilitation programs. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of a muscle factor in the development of low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Isaikin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome (MFPS is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by the formation of myofascial trigger points (MTP. MFPS most frequently occurs in patients with neck pain. The peripheral and central aspects of the formation of MTP, MFPS diagnostic criteria, piriformis syndrome, fibromyalgia, the impact of MFPS on quality of life and functional activity in patients are discussed.MFPS is treated according to the international guidelines for the treatment of nonspecific spinal pain, which encompass patient education programs, therapeutic exercises, early mobilization, manual therapy techniques, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as first-line analgesic agents. Meloxicam is noted to be highly effective in treating low back pain, including myofascial pain.The application of a low back muscular corset and its ability to protect vertebral structures from damage are considered. At present, there is no evidence for a link between the status of spinal muscles (according to magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and the intensity of pain syndrome and the degree of disability.

  8. Sex differences in how social networks and relationship quality influence experimental pain sensitivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vigil, Jacob M; Rowell, Lauren N; Chouteau, Simone; Chavez, Alexandre; Jaramillo, Elisa; Neal, Michael; Waid, David

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to examine how both structural and functional components of individuals' social networks may moderate the association between biological sex and experimental pain sensitivity...

  9. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 chronic pain patients to assess pressure pain threshold (cPPT), pressure pain tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in c......PPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection (HDT) and heat pain thresholds (HPT) at clinical painful and non-painful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM four distinct groups were formed: Group 1 (n=85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 2 (n=148) had...... impaired CPM and normal TSP. Group 3 (n=45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 4 (n=122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions compared with the other three groups (PTSP plays an important role in widespread pain. Group 1...

  10. Experimental reduction of pain catastrophizing modulates pain report but not spinal nociception as verified by mediation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Ellen L; Thompson, Kathryn A; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2015-08-01

    Pain catastrophizing is associated with enhanced pain; however, the mechanisms by which it modulates pain are poorly understood. Evidence suggests that catastrophizing modulates supraspinal processing of pain but does not modulate spinal nociception (as assessed by nociceptive flexion reflex [NFR]). Unfortunately, most NFR studies have been correlational. To address this, this study experimentally reduced catastrophizing to determine whether it modulates spinal nociception (NFR). Healthy pain-free participants (N = 113) were randomly assigned to a brief 30-minute catastrophizing reduction manipulation or a control group that received pain education. Before and after manipulations, 2 types of painful stimuli were delivered to elicit (1) NFR (single trains of stimuli) and (2) temporal summation of NFR (3 stimulations at 2 Hz). After each set of stimuli, participants were asked to report their pain intensity and unpleasantness, as well as their situation-specific catastrophizing. Manipulation checks verified that catastrophizing was effectively reduced. Furthermore, pain intensity and unpleasantness to both stimulation types were reduced by the catastrophizing manipulation, effects that were mediated by catastrophizing. Although NFRs were not affected by the catastrophizing manipulation, temporal summation of NFR was reduced. However, this effect was not mediated by catastrophizing. These results indicate that reductions in catastrophizing lead to reductions in pain perception but do not modulate spinal nociception and provides further evidence that catastrophizing modulates pain at the supraspinal, not the spinal, level.

  11. Myofascial involvement of supra- and infraspinatus muscles contributes to ipsilateral shoulder pain after muscle-sparing thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Aki; Iranami, Hiroshi; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamazaki, Akinori; Doko, Yukari

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that ipsilateral upper extremity elevation for muscle-sparing thoracotomy procedures contributes to the postoperative shoulder pain. Prospective observational study. Medical center. ASA physical status 1-2 patients undergoing elective lung surgeries including pneumonectomy, lobectomy, and segmentectomy performed through either the anterolateral approach or video-assisted thoracotomy surgery. Postoperative observation of ipsilateral shoulder pain. Postoperative examinations of sites of shoulder pain (clavicle, anterior, lateral,or posterior aspect of acromion, posterior neck, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and these entire areas) with or without trigger points, visual analog scale score of wound pain, and requested counts of analgesics. The number of patients who suffered from postoperative shoulder pain was 37 of 70 (52.9%). Demographic data, anterolateral/VATS ratio, VAS scores, and requested counts of rescue analgesics requirement were similar in the groups of patients with and without postoperative shoulder pain. The segmentectomy caused a significantly higher incidence of postoperative shoulder pain compared with other procedures (p painful regions compared to the other sites. The 16 of 37 patients (43.2%) with shoulder pain showed defined trigger points in their painful areas. These results supported the hypothesis that myofascial involvement contributed, to some extent, to shoulder pain after muscle-sparing thoracotomy with ipsilateral upper extremity elevation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Activation of lumbar paraspinal and abdominal muscles during therapeutic exercises in chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokoski, Jari P; Valta, Taru; Kankaanpää, Markku; Airaksinen, Olavi

    2004-05-01

    To assess the activities of paraspinal and abdominal muscles during therapeutic exercises for the treatment of patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP), and to study the effects of active physical rehabilitation on these activities. A cross-sectional study comparing muscle activities during 18 stabilization exercises, and a prospective follow-up of patients with CLBP during rehabilitation. Rehabilitation clinic in university hospital in Finland. Nine volunteers (5 men, 4 women) aged 27 to 58 years. Three months of active outpatient rehabilitation (4 to 6 times in a rehabilitation clinic, supplemented with self-motivated exercise at home) supervised by a physiotherapist. Surface electromyography was recorded bilaterally from L5 level paraspinal, rectus abdominis, and obliquus externus abdominis muscles. The recorded signal was averaged and normalized to the maximal electromyographic amplitude obtained during the maximal voluntary contraction. The measurements were taken before and after the exercise treatment period. CLBP patients showed variable trunk muscle activity patterns during the different therapeutic exercises, similar to those that we reported earlier in healthy subjects. The maximal trunk isometric extension (pre, 147.3+/-75.9Nm; post, 170.1+/-72.3Nm) and flexion (pre, 72.0+/-37.9Nm; post, 93.5+/-42.5Nm) torques did not show a significant changes during the exercise period. However, trunk rotation-flexion torque (pre, 52.9+/-26.5Nm; post, 82.4+/-65.8Nm) increased significantly (35.8%) after the exercise period (Pback and abdominal muscles remained unchanged. Disability, as assessed by visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index, did not change. The CLBP patients performed therapeutic exercises with similar abdominal and back extensor muscle activities in the same way as the healthy subjects in our earlier studies. In this study, active physical rehabilitation had no effect on the abdominal and back muscle activities or on pain and

  13. Does Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Training Affect Pain Pressure Thresholds of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain? A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos Bobos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We need to understand more about how DNF performs in different contexts and whether it affects the pain threshold over myofascial trigger points (MTrPs. Purpose. The objectives were to investigate the effect of neck muscles training on disability and pain and on pain threshold over MTrPs in people with chronic neck pain. Methods. Patients with chronic neck pain were eligible for participation with a Neck Disability Index (NDI score of over 5/50 and having at least one MTrP on either levator scapulae, upper trapezoid, or splenius capitis muscle. Patients were randomly assigned into either DNF training, superficial neck muscle exercise, or advice group. Generalized linear model (GLM was used to detect differences in treatment groups over time. Results. Out of 67 participants, 60 (47 females, mean age: 39.45 ± 12.67 completed the study. Neck disability and neck pain were improved over time between and within groups (p<0.05. However, no differences were found within and between the therapeutic groups (p<0.05 in the tested muscles’ PPTs and in cervicothoracic angle over a 7-week period. Conclusion. All three groups improved over time. This infers that the pain pathways involved in the neck pain relief are not those involved in pain threshold.

  14. Correlation between skin surface temperature over masticatory muscles and pain intensity in women with myogenous temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; Packer, Amanda Carine; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a common clinical manifestation in individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The literature report changes in microcirculation in this condition. The aim of the present study was to correlate skin surface temperature at the central point of the masticatory muscles with pain intensity in women with myogenous TMD. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to divide 40 female university students into four groups: control group (n=10), mild pain group (n=10), moderate pain group (n=10) and severe pain group (n=10). Infrared thermography was used to assess the masticatory muscles. No significant correlations were found between pain intensity and skin surface temperature over the left masseter (p=0.368), right masseter (p=0.618), left anterior temporalis (p=0.293) and right anterior temporalis (p=0.922) muscles. No correlations were found between pain intensity and asymmetry of the masseter (p=0.375) and anterior temporalis (p=0.090) muscles. Moreover, no significant difference in skin surface temperature (p> 0.05) was found among the different groups. Pain intensity in women with myogenous TMD was not associated with skin surface temperature at the central point of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles.

  15. Atrophy of sacrospinal muscle groups in patients with chronic, diffusely radiating lumbar back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    After surgery necessitated by lumbar back pain syndromes, radiolucency verified by CT may appear in the sacrospinal muscle group on the operate side. This radiolucency represents muscular atrophy and is in its most severe form a result of the replacement of muscle tissue with adipose tissue. Such muscular atrophy appeared in the present series in 31 out of all 156 patients (19.9%) and in 29 out of 94 patients operated on because of radiating lumbar back pain (30.9%). The radiological appearance, extent, and HU values of this muscular atrophy are presented in detail. Only weak correlations with the multitude of clinical symptoms and signs were found in this retrospective study. The effects of irreversible muscular atrophy on the indications for surgery and physiotherapy are discussed.

  16. Hip-abduction torque and muscle activation in people with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherlin, Mark A; Hart, Joseph M

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with a history of low back pain (LBP) may present with decreased hip-abduction strength and increased trunk or gluteus maximus (GMax) fatigability. However, the effect of hip-abduction exercise on hip-muscle function has not been previously reported. To compare hip-abduction torque and muscle activation of the hip, thigh, and trunk between individuals with and without a history of LBP during repeated bouts of side-lying hip-abduction exercise. Repeated measures. Clinical laboratory. 12 individuals with a history of LBP and 12 controls. Repeated 30-s hip-abduction contractions. Hip-abduction torque, normalized root-mean-squared (RMS) muscle activation, percent RMS muscle activation, and forward general linear regression. Hip-abduction torque reduced in all participants as a result of exercise (1.57 ± 0.36 Nm/kg, 1.12 ± 0.36 Nm/kg; P muscle activation for the GMax (P = .050) at the start of the third bout of exercise and for the biceps femoris (P = .039) at the end of exercise. The gluteal muscles best predicted hip-abduction torque in controls, while no consistent muscles were identified for individuals with a history of LBP. Hip-abduction torque decreased in all individuals after hip-abduction exercise, although individuals with a history of LBP had increased GMax activation during exercise. Gluteal muscle activity explained hip-abduction torque in healthy individuals but not in those with a history of LBP. Alterations in hip-muscle function may exist in individuals with a history of LBP.

  17. Trunk Postural Muscle Timing Is Not Compromised In Low Back Pain Patients Clinically Diagnosed With Movement Coordination Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rupal; Cannella, Marco; Henry, Sharon M; Smith, Susan; Giszter, Simon; Silfies, Sheri P

    2017-04-01

    Trunk muscle timing impairment has been associated with nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP), but this finding has not been consistent. This study investigated trunk muscle timing in a subgroup of patients with NSLBP attributed to movement coordination impairment (MCI) and matched asymptomatic controls in response to a rapid arm-raising task. Twenty-one NSLBP subjects and 21 matched controls had arm motion and surface EMG data collected from seven bilateral trunk muscles. Muscle onset and offset relative to deltoid muscle activation and arm motion, duration of muscle burst and abdominal-extensor co-contraction time were derived. Trunk muscle onset and offset latencies, and burst and co-contraction durations were not different (p > .05) between groups. Patterns of trunk muscle activation and deactivation relative to arm motion were not different. Task performance was similar between groups. Trunk muscle timing does not appear to be an underlying impairment in the subgroup of NSLBP with MCI.

  18. Efficacy of Sensory Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Perceived Pain and Gait Patterns in Individuals With Experimental Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, S Jun; Kim, Hyunsoo; Seeley, Matthew K; Hopkins, J Ty

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effect of experimental knee pain on perceived knee pain and gait patterns and to examine the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on perceived knee pain and pain-induced knee gait mechanics. Crossover trial. Biomechanics laboratory. Recreationally active, individuals without musculoskeletal pain aged 18 to 35 years (N=30). Thirty able-bodied individuals were assigned to either a TENS (n=15) or a placebo (n=15) group. All participants completed 3 experimental sessions in a counterbalanced order separated by 2 days: (1) hypertonic saline infusion (5% NaCl); (2) isotonic saline infusion (0.9% NaCl); and (3) control. Each group received sensory electrical stimulation or placebo treatment for 20 minutes, respectively. Perceived pain was collected every 2 minutes using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) for 50 minutes and analyzed using a mixed model analysis of covariance with repeated measures. Gait analyses were performed at baseline, infusion, and treatment. Sagittal and frontal knee angles and internal net joint torque across the entire stance were analyzed using a functional data analysis approach. Hypertonic saline infusion increased perceived pain (4/10cm on a VAS; Pgait abnormalities as compared with placebo treatment (Pgait patterns in a way that indicates potential quadriceps weakness. However, TENS treatment effectively reduces perceived pain and restores pain-induced gait abnormalities in sagittal knee mechanics. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of knee joint pain in experimental rodent models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Margaret J; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Pain assessment in animal models of osteoarthritis is integral to interpretation of a model's utility in representing the clinical condition, and enabling accurate translational medicine. Here we describe two methods for behavioral pain assessments available for use in animal models of experimental osteoarthritic pain: Von Frey filaments and spontaneous activity monitoring.

  20. Influence of Polymorphisms in the HTR3A and HTR3B Genes on Experimental Pain and the Effect of the 5-HT3 Antagonist Granisetron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Louca Jounger

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate experimentally if 5-HT3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP contribute to pain perception and efficacy of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron and sex differences. Sixty healthy participants were genotyped regarding HTR3A (rs1062613 and HTR3B (rs1176744. First, pain was induced by bilateral hypertonic saline injections (HS, 5.5%, 0.2 mL into the masseter muscles. Thirty min later the masseter muscle on one side was pretreated with 0.5 mL granisetron (1 mg/mL and on the other side with 0.5 mL placebo (isotonic saline followed by another HS injection (0.2 mL. Pain intensity, pain duration, pain area and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs were assessed after each injection. HS evoked moderate pain, with higher intensity in the women (P = 0.023, but had no effect on PPTs. None of the SNPs influenced any pain variable in general, but compared to men, the pain area was larger in women carrying the C/C (HTR3A (P = 0.015 and pain intensity higher in women with the A/C alleles (HTR3B (P = 0.019. Pre-treatment with granisetron reduced pain intensity, duration and area to a lesser degree in women (P < 0.05, but the SNPs did not in general influence the efficacy of granisetron. Women carrying the C/T & T/T (HTR3A genotype had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.041 and area (P = 0.005, and women with the C/C genotype (HTR3B had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.030, duration (P = 0.030 and area compared to men (P = 0.017. In conclusion, SNPs did not influence experimental muscle pain or the effect of granisetron on pain variables in general, but there were some sex differences in pain variables that seem to be influenced by genotypes. However, due to the small sample size further research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn.

  1. Skeletal muscle contractility, self-reported pain and tissue sensitivity in females with neck/shoulder pain and upper Trapezius myofascial trigger points - a randomized intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan; Aagaard, Per

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In relation to Myofascial Triggerpoints (MFTrPs) of the upper Trapezius, this study explored muscle contractility characteristics, the occurrence of post-intervention muscle soreness and the effect of dry needling on muscle contractile characteristics and clinical outcomes....... METHODS: Seventy-seven female office workers (25-46yrs) with and without neck/shoulder pain were observed with respect to self-reported pain (NRS-101), pressure-pain threshold (PPT), maximum voluntary contraction (Fmax) and rate of force development (RFD) at baseline (pre-intervention), immediately post......-intervention and 48 hours post-intervention. Symptomatic and asymptomatic participant groups were each randomized into two treatment sub-groups (superficial (SDN) and deep dry needling (DDN)) after baseline testing. At 48 hours post-intervention participants were asked whether delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and...

  2. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:26357422

  3. Clinimetric evaluation of methods to measure muscle functioning in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koning, C.H. de; Heuvel, SP van den; Staal, J.B; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M; Heniks, E.J.M

    2008-01-01

    .... This article provides a critical analysis of the research literature on the clinimetric properties of tests to measure neck muscle strength or endurance in patients with non-specific neck pain, which...

  4. Chronic Low Back Pain in Women: Muscle Activation during Task Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Fernanda G; Carmo, Carolina M; Fracini, América C; Pereira, Rita R P; Takara, Kelly S; Tanaka, Clarice

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the activities of the trunk and hip muscles in chronic low back pain (CLBP) women and asymptomatic subjects during the kneeling to half-kneeling task. [Subjects] Twenty-nine CLBP women and thirty asymptomatic subjects (C) participated in this study. [Methods] Electromyography activity (EMG) of the obliquus internus abdominis (OI), the lumbar erector spinae (LES) and the gluteus medius (GM) muscles was recorded bilaterally. The peak amplitude, the time of peak amplitude and the integrated linear envelope EMG for each muscle were obtained. [Results] The C group bilateral OI and GM muscles displayed higher peak amplitudes and earlier times of peak amplitude. They also had higher integrated linear envelope EMG values. The CLBP group bilateral LES muscles had higher peak amplitudes and earlier times of peak amplitude. They also showed an increased integrated linear envelope EMG values. [Conclusion] The CLBP women activate the LES muscles in the kneeling to half-kneeling task, showing different patterns of motor planning activity. PMID:24409022

  5. The Association between Imaging Parameters of the Paraspinal Muscles, Spinal Degeneration, and Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Kalichman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This narrative review investigated imaging parameters of the paraspinal muscles and their association with spinal degenerative features and low back pain (LBP found in the literature. Three principal signs of muscle degeneration were detected on imaging: decreased muscle size, decreased radiographic density, and increased fat deposits. Men have a higher density of paraspinal muscles than women, younger individuals have a higher density than older ones, and lean individuals have a higher density than those with an increased body mass index. Fatty infiltration appears to be a late stage of muscular degeneration and can be measured noninvasively by an MRI scan. Fatty infiltration in the lumbar multifidus is common in adults and is strongly associated with LBP, especially in women, independent of body composition. Fatty infiltration develops in areas where most degenerative changes are found. MR spectroscopy studies have corroborated that the lumbar multifidus in LBP subjects has a significantly higher fat content than asymptomatic controls. There is a strong need for establishing uniform methods of evaluating normal parameters and degenerative changes of the paraspinal muscles. Additional imaging studies are needed to improve the understanding of the association and causal relationships between LBP, spinal degeneration, and changes in the paraspinal muscles.

  6. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars L; Hansen, Klaus; Mortensen, Ole S; Zebis, Mette K

    2011-07-22

    Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years) with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain for a duration of at least 30 days during the previous year and a pain intensity of at least 2 on a modified VAS-scale of 0-10 participated. Exclusion criteria were traumatic injuries or other serious chronic disease. Using a standardized finger pressure of 2 kg, palpable tenderness were performed of eight anatomical neck/shoulder locations in the left and right side on a scale of 'no tenderness', 'some tenderness' and 'severe tenderness'. In women, the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus showed the highest prevalence of severe tenderness (18-30%). In comparison, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the upper trapezius, occipital border and supraspinatus was 13-19%. Severe tenderness of the medial deltoid was least prevalent (0-1%). In men, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the levator scapulae was 13-21%, and ranged between 0-8% in the remainder of the examined anatomical locations. A high prevalence of tenderness exists in several anatomical locations of the neck/shoulder complex among adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Future research should focus on several neck/shoulder muscles, including the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus, and not only the upper trapezius. ISRCTN60264809.

  7. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years) with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain for a duration of at least 30 days during the previous year and a pain intensity of at least 2 on a modified VAS-scale of 0-10 participated. Exclusion criteria were traumatic injuries or other serious chronic disease. Using a standardized finger pressure of 2 kg, palpable tenderness were performed of eight anatomical neck/shoulder locations in the left and right side on a scale of 'no tenderness', 'some tenderness' and 'severe tenderness'. Results In women, the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus showed the highest prevalence of severe tenderness (18-30%). In comparison, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the upper trapezius, occipital border and supraspinatus was 13-19%. Severe tenderness of the medial deltoid was least prevalent (0-1%). In men, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the levator scapulae was 13-21%, and ranged between 0-8% in the remainder of the examined anatomical locations. Conclusions A high prevalence of tenderness exists in several anatomical locations of the neck/shoulder complex among adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Future research should focus on several neck/shoulder muscles, including the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus, and not only the upper trapezius. Trial Registration ISRCTN60264809 PMID:21777478

  8. Prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Ole S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many adults experience bothersome neck/shoulder pain. While research and treatment strategies often focus on the upper trapezius, other neck/shoulder muscles may be affected as well. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence and anatomical location of muscle tenderness in adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Methods Clinical neck/shoulder examination at two large office workplaces in Copenhagen, Denmark. 174 women and 24 men (aged 25-65 years with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain for a duration of at least 30 days during the previous year and a pain intensity of at least 2 on a modified VAS-scale of 0-10 participated. Exclusion criteria were traumatic injuries or other serious chronic disease. Using a standardized finger pressure of 2 kg, palpable tenderness were performed of eight anatomical neck/shoulder locations in the left and right side on a scale of 'no tenderness', 'some tenderness' and 'severe tenderness'. Results In women, the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus showed the highest prevalence of severe tenderness (18-30%. In comparison, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the upper trapezius, occipital border and supraspinatus was 13-19%. Severe tenderness of the medial deltoid was least prevalent (0-1%. In men, the prevalence of severe tenderness in the levator scapulae was 13-21%, and ranged between 0-8% in the remainder of the examined anatomical locations. Conclusions A high prevalence of tenderness exists in several anatomical locations of the neck/shoulder complex among adults with nonspecific neck/shoulder pain. Future research should focus on several neck/shoulder muscles, including the levator scapulae, neck extensors and infraspinatus, and not only the upper trapezius. Trial Registration ISRCTN60264809

  9. High-intensity strength training improves function of chronically painful muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Skotte, Jørgen H

    2014-01-01

    MYA and CON. In the intervention study, SST improved all force parameters significantly more than the two other groups, to levels comparable to that of CON. This was seen along with muscle fiber hypertrophy and increased capillarization. CONCLUSION: Women with trapezius myalgia have lower strength......AIM: This study investigates consequences of chronic neck pain on muscle function and the rehabilitating effects of contrasting interventions. METHODS: Women with trapezius myalgia (MYA, n = 42) and healthy controls (CON, n = 20) participated in a case-control study. Subsequently MYA were...... by 2 s relaxation at baseline and 10-week follow-up. RESULTS: In the case-control study, peak force, rate of force development, and rate of force relaxation as well as EMG amplitude were lower in MYA than CON throughout all 100 MVC. Muscle fiber capillarization was not significantly different between...

  10. [Etiological analysis and significance of anterior knee pain induced by gluteal muscles contracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Liu, Yu-jie; Wang, Jun-liang; Qi, Wei; Qu, Feng; Yuan, Bang-tuo; Wang, Jiang-tao; Shen, Xue-zhen; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Juan-li

    2014-12-01

    To explore causes of gluteal muscle contracture induced anterior knee pain and curative effect of arthroscopic release. From March 2002 to August 2013,36 patients with gluteal muscle contracture induced anterior knee pain were treated, including 15 males, 21 females, aged from 9 to 40 years old with an average (18.7±7.2) years old; the courses of diseases ranged from 4 to 30 years. The clinical manifestations involved limited to symmelia, positive Ober sign, buttocks touch contracture belts, knee and patella slide to lateral when doing squat activities. All patients were performed gluteal muscle contracture release under arthroscopic. Postoperative complications were observed, Kujala scoring before and after operation was used for compare curative effect. All patients were followed up with an average of 29 months. The incision were healed well, and no complications were occurred. Postoperative Kujala score were improved more than preoperative. Gluteal muscle contracture release could alleviate hypertension of lateral patella, and palys an important role in preventing patellofemoral arthritis.

  11. Reliability of four experimental mechanical pain tests in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Ann-Britt Langager; Thomsen, Lise L; Tornoe, Birte

    2013-01-01

    In order to study pain in children, it is necessary to determine whether pain measurement tools used in adults are reliable measurements in children. The aim of this study was to explore the intrasession reliability of pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in healthy children. Furthermore, the aim was a...... was also to study the intersession reliability of the following four tests: (1) Total Tenderness Score; (2) PPT; (3) Visual Analog Scale score at suprapressure pain threshold; and (4) area under the curve (stimulus-response functions for pressure versus pain)....

  12. Effect of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, maximum isometric contraction of the extensor muscles, and pressure pain threshold in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: Double blinded randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan Namvar; Gholamreza olyaei; Behrouz Attarbashi Moghadam; Mohammad Hosseinifar

    2016-01-01

    The impact of myofascial release technique alone has not been investigated in the patients with non-specific chronic neck pain. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, the maximum contraction of isometric extensor muscles of neck and pressure pain threshold in the patient with non-specific chronic neck pain compared with control group. In this clinical, randomized, double-blind trial, the patients with non-specific chr...

  13. Effect of self-myofascial release on myofascial pain, muscle flexibility, and strength: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Leonid; Ben David, Chen

    2017-04-01

    Numerous techniques have been employed to treat myofascial pain syndrome. Self-myofascial release (SMFR) is a relatively new technique of soft tissue mobilization. The simplicity and portability of the SMFR tools allow it to be easily implemented in any type of fitness or rehabilitation program. It is an active method and can be used by anyone at home or at the workplace. To review the current methods of SMFR, their mechanisms, and efficacy in treating myofascial pain, improving muscle flexibility and strength. PubMed, Google Scholar, and PEDro databases were searched without search limitations from inception until July 2016 for terms relating to SMFR. During the past decade, therapists and fitness professionals have implemented SMFR mainly via foam rolling as a recovery or maintenance tool. Researchers observed a significant increase in the joint range of motion after using the SMFR technique and no decrease in muscle force or changes in performance after treatment with SMFR. SMFR has been widely used by health-care professionals in treating myofascial pain. However, we found no clinical trials which evaluated the influence of SMFR on myofascial pain. There is an acute need for these trials to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of SMFR in the treatment of the myofascial syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Referred pain from myofascial trigger points in head, neck, shoulder, and arm muscles reproduces pain symptoms in blue-collar (manual) and white-collar (office) workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Gröbli, Christian; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Fischer, Christine Stebler; Boesch, Daniel; Froidevaux, Philippe; Stocker, Lilian; Weissmann, Richard; González-Iglesias, Javier

    2012-07-01

    To describe the prevalence and referred pain area of trigger points (TrPs) in blue-collar (manual) and white-collar (office) workers, and to analyze if the referred pain pattern elicited from TrPs completely reproduces the overall spontaneous pain pattern. Sixteen (62% women) blue-collar and 19 (75% women) white-collar workers were included in this study. TrPs in the temporalis, masseter, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, oblique capitis inferior, levator scapulae, scalene, pectoralis major, deltoid, infraspinatus, extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus, extensor digitorum communis, and supinator muscles were examined bilaterally (hyper-sensible tender spot within a palpable taut band, local twitch response with snapping palpation, and elicited referred pain pattern with palpation) by experienced assessors blinded to the participants' condition. TrPs were considered active when the local and referred pain reproduced any symptom and the patient recognized the pain as familiar. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomic maps, digitized, and measured. Blue-collar workers had a mean of 6 (SD: 3) active and 10 (SD: 5) latent TrPs, whereas white-collar workers had a mean of 6 (SD: 4) active and 11 (SD: 6) latent TrPs (P>0.548). No significant differences in the distribution of active and latent TrPs in the analyzed muscles between groups were found. Active TrPs in the upper trapezius, infraspinatus, levator scapulae, and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles were the most prevalent in both groups. Significant differences in referred pain areas between muscles (Pactive TrPs reproduced the overall pain pattern. The distribution of TrPs was not significantly different between groups. Clinicians should examine for the presence of muscle TrPs in blue-collar and white-collar workers.

  15. [Mechanisms of muscle pain : significance of trigger points and tender points].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinschek, H-P

    2008-12-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) belong to the group of chronic non-inflammatory pain syndromes affecting muscles and tendinous insertions. Important criteria in the diagnosis of both diseases are the presence of "tender points" and "trigger points". According to ACR criteria FMS is characterized by the presence of tender points whereas trigger points are typically found in MPS.The main difference is that until now tender points could only be defined in terms of their localization, whereas trigger points can be found upon palpation which may cause a specific referred pain pattern. In addition, analysis of trigger points by microdialysis demonstrated elevated levels of pro-inflammatory substances at these sites. Moreover, local treatment of trigger points either by manipulative therapy or injection appears to be most effective for prompt relief of symptoms.

  16. Referred pain from muscle trigger points in the masticatory and neck-shoulder musculature in women with temporomandibular disoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Galán-Del-Río, Fernando; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Svensson, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Our aim was to describe the referred pain patterns and size of areas of trigger points (TrPs) in the masticatory and neck-shoulder muscles of women with myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Twenty-five women with myofascial TMD and 25 healthy matched women participated. Bilateral temporalis, deep masseter, superficial masseter, sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles were examined for TrPs by an assessor blinded to the subjects' condition. TrPs were identified with manual palpation and categorized into active and latent according to proposed criteria. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomical maps, digitalized, and measured. The occurrence of active (P latent TrPs (P = .04) were different between groups. In all muscles, there were significantly more active and latent TrP in patients than controls (P .703). The local and referred pain elicited from active TrPs in the masticatory and neck-shoulder muscles shared similar pain pattern as spontaneous TMD, which supports the concept of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in myofascial TMD. The current study showed the existence of multiple active muscle TrPs in the masticatory and neck-shoulder muscles in women with myofascial TMD pain. The local and referred pain elicited from active TrPs reproduced pain complaints in these patients. Further, referred pain areas were larger in TMD pain patients than in healthy controls. The results are also in accordance with the notion of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in patients with myofascial TMD. Copyright © 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on shoulder strength and throwing accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassinger, Craig A; Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    Shoulder injuries often comprise two separate yet related components, structural tissue damage and pain. The role of each of these components on shoulder function is difficult to ascertain. Experimental pain models allow the assessment of consequences of localized pain when applied to healthy individuals. By understanding the role of pain on shoulder function, clinicians will be able to more efficiently assess and treat shoulder injuries. The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on shoulder isokinetic rotational strength and throwing accuracy. This was a block counterbalanced, crossover, repeated measures study design utilizing 20 individuals without self-reported shoulder or cervical pathology. Shoulder function was measured with and without experimental pain injection (2 mL of 5% hypertonic saline) in the sub-acromial space. Functional tasks consisted of shoulder rotational strength utilizing isokinetic testing and throwing accuracy via the functional throwing performance index. The hypertonic saline induced moderate pain levels in all participants (4.3-5.1/10). Normalized shoulder internal (t = 3.76, p = 0.001) and external (t = 3.12, p = 0.006) rotation strength were both diminished in the painful condition compared to the pain free condition. Throwing accuracy was also reduced while the participants experienced pain (t = 3.99, p = 0.001). Moderate levels of experimental shoulder pain were sufficient to negatively influence shoulder strength and throwing accuracy in participants without shoulder pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Observational learning and pain-related fear: an experimental study with colored cold pressor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Kim; Goubert, Liesbet; Peters, Madelon L; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2011-12-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to experimentally test whether pain-related fear can be acquired through observational learning, whether extinction occurs after actual exposure to the aversive stimulus, and whether pain-related fear was associated with increased pain ratings. During an observation phase, female volunteers watched a video showing models performing cold pressor tasks (CPT), of which the color served as a conditioned stimulus (CS). In a differential fear conditioning paradigm, each of 2 colors were either paired with models' painful (CS+) or neutral (CS-) facial expressions. Exposure consisted of participants performing CPTs of both colors (10°C). Self-reported fear of pain and expected pain ratings were obtained after the observation period, while actual pain and avoidance measures were obtained during and after exposure. Results show that after observing another person performing the CPT associated with the painful faces, subjects report more fear of pain and expect more intense and unpleasant pain as compared with the CPT associated with the neutral faces. This effect of observational learning on pain-related fear persisted until after exposure. During and after exposure no stimulus-type effect for pain ratings was found. This study provides preliminary evidence for observational learning of pain-related fear in humans. Fear of pain can be more disabling than pain itself, and is a risk factor for chronic pain. Knowledge about the acquisition of pain-related fear may help to develop novel pain management programs. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the effects of observational learning on pain-related fear. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lumbar and abdominal muscle activity during walking in subjects with chronic low back pain: Support of the ''guarding'' hypothesis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, M.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; Rietman, Johan Swanik; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    It has been hypothesized that changes in trunk muscle activity in chronic low back pain (CLBP) reflect an underlying “guarding��? mechanism, which will manifest itself as increased superficial abdominal – and lumbar muscle activity. During a functional task like walking, it may be further provoked

  20. Efficacy of kinesio tape application on pain and muscle strength in patients with myofascial pain syndrome: a placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Mesci, Nilgün; Şilte, Ayşe Duygu; Aydog, Ece

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the short- and mid-term effects of Kinesio taping on the trapezius muscle in individuals with myofascial pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven patients with active upper trapezius myofascial trigger points were randomly divided to 2 groups: group 1 received Kinesio taping for the upper trapezius muscle, and group 2 received a sham Kinesio taping application. Neck pain (Visual Analog Scale and pressure algometry) and trapezius muscle strength data were collected at baseline, immediately after Kinesio taping application, and at one month follow-up. [Results] The mean changes in Visual Analog Scale scores were significantly different between groups at T2 and T1, with less pain in group 1. The mean changes in algometry scores were significantly different between groups at T3 compared with T2 in favor of group 1. The mean changes in trapezius muscle strength were significantly different between the groups at T2 compared with T1 in favor of group 1. [Conclusion] Patients with myofascial pain syndrome receiving an application of Kinesio taping exhibited statistically significant improvements in pain and upper trapezius muscle strength.

  1. One-year evaluation of the effect of physical therapy for masticatory muscle pain : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craane, B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Stappaerts, K.; De Laat, A.

    Physical therapy is widely used to decrease pain and restore function in patients suffering from masticatory muscle pain. Controlled studies on its efficacy are scarce. This study evaluated the 1-year effect of a 6-week physical therapy programme in a single blind, randomized, controlled trial.

  2. Lower-limb pain, disease, and injury burden as determinants of muscle strength deficit after hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portegijs, Erja; Rantanen, Taina; Kallinen, Mauri; Heinonen, Ari; Alen, Markku; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip fracture may result in an asymmetrical lower-limb strength deficit. The deficit may be related to the trauma, surgical treatment, pain, or disuse of the fractured limb. However, disease and injury burden or musculoskeletal pain in the other limb may reduce muscle strength on that

  3. Association between Gene Polymorphisms and Pain Sensitivity Assessed in a Multi-Modal Multi-Tissue Human Experimental Model - An Explorative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Sato, Hiroe

    2016-01-01

    The genetic influence on sensitivity to noxious stimuli (pain sensitivity) remains controversial and needs further investigation. In the present study, the possible influence of polymorphisms in three opioid receptor (OPRM, OPRD and OPRK) genes and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene...... on pain sensitivity in healthy participants was investigated. Catechol-O-methyltransferase has an indirect effect on the mu opioid receptor by changing its activity through an altered endogenous ligand effect. Blood samples for genetic analysis were withdrawn in a multi-modal and multi-tissue experimental...... pain model in 40 healthy participants aged 20-65. Seventeen different single nucleotide polymorphisms in different genes (OPRM, OPRK, OPRD and COMT) were included in the analysis. Experimental pain tests included thermal skin stimulation, mechanical muscle and bone stimulation and mechanical...

  4. Short-term effects of traditional Thai massage on electromyogram, muscle tension and pain among patients with upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttagat, Vitsarut; Narktro, Thitipong; Onsrira, Kamonporn; Pobsamai, Chaithawat

    2016-10-01

    To investigate effects of traditional Thai massage (TTM) on electromyographic (EMG) activity, muscle tension and pain intensity in patients with upper back pain associated with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). A single-blind, randomized clinical trial. The Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Science, Mae Fah Luang University, Thailand. Fifty patients were randomly assigned to receive a 30-min session of either TTM or control (sham microwave diathermy). Electromyogram (EMG), Muscle tension rating, and pain intensity rating TTM were associated with significant decreases in EMG, muscle tension and pain intensity after the end of treatment session (p0.05) except for muscle tension (p<0.05). In addition, there was a significantly greater reduction in all parameters for the TTM group when compared with the control group. We therefore suggest that TTM can increase physical relaxation and reduce pain in patients with upper back pain associated with MTrPs. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02067325. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of manual muscle tests and mechanical neck pain: results from a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Scott C; Rosner, Anthony L; McDowall, Donald

    2011-04-01

    To determine whether there was a statistical difference for manual muscle test (MMT) findings for cervical muscles in subjects with and without mechanical neck pain (MNP), and to use confidence intervals to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the MMT in this group of subjects. Manual muscle strength tests were conducted on two groups of patients who reported to two outpatient chiropractic clinics. In group 1, 148 patients were evaluated for MMT data (50 males and 98 females, average age 37), 127 with "whiplash"-type injuries (average duration 16 weeks) and 21 with non-traumatic chronic neck pain (average duration 36 weeks). In group 2, 100 patients were evaluated for comparative MMT data (39 males and 61 females, average age 38) with no current MNP or remarkable history of MNP. Standardized MMT assessments of the strength of the sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, upper trapezius, and cervical extensor muscles bilaterally were performed on all subjects in groups 1 and 2. In group 1, 139 of 148 patients reporting neck pain also showed positive results in at least one of four MMT tests (sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, upper trapezius, and cervical extensors). In group 2, 30 of the 100 patients without MNP showed positive results in one or more of the four MMT tests. Confidence intervals were calculated and showed that, in terms of MMT findings, there was a significant difference between the two groups of patients. A symptomatic group of patients with MNP demonstrated significantly increased MMT findings in the form of reduced strength levels compared to a control group. This evidence suggests that the MMT is potentially a sensitive and specific test for evaluating cervical spine muscular impairments in patients with MNP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Automated discovery of safety and efficacy concerns for joint & muscle pain relief treatments from online reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David Z; Gruss, Richard; Abrahams, Alan S

    2017-04-01

    Product issues can cost companies millions in lawsuits and have devastating effects on a firm's sales, image and goodwill, especially in the era of social media. The ability for a system to detect the presence of safety and efficacy (S&E) concerns early on could not only protect consumers from injuries due to safety hazards, but could also mitigate financial damage to the manufacturer. Prior studies in the field of automated defect discovery have found industry-specific techniques appropriate to the automotive, consumer electronics, home appliance, and toy industries, but have not investigated pain relief medicines and medical devices. In this study, we focus specifically on automated discovery of S&E concerns in over-the-counter (OTC) joint and muscle pain relief remedies and devices. We select a dataset of over 32,000 records for three categories of Joint & Muscle Pain Relief treatments from Amazon's online product reviews, and train "smoke word" dictionaries which we use to score holdout reviews, for the presence of safety and efficacy issues. We also score using conventional sentiment analysis techniques. Compared to traditional sentiment analysis techniques, we found that smoke term dictionaries were better suited to detect product concerns from online consumer reviews, and significantly outperformed the sentiment analysis techniques in uncovering both efficacy and safety concerns, across all product subcategories. Our research can be applied to the healthcare and pharmaceutical industry in order to detect safety and efficacy concerns, reducing risks that consumers face using these products. These findings can be highly beneficial to improving quality assurance and management in joint and muscle pain relief. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sex Differences in Parent and Child Pain Ratings during an Experimental Child Pain Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C Moon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in the field of pediatric pain has largely ignored the role of fathers in their children’s pain experiences. The first objective of the present study was to examine the effect of the presence of mothers versus fathers on children’s subjective ratings, facial expressions and physiological responses to acute pain. The second objective was to examine whether child and parent sex influence parents’ proxy ratings of their children’s pain. The final objective was to compare levels of agreement between mothers’ and fathers’ assessments of their children’s pain. Participants included 73 children (37 boys, 36 girls, four to 12 years of age, along with 32 fathers and 41 mothers. Children undertook the cold pressor pain task while observed by one of their parents. During the task, the children’s heart rates and facial expressions were recorded. Children provided self-reports and parents provided proxy reports of child pain intensity using the seven-point Faces Pain Scale. Neither child nor parent sex had a significant impact on children’s subjective reports, facial expressions or heart rates in response to acute pain. Fathers gave their sons higher pain ratings than their daughters, whereas mothers’ ratings of their sons’ and daughters’ pain did not differ. Kappa statistics and t tests revealed that fathers tended to be more accurate judges of their children’s pain than mothers. Overall, this research highlights the importance of examining both parent and child sex differences in pediatric pain research.

  8. Reduction of cervical and respiratory muscle strength in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and having moderate to severe disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Sollano-Vallez, Ernesto; Del Corral, Tamara

    2017-06-11

    To investigate whether patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and having moderate to severe disability have a greater cervical motor function impairment and respiratory disturbances compared with patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain having mild disability and asymptomatic subjects; and the association between these outcomes in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study, 44 patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain and 31 healthy subjects participated. The neck disability index was used to divide the patients into 2 groups: 1) mild disability group (scores between 5 and 14 points); and 2) moderate to severe disability group (scores >14 points). Cervical motor function was measured by cervical range of motion, forward head posture, neck flexor, and extensor muscle strength. Respiratory function and maximum respiratory pressures were also measured. Statistically differences were found between the patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain having a moderate to severe disability and the asymptomatic subjects for cervical and respiratory muscle strength. Comparisons between chronic nonspecific neck pain and the asymptomatic groups showed differences for all the variables, except for forward head posture. The regression model determined that strength of cervical flexion explained 36.4 and 45.6% of the variance of maximum inspiratory pressures and maximum expiratory pressures, respectively. Only the chronic nonspecific neck pain group with moderate to severe disability showed differences compared with the healthy subjects. Neck muscle strength could be a good predictor of respiratory muscle function. Implications for rehabilitation Neck pain severity could be closely associated with decreased respiratory pressure in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach for patients with moderate to severe disability, such as respiratory muscle training. The regression

  9. Effect of the Spacing of Backpack Shoulder Straps on Cervical Muscle Activity, Acromion and Scapular Position, and Upper Trapezius Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min-hee; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of the spacing of backpack shoulder straps on cervical muscle activity, acromion and scapular position, and upper trapezius (UT) pain. [Subjects] Fourteen males aged 20?32?years, were recruited. [Methods] We measured the MPS (midcervical paraspinal) activity, acromial angle, scapular distance, and UT pain after gait carrying a backpack with different shoulder strap spacings. [Results] The MPS, scapular inferior distance, and UT pressure pain thresh...

  10. Altered trunk muscle coordination during rapid trunk flexion in people in remission of recurrent low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'hooge, Roseline; Hodges, Paul; Tsao, Henry; Hall, Leanne; Macdonald, David; Danneels, Lieven

    2013-02-01

    People with a history of low back pain (LBP) are at high risk to encounter additional LBP episodes. During LBP remission, altered trunk muscle control has been suggested to negatively impact spinal health. As sudden LBP onset is commonly reported during trunk flexion, the aim of the current study is to investigate whether dynamic trunk muscle recruitment is altered in LBP remission. Eleven people in remission of recurrent LBP and 14 pain free controls performed cued trunk flexion during a loaded and unloaded condition. Electromyographic activity was recorded from paraspinal (lumbar and thoracic erector spinae, latissimus dorsi, deep and superficial multifidus) and abdominal muscles (obliquus internus, externus and rectus abdominis) with surface and fine-wire electrodes. LBP participants exhibited higher levels of co-contraction of flexor/extensor muscles, lower agonistic abdominal and higher antagonistic paraspinal muscle activity than controls, both when data were analyzed in grouped and individual muscle behavior. A sub-analysis in people with unilateral LBP (n = 6) pointed to opposing changes in deep and superficial multifidus in relation to the pain side. These results suggest that dynamic trunk muscle control is modified during LBP remission, and might possibly increase spinal load and result in earlier muscle fatigue due to intensified muscle usage. These negative consequences for spinal health could possibly contribute to recurrence of LBP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Referred pain from myofascial trigger points in head and neck-shoulder muscles reproduces head pain features in children with chronic tension type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel M; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Ambite-Quesada, Silvia; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Pareja, Juan A

    2011-02-01

    Our aim was to describe the referred pain pattern and areas from trigger points (TrPs) in head, neck, and shoulder muscles in children with chronic tension type headache (CTTH). Fifty children (14 boys, 36 girls, mean age: 8 ± 2) with CTTH and 50 age- and sex- matched children participated. Bilateral temporalis, masseter, superior oblique, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, suboccipital, and levator scapula muscles were examined for TrPs by an assessor blinded to the children's condition. TrPs were identified with palpation and considered active when local and referred pains reproduce headache pain attacks. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomical maps, digitalized, and also measured. The total number of TrPs was significantly greater in children with CTTH as compared to healthy children (P < 0.001). Active TrPs were only present in children with CTTH (P < 0.001). Within children with CTTH, a significant positive association between the number of active TrPs and headache duration (r (s) = 0.315; P = 0.026) was observed: the greater the number of active TrPs, the longer the duration of headache attack. Significant differences in referred pain areas between groups (P < 0.001) and muscles (P < 0.001) were found: the referred pain areas were larger in CTTH children (P < 0.001), and the referred pain area elicited by suboccipital TrPs was larger than the referred pain from the remaining TrPs (P < 0.001). Significant positive correlations between some headache clinical parameters and the size of the referred pain area were found. Our results showed that the local and referred pains elicited from active TrPs in head, neck and shoulder shared similar pain pattern as spontaneous CTTH in children, supporting a relevant role of active TrPs in CTTH in children.

  12. Muscle shortening manoeuvre reduces pain and functional impairment in shoulder impingement syndrome: clinical and ultrasonographic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Maresca, Marco; Bracci, Riccardo; Ravaschio, Andrea; Valiensi, Bruno; Casale, Roberto; Bandinelli, Francesca; Candelieri, Antonio; Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Porta, Francesco; Innocenti, Massimo; Carulli, Christian; Matucci Cerinic, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the short-term efficacy of muscle shortening manoeuvre (MSM), by inducing an increase in strength of the shoulder muscles, for the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Sixty subjects (mean age: 58.6 years) with SIS were assigned to one of 3 different treatment interventions: 1) MSM: a series of fast accelerations in the upward direction was applied to the upper limb that was also submitted to forces acting in the opposite direction (added mass); 2) traditional physiotherapeutic technique: scapulothoracic gliding; 3) simple traction: the added mass was applied to the limb without the series of fast accelerations. Pain intensity, Neer's impingement sign, range of motion and muscle strength were assessed. Ultrasound (US) examination was performed before, immediately after and 30 days after each treatment to study the width of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, long biceps tendon sheath and acromioclavicular joint. Impingement was evaluated by dynamic examination. After treatment with MSM, pain was significantly reduced (p<0.001), Neer's impingement sign was negative, range of motion and muscle strength were increased. US examination showed that the widths of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa (p<0.001), long biceps tendon sheath (p<0.001) and acromioclavicular joint (p<0.001) were significantly reduced; impingement was no more detected. After 30 days, improvement in clinical and US findings was maintained. In the two control groups, no significant changes were observed after treatment. Clinical and US findings demonstrate that MSM, by inducing an increase in muscle strength, is effective in the short-term treatment of SIS.

  13. Muscle strength and range of motion in adolescent pitchers with throwing-related pain: implications for injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakis, James E; McHugh, Malachy P; Caracciolo, Philip A; Busciacco, Lisa; Mullaney, Michael; Nicholas, Stephen J

    2008-11-01

    A high prevalence of throwing-related shoulder and elbow pain has been documented in adolescent baseball pitchers. Pitchers with a history of throwing-related pain will have weakened dominant-arm posterior shoulder musculature and greater dominant-arm glenohumeral total range of motion (ROM) loss compared with pitchers without throwing-related pain. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-three adolescent pitchers (age 15.7 +/- 1.4 years) were tested. Twelve pitchers had throwing-related pain in the prior season and were currently symptom-free, while the remaining 11 pitchers had no such history of pain. Internal and external rotation ROM and muscle strength (lower trapezius, middle trapezius, rhomboids, latissimus dorsi, supraspinatus, internal rotators, external rotators) were measured bilaterally. Dominant versus nondominant differences in ROM and strength were compared between pitchers with and without throwing-related pain. As a whole, the group of 23 pitchers had a loss of internal rotation ROM (13 degrees +/- 10 degrees , P pain. Dominant versus nondominant muscle strength was lower (P pain group versus nonpain group for the middle trapezius (7% +/- 19% vs 22% +/- 12%) and supraspinatus (-4% +/- 27% vs 14% +/- 14%) and higher (P pain in this population may be due to the inability of weakened posterior shoulder musculature to tolerate stress imparted on it by adaptively strengthened propulsive muscles. Selective posterior shoulder strengthening may be indicated in rehabilitative and injury prevention programs for adolescent pitchers.

  14. Repeated intramuscular injections of nerve growth factor induced progressive muscle hyperalgesia, facilitated temporal summation, and expanded pain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Koei; Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Mizumura, Kazue; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Intramuscular injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) is known to induce deep-tissue mechanical hyperalgesia. In this study it was hypothesised that daily intramuscular injections of NGF produce a progressive manifestation of soreness, mechanical hyperalgesia, and temporal summation of pain. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 12 healthy subjects were injected on 3 days with NGF into the tibialis anterior muscle and with isotonic saline on the contralateral side. Assessments were performed before and after the injections on days 0, 1, and 2, and repeated on days 3, 6, and 10. The self-perceived muscle soreness was assessed on a Likert scale. Computer-controlled pressure algometry was used to assess the pressure pain thresholds (PPTs). Temporal summation of pain after repeated pressure stimulations was assessed by computer-controlled pressure algometry. The pain distribution following painful pressure stimulation was also recorded. Compared with baseline and isotonic saline, the NGF injections caused (Ppain at days 1 to 10; and (4) enlarged pressure-induced pain area after the injection on day 1 to day 6. The daily injections of NGF produced a progressive manifestation of muscle soreness, mechanical hyperalgesia, temporal summation of pressure pain, and pressure-induced pain distribution. These data illustrate that the prolonged NGF application affects peripheral and central mechanisms and may reflect process in musculoskeletal pain conditions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Liao, Lina; Gao, Meiya; Ma, Wenqiang; Zhou, Yang; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2015-08-01

    Calcitonin-related gene peptide (CGRP) plays an important role in orofacial inflammatory pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Closed coil springs were used to deliver forces. Rats were euthanized on 0d, 1d, 3d, 5d, 7d, and 14d following experimental tooth movement. Then, alveolar bones were obtained for immunostaining of periodontal tissues against CGRP. Two hours prior to euthanasia on each day, orofacial pain levels were assessed through rat grimace scale. CGRP and olcegepant (CGRP receptor antagonist) were injected into periodontal tissues to verify the roles of periodontal CGRP in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Periodontal CGRP expression levels and orofacial pain levels were elevated on 1d, 3d, 5d, and 7d following experimental tooth movement. The two indices were significantly correlated with each other and fitted into a dose-response model. Periodontal administration of CGRP could elevate periodontal CGRP expressions and exacerbate orofacial pain. Moreover, olcegepant administration could decrease periodontal CGRP expressions and alleviate orofacial pain. Therefore, periodontal CGRP plays an important role in pain transmission and modulation following experimental tooth movement. We suggest that it may participate in a positive feedback aiming to amplify orofacial pain signals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of coping statements on experimental pain in chronic pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Roditi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Roditi, Michael E Robinson, Nola LitwinsDepartment of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: The present study measured the effects of catastrophizing self-statements and positive coping self-statements on cold pressor-induced pain. Participants were 58 adult chronic pain patients with current facial pain. It was hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to a decrease in pain endurance whereas positive coping would lead to an increase in pain endurance. It was also hypothesized that catastrophizing would lead to an increase in peak pain intensity whereas positive coping would lead to a decrease in peak pain intensity. At pretest, participants submerged their nondominant hand in the cold pressor. Pain sensitivity ranges (PSR were subsequently determined by calculating the difference between tolerance and threshold times. Ratings of peak pain intensity were measured using a pressure sensitive bladder/transducer. Participants underwent random assignment to either a catastrophizing group or a positive coping self-statement group. ANCOVA results revealed that on average, participants employing catastrophizing statements as a coping strategy experienced significantly lower PSR (M = 35.53, SD = 39.71 compared to participants employing positive coping self-statements (M = 73.70, SD = 86.14 when controlling for pretest PSR. Group assignment had no significant influence on peak pain intensity ratings. Thus, our results reveal that manipulation of coping causes changes in pain endurance.Keywords: catastrophizing, coping, expectation, pain sensitivity

  17. Relationship Between Electromyographic Signal Amplitude and Thickness Change of the Trunk Muscles in Patients With and Without Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Olivera; Konstantinovic, Ljubica; Miljkovic, Nadica; Bijelic, Goran

    2015-10-01

    To compare the relative thickness change of the transversal abdominal (TrA) and lumbar multifidus (LM) muscles during activation in individuals with and without low back pain (LBP), and to establish a relationship between surface electromyography (sEMG) signal amplitude and the relative thickness change of the corresponding muscle during clinically relevant activity, with preferential activation of TrA/LM. Thirty-seven pain-free participants and 36 LBP patients were assessed by ultrasound for thickness changes of TrA and LM and by sEMG for changes of electrical activity of the same muscles. sEMG is done with wireless LUMBIA system. The position of the sEMG sensors and activation maneuvers were chosen carefully. Significant group effect was found for relative thickness change of TrA (F1,142=60.69, Pchange of TrA and sEMG signal amplitude on both sides for LBP (r=0.46 to 0.63, Ppain-free patients (r=0.43-0.47, Pchange and sEMG was significant in pain-free participants for both sides (r=0.36 to 0.38 Pchange of the muscle thickness could be used as the indicator of the muscle activity. Insight into the activity of TrA/LM in pain-free individuals and LBP patients during and after painful episodes may clarify the role of functional abnormalities of these muscles in LBP.

  18. The relationship beween posture and back muscle endurance in industrial workers with flexion-related low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Peter B; Mitchell, Tim; Bulich, Paul; Waller, Rob; Holte, Johan

    2006-11-01

    This preliminary cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine if there were measurable relationships between posture, back muscle endurance and low back pain (LBP) in industrial workers with a reported history of flexion strain injury and flexion pain provocation. Clinical reports state that subjects with flexion pain disorders of the lumbar spine commonly adopt passive flexed postures such as slump sitting and present with associated dysfunction of the spinal postural stabilising musculature. However, to date there is little empirical evidence to support that patients with back pain, posture their spines differently than pain-free subjects. Subjects included 21 healthy industrial workers and 24 industrial workers with flexion-provoked LBP. Lifestyle information, lumbo-pelvic posture in sitting, standing and lifting, and back muscle endurance were measured. LBP subjects had significantly reduced back muscle endurance (P postured their spines significantly closer to their end of range lumbar flexion in 'usual' sitting than the healthy controls (P back muscle endurance were also identified. There were no significant differences found between the groups for the standing and lifting posture measures. These preliminary results support that a relationship may exist between flexed spinal postures, reduced back muscle endurance, physical inactivity and LBP in subjects with a history of flexion injury and pain.

  19. Experimental human muscle damage: morphological changes in relation to other indices of damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D A; Newham, D J; Round, J M; Tolfree, S E

    1986-06-01

    The effects of eccentric exercise have been examined in human calf and biceps muscles. Release of muscle creatine kinase and uptake of technetium pyrophosphate have been followed for up to 20 days after the exercise and the results are related to the morphological changes seen in needle biopsy samples. The response to exercise was variable, all subjects developing pain and tenderness in the exercised muscles after 1-2 days and this was followed, in most subjects, by a large increase in plasma creatine kinase 4-6 days after the exercise. This was paralleled by an increased uptake of technetium pyrophosphate into the exercised muscle. Biopsies of the affected muscles showed little or no change in the first 7 days after the exercise but later degenerating fibres were seen, as well as infiltration by mononuclear cells and eventually, by 20 days, signs of regeneration. Very extensive changes were seen in the calf muscle of one subject; changes in the biceps were qualitatively similar but not so severe. In the severely affected calf muscle type II fibres were preferentially damaged. Mononuclear cell infiltration both between and within degenerating fibres was maximal well after the time of peak plasma creatine kinase and it is likely that in eccentrically exercised muscle infiltrating mononuclear cells act to scavenge cellular debris rather than to cause damage to the muscle.

  20. An experimental investigation of the effects of preferred and relaxing music listening on pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Laura A; MacDonald, Raymond A R

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of music listening on perception and tolerance of experimentally induced cold pressor pain. Fifty-four participants (34 females, 20 males) each underwent 3 cold pressor trials while listening to (a) white noise, (b) specially designed relaxation music, and (c) their own chosen music. Tolerance time, pain intensity on visual analog scale, and the pain rating index of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and perceived control over the pain were measured in each condition. While listening to their own preferred music, male and female participants tolerated the painful stimulus significantly longer than during both the relaxation music and control conditions. However, only female participants rated the intensity of the pain as significantly lower in the preferred music condition. Both male and female participants reported feeling significantly more control when listening to their preferred music. It is suggested that personal preference is an influential factor when considering the efficacy of music listening for pain relief.

  1. Effect of helium-neon laser auriculotherapy on experimental pain threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C E; Clelland, J A; Knowles, C J; Jackson, J R

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of helium-neon laser auriculotherapy on experimental pain threshold. Eighty healthy female and male subjects, aged 18 to 39 years, were assigned randomly to one of two treatment groups. Subjects in the Experimental Group (n = 41) received laser stimulation, and subjects in the Control Group (n = 39) received sham stimulation to appropriate acupuncture points on the left ear. Experimental pain threshold at the ipsilateral wrist was determined with an electrical stimulus immediately before and after treatment. The mean change (posttreatment minus pretreatment) for the Experimental Group was greater than the mean change for the Control Group (p less than .05). The Experimental Group demonstrated a statistically significant (p less than .05) increase in mean pain threshold after treatment, but the Control Group did not. Results indicate that helium-neon laser auriculotherapy can increase experimental pain threshold and suggest a possible alternative for patients intolerant of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

  2. The interruptive effect of pain in a multitask environment: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M L; Crombez, Geert; Eccleston, Christopher; Liefooghe, Baptist; Van Damme, Stefaan

    2012-02-01

    Daily life is characterized by the need to stop, start, repeat, and switch between multiple tasks. Here, we experimentally investigate the effects of pain, and its anticipation, in a multitask environment. Using a task-switching paradigm, participants repeated and switched between 3 tasks, of which 1 predicted the possible occurrence of pain. Half of the participants received low intensity pain (N = 30), and half high intensity pain (N = 30). Results showed that pain interferes with the performance of a simultaneous task, independent of the pain intensity. Furthermore, pain interferes with the performance on a subsequent task. These effects are stronger with high intensity pain than with low intensity pain. Finally, and of particular importance in this study, interference of pain on a subsequent task was larger when participants switched to another task than when participants repeated the same task. This article is concerned with the interruptive effect of pain on people's task performance by using an adapted task-switching paradigm. This adapted paradigm may offer unique possibilities to investigate how pain interferes with task performance while people repeat and switch between multiple tasks in a multitask environment. Copyright © 2012 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Perception of experimental pain is reduced after provoked waking from rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya, Vivek G; Bentley, Alison J

    2010-06-01

    Patients with chronic pain often complain of pain when they wake at night, but the accuracy of their perception of the pain after waking at night is unknown. While cognitive functions are reduced for a short time after waking from sleep, a situation known as sleep inertia, it is unclear how sleep inertia may affect the perception of pain. We investigated the effects of sleep inertia on the perception of experimentally induced pain. Fourteen male volunteers were exposed to a randomized thermal heat stimulus of 43.1 degrees C 'hot' and 46.5 degrees C 'hurting' during provoked waking from Stage 2 sleep, slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Subjects rated their pain on awakening on a Visual Analogue Scale at 30 s after awakening and each minute thereafter for 5 min. We found no change in pain perception over the 5-min period irrespective of temperature used or sleep stage. However, perceived pain when awoken abruptly from REM sleep was significantly lower than the awake score for both the hot (P = 0.0069) and hurting (P = 0.0025) temperatures. Pain perception when woken from Stage 2 sleep or slow wave sleep was not significantly different from perception when awake. Our findings indicate that sleep inertia reduces pain perception when awoken abruptly from REM. This suggests that patients who wake up in pain either perceive accurately the pain they are experiencing, or at worst underestimate the level of pain if woken from REM sleep.

  4. Evaluation of skeletal muscle regeneration in experimental model after malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pertille

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze muscle regeneration after cryoinjury in the tibialis anterior muscle of young rats that were malnourished and then recovered. Forty Wistar rats were divided into a nourished group that received a normal protein diet (14% casein for 90 days and a malnourished and recovered rats group (MR that was submitted to 45 days of malnutrition with a hypoproteic diet (6% casein followed by 45 days of a normal protein diet (14% casein. After the recovery period, all of the animals underwent cryoinjury in the right tibialis anterior muscle and euthanasia after 7, 14 and 21 days. The amount of connective tissue and the inflammation area was higher in the malnutrition recovered injury MR group (MRI at 14 days post-injury (p < 0.05. Additionally, the cross-sectional area (CSA of the regenerated fibers was decreased in the MRI (p < 0.05. The MyoD and myogenin protein levels were higher in the nourished injury group. Similar levels of TGF-β1 were found between groups. The proposed malnutrition protocol was effective in showing delayed changes in the regeneration process of the tibialis anterior muscle of young rats. Furthermore, we observed a delay in muscle repair even after nutritional recovery.

  5. Muscle Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  6. Skeletal muscle contractility, self-reported pain and tissue sensitivity in females with neck/shoulder pain and upper Trapezius myofascial trigger points- a randomized intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Hartvigsen, Jan; Aagaard, Per; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2012-11-25

    In relation to Myofascial Triggerpoints (MFTrPs) of the upper Trapezius, this study explored muscle contractility characteristics, the occurrence of post-intervention muscle soreness and the effect of dry needling on muscle contractile characteristics and clinical outcomes. Seventy-seven female office workers (25-46yrs) with and without neck/shoulder pain were observed with respect to self-reported pain (NRS-101), pressure-pain threshold (PPT), maximum voluntary contraction (Fmax) and rate of force development (RFD) at baseline (pre-intervention), immediately post-intervention and 48 hours post-intervention. Symptomatic and asymptomatic participant groups were each randomized into two treatment sub-groups (superficial (SDN) and deep dry needling (DDN)) after baseline testing. At 48 hours post-intervention participants were asked whether delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and/or post-needling soreness had developed. Muscle contractile characteristics did not differ between groups at baseline. Forty-six individuals developed muscle soreness (39 from mechanical testing and seven from needling). No inter-group differences were observed post-intervention for Fmax or RFD for the four sub-groups. Over the observation period, symptomatic participants reported less pain from both SDN (p= 0.003) and DDN (p=0.011). However, PPT levels were reduced for all participants (p=0.029). Those reporting DOMS experienced significant decreases in PPT, irrespective of symptom state or intervention (p=0.001). In selected female neck/shoulder pain sufferers, maximum voluntary contraction and rapid force generation of the upper Trapezius was not influenced by clinically relevant self-reported pain or the presence of diagnostically relevant MFTrPs. Dry needling, deep or superficial, did not affect measured functional outcomes over the 48-hour observation period. DOMS affected participants uniformly irrespective of pain, MFTrP status or intervention type and therefore is like to act as a

  7. An unusual cause of sciatic pain as a result of the dynamic motion of the obturator internus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yasuaki; Ogata, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yoshikazu; Yamagata, Masatsune

    2009-06-01

    It has been reported that compression of the sciatic nerve because of any cause, including endometriosis, piriformis syndrome, abscess, tumor, adjoining uterus provoke sciatic pain. Some of these pathophysiologies have been diagnosed clinically and sometimes by exclusion. To discuss the clinical features of sciatic neuropathy under the belief that dynamic motion of the obturator internus muscle and tendon should be included in the differential diagnosis of sciatic neuropathy. Sciatic neuropathy, which was because of compression of the sciatic nerve caused by dynamic motion of the tendon and muscle of the obturator internus, was reported. We performed surgery to confirm the outlet of the pelvis. Although no compression was provoked by the piriformis muscle, obvious compression was observed on the sciatic nerve by the stretched obturator internus muscle. Although it may not be common, compression of the sacral plexus caused by dynamic motion of the obturator internus muscle should be included as a possible diagnosis for sciatic pain.

  8. Downregulation of selective microRNAs in trigeminal ganglion neurons following inflammatory muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dong

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active regulation of gene expression in the nervous system plays an important role in the development and/or maintenance of inflammatory pain. MicroRNA (miRNA negatively regulates gene expression via posttranscriptional or transcriptional inhibition of specific genes. To explore the possible involvement of miRNA in gene regulation during inflammatory pain, we injected complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA unilaterally into the rat masseter muscle and quantified changes in neuron-specific mature miRNAs in the trigeminal ganglion (TG. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed significant, but differential, downregulation of mature miR-10a, -29a, -98, -99a, -124a, -134, and -183 in the ipsilateral mandibular division (V3 of the TG within 4 hr after CFA. In contrast, levels of tested miRNAs did not change significantly in the contralateral V3 or the ipsilateral ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the TG from inflamed rats, nor in the ipsilateral V3 of saline-injected animals. The downregulated miRNAs recovered differentially to a level equal to or higher than that in naive animals. Full recovery time varied with miRNA species but was at least 4 days. Expression and downregulation of some miRNAs were further confirmed by in situ hybridization of TG neurons that innervate the inflamed muscle. Although neurons of all sizes expressed these miRNAs, their signals varied between neurons. Our results indicate that miRNA species specific to neurons are quickly regulated following inflammatory muscle pain.

  9. Mental Status as a Common Factor for Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieszko Wieckiewicz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory muscle pain (MMP is the primary reason for chronic non-odontogenic orofacial pain in the human population. MMP has become a considerable social problem, which affects about 12–14% of the adult population and is 1.5–2 times more frequent in women than in men. This term defines a pain which has its origins in the masticatory muscles. Although MMP is typically felt in the face, jaws, and preauricular area, MMP can radiate to the ear, teeth, head, and neck. This systematic review explains the relationship between MMP and common mental states, such as anxiety, depression, mood and stress-related disorders, and is reported in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. We performed a search in the PubMed database for peer-reviewed articles published after November 1st 2006 in the context of MMP and mental states. According to the defined criteria, 38 studies were finally included into the systematic review, of which prospective cohort studies were found to be the most common. We investigated four primary outcomes (anxiety, depression, mood disorders, and stress-related disorders and several secondary outcomes of search. Seventy-nine percent of studies concerned depression, 42% anxiety, 29% mood disorders, and 21% stress-related disorders. Most of the studies showed a relationship between MMP and alterations in mental status. Nonetheless, the researchers usually evidenced only the co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders and dysfunctions of the masticatory muscles among the group of patients, in large part in women. Moreover, some studies were marked with limited generalizability of the reported results, quality flaws and heterogeneity. In the light of the analyzed literature, the causal relationship between mental states and MMP is still not clearly established.

  10. The Effects of Vibration and Muscle Fatigue on Trunk Sensorimotor Control in Low Back Pain Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Nougarou, François; Normand, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Changes in sensorimotor function and increased trunk muscle fatigability have been identified in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP). This study assessed the control of trunk force production in conditions with and without local erector spinae muscle vibration and evaluated the influence of muscle fatigue on trunk sensorimotor control. Methods Twenty non-specific cLBP patients and 20 healthy participants were asked to perform submaximal isometric trunk extension torque with and without local vibration stimulation, before and after a trunk extensor muscle fatigue protocol. Constant error (CE), variable error (VE) as well as absolute error (AE) in peak torque were computed and compared across conditions. Trunk extensor muscle activation during isometric contractions and during the fatigue protocol was measured using surface electromyography (sEMG). Results Force reproduction accuracy of the trunk was significantly lower in the patient group (CE = 9.81 ± 2.23 Nm; AE = 18.16 ± 3.97 Nm) than in healthy participants (CE = 4.44 ± 1.68 Nm; AE = 12.23 ± 2.44 Nm). Local erector spinae vibration induced a significant reduction in CE (4.33 ± 2.14 Nm) and AE (13.71 ± 3.45 Nm) mean scores in the patient group. Healthy participants conversely showed a significant increase in CE (8.17 ± 2.10 Nm) and AE (16.29 ± 2.82 Nm) mean scores under vibration conditions. The fatigue protocol induced erector spinae muscle fatigue as illustrated by a significant decrease in sEMG median time-frequency slopes. Following the fatigue protocol, patients with cLBP showed significant decrease in sEMG root mean square activity at L4-5 level and responded in similar manner with and without vibration stimulation in regard to CE mean scores. Conclusions Patients with cLBP have a less accurate force reproduction sense than healthy participants. Local muscle vibration led to significant trunk neuromuscular control improvements in the cLBP patients before and after a muscle

  11. The Effects of Vibration and Muscle Fatigue on Trunk Sensorimotor Control in Low Back Pain Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Alexandre Boucher

    Full Text Available Changes in sensorimotor function and increased trunk muscle fatigability have been identified in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP. This study assessed the control of trunk force production in conditions with and without local erector spinae muscle vibration and evaluated the influence of muscle fatigue on trunk sensorimotor control.Twenty non-specific cLBP patients and 20 healthy participants were asked to perform submaximal isometric trunk extension torque with and without local vibration stimulation, before and after a trunk extensor muscle fatigue protocol. Constant error (CE, variable error (VE as well as absolute error (AE in peak torque were computed and compared across conditions. Trunk extensor muscle activation during isometric contractions and during the fatigue protocol was measured using surface electromyography (sEMG.Force reproduction accuracy of the trunk was significantly lower in the patient group (CE = 9.81 ± 2.23 Nm; AE = 18.16 ± 3.97 Nm than in healthy participants (CE = 4.44 ± 1.68 Nm; AE = 12.23 ± 2.44 Nm. Local erector spinae vibration induced a significant reduction in CE (4.33 ± 2.14 Nm and AE (13.71 ± 3.45 Nm mean scores in the patient group. Healthy participants conversely showed a significant increase in CE (8.17 ± 2.10 Nm and AE (16.29 ± 2.82 Nm mean scores under vibration conditions. The fatigue protocol induced erector spinae muscle fatigue as illustrated by a significant decrease in sEMG median time-frequency slopes. Following the fatigue protocol, patients with cLBP showed significant decrease in sEMG root mean square activity at L4-5 level and responded in similar manner with and without vibration stimulation in regard to CE mean scores.Patients with cLBP have a less accurate force reproduction sense than healthy participants. Local muscle vibration led to significant trunk neuromuscular control improvements in the cLBP patients before and after a muscle fatigue protocol. Muscle vibration

  12. The Effects of Vibration and Muscle Fatigue on Trunk Sensorimotor Control in Low Back Pain Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Jean-Alexandre; Abboud, Jacques; Nougarou, François; Normand, Martin C; Descarreaux, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Changes in sensorimotor function and increased trunk muscle fatigability have been identified in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP). This study assessed the control of trunk force production in conditions with and without local erector spinae muscle vibration and evaluated the influence of muscle fatigue on trunk sensorimotor control. Twenty non-specific cLBP patients and 20 healthy participants were asked to perform submaximal isometric trunk extension torque with and without local vibration stimulation, before and after a trunk extensor muscle fatigue protocol. Constant error (CE), variable error (VE) as well as absolute error (AE) in peak torque were computed and compared across conditions. Trunk extensor muscle activation during isometric contractions and during the fatigue protocol was measured using surface electromyography (sEMG). Force reproduction accuracy of the trunk was significantly lower in the patient group (CE = 9.81 ± 2.23 Nm; AE = 18.16 ± 3.97 Nm) than in healthy participants (CE = 4.44 ± 1.68 Nm; AE = 12.23 ± 2.44 Nm). Local erector spinae vibration induced a significant reduction in CE (4.33 ± 2.14 Nm) and AE (13.71 ± 3.45 Nm) mean scores in the patient group. Healthy participants conversely showed a significant increase in CE (8.17 ± 2.10 Nm) and AE (16.29 ± 2.82 Nm) mean scores under vibration conditions. The fatigue protocol induced erector spinae muscle fatigue as illustrated by a significant decrease in sEMG median time-frequency slopes. Following the fatigue protocol, patients with cLBP showed significant decrease in sEMG root mean square activity at L4-5 level and responded in similar manner with and without vibration stimulation in regard to CE mean scores. Patients with cLBP have a less accurate force reproduction sense than healthy participants. Local muscle vibration led to significant trunk neuromuscular control improvements in the cLBP patients before and after a muscle fatigue protocol. Muscle vibration stimulation

  13. Comparison of Abdominal Muscles Thickness Changes Different Postures beween Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients and Healthy Males by Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Rasouli

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: Abdominal muscles respond to postural changes and these muscles are automatically targeted by decreasing the seated stability. In non–specific chronic low back pain patients, activity of Transvers Abdominis was decreased and activity of Rectus Abdominis was increased.

  14. Comparison of Cervical Extensor Muscles Thickness in Females with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain and Healthy Individuals by Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziyeh Baghi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neck pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. Structural and functional alteration of cervical muscles is a commonly-reported complication of chronic neck pain (CNP. Measurement of muscle thickness is an acceptable way to evaluate muscle morphological structure. Therefore, this study aimed to measure cervical extensor muscles thickness in individuals with chronic nonspecific neck pain and healthy controls using ultrasonography so as to evaluate structural differences between the 2 groups. Materials & Methods:  A total of 30 female volunteers (15 individuals with nonspecific CNP and 15 controls participated in this casual comparative  study. Thickness of cervical extensor muscles, including multifidus, semispinalis cervicis, semispinalis capitis, splenius capitis, and upper trapezius at the level of the forth cervical vertebrae were measured using ultrasonography in resting position. Independent t test was performed to analyze the data by using the spss 20 software. Results: The thicknesses of cervical multifidus and semispinalis cervicis muscles in patients with CNP were smaller than those of controls with P=0.03 and P=0.01, respectively. There were no significant differences between two groups regarding the thicknesses of semispinalis capitis, splenius capitis, and upper trapezius muscles (P>0.05. Conclusion: Reduced multifidus and semispinalis cervicis thickness seen in the present study indicates deep neck extensor muscles atrophy and weakness in patients with neck pain. However, there were no differences between two groups with regard to superficial muscles thicknesses. Accordingly, exercise therapy for deep muscles should be considered in the management of patients with nonspecific CNP.

  15. Trunk muscle endurance and low back pain in female dance students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Christopher; Redding, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is often cited as a common condition at all levels of dance. Evidence suggests that reduced endurance of the trunk muscles can predispose an individual to LBP. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in trunk muscle endurance in a sample of tertiary level dance students with and without LBP. Seventeen full-time female dance students were divided into two groups: dance students with LBP (N = 11), and without LBP (N = 6). All participants provided informed consent, and the study was approved by an institutional ethics review board. Participants performed four isometric tests that assess trunk muscle endurance: the right and left side plank, double straight leg raise (DSLR), and the Sorensen test. A modified version of the Osaka City University test was used to assess the presence of LBP. A significant difference (p students with LBP displayed lower levels of endurance compared to those without. No other significant differences were found. This study offers some evidence that reduced trunk muscle endurance is present among dancers with LBP and provides direction for future research into back health among dancers.

  16. Prevalence of and referred pain from myofascial trigger points in the forearm muscles in patients with lateral epicondylalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Carnero, Josué; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; de la Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2007-05-01

    Referred pain and pain characteristics evoked from the extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor digitorum communis, and brachioradialis muscles was investigated in 20 patients with lateral epicondylalgia (LE) and 20-matched controls. Both groups were examined for the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in a blinded fashion. The quality and location of the evoked referred pain, and the pressure pain threshold (PPT) at the lateral epicondyle on the right upper extremity (symptomatic side in patients, and dominant-side on controls) were recorded. Several lateral elbow pain parameters were also evaluated. Within the patient group, the elicited referred pain by manual exploration of 13 out of 20 (65%) extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles, 12/20 (70%) extensor carpi radialis longus muscles, 10/20 (50%) brachioradialis muscles, and 5/20 (25%) extensor digitorum communis muscles, shares similar pain patterns as their habitual lateral elbow and forearm pain. The mean number of muscles with TrPs for each patient was 2.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1,4] of which 2 (95% CI 1,3) were active, and 0.9 (95% CI 0,2) were latent TrPs. Control participants only had latent TrPs (mean: 0.4; 95% CI 0,2). TrP occurrence between the 2 groups was significantly different for active TrPs (Platent TrPs (P>0.05). The referred pain pattern was larger in patients than in controls, with pain referral to the lateral epicondyle (proximally) and to the dorso-lateral aspect of the forearm in the patients, and confined to the dorso-lateral aspect of the forearm in the controls. Patients with LE showed a significant (Pactive TrPs (rs=-0.5; P=0.02): the greater the number of active TrPs, the lower the PPT at the lateral epicondyle. Our results suggest that in patients with LE, the evoked referred pain and its sensory characteristics shared similar patterns as their habitual elbow and forearm pain, consistent with active TrPs. Lower PPT and larger referred

  17. The intra- and inter-rater reliability of five clinical muscle performance tests in patients with and without neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tina; Langberg, Henning; Enoch, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the reliability of muscle performance tests using cost- and time-effective methods similar to those used in clinical practice. When conducting reliability studies, great effort goes into standardising test procedures to facilitate a stable outcome. Therefore, several test...... trials are often performed. However, when muscle performance tests are applied in the clinical setting, clinicians often only conduct a muscle performance test once as repeated testing may produce fatigue and pain, thus variation in test results. We aimed to investigate whether cervical muscle...... performance tests, which have shown promising psychometric properties, would remain reliable when examined under conditions similar to those of daily clinical practice....

  18. Body awareness and responses to experimentally Induced pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Minev; M. Petkova; B. Petrova; R. Strebkova

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE. The aim of this study is to discuss personal and demographic factors that influence the relationship between physical activity and awareness of one's own body, as well as the pain response...

  19. Frequency of daytime tooth clenching episodes in individuals affected by masticatory muscle pain and pain-free controls during standardized ability tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Iacopo; Landino, Donatella; Donnarumma, Valeria; Castroflorio, Tommaso; Lobbezoo, Frank; Michelotti, Ambrosina

    2017-05-01

    Tooth clenching has been suggested to be related to temporomandibular pain. However, the electromyographic characteristics of daytime clenching episodes have been minimally investigated. This study aimed to analyze the frequency, amplitude, and duration of daytime clenching episodes in patients with masticatory muscle pain and pain-free individuals. Fifteen women with masticatory muscles myalgia (MP group, mean ± SD age = 26.4 ± 7.6 years) matched for age to 18 pain-free women (CTR group, mean ± SD age = 25.3 ± 2.8 years) were submitted to three different ability tasks (filling out questionnaires for 40 min, reading for 20 min, and playing a videogame for 20 min). The electromyographic activity periods (AP) of the right masseter greater than 10 % (AP10), 20 % (AP20), and 30 % (AP30) of the maximum voluntary contraction were analyzed. The mean frequencies of AP10, AP20, and AP30 were greater in MP than in CTR individuals (all p pain-free individuals. Clinicians should recognize that the frequency and intensity of daytime clenching are noticeably increased in individuals with masticatory muscle pain in order to better tailor treatment.

  20. Trunk muscle strength and disability level of low back pain in collegiate wrestlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kazunori; Nakazato, Koichi; Irie, Kazunori; Fujimoto, Hideo; Nakajima, Hiroyuki

    2004-08-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a frequent injury in athletes. This study examined the relationship between isokinetic trunk muscle strength and the functional disability level of chronic LBP. We particularly focused on the existence of radiological abnormalities (RA) in the lumbar region. Subjects were 53 collegiate wrestlers. Trunk extensor and flexor muscle strength was measured at three angular velocities (60, 90, and 120degrees x s(-1)). The examined parameters for trunk muscle strength were peak torque, work, average torque, and average power. The disability level of LBP was estimated by using two questionnaires. Based on the RA evaluation with x-ray and MRI, all 53 wrestlers were assigned to two groups as the RA group (N = 35, 66%) and the non-RA group (N = 18, 34%). Correlations between trunk muscle strength and the disability level of LBP in each group were analyzed with Spearman's rank test. Without considering the disability level, there were 14 subjects with LBP (40%) in the RA group and 8 (44%) in the non-RA. Significantly correlated parameters with the disability level of LBP could be observed only when the subjects were restricted to the non-RA group. The correlated parameters with the two questionnaires were peak torque at 120degrees x s(-1), work at 60degrees x s(-1) and 90degrees x s(-1), and average torque at 90degrees x s(-1) and 120degrees x s(-1). There were no significantly correlated parameters in the RA group. None of the trunk flexor parameters were significantly correlated with the disability level of LBP. The relatively low strength of trunk extensors may be one of the factors related to nonspecific chronic low back pain in collegiate wrestlers.

  1. Effect of Individual Strengthening Exercises for Anterior Pelvic Tilt Muscles on Back Pain, Pelvic Angle, and Lumbar ROMs of a LBP Patient with Flat Back

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of individual strengthening exercises for the anterior pelvic tilt muscles on back pain, pelvic tilt angle, and lumbar ROM of a low back pain (LBP...

  2. Body awareness and responses to experimentally Induced pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Minev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. The aim of this study is to discuss personal and demographic factors that influence the relationship between physical activity and awareness of one's own body, as well as the pain response (threshold and tolerance of pain, situational anxiety and personality. In the study 38 healthy individual- volunteers, students in Trakia University - Stara Zagora were selected. All participants were divided into two groups: actively involved in individual or team sport (n = 19 and healthy normaly active subjects (non-athletes, n = 19. The age of the study participants ranged between 18 and 39 years, while the gender breakdown was as follows: men - 22 women – 16. Methods: Psychological Questionnaires: Body Awareness Questionnaire that asks subjects to rate, on a 4 point scale, the degree to which they were currently experiencing symptoms of sympathetic arousal, State Trait Anger Scale, and State Trait Anxiety Scale. Objective methods (cold pressure test are used only to determine the pain sensation and pain tolerance thresholds. The results of investigation support significant differences between athletes and non-athletes in pain thershold, body awareness and anxiety. The study conclusions discuss body awareness as an increasing factor for pain resistance in athletes and as an integral part of the learning process among them.

  3. Muscle agonist-antagonist interactions in an experimental joint model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkovenko, Andrei V; Sawczyn, Stanislaw; Bulgakova, Natalia V; Jasczur-Nowicki, Jaroslaw; Mishchenko, Viktor S; Kostyukov, Alexander I

    2012-10-01

    The experiments presented here and performed in anaesthetized cats aimed at studying the dynamics of interactions between antagonist muscle groups. The tendons of triceps surae muscles of both hindlimbs were connected with an artificial joint (a pulley installed on a shaft). The muscles were activated by the distributed stimulation of five filaments of cut ventral roots L7-S1 on both sides of the spinal cord; movements were evoked by the rate-modulation of the stimulation trains. The study mostly compared programs of reciprocal activation and co-activation, including different changes in stimulation rates of muscle antagonists. The most common feature of the movements in both activation modes was hysteresis of the joint angle changes in dependence on stimulus rate. Reciprocal activation appeared suitable for a precise regulation of both amplitude and velocity of the movements in direction of the agonist shortening; maximal effectiveness was achieved during full switching off the antagonist stimulation at plateaus of the movement traces. The reverse movements during decrease of the agonist's stimulation rate demonstrated an explicit nonlinear form with pronounced initial phase of the joint angle fixation. The co-activation pattern distinctly reduced the hysteresis of joint movements and suppressed the stimulation after-effects, such as the lasting residual movements after fixation of the stimulation rates.

  4. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Nielsen, Thomas Graven; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...... progression. This study investigated changes in knee moments during walking following experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and whether these changes replicated the joint moments observed in medial knee OA patients....

  5. Vitamin D, race, and experimental pain sensitivity in older adults with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, T L; Goodin, B R; Horgas, A L; Kindler, L L; King, C D; Sibille, K T; Peloquin, C A; Riley, J L; Staud, R; Bradley, L A; Fillingim, R B

    2012-12-01

    Low circulating serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (referred to hereafter as vitamin D) have been correlated with many health conditions, including chronic pain. Recent clinical practice guidelines define vitamin D levels deficient and levels of 21-29 ng/ml as insufficient. Vitamin D insufficiency, including the most severe levels of deficiency, is more prevalent in black Americans. Ethnic and race group differences have been reported in both clinical and experimental pain, with black Americans reporting increased pain. The purpose of this study was to examine whether variations in vitamin D levels contribute to race differences in knee osteoarthritis pain. The sample consisted of 94 participants (74% women), including 45 blacks and 49 whites with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Their average age was 55.8 years (range 45-71 years). Participants completed a questionnaire on knee osteoarthritis symptoms and underwent quantitative sensory testing, including measures of sensitivity to heat-induced and mechanically induced pain. Blacks had significantly lower levels of vitamin D compared to whites, demonstrated greater clinical pain, and showed greater sensitivity to heat-induced and mechanically induced pain. Low levels of vitamin D predicted increased experimental pain sensitivity, but did not predict self-reported clinical pain. Group differences in vitamin D levels significantly predicted group differences in heat pain and pressure pain thresholds at the index knee and ipsilateral forearm. These data demonstrate that race differences in experimental pain are mediated by differences in the vitamin D level. Vitamin D deficiency may be a risk factor for increased knee osteoarthritis pain in black Americans. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Isometric force production parameters during normal and experimental low back pain conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blouin Jean-Sébastien

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The control of force and its between-trial variability are often taken as critical determinants of motor performance. Subjects performed isometric trunk flexion and extension forces without and with experiment pain to examine if pain yields changes in the control of trunk forces. The objective of this study is to determine if experimental low back pain modifies trunk isometric force production. Methods Ten control subjects participated in this study. They were required to exert 50 and 75% of their isometric maximal trunk flexion and extension torque. In a learning phase preceding the non painful and painful trials, visual and verbal feedbacks were provided. Then, subjects were asked to perform 10 trials without any feedback. Time to peak torque, time to peak torque variability, peak torque variability as well as constant and absolute error in peak torque were calculated. Time to peak and peak dF/dt were computed to determine if the first peak of dF/dt could predict the peak torque achieved. Results Absolute and constant errors were higher in the presence of a painful electrical stimulation. Furthermore, peak torque variability for the higher level of force was increased with in the presence of experimental pain. The linear regressions between peak dF/dt, time to peak dF/dt and peak torque were similar for both conditions. Experimental low back pain yielded increased absolute and constant errors as well as a greater peak torque variability for the higher levels of force. The control strategy, however, remained the same between the non painful and painful condition. Cutaneous pain affects some isometric force production parameters but modifications of motor control strategies are not implemented spontaneously. Conclusions It is hypothesized that adaptation of motor strategies to low back pain is implemented gradually over time. This would enable LBP patients to perform their daily tasks with presumably less pain and more

  7. A comparison of muscle activity in using touchscreen smartphone among young people with and without chronic neck-shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanfei; Szeto, Grace P Y; Dai, Jie; Madeleine, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine differences in muscle activity between young people with and without neck-shoulder pain (n = 20 in each group), when they performed texting on a smartphone. Texting was compared between using both hands ('bilateral texting') and with only one hand ('unilateral texting'). Texting tasks were also compared with computer typing. Surface electromyography from three proximal postural muscles and four distal hand/thumb muscles on the right side was recorded. Compared with healthy controls, young people with neck-shoulder pain showed altered motor control consisting of higher muscle activity in the cervical erector spinae and upper trapezius when performing texting and typing tasks. Generally, unilateral texting was associated with higher muscle loading compared with bilateral texting especially in the forearm muscles. Compared with computer typing, smartphone texting was associated with higher activity in neck extensor and thumb muscles but lower activity in upper and lower trapezius as well as wrist extensors. This study demonstrated that symptomatic individuals had increased muscle activity in the neck–shoulder region when texting on a smartphone. Contemporary ergonomic guidelines should include advice on how to interact with handheld electronic devices to achieve a relaxed posture and reduced muscle load in order to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

  8. The effects of mindful attention and state mindfulness on acute experimental pain among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petter, Mark; McGrath, Patrick J; Chambers, Christine T; Dick, Bruce D

    2014-06-01

    Attention-based coping strategies for pain are widely used in pediatric populations. The purpose of this study was to test a novel mindful attention manipulation on adolescent's experimental pain responses. Furthermore, the relationship between state mindfulness and experimental pain was examined. A total of 198 adolescents were randomly assigned to a mindful attention manipulation or control group prior to an experimental pain task. Participants completed measures of state mindfulness immediately prior to the pain task, and situational catastrophizing and pain intensity following the task. Overall the manipulation had no effect on pain. Secondary analysis showed that meditation experience moderated the effect of the manipulation. State mindfulness predicted pain outcomes, with reductions in situational catastrophizing mediating this relationship. The mindful attention manipulation was effective among adolescents with a regular meditation practice. State mindfulness was related to ameliorated pain responses, and these effects were mediated by reduced catastrophizing. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Effect of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, maximum isometric contraction of the extensor muscles, and pressure pain threshold in patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain: Double blinded randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Namvar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of myofascial release technique alone has not been investigated in the patients with non-specific chronic neck pain. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of myofascial release technique on pain, disability, the maximum contraction of isometric extensor muscles of neck and pressure pain threshold in the patient with non-specific chronic neck pain compared with control group. In this clinical, randomized, double-blind trial, the patients with non-specific chronic neck pain have been entered the study by the available sampling method and have been located randomly into two groups of myofascial release therapy group, and control group. Pressure pain threshold, pain intensity, disability and isometric power of neck extensor muscles before and after intervention were registered through pressure algometer, visual analogue scale, neck disability index, and pressure biofeedback. The treatment was performed for 4 sessions and each session for 20 minutes. The paired t-tests and independent t-test were used for within group and between group comparison respectively. Comparing the mean of pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, neck disability index in the intervention group compared with control group showed significant reduction (P0.05. Myofascial Release is one of the effective manual therapy techniques in reducing pain, disability, improving the isometric extension strength of neck in patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain.

  10. Effects of Stabilization Exercises Focusing on Pelvic Floor Muscles on Low Back Pain and Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Fariba; Mohammadi, Khadijeh; Amir Sasan, Ramin; Niko Kheslat, Saeed; Oskouei, Ali E

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of stabilization exercises focusing on pelvic floor muscles on both low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) in women suffering from chronic nonspecific LBP. In a randomized clinical trial, 60 women, ranging from 45 to 60 years old, with chronic nonspecific LBP and stress UI were recruited. They were randomly assigned to the control group (n = 30) that received routine physiotherapy modalities and regular exercises, or the training group (n = 30) that received routine physiotherapy modalities and stabilization exercises focusing on pelvic floor muscle (12 weeks). Clinical characteristics of the study subjects including UI intensity and quality of life assessed by International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form questionnaire, functional disability assessed by Oswestry disability index scores, pain intensity, pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance, and transverses abdominis muscle strength were measured before and after treatment. Functional disability and pain intensity were significantly decreased in control (P Pelvic floor muscle strength and endurance, and transverses abdominis muscle strength were statistically increased in the training group compared with those in the control group (P pelvic floor muscle improves stress UI as well as LBP in women with chronic nonspecific LBP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Decreased task duration and unchanged trunk muscle activity in low-back pain patients during stair climbing after back extensor muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    2014-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a major problem. Spine control and stability mechanisms are important but the knowledge of these parameters in functions is sparse. 7 healthy / 5 recurrent mild-to-moderate LBP patients participated in assessment of abdominal, lumbar and gluteal muscles' surface EMG and vid...

  12. Spinal Disinhibition in Experimental and Clinical Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrew G; Lee-Kubli, Corinne; Azmi, Shazli; Zhang, Michael; Ferdousi, Maryam; Mixcoatl-Zecuatl, Teresa; Petropoulos, Ioannis N; Ponirakis, Georgios; Fineman, Mark S; Fadavi, Hassan; Frizzi, Katie; Tavakoli, Mitra; Jeziorska, Maria; Jolivalt, Corinne G; Boulton, Andrew J M; Efron, Nathan; Calcutt, Nigel A; Malik, Rayaz A

    2017-05-01

    Impaired rate-dependent depression (RDD) of the Hoffman reflex is associated with reduced dorsal spinal cord potassium chloride cotransporter expression and impaired spinal γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor function, indicative of spinal inhibitory dysfunction. We have investigated the pathogenesis of impaired RDD in diabetic rodents exhibiting features of painful neuropathy and the translational potential of this marker of spinal inhibitory dysfunction in human painful diabetic neuropathy. Impaired RDD and allodynia were present in type 1 and type 2 diabetic rats but not in rats with type 1 diabetes receiving insulin supplementation that did not restore normoglycemia. Impaired RDD in diabetic rats was rapidly normalized by spinal delivery of duloxetine acting via 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2A receptors and temporally coincident with the alleviation of allodynia. Deficits in RDD and corneal nerve density were demonstrated in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy compared with healthy control subjects and patients with painless diabetic neuropathy. Spinal inhibitory dysfunction and peripheral small fiber pathology may contribute to the clinical phenotype in painful diabetic neuropathy. Deficits in RDD may help identify patients with spinally mediated painful diabetic neuropathy who may respond optimally to therapies such as duloxetine. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  13. Comparison of MnO2 nanoparticles and microparticles distribution in CNS and muscle and effect on acute pain threshold in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Nosrati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Recently, applications of MnO2 nanoparticles and microparticles in industry, pharmacology, and medicine have considerably expanded. Mn distribution and clearance from brain and spinal cord tissue compared with muscle tissue of rats after single subcutaneous injection of nanoparticles and microparticle of MnO2 . Pain sensory threshold of rat was evaluated as neurologic consequence of the particles on CNS activity of rats.   Materials and Methods: Rats divided to control and two experimental groups. Each experimental group received a single subcutaneous injection of MnO2 nano- and microparticles, respectively. Acute pain thresholds of rats were evaluated by tail immersion method and its weight gain was recorded during these weeks. Samples taken from brain, spinal cord and muscle tissues of rats, once every 2 week for 8 weeks. The tissue Mn level was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry method. Results: Both particles size passed from blood barriers. Unlike brain tissue, manganese completely cleared from spinal tissue after 8 weeks in both groups. Clearance of Mn from muscle tissue is not complete in both of the groups. Weight gain of rats in both groups was slower than control rats. In microparticle group, rats showed progressive analgesia (p

  14. Effect of progressive muscle relaxation therapy on improving signs and symptoms of patients with myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momen Beitollahi J.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: One of the most common causes of facial pain, is muscular pain. MPDS is one of the most important disorders of facial area that many of patients suffer from pain, tenderness of one or more masticatory muscles and limitation of movement. Psychological factors play an important role in MPDS. Anxiety and depression by increasing muscle tension, can cause myofacial pain syndrome; They can also accompany the syndrome as comorbidities or develop as sequelae of chronic pain and disability. Many approaches can be used to treat myofacial pain syndrome. The least invasive and least traumatic approach should be se.lected. Often, treatment for myofacial pain syndrome fails, because underlying problems go untreated. Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR is mainly used for treating anxiety and depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of PMR in improving signs and symptoms of patients with MPDS. "nMaterials and Methods: In this before and after clinical trial study, 33 patients with MPDS that had anxiety and or mild depression(were assessed by Beck Inventorywere treated by PMR in a period of a month (3 visitsand were followed up until 2 months. Analysis was done using paired t-test/ wilcoxon-sign-rank test. "nResults: The results of this study showed that variants like intensity of pain, tenderness of masticatory muscles, maximum opening of mouth with and without pain, anxiety (p<0.001 and depression (p=0.001 improved significant 16 after treatment in comparison with before treatment. "nConclusion: In conclusion, PMR is effective in improving signs and symptoms in patients with MPDS. Therefore psychological status should be considered in treatment plan of these patients.

  15. The influence of isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle on young female patients with anterior knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wilczyński

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anterior knee pain is a disease associated with abnormalities in the patellofemoral joint. It is a common reason for seeking advice from an orthopaedist. This problem is characterised by chronic pain in the anterior part of one or both knees. This issue often affects women, especially at a young age. The effect of this ailment is deterioration of the quality of life. This dysfunction significantly reduces abilities, and often prevents the performance of daily activities. Pain usually occurs during physical activity, but may also be accompanied by prolonged immobilisation of the knee joint. In defining the type of patellofemoral instability, orthopaedists use magnetic resonance imaging, arthroscopy, ultrasonography, and X-ray examination. A relatively effective method of treatment of pain in the patellofemoral joint is through isometric exercises of the quadriceps. They increase the strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle and reduce instability in the patellofemoral joint. Aim of the research: To evaluate the effectiveness of isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle on young female patients with anterior knee pain. Material and methods : The study involved 30 women aged 13–44 years (mean age: 26.8 years, who had been diagnosed with pain in the front of the knee. Results and conclusions: Isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle are an effective method of reducing anterior knee pain. Isometric exercises have a beneficial influence on improving physical activity, including performing basic activities of daily living. Student’s t distribution showed, that isometric exercises of the quadriceps muscle reduce pain at the front of the knee. Kruskal-Wallis test confirmed a significant reduction of anterior knee pain.

  16. Experimental model of human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Regadas, Rommel P.; Maria E. A. Moraes; Mesquita,Francisco J. C.; Joao B. G. Cerqueira; Gonzaga-Silva,Lucio F.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a technique for en bloc harvesting of the corpus cavernosum, cavernous artery and urethra from transplant organ donors and contraction-relaxation experiments with corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The corpus cavernosum was dissected to the point of attachment with the crus penis. A 3 cm segment (corpus cavernosum and urethra) was isolated and placed in ice-cold sterile transportation buffer. Under magnification, the cavernous artery was dissected. Th...

  17. Effects of Hemibridge with Ball and Balloon Exercise on Forced Expiratory Volume and Pain in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: An Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jorida Fernandes; Akshay Chougule

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives: Suboptimal breathing patterns and impairments of posture and trunk stability are often associated with musculoskeletal complaints such as low back pain. Respiration is also affected by poor neuromuscular control of core muscles. Immediate effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise has been studied on chronic pain in athlete population. Objective: To evaluate the effects of hemibridge with ball and balloon exercise on pain, forced expiratory volume and func...

  18. The Comparison of the Effects of Trigger Points Pressure Release and Kinesio Taping on Pain and Hip Abductor Muscles Strength in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Mazloum

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Hip muscles insufficiency plays a significant role in deterioration of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS, which can be manifested as myofascial trigger point (MTrPs in hip muscles. Then, our purpose was to determine the prevalence of MTrPs in the gluteus medius (GMe and quadratus lumborum (QL muscles and to investigate the effect of a therapeutic intervention on pain intensity and hip abductor muscles isometric strength in patients with PFPS. Methods: Forty volunteer subjects (20 patients and 20 healthy participated in the study. Latent MTrPs in GMe and QL were evaluated and a handheld dynamometer was used to measure peak isometric strength test (PIST for hip abductors. Patients with PFPS having MTrPs in GMe were randomly divided into either a treatment group (Mean age±SD: 23.2±4.3 years or control (Mean age±SD: 24.4±4.6 years. The therapeutic intervention included trigger point pressure release (TrPPR and Kinesio Taping® (KT. Pain intensity and PIST for hip abductors were assessed at baseline and after intervention in both groups. Results: There is more significant patients with PFPS having latent MTrPs in GMe and QL than the healthy counterparts (p0.05. Conclusion: Concomitant using of TrPPR therapy and KT method can decrease pain intensity in individuals with PFPS. Further studies are required to understand the underlying mechanisms.

  19. Experimental model of human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel P. Regadas

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe a technique for en bloc harvesting of the corpus cavernosum, cavernous artery and urethra from transplant organ donors and contraction-relaxation experiments with corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The corpus cavernosum was dissected to the point of attachment with the crus penis. A 3 cm segment (corpus cavernosum and urethra was isolated and placed in ice-cold sterile transportation buffer. Under magnification, the cavernous artery was dissected. Thus, 2 cm fragments of cavernous artery and corpus cavernosum were obtained. Strips measuring 3 x 3 x 8 mm3 were then mounted vertically in an isolated organ bath device. Contractions were measured isometrically with a Narco-Biosystems force displacement transducer (model F-60, Narco-Biosystems, Houston, TX, USA and recorded on a 4-channel Narco-Biosystems desk model polygraph. RESULTS: Phenylephrine (1µM was used to induce tonic contractions in the corpus cavernosum (3 - 5 g tension and cavernous artery (0.5 - 1g tension until reaching a plateau. After precontraction, smooth muscle relaxants were used to produce relaxation-response curves (10-12M to 10-4 M. Sodium nitroprusside was used as a relaxation control. CONCLUSION: The harvesting technique and the smooth muscle contraction-relaxation model described in this study were shown to be useful instruments in the search for new drugs for the treatment of human erectile dysfunction.

  20. Experimental model of human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regadas, Rommel P; Moraes, Maria E A; Mesquita, Francisco J C; Cerqueira, Joao B G; Gonzaga-Silva, Lucio F

    2010-01-01

    To describe a technique for en bloc harvesting of the corpus cavernosum, cavernous artery and urethra from transplant organ donors and contraction-relaxation experiments with corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. The corpus cavernosum was dissected to the point of attachment with the crus penis. A 3 cm segment (corpus cavernosum and urethra) was isolated and placed in ice-cold sterile transportation buffer. Under magnification, the cavernous artery was dissected. Thus, 2 cm fragments of cavernous artery and corpus cavernosum were obtained. Strips measuring 3 x 3 x 8 mm(3) were then mounted vertically in an isolated organ bath device. Contractions were measured isometrically with a Narco-Biosystems force displacement transducer (model F-60, Narco-Biosystems, Houston, TX, USA) and recorded on a 4-channel Narco-Biosystems desk model polygraph. Phenylephrine (1 microM) was used to induce tonic contractions in the corpus cavernosum (3-5 g tension) and cavernous artery (0.5-1 g tension) until reaching a plateau. After precontraction, smooth muscle relaxants were used to produce relaxation-response curves (10(-12) M to 10(-4) M). Sodium nitroprusside was used as a relaxation control. The harvesting technique and the smooth muscle contraction-relaxation model described in this study were shown to be useful instruments in the search for new drugs for the treatment of human erectile dysfunction.

  1. Skeletal Muscle Haemangioma: A Cause for Chronic Pain about the Knee: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopuri Ravi Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle haemangiomas are uncommon soft tissue tumors; more than 90% are misdiagnosed initially. They present as chronic pain and swelling in a muscle with or without a history of trauma. Plain X-rays, bone scans, computerized tomography (CT studies, and angiography studies may not always be specific for this tumor. Diagnostic ultrasound is an appropriate initial imaging modality for suspected haemangioma, although magnetic resonance imaging is the investigation of choice. Many treatment modalities for the symptomatic haemangiomas are available of which surgical excision is the most preferred. We present an unusual case of pain, swelling, and restriction of movements in the right knee following an episode of trauma in a 12-year-old boy who was being followed for 1 year by a general practioner and later referred to us. The patient was diagnosed to have intramuscular cavernous haemangioma in the vastus medialis by us for which he was treated by surgical excision and followed for 1 year and found to have no recurrence. The clinical features, radiological picture, pathological histology, diagnostic tools, and treatment options have been discussed.

  2. Changes in deep lumbar stabilizing muscle thickness by transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung Ok; Cho, Hee Kyung; Kim, So Yeon; Jones, Rodney; Cho, Yun Woo; Ahn, Sang Ho

    2016-06-17

    Transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is known to stimulate contraction of deep lumbar stabilizing muscles. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in deep lumbar stabilizing muscle thickness during transcutaneous NMES on specific abdominal wall and paraspinal regions. Thirty patients with low back pain (LBP) were recruited. Three sessions were preformed: Session 1: NMES on abdominal wall, Session 2: NMES on lumbar paraspinal area, and Session 3: concurrent NMES on abdominal wall and lumbar paraspinal area. Real time ultrasound imaging (RUSI) of three abdominal stabilizing muscles; transverse abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI), obliquus externus (OE) muscles and one posterior stabilizer, the lumbar multifidus muscles (LM) was captured. All studied muscles of TrA, OI, OE, and LM were found to have significant thickness increases during all three sessions compared to resting state (p Rehabilitative efforts for patients with LBP may benefit from simultaneous transcutaneous NMES of abdominal and lumbar regions.

  3. Specific proteins of the trapezius muscle correlate with pain intensity and sensitivity – an explorative multivariate proteomic study of the trapezius muscle in women with chronic widespread pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olausson P

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Patrik Olausson, Bijar Ghafouri, Nazdar Ghafouri, Björn Gerdle Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden Abstract: Chronic widespread pain (CWP including fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS has a high prevalence and is associated with prominent negative consequences. CWP/FMS exhibits morphological and functional alterations in the central nervous system. The importance of peripheral factors for maintaining the central alterations are under debate. In this study, the proteins from biopsies of the trapezius muscle from 18 female CWP/FMS patients and 19 healthy female controls were analyzed. Pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds (PPT over the trapezius muscles were registered. Twelve proteins representing five different groups of proteins were important regressors of pain intensity in CWP/FMS (R2=0.99; P<0.001. In the regression of PPT in CWP/FMS, it was found that 16 proteins representing six groups of proteins were significant regressors (R2=0.95, P<0.05. Many of the important proteins were stress and inflammation proteins, enzymes involved in metabolic pathways, and proteins associated with muscle damage, myopathies, and muscle recovery. The altered expression of these proteins may reflect both direct and indirect nociceptive/inflammatory processes as well as secondary changes. The relative importance of the identified proteins and central alterations in CWP need to be investigated in future research. Data from this and the previous study concerning the same cohorts give support to the suggestion that peripheral factors are of importance for maintaining pain aspects in CWP/FMS. Keywords: chronic widespread pain, proteomics, biomarkers, multivariate data analysis, pain threshold, numeric rating scale

  4. Comparison of the effects of knee and hip and single knee muscles strengthening/ stretching exercises on pain intensity and function in athletes with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Mazloum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is a common musculoskeletal condition among athletes. The evidence emphasizes on the importance of hip musculature strengthening exercises for such patients. Objective: To investigate the effects of strengthening-stretching knee muscles exercises and hip posterolateral musculature exercises in athletes with PFPS. Methods: In this clinical trial, 28 athletes with age average of 22.7±2.4 years with PFPS were allocated into conventional knee muscles exercises (CKME (n=14 and posterolateral hip muscles exercises (PHME (n=14. The subjects of both groups performed the supervised exercise protocols in 12 sessions. The Visual Analogue Scale and 6-minute walking tests were administrated respectively to evaluate pain intensity and function. The data were analyzed using Shapiro-wilk test, Independent-sample t test, and Repeated Measure ANOVA test. Findings: Demographic, pain intensity, and physical function data were similar between groups at baseline. Both groups significantly improved in pain intensity and function following a 4-week exercise program. Additionally, the athletes in PHME group had higher level of decreased pain intensity and improved function in follow-up assessment than the subjects in CKME group. Conclusion: Using hip posterolateral musculature exercises in addition to the knee conventional exercises is more effective for athletes with PFPS.

  5. Changes in lumbar multifidus muscle function and nociceptive sensitivity in low back pain patient responders versus non-responders after dry needling treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Walker, Michael J; Su, Jonathan; McGowen, Jared M; Umlauf, Lindsey; Harris, Kevin D; Ross, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the physiologic mechanism of dry needling. While some evidence suggests that dry needling may decrease nocioceptive sensitivity and facilitate muscle function, no studies to date have examined these physiologic changes compared to clinical outcomes. To examine changes in lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle function and nociceptive sensitivity after dry needling in patients with LBP and to determine if such changes differ in patients that exhibit improved disability (responders) and those that do not (non-responders). Quasi-experimental study. Sixty-six volunteers with mechanical LBP (38 men, age = 41.3 ± 9.2 years) completed the study. Ultrasound measurements and pain algometry of the LM were taken at baseline and repeated immediately following dry needling treatment to the LM muscles and after one week. The percent change in muscle thickness from rest to contraction was calculated for each time point to represent muscle function. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) was used to measure nociceptive sensitivity. Participants were dichotomized as responders and non-responders based on whether or not they experienced clinical improvement using the modified Oswestry Disability Index after one week. 2 × 3 mixed-model ANOVA were conducted for group (responders vs. non-responders) by time. Patient responders exhibited larger improvements in LM muscle contraction and nociceptive sensitivity 1 week, but not immediately, after dry needling than non-responders. Our results suggest that there may be lasting and clinically relevant sensorimotor changes that occur in LBP patients that improve with dry needling treatment that partially explain the physiologic mechanism of action. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Genetic Influences of OPRM1, OPRD1 and COMT on Morphine Analgesia in a Multi-Modal, Multi-Tissue Human Experimental Pain Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Christrup, Lona Louring; Sato, Hiroe

    2017-01-01

    Human studies on experimentally induced pain are of value to elucidate the genetic influence on morphine analgesia under controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate if genetic variants of mu, kappa and delta opioid receptor genes (OPRM1, OPRK1 and OPRD1) and catechol......-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) are associated with the morphine analgesia. The study was a randomised, double-blind, two-way, cross-over, single-dose study conducted in 40 healthy participants, where morphine was compared with placebo. Pain was induced by contact heat, muscle pressure, bone pressure, rectal stimulations......, results suggest that genetic variants in the COMT and OPRM1 irrespective of gender, and OPRD1 in males, may contribute to the variability in morphine analgesia in experimental pain models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  7. Motor training of the lumbar paraspinal muscles induces immediate changes in motor coordination in patients with recurrent low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Henry; Druitt, Thomas R; Schollum, Tracie M; Hodges, Paul W

    2010-11-01

    Recurrent low back pain (LBP) is associated with altered motor coordination of the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Whether these changes can be modified with motor training remains unclear. Twenty volunteers with unilateral LBP were randomly assigned to cognitively activate the lumbar multifidus independently from other back muscles (skilled training) or to activate all paraspinal muscles with no attention to any specific muscles (extension training). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of deep (DM) and superficial multifidus (SM) muscles were recorded bilaterally using intramuscular fine-wire electrodes and that of superficial abdominal and back muscles using surface electrodes. Motor coordination was assessed before and immediately after training as onsets of trunk muscle EMG during rapid arm movements, and as EMG amplitude at the mid-point of slow trunk flexion-extension movements. Despite different intentions of the training tasks, the pattern of activity was similar for both. After both training tasks, activation of the DM and SM muscles was earlier during rapid arm movements. However, during slow trunk movements, DM and SM activity was increased, and EMG activity of the superficial trunk muscles was reduced only after skilled training. These findings show the potential to alter motor coordination with motor training of the lumbar paraspinal muscles in recurrent LBP. Changes in motor coordination differed between skilled and extension training during slows trunk movements. As identical patterns of muscle activity were observed between training protocols, the results suggest that training-induced changes in motor coordination are not simply related to the muscle activation, but appear to be related to the task. Copyright © 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Early results of low-level laser application for masticatory muscle pain: a double-blind randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancakli, Erkan; Gökçen-Röhlıg, Bilge; Balık, Ali; Öngül, Değer; Kıpırdı, Selin; Keskın, Haluk

    2015-10-23

    To evaluate the effect of Low Level Laser (LLL) application at the points of greatest pain in patients with chronic masticatory muscle pain. A total number of 30 (21 women, 9 men, with a mean age of 39.2) were selected after the diagnosis of MPDS according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorder (RDC/TMD). The patients were randomly divided into three groups; laser group I (n = 10); patients received the LLL at the point of greatest pain, laser group II (n = 10); patients received LLL at pre-established points in the effected muscles and placebo group (n = 10). LLL and placebo were applied three times per week, for a total of 12 sessions. Mandibular mobility was examined, masticator muscles tenderness were assessed and PPT values were obtained. Subjective pain levels were evaluated using VAS. The measurements performed before the treatment and after the completion of the therapy. Descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, and frequency) Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test and paired-sample t-tests were used for analysis. In both laser groups, there was a statically significant reduction in PPT values of the muscles, number of muscles without any pain on palpation increased significantly, mandibular movements' ranges were improved. Laser group I demonstrated statistically better results than the Laser group II in all of the measured values. Plasebo group did not show any statistically difference in any of the measured values. LLLT can be accepted as an alternative treatment modality in the management of masticatory muscle pain and direct irradiation seems to effect better. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN31085 , Date of registration 28/08/20145.

  9. Masseter muscle myofibrillar protein synthesis and degradation in an experimental critical illness myopathy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkad, Hazem; Corpeno, Rebeca; Larsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is a debilitating common consequence of modern intensive care, characterized by severe muscle wasting, weakness and a decreased myosin/actin (M/A) ratio. Limb/trunk muscles are primarily affected by this myopathy while cranial nerve innervated muscles are spared or less affected, but the mechanisms underlying these muscle-specific differences remain unknown. In this time-resolved study, the cranial nerve innervated masseter muscle was studied in a unique experimental rat intensive care unit (ICU) model, where animals were exposed to sedation, neuromuscular blockade (NMB), mechanical ventilation, and immobilization for durations varying between 6 h and 14d. Gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, RT-PCR and morphological staining techniques were used to analyze M/A ratios, myofiber size, synthesis and degradation of myofibrillar proteins, and levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Results obtained in the masseter muscle were compared with previous observations in experimental and clinical studies of limb muscles. Significant muscle-specific differences were observed, i.e., in the masseter, the decline in M/A ratio and muscle fiber size was small and delayed. Furthermore, transcriptional regulation of myosin and actin synthesis was maintained, and Akt phosphorylation was only briefly reduced. In studied degradation pathways, only mRNA, but not protein levels of MuRF1, atrogin-1 and the autophagy marker LC3b were activated by the ICU condition. The matrix metalloproteinase MMP-2 was inhibited and protective HSPs were up-regulated early. These results confirm that the cranial nerve innervated masticatory muscles is less affected by the ICU-stress response than limb muscles, in accordance with clinical observation in ICU patients with CIM, supporting the model' credibility as a valid CIM model.

  10. Experimenter Effects on Pain Reporting in Women Vary across the Menstrual Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M. Vigil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Separate lines of research have shown that menstrual cycling and contextual factors such as the gender of research personnel influence experimental pain reporting. Objectives. This study examines how brief, procedural interactions with female and male experimenters can affect experimentally reported pain (cold pressor task, CPT across the menstrual cycle. Methods. Based on the menstrual calendars 94 naturally cycling women and 38 women using hormonal contraceptives (Mage=19.83,  SD=3.09 were assigned to low and high fertility groups. This assignment was based on estimates of their probability of conception given their current cycle day. Experimenters (12 males, 7 females engaged in minimal procedural interactions with participants before the CPT was performed in solitude. Results. Naturally cycling women in the high fertility group showed significantly higher pain tolerance (81 sec, d=.79 following interactions with a male but not a female experimenter. Differences were not found for women in the low fertility or contraceptive groups. Discussion. The findings illustrate that menstrual functioning moderates the effect that experimenter gender has on pain reporting in women. Conclusion. These findings have implications for standardizing pain measurement protocols and understanding how basic biopsychosocial mechanisms (e.g., person-perception systems can modulate pain experiences.

  11. Isokinetic testing of flexor and extensor muscles in athletes suffering from low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzit, G P; Chisotti, L; Albertini, G; Martore, M; Gribaudo, C G

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the usefulness of isokinetic testing in athletes with chronic low back pain (LBP) to obtain quantitative information for rehabilitation purposes. a comparative study. Physiotherapy Department--Institute of Sports Medicine in Italy. 50 men, aged 25-65, practising running, cycling, triathlon, tennis, soccer, basketball, volleyball, skiing and golf. The patients were divided into two groups. Group A was treated for 3 months with postural exercises 2 or 3 times a week. Group B was treated for the same period of time with resistive exercises performed by resorting to specific machines. Before and after treatment, trunk muscle strength was evaluated by means of an isokinetic test carried out in a seated position. The isokinetic measurements used were peak torque (PT), work, power-in the best repetition and total work (TW) in four repetitions. Both the pain and the functional impairment during physical activity was evaluated by subjective visual analogic scale. The PT showed a parallel increase in flexor and extensor muscles in Group A. In Group B it increased by 32.2% at 60 degrees/s and 44.1% at 120 degrees/s as for the extensor muscles while the flexion-to-extension ratio decreased significantly. The TW registered a bigger percentage increase in both groups (+21% at 60 degrees/s and +20.4% at 120 degrees/s in Group A; +36.5% at 60 degrees/s and +50.3% at 120 degrees/s in Group B). The two rehabilitation programmes had the same effect on the course of LBP, but in Group B we observed a bigger increase in strength which could be potentially useful during a sports activity.

  12. Antinociceptive Interaction of Tramadol with Gabapentin in Experimental Mononeuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Noriega, Viviana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Zanetta, Pilar; Castillo, Rodrigo; Aranda, Nicolás; Sierralta, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is the result of injury to the nervous system, and different animal models have been established to meet the manifestations of neuropathy. The pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain includes gabapentin and tramadol, but these are only partially effective when given alone. The aim of this study was to assess the antinociceptive interaction between both drugs using the isobolographic analysis and changes of the IL-1β concentration in a mouse model of neuropathic pain (partial sciatic nerve ligation or PSNL). The i.p. administration of gabapentin (5-100 mg/kg) or tramadol (12.5-100 mg/kg) displayed a dose-dependent antinociception in the hot plate assay of PSNL mice, and effects induced by gabapentin with tramadol were synergistic. Administration of gabapentin or tramadol reversed significantly the increase in the concentration of IL-1β induced by PSNL after either 7 or 14 days and their combination was significantly more potent in reversing the elevated concentration of IL-1β. The synergism obtained by the co-administration of gabapentin and tramadol is proposed to result from action on different mechanisms in pain pathways. Gabapentin or tramadol or their combination modulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, in a model of mice PSNL which could be due to an inhibition of glial function. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  13. Side effects of pain and analgesia in animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirkof, Paulin

    2017-03-22

    This review highlights selected effects of untreated pain and of widely used analgesics such as opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and antipyretics, to illustrate the relevance of carefully planned, appropriate and controlled analgesia for greater reproducibility in animal experiments involving laboratory rodents.

  14. Increased pain and muscle glutamate concentration after single ingestion of monosodium glutamate by myofascial temporomandibular disorders patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, A; Castrillon, E E; Baad-Hansen, L; Ghafouri, B; Gerdle, B; Wåhlén, K; Ernberg, M; Cairns, B E; Svensson, P

    2016-10-01

    A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was conducted to investigate if single monosodium glutamate (MSG) administration would elevate muscle/serum glutamate concentrations and affect muscle pain sensitivity in myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients more than in healthy individuals. Twelve myofascial TMD patients and 12 sex- and age-matched healthy controls participated in two sessions. Participants drank MSG (150 mg/kg) or NaCl (24 mg/kg; control) diluted in 400 mL of soda. The concentration of glutamate in the masseter muscle, blood plasma and saliva was determined before and after the ingestion of MSG or control. At baseline and every 15 min after the ingestion, pain intensity was scored on a 0-10 numeric rating scale. Pressure pain threshold, pressure pain tolerance (PPTol) and autonomic parameters were measured. All participants were asked to report adverse effects after the ingestion. In TMD, interstitial glutamate concentration was significantly greater after the MSG ingestion when compared with healthy controls. TMD reported a mean pain intensity of 2.8/10 at baseline, which significantly increased by 40% 30 min post MSG ingestion. At baseline, TMD showed lower PPTols in the masseter and trapezius, and higher diastolic blood pressure and heart rate than healthy controls. The MSG ingestion resulted in reports of headache by half of the TMD and healthy controls, respectively. These findings suggest that myofascial TMD patients may be particularly sensitive to the effects of ingested MSG. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?': Elevation of interstitial glutamate concentration in the masseter muscle caused by monosodium glutamate (MSG) ingestion was significantly greater in myofascial myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients than healthy individuals. This elevation of interstitial glutamate concentration in the masseter muscle significantly increased the intensity of spontaneous pain in myofascial TMD patients. © 2016

  15. Differential RNA Expression Profile of Skeletal Muscle Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kaminski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The differential susceptibility of skeletal muscle by myasthenia gravis (MG is not well understood. We utilized RNA expression profiling of extraocular muscle (EOM, diaphragm (DIA, and extensor digitorum (EDL of rats with experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG to evaluate the hypothesis that muscles respond differentially to injury produced by EAMG. EAMG was induced in female Lewis rats by immunization with acetylcholine receptor purified from the electric organ of the Torpedo. Six weeks later after rats had developed weakness and serum antibodies directed against the AChR, animals underwent euthanasia and RNA profiling performed on DIA, EDL, and EOM. Profiling results were validated by qPCR. Across the three muscles between the experiment and control groups, three hundred and fifty-nine probes (1.16% with greater than 2 fold changes in expression in 7 of 9 series pairwise comparisons from 31,090 probes were identified with approximately two-thirds being increased. The three muscles shared 16 genes with increased expression and 6 reduced expression. Functional annotation demonstrated that these common expression changes fell predominantly into categories of metabolism, stress response, and signaling. Evaluation of specific gene function indicated that EAMG led to a change to oxidative metabolism. Genes related to muscle regeneration and suppression of immune response were activated. Evidence of a differential immune response among muscles was not evident. Each muscle had a distinct RNA profile but with commonality in gene categories expressed that are focused on muscle repair, moderation of inflammation, and oxidative metabolism.

  16. Gender role affects experimental pain responses: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabas, O A; Tashani, O A; Tabasam, G; Johnson, M I

    2012-10-01

    Gender role refers to the culturally and socially constructed meanings that describe how women and men should behave in certain situations according to feminine and masculine roles learned throughout life. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the relationship between gender role and experimental pain responses in healthy human participants. We searched computerized databases for studies published between January 1950 and May 2011 that had measured gender role in healthy human adults and pain response to noxious stimuli. Studies were entered into a meta-analysis if they calculated a correlation coefficient (r) for gender role and experimental pain. Searches yielded 4465 'hits' and 13 studies were eligible for review. Sample sizes were 67-235 participants and the proportion of female participants was 45-67%. Eight types of gender role instrument were used. Meta-analysis of six studies (406 men and 539 women) found a significant positive correlation between masculine and feminine personality traits and pain threshold and tolerance, with a small effect size (r = 0.17, p = 0.01). Meta-analysis of four studies (263 men and 297 women) found a significant negative correlation between gender stereotypes specific to pain and pain threshold and tolerance, with a moderate effect size (r = -0.41, p Gender stereotypes specific to pain scales showed stronger associations with sex differences in pain sensitivity response than masculine and feminine personality trait scales. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  17. State of levator muscles as one of the factors in development of pelvie pain syndrome among men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Neimark

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of transrectal ultrasound research of muscles — levators (muscles that lift the anus and prostate gland among 33 patients with chronic pelvic pain syndrome using the method of duplex scanning. Changes in the speed characteristics of the vessels in the levators and prostate gland allow to specify the positive dynamics of therapeutic measures (in our case and after laser treatment and so improve the quality of patients´ life.

  18. Pain and fear avoidance partially mediate change in muscle strength during resistance exercise in women with fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Anette Larsson; Annie Palstam; Monika Löfgren; Malin Ernberg; Jan Bjersing; Indre Bileviciute-Ljungar; Björn Gerdle; Eva Kosek; Kaisa Mannerkorpi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Resistance exercise results in health benefits in fibromyalgia. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that mediate change in muscle strength in women with fibromyalgia as a result of resistance exercise. Methods: Sixty-seven women with fibromyalgia (age range 25–64 years) were included. Tests of muscle strength and questionnaires related to pain, fear avoidance and physical activity were carried out. Multivariable stepwise regression was used to analyse explana...

  19. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo,Vânia F.; Amorim, Juleimar S. C.; Pereira, Aline M.; Ferreira, Paulo H.; Pereira, Leani S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. Objective: To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Method: Fifty-four elderly individua...

  20. Respiratory muscle endurance training reduces chronic neck pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, B; Ferreira, T Duarte; Mittelholzer, M; Humphreys, B K; Boutellier, U

    2016-11-21

    Patients with chronic neck pain show also respiratory dysfunctions. To investigate the effects of respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET) on chronic neck pain. In this pilot study (single-subject design: 3 baseline measurements, 4 measurements during RMET), 15 neck patients (49.3 ± 13.7 years; 13 females) conducted 20 sessions of home-based RMET using a SpiroTiger® (normocapnic hyperpnoea). Maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), maximal inspiratory (Pimax) and expiratory (Pemax) pressure were measured before and after RMET. Neck flexor endurance, cervical and thoracic mobility, forward head posture, chest wall expansion and self-assessed neck disability [Neck Disability Index (NDI), Bournemouth questionnaire] were weekly assessed. Repeated measure ANOVA (Bonferroni correction) compared the first and last baseline and the last measurement after RMET. RMET significantly increased MVV (p= 0.025), Pimax (p= 0.001) and Pemax (pneck disability significantly decreased (NDI: p= 0.001; Bournemouth questionnaire: p= 0.002), while neck flexor endurance (pneck pain. The underlying mechanisms, including blood gas analyses, need further investigation in a randomized controlled study.

  1. Asymmetric pelvic bracing and altered kinematics in patients with posterior pelvic pain who present with postural muscle delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussey, Melanie D; Milosavljevic, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the muscle activity and hip-spine kinematics in a group of individuals diagnosed with posterior pelvic girdle pain and confirmed postural muscle delay during a repeated fast hip flexion task. Twenty-four (12 pain and 12 control) age and sex matched participants performed a repeated fast hip flexion task to auditory signal. Surface EMG activity in the external and internal oblique, the multifidus, the gluteus maximus and biceps femoris in the stance-limb was examined for onset timing and EMG integral. Sagittal plane hip (swing limb) and spine kinematics were examined for group and side differences over the repeated trials. While the pain group lacked significant feedforward muscle activity they displayed higher muscle activity at movement onset in the biceps femoris bilaterally (ppain group experienced asymmetrical spinal range of motion with increased motion on the contralateral side (ppelvic control during lumbo-pelvic rotation. Further, there appears to be a symptom led strategy for bracing the innominate through opposing tension in the biceps and external oblique during movement of the painful side. Such asymmetrical pelvic girdle bracing may be a strategy to increase the stability of the pelvis in light of the failed load transfer mechanism. Putatively, this strategy may increase the mechanical stress on the sacroiliac joint exacerbating pain complaints. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of Muscles Dysfunction From Myofascial Pain Syndrome Through Cervical Disc-Root Conflict to Degenerative Spine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisiński, Przemysław; Huber, Juliusz

    2017-02-01

    Comparative clinical and neurophysiological study in three groups of patients with general diagnosis of neck pain. To determine symptoms of muscles dysfunction in patients with myofascial pain syndrome, disc-root conflict, and degenerative changes at cervical spine. The explanation for cervical pain origin should be based on results from chosen clinical and neurophysiological studies in correlation with neuroimaging findings. Three subgroups of patients (N = 60 each) with certain symptoms were examined. Clinical evaluation included examination of pain intensity in VAS scale, muscle strength in Lovett scale, evaluation of reflexes, Spurling test, assessment of active trigger points (TRPs), and superficial sensory perception. Neurophysiological testing included surface electromyography at rest (rEMG) and during maximal contraction (mcEMG) as well as electroneurography (ENG). The greatest pain intensity with its decentralization phenomenon occurred in patients with disc-root conflict. Significant decrease of muscle strength was detected in trapezius muscle in myofascial pain syndrome subgroup. Weakness of abductor pollicis brevis muscle in patients with disc-root conflict differed them from patients with myofascial pain syndrome (P = 0.05). Patients with disc-root conflict and degenerative spine disease showed differences (P = 0.03) in reflexes evoked from triceps brachii. Positive Spurling symptom was most common (56.7%) in disc-root conflict subgroup. TRPs in trapezius muscle were found in all patients with myofascial pain syndrome. Results of rEMG amplitude measurements differed patients at P = 0.05. Only mcEMG recording from abductor pollicis brevis muscle allows for their clear cut differentiation. ENG studies showed abnormalities in patients with disc-root conflict and degenerative spine disease (P from 0.05 to 0.02). Positive correlation of VAS, TRPs, and rEMG as well as Lovett scores, mcEMG, and ENG results was found. Only applying several

  3. Managing Knee Osteoarthritis: The Effects of Body Weight Supported Physical Activity on Joint Pain, Function, and Thigh Muscle Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeler, Jason; Christian, Mathew; Cooper, Juliette; Leiter, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Peter

    2015-11-01

    To determine the effect of a 12-week lower body positive pressure (LBPP)-supported low-load treadmill walking program on knee joint pain, function, and thigh muscle strength in overweight patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Prospective, observational, repeated measures investigation. Community-based, multidisciplinary sports medicine clinic. Thirty-one patients aged between 55 and 75 years, with a body mass index ≥25 kg/m and mild-to-moderate knee OA. Twelve-week LBPP-supported low-load treadmill walking regimen. Acute knee joint pain (visual analog scale) during full weight bearing treadmill walking, chronic knee pain, and joint function [Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire] during normal activities of daily living, and thigh muscle strength (isokinetic testing). Appropriate methods of statistical analysis were used to compare data from baseline and follow-up evaluation. Participants reported significant improvements in knee joint pain and function and demonstrated significant increases in thigh muscle strength about the degenerative knee. Participants also experienced significant reductions in acute knee pain during full weight bearing treadmill walking and required dramatically less LBPP support to walk pain free on the treadmill. Data suggest that an LBPP-supported low-load exercise regimen can be used to significantly diminish knee pain, enhance joint function, and increase thigh muscle strength, while safely promoting pain-free walking exercise in overweight patients with knee OA. These findings have important implications for the development of nonoperative treatment strategies that can be used in the management of joint symptoms associated with progressive knee OA in at-risk patient populations. This research suggests that LBPP-supported low-load walking is a safe user-friendly mode of exercise that can be successfully used in the management of day-to-day joint symptoms associated with knee OA, helping to improve the

  4. Influence of craniomandibular and cervical pain on the activity of masticatory muscles in individuals with Temporomandibular Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ries,Lilian Gerdi Kittel; Graciosa,Maylli Daiani; Medeiros,Daiane Lazzeri de; Pacheco, Sheila Cristina da Silva; Fassicolo,Carlos Eduardo; Graefling,Bárbara Camila Flissak; Degan, Viviane Veroni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:This study aimed to establish the prevalence of pain in the craniomandibular and cervical spine region in individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and to analyze the effects of these disorders on the bilateral activation of anterior temporalis (AT) and masseter (MA) muscles during the masticatory cycle.Methods:The participants were 55 female volunteers aged 18–30 years. The presence of TMD and craniomandibular and cervical spine pain was evaluated by applying the Resea...

  5. The effect of the application of manual pressure before the administration of intramuscular injections on students' perceptions of postinjection pain: a semi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Deniz; Baykara, Zehra Gocmen; Karadag, Ayise; Eyikara, Evrim

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of applying manual pressure before intramuscular injection and compare it with the standard injection technique in terms of reducing the young adult student's postinjection pain. The administration of intramuscular injections is a procedure performed by nurses and one that causes anxiety and pain for the patient. Nurses have ethical and legal obligations to mitigate injection-related pain and the nurses' use of effective pain management not only provides physical comfort to the patients, but also improves the patients' experience. Comparative experimental study. This study was conducted with first-year university students (n = 123) who were scheduled for hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccination via deltoid muscle injection. Students were randomly assigned to the groups. Comparison group students (n = 60) were given an injection using the conventional method, that is without manual pressure being applied prior to the injection. The experimental group students (n = 63) received manual pressure at the vaccination site immediately before injection for a period of 10 seconds. The two techniques were used randomly. The subjects were given pressure to the injection site, and perceived pain intensity was measured using Numerical Rating Scale. Findings demonstrate that students experienced significantly less pain when they received injections with manual pressure compared with the standard injection technique. The postinjection average pain score in the comparison group was higher than that in the experimental group (p pressure to the injection site before intramuscular injections reduces postinjection pain intensity in young adult students (p pressure to the adult's intramuscular injection site is recommended. Applying pressure to the injection area is a simple and cost-effective method to reduce the pain associated with injection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: peculiarities of pain-relieving therapy and place of anticonvulsants as analgetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nefyodov O.O.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common demyelinating disease affecting mainly young people of the working age (16-45 years and quickly leading to disability. Available data constitute that up to 80% of MS patients suffer from pain at different disease periods. Pain management and the analgesic drug choice in MS patients may be difficult. Anticonvulsant drugs possess an analgesic activity and are widely used in patients presenting painful neuropathic symptoms. Based on that, we aimed to investigate the nociceptive potential changes as well as the research-oriented behavior using the "open field" test in rat. An experimental animal equivalent of multiple sclerosis has been modeled, based on the methylprednisolone (M administration. Animals were also administered anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, topiramate, sodium volproat, pregabalin and gabapentin. The stu­dy showed advantages of gabapentin and pregabalin use in simulated disease treatment. This statement is based on the "open field" test results, where the motor-oriented rats’ behavior was evaluated. Administration of M+gabapentin and M+pregabalin showed positive dynamics of the motor activity: the number of squares crossed increased by 80.86% (p<0.05 and 81.73% (р<0.05 respectively. Maximum recovery of the research activity (peeking in "mink" was re­gis­tered in animals administered M+pregabalin: the increase rate was 300% (r<0.05 comparing with the 12th day of ex­periment. It was shown, that 5-days administration of M+gabapentin and M+pregabalin caused muscle tone impro­ve­ment by 190% (p<0.05 and 200% (p<0.05 respectively, comparing with animals with untreated multiple sclerosis. A sig­ni­fi­cant increase of analgesic activity of M+pregabalin and M+gabapentin combinations used together with me­thyl­pred­nisolone by 4.1 (p<0.05 and 3.6 (p<0.05 times was registered comparing with the initial methylprednisolone background.

  7. Changes in multifidus and abdominal muscle size in response to microgravity: possible implications for low back pain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hides, J A; Lambrecht, G; Stanton, W R; Damann, V

    2016-05-01

    In microgravity, muscle atrophy occurs in the intrinsic muscles of the spine, with changes also observed in the abdominal muscles. Exercises are undertaken on the International Space Station and on Earth following space flight to remediate these effects. Similar effects have been seen on Earth in prolonged bed rest studies and in people with low back pain (LBP). The aim of this case report was to examine the effects of microgravity, exercise in microgravity and post-flight rehabilitation on the size of the multifidus and antero-lateral abdominal muscles. Ultrasound imaging was used to assess size of the multifidus, transversus abdominis and internal oblique muscles at four time points: pre-flight and after daily rehabilitation on day one (R + 1), day 8 (R + 8) and day 14 (R + 14) after return to Earth (following 6 months in microgravity). Exercises in microgravity maintained multifidus size at L2-L4, however, after spaceflight, size of the multifidus muscle at L5 was reduced, size of the internal oblique muscle was increased and size of transversus abdominis was reduced. Rehabilitation post-space flight resulted in hypertrophy of the multifidus muscle to pre-mission size at the L5 vertebral level and restoration of antero-lateral abdominal muscle size. Exercise in space can prevent loss of spinal intrinsic muscle size. For the multifidus muscles, effectiveness varied at different levels of the spine. Post-mission rehabilitation targeting specific motor control restored muscle balance between the antero-lateral abdominal and multifidus muscles, similar to results from intervention trials for people with LBP. A limitation of the current investigation is that only one astronaut was studied, however, the microgravity model could be valuable as predictable effects on trunk muscles can be induced and interventions evaluated. Level of Evidence Case series.

  8. The influence of changes in trunk and pelvic posture during single leg standing on hip and thigh muscle activation in a pain free population

    OpenAIRE

    Prior, Simon; Mitchell, Tim; Whiteley, Rod; O’Sullivan, Peter; Williams, Benjamin K; Racinais, Sebastien; Farooq, Abdulaziz

    2014-01-01

    Background Thigh muscle injuries commonly occur during single leg loading tasks and patterns of muscle activation are thought to contribute to these injuries. The influence trunk and pelvis posture has on hip and thigh muscle activation during single leg stance is unknown and was investigated in a pain free population to determine if changes in body posture result in consistent patterns of changes in muscle activation. Methods Hip and thigh muscle activation patterns were compared in 22 asymp...

  9. Effects of restricted environmental stimulation: enhancement of hypnotizability for experimental and chronic pain control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabasz, A F; Barabasz, M

    1989-07-01

    Enhancement of hypnotizability and pain tolerance has been demonstrated using restricted environmental stimulation therapy (REST) with university students as Ss (A. F. Barabasz, 1982). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether or not similar results could be obtained with chronic pain patients. Ss consisted of outpatients in treatment for conditions in which pain is prominent who also demonstrated low hypnotizability after repeated hypnosis plateau sessions. 2 groups of Ss were exposed to REST. Situational demand characteristics (Orne, 1962) favored an increase in hypnotizability for REST Group 1 (high demand). REST Group 2 (low demand) was exposed to situational demand characteristics designed to disguise the experimental hypothesis. 2 groups of control Ss were exposed to the same alternative demand characteristic manipulations as the experimental groups, but environmental stimulation was maintained. The Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSS:C) of Weitzenhoffer and E. R. Hilgard (1962), including a posthypnotic suggestion for an anesthetic reaction, and an ischemic pain test were administered prior to treatment and again immediately following treatment. After 6 hours of REST, significant increases in SHSS:C scores were found for high-demand and low-demand experimental Ss, as well as for high-demand control Ss. No such increase was found for low-demand controls. Significant decreases in pain scores were found for both high- and low-demand experimental groups. No significant pain score decreases were found for either control group, suggesting a relatively weak effect of demand characteristics. An independent postexperimental inquiry suggested all Ss believed they received active treatments. The inquiry, conducted 10-15 days after the experiment, also revealed a majority of experimental Ss were using hypnosis on a daily basis to reduce pain with a substantial decrease in pain medication. Only 2 control Ss (highest in hypnotizability

  10. Tryptase-PAR2 axis in experimental autoimmune prostatitis, a model for chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Kenny; Done, Joseph D; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Murphy, Stephen F; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-07-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) affects up to 15% of the male population and is characterized by pelvic pain. Mast cells are implicated in the murine experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) model as key to chronic pelvic pain development. The mast cell mediator tryptase-β and its cognate receptor protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) are involved in mediating pain in other visceral disease models. Prostatic secretions and urines from CP/CPPS patients were examined for the presence of mast cell degranulation products. Tryptase-β and PAR2 expression were examined in murine EAP. Pelvic pain and inflammation were assessed in the presence or absence of PAR2 expression and upon PAR2 neutralization. Tryptase-β and carboxypeptidase A3 were elevated in CP/CPPS compared to healthy volunteers. Tryptase-β was capable of inducing pelvic pain and was increased in EAP along with its receptor PAR2. PAR2 was required for the development of chronic pelvic pain in EAP. PAR2 signaling in dorsal root ganglia led to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation and calcium influx. PAR2 neutralization using antibodies attenuated chronic pelvic pain in EAP. The tryptase-PAR2 axis is an important mediator of pelvic pain in EAP and may play a role in the pathogenesis of CP/CPPS. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of brief mindfulness meditation training on experimentally induced pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Fadel; Gordon, Nakia S; Merchant, Junaid; Goolkasian, Paula

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of brief mindfulness meditation training on ratings of painful electrical stimulation. In Experiment 1, we used a 3-day (20 min/d) mindfulness meditation intervention and measured pain ratings before and after the intervention. Participants' numerical ratings of pain to "low" and "high" electrical stimulation significantly decreased after meditation training. Pain sensitivity, measured by change in stimulus intensity thresholds, also decreased after training. We investigated, in Experiment 2, how well relaxation and a math distraction task attenuated experimental pain. Math distraction but not relaxation reduced high pain ratings. There was no reduction in pain sensitivity in these participants. In Experiment 3, we directly compared the effects of meditation with math distraction and relaxation conditions. Our findings indicated significant effects of both meditation and math distraction. Consistent with what was observed in Experiment 1, these participants also demonstrated a decrease in pain sensitivity after meditation training. Changes in the mindfulness and anxiety assessments suggest that meditation's analgesic effects are related to reduced anxiety and the enhanced ability to focus on the present moment. Our findings indicate that a brief 3-day mindfulness meditation intervention was effective at reducing pain ratings and anxiety scores when compared with baseline testing and other cognitive manipulations. The brief meditation training was also effective at increasing mindfulness skills. Copyright 2010 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic stress moderates the impact of social exclusion on pain tolerance: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieritz, Karoline; Schäfer, Sarina J; Strahler, Jana; Rief, Winfried; Euteneuer, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Experiences of social pain due to social exclusion may be processed in similar neural systems that process experiences of physical pain. The present study aimed to extend the findings on social exclusion and pain by examining the impact of social exclusion on an affective (ie, heat pain tolerance) and a sensory component of pain (ie, heat pain intensity). Whether a potential effect may be moderated by chronic life stress, social status, or social sup-port was further examined. A community-based sample of 59 women was studied. Social exclusion and inclusion were experimentally manipulated by using a virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball in which participants were randomly assigned to either being excluded or being included by two other virtual players. Heat pain tolerance and intensity were assessed before and after the game. Potential psychosocial moderators were assessed via a questionnaire. The main finding of this study is that chronic stress moderates the impact of social exclusion on pain tolerance (psocially excluded participants showed a lower heat pain tolerance than participants who were socially included. Contrary to the authors' hypothesis, pain sensitivity was increased in socially included participants compared with socially excluded participants after the game (psocial exclusion.

  13. Pain and fear avoidance partially mediate change in muscle strength during resistance exercise in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Löfgren, Monika; Ernberg, Malin; Bjersing, Jan; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Gerdle, Björn; Kosek, Eva; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2017-11-21

    Resistance exercise results in health benefits in fibromyalgia. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that mediate change in muscle strength in women with fibromyalgia as a result of resistance exercise. Sixty-seven women with fibromyalgia (age range 25-64 years) were included. Tests of muscle strength and questionnaires related to pain, fear avoidance and physical activity were carried out. Multivariable stepwise regression was used to analyse explanatory factors for change and predictors for final values of knee-extension force, elbow-flexion force and hand-grip force. Change in knee-extension force was explained by fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity at baseline, together with change in pain intensity, knee-extension force at baseline, age and body mass index (BMI) (R2=0.40, p = 0.013). Change in elbow-flexion force was explained by pain intensity at baseline, together with baseline fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity, BMI and elbow-flexion force at baseline (R2 = 0.32, p = 0.043). Change in hand-grip force was explained by hand-grip force at baseline, change in pain intensity and baseline fear avoidance (R2 = 0.37, p = 0.009). Final muscle strength was predicted by the same variables as change, except pain. Pain and fear avoidance are important factors to consider in rehabilitation using resistance exercise for women with fibromyalgia.

  14. Are Ultrasonographic Measures of Cervical Flexor Muscles Correlated With Flexion Endurance in Chronic Neck Pain and Asymptomatic Participants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamkhar, Leila; Kahlaee, Amir Hossein

    2017-12-01

    This study compared the relationship between some clinical factors and the size of neck flexors in participants with or without chronic neck pain. In this case-control study, the correlation between flexor endurance capacity as well as thickness, cross-section area, and shape ratio of longus colli/capitis and sternocleidomastoid muscles were examined in 30 patients with chronic neck pain and 30 asymptomatic participants. The patients showed lower flexor endurance (P = 0.02), smaller thickness (P = 0.03), and cross-section area (P neck pain. In the control group, flexor endurance was negatively correlated with longus colli shape ratio (r = -0.45, P = 0.01) but positively correlated with longus capitis thickness (r = 0.45, P = 0.01) and cross-section area (r = 0.38, P = 0.03). Neck disability and pain intensity indices were not significantly correlated with either flexor muscles endurance or size. The ultrasonographic measures of the deep neck flexor muscles and the flexor endurance test, being associated with each other, could successfully differentiate patients with chronic neck pain from asymptomatic participants. However, the endurance test scores were not correlated with self-reported disability or pain intensity indices.

  15. Decreased task duration and unchanged trunk muscle activity in low-back pain patients during stair climbing after back extensor muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Henrik; Østergaard, Gert Værge; Brogner, Heidi Marie

    recording during 10 concurrent stair steps pre / post lumbar extensor muscle exhaustion. Duration of gait tasks were shorter in LBP patients generally and longer during load and shorter during transfer in descend stepping after back extensor fatigue. Back extensor fatigue resulted in higher back......- and abdominal muscle activity in healthy than in patients in most phases, but during descend transfer patients activity decreased. In LBP patients back extensor fatigue resulted in decreased muscular activity in the trunk muscles during stair stepping compared to healthy. Decreased duration of the motor tasks......Low-back pain (LBP) is a major problem. Spine control and stability mechanisms are important but the knowledge of these parameters in functions is sparse. 7 healthy / 5 recurrent mild-to-moderate LBP patients participated in assessment of abdominal, lumbar and gluteal muscles' surface EMG and video...

  16. The role of periodontal ASIC3 in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meiya; Long, Hu; Ma, Wenqiang; Liao, Lina; Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yang; Shan, Di; Huang, Renhuan; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify the roles of Acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the experimental group (40g, n = 30) and the sham group (0g, n = 30). Closed coil springs were ligated between maxillary incisor and molars to achieve experimental tooth movement. Rat grimace scale (RGS) scores were assessed at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after the placement of the springs. ASIC3 immunostaining was performed and the expression levels of ASIC3 were measured through integrated optical density/area in Image-Pro Plus 6.0. Moreover, 18 rats were divided into APETx2 group (n = 6), amiloride group (n = 6), and vehicle group (n = 6), and RGS scores were obtained compared among them to verify the roles of ASIC3 in orofacial pain following tooth movement. ASIC3 expression levels became significantly higher in the experimental group than in sham group on 1, 3, and 5 days and became similar on 7 and 14 days. Pain levels (RGS scores) increased in both groups and were significantly higher in the experimental group on 1, 3, 5, and 7 days and were similar on 14 days. Periodontal ASIC3 expression levels were correlated with orofacial pain levels following experimental tooth movement. Periodontal administrations of ASIC3 antagonists (APETx2 and amiloride) could alleviate pain. This study needs to be better evidenced by RNA interference of ASIC3 in periodontal tissues in rats following experimental tooth movement. Moreover, we hope further studies would concentrate on the pain perception of ASIC3 knockout (ASIC3(-/-)) mice. Our results suggest that periodontal ASIC3 plays an important role in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  18. Immediate Effect of Hold-Relax Stretching of Iliopsoas Muscle on Transversus Abdominis Muscle Activation in Chronic Non-Specific Low Back Pain with Lumbar Hyperlordosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malai, Suthichan; Pichaiyongwongdee, Sopa; Sakulsriprasert, Prasert

    2015-06-01

    To determine the immediate effect of hold-relax (HR) stretching of the iliopsoas muscle on pain, transversus abdominis (TrA) activation capacity, lumbar stability level, lumbar lordosis angle and iliopsoas muscle length in chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP) with lumbar hyperlordosis. Participants aged from 30-55 years with CNSLBP with lumbar hyperlordosis were divided in two groups: (Group 1) Intervention group received 10-second isometric contraction ofthe iliopsoas muscle (HR), 10-second rest, 20-second static stretch, 5 repetitions. (Group 2) control group received 15 minutes resting in supine lying. The visual analog scale, prone test with the pressure biofeedback unit, modified isometric stability test, aflexible ruler and modified Thomas test were usedforpre- and post-test. Two-way ANOVA was used for within and between-group comparisons. The present study consisted of 20 participants. Significant differences were found in pain, TrA activation capacity, lumbar lordosis angle and iliopsoas muscle length between intervention and control groups and between pre- and post-test for intervention group (ppain and lumbar lordosis angle, enhanced TrA activation, and increased length of hip flexor in CNSLBP with lumbar hyperlordosis.

  19. Changes in muscle thickness after exercise and biofeedback in people with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partner, Shandi L; Sutherlin, Mark Alan; Acocello, Shellie; Saliba, Susan A; Magrum, Eric M; Hart, Joe M

    2014-11-01

    Individuals with low back pain (LBP) have reduced function of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and lumbar multifidus (LM) muscles. Biofeedback during exercise may increase the ability to contract the TrA and LM muscles compared with exercise alone. To compare TrA preferential activation ratio (PAR) and the percent change in LM-muscle thickness in patients with LBP history before and after exercise with or without biofeedback. Controlled laboratory study. University research laboratory. 20 LBP individuals, 10 exercise alone and 10 exercise with biofeedback. Patients were allotted to tabletop exercises in isolation or tabletop exercises with visual, auditory, and tactile biofeedback. TrA PAR and percent change in LM-muscle thickness. There were no differences between groups at baseline (all P > .05). Nonparametric statistics showed decreased resting muscle thickness for total lateral abdominal-wall muscles (P = .007) but not TrA (P = .410) or LM (P = .173). Percent TrA thickness increased from table to standing positions before (P = .006) and after exercise (P = .009). TrA PAR increased after exercise (pre 0.01 ± 0.02, post 0.03 ± 0.04, P = .033) for all patients and for exercise with biofeedback (pre 0.02 ± 0.01, post 0.03 ± 0.01, P = .037) but not for exercise alone (pre 0.01 ± 0.02, post 0.02 ± 0.05, P = .241). No group differences were observed for TrA PAR before (exercise 0.01 ± 0.02, exercise with biofeedback 0.02 ± 0.01, P = .290) or after exercise (exercise 0.02 ± 0.05, exercise with biofeedback 0.03 ± 0.01, P = .174). There were no group differences in LM percent change before exercise (P = .999) or after exercise (P = .597). In addition, no changes were observed in LM percent change as a result of exercise among all participants (P = .391) or for each group (exercise P = .508, exercise with biofeedback P = .575). TrA PAR increased after a single session of exercises, whereas no thickness changes occurred in LM.

  20. Differences in cervical multifidus muscle thickness during isometric contraction of shoulder muscles: a comparison between patients with chronic neck pain and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama, Leila; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Zavieh, Minoo Khalkhali; NooriKochi, Farhang; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (1) measure the thickness of cervical multifidus muscle (CMM) in different maximal voluntary contraction percentages of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles, (2) evaluate the differences of the CMM thickness in different directions of the shoulder movement, and (3) compare the changes in the CMM thickness of participants with neck pain and also of healthy individuals. Twenty healthy men (age, 27.45 ± 4.37 years; height, 177 ± 4.66 cm; weight, 72.85 ± 6.46 kg) and 20 men with chronic mechanical neck pain (age, 28.90 ± 5.53 years; height, 176 ± 5.98 cm; weight, 73.15 ± 7.82 kg) participated in the study. Both the right and left CMM thicknesses were measured using an ultrasound device while participants performed isometric contraction of shoulder muscles in 6 movement directions. In both groups, an increment of CMM thickness followed as the increase of isometric force (P pain participants (P = .03). Although no significant difference of CMM thickness was seen among the effects of the 6 force directions (P > .05), there was a significant difference of activity noted between the left and right sides (P = .047). The results of the present study indicate that isometric contraction of shoulder muscles caused an increase in the CMM thickness regardless of force direction. This increase was seen in both groups of healthy participants and patients with neck pain. However, less thickness changes were observed in participants with neck pain, which may be interpreted as reduced CMM activity in such people. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Isokinetic trunk muscle performance in pre-teens and teens with and without back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, J-C; Boudokhane, S; Pujol, A; Chaléat-Valayer, E; Le Blay, G; Deceuninck, J

    2014-02-01

    To assess with an isokinetic dynamometer the force and endurance of the spinal flexor and extensor muscles in pre-teens or teens aged 11 to 13 and 14 to 16 years with and without low back pain (LBP). The control group and the LBP group were homogeneous in terms of age, weight, height and Body Mass Index (BMI). Assessment was carried out with the isokinetic dynamometer Cybex Norm®. The spinal flexors and extensors were explored concentrically at speeds of 60°, 90° and 120°/sec. The parameters chosen were: maximal moment of force (MMF), mean power (MP), total work (TW), F/E ratios (between the flexors and the extensors for the aforesaid parameters). In the LBP groups, clinical information (pain, extensibility of the spinal and sub-pelvic muscles, sports practice) and sagittal radiological data were all measured. While no significant difference in isokinetic performance was found between asymptomatic and LBP children in the 11-to-13-year-old group, the isokinetic performances of the LBP children were influenced positively by BMI value, number of hours of physical activity and radiologic value of the lumbar lordosis. As regards these pre-teens, assessment with an isokinetic dynamometer does not highlight muscle characteristics that might explain LBP occurrence. As regards the 14-to-16-year-old group, muscle strength has been found to be correlated with age. LBP teens were showed to have weaker extensors and stronger flexors than the healthy teens. It is with regard to this age group that assessment with an isokinetic dynamometer clearly yields interesting results. Since we have yet to standardize our evaluation criteria (working speed, number of trials…), it is difficult to compare our results with those reported in the literature. This is a preliminary study involving a relatively low number of patients. That said, given the fact that numerous parameters are connected with the age and height of the subjects, assessment with an isokinetic dynamometer can be

  2. Referred Pain Patterns of the Infraspinatus Muscle Elicited by Deep Dry Needling and Manual Palpation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda-Pagán, Emilio J; Lozano-Quijada, Carlos; Segura-Heras, Jose V; Peral-Berna, María; Lumbreras, Blanca

    2017-03-07

    To identify the most common referred pain (ReP) pattern of the infraspinatus myofascial trigger point (MTrP) and compare its coincidence with the original ReP pattern, to verify whether there are any significant differences by sex and types of technique and to determine the observed signs and symptoms evoked by deep dry needling (DDN) and manual palpation (MPal). A cohort study of patients randomized to two different examination methods (July and August 2016). Students and staff recruited from Miguel Hernandez University (Southeast Spain). One hundred thirty-three participants (70.7% women) with shoulder complaints were randomly assigned to either an MPal (n = 67) or DDN group (n = 66). The same physiotherapist carried out the techniques on all participants, and the same protocol was followed for both the DDN and MPal groups. The physiotherapist did not ask participants about their pain features or other relevant issues. Local twitch response (LTR) and ReP assessed through a visual analogue scale and features of ReP of the infraspinatus muscle. The areas with the highest percentage of ReP were the front (area 3; 27.1%) and back (area 11; 21.1%) of the arm, anterior (area 4; 36.1%) and posterior (area 12; 42.1%) shoulder, and infraspinatus muscle area. DDN proved to be significantly easier than MPal in evoking an LTR (p ≤ 0.001). There were significant differences between sexes in zone 2 (p = 0.041) and no statistically significant differences were found by technique. The ReP pattern of the infraspinatus muscle coincides with the original pattern described by Travell and Simons, although the neck area should be questioned. The study found no significant differences in the ReP pattern by sex and when comparing MPal with DDN of MTrP of the infraspinatus muscle. DDN proved to be significantly easier than MPal in evoking an LTR.

  3. Adaptation of muscles of the lumbar spine to sudden imbalance in patients with lower back pain caused by military training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Shi, Jian-guo; Ye, Hong; Liu, Zhi-rong; Zheng, Long-bao; Ni, Zhi-ming; Fan, Liang-quan; Wang, Jian; Hou, Zhen-hai

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of sudden load changes (expected and unexpected imbalance) on the activity of muscles of the lumbar spine and their central motor control strategy in military personnel with or without chronic low back pain (LBP). Bilateral sudden imbalance was examined (2 × 2 factorial design). The 117th PLA Hospital, Hangzhou, China Twenty-one male subjects with lower back pain and 21 male healthy control subjects were active members of the Nanjing Military Region land forces. Independent variables: LBP vs. healthy controls and imbalance anticipation (expected and unexpected imbalance). rapid reaction time (RRT) and intensity of rapid reaction (IRR) of bilateral lumbar (L3-L4) erector spinae (ES), lumbar (L5-S1) multifidus (MF), and abdominal external oblique muscles. Results Under expected or unexpected sudden imbalance conditions, subjects with LBP demonstrated significantly greater IRR than healthy controls in ipsilateral and contralateral ES and MF, respectively (P muscles and a significant time expectation effect on RRT of contralateral MF muscles were also observed. RRT of the contralateral ES muscles was significantly lower than that of the ipsilateral ES muscles (P muscles in patients with chronic LBP. The activation amplitude increased. The results may provide a theoretical basis for a study on the pathogenesis of chronic LBP.

  4. Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Pain Disorders in Head, Abdomen, Muscles and Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J. Friedrichsdorf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary pain disorders (formerly “functional pain syndromes” are common, under-diagnosed and under-treated in children and teenagers. This manuscript reviews key aspects which support understanding the development of pediatric chronic pain, points to the current pediatric chronic pain terminology, addresses effective treatment strategies, and discusses the evidence-based use of pharmacology. Common symptoms of an underlying pain vulnerability present in the three most common chronic pain disorders in pediatrics: primary headaches, centrally mediated abdominal pain syndromes, and/or chronic/recurrent musculoskeletal and joint pain. A significant number of children with repeated acute nociceptive pain episodes develop chronic pain in addition to or as a result of their underlying medical condition “chronic-on-acute pain.” We provide description of the structure and process of our interdisciplinary, rehabilitative pain clinic in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA with accompanying data in the treatment of chronic pain symptoms that persist beyond the expected time of healing. An interdisciplinary approach combining (1 rehabilitation; (2 integrative medicine/active mind-body techniques; (3 psychology; and (4 normalizing daily school attendance, sports, social life and sleep will be presented. As a result of restored function, pain improves and commonly resolves. Opioids are not indicated for primary pain disorders, and other medications, with few exceptions, are usually not first-line therapy.

  5. Sex differences in how social networks and relationship quality influence experimental pain sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Jacob M; Rowell, Lauren N; Chouteau, Simone; Chavez, Alexandre; Jaramillo, Elisa; Neal, Michael; Waid, David

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to examine how both structural and functional components of individuals' social networks may moderate the association between biological sex and experimental pain sensitivity. One hundred and fifty-two healthy adults (mean age = 22yrs., 53% males) were measured for cold pressor task (CPT) pain sensitivity (i.e., intensity ratings) and core aspects of social networks (e.g., proportion of friends vs. family, affection, affirmation, and aid). Results showed consistent sex differences in how social network structures and intimate relationship functioning modulated pain sensitivity. Females showed higher pain sensitivity when their social networks consisted of a higher proportion of intimate types of relationship partners (e.g., kin vs. non kin), when they had known their network partners for a longer period of time, and when they reported higher levels of logistical support from their significant other (e.g., romantic partner). Conversely, males showed distinct patterns in the opposite direction, including an association between higher levels of logistical support from one's significant other and lower CPT pain intensity. These findings show for the first time that the direction of sex differences in exogenous pain sensitivity is likely dependent on fundamental components of the individual's social environment. The utility of a social-signaling perspective of pain behaviors for examining, comparing, and interpreting individual and group differences in experimental and clinical pain reports is discussed.

  6. Effects of core stability exercises on multifidus muscles in healthy women and women with chronic low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliziene, Irina; Sipaviciene, Saule; Klizas, Sarunas; Imbrasiene, Daiva

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low-back pain (LBP) may be related to decreased lumbar multifidus muscle cross-sectional area (CSA). In this study, core stabilization exercises were designed to enhance neuromuscular control and correct multifidus dysfunction. The subjects were healthy women (n = 11) and women with chronic LBP (n = 17). Lumbar multifidus muscle CSAs were measured by ultrasonography. Tests were carried out before training exercises for lumbar stability, and again 4 months and 8 months after training. In women with LBP, the mean multifidus muscle CSA increased by 22% on the right side and 23% on the left side after 8 months of lumbar stabilization training, compared with baseline measurements. In healthy women, mean multifidus muscle CSA increased by 24% on the right side and 23% on the left side, compared with baseline values. A core stabilization exercise program significantly increased multifidus muscle CSAs in both healthy women and women with chronic LBP.

  7. Abnormal brain processing of pain in migraine without aura: a high-density EEG brain mapping study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, L; Egsgaard, L L; Jensen, R

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we used high-density EEG brain mapping to investigate spatio-temporal aspects of brain activity in response to experimentally induced muscle