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Sample records for experimental murine model

  1. Beneficial lactobacilli: effects on the vaginal tract in a murine experimental model.

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    De Gregorio, Priscilla Romina; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Santos, Viviana; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fatima

    2012-11-01

    Vaginal probiotics containing lactic acid bacteria with activity towards pathogenic microorganisms that cause urogenital tract infections have been proposed as a valid strategy for their prophylaxis and therapy. A murine experimental model was set up to evaluate the colonization capability of beneficial human lactobacilli and their effects on the mouse vaginal mucosa and innate immune cells. Five Lactobacillus strains were intravaginally inoculated into previously estrogenized BALB/c mice. The significance of the effects observed in the vaginal tract was determined by analysis of variance using the general linear model. The numbers of viable vaginal lactobacilli were significantly higher at proestrous-estrous than those at the metaestrous-diestrous phase and decreased markedly on the days after inoculation. Lactobacilli inoculation did not cause cytological or histological modifications of the murine vaginal tract. Moreover, the intravaginal administration of Lactobacillus salivarius CRL (Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos culture collection) 1328 and Lactobacillus gasseri CRL 1263 did not affect the amounts of granulocytes and macrophages present in vaginal washings. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that vaginal lactobacilli did not produce adverse effects on the murine vaginal tract. Therefore, they could be proposed as safe probiotic candidates to promote a balanced microbiota in the urogenital tract.

  2. Effect of Anapsos® in a murine model of experimental trichomoniasis

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    Nogal-Ruiz J.J.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunomodulator effect of Anapsos® (Polypodium leucotomos extract in NMRI (US Naval Medical Research Institute outbred mice infected by the intraperitoneal route with 107 Trichomonas vaginalis has been tested. Gross histopathologic changes in abdominal organs and mortality rate, as a consequence of the pathogenicity of the protozoa and the immune response of the host, were evaluated. Among the different treatment regimes assayed, Anapsos® at doses of 20 mg/Kg/day administered for 10 days before infection decreases the parasite pathogenicity index (PI in the treated animals when compared to those of the untreated control group. The immunosuppresor treatments with azathioprine (100 mg/Kg/day x 1, cyclophosphamide (100 mg/Kg/day x 1, and FK-506 (10 mg/Kg/day x 10 significantly decreased the PI, while an immunostimulant treatment with glycophosphopeptical (13 mg/Kg/day x 10 increased it. These assays have shown the usefulness of the murine model of experimental trichomoniasis for the study of immunomodulator activity of natural or synthetic drugs.

  3. An in vitro experimental model of neuroinflammation: the induction of interleukin-6 in murine astrocytes infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, and its inhibition by oestrogenic receptor modulators

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    Rubio, Nazario; Cerciat, Marie; Unkila, Mikko; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Arevalo, Maria-Angeles

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of neuroinflammation based on the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by neural glial cells infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). Production of IL-6 mRNA in mock-infected and TMEV-infected SJL/J murine astrocytes was examined using the Affymetrix murine genome U74v2 DNA microarray. The IL-6 mRNA from infected cells showed an eightfold increase in hybridization to a sequence encoding IL-6 located on chromosome number 5. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) was used to study the regulation of IL-6 expression. The presence of IL-6 in the supernatants of TMEV-infected astrocyte cultures was quantified by ELISA and found to be weaker than in cultures of infected macrophages. The IL-6 was induced by whole TMEV virions, but not by Ad.βGal adenovirus, purified TMEV capsid proteins, or UV-inactivated virus. Two recombinant inflammatory cytokines, IL-1α and tumour necrosis factor-α were also found to be potent inducers of IL-6. The secreted IL-6 was biologically active because it fully supported B9 hybridoma proliferation in a [3H]thymidine incorporation bioassay. The cerebrospinal fluid of infected mice contained IL-6 during the acute encephalitis phase, peaking at days 2–4 post-infection. Finally, this in vitro neuroinflammation model was fully inhibited, as demonstrated by ELISA and qPCR, by five selective oestrogen receptor modulators. PMID:21564094

  4. Experimental Hyalohyphomycosis by Purpureocillium lilacinum: Outcome of the Infection in C57BL/6 Murine Models

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    Danielly C. M. de Sequeira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpureocillium lilacinum is a filamentous, hyaline fungus considered an emerging pathogen in humans. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcome of hyalohyphomycosis in C57BL/6 murine models inoculated with two clinical P. lilacinum isolates (S1 and S2. Each isolate was inoculated in mice randomly distributed in immunocompetent (CPT and immunosuppressed (SPS groups. Mice were evaluated at day 7, 21, and 45 after inoculation for histopathological analysis, recovery of fungal cells, and immunological studies. Histological analysis showed scarce conidia-like structures in lung tissue from CPT mice and a lot of fungal cells in SPS mice inoculated with S2 compared to mice inoculated with S1. The maximum recovery of fungal cells was seen in CPT mice inoculated with both isolates at day 7, but with mean significantly higher in those inoculated with S2 isolate. Phenotypical characterization of T cells showed TCD8+ lymphocytes predominance over TCD4+ in immunosuppressed mice infected and control groups. We also observed higher percentages of the central and effector memory/effector phenotype in CPT mice infected with S2 strain, especially in TCD8+ in the initial period of infection. Regulatory T cells showed higher percentages in immunosuppressed, predominantly after the acute phase. Our results showed that the P. lilacinum is a fungus capable to cause damages in competent and immunosuppressed experimental hosts. Furthermore, S2 isolate seems to cause more damage to the experimental host and it was possible to identify different cellular subsets involved in the mice immune response.

  5. Ultrasonic vocalization in murine experimental stroke: A mechanistic model of aphasia.

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    Palmateer, Julie; Pan, Jie; Pandya, Arushi; Martin, Lianna; Kumar, Sungita; Ofomata, Adaora; Jones, Theresa A; Gore, Andrea C; Schallert, Timothy; Hurn, Patricia D

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one-fourth of stroke survivors are aphasic. Speech therapy is the main treatment approach but leaves most patients with chronic disability. Attempts to improve this situation are hampered by a lack of mechanistic understanding of the disability and treatments, reflecting the neglect of this impairment modality in pre-clinical research. Accordingly, we devised a novel murine model of speech-related impairment after stroke to investigate the role of language- and plasticity-associated molecules. Rodents communicate socially with ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), conveying semantic and semiotic information with complex frequency modulated "songs" and alarm calls. Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced in male C57BL6 mice via either 30 or 45 minutes of reversible right MCAO using the intraluminal filament technique. Nine days post-operatively brains are stained with TTC and analyzed for infarct volume. For behavioral measures health scores are taken (days 1-4), cylinder tests and USV recordings performed at days 3 and 7 post operatively. Real time PCR was performed at 24 and 48 hour and 7 day time points to quantify mRNA expression of communication-related genes (Foxp2, Foxp1, Srpx2, Cntnap2 and Gapdh). Immunohistochemistry was performed to localize FOXP2 protein. After middle cerebral artery occlusion of either 30 or 45 minutes duration, mice demonstrate profoundly impaired socially evoked USVs. In addition, there is suppression of the language-associated transcription factor, Forkhead box protein 2 (Foxp2), and its downstream binding partner, contactin-associated protein 2 (Cntnap2). These findings set a foundation for further studies of mechanisms and novel treatment strategies for post-stroke vocalization impairments.

  6. Effect of piroxicam, metamizol, and S-adenosylmethionine in a murine model of experimental trichomoniasis

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    Nogal-Ruiz J.J.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological effects of piroxicam, metamizol, and S-adenosylmethionine (S-AMET have been tested in NMRI mice infected intraperitoneally with Trichomonas vaginalis. An intraperitoneal treatment during ten preinfection days with piroxicam (10 mg/Kg/day, or metamizol (275 mg/Kg/day, but not with S-AMET (17 mg/Kg/day induced a significant decrease of abdominal lesions and mortality, assessed by means of a pathogenicity index. The trichomonicidal activity of piroxicam, metamizol, and S-AMET was tested in vitro at the concentration of 300 μM, but found ineffective. These assays have shown the usefulness of the experimental trichomoniasis model for the study of the immunomodulating activity of synthetic drugs.

  7. Murine model of hepatic breast cancer.

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    Rikhi, Rishi; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Deas, Olivier; Svalina, Matthew N; Bial, John; Mansoor, Atiya; Cairo, Stefano; Keller, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in this population. Breast cancer related deaths have declined due to screening and adjuvant therapies, yet a driving clinical need exists to better understand the cause of the deadliest aspect of breast cancer, metastatic disease. Breast cancer metastasizes to several distant organs, the liver being the third most common site. To date, very few murine models of hepatic breast cancer exist. In this study, a novel murine model of liver breast cancer using the MDA-MB-231 cell line is introduced as an experimental (preclinical) model. Histological typing revealed consistent hepatic breast cancer tumor foci. Common features of the murine model were vascular invasion, lung metastasis and peritoneal seeding. The novel murine model of hepatic breast cancer established in this study provides a tool to be used to investigate mechanisms of hepatic metastasis and to test potential therapeutic interventions.

  8. Evaluation of therapeutic potential of nanosilver particles synthesised using aloin in experimental murine mastitis model.

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    Chaitanya Kumar, Thota Venkata; Muralidhar, Yegireddy; Prasad, Pagadala Eswara; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara; Alpha Raj, Mekapogu

    2013-09-01

    Nanobiotechnology is an emerging biological branch of nanotechnology. Application of nanoparticles with specific size and shape in biology has already shown unforeseen and interesting results. A study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic potential of phytogenically derived aloin mediated nanosilver particles (AAgNPs), prepared by reduction of silver nitrate with aloin, in Staphylococcus aureus induced murine mastitis. A total of 40 female mice were divided into five groups of eight animals each. Group I served as lactating control, groups II-V were inoculated with 20 μl of 24 h broth culture of S. aureus containing 4.0 × 105 cfu/quarter under ketamine anaesthesia. After 6 h post inoculation, groups III and IV received 20 μl of aloin nanosilver (AAgNPs) through intramammary and intraperitoneal routes, respectively. Group V received antibiotic cefepime at 1 mg/kg body weight through the intra-peritoneal route. After 18 h post-treatment, serum C reactive protein, weights of mammary glands, mammary gland bacterial load, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content, reduced glutathione content, superoxide dismutase activity and catalase activity and histopathology were determined. The compound showed a minimum inhibitory concentration of 21.8 ng/ml against S. aureus. Significant reduction (98%) in poly-morpho nuclear cell infiltration was observed with AAgNPs than antibiotic (50%).

  9. Effect of a high-fat diet and alcohol on cutaneous repair: A systematic review of murine experimental models.

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    Daiane Figueiredo Rosa

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol intake associated with an inappropriate diet can cause lesions in multiple organs and tissues and complicate the tissue repair process. In a systematic review, we analyzed the relevance of alcohol and high fat consumption to cutaneous and repair, compared the main methodologies used and the most important parameters tested. Preclinical investigations with murine models were assessed to analyze whether the current evidence support clinical trials.The studies were selected from MEDLINE/PubMed and Scopus databases, according to Fig 1. All 15 identified articles had their data extracted. The reporting bias was investigated according to the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting of in Vivo Experiments strategy.In general, animals offered a high-fat diet and alcohol showed decreased cutaneous wound closure, delayed skin contraction, chronic inflammation and incomplete re-epithelialization.In further studies, standardized experimental design is needed to establish comparable study groups and advance the overall knowledge background, facilitating data translatability from animal models to human clinical conditions.

  10. Soluble MHC Class II-driven Therapy for a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Murine Experimental in vitro and in vivo Model.

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    Bakela, Katerina; Dimakopoulou, Myrsini; Batsou, Panagiota; Manidakis, Nikos; Athanassakis, Irene

    2018-02-07

    Taking into consideration the multiparametric nature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the severity and variability of symptoms and the lack of effective therapeutic approaches, the present study took advantage of the recently described role of soluble major histocompatibility complex class II (sMHCII) molecules in maintaining tolerance to the organism and attempted to apply sMHCII proteins as a treatment to murine SLE experimental models in vitro as well as in vivo. After breaking tolerance to DNA in vitro, which was accompanied by development of specific anti-dsDNA antibodies, syngeneic or allogeneic sMHCII molecules, purified from healthy mouse serum, could significantly reduce the specific antibody levels and drive the system towards immunosuppression, as assessed by specific marker analysis on T cells and cytokine production by flow cytometry and ELISA respectively. The in vivo experimental model consisted of pristane-induced SLE symptoms to BALB/c mice, which developed maximal levels of anti-dsDNA two months after pristane inoculation. Syngeneic or allogeneic sMHCII administration could alleviate pristane-induced symptoms, significantly decrease specific anti-dsDNA antibody production and develop immunosuppression to the host, as manifested by increase of CD4+CTLA-4+ and CD4+CD25+ cell populations in the spleen. Thus, the results presented in this study, introduced the ability of sMHCII proteins to suppress specific autoantigen response, opening new areas of research and offering novel therapeutic approaches to SLE with expanding features to other autoimmune diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunogenic multistage recombinant protein vaccine confers partial protection against experimental toxoplasmosis mimicking natural infection in murine model

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    Yaprak Gedik

    2016-01-01

    To generate a protective vaccine against toxoplasmosis, multistage vaccines and usage of challenging models mimicking natural route of infection are critical cornerstones. In this study, we generated a BAG1 and GRA1 multistage vaccine that induced strong immune response in which the protection was not at anticipated level. In addition, the murine model was orally challenged with tissue cysts to mimic natural route of infection.

  12. Experimental parameters differentially affect the humoral response of the cholera-toxin-based murine model of food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, S.; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    of the antibody response depended on the type of antigen and number of immunizations. Conclusions: The critical parameters of the CT-based murine allergy model differentially control the intensity and kinetics of the developing immune response. Adjustment of these parameters could be a key tool for tailoring......Background: Recent studies have developed a murine model of IgE-mediated food allergy based on oral coadministration of antigen and cholera toxin (CT) to establish a maximal response for studying immunopathogenic mechanisms and immunotherapeutic strategies. However, for studying subtle...... immunomodulating factors or factors effective during response initiation, this maximal response-based model is less suitable due to a lack of sensitivity. Therefore, in attempts to identify essential parameters to fine-tune the immune response towards a submaximal level, potentially more sensitive, we were...

  13. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model.

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    Izabelle Silva Rehfeld

    Full Text Available Bovine vaccinia (BV is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV, which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT, viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral

  14. Therapeutic potency of IL2-caspase 3 targeted treatment in a murine experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Shteingart, S; Rapoport, M; Grodzovski, I; Sabag, O; Lichtenstein, M; Eavri, R; Lorberboum-Galski, H

    2009-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises primarily the two disorders - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease - that involve deregulated T cell responses. The ever-increasing incidence rate of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis during recent decades, combined with the limited efficacy and potential adverse effects of current treatments, explain the real need for seeking more specific and selective methods for treating these diseases. To investigate the ability of interleukin 2 (IL2)-caspase 3 chimeric protein, designed to target activated T lymphocytes that express the high-affinity IL2 receptor, to ameliorate the clinical symptoms of acute murine experimental colitis, using a mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Mice with DSS-induced colitis were treated with IL2-caspase 3 for 7 days and disease severity was assessed in parallel to control, non-treated mice, receiving only daily injections of phosphate-buffered saline. IL2-caspase 3 was tested both for its ability to prevent the development of colitis, and for its therapeutic potential to cure on-going, active acute disease. In addition, colon tissue samples were used for myeloperoxidase assays and RNA isolation followed by polymerase chain reaction to determine mRNA expression levels of specific genes. Treatment with IL2-caspase 3 dose-dependently ameliorated the disease activity index (DAI) of mice colitis. We achieved up to 78% improvement in DAI with intravenous injections of 15 microg/mouse/day. Furthermore, IL2-caspase 3 decreased neutrophil and macrophage infiltration to the inflamed tissue by up to 57%. IL2-caspase 3 was proven as a therapeutic reagent in another model, where treatment begins only after disease onset. Here we demonstrated a 70% decrease in DAI when compared to non-treated sick mice. A reduction in mRNA expression levels of both IL1 beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha was found in lysates of total colon tissue of treated mice, as compared to sick, untreated

  15. CCR2 gene deletion and pharmacologic blockade ameliorate a severe murine experimental autoimmune neuritis model of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

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    Furong Yuan

    Full Text Available The molecular determinants and signaling pathways responsible for hematogenous leukocyte trafficking during peripheral neuroinflammation are incompletely elucidated. Chemokine ligand/receptor pair CCL2/CCR2 has been pathogenically implicated in the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS. We evaluated the role of CCR2 in peripheral neuroinflammation utilizing a severe murine experimental autoimmune neuritis (sm-EAN model. Sm-EAN was induced in 8-12 week old female SJL CCR2 knockout (CCR2KO, heterozygote (CCR2HT and wild type (CCR2WT mice, and daily neuromuscular severity scores and weights recorded. In vitro and in vivo splenocyte proliferation and cytokine expression assays, and sciatic nerve Toll-like receptor (TLR 2, TLR4 and CCL2 expression assays were performed to evaluate systemic and local innate immune activation at disease onset. Motor nerve electrophysiology and sciatic nerve histology were also performed to characterize the inflammatory neuropathy at expected peak severity. To further determine the functional relevance of CCR2 in sm-EAN, 20 mg/kg CCR2 antagonist, RS 102895 was administered daily for 5 days to a cohort of CCR2WT mice following sm-EAN disease onset, with efficacy compared to 400 mg/kg human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg. CCR2KO mice were relatively resistant to sm-EAN compared to CCR2WT and CCR2HT mice, associated with attenuated peripheral nerve demyelinating neuritis. Partial CCR2 gene deletion did not confer any protection against sm-EAN. CCR2KO mice demonstrated similar splenocyte activation or proliferation profiles, as well as TLR2, TLR4 and CCL2 expression to CCR2WT or CCR2HT mice, implying a direct role for CCR2 in sm-EAN pathogenesis. CCR2 signaling blockade resulted in rapid, near complete recovery from sm-EAN following disease onset. RS 102895 was significantly more efficacious than IVIg. CCR2 mediates pathogenic hematogenous monocyte trafficking

  16. Murine model of TB meningitis

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    Umesh Datta Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated the design of a novel murine model of CNS-TB using a C3 strain and that replicated events of EPTB dissemination. This model will promote efforts to understand the pathogenesis CNS-TB infection for development of improved therapeutic interventions in the future.

  17. Does Carica papaya leaf-extract increase the platelet count? An experimental study in a murine model.

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    Dharmarathna, Sinhalagoda Lekamlage Chandi Asoka; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Waduge, Roshitha Nilmini; Rajapakse, Rajapakse Peramune Veddikkarage Jayanthe; Kularatne, Senanayake Abeysinghe Mudiyanselage

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the potential role of fresh Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract on haematological and biochemical parameters and toxicological changes in a murine model. In total 36 mice were used for the trial. Fresh C. papaya leaf extract [0.2 mL (2 g)/mouse] was given only to the test group (18 mice). General behavior, clinical signs and feeding patterns were recorded. Blood and tissue samples were collected at intervals. Haematological parameters including platelet, red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), packed cell volume (PCV), serum biochemistry including serum creatinine, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) were determined. Organs for possible histopathological changes were examined. Neither group exhibited alteration of behavior or reduction in food and water intake. Similarly, no significant changes in SGOT, SGPT and serum creatinine levels were detected in the test group. Histopathological organ changes were not observed in either group of mice except in three liver samples of the test group which had a mild focal necrosis. The platelet count (11.33±0.35)×10⁵/µL (P=0.00004) and the RBC count (7.97±0.61)×10⁶/µL (P=0.00003) were significantly increased in the test group compared to that of the controls. However, WBC count and PCV (%) values were not changed significantly in the test group. The platelet count in the test group started to increase significantly from Day 3 (3.4±0.18×10⁵/µL), reaching almost a fourfold higher at Day 21 (11.3×10⁵/µL), while it was 3.8×10⁵/µL and 5.5×10⁵/µL at Day 3 and Day 21 respectively in the control. Likewise, the RBC count in the test group increased from 6×10⁶/µL to 9×10⁶/ µL at Day 21 while it remained near constant in the control group (6×10⁶/µL). Fresh C. papaya leaf extract significantly increased the platelet and RBC counts in the test group as compared to controls. Therefore, it is very important to identify

  18. Murine model of rotavirus infection.

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    Feng, N; Franco, M A; Greenberg, H B

    1997-01-01

    The murine model of homologous rotavirus infection has been used to study the determinants of protection. The local IgA immune response appears to be the critical factor in generating protective immunity after natural infection. A series of knockout mice were used to evaluate the contribution of T cells and B cells to immunity and resolution from primary infection. Both arms of immune system played a role in the resolution of primary infection but antibody was much more important for prevention of reinfection.

  19. NG2 glia generate new oligodendrocytes but few astrocytes in a murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of demyelinating disease.

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    Tripathi, Richa B; Rivers, Leanne E; Young, Kaylene M; Jamen, Francoise; Richardson, William D

    2010-12-01

    The adult mammalian brain and spinal cord contain glial precursors that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α subunit (PDGFRA) and the NG2 proteoglycan. These "NG2 cells" descend from oligodendrocyte precursors in the perinatal CNS and continue to generate myelinating oligodendrocytes in the gray and white matter of the postnatal brain. It has been proposed that NG2 cells can also generate reactive astrocytes at sites of CNS injury or demyelination. To test this we examined the fates of PDGFRA/NG2 cells in the mouse spinal cord during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)--a demyelinating condition that models some aspects of multiple sclerosis in humans. We administered tamoxifen to Pdgfra-CreER(T2):Rosa26R-YFP mice to induce yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) expression in PDGFRA/NG2 cells and their differentiated progeny. We subsequently induced EAE and observed a large (>4-fold) increase in the local density of YFP(+) cells, >90% of which were oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Many of these became CC1-positive, NG2-negative differentiated oligodendrocytes that expressed myelin markers CNP and Tmem10/Opalin. PDGFRA/NG2 cells generated very few GFAP(+)-reactive astrocytes (1-2% of all YFP(+) cells) or NeuN(+) neurons (demyelinated spinal cord.

  20. A novel murine model for keratoprosthesis.

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    Crnej, Alja; Omoto, Masahiro; Dohlman, Thomas H; Graney, John M; Dohlman, Claes H; Drnovsek-Olup, Brigita; Dana, Reza

    2014-05-15

    To establish a murine model for keratoprosthesis. A miniature keratoprosthesis (m-KPro) device was created consisting of a poly[methyl methacrylate] front part and a titanium back plate, designed after the Boston KPro, which is in widespread clinical use. BALB/c mice were used and a 2 mm in diameter donor cornea was punched out. After 2-mm trepanation of the syngeneic recipient cornea, extracapsular crystalline lens extraction was performed. The m-KPro was assembled onto the cornea button in a similar manner to human KPro implantation. The cornea-device complex was secured to the recipient bed with eight interrupted 11-0 sutures. All mice (n = 10) were followed up for 8 weeks postoperatively. All m-KPros were successfully implanted and retained in all 10 animals. There were no critical complications such as endophthalmitis, corneal melting, device extrusions, leakage, extensive inflammation, or weight loss in the animals. We observed mild to moderate donor and host corneal neovascularization in all cases throughout the follow-up period. We have established a novel murine model of KPro implantation that we anticipate will serve as a good experimental system for evaluating host responses after KPro surgery. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  1. The efficacy of hydro alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on experimental zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions in murine model.

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    Ahmadi, Maryam; Fata, Abdolmajid; Khamesipour, Ali; Rakhshandeh, Hasan; Miramin Mohammadi, Akram; Salehi, Ghodratollah; Monavari, Hadi

    2014-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the most important parasitic infectious diseases in the world. Since last century, many efforts have been made to control and treat the disease, but appropriate vaccines, pesticides and medicines are not available or even eligible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on the lesions of experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) in Balb/c mice. The population study was 60 Ballb/c mice which divided to 6 groups, all infected with Leishmania major [MRHO/75/IR]. Soon after the ulcer started to appear in the early stage, a dose of provided herbal extract with 5, 10 and 15% concentration applied on each lesion. The surface area of the lesions measured during an interval of 10 days. Direct Giemsa stained smears prepared two and four weeks after treatment. Increasing the mean size of the lesions was statistically significant compared to those in control group (p>0.001). Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) developed in all of the mice including the control group that received Eucerine alone. Survival rate in group receiving 15% S. rosmarinus extracts showed significantly higher compared to mice in control group (pexperimental CL ulcers of Balb/c mice. Further studies with higher concentrations or nano particles are recommended.

  2. The efficacy of hydro alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on experimental zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions in murine model

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    Maryam Ahmadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Leishmaniasis is one of the most important parasitic infectious diseases in the world. Since last century, many efforts have been made to control and treat the disease, but appropriate vaccines, pesticides and medicines are not available or even eligible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on the lesions of experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL in Balb/c mice. Materials and Methods: The population study was 60 Ballb/c mice which divided to 6 groups, all infected with Leishmania major [MRHO/75/IR]. Soon after the ulcer started to appear in the early stage, a dose of provided herbal extract with 5, 10 and 15% concentration applied on each lesion. The surface area of the lesions measured during an interval of 10 days. Direct Giemsa stained smears prepared two and four weeks after treatment. Results: Increasing the mean size of the lesions was statistically significant compared to those in control group (p>0.001. Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL developed in all of the mice including the control group that received Eucerine alone. Survival rate in group receiving 15% S. rosmarinus extracts showed significantly higher  compared to mice in control group (p

  3. Cáncer experimental e inflamación sistémica en un modelo murino Systemic inflammation and experimental cancer in a murine model

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    Juan Bruzzo

    2007-10-01

    both animals and human beings. In contrast, the relationship between cancer and systemic inflammation has been less studied. In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of the murine fibrosarcoma MC-C, was accompanied by manifestations of systemic inflammation, as demonstrated by an increase in both the number of circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN and the serum concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and the acute phase proteins C reactive (CRP and serum A amyloid (SAA. Two temporally separate peaks of systemic inflammation were detected during tumor development. The first was displayed during the first week after tumor inoculation. The second peak began around day 14 and its intensity was proportional to tumor size. In mice bearing a large MC-C tumor, a high number of circulating PMN and myeloid precursors were evident. Most of these cells exhibited activation evidenced by an increased reactive oxygen species generation and high expression of the Gr1+/Mac1+ markers. Inoculation of thioglycolate -which generates a transient systemic inflammation- accelerated the growth of MC-C tumor and reciprocally, inhibition of such systemic inflammation by using indomethacin, prevented that enhancing effect. This suggests that the systemic inflammation that the tumor generates on its own, could be part of its growth strategy.

  4. Murine models of drug hypersensitivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierkens, S.; Pieters, R.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Drug hypersensitivity reactions are relatively rare but may result in severe morbidity and fatalities. Due to the idiosyncratic nature and multifactorial etiology of these reactions, development of a single animal model to study the immunosensitizing mechanisms of all drugs is

  5. Changes in scleral collagen organization in murine chronic experimental glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijanka, Jacek K; Kimball, Elizabeth C; Pease, Mary E; Abass, Ahmed; Sorensen, Thomas; Nguyen, Thao D; Quigley, Harry A; Boote, Craig

    2014-09-16

    The organization of scleral collagen helps to determine the eye's biomechanical response to intraocular pressure (IOP), and may therefore be important in glaucoma. This study provides a quantitative assessment of changes in scleral collagen fibril organization in bead-induced murine experimental glaucoma. Wide-angle X-ray scattering was used to study the effect of bead-induced glaucoma on posterior scleral collagen organization in one eye of 12 CD1 mice, with untreated fellow eyes serving as controls. Three collagen parameters were measured: the local preferred fibril directions, the degree of collagen anisotropy, and the total fibrillar collagen content. The mouse sclera featured a largely circumferential orientation of fibrillar collagen with respect to the optic nerve head canal. Localized alteration to fibril orientations was evident in the inferior peripapillary sclera of bead-treated eyes. Collagen anisotropy was significantly (Pglaucoma in mice, and potentially in human glaucoma. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Antitumor effect of blister beetles: an ethno-medicinal practice in Karbi community and its experimental evaluation against a murine malignant tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akalesh Kumar; Prasad, Surya Bali

    2013-07-30

    The blister beetles Epicauta hirticornis and Mylabris cichorii are used as a folk medicine by the Karbi tribe in Karbi Anglong district of Assam, India for the treatment of different human ailments, including cancer cases. It includes field survey related to zoo-therapeutic aspects of two blister beetles in Karbi community, isolation of bio-active compound and evaluation of its antitumor potential with possible mode of action against murine Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC). The main bio-active compound of blister beetles was isolated from ethyl acetate extract and the structure was confirmed as cantharidin using NMR, IR, Mass and X-ray diffractometer. The effect of cantharidin on apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and the apoptosis related signaling pathways were determined using different bioassays, including cell cycle analysis, mitochondrial membrane potential, western blot analysis of cytochrome c, caspases 9, 3/7 assays, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Cantharidin induced apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy cell death in EAC cells. The decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential was observed, which may help to release cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. Cantharidin treatment caused up-regulation of caspases 9 and -3/7 and a decrease in LDH activity in EAC cells. The major bioactive compound of these blister beetles is cantharidin which induces severe apoptosis in EAC cells involving mitochondrial intrinsic pathway. Cantharidin-mediated inhibition of LDH activity may lead to short supply of NAD(+) and cut off energy and anabolic supply to cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Distinctive Roles for α7*- and α9*-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Inflammatory and Autoimmune Responses in the Murine Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Whiteaker, Paul; Morley, Barbara J; Shi, Fu-Dong; Lukas, Ronald J

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine, including in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in mice of some forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Other studies using knock-out (KO) mice have implicated nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors containing α7, α9, or β2 subunits (α7*-, α9*- or β2*-nAChR) in different, disease-exacerbating or disease-ameliorating processes. These outcomes are in harmony with gene expression analyses showing nAChR subunit mRNA in many classes of immune system cell types. Consistent with influences on disease status, predictable effects of nAChR subunit (and subtype) KO, or of nicotine exposure, are seen on immune cell numbers and distribution and on cytokine levels or other markers of immunity, inflammation, demyelination, and axonal degradation. Providing support for our hypotheses about distinctive roles for nAChR subtypes in EAE, here we have used direct and adoptive EAE induction and a nAChR subunit gene double knock-out (DKO) strategy. Immune cell expression of nAChR α9 subunits as protein is demonstrated by immunostaining of isolated CD4+, CD8+, CD11b+ and CD11c+ cells from wild-type (WT) mice, but not in cells from nAChR α9 subunit KO animals. Nicotine exposure is protective against directly-induced EAE in WT or α7/α9 DKO animals relative to effects seen in WT/vehicle-treated mice, but, remarkably, EAE is exacerbated in vehicle-treated α7/α9 DKO mice. Brain lesion volume and intra-cranial inflammatory activity similarly are higher in DKO/vehicle than in WT/vehicle-treated animals, although nicotine's protective effects are seen in each instance. By contrast, in adoptive transfer studies, disease severity is attenuated and disease onset is delayed in recipients of splenocytes from WT animals treated with nicotine rather than with vehicle. Moreover, protection as seen in nicotine-treated WT animals is the same in recipients of splenocytes from nAChR

  9. Distinctive Roles for α7*- and α9*-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Inflammatory and Autoimmune Responses in the Murine Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine, including in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model in mice of some forms of multiple sclerosis (MS. Other studies using knock-out (KO mice have implicated nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh receptors containing α7, α9, or β2 subunits (α7*-, α9*- or β2*-nAChR in different, disease-exacerbating or disease-ameliorating processes. These outcomes are in harmony with gene expression analyses showing nAChR subunit mRNA in many classes of immune system cell types. Consistent with influences on disease status, predictable effects of nAChR subunit (and subtype KO, or of nicotine exposure, are seen on immune cell numbers and distribution and on cytokine levels or other markers of immunity, inflammation, demyelination, and axonal degradation. Providing support for our hypotheses about distinctive roles for nAChR subtypes in EAE, here we have used direct and adoptive EAE induction and a nAChR subunit gene double knock-out (DKO strategy. Immune cell expression of nAChR α9 subunits as protein is demonstrated by immunostaining of isolated CD4+, CD8+, CD11b+ and CD11c+ cells from wild-type (WT mice, but not in cells from nAChR α9 subunit KO animals. Nicotine exposure is protective against directly-induced EAE in WT or α7/α9 DKO animals relative to effects seen in WT/vehicle-treated mice, but, remarkably, EAE is exacerbated in vehicle-treated α7/α9 DKO mice. Brain lesion volume and intra-cranial inflammatory activity similarly are higher in DKO/vehicle than in WT/vehicle-treated animals, although nicotine’s protective effects are seen in each instance. By contrast, in adoptive transfer studies, disease severity is attenuated and disease onset is delayed in recipients of splenocytes from WT animals treated with nicotine rather than with vehicle. Moreover, protection as seen in nicotine-treated WT animals is the same in recipients of

  10. Murine cytomegalovirus infection leads to increased levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a murine aortic allograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Christian; Abele-Ohl, Silke; Eckl, Sebastian; Ramsperger-Gleixner, Martina; Mahmoudian, Shohreh; Weyand, Michael; Stamminger, Thomas; Ensminger, Stephan M

    2010-08-27

    Cytomegalovirus infection after heart transplantation is considered as risk factor for the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) as a single risk factor on transplant arteriosclerosis in an experimental aortic allograft model. Major histocompatibility complex class I-mismatched aortas of C.B10-H2(b)/LilMcdJ donor were transplanted into BALB/c recipients, which were either mock-infected or infected with MCMV (strain Smith) on day 7 and harvested 37 days after transplantation. In one experimental group animals received a daily dose of everolimus to increase the viral load of recipients. Grafts were analyzed by histology, morphometry, and immunofluorescence. Intragraft cytokine mRNA production was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and persistence of cytomegalovirus infection was confirmed by TaqMan PCR. After infection with MCMV, there was significantly more intimal proliferation when compared with uninfected controls (intimal proliferation 83.5%+/-9.6% [MCMV] vs. 43.9%+/-5.1% [MCMV]), indicating that MCMV plays a role in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Even after treatment with everolimus, MCMV infection pronounced significantly more intimal proliferation (intimal proliferation 52.5%+/-7.3% [MCMV] vs. 20.2%+/-1.7% [MCMV]). Intragraft mRNA expression showed significantly higher production of CD62E, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 after infection with MCMV. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly more CD4, CD8, and dendritic cells. We could also confirm the presence of MCMV for the duration of the experimental protocol by PCR within the spleen, liver, salivary glands, lung, and the aortic transplant. These data suggest that MCMV infection plays an important role in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis.

  11. A murine experimental anthracycline extravasation model: pathology and study of the involvement of topoisomerase II alpha and iron in the mechanism of tissue damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thougaard, Annemette V; Langer, Seppo W; Hainau, Bo

    2010-01-01

    tested two major hypotheses: (1) interaction with topoisomerase II alpha and (2) the formation of tissue damaging reactive oxygen species following redox cycling of an anthracycline Fe(2+) complex. Dexrazoxane could minimise skin damage via both mechanisms, as it stops the catalytic activity...... of topoisomerase II alpha and thereby prevents access of anthracycline to the enzyme and thus cytotoxicity, and also acts as a strong iron chelator following opening of its two bisdioxopiperazine rings. Using the model of extravasation in a dexrazoxane-resistant transgenic mouse with a heterozygous mutation...

  12. A pre-clinical murine model of oral implant osseointegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraret, S.; Hunter, D.J.; Bardet, C.; Brunski, J.B.; Bouchard, P.; Helms, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Many of our assumptions concerning oral implant osseointegration are extrapolated from experimental models studying skeletal tissue repair in long bones. This disconnect between clinical practice and experimental research hampers our understanding of bone formation around oral implants and how this process can be improved. We postulated that oral implant osseointegration would be fundamentally equivalent to implant osseointegration elsewhere in the body. Mice underwent implant placement in the edentulous ridge anterior to the first molar and peri-implant tissues were evaluated at various timepoints after surgery. Our hypothesis was disproven; oral implant osseointegration is substantially different from osseointegration in long bones. For example, in the maxilla peri-implant pre-osteoblasts are derived from cranial neural crest whereas in the tibia peri-implant osteoblasts are derived from mesoderm. In the maxilla, new osteoid arises from periostea of the maxillary bone but in the tibia the new osteoid arises from the marrow space. Cellular and molecular analyses indicate that osteoblast activity and mineralization proceeds from the surfaces of the native bone and osteoclastic activity is responsible for extensive remodeling of the new peri-implant bone. In addition to histologic features of implant osseointegration, molecular and cellular assays conducted in a murine model provide new insights into the sequelae of implant placement and the process by which bone is generated around implants. PMID:23886841

  13. Dendritic Immunotherapy Improvement for an Optimal Control Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Rangel-Reyes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic protocols in immunotherapy are usually proposed following the intuition and experience of the therapist. In order to deduce such protocols mathematical modeling, optimal control and simulations are used instead of the therapist’s experience. Clinical efficacy of dendritic cell (DC vaccines to cancer treatment is still unclear, since dendritic cells face several obstacles in the host environment, such as immunosuppression and poor transference to the lymph nodes reducing the vaccine effect. In view of that, we have created a mathematical murine model to measure the effects of dendritic cell injections admitting such obstacles. In addition, the model considers a therapy given by bolus injections of small duration as opposed to a continual dose. Doses timing defines the therapeutic protocols, which in turn are improved to minimize the tumor mass by an optimal control algorithm. We intend to supplement therapist’s experience and intuition in the protocol’s implementation. Experimental results made on mice infected with melanoma with and without therapy agree with the model. It is shown that the dendritic cells’ percentage that manages to reach the lymph nodes has a crucial impact on the therapy outcome. This suggests that efforts in finding better methods to deliver DC vaccines should be pursued.

  14. A novel postoperative immobilization model for murine Achilles tendon sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Yoichiro; Takayama, Yuzo; Kushige, Hiroko; Jacinto, Sandra; Sekido, Mitsuru; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-08-01

    The body's motion and function are all in part effected by a vital tissue, the tendon. Tendon injury often results in limited functioning after postoperative procedures and even for a long time after rehabilitation. Although numerous studies have reported surgical procedures using animal models which have contributed to both basic and clinical research, modeling of tendon sutures or postoperative immobilizations has not been performed on small experimental animals, such as mice. In this study we have developed an easy Achilles tendon suture and postoperative ankle fixation model in a mouse. Right Achilles tendons were incised and 10-0 nylons were passed through the proximal and distal ends using a modified Kessler method. Subsequently, the right ankle was immobilized in a plantarflexed position with novel splints, which were made from readily available extension tubes. Restriction of the tendon using handmade splints reduced swelling, as opposed to fixating with the usual plaster of Paris. Using this method, the usage of the right Achilles tendons began on postoperative days 13.5 ± 4.6, which indicated healing within two weeks. Therefore our simple short-term murine Achilles tendon suture procedure is useful for studying immediate tendon repair mechanisms in various models, including genetically-modified mice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. A murine model of esophageal candidiasis with local characteristic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Hiroko; Hisajima, Tatsuya; Hu, Weimin; Yamaguchi, Hideyo; Nishiyama, Yayoi; Abe, Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    A simple method to establish a murine esophageal candidiasis model that displayed characteristic symptoms of the condition was developed using the sedative agent, chlorpromazine. Mice were immunosuppressed with prednisolone and were given tetracycline hydrochloride. One day later, the mice received chlorpromazine to keep them in a sedated state for about 3 hr. Under the sedated condition, they were infected with 4 x 10(7) viable cells of Candida albicans by intra-esophageal injection with a round-head needle on syringe. From day 3 to day 6 post inoculation, 10(5)-10(6) colony forming units of C. albicans were recovered from the esophageal tube of each mouse and whitish, curd-like patches were observed on most of the inner surface of the tube. Histological examination showed that C. albicans in esophageal lesions grew mainly in mycelial form. In this experimental model, intragastric administration of an itraconazole oral solution (20 mg/kg/day) was clearly effective. This model would provide a useful tool to investigate the pathogenesis of C. albicans esophageal infection and the efficacy of various antifungal agents microbiologically and symptomatically.

  16. Topical Apigenin Alleviates Cutaneous Inflammation in Murine Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Qiang Man

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines have been used in preventing and treating skin disorders for centuries. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration of chrysanthemum extract exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether topical applications of apigenin, a constituent of chrysanthemum extract, influence cutaneous inflammation is still unclear. In the present study, we first tested whether topical applications of apigenin alleviate cutaneous inflammation in murine models of acute dermatitis. The murine models of acute allergic contact dermatitis and acute irritant contact dermatitis were established by topical application of oxazolone and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA, respectively. Inflammation was assessed in both dermatitis models by measuring ear thickness. Additionally, the effect of apigenin on stratum corneum function in a murine subacute allergic contact dermatitis model was assessed with an MPA5 physiology monitor. Our results demonstrate that topical applications of apigenin exhibit therapeutic effects in both acute irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis models. Moreover, in comparison with the vehicle treatment, topical apigenin treatment significantly reduced transepidermal water loss, lowered skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration in a subacute murine allergic contact dermatitis model. Together, these results suggest that topical application of apigenin could provide an alternative regimen for the treatment of dermatitis.

  17. Effects of Japanese herbal medicine Sairei-to on murine experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaburaki, Toshikatsu; Zhang, Qi; Jin, Xiangyuan; Uchiyama, Masateru; Fujino, Yujiro; Nakahara, Hisae; Takamoto, Mitsuko; Otomo, Kazuyoshi; Niimi, Masanori

    2013-12-01

    It has been suggested thatSairei-to (TJ114), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, has immunomodulatory activities. To evaluate the effects of TJ114 on uveitis, we examined the effectiveness of oral administration in a murine model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Murine EAU was induced by subcutaneous injection of human inter-photoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) peptide mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant. In the TJ114-treated group, 2 g/kg was administrated orally from 0 to 20 days after immunization. Clinical scoring, histopathological scoring of EAU, cell proliferation, cytokine assessment, and adoptive transfer experiment of splenic T cells into naïve mice were performed. EAU development occurred in 32 of 38 mice (86 %) in the untreated group and 12 of 33 (36 %) in the TJ114-treated group. The clinical scores for EAU in the vehicle-treated and TJ114-treated groups were 1.56 ± 1.65 and 0.59 ± 0.63 respectively, at 14 days after immunization (p < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test), and 2.26 ± 1.56 and 0.75 ± 1.31 respectively at 21 days (p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test), while the histopathological scores at 21 days were 1.47 ± 1.42 and 0.54 ± 0.84 respectively (p < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test). Interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production by cervical lymph node cells obtained from the TJ114-treated group were significantly reduced as compared with those from the vehicle-treated group (p < 0.01, Student's unpaired t-test). Moreover, the levels of C-C motif chemokine 2 (CCL2) and IFN-γ were significantly reduced in splenocytes of TJ114-treated mice as compared with the vehicle-treated group (p < 0.01, Student's unpaired t-test). Mice that received adoptive transfer of splenic T cells from TJ114-treated EAU mice caused significantly lower severity of EAU compared to those that received from vehicle-treated EAU mice. Oral administration of TJ114 has an inhibitory effect on a murine model of EAU, possibly via reduction in

  18. Polyopes affinis alleviates airway inflammation in a murine model of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marine algae have been utilized in food as well as medicine products for a variety of purposes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an ethanol extract of Polyopes affinis (P.affinis) can inhibit the pathogenesis of T helper 2 (Th2)-mediated allergen-induced airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma.

  19. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  20. Experimental murine amyloidosis II: effect of penicillamine therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, A; Hinton, C.; Tribe, C R

    1980-01-01

    D-penicillamine was used in 2 different doses to treat experimental amyloidosis in mice. No beneficial effect, as measured by duration of survival or amount of amyloid in the liver, could be demonstrated.

  1. 5-Lipoxygenase Knockout Aggravated Apical Periodontitis in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Sun, H; Yang, B; Liu, X; Wang, J

    2017-11-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) plays a vital role in the host innate immune response, including bacteria-induced inflammation. Apical periodontitis (AP) is due to immune disorders caused by imbalances between bacterial invasion and subsequent host defense response. In this work, we investigated the role of 5-lipoxygenase in AP by using 5- lo knockout mice (5- lo-/- mice). Results showed that 5- lo-/- mice had greater periapical bone loss and more osteoclasts positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining than did wild-type mice, as determined by micro-computed tomography and histologic staining. The inflammation- and osteoclastogenesis-related factors IL-1β, TNF-α, RANK, and RANKL were also significantly elevated in 5- lo-/- mice, whereas osteoprotegerin was reduced. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages from 5- lo-/- mice revealed an obviously impaired ability to phagocytose the AP pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum. In vivo experiments confirmed that 5- lo knockout led to decreased macrophage recruitment and increased F. nucleatum infection around the periapical area due to decreased leukotriene B4 and LXA4 production. All these results showed that 5- lo knockout impaired the host innate immune system to promote the release of bone resorption-related factors. Therefore, 5- lo deficiency aggravated AP in an experimental murine AP model.

  2. Costimulatory signal blockade in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub, M; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Stadlbauer, T H

    1999-01-01

    Blockade of the CD28-B7 or CD40L-CD40 T cell costimulatory signals prevents induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the effect of simultaneous blockade of these signals in EAE is unknown. We show that administration of either MR1 (to block CD40L) or CTLA4Ig (to block...

  3. Heme oxygenase-1-generated biliverdin ameliorates experimental murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberat, Pascal O; A-Rahim, Yousif I; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Warny, Michel M; Csizmadia, Eva; Robson, Simon C; Bach, Fritz H

    2005-04-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) seems to have an important protective role in acute and chronic inflammation. The products of heme catalysis, biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide (CO), and iron (that induces apoferritin) mediate the beneficial effects of HO-1. Blockade of HO-1 activity results in exacerbation of experimental colitis. We tested whether HO-1 has protective effects in the development of colitis and determined that specific enzymatic products of HO-1 are responsible for these effects. Colitis was induced by oral administration of dextran sodium sulfate (5%) to C57BL/6 mice for 7 days. HO-1 was up-regulated by cobalt-protoporphyrin (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Biliverdin, exogenous CO, or the iron chelator desferrioxamine was administered to other groups. Cobalt-protoporphyrin treatment resulted in significant up-regulation of HO-1 protein in mucosal and submucosal cells. Induction of HO-1 was associated with significantly less loss of body weight in mice with induced colitis (-12% versus -22% in the control animals, P biliverdin administration (50 micromol/kg, 3 times per day, intraperitoneally). We conclude that heightened HO-1 expression or administration of biliverdin ameliorates dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis. Novel therapeutic strategies based on HO-1 and/or biliverdin administration may have use in inflammatory bowel disease.

  4. T Cell Integrin Overexpression as a Model of Murine Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Raymond L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrin adhesion molecules have important adhesion and signaling functions. They also play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Over the past few years we have described a T cell adoptive transfer model to investigate the role of T cell integrin adhesion molecules in the development of autoimmunity. This report summarizes the methods we used in establishing this murine model. By treating murine CD4+ T cells with DNA hypomethylating agents and by transfection we were able to test the in vitro effects of integrin overexpression on T cell autoreactive proliferation, cytotoxicity, adhesion and trafficking. Furthermore, we showed that the ability to induce in vivo autoimmunity may be unique to the integrin lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1.

  5. Dystrophic Spinal Deformities in a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Murine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Steven D.; Wei Zhang; Dalong Yang; Hao Yang; Shi Chen; Xiaohua Wu; Xiaohong Li; Xianlin Yang; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Guise, Theresa A.; Bergner, Amanda L.; Stevenson, David A.; Feng-Chun Yang

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf...

  6. Fumigaclavine C ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis via NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of Fumigaclavine C, a fungal metabolite, on murine experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS and its possible mechanism were examined in vivo and vitro. Oral administration of Fumigaclavine C dose-dependently attenuated the loss of body weight and shortening of colon length induced by DSS. The disease activity index, histopathologic scores of musco was also significantly reduced by Fumigaclavine C treatment. Protein and mRNA levels of DSS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in colon, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-17A, were markedly suppressed by Fumigaclavine C. At the same time, decreased activation of caspase-1 in peritoneal macrophages was detected in Fumigaclavine C -treated mice which suggested that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation was suppressed. Furthermore, in the LPS plus ATP cell model, we found that Fumigaclavine C dose-dependent inhibited IL-1β release and caspase-1 activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate the ability of Fumigaclavine C to inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and give some evidence for its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a key molecule in modulating low-degree inflammatory conditions such as diabetes. The role of PTP1B in other chronic inflammations, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS-induced murine experimental colitis via expanding CD11b(+Gr-1(+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Employing DSS-induced murine experimental colitis as inflammatory animal model, we found that, compared with wild-type littermates, PTP1B-null mice demonstrated greater resistance to DSS-induced colitis, as reflected by slower weight-loss, greater survival rates and decreased PMN and macrophage infiltration into the colon. The evidence collectively also demonstrated that the resistance of PTP1B-null mice to DSS-induced colitis is based on the expansion of MDSCs. First, PTP1B-null mice exhibited a greater frequency of MDSCs in the bone marrow (BM, peripheral blood and spleen when compared with wild-type littermates. Second, PTP1B levels in BM leukocytes were significantly decreased after cells were induced into MDSCs by IL-6 and GM-CSF, and the MDSC induction occurred more rapidly in PTP1B-null mice than in wild-type littermates, suggesting PTP1B as a negative regulator of MDSCs. Third, the adoptive transfer of MDSCs into mice with DSS-colitis significantly attenuated colitis, which accompanies with a decreased serum IL-17 level. Finally, PTP1B deficiency increased the frequency of MDSCs from BM cells likely through enhancing the activities of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidences that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via expanding MDSCs.

  8. Digoxin Attenuates Murine Experimental Colitis by Downregulating Th17-related Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Shinya; Takano, Ryosuke; Tamura, Satoshi; Oishi, Shinji; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Hamaya, Yasushi; Takagaki, Kosuke; Nagata, Toshi; Seto, Shintaro; Horii, Toshinobu; Kosugi, Isao; Iwashita, Toshihide; Osawa, Satoshi; Furuta, Takahisa; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Sugimoto, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Digoxin, a cardiac glycoside used for the treatment of heart failure, was reported to inhibit the retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) and attenuate the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and arthritis in mice. However, the effects of digoxin in a mice model of inflammatory bowel disease have not been elucidated. Colitis was induced in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by adoptive transfer of CD45RB CD4 T cells. Digoxin or a vehicle was injected into mice with colitis intraperitoneally every other day and changes in body weight were evaluated. After 6 to 8 weeks, the treated mice were killed and evaluated for histological score, T-cell subset, and cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the colonic tissue. Wasting disease and histological damage were significantly attenuated in digoxin-treated mice with colitis compared with those in the vehicle-treated mice. In addition, the mRNAs of Th17-related cytokines were downregulated, whereas those of interleukin-10 were upregulated in the colonic mucosa of digoxin-treated mice. However, unexpectedly, the mRNA expression level of tumor necrosis factor alpha did not decrease in the colonic mucosa of digoxin-treated mice with colitis. This observation suggests that digoxin may ameliorate colitis by a tumor necrosis factor alpha-independent pathway. This study has shown for the first time that treatment with digoxin can ameliorate murine experimental colitis. This finding suggests that the suppression of Th17 using reagents such as digoxin could be effective in treating Crohn's disease refractory to anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy.

  9. Murine models in critical care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haouzi, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Access to genetically engineered mice has opened many new opportunities to address questions relevant to the pathophysiology and treatment of patients in critical conditions. However, the results of studies in mice cannot disregard the unique ability of small rodents to adjust their temperature and high metabolic rate and the corresponding respiratory and circulatory requirements in response to hypoxia. Studies performed in mice on questions related to metabolic, circulatory, and respiratory regulation should always be considered in light of the ability of mice to rapidly drop their nonshivering thermogenesis-related metabolism. As an example, it has been recently argued that a moderate level of inhaled hydrogen sulfide may have a potential benefit in patients in coma or shock or during an anoxic or ischemic insult, as this toxic gas dramatically reduces the metabolic rate in resting mice. However, acute hypometabolism has long been described in small mammals in response to hypoxia and is not specific to hydrogen sulfide. More importantly, mice have a specific metabolic rate that is 15-20 times higher than the specific metabolic level of a resting human. This difference can be accounted for by the large amount of heat produced by mice through nonshivering thermogenesis, related to the activity of uncoupling proteins. This mechanism, which is essential for maintaining homeothermia in small mammals, is virtually absent in larger animals, including in adult humans. Accordingly, no direct metabolic effect of hydrogen sulfide is observed in large mammals. We present the view that similar reasoning should be applied when the circulatory or respiratory response to hypoxic exposure is considered. This leads us to question whether a similar strategy could occur in mice in critical conditions other than hypoxia, such as in hypovolemic, septic, or cardiogenic shock. Mouse models developed to understand the mechanisms of protection against hypoxia or ischemia or to propose new

  10. Investigation of Murine Models for Sleep, Wakefulness and Target Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    subjective day, 7pm-7am w R NR 0 50 100 150 200 250 state c o u n t s F2 Females F2 Males Different from humans, mice exhibit polyphasic sleep with many...early trends, e.g., in the 1p.m. (6 hrs of subjective night) group, became non-significant with additional mice tested • The polyphasic sleep ...REPORT Final report - Investigation of Murine Models for Sleep , Wakefulness and Target Discovery 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  11. A comprehensive collection of experimentally validated primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction quantitation of murine transcript abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaowei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR is a widely applied analytical method for the accurate determination of transcript abundance. Primers for QPCR have been designed on a genomic scale but non-specific amplification of non-target genes has frequently been a problem. Although several online databases have been created for the storage and retrieval of experimentally validated primers, only a few thousand primer pairs are currently present in existing databases and the primers are not designed for use under a common PCR thermal profile. Results We previously reported the implementation of an algorithm to predict PCR primers for most known human and mouse genes. We now report the use of that resource to identify 17483 pairs of primers that have been experimentally verified to amplify unique sequences corresponding to distinct murine transcripts. The primer pairs have been validated by gel electrophoresis, DNA sequence analysis and thermal denaturation profile. In addition to the validation studies, we have determined the uniformity of amplification using the primers and the technical reproducibility of the QPCR reaction using the popular and inexpensive SYBR Green I detection method. Conclusion We have identified an experimentally validated collection of murine primer pairs for PCR and QPCR which can be used under a common PCR thermal profile, allowing the evaluation of transcript abundance of a large number of genes in parallel. This feature is increasingly attractive for confirming and/or making more precise data trends observed from experiments performed with DNA microarrays.

  12. Macrophage activation associated with chronic murine cytomegalovirus infection results in more severe experimental choroidal neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott W Cousins

    Full Text Available The neovascular (wet form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV. Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV, laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF, an outcome that requires active virus replication.

  13. Murine model of long-term obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Masayo; Yang, Jing; Katsuta, Eriko; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Woelfel, Ingrid A; Wang, Xuan; Spiegel, Sarah; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-11-01

    With the recent emergence of conjugated bile acids as signaling molecules in cancer, a murine model of obstructive jaundice by cholestasis with long-term survival is in need. Here, we investigated the characteristics of three murine models of obstructive jaundice. C57BL/6J mice were used for total ligation of the common bile duct (tCL), partial common bile duct ligation (pCL), and ligation of left and median hepatic bile duct with gallbladder removal (LMHL) models. Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method. Fibrotic change was determined by Masson-Trichrome staining and Collagen expression. Overall, 70% (7 of 10) of tCL mice died by day 7, whereas majority 67% (10 of 15) of pCL mice survived with loss of jaundice. A total of 19% (3 of 16) of LMHL mice died; however, jaundice continued beyond day 14, with survival of more than a month. Compensatory enlargement of the right lobe was observed in both pCL and LMHL models. The pCL model demonstrated acute inflammation due to obstructive jaundice 3 d after ligation but jaundice rapidly decreased by day 7. The LHML group developed portal hypertension and severe fibrosis by day 14 in addition to prolonged jaundice. The standard tCL model is too unstable with high mortality for long-term studies. pCL may be an appropriate model for acute inflammation with obstructive jaundice, but long-term survivors are no longer jaundiced. The LHML model was identified to be the most feasible model to study the effect of long-term obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  15. Iontophoretic delivery of carboplatin in a murine model of retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Brandy; Jockovich, Maria-Elena; Murray, Timothy G; Kralinger, Martina T; Voigt, Monika; Hernandez, Eleut; Feuer, William; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and dose-response of transcorneoscleral Coulomb controlled iontophoresis (CCI) of carboplatin in the treatment of retinal tumors of a murine model of retinoblastoma. Thirty 6-week-old LHBETATAG mice underwent a total of six, serial iontophoretic treatments administered two times per week using a current density of 2.57 mA/cm2 for 5 minutes. Fourteen animals received carboplatin treatments at concentrations of 1.4, 7.0, 10.0, or 14.0 mg/mL without current. Ten control mice underwent treatment with balanced saline solution. A dose-dependent inhibition of intraocular tumor was observed after repetitive iontophoretic treatment. At carboplatin concentrations of 7 mg/mL, 50% of the treated eyes (4/8) exhibited tumor control. No corneal toxicity was observed in eyes treated at carboplatin concentrations under 10 mg/mL. CCI delivery of carboplatin safely and effectively controls intraocular tumors in a dose-dependent manner in this murine model of retinoblastoma. CCI is a noninvasive, painless option for the focal delivery of carboplatin. However, further clinical and laboratory research is needed before this method of drug delivery is available for children with retinoblastoma.

  16. Neurological Disorders in a Murine Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Chillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. However, data on the impact of CRF on the cerebral circulatory system are scarce—despite the fact that stroke is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in people with CRF. In the present study, we examined the impact of CRF on behavior (anxiety, recognition and ischemic stroke severity in a well-defined murine model of CRF. We did not observe any significant increases between CRF mice and non-CRF mice in terms of anxiety. In contrast, CRF mice showed lower levels of anxiety in some tests. Recognition was not impaired (vs. controls after 6 weeks of CRF but was impaired after 10 weeks of CRF. Chronic renal failure enhances the severity of ischemic stroke, as evaluated by the infarct volume size in CRF mice after 34 weeks of CRF. Furthermore, neurological test results in non-CRF mice tended to improve in the days following ischemic stroke, whereas the results in CRF mice tended to worsen. In conclusion, we showed that a murine model of CRF is suitable for evaluating uremic toxicity and the associated neurological disorders. Our data confirm the role of uremic toxicity in the genesis of neurological abnormalities (other than anxiety.

  17. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia : An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone

  18. A novel inexpensive murine model of oral chronic digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helber, Izo; Kanashiro, Rosemeire M; Alarcon, Ernesto A; Antonio, Ednei L; Tucci, Paulo J F

    2004-01-01

    A novel inexpensive murine model of oral administration of digitoxin (100 micro g/kg per day) added to routine chow is described. Serum digitoxin levels achieved after oral (n = 5; 116 +/- 14 ng/mL) and subcutaneous (n = 5; 124 +/- 11 ng/mL) administration were similar. A significant increase in the maximal left ventricular pressure rise of treated (n = 9) compared with control (n = 6) rats (dP/dt: 8956 +/- 233 vs 7980 +/- 234 mmHg/s, respectively; P = 0.01) characterized the positive inotropic action of digitoxin. In addition, no differences were observed in treated compared with control rats with regard to the electrocardiogram and systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressures.

  19. Feasibility and scalability of spring parameters in distraction enterogenesis in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nhan; Dubrovsky, Genia; Rouch, Joshua D; Scott, Andrew; Stelzner, Matthias; Shekherdimian, Shant; Dunn, James C Y

    2017-07-01

    Distraction enterogenesis has been investigated as a novel treatment for short bowel syndrome (SBS). With variable intestinal sizes, it is critical to determine safe, translatable spring characteristics in differently sized animal models before clinical use. Nitinol springs have been shown to lengthen intestines in rats and pigs. Here, we show spring-mediated intestinal lengthening is scalable and feasible in a murine model. A 10-mm nitinol spring was compressed to 3 mm and placed in a 5-mm intestinal segment isolated from continuity in mice. A noncompressed spring placed in a similar fashion served as a control. Spring parameters were proportionally extrapolated from previous spring parameters to accommodate the smaller size of murine intestines. After 2-3 wk, the intestinal segments were examined for size and histology. Experimental group with spring constants, k = 0.2-1.4 N/m, showed intestinal lengthening from 5.0 ± 0.6 mm to 9.5 ± 0.8 mm (P springs with k ≤ 0.4 N/m can safely yield nearly 2-fold distraction enterogenesis in length and diameter in a scalable mouse model. Not only does this study derive the safe ranges and translatable spring characteristics in a scalable murine model for patients with short bowel syndrome, it also demonstrates the feasibility of spring-mediated intestinal lengthening in a mouse, which can be used to study underlying mechanisms in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A fluorescence model of the murine lung for optical detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Madeleine S.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2017-07-01

    We present a computer model of intravital excitation and external fluorescence detection in the murine lungs validated with a three-dimensional lung tissue phantom. The model is applied to optical detection of pulmonary tuberculosis infection.

  1. Kinetics of expression of costimulatory molecules and their ligands in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Navikas, V; Schaub, M

    1998-01-01

    We studied the kinetics of expression of costimulatory molecules and cytokines in the central nervous system (CNS) in murine relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). During the natural course of EAE, B7-2 expression in the CNS correlated with clinical signs, while B7-1 was exclu...

  2. Models of experimental epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Ekici

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common serious neurological conditionin the world, with an estimated prevalence of 1% ofthe population. A large number of experimental modelsof seizure and epilepsy have been developed. These experimentalmodels are elicited by chemical convulsants,electrical stimulation, genetic models, structural lesions,physical stimuli (cold, pressure, hyperthermia, electricalin animals. Well-characterized animal models may allowthe understanding of the basic mechanisms underlyingepileptogenesis (it refers to the alteration of a normalneuronal network into a hyperexcitable network in whichrecurrent, spontaneous seizures occur. Moreover, thesemodels might also prove useful in identifying novel therapeuticapproaches to treatment of epilepsy. J Clin ExpInvest 2011; 2(1: 118-123

  3. Enteric serotonin and oxytocin: endogenous regulation of severity in a murine model of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross Margolis, Kara; Vittorio, Jennifer; Talavera, Maria; Gluck, Karen; Li, Zhishan; Iuga, Alina; Stevanovic, Korey; Saurman, Virginia; Israelyan, Narek; Welch, Martha G; Gershon, Michael D

    2017-11-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a gastrointestinal inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that may also affect the liver, causes a great deal of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. We tested the hypothesis that signaling molecules, which are endogenous to the bowel, regulate the severity of intestinal and hepatic damage in an established murine NEC model. Specifically, we postulated that mucosal serotonin (5-HT), which is proinflammatory, would exacerbate experimental NEC and that oxytocin (OT), which is present in enteric neurons and is anti-inflammatory, would oppose it. Genetic deletion of the 5-HT transporter (SERT), which increases and prolongs effects of 5-HT, was found to increase the severity of systemic manifestations, intestinal inflammation, and associated hepatotoxicity of experimental NEC. In contrast, genetic deletion of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), which is responsible for 5-HT biosynthesis in enterochromaffin (EC) cells of the intestinal mucosa, and TPH inhibition with LP-920540 both decrease the severity of experimental NEC in the small intestine and liver. These observations suggest that 5-HT from EC cells helps to drive the inflammatory damage to the gut and liver that occurs in the murine NEC model. Administration of OT decreased, while the OT receptor antagonist atosiban exacerbated, the intestinal inflammation of experimental NEC. Data from the current investigation are consistent with the tested hypotheses-that the enteric signaling molecules, 5-HT (positively) and OT (negatively) regulate severity of inflammation in a mouse model of NEC. Moreover, we suggest that mucosally restricted inhibition of 5-HT biosynthesis and/or administration of OT may be useful in the treatment of NEC. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Serotonin (5-HT) and oxytocin reciprocally regulate the severity of intestinal inflammation and hepatotoxicity in a murine model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Selective depletion of mucosal 5-HT through genetic deletion or

  4. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Mulay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM, or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs at an air–liquid interface (ALI that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi, suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host–pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development.

  5. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  6. Advances in the development of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli vaccines using murine models of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Angulo, Victor A.; Kalita, Anjana; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains are food borne pathogens with importance in public health. EHEC colonizes the large intestine and causes diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and in some cases, life-threatening hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) due to the production of Shiga toxins (Stx). The lack of effective clinical treatment, sequelae after infection and mortality rate in humans supports the urgent need of prophylactic approaches, such as development of vaccines. Shedding from cattle, the main EHEC reservoir and considered the principal food contamination source, has prompted the development of licensed vaccines that reduce EHEC colonization in ruminants. Although murine models do not fully recapitulate human infection, they are commonly used to evaluate EHEC vaccines and the immune/protective responses elicited in the host. Mice susceptibility differs depending of the EHEC inoculums; therefore, displaying different mortality rates and Stx-mediated renal damage. Therefore, several experimental protocols have being pursued in this model to develop EHEC-specific vaccines. Recent candidate vaccines evaluated include those composed of virulence factors alone or as fused-subunits, DNA-based, attenuated bacteria and bacterial ghosts. In this review, we summarize progress in the design and testing of EHEC vaccines and the use of different strategies for the evaluation of novel EHEC vaccines in the murine model. PMID:23707170

  7. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Munson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ- deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  8. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  9. Exploring the translational disconnect between the murine and human inflammatory response: analysis of LPS dose–response relationship in murine versus human cell lines and implications for translation into murine models of sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarron EP

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eamon P McCarron,1 Dominic P Williams,1 Daniel J Antoine,1 Anja Kipar,2 Jana Lemm,3 Sebastian Stehr,3 Ingeborg D Welters,4 1Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Centre for Drug Safety Science, Institute of Translational Medicine, 2Department of Veterinary Pathology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; 3Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany; 4Department of Obesity and Endocrinology, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK Background: Inflammation forms an important part of the human innate immune system and is largely dependent on the activation of the "classical" NF-κB pathway through Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Understanding this has allowed researchers to explore roles of therapeutic targets in managing conditions such as sepsis. Recapitulating an inflammatory response using lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a "sterile" technique, can provide information that is dissimilar to the clinical condition. By examining NF-κB activation (through immunoblotting of the p65 subunit in two separate cell lines (murine and human and analyzing two murine models of sepsis (intraperitoneal [IP] LPS and IP stool inoculation, an evaluation of the translational disconnect between experimental and clinical sepsis can be made. Methods: THP-1 (human cells and RAW 264.7 (murine cells were dosed with concentrations of LPS (human, 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL; murine, 30 pg/mL to 1,000 ng/mL and nuclear actin and p65 were immunoblotted to measure changes in nuclear density. In vivo, C57BL/6 mice received either IP injection of stool suspension (5 µL/g or LPS (25 mg/kg or saline (1 mL/kg. Animals were culled at 6 hours and tissues were analyzed. Results: An increase in basal p65:actin density in THP-1 cells (mean 0.214, standard error of the mean 0.024 was seen at doses as small as 0.1 ng/mL (0.519±0.064. In contrast to RAW 264.7 cells, basal increases (0.170±0

  10. Cell therapy in the treatment of bronchiolitis obliterans in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio de Oliveira Espinel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of stem cells derived from adipose tissue in reducing graft inflammation in a murine model of allogeneic heterotopic tracheal transplant.METHODS: We performed a heterotopic tracheal allografting in dorsal subcutaneous pouch and systemically injected 5x105 mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue. The animals were divided into two groups according to the time of sacrifice: T7 and T21. We also carried out histological analysis and digital morphometry.RESULTS: The T7 animals treated with cell therapy had median obstructed graft area of 0 versus 0.54 of controls (p = 0.635. The treated T21 subjects had median obstructed graft area of 0.25 versus 0 in controls (p = 0.041.CONCLUSION: The systemically injected cell therapy in experimental murine model of bronchiolitis obliterans did not reduce the severity of the allograft inflammation in a statistically significant way in seven days; Conversely, in 21 days, it increased the allograft inflammatory process.

  11. Radio-attenuated leishmanial parasites as immunoprophylactic agent against experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sanchita; Adak, Rupchand; Chakraborty, Priyanka; Haldar, Arun Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2012-01-01

    The present study intends to evaluate the role of radio-attenuated leishmania parasites as immunoprophylactic agents for experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis. BALB/c mice were immunized with gamma (γ)-irradiated Leishmania donovani. A second immunization was given after 15 days of first immunization. After two immunizations, mice were infected with virulent L. donovani promastigotes. Protection against Kala-azar (KA) was estimated from spleen and liver parasitic burden along with the measurement of nitrite and superoxide anion generation by isolation of splenocytes and also by T-lymphocyte helper 1(Th1) and T-lymphocyte helper 2(Th2) cytokines release from the experimental groups. It was observed that BALB/c mice having prior immunization with radio-attenuated parasites showed protection against L. donovani infection through higher expression of Th1 cytokines and suppression of Th2 cytokines along with the generation of protective free radicals. The group of mice without prior priming with radio-attenuated parasites surrendered to the disease. Thus it can be concluded that radio-attenuated L. donovani may be used for. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosing hypoxia in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis from reflectance multispectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinton, Sophie; Naylor, Amy J.; Claridge, Ela

    2017-07-01

    Spectra computed from multispectral images of murine models of Rheumatoid Arthritis show a characteristic decrease in reflectance within the 600-800nm region which is indicative of the reduction in blood oxygenation and is consistent with hypoxia.

  13. Enterocin CRL35 inhibits Listeria monocytogenes in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Emiliano; Saavedra, Lucila; Hebert, Elvira Maria; Haro, Cecilia; Sesma, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen causative of opportunistic infections. Listeriosis is associated with severe infections in pregnant women causing abortion or neonatal listeriosis. An alternative to antibiotics are safe novel bacteriocins peptides such as enterocin CRL35 with strong antilisterial activity produced by Enterococcus mundtii CRL35. In the present paper, our goal is to study the effectiveness of this peptide and the producer strain in a murine model of pregnancy-associated listeriosis. A single dose of 5×10(9) colony-forming unit of L. monocytogenes FBUNT (Faculty of Biochemistry-University of Tucumán) resulted in translocation of pathogen to liver and spleen of BALB/c pregnant mice. The maximum level of Listeria was observed on day 3 postinfection. Interestingly, the intragastric administration of enterocin CRL35 significantly reduced the translocation of the pathogen to vital organs. On the other hand, the preadministration of E. mundtii CRL35 slightly inhibited this translocation. Listeria infection caused a significant increase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes at day 3 postinfection compared to the noninfected group. This value was reduced after the administration of enterocin CRL35. No significant changes were observed in either white blood cells or lymphocytes counts. Based on the data presented in the present work enterocin CRL35 would be a promising alternative for the prevention of Listeria infections.

  14. Dystrophic Spinal Deformities in a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dalong; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shi; Wu, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xianlin; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Guise, Theresa A.; Bergner, Amanda L.; Stevenson, David A.; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col2.3Cre mice, with analogous histological features present in a human patient with dystrophic scoliosis. Intriguingly, 36–60% of Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col2.3Cre mice exhibit segmental vertebral fusion anomalies with boney obliteration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). While analogous findings have not yet been reported in the NF1 patient population, we herein present two case reports of IVD defects and interarticular vertebral fusion in patients with NF1. Collectively, these data provide novel insights regarding the pathophysiology of dystrophic spinal anomalies in NF1, and provide impetus for future radiographic analyses of larger patient cohorts to determine whether IVD and vertebral fusion defects may have been previously overlooked or underreported in the NF1 patient population. PMID:25786243

  15. Dystrophic spinal deformities in a neurofibromatosis type 1 murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D Rhodes

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice, with analogous histological features present in a human patient with dystrophic scoliosis. Intriguingly, 36-60% of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice exhibit segmental vertebral fusion anomalies with boney obliteration of the intervertebral disc (IVD. While analogous findings have not yet been reported in the NF1 patient population, we herein present two case reports of IVD defects and interarticular vertebral fusion in patients with NF1. Collectively, these data provide novel insights regarding the pathophysiology of dystrophic spinal anomalies in NF1, and provide impetus for future radiographic analyses of larger patient cohorts to determine whether IVD and vertebral fusion defects may have been previously overlooked or underreported in the NF1 patient population.

  16. Expression of profibrotic genes in a murine remnant kidney model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Binxia; Vohra, Pawan K; Janardhanan, Rajiv; Misra, Khamal D; Misra, Sanjay

    2011-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that there is increased expression of several profibrotic genes, including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2), a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motif-1 (ADAMTS-1), and fibroblast specific protein-1 (FSP-1) in a murine remnant kidney model. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) was created in 10 C57BL/6 male mice (20-25 g) by performing a right nephrectomy and ligation of the upper pole of the left kidney (remnant kidney). Animals were sacrificed 42 days and 56 days later. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, ADAMTS-1, and FSP-1 was performed in the remnant kidney. Histologic evaluation of the remnant kidney was performed using Ki-67, α-smooth muscle cell actin (α-SMA), hematoxylin and eosin, and Masson' trichrome staining. Kidney function was assessed using serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine. The mean serum BUN and creatinine levels at day 42 and day 56 were significantly higher than baseline (P Masson' trichrome, increased Ki-67, and increased α-SMA staining in the remnant kidney compared with the normal kidney. In the remnant kidney, there was increased fibrosis with increased α-SMA and Ki-67 staining and significantly increased expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, ADAMTS-1, and FSP-1. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. (1)H MRI of pneumococcal pneumonia in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Pasquina; Lanzoni, Anna; Nicolato, Elena; Di Modugno, Vincenza; Cristofori, Patrizia; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-07-01

    To detect and quantify pulmonary lesions due to pneumococcal pneumonia in a murine model by (1)H MRI. Pneumonia was induced in mice (N = 5) by intranasal administration of about 1 x 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) of Streptococcus pneumonie. A group of noninfected animals (N = 5) was used as a control group. MRI was performed, 48 hours after infection induction, at 4.7 T. ECG-gated gradient-echo (GRE) sequences with TE = 5 msec were used. After MRI examination, the animals were sacrificed for histological examination. Lungs appeared at MRI as regions with signal intensity (SI) at the level of the noise. Lesions appeared as hyperintense regions over the background and were localized mainly in the apical part of the lungs, in the medial and peribronchial regions. The anatomical localization of the lesions was confirmed by histology. The total lesion volume quantified by MRI data correlated with the total lesion volume quantified by histology. This work shows that standard (1)H MRI allows detection and quantification of lesions due to pneumococcal pneumonia in mice.

  18. A Murine Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Model: The DBA/2J Strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is attributed to mutations in genes that encode for the sarcomere proteins, especially Mybpc3 and Myh7. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies show significant variability in HCM phenotypes among affected individuals with identical causal mutations. Morphological changes and clinical expression of HCM are the result of interactions with modifier genes. With the exceptions of angiotensin converting enzyme, these modifiers have not been identified. Although mouse models have been used to investigate the genetics of many complex diseases, natural murine models for HCM are still lacking. In this study we show that the DBA/2J (D2 strain of mouse has sequence variants in Mybpc3 and Myh7, relative to widely used C57BL/6J (B6 reference strain and the key features of human HCM. Four-month-old of male D2 mice exhibit hallmarks of HCM including increased heart weight and cardiomyocyte size relative to B6 mice, as well as elevated markers for cardiac hypertrophy including β-myosin heavy chain (MHC, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, and skeletal muscle alpha actin (α1-actin. Furthermore, cardiac interstitial fibrosis, another feature of HCM, is also evident in the D2 strain, and is accompanied by up-regulation of type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA-markers of fibrosis. Of great interest, blood pressure and cardiac function are within the normal range in the D2 strain, demonstrating that cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis are not secondary to hypertension, myocardial infarction, or heart failure. Because D2 and B6 strains have been used to generate a large family of recombinant inbred strains, the BXD cohort, the D2 model can be effectively exploited for in-depth genetic analysis of HCM susceptibility and modifier screens.

  19. Detection of antibodies against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus GDVII strain in experimental guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häger, C; Glage, S; Held, N; Bleich, E M; Burghard, A; Mähler, M; Bleich, André

    2016-10-01

    A disease affecting guinea pigs called 'guinea pig lameness' characterized by clinical signs of depression, lameness of limbs, flaccid paralysis, weight loss and death within a few weeks was first described by Römer in 1911. After a research group in our facility kept laboratory guinea pigs from two different origins together in one room, lameness was observed in two animals. Further investigations revealed a serological immune response against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV; GDVII strain) in these animals. Histopathology of the lumbar spinal cord of these animals showed mononuclear cell infiltration and necrotic neurons in the anterior horn. Therefore, all guinea pigs from this contaminated animal unit, from other units in our facility, as well as from different European institutions and breeding centres were screened for antibodies directed against GDVII. Our investigations showed that approximately 80% of all guinea pigs from the contaminated animal unit were seropositive for GDVII, whereas animals from other separate units were completely negative. In addition, 43% of tested sera from the different European institutions and breeding centres contained antibodies against GDVII. The present data confirm that an unknown viral infection causes an immune response in experimental guinea pigs leading to seroconversion against GDVII and that guinea pigs from a commercial breeder are the source of the infection. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Experimental murine chromoblastomycosis obtained from Fonsecaea pedrosoi isolate cultured for a long periodt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AP Machado

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to describe F. pedrosoi propagules capable of causing chronic murine disease. Several changes in F. pedrosoi hyphae were identified in fungal cells cultured for a long period. Optical microscopy found many rounded cells with double-rigid melanin-rich walls. Terminal and intercalary chlamydoconidia were also frequently observed. Analyses of images from transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed several cells with walls composed of at least three layers and an outer layer enriched with melanin. Two groups of twenty BALB/c mice were subcutaneously infected in their footpads with F. pedrosoi cells at an inoculum concentration of approximately 1 x 10(4 cells/mL. In one group, long-term cultured F. pedrosoi cells were inoculated in one footpad, whereas in the other group, both footpads were infected. Active lesions were observed up to seven months post-infection, particularly in mice inoculated at two sites. After this period, animals were killed. Histological sections revealed characteristics bearing a strong resemblance to the human form of the disease such as tissue hyperplasia, granulomas with microabscesses and sclerotic cells. Based on this study, we identified fungal cells from old cultures capable of provoking chronic chromoblastomycosis under experimental conditions, especially when more than one site is infected.

  1. Murine model for congenital CMV infection and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is the leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, and SNHL is the most frequent sequela of congenital CMV infection. But the pathogenic mechanism remains unknown, and there is no ideal CMV intrauterine infection animal model to study the mechanisms by which SNHL develops. Methods We established the congenital murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection model by directly injecting the virus into the placenta on day 12.5 of gestation. Then, we observed the development and the MCMV congenital infection rate of the fetuses on the day they were born. Furthermore, we detected the auditory functions, the conditions of the MCMV infection, and the histological change of the inner ears of 28-day-old and 70-day-old offspring. Results Both the fetal loss rate and the teratism rate of offspring whose placentas were inoculated with MCMV increased, and their body length, head circumference, and weight decreased. The hearing level of offspring both decreased at both 28- and 70-days post birth; the 70-day-old mice developed lower hearing levels than did the 28-day old mice. No significant inflammatory changes in the cochleae of the mice were observed. MCMV DNA signals were mainly detected in the spiral ganglion neurons and the endolymph area, but not in the perilymph area. The number of neurons decreased, and their ultrastructures changed. Moreover, with age, the number of neurons dramatically decreased, and the ultrastructural lesions of neurons became much more severe. Conclusions The results suggest that the direct injection of MCMV into the placenta may efficiently cause fetal infection and disturb the intrauterine development of the fetus, and placental inoculation itself has no obvious adverse effects on offspring. The reduction in the number of spiral ganglion neurons and the ultrastructural lesions of the neurons may be the major cause of congenital CMV infection-induced progressive SNHL.

  2. Developmental Toxicant Exposure Is Associated with Transgenerational Adenomyosis in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner-Tran, Kaylon L; Duleba, Antoni J; Taylor, Hugh S; Osteen, Kevin G

    2016-10-01

    The common environmental toxicant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or, commonly, dioxin) is a known endocrine disruptor that has been linked to the development of endometriosis in experimental models. Using a murine model, we previously demonstrated that in utero TCDD exposure promotes the transgenerational development of an "endometriosis-like" uterine phenotype consisting of reduced responsiveness to progesterone, subfertility and an increased risk of preterm birth. Since adenomyosis is frequently observed as a comorbidity in women with endometriosis, herein, we sought to determine the incidence of adenomyosis in non-pregnant mice with a history of direct or indirect TCDD exposure. Using histologic assessment and immunohistochemical staining, we analyzed murine uteri for adenomyosis, microvessel density and expression of estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ESR1 and ESR2). Our studies revealed that unexposed control mice did not exhibit adenomyosis while this disease was frequently observed in mice with a history of early life TCDD exposure. A transgenerational impact of developmental TCDD exposure was demonstrated since a subset of mice with only an indirect exposure (F3) also exhibited adenomyosis. Microvessel density within the uterus was significantly higher in all groups of TCDD exposed mice compared to control animals, with density correlated to the severity of disease. Both ESR1 and ESR2 protein exhibited alterations in expression in experimental mice compared to controls. Similar to women with endometriosis, we observed a significant reduction in the ratio of Esr1/Esr2 mRNA in all F1 mice compared to controls. Although this retrospective study was not designed to specifically address mechanisms associated with development of adenomyosis, our data suggest that developmental TCDD exposure permanently alters adult steroid responses which may contribute to the transgenerational development of adenomyosis. Copyright 2016 by The Society for the Study of

  3. Biomarkers of disease and treatment in murine and cynomolgus models of chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louten, Jennifer; Mattson, Jeanine D; Malinao, Maria-Christina; Li, Ying; Emson, Claire; Vega, Felix; Wardle, Robert L; Van Scott, Michael R; Fick, Robert B; McClanahan, Terrill K; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Beaumont, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    Biomarkers facilitate early detection of disease and measurement of therapeutic efficacy, both at clinical and experimental levels. Recent advances in analytics and disease models allow comprehensive screening for biomarkers in complex diseases, such as asthma, that was previously not feasible. Using murine and nonhuman primate (NHP) models of asthma, identify biomarkers associated with early and chronic stages of asthma and responses to steroid treatment. The total protein content from thymic stromal lymphopoietin transgenic (TSLP Tg) mouse BAL fluid was ascertained by shotgun proteomics analysis. A subset of these potential markers was further analyzed in BAL fluid, BAL cell mRNA, and lung tissue mRNA during the stages of asthma and following corticosteroid treatment. Validation was conducted in murine and NHP models of allergic asthma. Over 40 proteins were increased in the BAL fluid of TSLP Tg mice that were also detected by qRT-PCR in lung tissue and BAL cells, as well as in OVA-sensitive mice and house dust mite-sensitive NHP. Previously undescribed as asthma biomarkers, KLK1, Reg3γ, ITLN2, and LTF were modulated in asthmatic mice, and Clca3, Chi3l4 (YM2), and Ear11 were the first lung biomarkers to increase during disease and the last biomarkers to decline in response to therapy. In contrast, GP-39, LCN2, sICAM-1, YM1, Epx, Mmp12, and Klk1 were good indicators of early therapeutic intervention. In NHP, AMCase, sICAM-1, CLCA1, and GP-39 were reduced upon treatment with corticosteroids. These results significantly advance our understanding of the biomarkers present in various tissue compartments in animal models of asthma, including those induced early during asthma and modulated with therapeutic intervention, and show that BAL cells (or their surrogate, induced sputum cells) are a viable choice for biomarker examination.

  4. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the midbrain in a murine model of retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, D M; Carpenter, J L; O'Brien, J M; Kivela, T; Brauner, E; Tarkkanen, A; Virtanen, I; Albert, D M

    1991-02-01

    The first heritable model of retinoblastoma was established by retina-specific expression of simian virus 40 T-antigen (SV40 T-ag) in transgenic mice. Bilateral, multifocal ocular tumors were observed in 100% of transgene-bearing mice. Central nervous system neoplasms occurred at a lower rate (27%) and represented the murine counterpart of human trilateral retinoblastoma. The authors characterized the transgenic brain tumors and found them to be primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) of the midbrain. Murine brain tumors do not involve the pineal gland and most closely resemble undifferentiated suprasellar or parasellar tumors occasionally observed in human trilateral retinoblastoma. The murine malignancies arose from the subependymal cells of the cerebral aqueduct. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examination revealed that the transgenic brain tumors were undifferentiated and lacked all antigens associated with normal murine neuronal, glial, and ependymal cells.

  5. Hexanic fraction of turmeric powder attenuates murine model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The current study was conducted to further examine the antinociceptive activity of hexane fraction of turmeric powder (HFTP) and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of action underlying its antinociceptive activity in various experimental models of chemical- and thermal-induced nociception. Materials and ...

  6. Murine AIDS Protects Mice Against Experimental Cerebral Malaria: Down-Regulation by Interleukin 10 a T-Helper Type 1 CD4^+ Cell-Mediated Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckwalanga, Michel; Marussig, Myriam; Dias Tavares, Marisa; Bouanga, Jean Claude; Hulier, Elisabeth; Henriette Pavlovitch, Jana; Minoprio, Paola; Portnoi, Denis; Renia, Laurent; Mazier, Dominique

    1994-08-01

    The retrovirus LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus induces murine AIDS in C57BL/6 mice that has many similarities with human AIDS; Plasmodium berghei ANKA causes experimental cerebral malaria in the same strain of mice. The outcome of malaria infection was studied in mice concurrently infected with the two pathogens. The retrovirus significantly reduced the gravity of the neurological manifestations associated with Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection. The protection against experimental cerebral malaria induced by murine AIDS increased with duration of viral infection and, hence, with the severity of the immunodeficiency. Interleukin 10, principally from splenic T cells, was shown to play a crucial role in this protection.

  7. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV.Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations.Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  8. Experimental Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    and discuss techniques for handling and representing uncertainty when modelling in experimental system development. These techniques are centred on patterns and styles for handling uncertainty in object-oriented software architectures. Tools We present the Knight tool designed for collaborative modelling......This thesis examines object-oriented modelling in experimental system development. Object-oriented modelling aims at representing concepts and phenomena of a problem domain in terms of classes and objects. Experimental system development seeks active experimentation in a system development project...... through, e.g., technical prototyping and active user involvement. We introduce and examine “experimental object-oriented modelling” as the intersection of these practices. The contributions of this thesis are expected to be within three perspectives on models and modelling in experimental system...

  9. Vascular dysfunction in a murine model of severe hemolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Frei, Anne C.; Guo, Yihe; Jones, Deron W.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Fagan, Karen A.; Hogg, Neil; Wandersee, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrin is the backbone of the erythroid cytoskeleton; sph/sph mice have severe hereditary spherocytosis (HS) because of a mutation in the murine erythroid α-spectrin gene. sph/sph mice have a high incidence of thrombosis and infarction in multiple tissues, suggesting significant vascular dysfunction. In the current study, we provide evidence for both pulmonary and systemic vascular dysfunction in sph/sph mice. We found increased levels of soluble cell adhesion molecules in sph/sph mice, sug...

  10. Recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor 121 decreases vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in murine pre-eclampsia model placenta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Sulistyowati

    2016-11-01

    Mean VCAM-1 expression in normal (0.97 ± 0.54% murine placentas, compared with placentas (2.94 ± 0.96% of murine preeclampsia models (p=0.000, while mean VCAM-1 expression in placentas of murine preeclampsia models with VEGF intervention was 2.14 ± 0.68% (p=0.030. Conclusion Recombinant VEGF-121 can reduce VCAM-1 expression in placentas of murine preeclampsia models. The present study has shown the potential benefits of VEGF therapy, justifying serious consideration of this therapeutic approach for use in women with preeclampsia.

  11. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing.

  12. Role of CCL7 in Type I Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Experimental Allergic Conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chuan-Hui; Collins, Andrea M; Boettner, Douglas R; Yang, YanFen; Ono, Santa J

    2017-01-15

    Molecules that are necessary for ocular hypersensitivity reactions include the receptors CCR1 and CCR3; CCL7 is a ligand for these receptors. Therefore, we explored the role of CCL7 in mast cell activity and motility in vitro and investigated the requirement for CCL7 in a murine model of IgE-mediated allergic conjunctivitis. For mast cells treated with IgE and Ag, the presence of CCL7 synergistically enhanced degranulation and calcium influx. CCL7 also induced chemotaxis in mast cells. CCL7-deficient bone marrow-derived mast cells showed decreased degranulation following IgE and Ag treatment compared with wild-type bone marrow-derived mast cells, but there was no difference in degranulation when cells were activated via an IgE-independent pathway. In vivo, CCL7 was upregulated in conjunctival tissue during an OVA-induced allergic response. Notably, the early-phase clinical symptoms in the conjunctiva after OVA challenge were significantly higher in OVA-sensitized wild-type mice than in control challenged wild-type mice; the increase was suppressed in CCL7-deficient mice. In the OVA-induced allergic response, the numbers of conjunctival mast cells were lower in CCL7-deficient mice than in wild-type mice. Our results demonstrate that CCL7 is required for maximal OVA-induced ocular anaphylaxis, mast cell recruitment in vivo, and maximal FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation in vitro. A better understanding of the role of CCL7 in mediating ocular hypersensitivity reactions will provide insights into mast cell function and novel treatments for allergic ocular diseases. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models as determined by global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David Adrian; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is caused by a complex interplay between immune and barrier abnormalities. Murine models of AD are essential for preclinical assessments of new treatments. While many models have been used to simulate AD, their transcriptomic profiles are not fully understood, and a compari...

  14. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models, as determined by using global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David A.; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux

    2017-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is caused by a complex interplay between immune and barrier abnormalities. Murine models of AD are essential for preclinical assessments of new treatments. Although many models have been used to simulate AD, their transcriptomic profiles are not fully understood,...

  15. Assessing the accuracy and reproducibility of modality independent elastography in a murine model of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Jared A.; Flint, Katelyn M.; Sanchez, Violeta; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Cancer progression has been linked to mechanics. Therefore, there has been recent interest in developing noninvasive imaging tools for cancer assessment that are sensitive to changes in tissue mechanical properties. We have developed one such method, modality independent elastography (MIE), that estimates the relative elastic properties of tissue by fitting anatomical image volumes acquired before and after the application of compression to biomechanical models. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of the method using phantoms and a murine breast cancer model. Magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired, and the MIE method was used to estimate relative volumetric stiffness. Accuracy was assessed using phantom data by comparing to gold-standard mechanical testing of elasticity ratios. Validation error was elasticity imaging metric in a preclinical cancer model. Our results suggest that the MIE method can reproducibly generate accurate estimates of the relative mechanical stiffness and provide guidance on the degree of change needed in order to declare biological changes rather than experimental error in future therapeutic studies. PMID:26158120

  16. Murine breast cancer mastectomy model that predicts patient outcomes for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuta, Eriko; Rashid, Omar M; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2017-11-01

    Despite massive expenditures in preclinical studies, many breast cancer agents show efficacy in murine models but fail in human trials. In humans, metastatic disease determines survival, but preclinical murine models only evaluate drug efficacy against the primary tumor. We hypothesized that evaluating efficacy against metastatic breast cancer would more efficiently predict efficacy in a murine model than evaluating the primary tumor alone. This study (1) critically evaluated a murine tumor removal model with metastatic tumor burden quantification for breast cancer preclinical trials and (2) validated the model with an agent that previously passed preclinical trials but failed human trials. Tumorectomy and Halsted (radical) mastectomy procedures after inoculation of 4T1-luc2 cells were compared. The effect of AZD0530, an oral Src inhibitor that passed preclinical trials but failed human trials, was evaluated using an inoculation model with/without Halsted mastectomy. Significant amounts of residual disease were confirmed by bioluminescence (P = 0.003) and 100% developed local recurrence after tumorectomy versus 14% (P = 0.005) after Halsted mastectomy. Bioluminescence value at 15 min after luciferin injection highly correlated with peak except for 24 h after injection. AZD0530 significantly suppressed primary tumor burden compared with no treatment (P = 0.002); but not in lung metastases. In a Halsted mastectomy model, AZD0530 had no efficacy against lung metastases or difference in survival. We critically evaluated and established a murine mastectomy model to evaluate metastatic tumors. It provides a new model for preclinical drug development that mimics the human adjuvant setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Murine Cytomegalovirus Downregulates Interleukin-17 in Mice with Retrovirus-induced Immunosuppression that are Susceptible to Experimental Cytomegalovirus Retinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Emily L.; Chien, Hsin; Dix, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17), a proinflammatory cytokine produced by CD4+ Th17 cells, has been associated with the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases including uveitis. The fate of IL-17 during HIV/AIDS, however, remains unclear, and a possible role for IL-17 in the pathogenesis of AIDS-related diseases has not been investigated. Toward these ends, we performed studies using a well-established animal model of experimental murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) retinitis that develops in C57/BL6 mice with retrovirus-induced immunosuppression (MAIDS). After establishing baseline levels for IL-17 production in whole splenic cells of healthy mice, we observed a significant increase in IL-17 mRNA levels in whole splenic cells of mice with MAIDS of 4-weeks (MAIDS-4), 8-weeks (MAIDS-8), and 10-weeks (MAIDS-10) duration. In contrast, enriched populations of splenic CD4+ T cells, splenic macrophages, and splenic neutrophils exhibited a reproducible decrease in levels of IL-17 mRNA during MAIDS progression. To explore a possible role for IL-17 during the pathogenesis of MAIDS-related MCMV retinitis, we first demonstrated constitutive IL-17 expression in retinal photoreceptor cells of uninfected eyes of healthy mice. Subsequent studies, however, revealed a significant decrease in intraocular levels of IL-17 mRNA and protein in MCMV-infected eyes of MAIDS-10 mice during retinitis development. That MCMV infection might cause a remarkable downregulation of IL-17 production was supported further by the finding that systemic MCMV infection of healthy, MAIDS-4, or MAIDS-10 mice also significantly decreased IL-17 mRNA production by whole splenic CD4+ T cells. Based on additional studies using IL-10 −/− mice infected systemically with MCMV and IL-10 −/− mice with MAIDS infected intraocularly with MCMV, we propose that MCMV infection downregulates IL-17 production via stimulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3 and interleukin-10. PMID:23415673

  18. Histopathological study of Schistosoma mansoni infection in the murine model using the PC (Pará) and LILA (Maranhão) strains

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Igor da Costa; Santos, Vanessa RC dos; Souza, Vera LR Barros; Rodrigues, Izabel R de C

    2006-01-01

    Experimental models of Schistosoma mansoni infections in mammals have contributed greatly in understanding the pathology and pathogenesis of human infection. The absence of earlier reviews regarding specific strains of the Amazon region prompted research, which the main objective was to describe histopathological lesions in different phases of schistosomiasis in a murine model using PC (Pará) and LILA (Maranhão) S. mansoni strains. One hundred and eighty young female albino swiss mice (Mus mu...

  19. A Leishmania murine model to evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of Pythium insidiosum proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Maria Inêz-Ferreira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pythium insidiosum immunomodulatory vaccine (PiV has been tested in clinical and experimental pythiosis. Previous data showed that P. insidiosum immunogens have the ability to switch the Th2 immune response, normally in place during pythiosis, to a curative Th1 response. Pythiosis cannot be reproduced in experimental rodents with the exception of rabbits, and thus thorough evaluation of PiV´s immunomodulatory properties has been limited by the lack of a compatible inbred mouse model. In this study, we took advantage of the murine BALB/c Leishmania infection model, where infected mice produce a Th2 response, to evaluate the PiV Th2 to Th1 immunomodulatory potential. Twenty-one days following challenge with L. major, large cutaneous granulomas developed in control mice, consistent with the expected Th2 response. In contrast, Leishmania-induced cutaneous lesions in PiV-immunized mice were minimal or absent. Flow cytometry analysis of spleen cells from mice immunized with PiV and subsequently challenged with L. major displayed more CD4+ and CD8+ cells than the control group. Moreover, spleen cells from mice that were immunized with PiV then challenged with L. major secreted high levels of IFN-γ, with a moderate IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10 mixed cytokine profile upon in vitro re-stimulation with PiV. Anti-P. insidiosum IgG1 in immunized animals was present at low titers suggesting a minor immunological role for this Ig isotype in this model. Our preliminary data showed that BALB/c mice challenged with L. major represent an attractive model in which to study PiV´s immunomodulatory properties.

  20. A New Murine Model of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Frauscher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with mineral and bone disorder (MBD, which is the main cause of the extensively increased cardiovascular mortality in the CKD population. We now aimed to establish a new murine experimental CKD-MBD model. Dilute brown non-Agouti (DBA/2 mice were fed with high-phosphate diet for 4 (HPD4 or 7 (HPD7 days, then with standard chow diet (SCD and subsequently followed until day 84. They were compared to DBA/2 mice maintained on SCD during the whole study period. Both 4 and 7 days HPD-fed mice developed phosphate nephropathy with tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, decreased glomerular filtration rate, and increased serum urea levels. The abdominal aorta of HPD-treated mice showed signs of media calcification. Histomorphometric analysis of HPD-treated mice showed decreased bone volume/tissue volume, low mineral apposition rate, and low bone formation rate as compared to SCD-fed mice, despite increased parathyroid hormone levels. Overall, the observed phenotype was more pronounced in the HPD7 group. In summary, we established a new, noninvasive, and therefore easy to perform reproducible CKD-MBD model, which showed media calcification, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and low-turnover bone disease.

  1. Transcutaneous photodynamic therapy delays the onset of paralysis in a murine multiple sclerosis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, David W. C.; Leong, Simon; Levy, Julia G.; Chan, Agnes H.

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD, Verteporfin) and whole body irradiation, can affect the course of adoptively transferred experimental allergic (autoimmune) encephalomyelitis (EAE) in PL mice. Murine EAE is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease which serves as a model for human multiple sclerosis. Using a novel disease induction protocol, we found that mice characteristically developed EAE within 3 weeks of receipt of myelin basic protein (MBP)-sensitized, in vitro-cultured spleen or lymph node cells. However, if animals were treated with PDT (1 mg BPD/kg bodyweight and exposed to whole body 15 Joules cm2 of LED light) 24 hours after receiving these cells, disease onset time was significantly delayed. PDT-treated mice developed disease symptoms 45 +/- 3 days following cell administration whereas untreated controls were affected within 23 +/- 2 days. In contrast, application of PDT 48 or 120 hours following injection of the pathogenic cells had no significant effect upon the development of EAE. Experiments are in progress to account for the protective effect of PDT in this animal model. These studies should provide evidence on the feasibility of PDT as a treatment for human autoimmune disease.

  2. Anti-Lipid IgG Antibodies Are Produced via Germinal Centers in a Murine Model Resembling Human Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Reséndiz-Mora, Albany; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Zárate-Neira, Luz; Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Medina, Yolanda; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are produced in some mycobacterial infections and in certain autoimmune diseases [such as anti-phospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)]. However, few studies have addressed the B cell responses underlying the production of these immunoglobulins. Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are consistently found in a murine model resembling human lupus induced by chlorpromazine-stabilized non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA). NPA are transitory lipid associations found in the membranes of most cells; when NPA are stabilized they can become immunogenic and induce specific IgG antibodies, which appear to be involved in the development of the mouse model of lupus. Of note, anti-NPA antibodies are also detected in patients with SLE and leprosy. We used this model of lupus to investigate in vivo the cellular mechanisms that lead to the production of anti-lipid, class-switched IgG antibodies. In this murine lupus model, we found plasma cells (Gr1−, CD19−, CD138+) producing NPA-specific IgGs in the draining lymph nodes, the spleen, and the bone marrow. We also found a significant number of germinal center B cells (IgD−, CD19+, PNA+) specific for NPA in the draining lymph nodes and the spleen, and we identified in situ the presence of NPA in these germinal centers. By contrast, very few NPA-specific, extrafollicular reaction B cells (B220+, Blimp1+) were found. Moreover, when assessing the anti-NPA IgG antibodies produced during the experimental protocol, we found that the affinity of these antibodies progressively increased over time. Altogether, our data indicate that, in this murine model resembling human lupus, B cells produce anti-NPA IgG antibodies mainly via germinal centers. PMID:27746783

  3. Gender and dose dependent ovalbumin induced hypersensitivity responses in murine model of food allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    While federal regulations mandate the labeling of major food allergens, allowable food allergen thresholds have yet to be determined. Therefore the aim of this project was to identify the lowest egg allergen ovalbumin (OVA) dose causing hypersensitization using a validated murine model. Mice were or...

  4. Fetal wound healing using a genetically modified murine model: the contribution of P-selectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    During early gestation, fetal wounds heal with paucity of inflammation and absent scar formation. P-selectin is an adhesion molecule that is important for leukocyte recruitment to injury sites. We used a murine fetal wound healing model to study the specific contribution of P-selectin to scarless wo...

  5. Cytogenetics and experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toretsky, J A; Helman, L J

    1997-07-01

    The use of cytogenetics has led to significant improvement in the diagnoses and classification of sarcomas. Many of the major sarcomas have been to have characteristic tumor-specific chromosomal translocations that are currently used in the diagnosis of these tumors. In the past year, a subset of Ewing's family of tumors and myxoid liposarcomas, which lack one of the characteristic translocations, were found to carry related translocations. New technologies such as a spectral karyotyping will likely increase out ability to identify additional tumor-specific translocations. The emergence of genetic alterations as prognostic factors, as illustrated by Ewing's family of tumors, osteosarcoma, and p53 expression in soft tissue sarcomas in general, is discussed. The review concludes with laboratory applications derived from either tumor cytogenetic or gene function abnormalities that are related to tumor-specific translocations. It is anticipated that advances in diagnosis, prognosis, and modeling will translate into future therapeutic advances.

  6. Immune tolerance induction using fetal directed placental injection in rodent models: a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Takahashi

    Full Text Available Induction of the immune response is a major problem in replacement therapies for inherited protein deficiencies. Tolerance created in utero can facilitate postnatal treatment. In this study, we aimed to induce immune tolerance towards a foreign protein with early gestational cell transplantation into the chorionic villi under ultrasound guidance in the murine model.Pregnant C57BL/6 (B6 mice on day 10 of gestation were anesthetized and imaged by high resolution ultrasound. Murine embryos and their placenta were positioned to get a clear view in B-mode with power mode of the labyrinth, which is the equivalent of chorionic villi in the human. Bone marrow cells (BMCs from B6-Green Fluorescence Protein (B6GFP transgenic mice were injected into the fetal side of the placenta which includes the labyrinth with glass microcapillary pipettes. Each fetal mouse received 2 x 105 viable GFP-BMCs. After birth, we evaluated the humoral and cell-mediated immune response against GFP.Bone marrow transfer into fetal side of placenta efficiently distributed donor cells to the fetal mice. The survival rate of this procedure was 13.5%(5 out of 37. Successful engraftment of the B6-GFP donor skin grafts was observed in all recipient (5 out of 5 mice 6 weeks after birth. Induction of anti-GFP antibodies was completely inhibited. Cytotoxic immune reactivity of thymic cells against cells harboring GFP was suppressed by ELISPOT assay.In this study, we utilized early gestational placental injection targeting the murine fetus, to transfer donor cells carrying a foreign protein into the fetal circulation. This approach is sufficient to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune tolerance against the foreign protein.

  7. Immune tolerance induction using fetal directed placental injection in rodent models: a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kei; Endo, Masayuki; Miyoshi, Takekazu; Tsuritani, Mitsuhiro; Shimazu, Yukiko; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Saga, Kotaro; Tamai, Katsuto; Flake, Alan W; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Induction of the immune response is a major problem in replacement therapies for inherited protein deficiencies. Tolerance created in utero can facilitate postnatal treatment. In this study, we aimed to induce immune tolerance towards a foreign protein with early gestational cell transplantation into the chorionic villi under ultrasound guidance in the murine model. Pregnant C57BL/6 (B6) mice on day 10 of gestation were anesthetized and imaged by high resolution ultrasound. Murine embryos and their placenta were positioned to get a clear view in B-mode with power mode of the labyrinth, which is the equivalent of chorionic villi in the human. Bone marrow cells (BMCs) from B6-Green Fluorescence Protein (B6GFP) transgenic mice were injected into the fetal side of the placenta which includes the labyrinth with glass microcapillary pipettes. Each fetal mouse received 2 x 105 viable GFP-BMCs. After birth, we evaluated the humoral and cell-mediated immune response against GFP. Bone marrow transfer into fetal side of placenta efficiently distributed donor cells to the fetal mice. The survival rate of this procedure was 13.5%(5 out of 37). Successful engraftment of the B6-GFP donor skin grafts was observed in all recipient (5 out of 5) mice 6 weeks after birth. Induction of anti-GFP antibodies was completely inhibited. Cytotoxic immune reactivity of thymic cells against cells harboring GFP was suppressed by ELISPOT assay. In this study, we utilized early gestational placental injection targeting the murine fetus, to transfer donor cells carrying a foreign protein into the fetal circulation. This approach is sufficient to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune tolerance against the foreign protein.

  8. [Matricaria chamomilla (aqueous extract) improves atopic dermatitis-like lesions in a murine model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Bautista, Raúl Julián; García-González, Laura Lucelly; Ocádiz-González, Marco Antonio; Flores-Tochihuitl, Julia; García-Villaseñor, Arturo; González-Hernández, Margarita; Muñoz-Hernández, Liliana; Ortiz-Figuero, María Del Consuelo; Ramírez-Anaya, Marisol; Reyna-Téllez, Silvia; Villanueva-Sánchez, Octavio

    2017-01-01

    Matricaria Chamomilla L. (Mch), popularly known as chamomile, has been used for centuries as an herbolary remedy due to its broad clinical spectrum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Mch associated to a vehicle with emollient function in induced atopic dermatitis (AD)-like lesions in a murine model. AD was induced with dinitrochlorobenzene on 12 male seven-week old BALB/c mice. Animals were divided in three groups (control, GC; control negative, GCN; and experimental, GE). Liquid petrolatum was applied to the GCN and liquid petrolatum with aqueous extract of Mch at 7% to the GE. Induction and evolution of the lesions were verified by biopsy at 2nd and 6th week. Evaluation of peripheral blood cells to correlate inflammatory cells was made as well at the same weeks. Lesions were clinically evaluated at 2nd, 4th and 6th week. Scratching was monitored according to the observation methodology of Kobayashi et al. Mch aqueous extract associated to a vehicle with emollient function improves atopic dermatitis-like lesions after two weeks.

  9. [The role of changes in matrix metalloproteases and chitotriosidase in the mechanism of protective effect of atorvastatin in experimental murine lipemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolenko, T A; Cherkanova, M S; Savchenko, N G; Klishevich, M S

    2009-01-01

    The effect of atorvastatin on the activity of chitotriosidase (CTO) and total matrix metalloproteases (MMPs)-new markers of cardiovascular disorder-was studied on the model of murine lipemia induced by single administration of Triton WR 1339 in two doses, 500 mg/kg (mild lipemia) and 850 mg/kg (severe lipemia). A hypolipidemic effect of atorvastatin was observed in mice with mild lipemia, but not in those with severe lipemia. In both mild and severe lipemia cases, the serum CTO activity was increased upon the combined administration of atorvastatin and Triton WR 1339, correlating with cholesterol and triglyceride concentration. The total serum MMP activity decreased only in experiments with atorvastatin administration to intact mice. In mice with experimental lipemia induced by Triton WR 1339, the administration of atorvastatin also increased the ALT and AST activity in the blood serum.

  10. A Novel Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome Accelerates Aortopathy and Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Nicholas B; Qian, Lan; Westergaard, Nicole M; Kutschke, William J; Born, Ella J; Turek, Joseph W

    2017-08-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) represents a genetic disorder with variable phenotypic expression. The main cardiovascular sequelae of MFS include aortic aneurysm/dissection and cardiomyopathy. Although significant advances in the understanding of transforming growth factor beta signaling have led to promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of aortopathy, clinical studies have tempered this optimism. In particular, these studies suggest additional signaling pathways that play a significant role in disease progression. To date, studies aimed at elucidating molecular mechanisms involved in MFS-induced disease progression have been hampered by the lack of an accelerated disease model. Wild-type B6.129 mice and MFS Fbn1(C1039G/+) mice underwent subcutaneous, cervical osmotic minipump installation with sodium chloride (wild-type mice, n = 39; MFS mice, n = 12) or angiotensin II, 4.5 mg/kg daily (wild-type mice, n = 11; MFS mice; n = 35) for as long as 28 days. Hemodynamic measurements were obtained throughout the experiment. Aortas and hearts were analyzed by transthoracic echocardiography and histopathology study. This accelerated murine MFS model replicates increased mortality from MFS-related maladies (20.0%, 39.3%, and 52.9% at 10, 14, and 28 days, respectively). Aortic diameters in accelerated MFS mice were significantly enlarged at 10 days after minipump implantation and correlated with a higher degree of elastin fragmentation. Accelerated MFS mice also demonstrated dilated cardiomyopathy at 14 days, even without aortic insufficiency, suggesting an intrinsic etiology. A novel in vivo model consisting of subcutaneously delivered angiotensin II in MFS mice reproducibly causes accelerated aortic aneurysm formation and cardiomyopathy. This model allows for better investigation of MFS sequelae by rapid experimental processes. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Antiprotozoal drug nitazoxanide enhances parasitemia, tissue lesions and mortality caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Reyes, Juan Salvador; Melnikov, Valery; Dobrovinskaya, Oxana; Rodriguez-Hernández, Alejandrina; Wookee-Zea, Cristina; Pimientel-Rodrigez, Víctor; Rueda-Valdovinos, Gabriela; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; López-Lemus, Uriel A; Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Chagas' disease is caused by unicellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). It is endemic throughout Latin America, but nowadays has become a global challenge due to tourism and migration. Non-treated infection may result in health-threatening complications and lead to death. Current medications for this infection are nifurtimox (NFT) and benznidazol. Both drugs may cause side effects and are ineffective in the chronic phase. Therefore, new antichagasic compounds are urgently required. Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a broad spectrum antiparasitic drug, proposed recently as a potential candidate to be added to the list of essential medicines for integrated neglected tropical disease control and elimination. Although the effect of NTZ against T. cruzi epimastigotes in vitro was reported, the corresponding experiments in animal models of T. cruzi infection have never been undertaken. The present work was designed to fill this gap and evaluate the effect of NTZ on experimental murine trypanosomiasis, in comparison with classical antichagasic agent NFT. Highly sensitive to T. cruzi BALB/c mice were infected using Albarrada T. cruzi strain, recently isolated in Mexico. Experimental groups were either left untreated, or otherwise treated with NFT, NTZ (100 and 1000 mg/kg), or with both drugs simultaneously. The severity of the infection was estimated based on criteria such as parasitemia, lesions in target tissues (heart, muscles and lungs) and mortality. Despite the expected protective effect, NTZ drastically aggravates the course of T. cruzi infection. Namely, parasitemia, tissue lesions and mortality caused by T. cruzi infection were significantly higher in NTZ-treated mice groups, even in comparison with untreated infected animals. NTZ by itself no produced mortality o tissue damage, and NFT showed an expected protective effect. Our results indicate that NTZ cannot be considered for Chagas' disease treatment. Moreover, NTZ should be used with caution in patients

  12. A Murine Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peri-Implant Mucositis and Peri-Implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirih, Flavia Q; Hiyari, Sarah; Leung, Ho-Yin; Barroso, Ana D V; Jorge, Adrian C A; Perussolo, Jeniffer; Atti, Elisa; Lin, Yi-Ling; Tetradis, Sotirios; Camargo, Paulo M

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants are a widely used treatment option for tooth replacement. However, they are susceptible to inflammatory diseases such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, which are highly prevalent and may lead to implant loss. Unfortunately, the understanding of the pathogenesis of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis is fragmented and incomplete. Therefore, the availability of a reproducible animal model to study these inflammatory diseases would facilitate the dissection of their pathogenic mechanisms. The objective of this study is to propose a murine model of experimental peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. Screw-shaped titanium implants were placed in the upper healed edentulous alveolar ridges of C57BL/6J mice 8 weeks after tooth extraction. Following 4 weeks of osseointegration, Porphyromonas gingivalis -lipolysaccharide (LPS) injections were delivered to the peri-implant soft tissues for 6 weeks. No-injections and vehicle injections were utilized as controls. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were assessed clinically, radiographically (microcomputerized tomograph [CT]), and histologically following LPS-treatment. LPS-injections resulted in a significant increase in soft tissue edema around the head of the implants as compared to the control groups. Micro-CT analysis revealed significantly greater bone loss in the LPS-treated implants. Histological analysis of the specimens demonstrated that the LPS-group had increased soft tissue vascularity, which harbored a dense mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, and the bone exhibited noticeable osteoclast activity. The induction of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis in mice via localized delivery of bacterial LPS has been demonstrated. We anticipate that this model will contribute to the development of more effective preventive and therapeutic approaches for these 2 conditions.

  13. A murine model of elastase- and cigarette smoke-induced emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubia Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe a murine model of emphysema induced by a combination of exposure to cigarette smoke (CS and instillation of porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE. Methods: A total of 38 C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups: control (one intranasal instillation of 0.9% saline solution; PPE (two intranasal instillations of PPE; CS (CS exposure for 60 days; and CS + PPE (two intranasal instillations of PPE + CS exposure for 60 days. At the end of the experimental protocol, all animals were anesthetized and tracheostomized for calculation of respiratory mechanics parameters. Subsequently, all animals were euthanized and their lungs were removed for measurement of the mean linear intercept (Lm and determination of the numbers of cells that were immunoreactive to macrophage (MAC-2 antigen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-12, and glycosylated 91-kDa glycoprotein (gp91phox in the distal lung parenchyma and peribronchial region. Results: Although there were no differences among the four groups regarding the respiratory mechanics parameters assessed, there was an increase in the Lm in the CS + PPE group. The numbers of MAC-2-positive cells in the peribronchial region and distal lung parenchyma were higher in the CS + PPE group than in the other groups, as were the numbers of cells that were positive for MMP-12 and gp91phox, although only in the distal lung parenchyma. Conclusions: Our model of emphysema induced by a combination of PPE instillation and CS exposure results in a significant degree of parenchymal destruction in a shorter time frame than that employed in other models of CS-induced emphysema, reinforcing the importance of protease-antiprotease imbalance and oxidant-antioxidant imbalance in the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  14. Characterization of murine hepatitis virus (JHM) RNA from rats with experimental encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1984-09-01

    When Wistar Furth rats are inoculated intracerebrally with the murine hepatitis virus JHM they often develop a demyelinating disease with resulting hind leg paralysis. Using an RNA transfer procedure and hybridization kinetic analysis, the virus-specific RNA in these rats was characterized. The pattern of JHM-specific RNA varied with individual infections of Wistar Furth rats. However, two species of JHM-specific RNA, the nucleocapsid and a 2.1-2.4 X 10(6)-Da RNA species were generally present. A general decrease in JHM-specific RNA in brains and spinal cord samples taken later than 20 days postinoculation was observed; however, JHM-specific RNA persisted in the spinal cord longer than in the brain of these rats.

  15. PEMFC modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, J.V.C. [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br; Ordonez, J.C.; Martins, L.S. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Advanced Power Systems], Emails: ordonez@caps.fsu.edu, martins@caps.fsu.edu

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a simplified and comprehensive PEMFC mathematical model introduced in previous studies is experimentally validated. Numerical results are obtained for an existing set of commercial unit PEM fuel cells. The model accounts for pressure drops in the gas channels, and for temperature gradients with respect to space in the flow direction, that are investigated by direct infrared imaging, showing that even at low current operation such gradients are present in fuel cell operation, and therefore should be considered by a PEMFC model, since large coolant flow rates are limited due to induced high pressure drops in the cooling channels. The computed polarization and power curves are directly compared to the experimentally measured ones with good qualitative and quantitative agreement. The combination of accuracy and low computational time allow for the future utilization of the model as a reliable tool for PEMFC simulation, control, design and optimization purposes. (author)

  16. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells.

  17. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack

    2006-01-01

    An engineering course, Simulation and Experimental Modeling, has been developed that is based on a method for direct estimation of physical parameters in dynamic systems. Compared with classical system identification, the method appears to be easier to understand, apply, and combine with physical...

  18. Establishment of a model of murine odontoblasts underexpressing PKD1 using shRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thivichon-Prince, B; Labert, N; Couble, Ml; Bleicher, F

    2013-07-10

    We have previously shown that PKD1, the gene encoding Polycystin-1 (or TRPP1) is expressed in human odontoblasts and that this protein is localized at the primary cilium of the cell. Nevertheless, its function remain unclear in this cell even if studies on osteoblasts, osteocytes and chondrocytes give TRPP1 as a promising candidate for mechanotransduction in response to mechanical stress. Consequently, to evaluate the role of TRPP1 in this transduction process, we needed first to generate an in vitro murine model down expressing Pkd1. Using lentivirus-mediated shRNA technology, we obtained a 60% suppression of Pkd1 mRNA expression in transfected MO6-G3 cells associated with a decrease of cell proliferation. Thus, establishment of this murine odontoblast model underexpressing Pkd1 associated with applied mechanical forces (compression or shear stress) will allow us to go further in the determination of TRPP1 involvement in odontoblasts mechanotransduction.

  19. Effect of Control-released Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Incorporated in β-Tricalcium Phosphate for Murine Cranial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Shimizu, MD

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that control-released bFGF incorporated in β-TCP can accelerate bone regeneration in the murine cranial defect model and may be promising for the clinical treatment of cranial defects.

  20. Cannabidiol increases survival and promotes rescue of cognitive function in a murine model of cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, A C; Brant, F; Miranda, A S; Machado, F S; Teixeira, A L

    2015-03-19

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication resulting from Plasmodium falciparum infection that might cause permanent neurological deficits. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotomimetic compound of Cannabis sativa with neuroprotective properties. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of CBD in a murine model of CM. Female mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) and treated with CBD (30mg/kg/day - 3 or 7days i.p.) or vehicle. On 5th day-post-infection (dpi), at the peak of the disease), animals were treated with single or repeated doses of Artesunate, an antimalarial drug. All groups were tested for memory impairment (Novel Object Recognition or Morris Water Maze) and anxiety-like behaviors (Open field or elevated plus maze test) in different stages of the disease (at the peak or after the complete clearance of the disease). Th1/Th2 cytokines and neurotrophins (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF)) were measured in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of experimental groups. PbA-infected mice displayed memory deficits and exhibited increase in anxiety-like behaviors on the 5dpi or after the clearance of the parasitemia, effects prevented by CBD treatment. On 5dpi, TNF-α and IL-6 increased in the hippocampus, while only IL-6 increased in the prefrontal cortex. CBD treatment resulted in an increase in BDNF expression in the hippocampus and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus (TNF-α) and prefrontal cortex (IL-6). Our results indicate that CBD exhibits neuroprotective effects in CM model and might be useful as an adjunctive therapy to prevent neurological symptoms following this disease. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Through-skull vasculature assessment using fluorescence brain imaging on murine models at around 800 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Gau, Yung-Tian A.; Rahmim, Arman; Wong, Dean F.; Bergles, Dwight E.; Kang, Jin U.

    2017-02-01

    We describe a scanning near-infrared fluorescence imager for through-skull non-invasive brain imaging on live murine models. The captured photoluminescence feature through scattering media was enhanced using a high sensitivity scientific CMOS sensor with the obtained spatial resolution of 15.63 μm, depth of field of 5 mm and an average local signal-to-noise ratio of 37.5 dB.

  2. Acute and chronic exposure to Tyrophagus putrescentiae induces allergic pulmonary response in a murine model

    OpenAIRE

    Nu?ez, Nail? Karine; da Cunha, Aline Andrea; dos Santos Dutra, Mois?s; Barbosa, Gustavo Leivas; Morassutti, Alessandra Loureiro; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Antunes, G?ssica Luana; Silveira, Josiane Silva; da Silva, Guilherme Liberato; Pitrez, Paulo M?rcio

    2016-01-01

    Background Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Tp) is a source of aeroallergen that causes allergic diseases. Objective To describe an acute and chronic murine model of allergic asthma with Tp extract with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvant. Methods Mites from dust sample were cultured and a raw extract was produced. Female BALB/c mice (6-8 weeks) were challenged intranasally with Tp extract or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline, for 10 consecutive days (acute protocol) or for 6 weeks (...

  3. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model

    OpenAIRE

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A.; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Forsberg, Anya I.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×106 breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast a...

  4. Alternans in genetically modified Langendorff-perfused murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian N Sabir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between alternans and arrhythmogenicity was studied in genetically modified murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT during Langendorff perfusion, before and after treatment with catecholamines and a β-adrenergic antagonist. Heterozygous (RyR2p/s and homozygous (RyR2s/s RyR2-P2328S hearts, and wild-type (WT controls, were studied before and after treatment with epinephrine (100 nM and 1 µM and propranolol (100 nM. Monophasic action potential recordings demonstrated significantly greater incidences of arrhythmia in RyR2s/p and RyR2s/s hearts as compared to WTs. Arrhythmogenicity in RyR2s/s hearts was associated with alternans, particularly at short baseline cycle lengths. Both phenomena were significantly accentuated by treatment with epinephrine and significantly diminished by treatment with propranolol, in full agreement with clinical expectations. These changes took place, however, despite an absence of changes in action potential durations, ventricular effective refractory periods or restitution curve characteristics. Furthermore pooled data from all hearts in which arrhythmia occurred demonstrated significantly greater alternans magnitudes, but similar restitution curve slopes, to hearts that did not demonstrate arrhythmia. These findings thus further validate the RyR2-P2328S murine heart as a model for human CPVT, confirming an alternans phenotype in common with murine genetic models of the Brugada syndrome and the congenital long-QT syndrome type 3. In contrast to these latter similarities, however, this report demonstrates the dissociation of alternans from changes in the properties of restitution curves for the first time in a murine model of a human arrhythmic syndrome.

  5. [Establishment of the retrovirus-mediated murine model with MLL-AF9 leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Si-Miao; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Mi; Zhao, Xue-Jiao; Qin, Yu; Zhang, Pei-Ling; Yuan, Rui-Feng; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Fang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to establish a retrovirus-mediated murine model with MLL-AF9 leukemia, so as to provide a basis for further investigation of the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategy of MLL associated leukemia. Murine (CD45.2) primary hematopoietic precursor positively selected for expression of the progenitor marker c-Kit by means of MACS were transduced with a retrovirus carrying MLL-AF9 fusion gene. After cultured in vitro, the transduced cells were injected intravenously through the tail vein into the lethally irradiated mice (CD45.1). PCR, flow cytometry and morphological observation were employed to evaluate the murine leukemia model system. The results showed that MLL-AF9 fusion gene was expressed in the infected cells, and the cells had a dramatically enhanced potential to generate myeloid colonies with primitive and immature morphology. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the immortalized cells highly expressed myeloid lineage surface markers Gr-1 and Mac-1. Moreover, the expression levels of Hoxa9 and Meis1 mRNA were significantly higher in the MLL-AF9 cells than that in control. The mice transplanted with MLL-AF9 cells displayed typical signs of leukemia within 6-12 weeks. Extensive infiltration leukemic cells was observed in the Wright-Giemsa stained peripheral blood smear and bone marrow, and also in the histology of liver and spleen. Flow cytometric analysis of the bone marrow and spleen cells demonstrated that the CD45.2 populations expressed highly myeloid markers Gr-1 and Mac-1. The leukemic mice died within 12 weeks. It is concluded that the retrovirus-mediated murine model with MLL-AF9 leukemia is successfully established, which can be applied in the subsequent researches.

  6. Differential effect of protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) on survival of experimental murine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarra, I; Collado, A; Garcia Lora, A; Garrido, F

    1999-03-01

    The effect of protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) on the survival of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice after intravenous injections of syngeneic murine sarcomas (GR9.B9 and Meth-A), LSTRA lymphoma and B16 melanoma cells was studied. Pretreatment of mice with PSK significantly increased survival after the injection of either type of sarcoma cells, although the effect was attenuated when high numbers of cells were injected. Survival was not modified significantly in LSTRA lymphoma or B16 melanoma. Mice pretreated with anti-asialo GMI serum showed significantly decreased survival from all tumors in comparison with untreated mice injected with tumors, regardless of cell dose used. We observed an inverse correlation between H-2 antigen expression and in vitro NK sensitivity of tumor cells from all lines except B16 melanoma cells. These results clearly suggest that pretreatment of mice with PSK prolongs survival and inhibits metastasis formation in mice injected with sarcoma cells, being this effect highly selective, since survival was not improved in mice injected with LSTRA lymphoma or B16 melanoma.

  7. Genetic deletion of dectin-1 does not affect the course of murine experimental colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinsbroek Sigrid EM

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is believed that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD result from an imbalance in the intestinal immune response towards the luminal microbiome. Dectin-1 is a widely expressed pattern recognition receptor that recognizes fungi and upon recognition it mediates cytokine responses and skewing of the adaptive immune system. Hence, dectin-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. Methods We assessed the responses of dectin-1 deficient macrophages to the intestinal microbiota and determined the course of acute DSS and chronic Helicobacter hepaticus induced colitis in dectin-1 deficient mice. Results We show that the mouse intestinal microbiota contains fungi and the cytokine responses towards this microbiota were significantly reduced in dectin-1 deficient macrophages. However, in two different colitis models no significant differences in the course of inflammation were found in dectin-1 deficient mice compared to wild type mice. Conclusions Together our data suggest that, although at the immune cell level there is a difference in response towards the intestinal flora in dectin-1 deficient macrophages, during intestinal inflammation this response seems to be redundant since dectin-1 deficiency in mice does not affect intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis.

  8. Efficacy of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and antibiotics in therapy of experimental murine staphylococcal mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M S; Ford, C W; Yancey, R J

    1994-05-01

    The mouse model was used to determine the efficacy of the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and antibiotic in treatment of experimentally induced staphylococcal mastitis. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha alone administered to the mammary glands of lactating mice recruited significantly more polymorphonuclear neutrophils into the gland by 4 h posttreatment than did the untreated control. One hundred times less recombinant mouse tumor necrosis factor-alpha than human tumor necrosis factor-alpha was required to enhance the killing of Staphylococcus aureus within the gland. Human tumor necrosis factor-alpha effectively enhanced the killing of the bacteria when it was administered 4 to 0 h prior to infection, but not 4 h after infection. When mice were first pretreated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha, infected, and then treated with antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and pirlimycin, but not cloxacillin), the combination of antibiotic and cytokine significantly reduced the number of bacteria within the gland compared with that for mice treated with antibiotic alone, cytokine alone, or placebo. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha may be an effective adjunct to antimicrobial therapy in treatment of staphylococcal mastitis in the bovine.

  9. Protective effects of astaxanthin from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on murine gastric ulcer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenta; Oyagi, Atsushi; Takahira, Dai; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishibashi, Takashi; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of astaxanthin extracted from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on gastric mucosal damage in murine gastric ulcer models. Mice were pretreated with astaxanthin for 1 h before ulcer induction. Gastric ulcers were induced in mice by oral administration of hydrochloride (HCl)/ethanol or acidified aspirin. The effect of astaxanthin on lipid peroxidation in murine stomach homogenates was also evaluated by measuring the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). The free radical scavenging activities of astaxanthin were also measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Astaxanthin significantly decreased the extent of HCl/ethanol- and acidified aspirin-induced gastric ulcers. Astaxanthin also decreased the level of TBARS. The ESR measurement showed that astaxanthin had radical scavenging activities against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and the superoxide anion radical. These results suggest that astaxanthin has antioxidant properties and exerts a protective effect against ulcer formation in murine models. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Enhanced Laws textures: A potential MRI surrogate marker of hepatic fibrosis in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojun; Jara, Hernan; Yu, Heishun; O'Brien, Michael; Soto, Jorge; Anderson, Stephan W

    2017-04-01

    To compare enhanced Laws textures derived from parametric proton density (PD) maps to other MRI surrogate markers (T 2 , PD, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)) in assessing degrees of liver fibrosis in an ex vivo murine model of hepatic fibrosis imaged using 11.7T MRI. This animal study was IACUC approved. Fourteen male, C57BL/6 mice were divided into control and experimental groups. The latter were fed a 3,5-dicarbethoxy-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) supplemented diet to induce hepatic fibrosis. Ex vivo liver specimens were imaged using an 11.7T scanner, from which the parametric PD, T 2 , and ADC maps were generated from spin-echo pulsed field gradient and multi-echo spin-echo acquisitions. A sequential enhanced Laws texture analysis was applied to the PD maps: automated dual-clustering algorithm, optimal thresholding algorithm, global grayscale correction, and Laws texture features extraction. Degrees of fibrosis were independently assessed by digital image analysis (a.k.a. %Area Fibrosis). Scatterplot graphs comparing enhanced Laws texture features, T 2 , PD, and ADC values to degrees of fibrosis were generated and correlation coefficients were calculated. Hepatic fibrosis and the enhanced Laws texture features were strongly correlated with higher %Area Fibrosis associated with higher Laws textures (r=0.89). Without the proposed enhancements, only a moderate correlation was detected between %Area Fibrosis and unenhanced Laws texture features (r=0.70). Correlation also existed between %Area Fibrosis and ADC (r=0.86), PD (r=0.65), and T 2 (r=0.66). Higher degrees of hepatic fibrosis are associated with increased Laws textures. The proposed enhancements could improve the accuracy of Laws texture features significantly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Combined high-fat diet and sustained high sucrose consumption promotes NAFLD in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Hamdan-Pérez, Nashla; Tovar, Armando R; Ordaz-Nava, Guillermo; Martínez-Benítez, Braulio; Torre-Villalvazo, Iván; Morán-Ramos, Sofía; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Noriega, Lilia G; Hiriart, Marcia; Medina-Santillán, Roberto; Castillo-Hernandez, María del Carmen; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum; Uribe, Misael; Torres, Nimbe

    2015-01-01

    The study of NAFLD in humans has several limitations. Using murine models helps to understand disease pathogenesis. Evaluate the impact of 4 different diets in the production of NAFLD with emphasis on a combined high-fat plus sustained high sucrose consumption. Eight week-old male Wistar rats were divided in four groups and fed for 90 days with the following diets: 1) Control chow diet (C); 2) High-fat cholesterol diet (HFC) + 5% sucrose in drinking water. 3) High-fat cornstarch diet (HFCO) + 5% sucrose in drinking water. 4) Chow diet + 20% sucrose in drinking water (HSD). Metabolic changes, leptin levels, liver histology, hepatic and plasma lipid composition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and liver gene expression of FAS, SREBP-1 and PPAR-α were evaluated. The HFC diet had the highest grade of steatosis (grade 2 of 3) and HSD showed also steatosis (grade 1). Liver weight TG and colesterol concentrations in liver were greater in the HFC diet. There were no increased levels of iron in the liver. Rats in HFC gained significantly more weight (P < 0.001). All experimental groups showed fasting hyperglycemia. HFC had the highest glucose level (158.5 ± 7 mg/dL) (P < 0.005). The HSD and the HFCO diets developed also hyperglycemia. HSD had significantly higher fasting hyperinsulinemia. Serum leptin was higher in the HFC diet (p = 0.001). In conclusion, the HFC diet with combination of high fat and high sucrose is more effective in producing NAFLD compared with a high sucrose diet only.

  12. Development of a radiofrequency ablation platform in a clinically relevant murine model of hepatocellular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaoqiang; Li, Guangfu; Liu, Dai; Motamarry, Anjan; Huang, Xiangwei; Wolfe, A. Marissa; Helke, Kristi L.; Haemmerich, Dieter; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F; Kimchi, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    RFA is used in treatment of patients with hepatocellular cancer (HCC); however, tumor location and size often limit therapeutic efficacy. The absence of a realistic animal model and a radiofrequency ablation (RFA) suitable for small animals presents significant obstacles in developing new strategies. To establish a realistic RFA platform that allows the development of effective RFA-integrated treatment in an orthotopic murine model of HCC, a human cardiac radiofrequency generator was modified for murine use. Parameters were optimized and RFA was then performed in normal murine livers and HCCs. The effects of RFA were monitored by measuring the ablation zone and transaminases. The survival of tumor-bearing mice with and without RFA was monitored, ablated normal liver and HCCs were evaluated macroscopically and histologically. We demonstrated that tissue-mimicking media was able to optimize RFA parameters. Utilizing this information we performed RFA in normal and HCC-bearing mice. RFA was applied to hepatic parenchyma and completely destroyed small tumors and part of large tumors. Localized healing of the ablation and normalization of transaminases occurred within 7 days post RFA. RFA treatment extended the survival of small tumor-bearing mice. They survived at least 5 months longer than the controls; however, mice with larger tumors only had a slight therapeutic effect after RFA. Collectively, we performed RFA in murine HCCs and observed a significant therapeutic effect in small tumor-bearing mice. The quick recovery of tumor-bearing mice receiving RFA mimics observations in human subjects. This platform provides us a unique opportunity to study RFA in HCC treatment. PMID:26537481

  13. Adapting human videofluoroscopic swallow study methods to detect and characterize dysphagia in murine disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Teresa E; Braun, Sabrina M; Brooks, Ryan T; Harris, Rebecca A; Littrell, Loren L; Neff, Ryan M; Hinkel, Cameron J; Allen, Mitchell J; Ulsas, Mollie A

    2015-03-01

    This study adapted human videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) methods for use with murine disease models for the purpose of facilitating translational dysphagia research. Successful outcomes are dependent upon three critical components: test chambers that permit self-feeding while standing unrestrained in a confined space, recipes that mask the aversive taste/odor of commercially-available oral contrast agents, and a step-by-step test protocol that permits quantification of swallow physiology. Elimination of one or more of these components will have a detrimental impact on the study results. Moreover, the energy level capability of the fluoroscopy system will determine which swallow parameters can be investigated. Most research centers have high energy fluoroscopes designed for use with people and larger animals, which results in exceptionally poor image quality when testing mice and other small rodents. Despite this limitation, we have identified seven VFSS parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice when using a high energy fluoroscope in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol. We recently obtained a low energy fluoroscopy system with exceptionally high imaging resolution and magnification capabilities that was designed for use with mice and other small rodents. Preliminary work using this new system, in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol, has identified 13 swallow parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice, which is nearly double the number obtained using conventional (i.e., high energy) fluoroscopes. Identification of additional swallow parameters is expected as we optimize the capabilities of this new system. Results thus far demonstrate the utility of using a low energy fluoroscopy system to detect and quantify subtle changes in swallow physiology that may otherwise be overlooked when using high energy fluoroscopes to investigate murine disease models.

  14. Non-invasive Loading Model of Murine Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Blandine

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is the commonest degenerative joint disease, leading to joint pain and disability. The mouse has been the primary animal used for research, due to its size, relatively short lifespan, and the availability of genetically modified animals. Importantly, they show pathogenesis similar to osteoarthritis in humans. Mechanical loading is a major risk factor for osteoarthritis, and various mouse models have been developed to study the role and effects of mechanics on health and disease in various joints. This review describes the main mouse models used to non-invasively apply mechanical loads on joints. Most of the mouse models of osteoarthritis target the knee, including repetitive loading and joint injury such as ligament rupture, but a few studies have also characterised models for elbow, temporomandibular joint, and whole-body vibration spinal loading. These models are a great opportunity to dissect the influences of various types of mechanical input on joint health and disease.

  15. THE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF OSTEONECROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Netylko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigation for the purpose of modeling of knee osteonecrosis were performed in 36 rats. The chronic renal insufficiency by means of left nephrectomy and electrocoagulation in 25% cortical substance of right kidney was induced before 6 months till experiment with subsequent introduction of 0,1% adrenalin solution and methylprednisolone in paraarticular structures. The results of experiment showed the polyetiologic feature of disease.

  16. Simultaneous administration of vitamin A and DTP vaccine modulates the immune response in a murine cerebral malaria model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, L; Jørgensen, M J; Ravn, H

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organisation recommends vitamin A supplementation (VAS) to children aged 6 months to 5 years in low-income countries, and for logistic reasons, this has been linked to routine childhood immunizations. Observational studies suggest that VAS given with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis ......The World Health Organisation recommends vitamin A supplementation (VAS) to children aged 6 months to 5 years in low-income countries, and for logistic reasons, this has been linked to routine childhood immunizations. Observational studies suggest that VAS given with diphtheria......-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine may increase mortality from non-targeted diseases. We investigated the non-targeted effect of pretreatment with VAS and DTP vaccine in a murine model of experimental cerebral malaria. Our a priori hypothesis was that VAS/DTP would aggravate the infection. We found that the effect of VAS...

  17. The updated experimental proteinoid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.; Przybylski, A.; Syren, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental proteinoid model includes new results indicating that polymers sufficiently rich in basic amino acid catalyze the synthesis of peptides from ATP and amino acids and of oligonucleotides from ATP. The need for simulation syntheses of amino acids yielding significant proportions of basic amino acids is now in focus. The modeled simultaneous protocellular synthesis of peptides and polynucleotides is part of a more comprehensive proposal for the origin of the coded genetic mechanism. The finding of membrane and action potentials in proteinoid microspheres, with or without added lecithin, is reported. The crucial nature of a nonrandom matrix for protocells is developed.

  18. Comparison of sepsis-induced transcriptomic changes in a murine model to clinical blood samples identifies common response patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro eLambeck

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental models, mimicking physiology and molecular dynamics of diseases in human, harbor the possibility to study the effect of interventions and transfer results from bench to bedside. Recent advances in high-throughput technologies, standardized protocols and inte-gration of knowledge from databases yielded rising consistency and usability of results for inter-species comparisons. Here, we explored similarities and dissimilarities in gene expres-sion from blood samples of a murine sepsis model (peritoneal contamination and infection, PCI and patients from the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU measured by microarrays. Applying a consistent pre-processing and analysis workflow, differentially expressed genes (DEG from PCI and PICU data significantly overlapped. A major fraction of DEG was commonly expressed and mapped to adaptive and innate immune response related pathways, whereas the minor fraction, including the chemokine (C-C motif ligand 4, exhibited constant inter-species disparities. Reproducibility of transcriptomic observations was validated experimentally in PCI. These data underline, that inter-species comparison can obtain commonly expressed transcriptomic features despite missing homologues and different protocols. Our findings point towards a high suitability of an animal sepsis model and further experimental efforts in order to transfer results from animal experiments to the bedside.

  19. FDG small animal PET permits early detection of malignant cells in a xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Trespidi, Silvia; Ambrosini, Valentina; Castellucci, Paolo; Farsad, Mohsen; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano [Azienda Ospedaliera di Bologna Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Leo, Korinne di; Tonelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea [University of Bologna, Sant' Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Bologna (Italy); Pettinato, Cinzia [Azienda Ospedaliera di Bologna Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Physics, Bologna (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [Ospedale S. Maria della Misericordia, Service of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rovigo (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    The administration of new anticancer drugs in animal models is the first step from in vitro to in vivo pre-clinical protocols. At this stage it is crucial to ensure that cells are in the logarithmic phase of growth and to avoid vascular impairment, which can cause inhomogeneous distribution of the drug within the tumour and thus lead to bias in the final analysis of efficacy. In subcutaneous xenograft murine models, positivity for cancer is visually recognisable 2-3 weeks after inoculation, when a certain amount of necrosis is usually already present. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of FDG small animal PET for the early detection of malignant masses in a xenograft murine model of human rhabdomyosarcoma. A second goal was to analyse the metabolic behaviour of this xenograft tumour over time. We studied 23 nude mice, in which 7 x 10{sup 6} rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RH-30 cell line) were injected in the dorsal subcutaneous tissues. Each animal underwent four FDG PET scans (GE, eXplore Vista DR) under gas anaesthesia. The animals were studied 2, 5, 14 and 20 days after inoculation. We administered 20 MBq of FDG via the tail vein. Uptake time was 60 min, and acquisition time, 20 min. Images were reconstructed with OSEM 2D iterative reconstruction and the target to background ratio (TBR) was calculated for each tumour. Normal subcutaneous tissue had a TBR of 0.3. Necrosis was diagnosed when one or more cold areas were present within the mass. All the animals were sacrificed and histology was available to verify PET results. PET results were concordant with the findings of necropsy and histology in all cases. The incidence of the tumour was 69.6% (16/23 animals); seven animals did not develop a malignant mass. Ten of the 23 animals had a positive PET scan 2 days after inoculation. Nine of these ten animals developed a tumour; the remaining animal became negative, at the third scan. The positive predictive value of the early PET scan was 90% (9/10 animals

  20. A murine model for virotherapy of malignant brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gambini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBMs are very aggressive and almost incurable brain tumors. The development of new therapeutical approaches capable of selectively killing cancer cells could represent a step forward to fight cancer. With this aim we tested the efficacy of a novel oncolytic therapy based on recombinant herpes simplex viruses (HSVs infecting exclusively cells expressing the human receptor HER-2 [1, 2], overexpressed in about 15% of GBM model based on PDGF-B embryonic transduction [4, 5]. We engineered cell cultures derived from this model to express HER-2 and we injected intracranically such cultures in NOD/SCID mice. We evaluated the efficacy of R-LM113, a recombinant HSV directed to HER-2, in this glioma model expressing HER-2. We demostrated that mice injected with engineered glioma cells infected with R-LM113 developed glioma with a statistically significant delay compared to mice injected with non-infected engineered glioma cells.

  1. Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Experimental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, E; Burdette, JE; Kenny, HA; Matei, D; Pilrose, J; Haluska, P.; Nephew, KP; Hales, DB; Stack, MS

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) is associated with high mortality and, as the majority (>75%) of women with OvCa have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, rates of survival have not changed appreciably over 30 years. A mechanistic understanding of OvCa initiation and progression is hindered by the complexity of genetic and/or environmental initiating events and lack of clarity regarding the cell(s) or tissue(s) of origin. Metastasis of OvCa involves direct extension or exfoliation of cells and cellular aggregates into the peritoneal cavity, survival of matrix-detached cells in a complex ascites fluid phase, and subsequent adhesion to the mesothelium lining covering abdominal organs to establish secondary lesions containing host stromal and inflammatory components. Development of experimental models to recapitulate this unique mechanism of metastasis presents a remarkable scientific challenge and many approaches used to study other solid tumors (lung, colon, and breast, for example) are not transferable to OvCa research given the distinct metastasis pattern and unique tumor microenvironment. This review will discuss recent progress in the development and refinement of experimental models to study OvCa. Novel cellular, three-dimensional organotypic, and ex vivo models are considered and the current in vivo models summarized. The review critically evaluates currently available genetic mouse models of OvCa, the emergence of xenopatients, and the utility of the hen model to study OvCa prevention, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance. As these new approaches more accurately recapitulate the complex tumor microenvironment, it is predicted that new opportunities for enhanced understanding of disease progression, metastasis and therapeutic response will emerge. PMID:23934194

  2. Murine models susceptibility to distinct Trypanosoma cruzi I genotypes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Cielo M; Montilla, Marleny; Vanegas, Ricardo; Castillo, Maria; Parra, Edgar; Ramírez, Juan David

    2017-04-01

    Chagas disease is a complex zoonosis that affects around 8 million people worldwide. This pathology is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, a kinetoplastid parasite that shows tremendous genetic diversity evinced in six distinct Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI) including a recent genotype named as TcBat and associated with anthropogenic bats. TcI presents a broad geographical distribution and has been associated with chronic cardiomyopathy. Recent phylogenetic studies suggest the existence of two genotypes (Domestic (TcIDom) and sylvatic TcI) within TcI. The understanding of the course of the infection in different mouse models by these two genotypes is not yet known. Therefore, we infected 126 animals (ICR-CD1, National Institute of Health (NIH) and Balb/c) with two TcIDom strains and one sylvatic strain for a follow-up period of 60 days. We quantified the parasitaemia, immune response and histopathology observing that the maximum day of parasitaemia was achieved at day 21 post-infection. Domestic strains showed higher parasitaemia than the sylvatic strain in the three mouse models; however in the survival curves Balb/c mice were less susceptible to infection compared with NIH and ICR-CD1. Our results suggest that the genetic background plays a fundamental role in the natural history of the infection and the sympatric TcI genotypes have relevant implications in disease pathogenesis.

  3. A new murine model of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouer, Martin; Meilhac, Olivier; Delbosc, Sandrine; Louedec, Liliane; Pavon-Djavid, Graciela; Cross, Jane; Legagneux, Josette; Bouilliant-Linet, Maxime; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Alsac, Jean-Marc

    2013-07-07

    Endovascular aneurysm exclusion is a validated technique to prevent aneurysm rupture. Long-term results highlight technique limitations and new aspects of Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pathophysiology. There is no abdominal aortic aneurysm endograft exclusion model cheap and reproducible, which would allow deep investigations of AAA before and after treatment. We hereby describe how to induce, and then to exclude with a covered coronary stentgraft an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a rat. The well known elastase induced AAA model was first reported in 1990(1) in a rat, then described in mice(2). Elastin degradation leads to dilation of the aorta with inflammatory infiltration of the abdominal wall and intra luminal thrombus, matching with human AAA. Endovascular exclusion with small covered stentgraft is then performed, excluding any interactions between circulating blood and the aneurysm thrombus. Appropriate exclusion and stentgraft patency is confirmed before euthanasia by an angiography thought the left carotid artery. Partial control of elastase diffusion makes aneurysm shape different for each animal. It is difficult to create an aneurysm, which will allow an appropriate length of aorta below the aneurysm for an easy stentgraft introduction, and with adequate proximal and distal neck to prevent endoleaks. Lots of failure can result to stentgraft introduction which sometimes lead to aorta tear with pain and troubles to stitch it, and endothelial damage with post op aorta thrombosis. Giving aspirin to rats before stentgraft implantation decreases failure rate without major hemorrhage. Clamping time activates neutrophils, endothelium and platelets, and may interfere with biological analysis.

  4. Prevention of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis by recombinant human interleukin-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lu; Itoh, Masahiro; Ablake, Maila

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of exogenously administered recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6 on the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in C3H/Hej mice. IL-6 significantly reduced histological signs of EAO and appearance of delayed type hypersensitivity against the immunizing testicul...

  5. Prevention of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis by recombinant human interleukin-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Lu; Itoh, Masahiro; Ablake, Maila

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of exogenously administered recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6 on the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in C3H/Hej mice. IL-6 significantly reduced histological signs of EAO and appearance of delayed type hypersensitivity against the immunizing testicular...

  6. CMV infection attenuates the disease course in a murine model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Pirko

    Full Text Available Recent evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS suggests that active CMV infection may result in more benign clinical disease. The goal of this pilot study was to determine whether underlying murine CMV (MCMV infection affects the course of the Theiler's murine encephalitis virus (TMEV induced murine model of MS. A group of eight TMEV-infected mice were co-infected with MCMV at 2 weeks prior to TMEV infection while a second group of TMEV-infected mice received MCMV two weeks post TMEV. We also used 2 control groups, where at the above time points MCMV was replaced with PBS. Outcome measures included (1 monthly monitoring of disability via rotarod for 8 months; (2 in vivo MRI for brain atrophy studies and (3 FACS analysis of brain infiltrating lymphocytes at 8 months post TMEV infection. Co-infection with MCMV influenced the disease course in mice infected prior to TMEV infection. In this group, rotarod detectable motor performance was significantly improved starting 3 months post-infection and beyond (p≤0.024. In addition, their brain atrophy was close to 30% reduced at 8 months, but this was only present as a trend due to low power (p = 0.19. A significant reduction in the proportion of brain infiltrating CD3+ cells was detected in this group (p = 0.026, while the proportion of CD45+ Mac1+ cells significantly increased (p = 0.003. There was also a strong trend for a reduced proportion of CD4+ cells (p = 0.17 while CD8 and B220+ cell proportion did not change. These findings support an immunomodulatory effect of MCMV infection in this MS model. Future studies in this co-infection model will provide insight into mechanisms which modulate the development of demyelination and may be utilized for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  7. The effectiveness of domestic cook on inactivation of murine norovirus in experimentally infected Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffan, A; Brutti, A; De Pasquale, A; Cappellozza, E; Pascoli, F; Cigarini, M; Di Rocco, M; Terregino, C; Arcangeli, G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of domestic cooking in inactivating Manila clams experimentally infected with murine norovirus (MNV). A cooking pan was modified to enable electronic temperature probes to be positioned to record both flesh and environment temperature. Manila clams were infected with 10(4) TCID 50% ml(-1) of MNV. The infected whole-in-shell clams, divided into three replicates, were cooked on an electric stove, and groups of nine clams were removed from the pan at fixed intervals. Pools of three digestive glands were examined by virus isolation to ascertain residual viral load. Results showed that 10 min of cooking by a traditional domestic method at a temperature close to 100°C, for at least 2 min, can completely devitalize the MNV in infected clams. This is generally the time needed for the majority of valves to open up. At present, it is highly recommended to label all lagoon products as 'requiring cooking before consumption', but no specifications are given on how long and at what temperature they should be cooked. Our results can provide the consumer with useful indications on how to cook clams to prevent any risk of foodborne illness. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Newly Characterized Murine Undifferentiated Sarcoma Models Sensitive to Virotherapy with Oncolytic HSV-1 M002

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    Eric K. Ring

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in conventional chemotherapy, surgical techniques, and radiation, outcomes for patients with relapsed, refractory, or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas are dismal. Survivors often suffer from lasting morbidity from current treatments. New targeted therapies with less toxicity, such as those that harness the immune system, and immunocompetent murine sarcoma models to test these therapies are greatly needed. We characterized two new serendipitous murine models of undifferentiated sarcoma (SARC-28 and SARC-45 and tested their sensitivity to virotherapy with oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1. Both models expressed high levels of the primary HSV entry molecule nectin-1 (CD111 and were susceptible to killing by interleukin-12 (IL-12 producing HSV-1 M002 in vitro and in vivo. M002 resulted in a significant intratumoral increase in effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and activated monocytes, and a decrease in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in immunocompetent mice. Compared to parent virus R3659 (no IL-12 production, M002 resulted in higher CD8:MDSC and CD8:T regulatory cell (Treg ratios, suggesting that M002 creates a more favorable immune tumor microenvironment. These data provide support for clinical trials targeting sarcomas with oncolytic HSV-1. These models provide an exciting opportunity to explore combination therapies for soft tissue sarcomas that rely on an intact immune system to reach full therapeutic potential.

  9. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy.

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    Estefanía de Munck

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA, a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS.

  10. KML001 Displays Vascular Disrupting Properties and Irinotecan Combined Antitumor Activities in a Murine Tumor Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Hoon Moon; Seung Ju Lee; Ho Yong Lee; Jong Cheol Lee; Heejeong Cha; Wha Ja Cho; Jeong Woo Park; Hyun Jin Park; Jin Seo; Young Han Lee; Ho-Taek Song; Young Joo Min

    2013-01-01

    KML001 is sodium metaarsenite, and has shown cytotoxic activity in human tumor cell lines. The anti-cancer mechanism of KML001 involves cancer cell destruction due to DNA damage at the telomeres of cancer cell chromosomes. In this study, we assessed the vascular disrupting properties of KML001 and investigated whether KML001 as VDA is able to increase anti-tumor activity in irinotecan combined treatment. We used a murine model of the CT26 colon carcinoma cell line. CT26 isograft mice treated ...

  11. Experimental animal models of osteonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Meng; Peng, Jiang; Qin, Ling; Lu, Shibi

    2011-08-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) or avascular necrosis (AVN) is a common bone metabolic disorder, mostly affecting femoral head. Although many biological, biophysical, and surgical methods have been tested to preserve the femoral head with ON, none has been proven fully satisfactory. It lacks consensus on an optimal approach for treatment. This is due, at least in part, to the lack of ability to systematically compare treatment efficacy using an ideal animal model that mimics full-range osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) in humans with high incidence of joint collapse accompanied by reparative reaction adjacent to the necrotic bone in a reproducible and accessible way. A number of preclinical animal ON models have been established for testing potential efficacy of various modalities developed for prevention and treatment of ON before introduction into clinics for potential applications. This paper describes a number of different methods for creating animal experimental ON models. Advantages and disadvantages of such models are also discussed as reference for future research in battle against this important medical condition.

  12. Production and characterization of murine models of classic and intermediate maple syrup urine disease

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    Watkins Simon

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase. MSUD has several clinical phenotypes depending on the degree of enzyme deficiency. Current treatments are not satisfactory and require new approaches to combat this disease. A major hurdle in developing new treatments has been the lack of a suitable animal model. Methods To create a murine model of classic MSUD, we used gene targeting and embryonic stem cell technologies to create a mouse line that lacked a functional E2 subunit gene of branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase. To create a murine model of intermediate MSUD, we used transgenic technology to express a human E2 cDNA on the knockout background. Mice of both models were characterized at the molecular, biochemical, and whole animal levels. Results By disrupting the E2 subunit gene of branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase, we created a gene knockout mouse model of classic MSUD. The homozygous knockout mice lacked branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase activity, E2 immunoreactivity, and had a 3-fold increase in circulating branched-chain amino acids. These metabolic derangements resulted in neonatal lethality. Transgenic expression of a human E2 cDNA in the liver of the E2 knockout animals produced a model of intermediate MSUD. Branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase activity was 5–6% of normal and was sufficient to allow survival, but was insufficient to normalize circulating branched-chain amino acids levels, which were intermediate between wildtype and the classic MSUD mouse model. Conclusion These mice represent important animal models that closely approximate the phenotype of humans with the classic and intermediate forms of MSUD. These animals provide useful models to further characterize the pathogenesis of MSUD, as well as models to test novel therapeutic strategies, such as gene and cellular therapies, to treat this devastating

  13. Hybrid FMT-CT imaging of amyloid-beta plaques in a murine Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Damon; de Kleine, Ruben; MacLaurin, Sarah A; Miller, Eric; Brooks, Dana H; Krucker, Thomas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2009-02-15

    The need to study molecular and functional parameters of Alzheimer's disease progression in animal models has led to the development of disease-specific fluorescent markers. However, curved optical interfaces and a highly heterogeneous internal structure make quantitative fluorescence imaging of the murine brain a particularly challenging tomographic problem. We investigated the integration of X-ray computed tomography (CT) information into a state-of-the-art fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) scheme and establish that the dual-modality approach is essential for high fidelity reconstructions of distributed fluorescence within the murine brain, as compared to conventional fluorescence tomography. We employ this method in vivo using a fluorescent oxazine dye to quantify amyloid-beta plaque burden in transgenic APP23 mice modeling Alzheimer's disease. Multi-modal imaging allows for accurate signal localization and correlation of in vivo findings to ex vivo studies. The results point to FMT-CT as an essential tool for in vivo study of neurodegenerative disease in animal models and potentially humans.

  14. Diaphragm atrophy and contractile dysfunction in a murine model of pulmonary hypertension.

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    Bumsoo Ahn

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH causes loss of body weight and inspiratory (diaphragm muscle dysfunction. A model of PH induced by drug (monocrotaline, MCT has been extensively used in mice to examine the etiology of PH. However, it is unclear if PH induced by MCT in mice reproduces the loss of body weight and diaphragm muscle dysfunction seen in patients. This is a pre-requisite for widespread use of mice to examine mechanisms of cachexia and diaphragm abnormalities in PH. Thus, we measured body and soleus muscle weight, food intake, and diaphragm contractile properties in mice after 6-8 weeks of saline (control or MCT (600 mg/kg injections. Body weight progressively decreased in PH mice, while food intake was similar in both groups. PH decreased (P<0.05 diaphragm maximal isometric specific force, maximal shortening velocity, and peak power. Protein carbonyls in whole-diaphragm lysates and the abundance of select myofibrillar proteins were unchanged by PH. Our findings show diaphragm isometric and isotonic contractile abnormalities in a murine model of PH induced by MCT. Overall, the murine model of PH elicited by MCT mimics loss of body weight and diaphragm muscle weakness reported in PH patients.

  15. Oral Bromelain Attenuates Inflammation in an Ovalbumin-Induced Murine Model of Asthma

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    Eric R. Secor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromelain, a widely used pineapple extract with cysteine protease activity, has been shown to have immunomodulatory effects in a variety of immune system models. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of orally administered bromelain in an ovalbumin (OVA-induced murine model of acute allergic airway disease (AAD. To establish AAD, female C57BL/6J mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal (i.p. OVA/alum and then challenged with OVA aerosols for 3 days. Mice were gavaged with either (phosphate buffered salinePBS or 200 mg/kg bromelain in PBS, twice daily for four consecutive days, beginning 1 day prior to OVA aerosol challenge. Airway reactivity and methacholine sensitivity, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cellular differential, Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13, and lung histology were compared between treatment groups. Oral bromelain-treatment of AAD mice demonstrated therapeutic efficacy as evidenced by decreased methacholine sensitivity (P ≤ 0.01, reduction in BAL eosinophils (P ≤ 0.02 and IL-13 concentrations (P ≤ 0.04 as compared with PBS controls. In addition, oral bromelain significantly reduced BAL CD19+ B cells (P ≤ 0.0001 and CD8+ T cells (P ≤ 0.0001 in AAD mice when compared with controls. These results suggest that oral treatment with bromelain had a beneficial therapeutic effect in this murine model of asthma and bromelain may also be effective in human conditions.

  16. Ube3a reinstatement identifies distinct developmental windows in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, Sara; van Woerden, Geeske M; Bruinsma, Caroline F; Mientjes, Edwin; Jolfaei, Mehrnoush Aghadavoud; Distel, Ben; Kushner, Steven A; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-05-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that results from loss of function of the maternal ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) allele. Due to neuron-specific imprinting, the paternal UBE3A copy is silenced. Previous studies in murine models have demonstrated that strategies to activate the paternal Ube3a allele are feasible; however, a recent study showed that pharmacological Ube3a gene reactivation in adulthood failed to rescue the majority of neurocognitive phenotypes in a murine AS model. Here, we performed a systematic study to investigate the possibility that neurocognitive rescue can be achieved by reinstating Ube3a during earlier neurodevelopmental windows. We developed an AS model that allows for temporally controlled Cre-dependent induction of the maternal Ube3a allele and determined that there are distinct neurodevelopmental windows during which Ube3a restoration can rescue AS-relevant phenotypes. Motor deficits were rescued by Ube3a reinstatement in adolescent mice, whereas anxiety, repetitive behavior, and epilepsy were only rescued when Ube3a was reinstated during early development. In contrast, hippocampal synaptic plasticity could be restored at any age. Together, these findings suggest that Ube3a reinstatement early in development may be necessary to prevent or rescue most AS-associated phenotypes and should be considered in future clinical trial design.

  17. Shigella mediated depletion of macrophages in a murine breast cancer model is associated with tumor regression.

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    Katharina Galmbacher

    Full Text Available A tumor promoting role of macrophages has been described for a transgenic murine breast cancer model. In this model tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent a major component of the leukocytic infiltrate and are associated with tumor progression. Shigella flexneri is a bacterial pathogen known to specificly induce apotosis in macrophages. To evaluate whether Shigella-induced removal of macrophages may be sufficient for achieving tumor regression we have developed an attenuated strain of S. flexneri (M90TDeltaaroA and infected tumor bearing mice. Two mouse models were employed, xenotransplantation of a murine breast cancer cell line and spontanous breast cancer development in MMTV-HER2 transgenic mice. Quantitative analysis of bacterial tumor targeting demonstrated that attenuated, invasive Shigella flexneri primarily infected TAMs after systemic administration. A single i.v. injection of invasive M90TDeltaaroA resulted in caspase-1 dependent apoptosis of TAMs followed by a 74% reduction in tumors of transgenic MMTV-HER-2 mice 7 days post infection. TAM depletion was sustained and associated with complete tumor regression.These data support TAMs as useful targets for antitumor therapy and highlight attenuated bacterial pathogens as potential tools.

  18. Establishment of a new murine elastase-induced aneurysm model combined with transplantation.

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    Zuzanna Rowinska

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to develop a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm formation combined with aortic transplantation.Adult male mice (n = 6-9 per group underwent infrarenal, orthotopic transplantation of the aorta treated with elastase or left untreated. Subsequently, both groups of mice were monitored by ultrasound until 7 weeks after grafting.Mice receiving an elastase-pretreated aorta developed aneurysms and exhibited a significantly increased diastolic vessel diameter compared to control grafted mice at 7 week after surgery (1.11 ± 0.10 mm vs. 0.75 ± 0.03 mm; p ≤ 0,001. Histopathological examination revealed disruption of medial elastin, an increase in collagen content and smooth muscle cells, and neointima formation in aneurysm grafts.We developed a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm combined with aortic transplantation. This model may be suitable to investigate aneurysm-specific inflammatory processes and for use in gene-targeted animals.

  19. Murine model imitating chronic wound infections for evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy efficacy

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    Grzegorz Fila

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens.The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 µM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24-48 hr delay in pathogen expansion for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and we noticed longer growth suppression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for chronic wound infections.

  20. Curcumin Ingestion Inhibits Mastocytosis and Suppresses Intestinal Anaphylaxis in a Murine Model of Food Allergy.

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    Shannon R M Kinney

    Full Text Available IgE antibodies and mast cells play critical roles in the establishment of allergic responses to food antigens. Curcumin, the active ingredient of the curry spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory properties, and thus may have the capacity to regulate Th2 cells and mucosal mast cell function during allergic responses. We assessed whether curcumin ingestion during oral allergen exposure can modulate the development of food allergy using a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA-induced intestinal anaphylaxis. Herein, we demonstrate that frequent ingestion of curcumin during oral OVA exposure inhibits the development of mastocytosis and intestinal anaphylaxis in OVA-challenged allergic mice. Intragastric (i.g. exposure to OVA in sensitized BALB/c mice induced a robust IgE-mediated response accompanied by enhanced OVA-IgE levels, intestinal mastocytosis, elevated serum mMCP-1, and acute diarrhea. In contrast, mice exposed to oral curcumin throughout the experimental regimen appeared to be normal and did not exhibit intense allergic diarrhea or a significant enhancement of OVA-IgE and intestinal mast cell expansion and activation. Furthermore, allergic diarrhea, mast cell activation and expansion, and Th2 responses were also suppressed in mice exposed to curcumin during the OVA-challenge phase alone, despite the presence of elevated levels of OVA-IgE, suggesting that curcumin may have a direct suppressive effect on intestinal mast cell activation and reverse food allergy symptoms in allergen-sensitized individuals. This was confirmed by observations that curcumin attenuated the expansion of both adoptively transferred bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs, and inhibited their survival and activation during cell culture. Finally, the suppression of intestinal anaphylaxis by curcumin was directly linked with the inhibition of NF-κB activation in curcumin-treated allergic mice, and curcumin inhibited the phosphorylation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB in BMMCs. In

  1. Multivariate modelling with 1H NMR of pleural effusion in murine cerebral malaria

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    Ghosh Soumita

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral malaria is a clinical manifestation of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Although brain damage is the predominant pathophysiological complication of cerebral malaria (CM, respiratory distress, acute lung injury, hydrothorax/pleural effusion are also observed in several cases. Immunological parameters have been assessed in pleural fluid in murine models; however there are no reports of characterization of metabolites present in pleural effusion. Methods 1H NMR of the sera and the pleural effusion of cerebral malaria infected mice were analyzed using principal component analysis, orthogonal partial least square analysis, multiway principal component analysis, and multivariate curve resolution. Results It has been observed that there was 100% occurrence of pleural effusion (PE in the mice affected with CM, as opposed to those are non-cerebral and succumbing to hyperparasitaemia (NCM/HP. An analysis of 1H NMR and SDS-PAGE profile of PE and serum samples of each of the CM mice exhibited a similar profile in terms of constituents. Multivariate analysis on these two classes of biofluids was performed and significant differences were detected in concentrations of metabolites. Glucose, creatine and glutamine contents were high in the PE and lipids being high in the sera. Multivariate curve resolution between sera and pleural effusion showed that changes in PE co-varied with that of serum in CM mice. The increase of glucose in PE is negatively correlated to the glucose in serum in CM as obtained from the result of multiway principal component analysis. Conclusions This study reports for the first time, the characterization of metabolites in pleural effusion formed during murine cerebral malaria. The study indicates that the origin of PE metabolites in murine CM may be the serum. The loss of the components like glucose, glutamine and creatine into the PE may worsen the situation of patients, in conjunction with the enhanced

  2. Phytochemical profiles and biological activity evaluation of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim seed against asthma in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weizhuo; Xie, Qiangmin; Guan, Jian; Jin, Saihong; Zhao, Yuqing

    2014-03-28

    Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim seed (ZBMS) has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as an ingredient of polyherbal formulations for the treatment of inflammation and asthma. The aim of this study was to analyze the major composition and to evaluate the anti-asthma activity of ZBMS. Some murine models including acetylcholine/histamine-induced asthma, ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, ear edema and toe swelling measurement, citric acid-induced cough, and anti-stress abilities were investigated to fully study the anti-asthma activity of ZBMS.GC chromatography was also performed to analyze the major fatty acid composition of ZBMS. The results demonstrated that the major fatty acid composition of ZBMS includes oleic acid (20.15%), linoleic acid (26.54%), and α-linolenic acid (30.57%), which was the leading component of ZBMS, and that the total fatty acid content of ZBMS was 77.27%. The murine models demonstrated that ZBMS displays a protective effect on guinea pig sensitization, a dose-dependent inhibition of the increases in RL and decreases in Cdyn, which resulted in the relief of auricle edema and toe swelling in mice and anti-stress activity. Our results validate the traditional use of ZBMS for the treatment of asthma and other inflammatory joint disorders, and suggest that ZBMS has potential as a new therapeutic agent for asthma management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantifying mechanical properties in a murine fracture healing system using inverse modeling: preliminary work

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    Miga, Michael I.; Weis, Jared A.; Granero-Molto, Froilan; Spagnoli, Anna

    2010-03-01

    Understanding bone remodeling and mechanical property characteristics is important for assessing treatments to accelerate healing or in developing diagnostics to evaluate successful return to function. The murine system whereby mid-diaphaseal tibia fractures are imparted on the subject and fracture healing is assessed at different time points and under different therapeutic conditions is a particularly useful model to study. In this work, a novel inverse geometric nonlinear elasticity modeling framework is proposed that can reconstruct multiple mechanical properties from uniaxial testing data. To test this framework, the Lame' constants were reconstructed within the context of a murine cohort (n=6) where there were no differences in treatment post tibia fracture except that half of the mice were allowed to heal 4 days longer (10 day, and 14 day healing time point, respectively). The properties reconstructed were a shear modulus of G=511.2 +/- 295.6 kPa, and 833.3+/- 352.3 kPa for the 10 day, and 14 day time points respectively. The second Lame' constant reconstructed at λ=1002.9 +/-42.9 kPa, and 14893.7 +/- 863.3 kPa for the 10 day, and 14 day time points respectively. An unpaired Student t-test was used to test for statistically significant differences among the groups. While the shear modulus did not meet our criteria for significance, the second Lame' constant did at a value pfracture healing research community were not found to be statistically significant.

  4. Immunotoxicity and allergic potential induced by topical application of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) in a murine model.

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    Anderson, Stacey E; Franko, Jennifer; Anderson, Katie L; Munson, Albert E; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B Jean

    2013-01-01

    Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is an industrial chemical, used as a paint and adhesive solvent, with the potential for significant increases in production. Using select immune function assays, the purpose of these studies was to evaluate the immunotoxicity of DMC following dermal exposure using a murine model. Following a 28-day exposure, DMC produced a significant decrease in thymus weight at concentrations of 75% and greater. No effects on body weight, hematological parameters (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and their differentials), or immune cell phenotyping (B-cells, T-cells, and T-cell sub-sets) were identified. The IgM antibody response to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was significantly reduced in the spleen but not the serum. DMC was not identified to be an irritant and evaluation of the sensitization potential, conducted using the local lymph node assay (LLNA) at concentrations ranging from 50-100%, did not identify increases in lymphocyte proliferation. These results demonstrate that dermal exposure to DMC induces immune suppression in a murine model and raise concern about potential human exposure and the need for occupational exposure regulations.

  5. The effect of rupatadine on lung histopathology in a murine model of chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, Tuba; Karaman, Meral; Firinci, Fatih; Uysal, Pinar; Kiray, Muge; Bagriyanik, Alper H; Yilmaz, Osman; Karaman, Ozkan; Uzuner, Nevin

    2013-03-01

    Rupatadine is a new second-generation antihistamine with H(1) receptor antagonist activity and platelet-activating factor antagonist properties. This study aimed to investigate the effect of rupatadine on histologic changes in the lungs in a murine model of chronic asthma. Thirty-five BALB/c mice were divided into five groups of seven mice each: group I (control), group II (placebo [saline]), group III (dexamethasone 1 mg · kg(-1)·d(-1)), group IV (rupatadine 3 mg·kg(-1) d(-1)), and group V (rupatadine 30 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)). Groups II through V were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin and treated once per day via the oral route (gavage). Animals were sacrificed 24 h after the last treatment was administered. Airway histopathology was evaluated using light and electron microscopy in all groups. There were no significant differences observed in any of the histologic parameters between groups II and IV. There were significantly thinner basement membrane, subepithelial smooth muscle layer, and epithelia were significantly thinner in group V than in group II (p Rupatadine had a beneficial effect on histologic changes in a chronic murine model of asthma.

  6. SEP-induced activity and its thermographic cortical representation in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Ruff, Roman; Kirsch, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    This article is a methodical report on the generation of reproducible changes in brain activity in a murine model. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) are used to generate synchronized cortical activity. After electrical stimulation of mice forelimbs, the potentials were recorded with a flexible thin-film polyimide electrode structure directly from the cortex. Every registration included a simultaneous recording from both hemispheres that repeated four times to reproduce and compare the results. The SEPs in the murine model were shown to generate a very stable signal. The latency of the second positive wave (P2 wave) ranged between 16 and 19 ms, and the N1-P2 amplitude ranged between 39 and 48 µV. In addition, the temperature distribution of the cortex was acquired using infrared thermography. Surface cortical temperature changed during electrical stimulation without a clear hemispheric correlation. These initial results could be a step toward a better understanding of the different synchronized cortical activities and basic methods of evaluation of various mathematical algorithms to detect them.

  7. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

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    Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jia, Dongwei, E-mail: jiadongwei@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  8. Investigation of the temporal humoral immune response in a murine model of actinomycetoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, M del C; Torres, J A; Zlotnik, H

    1996-06-01

    The murine model of actinomycetoma offers the potential of studying many unknown aspects of this infection. In this work, the model was used to investigate the temporal humoral immune response to actinomycetoma agents. Groups of 7- to 9-week-old female BALB/c mice were inoculated in one of the hind footpads with one of four different Nocardia strains. To mimic the constant exposure of infected humans to the virulent soil inhabiting agents, a second injection consisting of live nocardiae in incomplete Freund's adjuvant was administered five months after the first one. Murine serum samples were collected throughout the study and their IgM and IgM titers were determined by ELISA and the Western blot assay. The results obtained indicate that the ELISA titers increased as the infection progressed and this correlated with a greater number of antigen bands being recognized in the blots. Overall, however, the ELISA titers were lower for the N. brasiliensis infected mice than those of the N. asteroides ones. This observation may be indicative of an immunosuppressive state and is worthy of further investigation.

  9. Pre-clinical efficacy and dosing of an AAV8 vector expressing human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase in a murine model of methylmalonic acidemia (MMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Randy J; Venditti, Charles P

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT), delivered using an AAV serotype 8 vector, rescues the lethal phenotype displayed by mice with MMA and provides long-term phenotypic correction. In addition to defining a lower limit of effective dosing, our studies establish that neither a species barrier to mitochondrial processing nor an apparent immune response to MUT limits the murine model as an experimental platform to test the efficacy of human gene therapy vectors for MMA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Antibacterial efficacy of Withania somnifera (ashwagandha) an indigenous medicinal plant against experimental murine salmonellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owais, M; Sharad, K S; Shehbaz, A; Saleemuddin, M

    2005-03-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the antibacterial activity of ashwagandha [Withania somnifera L. Dunal (Solanaceae; root and leaves)], an Indian traditional medicinal plant against pathogenic bacteria. Both aqueous as well as alcoholic extracts of the plant (root as well as leaves) were found to possess strong antibacterial activity against a range of bacteria, as revealed by in vitro Agar Well Diffusion Method. The methanolic extract was further subfractionated using various solvents and the butanolic sub-fraction was found to possess maximum inhibitory activity against a spectrum of bacteria including Salmonella typhimurium. Moreover, in contrast to the synthetic antibiotic (viz. chloramphenicol), these extracts did not induce lysis on incubation with human erythrocytes, advocating their safety to the living cells. Finally, the antibacterial efficacy of the extracts isolated from plant (both root and leaves) was determined against experimental salmonellosis in Balb/C mice. Oral administration of the aqueous extracts successfully obliterated salmonella infection in Balb/C mice as revealed by increased survival rate as well as less bacterial load in various vital organs of the treated animals.

  11. An experimental study of artificial murine bladder reflex arc established by abdominal reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Wu; Zhao, Yu-Wu; Hou, Chun-Lin; Ni, Wei-Feng; Rui, Bi-Yu; Guo, Shang-Chun; Zheng, Xian-You; Dai, Ke-Rong

    2011-02-01

    The neurogenic bladder dysfunction caused by spinal cord injury is difficult to treat clinically. The aim of this research was to establish an artificial bladder reflex arc in rats through abdominal reflex pathway above the level of spinal cord injury, reinnervate the neurogenic bladder and restore bladder micturition. The outcome was achieved by intradural microanastomosis of the right T13 ventral root to S2 ventral root with autogenous nerve grafting, leaving the right T13 dorsal root intact. Long-term function of the reflex arc was assessed from nerve electrophysiological data and intravesical pressure tests during 8 months postoperation. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing was performed to observe the effectiveness of the artificial reflex. Single stimulus (3 mA, 0.3 ms pulses, 20 Hz, 5-second duration) on the right T13 dorsal root resulted in evoked action potentials, raised intravesical pressures and bladder smooth muscle, compound action potential recorded from the right vesical plexus before and after the spinal cord transaction injury between L5 and S4 segmental in 12 Sprague-Dawley rats. There were HRP labelled cells in T13 ventral horn on the experimental side and in the intermediolateral nucleus on both sides of the L6-S4 segments after HRP injection. There was no HRP labelled cell in T13 ventral horn on the control side. Using the surviving somatic reflex above the level of spinal cord injury to reconstruct the bladder autonomous reflex arc by intradural microanastomosis of ventral root with a segment of autologous nerve grafting is practical in rats and may have clinical applications for humans.

  12. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Lana, Marta de

    2016-09-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC-poly(d,l-lactide)-polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC-poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Detection of Talaromyces marneffei from Fresh Tissue of an Inhalational Murine Pulmonary Model Using Nested PCR.

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    Yinghui Liu

    Full Text Available Penicilliosis marneffei, often consecutive to the aspiration of Talaromyces marneffei (Penicillium marneffei, continues to be one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients in endemic regions such as Southeast Asia. Improving the accuracy of diagnosing this disease would aid in reducing the mortality of associated infections. In this study, we developed a stable and reproducible murine pulmonary model that mimics human penicilliosis marneffei using a nebulizer to deliver Talaromyces marneffei (SUMS0152 conidia to the lungs of BALB/c nude mice housed in exposure chamber. Using this model, we further revealed that nested PCR was sensitive and specific for detecting Talaromyces marneffei in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and fresh tissues. This inhalation model may provide a more representative analysis tool for studying the development of penicilliosis marneffei, in addition to revealing that nested PCR has a predictive value in reflecting pulmonary infection.

  14. Murine Models of Sepsis and Trauma: Can We Bridge the Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortz, Julie A; Raymond, Steven L; Mira, Juan C; Moldawer, Lyle L; Mohr, Alicia M; Efron, Philip A

    2017-07-01

    Sepsis and trauma are both leading causes of death in the United States and represent major public health challenges. Murine models have largely been used in sepsis and trauma research to better understand the pathophysiological changes that occur after an insult and to develop potential life-saving therapeutic agents. Mice are favorable subjects for this type of research given the variety of readily available strains including inbred, outbred, and transgenic strains. In addition, they are relatively easy to maintain and have a high fecundity. However, pharmacological therapies demonstrating promise in preclinical mouse models of sepsis and trauma often fail to demonstrate similar efficacy in human clinical trials, prompting considerable criticism surrounding the capacity of murine models to recapitulate complex human diseases like sepsis and traumatic injury. Fundamental differences between the two species include, but are not limited to, the divergence of the transcriptomic response, the mismatch of temporal response patterns, differences in both innate and adaptive immunity, and heterogeneity within the human population in comparison to the homogeneity of highly inbred mouse strains. Given the ongoing controversy, this narrative review aims to not only highlight the historical importance of the mouse as an animal research model but also highlight the current benefits and limitations of the model as it pertains to sepsis and trauma. Lastly, this review will propose future directions that may promote further use of the model. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Efficient Generation of Bispecific Murine Antibodies for Pre-Clinical Investigations in Syngeneic Rodent Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labrijn, Aran F.; Meesters, Joyce I.; Bunce, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    for the generation of therapeutic human IgG1 bispecific antibodies (bsAb). To facilitate the investigation of dual-Targeting concepts in immuno-competent mice, we now applied and optimized our method for the generation of murine bsAbs. We show that the optimized combinations of matched point-mutations enabled...... efficient generation of murine bsAbs for all subclasses studied (mouse IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b; rat IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG2c). The mutations did not adversely affect the inherent effector functions or pharmacokinetic properties of the corresponding subclasses. Thus, cFAE can be used to efficiently......Therapeutic concepts exploiting tumor-specific antibodies are often established in pre-clinical xenograft models using immuno-deficient mice. More complex therapeutic paradigms, however, warrant the use of immuno-competent mice, that more accurately capture the relevant biology that is being...

  16. Inflammation-mediated memory dysfunction and effects of a ketogenic diet in a murine model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Young Kim

    Full Text Available A prominent clinical symptom in multiple sclerosis (MS, a progressive disorder of the central nervous system (CNS due to heightened neuro-inflammation, is learning and memory dysfunction. Here, we investigated the effects of a ketogenic diet (KD on memory impairment and CNS-inflammation in a murine model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, using electrophysiological, behavioral, biochemical and in vivo imaging approaches. Behavioral spatial learning deficits were associated with motor disability in EAE mice, and were observed concurrently with brain inflammation. The KD improved motor disability in the EAE model, as well as CA1 hippocampal synaptic plasticity (long-term potentiation and spatial learning and memory (assessed with the Morris Water Maze. Moreover, hippocampal atrophy and periventricular lesions in EAE mice were reversed in KD-treated EAE mice. Finally, we found that the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, in our EAE model were both suppressed by the KD. Collectively, our findings indicate that brain inflammation in EAE mice is associated with impaired spatial learning and memory function, and that KD treatment can exert protective effects, likely via attenuation of the robust immune response and increased oxidative stress seen in these animals.

  17. Histological advantages of the tumor graft: a murine model involving transplantation of human pancreatic cancer tissue fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Yoshimasa; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohara, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Hashimoto, Shinji; Enomoto, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Keiichi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Ohkochi, Nobuhiro

    2013-11-01

    Experimental data based on cell line-derived xenograft models (cell xenograft) seldom reproduce the clinical situation, and therefore we demonstrated here the superiority of a murine model involving transplantation of human pancreatic cancer tissue fragments (tumor graft), focusing on the histological features and drug delivery characteristics. Tumor pieces from 10 pancreatic cancer patients were transplanted into SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mice. Histological characteristics of tumor grafts, including morphology, desmoplastic reaction, and vascularization, were compared with those of cell xenografts. Drug delivery was evaluated by quantifying the concentrations of injected drug, and the results were compared with its histological features. Eight of the 10 transplanted tumors successfully engrafted. Histological comparisons between tumor grafts and cell xenografts revealed the following: the amount of stroma was more (22.9% ± 11.8% vs 10.8% ± 5.4%; P cancer cell distance was longer (35.3 ± 39.0 vs 3.9 ± 3.1 μm; P Pancreatic tumor grafts better reproduce the histological nature of clinical cancer and thus provide a more realistic model that is applicable for pharmacokinetic studies.

  18. Stretching Reduces Skin Thickness and Improves Subcutaneous Tissue Mobility in a Murine Model of Systemic Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Berrueta, Lisbeth; Urso, Katia; Olenich, Sara; Muskaj, Igla; Badger, Gary J; Aliprantis, Antonios; Lafyatis, Robert; Langevin, Helene M

    2017-01-01

    Although physical therapy can help preserve mobility in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), stretching has not been used systematically as a treatment to prevent or reverse the disease process. We previously showed in rodent models that stretching promotes the resolution of connective tissue inflammation and reduces new collagen formation after injury. Here, we tested the hypothesis that stretching would impact scleroderma development using a mouse sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease (sclGvHD) model. The model consists in the adoptive transfer (allogeneic) of splenocytes from B10.D2 mice (graft) into Rag2(-/-) BALB/c hosts (sclGvHD), resulting in skin inflammation followed by fibrosis over 4 weeks. SclGvHD mice and controls were randomized to stretching in vivo for 10 min daily versus no stretching. Weekly ultrasound measurements of skin thickness and subcutaneous tissue mobility in the back (relative tissue displacement during passive trunk motion) successfully captured the different phases of the sclGvHD model. Stretching reduced skin thickness and increased subcutaneous tissue mobility compared to no stretching at week 3. Stretching also reduced the expression of CCL2 and ADAM8 in the skin at week 4, which are two genes known to be upregulated in both murine sclGvHD and the inflammatory subset of human SSc. However, there was no evidence that stretching attenuated inflammation at week 2. Daily stretching for 10 min can improve skin thickness and mobility in the absence of any other treatment in the sclGvHD murine model. These pre-clinical results suggest that a systematic investigation of stretching as a therapeutic modality is warranted in patients with SSc.

  19. Short-term hyperoxia does not exert immunologic effects during experimental murine and human endotoxemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiers, Dorien; Gerretsen, Jelle; Janssen, Emmy; John, Aaron; Groeneveld, R.; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; Scheffer, Gert-Jan; Pickkers, Peter; Kox, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen therapy to maintain tissue oxygenation is one of the cornerstones of critical care. Therefore, hyperoxia is often encountered in critically ill patients. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that hyperoxia may affect outcome, although mechanisms are unclear. Immunologic effects might be involved, as hyperoxia was shown to attenuate inflammation and organ damage in preclinical models. However, it remains unclear whether these observations can be ascribed to direct immunosuppressive effects of hyperoxia or to preserved tissue oxygenation. In contrast to these putative anti-inflammatory effects, hyperoxia may elicit an inflammatory response and organ damage in itself, known as oxygen toxicity. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of systemic inflammation, short-term hyperoxia (100% O2 for 2.5 hours in mice and 3.5 hours in humans) does not result in increased levels of inflammatory cytokines in both mice and healthy volunteers. Furthermore, we show that, compared with room air, hyperoxia does not affect the systemic inflammatory response elicited by administration of bacterial endotoxin in mice and man. Finally, neutrophil phagocytosis and ROS generation are unaffected by short-term hyperoxia. Our results indicate that hyperoxia does not exert direct anti-inflammatory effects and temper expectations of using it as an immunomodulatory treatment strategy. PMID:26616217

  20. The Roles of Streptozotocin Neurotoxicity and Neutral Endopeptidase in Murine Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Davidson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that inhibition of neutral endopeptidase (NEP, a protease that degrades vaso- and neuroactive peptides, improves vascular and neural function in diabetic animal models. In this study we explored the role of NEP in neuropathy related to either insulin-deficient diabetes or diet-induced obesity using NEP deficient (−/− mice. Initial studies showed that streptozotocin, in the absence of subsequent hyperglycemia, did not induce nerve conduction slowing or paw thermal hypoalgesia. Glucose disposal was impaired in both C57Bl/6 and NEP −/− mice fed a high fat diet. Thermal hypoalgesia and nerve conduction slowing were present in both streptozotocin-diabetic and high fat fed C57Bl/6 mice but not in NEP −/− mice exposed to either streptozotocin-induced diabetes or a high fat diet. These studies suggest that streptozotocin does not induce neurotoxicity in mice and that NEP plays a role in regulating nerve function in insulin-deficient diabetes and diet-induced obesity.

  1. MicroRNA-184-mediated inhibition of tumour growth in an orthotopic murine model of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivnan, Amanda; Foley, Niamh H; Tracey, Lorraine; Davidoff, Andrew M; Stallings, Raymond L

    2010-11-01

    Neuroblastoma is a paediatric cancer which originates from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system. Previous studies have shown that miR-184 expression has anti-proliferative effects in neuroblastoma cells grown in culture. Therefore, it was of interest to evaluate this effect in vivo. Neuroblastoma cells overexpressing miR-184 were injected retroperitoneally into CB17-SCID mice and tumour burden was assessed by measuring bioluminescence. Overall survival was also evaluated. Ectopic overexpression of miR-184 in neuroblastoma cell lines is anti-proliferative. In addition, overexpression of miR-184 led to a significant reduction in tumour growth relative to negative control-treated cohorts in a xenograft model of neuroblastoma. This study demonstrated for the first time that miR-184 significantly reduces tumour growth and increases overall survival in an orthotopic murine model of neuroblastoma through assessment of tumour growth and moribundity relative to control miRNA-treated cohorts.

  2. Examination of West Nile Virus Neuroinvasion and Neuropathogenesis in the Central Nervous System of a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Hameeda

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic virus that causes inflammation and neuronal loss in the Central Nervous System leading to encephalitis and death. In this chapter, detailed methods to detect WNV in the murine brain tissue by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and viral plaque assays are described. Determination of WNV neuropathogenesis by Hematoxylin and Eosin staining and immunohistochemical procedures are provided. In addition, TUNEL assays to determine neuronal loss during WNV neuropathogenesis are discussed in detail. Collectively, the methods mentioned in this chapter provide an overview to understand neuroinvasion and neuropathogenesis in a murine model of WNV infection.

  3. Evaluation of antithrombotic activity of thrombin DNA aptamers by a murine thrombosis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zavyalova

    Full Text Available Aptamers are nucleic acid based molecular recognition elements with a high potential for the theranostics. Some of the aptamers are under development for therapeutic applications as promising antithrombotic agents; and G-quadruplex DNA aptamers, which directly inhibit the thrombin activity, are among them. RA-36, the 31-meric DNA aptamer, consists of two thrombin binding pharmacophores joined with the thymine linker. It has been shown earlier that RA-36 directly inhibits thrombin in the reaction of fibrinogen hydrolysis, and also it inhibits plasma and blood coagulation. Studies of both inhibitory and anticoagulation effects had indicated rather high species specificity of the aptamer. Further R&D of RA-36 requires exploring its efficiency in vivo. Therefore the development of a robust and adequate animal model for effective physiological studies of aptamers is in high current demand. This work is devoted to in vivo study of the antithrombotic effect of RA-36 aptamer. A murine model of thrombosis has been applied to reveal a lag and even prevention of thrombus formation when RA-36 was intravenous bolus injected in high doses of 1.4-7.1 µmol/kg (14-70 mg/kg. A comparative study of RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin reveals that both direct thrombin inhibitors have similar antithrombotic effects for the murine model of thrombosis; though in vitro bivalirudin has anticoagulation activity several times higher compared to RA-36. The results indicate that both RA-36 aptamer and bivalirudin are direct thrombin inhibitors of different potency, but possible interactions of the thrombin-inhibitor complex with other components of blood coagulation cascade level the physiological effects for both inhibitors.

  4. Suppressive effect of compact bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells on chronic airway remodeling in murine model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogulur, Ismail; Gurhan, Gulben; Aksoy, Ayca; Duruksu, Gokhan; Inci, Cigdem; Filinte, Deniz; Kombak, Faruk Erdem; Karaoz, Erdal; Akkoc, Tunc

    2014-05-01

    New therapeutic strategies are needed in the treatment of asthma besides vaccines and pharmacotherapies. For the development of novel therapies, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is a promising approach in regenerative medicine. Delivery of compact bone (CB) derived MSCs to the injured lungs is an alternative treatment strategy for chronic asthma. In this study, we aimed to isolate highly enriched population of MSCs from mouse CB with regenerative capacity, and to investigate the impact of these cells in airway remodeling and inflammation in experimental ovalbumin-induced mouse model of chronic asthma. mCB-MSCs were isolated, characterized, labeled with GFP and then transferred into mice with chronic asthma developed by ovalbumin (OVA) provocation. Histopathological changes including basement membrane, epithelium, subepithelial smooth thickness and goblet cell hyperplasia, and MSCs migration to lung tissues were evaluated. These histopathological alterations were increased in ovalbumin-treated mice compared to PBS group (PmCB-MSC significantly reduced these histopathological changes in both distal and proximal airways (PmCB-MSCs also significantly promoted Treg response in ovalbumin-treated mice (OVA+MSC group) (PmCB-MSCs migrated to lung tissue and suppressed histopathological changes in murine model of asthma. The results reported here provided evidence that mCB-MSCs may be an alternative strategy for the treatment of remodeling and inflammation associated with chronic asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Back, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani; Hylarides, Mark; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-05-15

    Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy using an Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide 211At Combined with Bone Marrow Transplantation Prolongs Survival in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model ABSTRACT Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies (Ab) labeled primarily with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse.

  6. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Experimental Murine Colitis via TSP-1-Dependent Activation of Latent TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Uemura, Mamoru; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Nishimura, Junichi; Hata, Taishi; Matsuda, Chu; Takemasa, Ichiro; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Murata, Kohei; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2017-08-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been investigated as therapeutic tools for a variety of autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory properties of ASCs are not well understood. Here, we investigated the mechanism of regulatory T cell (Treg) induction in ASC therapy in a murine model of inflammatory bowel disease. Acute colitis was induced in mice using dextran sulfate sodium and ASCs administered intraperitoneally. Tregs and CD103+ dendritic cells were analyzed in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), spleen, and colonic lamina propria (CLP). Activation of latent TGF-β by ASCs was analyzed in vitro using ELISA. siRNA technology was used to create ASCs in which TSP-1 or integrinαv was knocked down in order to investigate the involvement of these proteins in the activation of latent TGF-β. In addition, TSP-1-knockdown ASCs were administered to mice with colitis to assess their clinical efficacy in vivo. Systemic administration of ASCs significantly lessened the clinical and histopathological severity of colitis. ASCs were distributed throughout the lymphatic system in the MLNs and spleen. Tregs were increased in the MLNs and CLP, but CD103+ dendritic cells were not significantly altered. The ASCs activated latent TGF-β. TSP-1 knockdown impaired TGF-β activation in vitro and abrogated the therapeutic effects of the ASCs in vivo. Furthermore, Tregs were not increased in the MLNs and CLP from mice treated with TSP-1-knockdown ASCs. These results demonstrate that ASCs induce Tregs by activating latent TGF-β via TSP-1, independent of CD103+ dendritic cell induction.

  7. Restoration of Tear Secretion in a Murine Dry Eye Model by Oral Administration of Palmitoleic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Nakamura

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides–derived products have traditionally been used as food and medicinal ingredients in Eastern countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of oral intake of sea buckthorn oil products on tear secretion using a murine dry eye model. Orally administered sea buckthorn pulp oil (not seed oil restored aqueous tear secretion to its normal value under a dry eye condition. Palmitoleate (C16:1, a fatty acid present in sea buckthorn pulp oil, preserved tear secretion and suppressed inflammatory cytokines in the lacrimal gland to the same extent as that by pulp oil. These results suggest that an oral intake of sea buckthorn pulp oil has a potency to preserve tear secretion capacity in the dry eye state and palmitoleate, its main constituent fatty acid, is an active component of the oil. This effect may enable a potent diet-based treatment for the prevention of dry eye.

  8. Near-infrared angiography for critical limb ischemia in a diabetic murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Missael; Zayed, Mohamed A.; Park, Kyoung-mi; Gruev, Viktor

    2017-04-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent disease process that afflicts more than 20% of individuals with diabetes. Progression of PAD in the setting of diabetes can lead to critical limb ischemia (CLI), which is associated with increased risk of wounds, gangrene, and limb loss. Prompt noninvasive evaluation of limbs affected by PAD progression and CLI is currently limited. Here, we evaluate the utility of a custom-designed multispectral imaging system for fluorescence-based near-infrared angiography and compare it to the existing gold standard of laser-scanning Doppler perfusion assessments. Due to its higher resolution and fluorescence sensitivity, near-infrared angiography demonstrates a greater capacity to characterize altered dynamic arterial perfusion in a clinically relevant diabetic murine model for CLI. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our imaging system can accurately track arterial perfusion recovery over time following induced ischemia, and reveal unique phenotypic differences in the setting of diabetes.

  9. Neurobehavioural evaluation of resveratrol in murine models of anxiety and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, Mohammed Garba; Iniaghe, Loretta Oghenekome; Abolarin, Mutiat; Abdullahi, Opeyemi Isa; Magaji, Rabiu Abdusalam

    2017-04-01

    Resveratrol, a caloric restriction mimetic, is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including generalized anxiety and schizophrenia. This study investigated the anxiolytic and antipsychotic potentials of resveratrol in murine models of anxiety and schizophrenia. Mice were pretreated with resveratrol (200 and 400 mg/kg) in 1% carboxymethyl cellulose for 14 days and subjected to behavioural tests on the 15th day. Anxiolytic activity of resveratrol was determined using the hole board and staircase tests while its anti-psychotic property was evaluated via apormorphine induced stereotypy and swim-induced grooming tests. Although resveratrol did not significantly reduce the mean number of head dips at doses used in the hole board test, it significantly (p Resveratrol significantly (p resveratrol at doses used in this study produced anxiolysis and anti-psychotic effects in mice.

  10. Ketoacidosis alone does not predispose to mucormycosis by Lichtheimia in a murine pulmonary infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Bianca; Rambach, Günter; Schwartze, Volker U; Voigt, Kerstin; Schubert, Katja; Speth, Cornelia; Jacobsen, Ilse D

    2017-07-27

    Mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection; however, the number of cases increased during the last decades. The main risk factors are immunosuppression and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Although Lichtheimia species represent a common cause of mucormycosis in Europe, virulence and pathogenesis of this genus has not been investigated in detail yet. Using murine pulmonary infection models, we found that immunosuppression is essential for establishment of infection. The disease was characterized by necrosis, angioinvasion, thrombosis, and the lethal course of infection was associated with systemic activation of platelets. Furthermore, dissemination to internal organs was frequently observed. While the virulence potential of individual L. corymbifera and L. ramosa isolates differed, pathogenicity of both species was comparable. Although ketoacidosis promoted Rhizopus infection in mice, it did not predispose mice to infection with Lichtheimia in the absence of additional immunosuppression. This might partially explain the dominance of Rhizopus as cause of mucormycosis in countries with high prevalence of ketoacidotic patients.

  11. Therapeutic activity of two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthou Christian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that allanxanthone C and macluraxanthone, two xanthones purified from Guttiferae trees, display in vitro antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities in leukemic cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and leukemia B cell lines. Results Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of the two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human CLL, developed by engrafting CD5-transfected chronic leukemia B cells into SCID mice. Treatment of the animals with five daily injections of either allanxanthone C or macluraxanthone resulted in a significant prolongation of their survival as compared to control animals injected with the solvent alone (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0141, respectively. The same treatment of mice which were not xenografted induced no mortality. Conclusion These data show for the first time the in vivo antileukemic activities of two plant-derived xanthones, and confirm their potential interest for CLL therapy.

  12. Characterization of a Murine Model of Bioequivalent Bladder Wound Healing and Repair Following Subtotal Cystectomy

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    Mona Zarifpour

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous work demonstrated restoration of a bioequivalent bladder within 8 weeks of removing the majority of the bladder (subtotal cystectomy or STC in rats. The goal of the present study was to extend our investigations of bladder repair to the murine model, to harness the power of mouse genetics to delineate the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed robust bladder regrowth. Female C57 black mice underwent STC, and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-STC, bladder repair and function were assessed via cystometry, ex vivo pharmacologic organ bath studies, and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Histology was also performed to measure bladder wall thickness. We observed a time-dependent increase in bladder capacity (BC following STC, such that 8 and 12 weeks post-STC, BC and micturition volumes were indistinguishable from those of age-matched non-STC controls and significantly higher than observed at 4 weeks. MRI studies confirmed that bladder volume was indistinguishable within 3 months (11 weeks post-STC. Additionally, bladders emptied completely at all time points studied (i.e., no increases in residual volume, consistent with functional bladder repair. At 8 and 12 weeks post-STC, there were no significant differences in bladder wall thickness or in the different components (urothelium, lamina propria, or smooth muscle layers of the bladder wall compared with age-matched control animals. The maximal contractile response to pharmacological activation and electrical field stimulation increased over time in isolated tissue strips from repaired bladders but remained lower at all time points compared with controls. We have established and validated a murine model for the study of de novo organ repair that will allow for further mechanistic studies of this phenomenon after, for example, genetic manipulation.

  13. A metabolomic analysis of two intravenous lipid emulsions in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T Kalish

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition (PN, including intravenous lipid administration, is a life-saving therapy but can be complicated by cholestasis and liver disease. The administration of intravenous soy bean oil (SO has been associated with the development of liver disease, while the administration of intravenous fish oil (FO has been associated with the resolution of liver disease. The biochemical mechanism of this differential effect is unclear. This study compares SO and FO lipid emulsions in a murine model of hepatic steatosis, one of the first hits in PN-associated liver disease.We established a murine model of hepatic steatosis in which liver injury is induced by orally feeding mice a PN solution. C57BL/6J mice were randomized to receive PN alone (a high carbohydrate diet (HCD, PN plus intravenous FO (Omegaven®; Fresenius Kabi AG, Bad Homburg VDH, Germany, PN plus intravenous SO (Intralipid®; Fresenius Kabi AG, Bad Homburg v.d.H., Germany, for Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL, or a chow diet. After 19 days, liver tissue was harvested from all animals and subjected to metabolomic profiling.The administration of an oral HCD without lipid induced profound hepatic steatosis. SO was associated with macro- and microvesicular hepatic steatosis, while FO largely prevented the development of steatosis. 321 detectable compounds were identified in the metabolomic analysis. HCD induced de novo fatty acid synthesis and oxidative stress. Both FO and SO relieved some of the metabolic shift towards de novo lipogenesis, but FO offered additional advantages in terms of lipid peroxidation and the generation of inflammatory precursors.Improved lipid metabolism combined with reduced oxidative stress may explain the protective effect offered by intravenous FO in vivo.

  14. Genetic and functional studies of the intervertebral disc: a novel murine intervertebral disc model.

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    Dominic W Pelle

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD homeostasis is mediated through a combination of micro-environmental and biomechanical factors, all of which are subject to genetic influences. The aim of this study is to develop and characterize a genetically tractable, ex vivo organ culture model that can be used to further elucidate mechanisms of intervertebral disc disease. Specifically, we demonstrate that IVD disc explants (1 maintain their native phenotype in prolonged culture, (2 are responsive to exogenous stimuli, and (3 that relevant homeostatic regulatory mechanisms can be modulated through ex-vivo genetic recombination. We present a novel technique for isolation of murine IVD explants with demonstration of explant viability (CMFDA/propidium iodide staining, disc anatomy (H&E, maintenance of extracellular matrix (ECM (Alcian Blue staining, and native expression profile (qRT-PCR as well as ex vivo genetic recombination (mT/mG reporter mice; AdCre following 14 days of culture in DMEM media containing 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% L-glutamine, and 1% penicillin/streptomycin. IVD explants maintained their micro-anatomic integrity, ECM proteoglycan content, viability, and gene expression profile consistent with a homeostatic drive in culture. Treatment of genetically engineered explants with cre-expressing adenovirus efficaciously induced ex vivo genetic recombination in a variety of genetically engineered mouse models. Exogenous administration of IL-1ß and TGF-ß3 resulted in predicted catabolic and anabolic responses, respectively. Genetic recombination of TGFBR1fl/fl explants resulted in constitutively active TGF-ß signaling that matched that of exogenously administered TGF-ß3. Our results illustrate the utility of the murine intervertebral disc explant to investigate mechanisms of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  15. Genetic and Functional Studies of the Intervertebral Disc: A Novel Murine Intervertebral Disc Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelle, Dominic W.; Peacock, Jacqueline D.; Schmidt, Courtney L.; Kampfschulte, Kevin; Scholten, Donald J.; Russo, Scott S.; Easton, Kenneth J.; Steensma, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) homeostasis is mediated through a combination of micro-environmental and biomechanical factors, all of which are subject to genetic influences. The aim of this study is to develop and characterize a genetically tractable, ex vivo organ culture model that can be used to further elucidate mechanisms of intervertebral disc disease. Specifically, we demonstrate that IVD disc explants (1) maintain their native phenotype in prolonged culture, (2) are responsive to exogenous stimuli, and (3) that relevant homeostatic regulatory mechanisms can be modulated through ex-vivo genetic recombination. We present a novel technique for isolation of murine IVD explants with demonstration of explant viability (CMFDA/propidium iodide staining), disc anatomy (H&E), maintenance of extracellular matrix (ECM) (Alcian Blue staining), and native expression profile (qRT-PCR) as well as ex vivo genetic recombination (mT/mG reporter mice; AdCre) following 14 days of culture in DMEM media containing 10% fetal bovine serum, 1% L-glutamine, and 1% penicillin/streptomycin. IVD explants maintained their micro-anatomic integrity, ECM proteoglycan content, viability, and gene expression profile consistent with a homeostatic drive in culture. Treatment of genetically engineered explants with cre-expressing adenovirus efficaciously induced ex vivo genetic recombination in a variety of genetically engineered mouse models. Exogenous administration of IL-1ß and TGF-ß3 resulted in predicted catabolic and anabolic responses, respectively. Genetic recombination of TGFBR1fl/fl explants resulted in constitutively active TGF-ß signaling that matched that of exogenously administered TGF-ß3. Our results illustrate the utility of the murine intervertebral disc explant to investigate mechanisms of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:25474689

  16. A GM-CSF and CD40L bystander vaccine is effective in a murine breast cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman H

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hatem Soliman,1 Melanie Mediavilla-Varela,2 Scott J Antonia,3 1Department of Women's Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics, 2Department of Immunology, 3Department of Thoracic Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA Background: There is increasing interest in using cancer vaccines to treat breast cancer patients in the adjuvant setting to prevent recurrence in high risk situations or in combination with other immunomodulators in the advanced setting. Current peptide vaccines are limited by immunologic compatibility issues, and engineered autologous cellular vaccines are difficult to produce on a large scale. Using standardized bystander cell lines modified to secrete immune stimulating adjuvant substances can greatly enhance the ability to produce immunogenic cellular vaccines using unmodified autologous cells or allogeneic medical grade tumor cell lines as targets. We investigated the efficacy of a cellular vaccine using B78H1 bystander cell lines engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and CD40 ligand (BCG in a murine model of breast cancer. Methods: Five-week-old female BALB/c mice were injected orthotopically in the mammary fat pad with 4T1 tumor cells. Treatment consisted of irradiated 4T1 ± BCG cells given subcutaneously every 4 days and was repeated three times per mouse when tumors became palpable. Tumors were measured two to three times per week for 25 days. The vaccine's activity was confirmed in a second experiment using Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC cells in C57BL/6 mice to exclude a model specific effect. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2 enzyme-linked immunospots (ELISPOTS were performed on splenic lymphocytes incubated with 4T1 lysates along with immunohistochemistry for CD3 on tumor sections. Results: Tumor growth was significantly inhibited in the 4T1-BCG and LLC-BCG treatment groups when compared to 4T1 and LLC treatment groups. There were higher levels of IL-2 and IFN

  17. Monitoring the Efficacy of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in a Murine Model of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis using L. major expressing GFP

    OpenAIRE

    Latorre-Esteves, Elena; Akilov, Oleg E.; Rai, Prakash; Beverley, Stephen M.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-01-01

    A murine model of cutaneous leishmaniasis with green fluorescent protein positive (GFP+) L. major enables the monitoring of parasitic load via measurements of GFP fluorescence intensity, allowing for a faster and more efficient way of monitoring the clinical outcome of photodynamic therapy (PDT). This model may provide new insights on the phototoxic aspects in PDT. Although PDT regimens may be somewhat different in humans, it is expected that the developed model will facilitate the optimizati...

  18. Will PEDF Therapy Reverse Chronic Demyelination and Prevent Axon Loss in a Murine Model of Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Multiple Sclerosis ? PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David Pleasure MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California Davis, CA 95618 REPORT DATE...Murine Model of Progressive Multiple Sclerosis ? 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0566 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David Pleasure MD 5d...enhance central nervous system (CNS) remyelination and preserve CNS axons in mouse models of multiple sclerosis models. After determining the dosage of

  19. Quantification of perfusion in murine myocardium: A retrospectively triggered T1 -based ASL method using model-based reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutjahr, Fabian T; Kampf, Thomas; Winter, Patrick; Meyer, Cord B; Williams, Tatjana; Jakob, Peter M; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Ziener, Christian H; Helluy, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    A method for the quantification of perfusion in murine myocardium is demonstrated. The method allows for the reconstruction of perfusion maps on arbitrary time points in the heart cycle while addressing problems that arise due to the irregular heart beat of mice. A flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery arterial spin labeling method using an untriggered FLASH-read out with random sampling is used. Look-Locker conditions are strictly maintained. No dummy pulses or mechanism to reduce deviation from Look-Locker conditions are needed. Electrocardiogram and respiratory data are recorded for retrospective gating and triggering. A model-based technique is used to reconstruct missing k-space data to cope with the undersampling inherent in retrospectively gated methods. Acquisition and reconstruction were validated numerically and in phantom measurements before in vivo experimentation. Quantitative perfusion maps were acquired within a single slice measurement time of 11 min. Perfusion values are in good accordance to literature values. Myocardial infarction could be clearly visualized and results were confirmed with histological results. The proposed method is capable of producing quantitative perfusion maps on arbitrary positions in the heart cycle within a short measurement time. The method is robust against irregular breathing patterns and heart rate changes and can be implemented on all scanners. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Assessment of dry eye in a GVHD murine model: Approximation through tear osmolarity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Carrasco, Rafael; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Nieto-Gómez, Cristina; García, Elisabet Martín; Ramos, Teresa L; Velasco, Almudena; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Aijón, José; Hernández-Galilea, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    Dry eye disease is one of the most frequent pathological events that take place in the course of the graft versus host disease (GVHD), and is the main cause of deterioration in quality of life for patients. Thus, demonstration of dry eye signs in murine models of oGVHD is crucial for the validation of these models for the study of the disease. Given the increasing evidence that tear osmolarity is an important player of dry eye disease, our purpose in this study was to validate the use of a reliable method to assess tear osmolarity in mice: the electrical impedance method. Then, we wanted to test its utility with an oGVHD model. Tear volume assessment was also performed, using the phenol red thread test. We found differences in tear osmolarity in mice that received a transplant with cells from bone marrow and spleen (the GVHD group) when compared with mice that only received bone marrow cells (the BM group) at day 7 (362 ± 8 mOsm/l and 345 ± 9 mOsm/l respectively; P eye disease, what contributes to give relevance to this model for the study of GVHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantifying lung morphology with respiratory-gated micro-CT in a murine model of emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, N. L.; Martin, E. L.; Lewis, J. F.; Veldhuizen, R. A. W.; Holdsworth, D. W.; Drangova, M.

    2009-04-01

    Non-invasive micro-CT imaging techniques have been developed to investigate lung structure in free-breathing rodents. In this study, we investigate the utility of retrospectively respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging in an emphysema model to determine if anatomical changes could be observed in the image-derived quantitative analysis at two respiratory phases. The emphysema model chosen was a well-characterized, genetically altered model (TIMP-3 knockout mice) that exhibits a homogeneous phenotype. Micro-CT scans of the free-breathing, anaesthetized mice were obtained in 50 s and retrospectively respiratory sorted and reconstructed, providing 3D images representing peak inspiration and end expiration with 0.15 mm isotropic voxel spacing. Anatomical measurements included the volume and CT density of the lungs and the volume of the major airways, along with the diameters of the trachea, left bronchus and right bronchus. From these measurements, functional parameters such as functional residual capacity and tidal volume were calculated. Significant differences between the wild-type and TIMP-3 knockout groups were observed for measurements of CT density over the entire lung, indicating increased air content in the lungs of TIMP-3 knockout mice. These results demonstrate retrospective respiratory-gated micro-CT, providing images at multiple respiratory phases that can be analyzed quantitatively to investigate anatomical changes in murine models of emphysema.

  2. In vivo experimental model of human gingival mucosa using immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukinoki, K; Miyoshi, Y; Aoki, T; Karakida, K; Ohta, Y; Kaneko, A; Ueyama, Y; Watanabe, Y

    2007-08-01

    To establish an in vivo experimental model for examining human periodontal tissue, the present study examined several transplant techniques that maintain the structure and characteristics of human gingival mucosa. Human oral mucosal tissue samples were collected from the gingiva (n = 11), palate (n = 1), and tongue (n = 3). These mucosal grafts were transplanted onto BALB/c nu/scid mice with double-mutant immunodeficiency. Murine skin, twice the size of the graft, was cut open in an ' square superset'-shape. Next, the connective tissue side of the graft was placed onto the murine connective tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis was also performed, using polyclonal rabbit antibody to involucrin, monoclonal antibody to vimentin, monoclonal antibody to CD34, and monoclonal antibody to Ki-67, to determine whether the characteristics of human oral mucosa were maintained. When the connective tissue side of the graft was placed on the murine fascial membrane, the histological structure of the graft was maintained for 60 d. These grafts were examined for human characteristics using human-specific antibodies. Immunohistochemically, the expression patterns of involucrin, vimentin, and Ki-67 indicated that transplanted mucosa revealed normal human characteristics, including differentiation and proliferation up to 80 d. CD34 was not detected in the graft endothelial cells. The present study revealed that the novel technique of transplantation of human gingival mucosa in nu/scid mice may serve as an in vivo experimental model of periodontal disease.

  3. A murine model of elastase- and cigarette smoke-induced emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rubia; Olivo, Clarice Rosa; Lourenço, Juliana Dias; Riane, Alyne; Cervilha, Daniela Aparecida de Brito; Ito, Juliana Tiyaki; Martins, Milton de Arruda; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenório Quirino Dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    To describe a murine model of emphysema induced by a combination of exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) and instillation of porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE). A total of 38 C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups: control (one intranasal instillation of 0.9% saline solution); PPE (two intranasal instillations of PPE); CS (CS exposure for 60 days); and CS + PPE (two intranasal instillations of PPE + CS exposure for 60 days). At the end of the experimental protocol, all animals were anesthetized and tracheostomized for calculation of respiratory mechanics parameters. Subsequently, all animals were euthanized and their lungs were removed for measurement of the mean linear intercept (Lm) and determination of the numbers of cells that were immunoreactive to macrophage (MAC)-2 antigen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12, and glycosylated 91-kDa glycoprotein (gp91phox) in the distal lung parenchyma and peribronchial region. Although there were no differences among the four groups regarding the respiratory mechanics parameters assessed, there was an increase in the Lm in the CS + PPE group. The numbers of MAC-2-positive cells in the peribronchial region and distal lung parenchyma were higher in the CS + PPE group than in the other groups, as were the numbers of cells that were positive for MMP-12 and gp91phox, although only in the distal lung parenchyma. Our model of emphysema induced by a combination of PPE instillation and CS exposure results in a significant degree of parenchymal destruction in a shorter time frame than that employed in other models of CS-induced emphysema, reinforcing the importance of protease-antiprotease imbalance and oxidant-antioxidant imbalance in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Descrever um modelo murino de enfisema induzido por exposição a fumaça de cigarro (FC) e instilação de elastase pancreática porcina (EPP). Trinta e oito camundongos C57BL/6 foram aleatoriamente divididos em quatro grupos: controle (uma instilação intranasal

  4. Excisional wound healing is delayed in a murine model of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil K Seth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD, often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. METHODS: CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR. RESULTS: CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU and angiogenesis (CD31, with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45 as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS on qPCR. CONCLUSIONS: These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes.

  5. Ligature induced peri-implantitis: tissue destruction and inflammatory progression in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Vo, Trang N; Hao, Jia; Chou, Josh; Oshima, Masamitsu; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Shinji; Kaboosaya, Boosana; Kasugai, Shohei

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tissue destruction and inflammatory progression of ligature-induced peri-implantitis in mice and to establish an alternative murine model of peri-implantitis. Sixty male C57BL/6NCrSlc mice (4-week-old) were used and the maxillary right first molars were extracted. Eight weeks after extraction, custom-made pure titanium machined screw type implants (0.8 × 1.5 mm) were placed, one implant per animal. Four weeks later, 5-0 silk ligatures were applied around implant necks to induce peri-implantitis. Animals were sacrificed at 0 (before ligature), 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after ligature. Half of the samples were analyzed radiologically and histologically to measure bone level change, osteoclast number, density, and distribution. The rest of the samples was used to determine the relative mRNA expression levels of IL-1 and TNF-α with RT-PCR analysis. Bone levels at all sites (buccal, palatal, mesial, distal) decreased 40-50% significantly 28 days after ligature (P implant bone resorption suggested 28 days ligation is sufficient to successfully induce peri-implantitis in the current mice model. This model might open a new avenue to study the pathogenesis and mechanism of peri-implantitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Excisional Wound Healing Is Delayed in a Murine Model of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Akhil K.; De la Garza, Mauricio; Fang, Robert C.; Hong, Seok J.; Galiano, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD), often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. Methods CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD) 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU) and angiogenesis (CD31), with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45) as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS) on qPCR. Conclusions These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes. PMID:23536900

  7. Characterization of a murine model of monocrotaline pyrrole-induced acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pullamsetti Soni S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New animal models of chronic pulmonary hypertension in mice are needed. The injection of monocrotaline is an established model of pulmonary hypertension in rats. The aim of this study was to establish a murine model of pulmonary hypertension by injection of the active metabolite, monocrotaline pyrrole. Methods Survival studies, computed tomographic scanning, histology, bronchoalveolar lavage were performed, and arterial blood gases and hemodynamics were measured in animals which received an intravenous injection of different doses of monocrotaline pyrrole. Results Monocrotaline pyrrole induced pulmonary hypertension in Sprague Dawley rats. When injected into mice, monocrotaline pyrrole induced dose-dependant mortality in C57Bl6/N and BALB/c mice (dose range 6–15 mg/kg bodyweight. At a dose of 10 mg/kg bodyweight, mice developed a typical early-phase acute lung injury, characterized by lung edema, neutrophil influx, hypoxemia and reduced lung compliance. In the late phase, monocrotaline pyrrole injection resulted in limited lung fibrosis and no obvious pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion Monocrotaline and monocrotaline pyrrole pneumotoxicity substantially differs between the animal species.

  8. 4D optical coherence tomography of aortic valve dynamics in a murine mouse model ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Christian; Jannasch, Anett; Faak, Saskia; Waldow, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2015-07-01

    The heart and its mechanical components, especially the heart valves and leaflets, are under enormous strain during lifetime. Like all highly stressed materials, also these biological components undergo fatigue and signs of wear, which impinge upon cardiac output and in the end on health and living comfort of affected patients. Thereby pathophysiological changes of the aortic valve leading to calcific aortic valve stenosis (AVS) as most frequent heart valve disease in humans are of particular interest. The knowledge about changes of the dynamic behavior during the course of this disease and the possibility of early stage diagnosis could lead to the development of new treatment strategies and drug-based options of prevention or therapy. ApoE-/- mice as established model of AVS versus wildtype mice were introduced in an ex vivo artificially stimulated heart model. 4D optical coherence tomography (OCT) in combination with high-speed video microscopy were applied to characterize dynamic behavior of the murine aortic valve and to characterize dynamic properties during artificial stimulation. OCT and high-speed video microscopy with high spatial and temporal resolution represent promising tools for the investigation of dynamic behavior and their changes in calcific aortic stenosis disease models in mice.

  9. Genetic immunization with mouse thyrotrophin hormone receptor plasmid breaks self-tolerance for a murine model of autoimmune thyroid disease and Graves' orbitopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, A; Horstmann, M; Diaz-Cano, S; Plöhn, S; Stähr, K; Mattheis, S; Oeverhaus, M; Lang, S; Flögel, U; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, U; Eckstein, A; Banga, J P

    2017-10-23

    Experimental models of Graves' hyperthyroid disease accompanied by Graves' orbitopathy (GO) can be induced efficiently in susceptible inbred strains of mice by immunization by electroporation of heterologous human TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit plasmid. In this study, we report on the development of a bona fide murine model of autoimmune Graves' disease induced with homologous mouse TSHR A-subunit plasmid. Autoimmune thyroid disease in the self-antigen model was accompanied by GO and characterized by histopathology of hyperplastic glands with large thyroid follicular cells. Examination of orbital tissues showed significant inflammation in extra-ocular muscle with accumulation of T cells and macrophages together with substantial deposition of adipose tissue. Notably, increased levels of brown adipose tissue were present in the orbital tissue of animals undergoing experimental GO. Further analysis of inflammatory loci by 19 F-magnetic resonance imaging showed inflammation to be confined to orbital muscle and optic nerve, but orbital fat showed no difference in inflammatory signs in comparison to control β-Gal-immunized animals. Pathogenic antibodies induced to mouse TSHR were specific for the self-antigen, with minimal cross-reactivity to human TSHR. Moreover, compared to other self-antigen models of murine Graves' disease induced in TSHR knock-out mice, the repertoire of autoantibodies to mouse TSHR generated following the breakdown of thymic self-tolerance is different to those that arise when tolerance is not breached immunologically, as in the knock-out models. Overall, we show that mouse TSHR A-subunit plasmid immunization by electroporation overcomes tolerance to self-antigen to provide a faithful model of Graves' disease and GO. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  10. High and low frequency subharmonic imaging of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahibawkar, Manasi; Forsberg, Mark A; Gupta, Aditi; Jaffe, Samantha; Dulin, Kelly; Eisenbrey, John R; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Forsberg, Anya I; Dave, Jaydev K; Marshall, Andrew; Machado, Priscilla; Fox, Traci B; Liu, Ji-Bin; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-09-01

    This project compared quantifiable measures of tumor vascularity obtained from contrast-enhanced high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) subharmonic ultrasound imaging (SHI) to 3 immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in a murine breast cancer model (since angiogenesis is an important marker of malignancy and the target of many novel cancer treatments). Nineteen athymic, nude, female rats were implanted with 5×10(6) breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in the mammary fat pad. The contrast agent Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) was injected in a tail vein (dose: 180μl/kg) and LF pulse-inversion SHI was performed with a modified Sonix RP scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada) using a L9-4 linear array (transmitting/receiving at 8/4MHz in SHI mode) followed by HF imaging with a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, ON, Canada) using a MS250 linear array transmitting and receiving at 24MHz. The radiofrequency data was filtered using a 4th order IIR Butterworth bandpass filter (11-13MHz) to isolate the subharmonic signal. After the experiments, specimens were stained for endothelial cells (CD31), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Fractional tumor vascularity was calculated as contrast-enhanced pixels over all tumor pixels for SHI, while the relative area stained over total tumor area was calculated from specimens. Results were compared using linear regression analysis. Out of 19 rats, 16 showed tumor growth (84%) and 11 of them were successfully imaged. HF SHI demonstrated better resolution, but weaker signals than LF SHI (0.06±0.017 vs. 0.39±0.059; p<0.001). The strongest overall correlation in this breast cancer model was between HF SHI and VEGF (r=-0.38; p=0.03). In conclusion, quantifiable measures of tumor neovascularity derived from contrast-enhanced HF SHI appear to be a better method than LF SHI for monitoring angiogenesis in a murine xenograft model of breast cancer

  11. New model systems for experimental evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sinéad

    2013-07-01

    Microbial experimental evolution uses a few well-characterized model systems to answer fundamental questions about how evolution works. This special section highlights novel model systems for experimental evolution, with a focus on marine model systems that can be used to understand evolutionary responses to global change in the oceans. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Effect of Ganciclovir on murine cytomegalovirus-induced hearing loss in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuehua; Meng, Lingjian; Wang, Jun; Meng, Hong

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of Ganciclovir on murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-induced hearing impairment in a mouse model by studying modulations in auditory brainstem response (ABR) and pathological changes in the inner ear. MCMV infection was established via trans-brain. For this purpose, 24 BALB/c newborn mice were randomly and equally divided into control group (10 μl of sterile normal saline was injected); model group (10 μl of MCMV TCID50-10(4) IU/0.1 ml was injected); and interfered group (Trans-brain MCMV; Ganciclovir at the rate of 60 mg/kg was intraperitoneally injected). ABR audiometry was performed after 14 days. Acoustic vesicles were obtained for MCMV-PCR analysis and histopathological examination. Comparing ABR in model group against controls, incubation period of wave was lengthened (F = 9.151, P = 0.011-0.05) and wave amplitude was cut down (F = 5.095, P = 0.043-0.05). Comparing ABR in model group against interfered group, incubation period and amplitude of wave were F = 13.797 (P = 0.003-0.05) and F = 14.587 (P = 0.002-0.05), respectively. Cochlear histopathological changes in model group included thickening of vestibular membrane, lymphocytic infiltration, and fibrous degeneration of cochlear duct. In Ganciclovir interfered group, however, these pathologic changes were less significant as compared with those of model group. We, therefore, conclude that Ganciclovir treatment at the early stage of MCMV-induced hearing impairment inhibits the disease progression in infected mice.

  13. A paclitaxel-loaded recombinant polypeptide nanoparticle outperforms Abraxane in multiple murine cancer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Bellucci, Joseph J.; Weitzhandler, Isaac; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Li, Xinghai; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chi, Jen-Tsan Ashley; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-08-01

    Packaging clinically relevant hydrophobic drugs into a self-assembled nanoparticle can improve their aqueous solubility, plasma half-life, tumour-specific uptake and therapeutic potential. To this end, here we conjugated paclitaxel (PTX) to recombinant chimeric polypeptides (CPs) that spontaneously self-assemble into ~60 nm near-monodisperse nanoparticles that increased the systemic exposure of PTX by sevenfold compared with free drug and twofold compared with the Food and Drug Administration-approved taxane nanoformulation (Abraxane). The tumour uptake of the CP-PTX nanoparticle was fivefold greater than free drug and twofold greater than Abraxane. In a murine cancer model of human triple-negative breast cancer and prostate cancer, CP-PTX induced near-complete tumour regression after a single dose in both tumour models, whereas at the same dose, no mice treated with Abraxane survived for >80 days (breast) and 60 days (prostate), respectively. These results show that a molecularly engineered nanoparticle with precisely engineered design features outperforms Abraxane, the current gold standard for PTX delivery.

  14. Cryptococcus neoformans hyperfilamentous strain is hypervirulent in a murine model of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Feretzaki

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a human fungal pathogen that causes lethal infections of the lung and central nervous system in immunocompromised individuals. C. neoformans has a defined bipolar sexual life cycle with a and α mating types. During the sexual cycle, which can occur between cells of opposite mating types (bisexual reproduction or cells of one mating type (unisexual reproduction, a dimorphic transition from yeast to hyphal growth occurs. Hyphal development and meiosis generate abundant spores that, following inhalation, penetrate deep into the lung to enter the alveoli, germinate, and establish a pulmonary infection growing as budding yeast cells. Unisexual reproduction has been directly observed only in the Cryptococcus var. neoformans (serotype D lineage under laboratory conditions. However, hyphal development has been previously associated with reduced virulence and the serotype D lineage exhibits limited pathogenicity in the murine model. In this study we show that the serotype D hyperfilamentous strain XL280α is hypervirulent in an animal model. It can grow inside the lung of the host, establish a pulmonary infection, and then disseminate to the brain to cause cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. Surprisingly, this hyperfilamentous strain triggers an immune response polarized towards Th2-type immunity, which is usually observed in the highly virulent sibling species C. gattii, responsible for the Pacific Northwest outbreak. These studies provide a technological advance that will facilitate analysis of virulence genes and attributes in C. neoformans var. neoformans, and reveal the virulence potential of serotype D as broader and more dynamic than previously appreciated.

  15. Applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in murine cancer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckermann, Marc; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Gronych, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Advanced biological technologies allowing for genetic manipulation of the genome are increasingly being used to unravel the molecular pathogenesis of human diseases. The clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR-associated protein (CRISPR/Cas) technology started a revolution of this field owing to its flexibility and relative ease of use. Recently, application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been extended to in vivo approaches, leveraging its potential for human disease modeling. Particularly in oncological research, where genetic defects in somatic cells are tightly linked to etiology and pathological phenotypes, the CRISPR/Cas technology is being used to recapitulate various types of genetic aberrations. Here we review murine cancer models that have been developed via combining the CRISPR/Cas9 technology with in vivo somatic gene transfer approaches. Exploiting these methodological advances will further accelerate detailed investigations of tumor etiology and treatment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Genetic factors influencing the development of chronic graft-versus-host disease in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayback, D L; Dobkins, J A; Harper, J M; Allen, R D

    2000-11-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of bone marrow transplantation that can occur in either acute or chronic forms. Much of the long-term pathology seen in chronic GVHD is a result of autoantibody production. In the DBA/2-->B6D2F1 murine model of chronic GVHD, anti-ssDNA autoantibodies can be detected by 14 days post cell transfer. These autoantibodies are not observed in B6D2F1 recipients of cells from C57BL/6 or B10.D2 donors, which develop acute rather than chronic GVHD. Therefore, in this model, donor genetic factors predispose to the development of chronic GVHD in recipients. We performed a genetic analysis aimed at mapping donor loci that influence the magnitude of early autoantibody production in B6D2F1 recipients of cells from DBA/2 donor mice. Linkage analysis suggested an influence of two loci: a locus on chromosome 11 linked to D11Mit278 and a locus on chromosome 4 linked to D4Mit226. The locus on chromosome 11 also appeared to influence the development of renal pathology associated with chronic GVHD.

  17. Surgical Debridement Is Superior to Sole Antibiotic Therapy in a Novel Murine Posttraumatic Osteomyelitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Christoph; Ismer, Britta; Schira, Jessica; Abraham, Stephanie; Harati, Kamran; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Behr, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone infections after trauma, i.e. posttraumatic osteomyelitis, pose one of the biggest problems of orthopedic surgery. Even after sufficient clinical therapy including vast debridement of infected bone and antibiotic treatment, regeneration of postinfectious bone seems to be restricted. One explanation includes the large sized defects resulting from sufficient debridement. Furthermore, it remains unclear if inflammatory processes after bone infection do affect bone regeneration. For continuing studies in this field, an animal model is needed where bone regeneration after sufficient treatment can be studied in detail. Methods For this purpose we created a stable infection in murine tibiae by Staphylococcus aureus inoculation. Thereafter, osteomyelitic bones were debrided thoroughly and animals were subsequently treated with antibiotics. Controls included debrided, non-infected, as well as infected animals exclusively treated with antibiotics. To verify sufficient treatment of infected bone, different assessments detecting S. aureus were utilized: agar plates, histology and RT-qPCR. Results All three detection methods revealed massive reduction or eradication of S. aureus within debrided bones 1 and 2 weeks postoperatively, whereas sole antibiotic therapy could not provide sufficient treatment of osteomyelitic bones. Debrided, previously infected bones showed significantly decreased bone formation, compared to debrided, non-infected controls. Discussion Thus, the animal model presented herein provides a reliable and fascinating tool to study posttraumatic osteomyelitis for clinical therapies. PMID:26872128

  18. Roflumilast Prevents the Metabolic Effects of Bleomycin-Induced Fibrosis in a Murine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Milara

    Full Text Available Fibrotic remodeling is a process common to chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and asthma. Based on preclinical studies phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4 inhibitors may exhibit beneficial anti-inflammatory and anti-remodeling properties for the treatment of these respiratory disorders. Effects of PDE4 inhibitors on changes in the lung metabolome in models of pulmonary fibrotic remodeling have not yet been explored. This work studies the effects of the PDE4 inhibitor roflumilast on changes in the lung metabolome in the common murine model of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR metabolic profiling of intact lung tissue. Metabolic profiling reveals strong differences between fibrotic and non-fibrotic tissue. These differences include increases in proline, glycine, lactate, taurine, phosphocholine and total glutathione and decreases in global fatty acids. In parallel, there was a loss in plasma BH4. This profile suggests that bleomycin produces alterations in the oxidative equilibrium, a strong inflammatory response and activation of the collagen synthesis among others. Roflumilast prevented most of these metabolic effects associated to pulmonary fibrosis suggesting a favorable anti-fibrotic profile.

  19. Divergent effects of RIP1 or RIP3 blockade in murine models of acute liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, M; Graffeo, C S; Rokosh, R; Pansari, M; Ochi, A; Levie, E M; Van Heerden, E; Tippens, D M; Greco, S; Barilla, R; Tomkötter, L; Zambirinis, C P; Avanzi, N; Gulati, R; Pachter, H L; Torres-Hernandez, A; Eisenthal, A; Daley, D; Miller, G

    2015-05-07

    Necroptosis is a recently described Caspase 8-independent method of cell death that denotes organized cellular necrosis. The roles of RIP1 and RIP3 in mediating hepatocyte death from acute liver injury are incompletely defined. Effects of necroptosis blockade were studied by separately targeting RIP1 and RIP3 in diverse murine models of acute liver injury. Blockade of necroptosis had disparate effects on disease outcome depending on the precise etiology of liver injury and component of the necrosome targeted. In ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis, RIP3 deletion was protective, whereas RIP1 inhibition exacerbated disease, accelerated animal death, and was associated with increased hepatocyte apoptosis. Conversely, in acetaminophen-mediated liver injury, blockade of either RIP1 or RIP3 was protective and was associated with lower NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our work highlights the fact that diverse modes of acute liver injury have differing requirements for RIP1 and RIP3; moreover, within a single injury model, RIP1 and RIP3 blockade can have diametrically opposite effects on tissue damage, suggesting that interference with distinct components of the necrosome must be considered separately.

  20. Murine and Human Model Systems for the Study of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian M

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a population of innate immune cells that possess their own effector functions as well as numerous regulatory properties that shape the activity of other innate and adaptive cells of the immune system. Following their development from either lymphoid or myeloid progenitors, the function of dendritic cells is tightly linked to their maturation and activation status. Differentiation into specialized subsets of dendritic cells also contributes to the diverse immunologic functions of these cells. Because of the key role played by dendritic cells in the regulation of both immune tolerance and activation, significant efforts have been focused on understanding dendritic cell biology. This review highlights the model systems currently available to study dendritic cell immunobiology and emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages to each system in both murine and human settings. In particular, in vitro cell culture systems involving immortalized dendritic cell lines, ex vivo systems for differentiating and expanding dendritic cells from their precursor populations, and systems for expanding, ablating, and manipulating dendritic cells in vivo are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of these systems to our current understanding of the development, function, and immunotherapeutic applications of dendritic cells, and insights into how these models might be extended in the future to answer remaining questions in the field are discussed.

  1. Novel Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibodies against Ebolavirus Glycoproteins Show Protection in a Murine Challenge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duehr, James; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Oestereich, Lisa; Chromikova, Veronika; Amanat, Fatima; Rajendran, Madhusudan; Gomez-Medina, Sergio; Mena, Ignacio; tenOever, Benjamin R; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Basler, Christopher F; Munoz-Fontela, Cesar; Krammer, Florian

    2017-08-15

    Out of an estimated 31,100 cases since their discovery in 1976, ebolaviruses have caused approximately 13,000 deaths. The vast majority (∼11,000) of these occurred during the 2013-2016 West African epidemic. Three out of five species in the genus are known to cause Ebola Virus Disease in humans. Several monoclonal antibodies against the ebolavirus glycoprotein are currently in development as therapeutics. However, there is still a paucity of monoclonal antibodies that can cross-react between the glycoproteins of different ebolavirus species, and the mechanism of these monoclonal antibody therapeutics is still not understood in detail. Here, we generated a panel of eight murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) utilizing a prime-boost vaccination regimen with a Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein expression plasmid followed by infection with a vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein. We tested the binding breadth of the resulting monoclonal antibodies using a set of recombinant surface glycoproteins from Reston, Taï Forest, Bundibugyo, Zaire, Sudan, and Marburg viruses and found two antibodies that showed pan-ebolavirus binding. An in vivo Stat2-/- mouse model was utilized to test the ability of these MAbs to protect from infection with a vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein. Several of our antibodies, including the broadly binding ones, protected mice from mortality despite lacking neutralization capability in vitro, suggesting their protection may be mediated by Fc-FcR interactions. Indeed, three antibodies displayed cellular phagocytosis and/or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro Our antibodies, specifically the two identified cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (KL-2E5 and KL-2H7), might add to the understanding of anti-ebolavirus humoral immunity.IMPORTANCE This study describes the generation of a panel of novel anti-ebolavirus glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies, including two

  2. Cell division inhibitors with efficacy equivalent to isoniazid in the acute murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Susan E; Awasthi, Divya; Kumar, Kunal; Carreau, Alexandra; Goullieux, Laurent; Lagrange, Sophie; Vermet, Hélène; Ojima, Iwao; Slayden, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    The increasing number of clinical strains resistant to one or more of the front-line TB drugs complicates the management of this disease. To develop next-generation benzimidazole-based FtsZ inhibitors with improved efficacy, we employed iterative optimization strategies based on whole bacteria potency, bactericidal activity, plasma and metabolic stability and in vivo efficacy studies. Candidate benzimidazoles were evaluated for potency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and select clinical strains, toxicity against Vero cells and compound stability in plasma and liver microsomes. The efficacy of lead compounds was assessed in the acute murine M. tuberculosis infection model via intraperitoneal and oral routes. MICs of SB-P17G-A33, SB-P17G-A38 and SB-P17G-A42 for M. tuberculosis H37Rv and select clinical strains were 0.18-0.39 mg/L. SB-P17G-A38 and SB-P17G-A42 delivered at 50 mg/kg twice daily intraperitoneally or orally demonstrated efficacy in reducing the bacterial load by 5.7-6.3 log10 cfu in the lungs and 3.9-5.0 log10 cfu in the spleen. SB-P17G-A33 delivered at 50 mg/kg twice daily intraperitoneally or orally also reduced the bacterial load by 1.7-2.1 log10 cfu in the lungs and 2.5-3.4 log10 cfu in the spleen. Next-generation benzimidazoles with excellent potency and efficacy against M. tuberculosis have been developed. This is the first report on benzimidazole-based FtsZ inhibitors showing an equivalent level of efficacy to isoniazid in an acute murine M. tuberculosis infection model. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Real-time in vivo green fluorescent protein imaging of a murine leishmaniasis model as a new tool for Leishmania vaccine and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sanjay R; Huang, Robert; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Kolli, Bala; Chang, Kwang-Poo; Hoffman, Robert M; Goto, Yasuyuki; Badaro, Roberto; Schooley, Robert T

    2008-12-01

    Leishmania species are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that cause a broad spectrum of clinical diseases in mammalian hosts. The most frequently used approach to quantify parasites in murine model systems is based on thickness measurements of the footpad or ear after experimental infection. To overcome the limitations of this method, we used a Leishmania mutant episomally transfected with enhanced green fluorescent protein, enabling in vivo real-time whole-body fluorescence imaging, to follow the progression of Leishmania infection in parasitized tissues. Fluorescence correlated with the number of Leishmania parasites in the tissue and demonstrated the real-time efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine. This approach provides several substantial advantages over currently available animal model systems for the in vivo study of immunopathogenesis, prevention, and therapy of leishmaniasis. These include improvements in sensitivity and the ability to acquire real-time data on progression and spread of the infection.

  4. MarA, SoxS and Rob function as virulence factors in an Escherichia coli murine model of ascending pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaz, Paul; Garrity-Ryan, Lynne K; McKenney, David; Jackson, Caroline; Levy, Stuart B; Tanaka, S Ken; Alekshun, Michael N

    2006-12-01

    MarA, SoxS and Rob are transcription factors belonging to the AraC family. While these proteins have been associated historically with control of multiple antibiotic resistance, and tolerance to oxidative stress agents and organic solvents, only a paucity of experimental data support a role in regulating virulence. Clinical Escherichia coli isolates, and isogenic strains lacking marA, soxS and rob, were studied in a murine model of ascending pyelonephritis, which is a clinically relevant model of urinary tract infection. Organisms lacking all three transcription factors (triple knockouts) were significantly less virulent than parental strains, and complementation studies demonstrated that the addition of marA, soxS and rob individually restored wild-type virulence in the triple-knockout strain. Deletion of soxS or rob alone was more detrimental than the removal of marA. Thus, all three proteins contribute to virulence in vivo.

  5. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial triclocarban in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Yan; Qiu, Hong; Morisseau, Christophe; Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Ulu, Arzu; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of the anti-microbial triclocarban (TCC) in personal care products (PCPs) has resulted in concern regarding environmental pollution. TCC is a potent inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Inhibitors of sEH (sEHIs) are anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and cardio-protective in multiple animal models. However, the in vivo effects anticipated from a sEHI have not been reported for TCC. Here we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects in vivo of TCC in a murine model. TCC was employed in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. Systolic blood pressure, plasma levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokine, and metabolomic profile of plasma oxylipins were determined. TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. TCC significantly repressed the increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine caused by LPS. Furthermore, TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo in a time-dependent manner towards resolution of inflammation as expected from a sEHI. These results demonstrated that at the doses used TCC is anti-inflammatory in the murine model. This study suggests that TCC may provide some benefits in humans in addition to its antimicrobial activities due to its potent inhibition of sEH. It may be a promising starting point for developing new low volume high value applications of TCC. However these biological effects also caution against the general over use of TCC in PCPs. PMID:21741984

  6. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Rode; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-01-01

    unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance......A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  7. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance......A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  8. Lin28b is sufficient to drive liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Liem H; Robinton, Daisy A; Seligson, Marc T; Wu, Linwei; Li, Lin; Rakheja, Dinesh; Comerford, Sarah A; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Parikh, Monisha S; Yang, Erin H; Powers, John T; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar P; Hammer, Robert E; Daley, George Q; Zhu, Hao

    2014-08-11

    Lin28a/b are RNA-binding proteins that influence stem cell maintenance, metabolism, and oncogenesis. Poorly differentiated, aggressive cancers often overexpress Lin28, but its role in tumor initiation or maintenance has not been definitively addressed. We report that LIN28B overexpression is sufficient to initiate hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma in murine models. We also detected Lin28b overexpression in MYC-driven hepatoblastomas, and liver-specific deletion of Lin28a/b reduced tumor burden, extended latency, and prolonged survival. Both intravenous siRNA against Lin28b and conditional Lin28b deletion reduced tumor burden and prolonged survival. Igf2bp proteins are upregulated, and Igf2bp3 is required in the context of LIN28B overexpression to promote growth. Therefore, multiple murine models demonstrate that Lin28b is both sufficient to initiate liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Establishment and characterization of a novel murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Katherine A.; Zhu, Xinxia; Burfeind, Kevin G.; Krasnow, Stephanie M.; Levasseur, Peter R.; Morgan, Terry K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Cachexia is a complex metabolic and behavioural syndrome lacking effective therapies. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most important conditions associated with cachexia, with >80% of PDAC patients suffering from the condition. To establish the cardinal features of a murine model of PDAC‐associated cachexia, we characterized the effects of implanting a pancreatic tumour cell line from a syngeneic C57BL/6 KRASG12D P53R172H Pdx‐Cre+/+ (KPC) mouse. Methods Male and female C57BL/6 mice were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or orthotopically with KPC tumour cells. We performed rigorous phenotypic, metabolic, and behavioural analysis of animals over the course of tumour development. Results All routes of administration produced rapidly growing tumours histologically consistent with moderate to poorly differentiated PDAC. The phenotype of this model was dependent on route of administration, with orthotopic and intraperitoneal implantation inducing more severe cachexia than subcutaneous implantation. KPC tumour growth decreased food intake, decreased adiposity and lean body mass, and decreased locomotor activity. Muscle catabolism was observed in both skeletal and cardiac muscles, but the dominant catabolic pathway differed between these tissues. The wasting syndrome in this model was accompanied by hypothalamic inflammation, progressively decreasing brown and white adipose tissue uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1) expression, and increased peripheral inflammation. Haematological and endocrine abnormalities included neutrophil‐dominant leukocytosis and anaemia, and decreased serum testosterone. Conclusions Syngeneic KPC allografts are a robust model for studying cachexia, which recapitulate key features of the PDAC disease process and induce a wide array of cachexia manifestations. This model is therefore ideally suited for future studies exploring the physiological systems involved in cachexia and for preclinical

  10. Murine Vaginal Colonization Model for Investigating Asymptomatic Mucosal Carriage of Streptococcus pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael E.; Nielsen, Hailyn V.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    While many virulence factors promoting Streptococcus pyogenes invasive disease have been described, specific streptococcal factors and host properties influencing asymptomatic mucosal carriage remain uncertain. To address the need for a refined model of prolonged S. pyogenes asymptomatic mucosal colonization, we have adapted a preestrogenized murine vaginal colonization model for S. pyogenes. In this model, derivatives of strains HSC5, SF370, JRS4, NZ131, and MEW123 established a reproducible, asymptomatic colonization of the vaginal mucosa over a period of typically 3 to 4 weeks' duration at a relatively high colonization efficiency. Prior treatment with estradiol prolonged streptococcal colonization and was associated with reduced inflammation in the colonized vaginal epithelium as well as a decreased leukocyte presence in vaginal fluid compared to the levels of inflammation and leukocyte presence in non-estradiol-treated control mice. The utility of our model for investigating S. pyogenes factors contributing to mucosal carriage was verified, as a mutant with a mutation in the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A (CcpA) demonstrated significant impairment in vaginal colonization. An assessment of in vivo transcriptional activity in the CcpA− strain for several known CcpA-regulated genes identified significantly elevated transcription of lactate oxidase (lctO) correlating with excessive generation of hydrogen peroxide to self-lethal levels. Deletion of lctO did not impair colonization, but deletion of lctO in a CcpA− strain prolonged carriage, exceeding even that of the wild-type strain. Thus, while LctO is not essential for vaginal colonization, its dysregulation is deleterious, highlighting the critical role of CcpA in promoting mucosal colonization. The vaginal colonization model should prove effective for future analyses of S. pyogenes mucosal colonization. PMID:23460515

  11. Model refinement for offshore platforms: Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Chen, Zongli; Wu, Yanjian

    2017-08-01

    Offshore jacket platforms are widely used in offshore oil and gas exploitation. Finite element models of such structures need to have many degrees of freedom (DOFs) to represent the geometrical detail of complex structures, thereby leading to incompatibility in the number of DOFs of experimental models. To bring them both to the same order while ensuring that the essential eigen- properties of the refined model match those of experimental models, an extended model refinement procedure is presented in this paper. Vibration testing of an offshore jacket platform model is performed to validate the applicability of the proposed approach. A full-order finite element model of the platform is established and then tuned to meet the measured modal properties identified from the acceleration signals. Both model reduction and modal expansion methods are investigated, as well as various scenarios of sensor arrangements. Upon completion of the refinement, the updated jacket platform model matches the natural frequencies of the measured model well.

  12. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    Full Text Available Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3 signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV. In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11 and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2 in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3

  14. Microparticles from stored red blood cells promote a hypercoagulable state in a murine model of transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young; Xia, Brent T; Jung, Andrew D; Chang, Alex L; Abplanalp, William A; Caldwell, Charles C; Goodman, Michael D; Pritts, Timothy A

    2018-02-01

    Red blood cell-derived microparticles are biologically active, submicron vesicles shed by erythrocytes during storage. Recent clinical studies have linked the duration of red blood cell storage with thromboembolic events in critically ill transfusion recipients. In the present study, we hypothesized that microparticles from aged packed red blood cell units promote a hypercoagulable state in a murine model of transfusion. Microparticles were isolated from aged, murine packed red blood cell units via serial centrifugation. Healthy male C57BL/6 mice were transfused with microparticles or an equivalent volume of vehicle, and whole blood was harvested for analysis via rotational thromboelastometry. Serum was harvested from a separate set of mice after microparticles or saline injection, and analyzed for fibrinogen levels. Red blood cell-derived microparticles were analyzed for their ability to convert prothrombin to thrombin. Finally, mice were transfused with either red blood cell microparticles or saline vehicle, and a tail bleeding time assay was performed after an equilibration period of 2, 6, 12, or 24 hours. Mice injected with red blood cell-derived microparticles demonstrated an accelerated clot formation time (109.3 ± 26.9 vs 141.6 ± 28.2 sec) and increased α angle (68.8 ± 5.0 degrees vs 62.8 ± 4.7 degrees) compared with control (each P microparticles exhibited a hundredfold greater conversion of prothrombin substrate to its active thrombin form (66.60 ± 0.03 vs 0.70 ± 0.01 peak OD; Pmicroparticles-injected mice compared with saline vehicle, suggesting thrombin-mediated conversion to insoluble fibrin (14.0 vs 16.5 µg/mL, Pmicroparticles-injected mice as compared with saline vehicle (each Pmicroparticles induce a transient hypercoagulable state through accelerated activation of clotting factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francesco Corno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION.Surgically induced, combined volume and pressure overload has been used in rabbits to create a simplified and reproducible model of acute left ventricular (LV failure.MATERIALS AND METHODS.New Zealand white male rabbits (n=24, mean weight 3.1±0.2kg were randomly assigned to either the Control group (n=10 or to the Heart Failure group (HF, n=14. Animals in the Control group underwent sham procedures. Animals in the HF group underwent procedures to induce LV volume overload by inducing severe aortic valve regurgitation with aortic cusp disruption and pressure overload using an occlusive silver clip positioned around the pre-renal abdominal aorta.RESULTS.Following Procedure-1 (volume overload echocardiography confirmed severe aortic regurgitation in all animals in the HF group, with increased mean pulse pressure difference from 18±3mmHg to 38±3mmHg (P

  16. Differential expression and function of breast regression protein 39 (BRP-39) in murine models of subacute cigarette smoke exposure and allergic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle Anthony J; Jordana Manel; Bauer Carla MT; Botelho Fernando M; Nikota Jake K; Humbles Alison A; Stampfli Martin R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background While the presence of the chitinase-like molecule YKL40 has been reported in COPD and asthma, its relevance to inflammatory processes elicited by cigarette smoke and common environmental allergens, such as house dust mite (HDM), is not well understood. The objective of the current study was to assess expression and function of BRP-39, the murine equivalent of YKL40 in a murine model of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and contrast expression and function to a model of ...

  17. Quantification of collagen and proteoglycan deposition in a murine model of airway remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Alistair K; Bottoms, Stephen E; Laurent, Geoffrey J; McAnulty, Robin J

    2005-01-01

    Background Sub-epithelial extracellular matrix deposition is a feature of asthmatic airway remodelling associated with severity of disease, decline in lung function and airway hyperresponsiveness. The composition of, and mechanisms leading to, this increase in subepithelial matrix, and its importance in the pathogenesis of asthma are unclear. This is partly due to limitations of the current models and techniques to assess airway remodelling. Methods In this study we used a modified murine model of ovalbumin sensitisation and challenge to reproduce features of airway remodelling, including a sustained increase in sub-epithelial matrix deposition. In addition, we have established techniques to accurately and specifically measure changes in sub-epithelial matrix deposition, using histochemical and immunohistochemical staining in conjunction with digital image analysis, and applied these to the measurement of collagen and proteoglycans. Results 24 hours after final ovalbumin challenge, changes similar to those associated with acute asthma were observed, including inflammatory cell infiltration, epithelial cell shedding and goblet cell hyperplasia. Effects were restricted to the bronchial and peribronchial regions with parenchymal lung of ovalbumin sensitised and challenged mice appearing histologically normal. By 12 days, the acute inflammatory changes had largely resolved and increased sub-epithelial staining for collagen and proteoglycans was observed. Quantitative digital image analysis confirmed the increased deposition of sub-epithelial collagen (33%, p proteoglycans (32%, p proteoglycan deposition in an animal model of airway remodelling. This model will be useful for measurement of other matrix components, as well as for assessment of the molecular mechanisms contributing to, and agents to modulate airway remodelling. PMID:15819978

  18. RhoA Kinase Inhibition With Fasudil Versus Simvastatin in Murine Models of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkar, Robert; Shi, Changbin; Austin, Cecilia; Moore, Thomas; Lightle, Rhonda; Cao, Ying; Zhang, Lingjiao; Wu, Meijing; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Girard, Romuald; McDonald, David A; Rorrer, Autumn; Gallione, Carol; Pytel, Peter; Liao, James K; Marchuk, Douglas A; Awad, Issam A

    2017-01-01

    We sought to compare the effect of chronic treatment with commonly tolerated doses of Fasudil, a specific RhoA kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, and simvastatin (with pleiotropic effects including ROCK inhibition) on cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) genesis and maturation in 2 models that recapitulate the human disease. Two heterozygous murine models, Ccm1(+/-)Msh2(-)(/-) and Ccm2(+/-)Trp53(-/-), were treated from weaning to 4 to 5 months of age with Fasudil (100 mg/kg per day), simvastatin (40 mg/kg per day) or with placebo. Mouse brains were blindly assessed for CCM lesion burden, nonheme iron deposition (as a quantitative measure of chronic lesional hemorrhage), and ROCK activity. Fasudil, but not simvastatin, significantly decreased mature CCM lesion burden in Ccm1(+/-)Msh2(-/-) mice, and in meta-analysis of both models combined, when compared with mice receiving placebo. Fasudil and simvastatin both significantly decreased the integrated iron density per mature lesion area in Ccm1(+/-)Msh2(-/-) mice, and in both models combined, compared with mice given placebo. ROCK activity in mature lesions of Ccm1(+/-)Msh2(-/-) mice was similar with both treatments. Fasudil, but not simvastatin, improved survival in Ccm1(+/-)Msh2(-/-) mice. Fasudil and simvastatin treatment did not affect survival or lesion development significantly in Ccm2(+/-)Trp53(-/-) mice alone, and Fasudil benefit seemed limited to males. ROCK inhibitor Fasudil was more efficacious than simvastatin in improving survival and blunting the development of mature CCM lesions. Both drugs significantly decreased chronic hemorrhage in CCM lesions. These findings justify the development of ROCK inhibitors and the clinical testing of commonly used statin agents in CCM. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. An Improved Syngeneic Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Breast Cancer Progression

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    Rashid, Omar M.; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Methods Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous injection in the area of the nipple (OP), or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. Results ODV produced less variable sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. Conclusions ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development. PMID:25200444

  20. Locomotion and muscle mass measures in a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis

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    Hartog Anita

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by chronic poly-arthritis, synovial hyperplasia, erosive synovitis, progressive cartilage and bone destruction accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in the skeletal muscle and can in part be explained by a decreased physical activity. The murine collagen induced arthritis (CIA model has been proven to be a useful model in RA research since it shares many immunological and pathological features with human RA. The present study explored the interactions between arthritis development, locomotion and muscle mass in the CIA model. Methods CIA was induced in male DBA/1 mice. Locomotion was registered at different time points by a camera and evaluated by a computerized tracing system. Arthritis severity was detected by the traditionally used semi-quantitative clinical scores. The muscle mass of the hind-legs was detected at the end of the study by weighing. A methotrexate (MTX intervention group was included to study the applicability of the locomotion and muscle mass for testing effectiveness of interventions in more detail. Results There is a strong correlation between clinical arthritis and locomotion. The correlations between muscle mass and locomotion or clinical arthritis were less pronounced. MTX intervention resulted in an improvement of disease severity accompanied by an increase in locomotion and muscle mass. Conclusion The present data demonstrate that registration of locomotion followed by a computerized evaluation of the movements is a simple non invasive quantitative method to define disease severity and evaluate effectiveness of therapeutic agents in the CIA model.

  1. High-Dose Menaquinone-7 Supplementation Reduces Cardiovascular Calcification in a Murine Model of Extraosseous Calcification

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    Daniel Scheiber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular calcification is prevalent in the aging population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and diabetes mellitus, giving rise to substantial morbidity and mortality. Vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP is an important inhibitor of calcification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of high-dose menaquinone-7 (MK-7 supplementation (100 µg/g diet on the development of extraosseous calcification in a murine model. Calcification was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy combined with high phosphate diet in rats. Sham operated animals served as controls. Animals received high or low MK-7 diets for 12 weeks. We assessed vital parameters, serum chemistry, creatinine clearance, and cardiac function. CKD provoked increased aortic (1.3 fold; p < 0.05 and myocardial (2.4 fold; p < 0.05 calcification in line with increased alkaline phosphatase levels (2.2 fold; p < 0.01. MK-7 supplementation inhibited cardiovascular calcification and decreased aortic alkaline phosphatase tissue concentrations. Furthermore, MK-7 supplementation increased aortic MGP messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA expression (10-fold; p < 0.05. CKD-induced arterial hypertension with secondary myocardial hypertrophy and increased elastic fiber breaking points in the arterial tunica media did not change with MK-7 supplementation. Our results show that high-dose MK-7 supplementation inhibits the development of cardiovascular calcification. The protective effect of MK-7 may be related to the inhibition of secondary mineralization of damaged vascular structures.

  2. Curcumin increases the pathogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in murine model.

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    Sandhya A Marathe

    Full Text Available Curcumin has gained immense importance for its vast therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Contrary to this, our study reveals that it regulates the defense pathways of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium to enhance its pathogenicity. In a murine model of typhoid fever, we observed higher bacterial load in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and liver, when infected with curcumin-treated Salmonella. Curcumin increased the resistance of S. Typhimurium against antimicrobial agents like antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This increased tolerance might be attributed to the up-regulation of genes involved in resistance against antimicrobial peptides--pmrD and pmrHFIJKLM and genes with antioxidant function--mntH, sodA and sitA. We implicate that iron chelation property of curcumin have a role in regulating mntH and sitA. Interestingly, we see that the curcumin-mediated modulation of pmr genes is through the PhoPQ regulatory system. Curcumin downregulates SPI1 genes, required for entry into epithelial cells and upregulates SPI2 genes required to intracellular survival. Since it is known that the SPI1 and SPI2 system can be regulated by the PhoPQ system, this common regulator could explain curcumin's mode of action. This data urges us to rethink the indiscriminate use of curcumin especially during Salmonella outbreaks.

  3. Telomerase inhibition improves tumor response to radiotherapy in a murine orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

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    Ferrandon, Sylvain; Malleval, Céline; El Hamdani, Badia; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Bolbos, Radu; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Manas, Patrick; Gryaznov, Sergei M; Alphonse, Gersende; Honnorat, Jérôme; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Poncet, Delphine

    2015-07-17

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive type of adult brain tumor. Most GBMs express telomerase; a high level of intra-tumoral telomerase activity (TA) is predictive of poor prognosis. Thus, telomerase inhibitors are promising options to treat GBM. These inhibitors increase the response to radiotherapy (RT), in vitro as well as in vivo. Since typical treatments for GBM include RT, our objective was to evaluate the efficiency of Imetelstat (TA inhibitor) combined with RT. We used a murine orthotopic model of human GBM (N = 8 to11 mice per group) and μMRI imaging to evaluate the efficacy of Imetelstat (delivered by intra-peritoneal injection) alone and combined with RT. Using a clinically established protocol, we demonstrated that Imetelstat significantly: (i) inhibited the TA in the very center of the tumor, (ii) reduced tumor volume as a proportion of TA inhibition, and (iii) increased the response to RT, in terms of tumor volume regression and survival increase. Imetelstat is currently evaluated in refractory brain tumors in young patients (without RT). Our results support its clinical evaluation combined with RT to treat GBM.

  4. Antidiabetic Properties of Azardiracta indica and Bougainvillea spectabilis: In Vivo Studies in Murine Diabetes Model.

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    Bhat, Menakshi; Kothiwale, Sandeepkumar K; Tirmale, Amruta R; Bhargava, Shobha Y; Joshi, Bimba N

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic syndrome characterized by an increase in the blood glucose level. Treatment of diabetes is complicated due to multifactorial nature of the disease. Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss and Bougainvillea spectabilis are reported to have medicinal values including antidiabetic properties. In the present study using invivo diabetic murine model, A. indica and B. spectabilis chloroform, methanolic and aqueous extracts were investigated for the biochemical parameters important for controlling diabetes. It was found that A. indica chloroform extract and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts showed a good oral glucose tolerance and significantly reduced the intestinal glucosidase activity. Interestingly, A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts showed significant increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and hepatic, skeletal muscle glycogen content after 21 days of treatment. In immunohistochemical analysis, we observed a regeneration of insulin-producing cells and corresponding increase in the plasma insulin and c-peptide levels with the treatment of A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts. Analyzing the results, it is clear that A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts are good candidates for developing new neutraceuticals treatment for diabetes.

  5. Antidiabetic Properties of Azardiracta indica and Bougainvillea spectabilis: In Vivo Studies in Murine Diabetes Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menakshi Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic syndrome characterized by an increase in the blood glucose level. Treatment of diabetes is complicated due to multifactorial nature of the disease. Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss and Bougainvillea spectabilis are reported to have medicinal values including antidiabetic properties. In the present study using in vivo diabetic murine model, A. indica and B. spectabilis chloroform, methanolic and aqueous extracts were investigated for the biochemical parameters important for controlling diabetes. It was found that A. indica chloroform extract and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts showed a good oral glucose tolerance and significantly reduced the intestinal glucosidase activity. Interestingly, A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts showed significant increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and hepatic, skeletal muscle glycogen content after 21 days of treatment. In immunohistochemical analysis, we observed a regeneration of insulin-producing cells and corresponding increase in the plasma insulin and c-peptide levels with the treatment of A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts. Analyzing the results, it is clear that A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts are good candidates for developing new neutraceuticals treatment for diabetes.

  6. Rosmarinic Acid Attenuates Airway Inflammation and Hyperresponsiveness in a Murine Model of Asthma.

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    Liang, Zhengmin; Xu, Yangfeng; Wen, Xuemei; Nie, Haiying; Hu, Tingjun; Yang, Xiaofeng; Chu, Xiao; Yang, Jian; Deng, Xuming; He, Jiakang

    2016-06-13

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) has numerous pharmacologic effects, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects. This study aimed to evaluate the preventive activity of RA in a murine model of asthma and to investigate its possible molecular mechanisms. Female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (Ova) were pretreated with RA (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) at 1 h before Ova challenge. The results demonstrated that RA markedly inhibited increases in inflammatory cells and Th2 cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), significantly reduced the total IgE and Ova-specific IgE concentrations, and greatly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) compared with the control Ova-induced mice. Histological analyses showed that RA substantially decreased the number of inflammatory cells and mucus hypersecretion in the airway. In addition, our results suggested that the protective effects of RA might be mediated by the suppression of ERK, JNK and p38 phosphorylation and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Furthermore, RA pretreatment resulted in a noticeable reduction in AMCase, CCL11, CCR3, Ym2 and E-selectin mRNA expression in lung tissues. These findings suggest that RA may effectively delay the progression of airway inflammation.

  7. Rosmarinic Acid Attenuates Airway Inflammation and Hyperresponsiveness in a Murine Model of Asthma

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    Zhengmin Liang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rosmarinic acid (RA has numerous pharmacologic effects, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects. This study aimed to evaluate the preventive activity of RA in a murine model of asthma and to investigate its possible molecular mechanisms. Female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (Ova were pretreated with RA (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg at 1 h before Ova challenge. The results demonstrated that RA markedly inhibited increases in inflammatory cells and Th2 cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, significantly reduced the total IgE and Ova-specific IgE concentrations, and greatly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR compared with the control Ova-induced mice. Histological analyses showed that RA substantially decreased the number of inflammatory cells and mucus hypersecretion in the airway. In addition, our results suggested that the protective effects of RA might be mediated by the suppression of ERK, JNK and p38 phosphorylation and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB. Furthermore, RA pretreatment resulted in a noticeable reduction in AMCase, CCL11, CCR3, Ym2 and E-selectin mRNA expression in lung tissues. These findings suggest that RA may effectively delay the progression of airway inflammation.

  8. Simvastatin reduces venous stenosis formation in a murine hemodialysis vascular access model

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    Janardhanan, Rajiv; Yang, Binxia; Vohra, Pawan; Roy, Bhaskar; Withers, Sarah; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Mandrekar, Jaywant; Kong, Hyunjoon; Leof, Edward B; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Misra, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Venous neointimal hyperplasia (VNH) is responsible for hemodialysis vascular access malfunction. Here we tested whether VNH formation occurs, in part, due to vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 gene expression causing adventitial fibroblast transdifferentiation to myofibroblasts (α-SMA-positive cells). These cells have increased proliferative and migratory capacity leading to VNH formation. Simvastatin was used to decrease VEGF-A and MMP-9 gene expression in our murine arteriovenous fistula model created by connecting the right carotid artery to the ipsilateral jugular vein. Compared to fistulae of vehicle-treated mice, the fistulae of simvastatin-treated mice had the expected decrease in VEGF-A and MMP-9 but also showed a significant reduction in MMP-2 expression with a significant decrease in VNH and a significant increase in the mean lumen vessel area. There was an increase in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and decreases in α-SMA density, cell proliferation, and HIF-1α and hypoxyprobe staining. This latter result prompted us to determine the effect of simvastatin on fibroblasts subjected to hypoxia in vitro. Simvastatin-treated fibroblasts had a significant decrease in myofibroblast production along with decreased cellular proliferation, migration, and MMP-9 activity but increased caspase 3 activity suggesting increased apoptosis. Thus, simvastatin results in a significant reduction in VNH, with increase in mean lumen vessel area by decreasing VEGF-A/MMP-9 pathway activity. PMID:23636169

  9. Efficacy of parthenolide on lung histopathology in a murine model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arıkan-Ayyıldız, Z; Karaman, M; Özbal, S; Bağrıyanık, A; Yilmaz, O; Karaman, Ö; Uzuner, N

    Parthenolide is the active constituent of the plant 'Tanacetum parthenium' (Feverfew) which has been used for centuries as a folk remedy for inflammatory conditions. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of parthenolide in a murine model of chronic asthma. Thirty-five BALB/c mice were divided into five groups; I (control), II (placebo), III (dexamethasone), IV (parthenolide) and V (dexamethasone and parthenolide combination). Lung histology was evaluated after treatment with the study drugs. Levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 were determined by ELISA. Histologic parameters except the number of mast and goblet cells improved in the parthenolide group when compared with placebo. All parameters except basal membrane thickness and number of mast cells were improved significantly better in the group receiving dexamethasone when compared with the parthenolide group. Improvement of most of the histologic parameters was similar in Groups III and V. Interleukin-4 levels were significantly reduced in the parthenolide group when compared to the placebo group. We demonstrated that parthenolide administration alleviated some of the pathological changes in asthma. But parthenolide alone is not efficient as dexamethasone therapy and the parthenolide and dexamethasone combination also did not add any beneficial effect to the dexamethasone treatment. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Club cell secretory protein improves survival in a murine obliterative bronchiolitis model.

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    Wendt, Christine; Tram, Kevin; Price, Andrew; England, Kristen; Stiehm, Andrew; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2013-11-01

    Club cell secretory protein (CCSP) is an indirect phospholipase A2 inhibitor with some immunosuppressive and antiproliferative properties that is expressed in bronchiolar Club cells. In our murine bone marrow transplant (BMT) model of obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), CCSP is diminished; however, its role is unknown. To determine the role of CCSP, B6 wild-type (WT) or CCSP-deficient (CCSP(-/-)) mice were lethally conditioned and given allogeneic bone marrow with a sublethal dose of allogeneic splenic T cells to induce OB. We found that CCSP(-/-) mice demonstrated a higher mortality following BMT-induced OB compared with WT mice. Mice were analyzed 60 days post-BMT for protein expression, pulmonary function, and histology. CCSP levels were reduced in WT mice with BMT-induced OB, and lower levels correlated to decreased lung compliance. CCSP(-/-) had a higher degree of injury and fibrosis as measured by hydroxy proline, along with an increased lung resistance and the inflammatory markers, leukotriene B4 and CXCL1. Replacement with recombinant intravenous CCSP partially reversed the weight loss and improved survival in the CCSP(-/-) mice. In addition, CCSP replacement improved histology and decreased inflammatory cells and markers. These findings indicate that CCSP has a regulatory role in OB and may have potential as a preventive therapy.

  11. Anti-cancer activity of Annexin V in murine melanoma model by suppressing tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuerui; Huo, Lina; Jin, Haibo; Han, Yuheng; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yanjun; Lai, Xinghuan; Le, Ziwei; Zhang, Jing; Hua, Zichun

    2017-06-27

    Annexin V, a protein with high affinity to phosphatidylserine (PS) in a calcium dependent manner, has been widely used to probe apoptosis. Annexin V in inhibiting engulfment of apoptotic cells by macrophages had been reported to increase the immunogenicity of tumor cells undergoing apoptosis. However, far less is known about its multiple properties, especially in cancer therapies. Here we found that Annexin V had a good anti-tumor activity in murine melanomaxenograft model. Treatment with Annexin V showed significant reduction in tumor size and remarkable tumor necrosis areas. The serum level of VEGF was downregualted by Annexin V both in normal mice and mice bearing tumor, suggesting that its new role on impeding tumor angiogenesis. In Silico analysis using Oncomine database, we also found the negative correlation of AnnexinV and VEGF both in skin and melanoma. The decreased Annexin V expression shows linearity relation with the elevated VEGF expression. These data provided a possibility that Annexin V can be used as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor in tumor therapy.

  12. The Metabolic Syndrome and Microvascular Complications in a Murine Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Junguk; Dauch, Jacqueline R.; Hinder, Lucy M.; Hayes, John M.; Backus, Carey; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kretzler, Matthias; Brosius, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    To define the components of the metabolic syndrome that contribute to diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), we treated the BKS db/db mouse, an established murine model of T2DM and the metabolic syndrome, with the thiazolidinedione class drug pioglitazone. Pioglitazone treatment of BKS db/db mice produced a significant weight gain, restored glycemic control, and normalized measures of serum oxidative stress and triglycerides but had no effect on LDLs or total cholesterol. Moreover, although pioglitazone treatment normalized renal function, it had no effect on measures of large myelinated nerve fibers, specifically sural or sciatic nerve conduction velocities, but significantly improved measures of small unmyelinated nerve fiber architecture and function. Analyses of gene expression arrays of large myelinated sciatic nerves from pioglitazone-treated animals revealed an unanticipated increase in genes related to adipogenesis, adipokine signaling, and lipoprotein signaling, which likely contributed to the blunted therapeutic response. Similar analyses of dorsal root ganglion neurons revealed a salutary effect of pioglitazone on pathways related to defense and cytokine production. These data suggest differential susceptibility of small and large nerve fibers to specific metabolic impairments associated with T2DM and provide the basis for discussion of new treatment paradigms for individuals with T2DM and DPN. PMID:25979075

  13. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Griw, M A; Alghazeer, R O; Al-Azreg, S A; Bennour, E M

    2016-01-01

    Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market.

  14. Nonessential Role for the NLRP1 Inflammasome Complex in a Murine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Thomas Brickler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI elicits the immediate production of proinflammatory cytokines which participate in regulating the immune response. While the mechanisms of adaptive immunity in secondary injury are well characterized, the role of the innate response is unclear. Recently, the NLR inflammasome has been shown to become activated following TBI, causing processing and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLR, caspase-1, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC. ASC is upregulated after TBI and is critical in coupling the proteins during complex formation resulting in IL-1β cleavage. To directly test whether inflammasome activation contributes to acute TBI-induced damage, we assessed IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 expression, contusion volume, hippocampal cell death, and motor behavior recovery in Nlrp1−/−, Asc−/−, and wild type mice after moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI injury. Although IL-1β expression is significantly attenuated in the cortex of Nlrp1−/− and Asc−/− mice following CCI injury, no difference in motor recovery, cell death, or contusion volume is observed compared to wild type. These findings indicate that inflammasome activation does not significantly contribute to acute neural injury in the murine model of moderate CCI injury.

  15. Behavioral Phenotyping of Murine Disease Models with the Integrated Behavioral Station (INBEST).

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    Sakic, Boris; Cooper, Marcella P A; Taylor, Sarah E; Stojanovic, Milica; Zagorac, Bosa; Kapadia, Minesh

    2015-04-23

    Due to rapid advances in genetic engineering, small rodents have become the preferred subjects in many disciplines of biomedical research. In studies of chronic CNS disorders, there is an increasing demand for murine models with high validity at the behavioral level. However, multiple pathogenic mechanisms and complex functional deficits often impose challenges to reliably measure and interpret behavior of chronically sick mice. Therefore, the assessment of peripheral pathology and a behavioral profile at several time points using a battery of tests are required. Video-tracking, behavioral spectroscopy, and remote acquisition of physiological measures are emerging technologies that allow for comprehensive, accurate, and unbiased behavioral analysis in a home-base-like setting. This report describes a refined phenotyping protocol, which includes a custom-made monitoring apparatus (Integrated Behavioral Station, INBEST) that focuses on prolonged measurements of basic functional outputs, such as spontaneous activity, food/water intake and motivated behavior in a relatively stress-free environment. Technical and conceptual improvements in INBEST design may further promote reproducibility and standardization of behavioral studies.

  16. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

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    Martha Elba Gonzalez-Mejia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO, has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf, infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME, non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001. In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels.

  17. Etanercept administration prevents the inflammatory response induced by carrageenan in the murine air pouch model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Rodrigo Antônio; Dalmarco, Eduardo Monguilhott; Fröde, Tânia Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases that affect approximately 1% of world's population. The development of TNF inhibitors in the last decade represents a great advance in the treatment of mild and severe forms of RA. Etanercept is one of these drugs that is useful for RA treatment, but the mechanism of inhibition of the signaling pathway of inflammation was not completely elucidated. This study was conducted to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of etanercept in comparison to reference drugs (dexamethasone and indomethacin). Inflammation was induced by subcutaneal administration of carrageenan in the Swiss albino mice using the murine air pouch model. Exudation; leukocytes; myeloperoxidase (MPO); adenosine deaminase (ADA); nitric oxide metabolites (NOx); tumor necrosis factor (TNF); interferon gamma (IFN-γ); interleukins (IL) IL-6, IL-17, IL-10, IL-4, and IL-2; nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation and apoptosis were evaluated 24 h after the induction of inflammation. Treatment with etanercept significantly inhibited exudate concentrations; leukocyte count; MPO and ADA activities; NOx, TNF, IFN-γ, and IL-17 levels; and NF-kappa B activation (p Etanercept induced apoptosis, reducing the number of viable neutrophils without increasing necrosis (p etanercept may be via decrease of NF-κB activation. This effect promoted the reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NOx and the induction of neutrophil apoptosis. The effect of etanercept upon neutrophils apoptosis may indicate the use of this drug therapy in the early stage of rheumatoid arthritis disease.

  18. Heat Shock Response Associated with Hepatocarcinogenesis in a Murine Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I

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    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Roy, Vincent; Orejuela, Diana; Tanguay, Robert M., E-mail: robert.tanguay@ibis.ulaval.ca [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Genetics, Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS) and PROTEO, 1030 avenue de la médecine, Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2014-04-23

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione). However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC.

  19. Differences in Host Innate Responses among Coccidioides Isolates in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Eric R G; David, Victoria R; Doyle, Adina L; Rajabi, Khadijeh; Kiefer, Jeffrey A; Pirrotte, Patrick; Barker, Bridget M

    2015-10-01

    Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are soil-dwelling fungi and the causative agents of coccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic to certain semiarid regions in the Americas. The most common route of infection is by inhalation of airborne Coccidioides arthroconidia. Once a susceptible host inhales the conidia, a transition to mature endosporulated spherules can occur within the first 5 days of infection. For this study, we examined the host response in a murine model of coccidioidomycosis during a time period of infection that has not been well characterized. We collected lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from BALB/c mice that were infected with a C. immitis pure strain, a C. immitis hybrid strain, or a C. posadasii strain as well as uninfected mice. We compared the host responses to the Coccidioides strains used in this study by assessing the level of transcription of selected cytokine genes in lung tissues and characterized host and fungal proteins present in BALF. Host response varied depending on the Coccidioides strain that was used and did not appear to be overly robust. This study provides a foundation to begin to dissect the host immune response early in infection, to detect abundant Coccidioides proteins, and to develop diagnostics that target these early time points of infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition blocks M2 macrophage differentiation and suppresses metastasis in murine breast cancer model.

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    Yi-Rang Na

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are often associated with abundant macrophages that resemble the alternatively activated M2 subset. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs inhibit anti-tumor immune responses and promote metastasis. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibition is known to prevent breast cancer metastasis. This study hypothesized that COX-2 inhibition affects TAM characteristics potentially relevant to tumor cell metastasis. We found that the specific COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, inhibited human M2 macrophage differentiation, as determined by decreased CD14 and CD163 expressions and increased TNFα production. Several key metastasis-related mediators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, were inhibited in the presence of etodolac as compared to untreated M2 macrophages. Murine bone marrow derived M2 macrophages also showed enhanced surface MHCII IA/IE and CD80, CD86 expressions together with enhanced TNFα expressions with etodolac treatment during differentiation. Using a BALB/c breast cancer model, we found that etodolac significantly reduced lung metastasis, possibly due to macrophages expressing increased IA/IE and TNFα, but decreased M2 macrophage-related genes expressions (Ym1, TGFβ. In conclusion, COX-2 inhibition caused loss of the M2 macrophage characteristics of TAMs and may assist prevention of breast cancer metastasis.

  1. 830-nm irradiation increases the wound tensile strength in a diabetic murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, I; Lanzafame, R J; Evans, R; Narayan, V; Dailey, B; Buehner, N; Naim, J O

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low-power laser irradiation on wound healing in genetic diabetes. Female C57BL/Ksj/db/db mice received 2 dorsal 1 cm full-thickness incisions and laser irradiation (830 nm, 79 mW/cm(2), 5.0 J/cm(2)/wound). Daily low-level laser therapy (LLLT) occurred over 0-4 days, 3-7 days, or nonirradiated. On sacrifice at 11 or 23 days, wounds were excised, and tensile strengths were measured and standardized. Nontreated diabetic wound tensile strength was 0.77 +/- 0.22 g/mm(2) and 1.51 +/- 0.13 g/mm(2) at 11 and 23 days. After LLLT, over 0-4 days tensile strength was 1.15 +/- 0.14 g/mm(2) and 2.45 +/- 0.29 g/mm(2) (P = 0.0019). Higher tensile strength at 23 days occurred in the 3- to 7-day group (2.72 +/- 0.56 g/mm(2) LLLT vs. 1.51 +/- 0.13 g/mm(2) nontreated; P laser irradiation at 830 nm significantly enhances cutaneous wound tensile strength in a murine diabetic model. Further investigation of the mechanism of LLLT in primary wound healing is warranted. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Second-Hand Smoke Increases Bronchial Hyperreactivity and Eosinophilia in a Murine Model of Allergic Aspergillosis

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    Brian W. P. Seymour

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Involuntary inhalation of tobacco smoke has been shown to aggravate the allergic response. Antibodies to fungal antigens such as Aspergillus fumigatus (Af cause an allergic lung disease in humans. This study was carried out to determine the effect of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS on a murine model of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA. BALB/c mice were exposed to aged and diluted sidestream cigarette smoke to simulate 'second-hand smoke'. The concentration was consistent with that achieved in enclosed public areas or households where multiple people smoke. During exposure, mice were sensitized to Af antigen intranasally. Mice that were sensitized to Af antigen and exposed to ETS developed significantly greater airway hyperreactivity than did mice similarly sensitized to Af but housed in ambient air. The effective concentration of aerosolized acetylcholine needed to double pulmonary flow resistance was significantly lower in Af + ETS mice compared to the Af + AIR mice. Immunological data that supports this exacerbation of airway hyperresponsiveness being mediated by an enhanced type 1 hypersensitivity response include: eosinophilia in peripheral blood and lung sections. All Af sensitized mice produced elevated levels of IL4, IL5 and IL10 but no IFN-γ indicating a polarized Th2 response. Thus, ETS can cause exacerbation of asthma in ABPA as demonstrated by functional airway hyperresponsiveness and elevated levels of blood eosinophilia.

  3. Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality

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    M.A. Al-Griw

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market.

  4. Stimulation of Respiratory Motor Output and Ventilation in a Murine Model of Pompe Disease by Ampakines.

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    ElMallah, Mai K; Pagliardini, Silvia; Turner, Sara M; Cerreta, Anthony J; Falk, Darin J; Byrne, Barry J; Greer, John J; Fuller, David D

    2015-09-01

    Pompe disease results from a mutation in the acid α-glucosidase gene leading to lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Respiratory insufficiency is common, and the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment, enzyme replacement, has limited effectiveness. Ampakines are drugs that enhance α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor responses and can increase respiratory motor drive. Recent work indicates that respiratory motor drive can be blunted in Pompe disease, and thus pharmacologic stimulation of breathing may be beneficial. Using a murine Pompe model with the most severe clinical genotype (the Gaa(-/-) mouse), our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that ampakines can stimulate respiratory motor output and increase ventilation. Our second objective was to confirm that neuropathology was present in Pompe mouse medullary respiratory control neurons. The impact of ampakine CX717 on breathing was determined via phrenic and hypoglossal nerve recordings in anesthetized mice and whole-body plethysmography in unanesthetized mice. The medulla was examined using standard histological methods coupled with immunochemical markers of respiratory control neurons. Ampakine CX717 robustly increased phrenic and hypoglossal inspiratory bursting and reduced respiratory cycle variability in anesthetized Pompe mice, and it increased inspiratory tidal volume in unanesthetized Pompe mice. CX717 did not significantly alter these variables in wild-type mice. Medullary respiratory neurons showed extensive histopathology in Pompe mice. Ampakines stimulate respiratory neuromotor output and ventilation in Pompe mice, and therefore they have potential as an adjunctive therapy in Pompe disease.

  5. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL.

  6. Detection of Spontaneous Schwannomas by MRI in a Transgenic Murine Model of Neurofibromatosis Type 2

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    S.M. Messerli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous schwannomas were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in a transgenic murine model of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 expressing a dominant mutant form of merlin under the Schwann cell-specific PO promoter. Approximately 85% of the investigated mice showed putative tumors by 24 months of age. Specifically, 21% of the mice showed tumors in the intercostal muscles, 14% in the limb muscles, 7% in the spinal cord and spinal ganglia, 7% in the external ear, 14% in the muscle of the abdominal region, and 7% in the intestine; 66% of the female mice had uterine tumors. Multiple tumors were detected by MRI in 21% of mice. The tumors were isointense with muscle by T1-weighted MRI, showed strong enhancement following administration of gadolinium-DTPA, and were markedly hyperintense by T2-weighted MRI, all hallmarks of the clinical manifestation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumors consisted of schwannomas and Schwann cell hyperplasias. The lesions stained positively for S-100 protein and a marker antigen for the mutated transgenic NF2 protein, confirming that the imaged tumors and areas of hyperplasia were of Schwann cell origin and expressed the mutated NF2 protein. Tumors were highly infectable with a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, hrR3, which contains the reporter gene, lacZ. The ability to develop schwannoma growth with a noninvasive imaging technique will allow assessment of therapeutic interventions.

  7. Micro-computed tomography in murine models of cerebral cavernous malformations as a paradigm for brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Romuald; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Orsbon, Courtney; Tan, Huan; Moore, Thomas; Hobson, Nick; Shenkar, Robert; Lightle, Rhonda; Shi, Changbin; Fam, Maged D; Cao, Ying; Shen, Le; Neander, April I; Rorrer, Autumn; Gallione, Carol; Tang, Alan T; Kahn, Mark L; Marchuk, Douglas A; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Awad, Issam A

    2016-09-15

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are hemorrhagic brain lesions, where murine models allow major mechanistic discoveries, ushering genetic manipulations and preclinical assessment of therapies. Histology for lesion counting and morphometry is essential yet tedious and time consuming. We herein describe the application and validations of X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), a non-destructive technique allowing three-dimensional CCM lesion count and volumetric measurements, in transgenic murine brains. We hereby describe a new contrast soaking technique not previously applied to murine models of CCM disease. Volumetric segmentation and image processing paradigm allowed for histologic correlations and quantitative validations not previously reported with the micro-CT technique in brain vascular disease. Twenty-two hyper-dense areas on micro-CT images, identified as CCM lesions, were matched by histology. The inter-rater reliability analysis showed strong consistency in the CCM lesion identification and staging (K=0.89, p<0.0001) between the two techniques. Micro-CT revealed a 29% greater CCM lesion detection efficiency, and 80% improved time efficiency. Serial integrated lesional area by histology showed a strong positive correlation with micro-CT estimated volume (r(2)=0.84, p<0.0001). Micro-CT allows high throughput assessment of lesion count and volume in pre-clinical murine models of CCM. This approach complements histology with improved accuracy and efficiency, and can be applied for lesion burden assessment in other brain diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Almorexant promotes sleep and exacerbates cataplexy in a murine model of narcolepsy.

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    Black, Sarah Wurts; Morairty, Stephen R; Fisher, Simon P; Chen, Tsui-Ming; Warrier, Deepti R; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2013-03-01

    Humans with narcolepsy and orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic (TG) mice exhibit extensive, but incomplete, degeneration of hypo-cretin (Hcrt) neurons. Partial Hcrt cell loss also occurs in Parkinson disease and other neurologic conditions. Whether Hcrt antagonists such as almorexant (ALM) can exert an effect on the Hcrt that remains after Hcrt neurodegeneration has not yet been determined. The current study was designed to evaluate the hypnotic and cataplexy-inducing efficacy of a Hcrt antagonist in an animal model with low Hcrt tone and compare the ALM efficacy profile in the disease model to that produced in wild-type (WT) control animals. Counterbalanced crossover study. Home cage. Nine TG mice and 10 WT mice. ALM (30, 100, 300 mg/kg), vehicle and positive control injections, dark/active phase onset. During the 12-h dark period after dosing, ALM exacerbated cataplexy in TG mice and increased nonrapid eye movement sleep with heightened sleep/wake fragmentation in both genotypes. ALM showed greater hypnotic potency in WT mice than in TG mice. The 100 mg/kg dose conferred maximal promotion of cataplexy in TG mice and maximal promotion of REM sleep in WT mice. In TG mice, ALM (30 mg/ kg) paradoxically induced a transient increase in active wakefulness. Core body temperature (Tb) decreased after acute Hcrt receptor blockade, but the reduction in Tb that normally accompanies the wake-to-sleep transition was blunted in TG mice. These complex dose- and genotype-dependent interactions underscore the importance of effector mechanisms downstream from Hcrt receptors that regulate arousal state. Cataplexy promotion by ALM warrants cautious use of Hcrt antagonists in patient populations with Hcrt neurodegeneration, but may also facilitate the discovery of anticataplectic medications. Black SW; Morairty SR; Fisher SP; Chen TM; Warrier DR; Kilduff TS. Almorexant promotes sleep and exacerbates cataplexy in a murine model of narcolepsy. SLEEP 2013;36(3):325-336.

  9. Clinical features of bacterial vaginosis in a murine model of vaginal infection with Gardnerella vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Nicole M; Lewis, Warren G; Lewis, Amanda L

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a dysbiosis of the vaginal flora characterized by a shift from a Lactobacillus-dominant environment to a polymicrobial mixture including Actinobacteria and gram-negative bacilli. BV is a common vaginal condition in women and is associated with increased risk of sexually transmitted infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth. Gardnerella vaginalis is one of the most frequently isolated bacterial species in BV. However, there has been much debate in the literature concerning the contribution of G. vaginalis to the etiology of BV, since it is also present in a significant proportion of healthy women. Here we present a new murine vaginal infection model with a clinical isolate of G. vaginalis. Our data demonstrate that this model displays key features used clinically to diagnose BV, including the presence of sialidase activity and exfoliated epithelial cells with adherent bacteria (reminiscent of clue cells). G. vaginalis was capable of ascending uterine infection, which correlated with the degree of vaginal infection and level of vaginal sialidase activity. The host response to G. vaginalis infection was characterized by robust vaginal epithelial cell exfoliation in the absence of histological inflammation. Our analyses of clinical specimens from women with BV revealed a measureable epithelial exfoliation response compared to women with normal flora, a phenotype that, to our knowledge, is measured here for the first time. The results of this study demonstrate that G. vaginalis is sufficient to cause BV phenotypes and suggest that this organism may contribute to BV etiology and associated complications. This is the first time vaginal infection by a BV associated bacterium in an animal has been shown to parallel the human disease with regard to clinical diagnostic features. Future studies with this model should facilitate investigation of important questions regarding BV etiology, pathogenesis and associated complications.

  10. Clinical features of bacterial vaginosis in a murine model of vaginal infection with Gardnerella vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Gilbert

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is a dysbiosis of the vaginal flora characterized by a shift from a Lactobacillus-dominant environment to a polymicrobial mixture including Actinobacteria and gram-negative bacilli. BV is a common vaginal condition in women and is associated with increased risk of sexually transmitted infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth. Gardnerella vaginalis is one of the most frequently isolated bacterial species in BV. However, there has been much debate in the literature concerning the contribution of G. vaginalis to the etiology of BV, since it is also present in a significant proportion of healthy women. Here we present a new murine vaginal infection model with a clinical isolate of G. vaginalis. Our data demonstrate that this model displays key features used clinically to diagnose BV, including the presence of sialidase activity and exfoliated epithelial cells with adherent bacteria (reminiscent of clue cells. G. vaginalis was capable of ascending uterine infection, which correlated with the degree of vaginal infection and level of vaginal sialidase activity. The host response to G. vaginalis infection was characterized by robust vaginal epithelial cell exfoliation in the absence of histological inflammation. Our analyses of clinical specimens from women with BV revealed a measureable epithelial exfoliation response compared to women with normal flora, a phenotype that, to our knowledge, is measured here for the first time. The results of this study demonstrate that G. vaginalis is sufficient to cause BV phenotypes and suggest that this organism may contribute to BV etiology and associated complications. This is the first time vaginal infection by a BV associated bacterium in an animal has been shown to parallel the human disease with regard to clinical diagnostic features. Future studies with this model should facilitate investigation of important questions regarding BV etiology, pathogenesis and

  11. A murine model of coxsackievirus A16 infection for anti-viral evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingwei; Shi, Jinping; Huang, Xulin; Liu, Fei; Cai, Yicun; Lan, Ke; Huang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is one of the main causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), which is a common infectious disease in children. CA16 infection may lead to severe nervous system damage and even death in humans. However, study of the pathogenesis of CA16 infection and development of vaccines and anti-viral agents are hindered partly by the lack of an appropriate small animal model. In the present study, we developed and characterized a murine model of CA16 infection. We show that neonatal mice are susceptible to CA16 infection via intraperitoneal inoculation. One-day-old mice infected with 2×10(6)TCID50 of CA16/SZ05 strain consistently exhibited clinical signs, including reduced mobility, and limb weakness and paralysis. About 57% of the mice died within 14days after infection. Significant damage in the brainstem, limb muscles and intestines of the infected mice in the moribund state was observed by histological examination, and the presence of CA16 in neurons of the brainstem was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining with a CA16-specific polyclonal antibody, strongly suggesting the involvement of the central nervous system in CA16 infection. Analysis of virus titers in various organs/tissues collected at 3, 6 and 9days post-infection, showed that skeletal muscle was the major site of virus replication at the early stage of infection, while the virus mainly accumulated in the brain at the late stage. In addition, susceptibility of mice to CA16 infection was found to be age dependent. Moreover, different CA16 strains could exhibit varied virulence in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrated that post-exposure treatment with an anti-CA16 monoclonal antibody fully protected mice against lethal CA16 infection. Collectively, these results indicate the successful development of a CA16 infection mouse model for anti-viral evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic Role for TSP-2 Antibody in a Murine Asthma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Huang, En Ping; Su, Jin; Zhu, Ping; Lin, Jun; Luo, Shen Qiu; Yang, Cui Lan

    2018-01-27

    Specific immunotherapy, including agonists for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), have been shown to protect from allergies and to have a high immunomodulatory capacity. A new antibody, TSP-2, reactive against an epitope of the extracellular domain of TLR2, was identified. The effect of the antibody on dendritic cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and flow cytometric analysis. The effect of TSP-2 in a murine asthma model induced with ovalbumin (OVA) was assessed. The model is a form of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and was analyzed by whole-body plethysmography, the measurement of Th1/Th2 cytokines in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum by ELISA, and the CCK-8 assay for lymphocyte proliferation. The effect of TSP-2 on the maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was assessed by flow cytometric analysis. TSP-2 promoted the maturation of dendritic cells and the proliferation of lymphocyte in vitro and in vivo. The effect of TSP-2 on T helper 1 (Th1)/Th2 cytokine secretion was slightly more powerful than that of Pam3CSK4. TSP-2 antibody reduced AHR and OVA-specific IgE levels in allergic asthma. TSP-2 antibody also reduced lung inflammation and decreased leukocyte numbers in an OVA-sensitized and challenged asthma model. TSP-2 antibody increased OVA-stimulated I-A, CD80, CD86, and MHC-II levels on BMDCs. This study identifies a novel therapeutic strategy for AHR, which uses antibodies reactive against TLR2. It also provides theoretical evidence for the control of allergic asthma by targeting TLR2. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The Relationship between the Antitumor Effect of the IL-12 Gene Therapy and the Expression of Th1 Cytokines in an HPV16-Positive Murine Tumor Model

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    Flor García Paz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of IL-12 expressed in plasmid on the Th1 cytokine profile in an experimental HPV16-positive murine tumor model and the association with the IL-12’s antitumor effect. Methods. Mice were injected with BMK-16/myc cells to establish HPV16-positive tumor and then pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid; pcDNA3 plasmid or PBS was injected directly into tumor site. The antitumor effect of the treatment was evaluated and the cytokines expression profile in each tumor tissue was analyzed. Results. Treatment with pNGVL3-mIL-12 plasmid had a significant antitumor effect, and a Th2-Th3-type cytokines prolife was detected in the murine tumor model with expression of the cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. However, after the tumor was treated with three intratumoral injections of plasmid containing IL-12 cDNA, it showed a cytokine profile associated with Th1 with expression of IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ cytokines and reduced expression of IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β1. Conclusions. The treatment with the IL-12 gene in the experimental HPV16-positive tumor model promoted the activation of the cellular immune response via expression of a Th1-type cytokine profile and was associated with the inhibition of tumor growth. Thus, IL-12 treatment represents a novel approach for gene therapy against cervical cancer.

  14. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-06

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes. Copyright © 2013

  16. Extracellular administration of BCL2 protein reduces apoptosis and improves survival in a murine model of sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Iwata

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Severe sepsis and septic shock are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In experimental sepsis there is prominent apoptosis of various cell types, and genetic manipulation of death and survival pathways has been shown to modulate organ injury and survival.We investigated the effect of extracellular administration of two anti-apoptotic members of the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2 family of intracellular regulators of cell death in a murine model of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. We show that intraperitoneal injection of picomole range doses of recombinant human (rh BCL2 or rhBCL2A1 protein markedly improved survival as assessed by surrogate markers of death. Treatment with rhBCL2 or rhBCL2A1 protein significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells in the intestine and heart following CLP, and this was accompanied by increased expression of endogenous mouse BCL2 protein. Further, mice treated with rhBCL2A1 protein showed an increase in the total number of neutrophils in the peritoneum following CLP with reduced neutrophil apoptosis. Finally, although neither BCL2 nor BCL2A1 are a direct TLR2 ligand, TLR2-null mice were not protected by rhBCL2A1 protein, indicating that TLR2 signaling was required for the protective activity of extracellularly adminsitered BCL2A1 protein in vivo.Treatment with rhBCL2A1 or rhBCL2 protein protects mice from sepsis by reducing apoptosis in multiple target tissues, demonstrating an unexpected, potent activity of extracellularly administered BCL2 BH4-domain proteins.

  17. Glucocerebrosidase modulates cognitive and motor activities in murine models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockenstein, Edward; Clarke, Jennifer; Viel, Catherine; Panarello, Nicholas; Treleaven, Christopher M; Kim, Changyoun; Spencer, Brian; Adame, Anthony; Park, Hyejung; Dodge, James C; Cheng, Seng H; Shihabuddin, Lamya S; Masliah, E; Sardi, S Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in GBA1, the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase, are associated with an enhanced risk of developing synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies. A higher prevalence and increased severity of motor and non-motor symptoms is observed in PD patients harboring mutant GBA1 alleles, suggesting a link between the gene or gene product and disease development. Interestingly, PD patients without mutations in GBA1 also exhibit lower levels of glucocerebrosidase activity in the central nervous system (CNS), implicating this lysosomal enzyme in disease pathogenesis. Here, we investigated whether modulation of glucocerebrosidase activity in murine models of synucleinopathy (expressing wild type Gba1) affected α-synuclein accumulation and behavioral phenotypes. Partial inhibition of glucocerebrosidase activity in PrP-A53T-SNCA mice using the covalent inhibitor conduritol-B-epoxide induced a profound increase in soluble α-synuclein in the CNS and exacerbated cognitive and motor deficits. Conversely, augmenting glucocerebrosidase activity in the Thy1-SNCA mouse model of PD delayed the progression of synucleinopathy. Adeno-associated virus-mediated expression of glucocerebrosidase in the Thy1-SNCA mouse striatum led to decrease in the levels of the proteinase K-resistant fraction of α-synuclein, amelioration of behavioral aberrations and protection from loss of striatal dopaminergic markers. These data indicate that increasing glucocerebrosidase activity can influence α-synuclein homeostasis, thereby reducing the progression of synucleinopathies. This study provides robust in vivo evidence that augmentation of CNS glucocerebrosidase activity is a potential therapeutic strategy for PD, regardless of the mutation status of GBA1. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of Lafoensia pacari and ellagic acid in a murine model of asthma.

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    Rogerio, Alexandre P; Fontanari, Caroline; Borducchi, Erica; Keller, Alexandre C; Russo, Momtchilo; Soares, Edson G; Albuquerque, Deijanira A; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2008-02-02

    We have shown that the ethanolic extract of Lafoensia pacari inhibits eosinophilic inflammation induced by Toxocara canis infection, and that ellagic acid is the secondary metabolite responsible for the anti-eosinophilic activity seen in a model of beta-glucan peritonitis. In the present study, we investigated the preventive and curative effects of L. pacari extract and ellagic acid on allergic lung inflammation using a murine model of ovalbumin-induced asthma. In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, preventive (22-day) treatment with L. pacari (200 mg/kg) and ellagic acid (10 mg/kg) inhibited neutrophil counts (by 75% and 57%) and eosinophil counts (by 78% and 68%). L. pacari reduced IL-4 and IL-13 levels (by 67% and 73%), whereas ellagic acid reduced IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 (by 67%, 88% and 85%). To investigate curative anti-inflammatory effects, we treated mice daily with ellagic acid (0.1, 1, or 10 mg/kg), also treating selected mice with L. pacari (200 mg/kg) from day 18 to day 22. The highest ellagic acid dose reduced neutrophil and eosinophil numbers (by 59% and 82%), inhibited IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 (by 62%, 61%, and 49%). Neither L. pacari nor ellagic acid suppressed ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness or cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis in lung homogenates. In mice treated with ellagic acid (10 mg/kg) or L. pacari (200 mg/kg) at 10 min after the second ovalbumin challenge, eosinophil numbers were 53% and 69% lower, respectively. Cytokine levels were unaffected by this treatment. L. pacari and ellagic acid are effective eosinophilic inflammation suppressors, suggesting a potential for treating allergies.

  19. Mucociliary clearance defects in a murine in vitro model of pneumococcal airway infection.

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    Fliegauf, Manfred; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Kremer, Bernhard; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Mucociliary airway clearance is an innate defense mechanism that protects the lung from harmful effects of inhaled pathogens. In order to escape mechanical clearance, airway pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) are thought to inactivate mucociliary clearance by mechanisms such as slowing of ciliary beating and lytic damage of epithelial cells. Pore-forming toxins like pneumolysin, may be instrumental in these processes. In a murine in vitro airway infection model using tracheal epithelial cells grown in air-liquid interface cultures, we investigated the functional consequences on the ciliated respiratory epithelium when the first contact with pneumococci is established. High-speed video microscopy and live-cell imaging showed that the apical infection with both wildtype and pneumolysin-deficient pneumococci caused insufficient fluid flow along the epithelial surface and loss of efficient clearance, whereas ciliary beat frequency remained within the normal range. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy demonstrated that pneumococci caused specific morphologic aberrations of two key elements in the F-actin cytoskeleton: the junctional F-actin at the apical cortex of the lateral cell borders and the apical F-actin, localized within the planes of the apical cell sides at the ciliary bases. The lesions affected the columnar shape of the polarized respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, the planar architecture of the entire ciliated respiratory epithelium was irregularly distorted. Our observations indicate that the mechanical supports essential for both effective cilia strokes and stability of the epithelial barrier were weakened. We provide a new model, where--in pneumococcal infection--persistent ciliary beating generates turbulent fluid flow at non-planar distorted epithelial surface areas, which enables pneumococci to resist mechanical cilia-mediated clearance.

  20. Mucociliary clearance defects in a murine in vitro model of pneumococcal airway infection.

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    Manfred Fliegauf

    Full Text Available Mucociliary airway clearance is an innate defense mechanism that protects the lung from harmful effects of inhaled pathogens. In order to escape mechanical clearance, airway pathogens including Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus are thought to inactivate mucociliary clearance by mechanisms such as slowing of ciliary beating and lytic damage of epithelial cells. Pore-forming toxins like pneumolysin, may be instrumental in these processes. In a murine in vitro airway infection model using tracheal epithelial cells grown in air-liquid interface cultures, we investigated the functional consequences on the ciliated respiratory epithelium when the first contact with pneumococci is established. High-speed video microscopy and live-cell imaging showed that the apical infection with both wildtype and pneumolysin-deficient pneumococci caused insufficient fluid flow along the epithelial surface and loss of efficient clearance, whereas ciliary beat frequency remained within the normal range. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy demonstrated that pneumococci caused specific morphologic aberrations of two key elements in the F-actin cytoskeleton: the junctional F-actin at the apical cortex of the lateral cell borders and the apical F-actin, localized within the planes of the apical cell sides at the ciliary bases. The lesions affected the columnar shape of the polarized respiratory epithelial cells. In addition, the planar architecture of the entire ciliated respiratory epithelium was irregularly distorted. Our observations indicate that the mechanical supports essential for both effective cilia strokes and stability of the epithelial barrier were weakened. We provide a new model, where--in pneumococcal infection--persistent ciliary beating generates turbulent fluid flow at non-planar distorted epithelial surface areas, which enables pneumococci to resist mechanical cilia-mediated clearance.

  1. Polyclonal antibody cocktails generated using DNA vaccine technology protect in murine models of orthopoxvirus disease.

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    Golden, Joseph W; Zaitseva, Marina; Kapnick, Senta; Fisher, Robert W; Mikolajczyk, Malgorzata G; Ballantyne, John; Golding, Hana; Hooper, Jay W

    2011-09-20

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA vaccination of nonhuman primates (NHP) with a small subset of vaccinia virus (VACV) immunogens (L1, A27, A33, B5) protects against lethal monkeypox virus challenge. The L1 and A27 components of this vaccine target the mature virion (MV) whereas A33 and B5 target the enveloped virion (EV). Here, we demonstrated that the antibodies produced in vaccinated NHPs were sufficient to confer protection in a murine model of lethal Orthopoxvirus infection. We further explored the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce immunogen-specific polyclonal antibodies that could then be combined into cocktails as potential immunoprophylactic/therapeutics. Specifically, we used DNA vaccines delivered by muscle electroporation to produce polyclonal antibodies against the L1, A27, A33, and B5 in New Zealand white rabbits. The polyclonal antibodies neutralized both MV and EV in cell culture. The ability of antibody cocktails consisting of anti-MV, anti-EV, or a combination of anti-MV/EV to protect BALB/c mice was evaluated as was the efficacy of the anti-MV/EV mixture in a mouse model of progressive vaccinia. In addition to evaluating weight loss and lethality, bioimaging technology was used to characterize the spread of the VACV infections in mice. We found that the anti-EV cocktail, but not the anti-MV cocktail, limited virus spread and lethality. A combination of anti-MV/EV antibodies was significantly more protective than anti-EV antibodies alone. These data suggest that DNA vaccine technology could be used to produce a polyclonal antibody cocktail as a possible product to replace vaccinia immune globulin.

  2. Therapeutic effects of rosmarinic acid on airway responses in a murine model of asthma.

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    Liang, Zhengmin; Nie, Haiying; Xu, Yangfeng; Peng, Jianbo; Zeng, Yun; Wei, Yingyi; Wen, Xuemei; Qiu, Jiaming; Zhong, Weiting; Deng, Xuming; He, Jiakang

    2016-12-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is an active component of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Previously, we reported that RA exerted a strong anti-inflammatory effect in a mouse acute lung injury model. Therefore, we hypothesized that RA might also have potential therapeutic effects in a murine model of asthma. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-asthmatic activity of RA and explored its possible molecular mechanisms of action. Female BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to and challenged with ovalbumin (Ova) were treated with RA (20mg/kg) 1h after challenge. The results showed that RA greatly diminished the number of inflammatory cells and the production of Th2 cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); significantly reduced the secretion of total IgE, Ova-specific IgE, and eotaxin; and markedly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) compared with Ova-induced mice. Histological studies further revealed that RA substantially decreased inflammatory cells infiltration and mucus hypersecretion compared with Ova-induced mice. Moreover, our results suggested that the protective effects of RA were mediated by the inhibition of JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Furthermore, RA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the mRNA expression of AMCase, CCL11, CCR3, Ym2 and E-selectin in lung tissue. These findings suggest that RA may effectively delay the development of airway inflammation and could thus be used as a therapy for allergic asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Murine model to study brain, behavior and immunity during hepatic encephalopathy

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    Gomides, Lindisley Ferreira; Marques, Pedro Elias; Faleiros, Bruno Engler; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz; Amaral, Sylvia Stella; Lage, Thais Reis; Resende, Gustavo Henrique Souza; Guidine, Patricia Alves Maia; Foureaux, Giselle; Ribeiro, Fabíola Mara; Martins, Fabiana Paiva; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky; Ferreira, Anderson José; Russo, Remo Castro; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Moraes, Márcio Flávio; Teixeira, Antonio Lúcio; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To propose an alternative model of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in mice, resembling the human features of the disease. METHODS: Mice received two consecutive intraperitoneal injections of thioacetamide (TAA) at low dosage (300 mg/kg). Liver injury was assessed by serum transaminase levels (ALT) and liver histology (hematoxylin and eosin). Neutrophil infiltration was estimated by confocal liver intravital microscopy. Coagulopathy was evaluated using prolonged prothrombin and partial thromboplastin time. Hemodynamic parameters were measured through tail cuff. Ammonia levels were quantified in serum and brain samples. Electroencephalography (EEG) and psychomotor activity score were performed to show brain function. Brain edema was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Mice submitted to the TAA regime developed massive liver injury, as shown by elevation of serum ALT levels and a high degree of liver necrosis. An intense hepatic neutrophil accumulation occurred in response to TAA-induced liver injury. This led to mice mortality and weight loss, which was associated with severe coagulopathy. Furthermore, TAA-treated mice presented with increased serum and cerebral levels of ammonia, in parallel with alterations in EEG spectrum and discrete brain edema, as shown by magnetic resonance imaging. In agreement with this, neuropsychomotor abnormalities ensued 36 h after TAA, fulfilling several HE features observed in humans. In this context of liver injury and neurological dysfunction, we observed lung inflammation and alterations in blood pressure and heart rate that were indicative of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSION: In summary, we describe a new murine model of hepatic encephalopathy comprising multiple features of the disease in humans, which may provide new insights for treatment. PMID:24799993

  4. Polyclonal antibody cocktails generated using DNA vaccine technology protect in murine models of orthopoxvirus disease

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    Ballantyne John

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we demonstrated that DNA vaccination of nonhuman primates (NHP with a small subset of vaccinia virus (VACV immunogens (L1, A27, A33, B5 protects against lethal monkeypox virus challenge. The L1 and A27 components of this vaccine target the mature virion (MV whereas A33 and B5 target the enveloped virion (EV. Results Here, we demonstrated that the antibodies produced in vaccinated NHPs were sufficient to confer protection in a murine model of lethal Orthopoxvirus infection. We further explored the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce immunogen-specific polyclonal antibodies that could then be combined into cocktails as potential immunoprophylactic/therapeutics. Specifically, we used DNA vaccines delivered by muscle electroporation to produce polyclonal antibodies against the L1, A27, A33, and B5 in New Zealand white rabbits. The polyclonal antibodies neutralized both MV and EV in cell culture. The ability of antibody cocktails consisting of anti-MV, anti-EV, or a combination of anti-MV/EV to protect BALB/c mice was evaluated as was the efficacy of the anti-MV/EV mixture in a mouse model of progressive vaccinia. In addition to evaluating weight loss and lethality, bioimaging technology was used to characterize the spread of the VACV infections in mice. We found that the anti-EV cocktail, but not the anti-MV cocktail, limited virus spread and lethality. Conclusions A combination of anti-MV/EV antibodies was significantly more protective than anti-EV antibodies alone. These data suggest that DNA vaccine technology could be used to produce a polyclonal antibody cocktail as a possible product to replace vaccinia immune globulin.

  5. Inhibition of sphingosine kinase-2 in a murine model of lupus nephritis.

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    Ashley J Snider

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a potent bioactive lipid, is emerging as a central mediator in inflammation and immune responses. We have previously implicated S1P and its synthetic enzyme sphingosine kinase (SK in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Generation of S1P requires phosphorylation of sphingosine by SK, of which there are two isoforms. Numerous studies have implicated SK1 in immune cell trafficking, inflammation and autoimmune disorders. In this study, we set out to determine the role of SK and S1P in lupus nephritis (LN. To this end, we examined S1P and dihydro-S1P (dh-S1P levels in serum and kidney tissues from a mouse model of LN. Interestingly dh-S1P was significantly elevated in serum and kidney tissue from LN mice, which is more readily phosphorylated by SK2. Therefore, we employed the use of the specific SK2 inhibitor, ABC294640 in our murine model of LN. Treatment with ABC294640 did not improve vascular or interstitial pathology associated with LN. However, mice treated with the SK2 inhibitor did demonstrate decreases in glomerular pathology and accumulation of B and T cells in the spleen these were not statistically different from lpr mice treated with vehicle. LN mice treated with ABC294640 did not have improved urine thromboxane levels or urine proteinuria measurements. Both S1P and dh-S1P levels in circulation were significantly reduced with ABC294640 treatment; however, dh-S1P was actually elevated in kidneys from LN mice treated with ABC294640. Together these data demonstrate a role for SKs in LN; however, they suggest that inhibition of SK1 or perhaps both SK isoforms would better prevent elevations in S1P and dh-S1P and potentially better protect against LN.

  6. Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Fission Protein Drp1 Improves Survival in a Murine Cardiac Arrest Model

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    Sharp, Willard W.; Beiser, David G.; Fang, Yong Hu; Han, Mei; Piao, Lin; Varughese, Justin; Archer, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Survival following sudden cardiac arrest is poor despite advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the use of therapeutic hypothermia. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1), a regulator of mitochondrial fission, is an important determinant of reactive oxygen species generation, myocardial necrosis, and left ventricular function following ischemia/reperfusion injury, but its role in cardiac arrest is unknown. We hypothesized that Drp1 inhibition would improve survival, cardiac hemodynamics, and mitochondrial function in an in vivo model of cardiac arrest. Design Laboratory investigation. Setting University laboratory Interventions Anesthetized and ventilated adult female C57BL/6 wild-type mice underwent an 8-min KCl induced cardiac arrest followed by 90 seconds of CPR. Mice were then blindly randomized to a single intravenous injection of Mdivi-1 (0.24 mg/kg), a small molecule Drp1 inhibitor or vehicle (DMSO). Measurements and Main Results Following resuscitation from cardiac arrest, mitochondrial fission was evidenced by Drp1 translocation to the mitochondrial membrane and a decrease in mitochondrial size. Mitochondrial fission was associated with increased lactate and evidence of oxidative damage. Mdivi-1 administration during CPR inhibited Drp1 activation, preserved mitochondrial morphology, and decreased oxidative damage. Mdivi-1 also reduced the time to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) 116±4 vs. 143±7 sec (pcardiac arrest. Conclusions Post cardiac arrest inhibition of Drp1 improves time to ROSC and myocardial hemodynamics resulting in improved survival and neurological outcomes in a murine model of cardiac arrest. Pharmacological targeting of mitochondrial fission may be a promising therapy for cardiac arrest. PMID:25599491

  7. The effect of rhinovirus on airway inflammation in a murine asthma model

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    Eugene Kim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the differences in lower airway inflammatory immune responses, including cellular responses and responses in terms of inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and the airway, to rhinovirus (RV infection on asthma exacerbation by comparing a control and a murine asthma model, with or without RV infection. Methods: BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with a crude extract of Dermatophagoides farinae (Df or phosphate buffered saline (PBS and were subsequently intranasally treated with a crude extract of Df or PBS. Airway responsiveness and cell infiltration, differential cell counts in BALF, and cytokine and chemokine concentrations in BALF were measured 24 hours after intranasal RV1B infection. Results: RV infection increased the enhanced pause (Penh in both the Df sensitized and challenged mice (Df mice and PBS-treated mice (PBS mice (P&lt;0.05. Airway eosinophil infiltration increased in Df mice after RV infection (P&lt;0.05. The levels of interleukin (IL 13, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and regulated on activation, normal T cells expressed and secreted (RANTES increased in response to RV infection in Df mice, but not in PBS mice (P&lt;0.05. The level of IL-10 significantly decreased following RV infection in Df mice (P&lt;0.05. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the augmented induction of proinflammatory cytokines, Th2 cytokines, and chemokines that mediate an eosinophil response and the decreased induction of regulatory cytokines after RV infection may be important manifestations leading to airway inflammation with eosinophil infiltration and changes in airway responsiveness in the asthma model.

  8. Effects of a potent peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst in murine models of endotoxemia and sepsis

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    Soriano, Francisco Garcia; Lorigados, Clara Batista; Pacher, Pal; Szabó, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    Excessive free radical production due to various bacterial components released during bacterial infection has been linked to cell death and tissue injury. Peroxynitrite is a highly reactive oxidant produced by the combination of NO and superoxide anion, which has been implicated in cell death and tissue injury in various forms of critical illness. Pharmacological decomposition of peroxynitrite may represent a potential therapeutic approach in diseases associated with the overproduction of NO and superoxide. In the present study we tested the effect of the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst in murine models of endotoxemia and sepsis. Mice were injected i.p. with LPS 40 mg/kg with or without FP15 (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3 or 10 mg/kg/h). Mice were sacrificed 12 hours later, followed by the harvesting of samples from the lung, liver and gut for MDA and MPO measurements. In other subsets of animals, blood samples were obtained by cardiac puncture at 1.5, 4, and 8 hours after LPS administration for cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10), nitrite/nitrate, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) measurements. Endotoxemic animals showed an increase in survival from 25% to 80% at the FP15 doses of 0.3 and 1 mg/kg/h. The same dose of FP15 had no effect on plasma levels of nitrite/nitrate. There was a reduction in liver and lung MDA in the endotoxemic animals pre-treated with FP15, as well as in hepatic MPO and biochemical markers of liver and kidney damage (ALT and BUN). In a bacterial model of sepsis induced by CLP, FP15 treatment (0.3 mg/kg/day) significantly protected against mortality. The current data support the view that peroxynitrite is a critical factor mediating liver, gut and lung injury in endotoxemia and septic shock: its pharmacological neutralization may be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:21263378

  9. Pharmacodynamic profiling of modithromycin: assessment in a pneumococcal murine pneumonia model.

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    Maglio, Dana; Sun, Heather K; Patel, Toral; Banevicius, Mary Anne; Nightingale, Charles H; Arya, Anu; Wang, Guoqiang; Chen, Zhigang; Phan, Ly T; Nicolau, David P

    2014-06-01

    The pharmacodynamic profile of modithromycin (EDP-420, EP-013420, S-013420), a novel bicyclolide, was evaluated in a neutropenic pneumococcal murine pneumonia model. Streptococcus pneumoniae median minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for five genotypically diverse isolates ranged from 0.016 μg/mL to 0.125 μg/mL and were unaffected by macrolide or penicillin resistance determinants. The modithromycin dosing regimens (total daily doses of 3.125-1000 mg/kg/day) were derived from the pharmacokinetic profile of the compound in infected mice and were selected to produce a wide range of exposures. Dose-response relationships characterised using the Emax model demonstrated high correlations both with the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve to MIC (AUC/MIC) and the ratio of the maximum drug concentration to MIC (Cmax/MIC). However, dose fractionation studies suggest that the AUC/MIC is the predominant driver of in vivo efficacy. The free drug AUC/MIC (fAUC/MIC) required for stasis and for 80% of maximum activity ranged from 4 to 53 and 25-99, respectively. The fAUC/MIC needed to achieve a 1 log reduction in bacterial density, which is a conventional measure of the required exposure in man to reliably predict efficacy, ranged from 9 to 69. These data demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo potency of modithromycin against S. pneumoniae irrespective of its phenotypic profile to the macrolides or penicillin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary reversal of neuropathy in a murine model of prediabetes and metabolic syndrome

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    Lucy M. Hinder

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with metabolic syndrome, which is defined as obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, can develop the same macro- and microvascular complications as patients with type 2 diabetes, including peripheral neuropathy. In type 2 diabetes, glycemic control has little effect on the development and progression of peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that other metabolic syndrome components may contribute to the presence of neuropathy. A parallel phenomenon is observed in patients with prediabetes and metabolic syndrome, where improvement in weight and dyslipidemia more closely correlates with restoration of nerve function than improvement in glycemic status. The goal of the current study was to develop a murine model that resembles the human condition. We examined longitudinal parameters of metabolic syndrome and neuropathy development in six mouse strains/genotypes (BKS-wt, BKS-Leprdb/+, B6-wt, B6-Leprdb/+, BTBR-wt, and BTBR-Lepob/+ fed a 54% high-fat diet (HFD; from lard. All mice fed a HFD developed large-fiber neuropathy and IGT. Changes appeared early and consistently in B6-wt mice, and paralleled the onset of neuropathy. At 36 weeks, B6-wt mice displayed all components of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity, IGT, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and oxidized low density lipoproteins (oxLDLs. Dietary reversal, whereby B6-wt mice fed a HFD from 4-20 weeks of age were switched to standard chow for 4 weeks, completely normalized neuropathy, promoted weight loss, improved insulin sensitivity, and restored LDL cholesterol and oxLDL by 50% compared with levels in HFD control mice. This dietary reversal model provides the basis for mechanistic studies investigating peripheral nerve damage in the setting of metabolic syndrome, and ultimately the development of mechanism-based therapies for neuropathy.

  11. A murine inhalation model to characterize pulmonary exposure to dry Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

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    Amanda D Buskirk

    Full Text Available Most murine models of fungal exposure are based on the delivery of uncharacterized extracts or liquid conidia suspensions using aspiration or intranasal approaches. Studies that model exposure to dry fungal aerosols using whole body inhalation have only recently been described. In this study, we aimed to characterize pulmonary immune responses following repeated inhalation of conidia utilizing an acoustical generator to deliver dry fungal aerosols to mice housed in a nose only exposure chamber. Immunocompetent female BALB/cJ mice were exposed to conidia derived from Aspergillus fumigatus wild-type (WT or a melanin-deficient (Δalb1 strain. Conidia were aerosolized and delivered to mice at an estimated deposition dose of 1×105 twice a week for 4 weeks (8 total. Histopathological and immunological endpoints were assessed 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the final exposure. Histopathological analysis showed that conidia derived from both strains induced lung inflammation, especially at 24 and 48 hour time points. Immunological endpoints evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and the mediastinal lymph nodes showed that exposure to WT conidia led to elevated numbers of macrophages, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. Importantly, CD8+ IL17+ (Tc17 cells were significantly higher in BALF and positively correlated with germination of A. fumigatus WT spores. Germination was associated with specific IgG to intracellular proteins while Δalb1 spores elicited antibodies to cell wall hydrophobin. These data suggest that inhalation exposures may provide a more representative analysis of immune responses following exposures to environmentally and occupationally prevalent fungal contaminants.

  12. Efficacy of Astaxanthin for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model.

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    Yoko Yoshihisa

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease associated with various factors, including immunological abnormalities and exposure to allergens. Astaxanthin (AST is a xanthophyll carotenoid that has recently been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects and to regulate the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Thus, we investigated whether AST could improve the dermatitis and pruritus in a murine model of AD using NC/Nga mice. In addition to a behavioral evaluation, the effects of AST on the AD were determined by the clinical skin severity score, serum IgE level, histological analyses of skin, and by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting analyses for the expression of inflammation-related factors. AST (100 mg/kg or vehicle (olive oil was orally administered once day and three times a week for 26 days. When compared with vehicle-treated group, the administration of AST significantly reduced the clinical skin severity score. In addition, the spontaneous scratching in AD model mice was reduced by AST administration. Moreover, the serum IgE level was markedly decreased by the oral administration of AST compared to that in vehicle-treated mice. The number of eosinophils, total and degranulated mast cells all significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. The mRNA and protein levels of eotaxin, MIF, IL-4, IL-5 and L-histidine decarboxylase were significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. These results suggest that AST improves the dermatitis and pruritus in AD via the regulation of the inflammatory effects and the expression of inflammatory cytokines.

  13. Effects of copper nanoparticle exposure on host defense in a murine pulmonary infection model

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    Grassian Vicki H

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human exposure to nanoparticles (NPs and environmental bacteria can occur simultaneously. NPs induce inflammatory responses and oxidative stress but may also have immune-suppressive effects, impairing macrophage function and altering epithelial barrier functions. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential pulmonary effects of inhalation and instillation exposure to copper (Cu NPs using a model of lung inflammation and host defense. Methods We used Klebsiella pneumoniae (K.p. in a murine lung infection model to determine if pulmonary bacterial clearance is enhanced or impaired by Cu NP exposure. Two different exposure modes were tested: sub-acute inhalation (4 hr/day, 5 d/week for 2 weeks, 3.5 mg/m3 and intratracheal instillation (24 hr post-exposure, 3, 35, and 100 μg/mouse. Pulmonary responses were evaluated by lung histopathology plus measurement of differential cell counts, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity, and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. Results Cu NP exposure induced inflammatory responses with increased recruitment of total cells and neutrophils to the lungs as well as increased total protein and LDH activity in BAL fluid. Both inhalation and instillation exposure to Cu NPs significantly decreased the pulmonary clearance of K.p.-exposed mice measured 24 hr after bacterial infection following Cu NP exposure versus sham-exposed mice also challenged with K.p (1.4 × 105 bacteria/mouse. Conclusions Cu NP exposure impaired host defense against bacterial lung infections and induced a dose-dependent decrease in bacterial clearance in which even our lowest dose demonstrated significantly lower clearance than observed in sham-exposed mice. Thus, exposure to Cu NPs may increase the risk of pulmonary infection.

  14. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and allometric scaling of chloroquine in a murine malaria model.

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    Moore, Brioni R; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Stoney, Jillian R; Ilett, Kenneth F; Jago, Jeffrey D; Batty, Kevin T

    2011-08-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is an important antimalarial drug for the treatment of special patient groups and as a comparator for preclinical testing of new drugs. Pharmacokinetic data for CQ in animal models are limited; thus, we conducted a three-part investigation, comprising (i) pharmacodynamic studies of CQ and CQ plus dihydroartemisinin (DHA) in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice, (ii) pharmacokinetic studies of CQ in healthy and malaria-infected mice, and (iii) interspecies allometric scaling for CQ from 6 animal and 12 human studies. The single-dose pharmacodynamic study (10 to 50 mg CQ/kg of body weight) showed dose-related reduction in parasitemia (5- to >500-fold) and a nadir 2 days after the dose. Multiple-dose regimens (total dose, 50 mg/kg CQ) demonstrated a lower nadir and longer survival time than did the same single dose. The CQ-DHA combination provided an additive effect compared to each drug alone. The elimination half-life (t(1/2)), clearance (CL), and volume of distribution (V) of CQ were 46.6 h, 9.9 liters/h/kg, and 667 liters/kg, respectively, in healthy mice and 99.3 h, 7.9 liters/h/kg, and 1,122 liters/kg, respectively, in malaria-infected mice. The allometric equations for CQ in healthy mammals (CL = 3.86 × W(0.56), V = 230 × W(0.94), and t(1/2) = 123 × W(0.2)) were similar to those for malaria-infected groups. CQ showed a delayed dose-response relationship in the murine malaria model and additive efficacy when combined with DHA. The biphasic pharmacokinetic profiles of CQ are similar across mammalian species, and scaling of specific parameters is plausible for preclinical investigations.

  15. Zoledronic acid improves bone histomorphometry in a murine model of Rett syndrome.

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    Shapiro, Jay R; Boskey, Adele L; Doty, Stephen B; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Blue, Mary E

    2017-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder predominately affecting young females, caused by deficiency of the global transcriptional protein methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Osteoblasts express MeCP2 and girls with RTT experience early onset osteoporosis, decreased bone mass and an increased fracture risk. There is no defined treatment for osteoporosis associated with RTT. The present study evaluated the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA), a third generation nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate with primarily anti-osteoclastic activity, in a mouse model of MeCP2 deficiency. Mice received weekly injections of 20μg/kg ZA for six weeks. Due to the shortened lifespan of hemizygous male (Mecp2-null) mice, treatment began at 3weeks of age for this group and corresponding wildtype (WT) male mice. Treatment for heterozygous (HET) and WT female mice began at 8weeks of age. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and dynamic analyses of bone turnover were performed. ZA treatment led to significant increases in bone volume fraction, number, connectivity density and apparent density of trabecular bone in all genotypes of mice. In contrast, cortical bone generally was unaffected by ZA injections. Parameters of bone turnover, including mineral apposition rate, labeled bone surface and bone formation rate decreased after treatment with ZA. Mecp2-null mice had reduced labeled bone surface and bone formation rate compared to WT male mice. The results indicate that ZA treatment significantly improved trabecular bone mass in a murine model of RTT with little effect on cortical bone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding Leadership: An Experimental-Experiential Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, George T.

    2014-01-01

    Books about leadership are dangerous to readers who fantasize about being leaders or apply leadership ideas as if they were proven formulas. As an antidote, I offer an experimental framework in which any leadership-management model can be tested to gain experiential understanding of the model. As a result one can gain reality-based insights about…

  17. Murine models of hepatitis C: what can we look forward to?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schaewen, Markus; Ploss, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    The study of interactions between hepatitis C virus (HCV) with its mammalian host, along with the development of more effective therapeutics and vaccines has been delayed by the lack of a suitable small animal model. HCV readily infects only humans and chimpanzees, which poses logistic, economic and ethical challenges with analyzing HCV infection in vivo. Progress has been made in understanding the determinants that dictate HCV's narrow host range providing a blueprint for constructing a mouse model with inheritable susceptibility to HCV infection. Indeed, genetically humanized mice were generated that support viral uptake, replication and production of infectious virions--albeit at low levels. These efforts are complemented with attempts to select for viral variants that are inherently more capable of replicating in non-human species. In parallel, engraftment of relevant human tissues into improved xenorecipients is being continuously refined. Incorporating advances in stem-cell-biology and tissue engineering may allow the generation of patient-specific humanized mice. Construction of such mouse "avatars" may allow analyzing functionally patient-specific differences with respect to susceptibility to infection, disease progression and responses to treatment. In this review, we discuss the three, before mentioned approaches to overcome current species barriers and generate a small animal model for HCV infection, i.e. genetic modification of mice to increase their susceptibility to the virus; genetic modification of HCV, to increase its pathogenicity for mice; and the introduction of human liver and immune cells into immunodeficient mice, to create "humanized" mice. Although in the foreseeable future there will not be a single model that perfectly mimics the natural course of HCV in humans there is reason for optimism. The spectrum of murine animal models for hepatitis C provides a broad arsenal for analyzing the disease. These models may play an important role by

  18. Application and evaluation of a molecular approach for detection of the schistosomicidal effect of Mirazid® (myrrh in the murine model

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    Wael M. Lotfy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The conventional PCR technique was used for studying the schistosomicidal effect of Mirazid® in the murine model. Results of the molecular study were compared with the parasitological results (ova and worm count. The used PCR technique was more sensitive than the Kato-Katz thick smears. Mirazid® showed some schistosomicidal effects against murine Schistosoma mansoni. However, it was not efficient enough to cure any of the studied mice.

  19. Antitumor activity of platinum(II) complexes with histamine and radioiodinated histamine in a transplantable murine adenocarcinoma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnuszek, Piotr [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, National Medicines Institute, 00-725 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: pgarnuszek@il.waw.pl; Karczmarczyk, Urszula; Maurin, Michal [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, National Medicines Institute, 00-725 Warsaw (Poland)

    2008-07-15

    /PtCl{sub 2}[{sup 131}I]Hist, and no survival improvement was found for the groups treated mostly with the radiation (PtCl{sub 2}[{sup 125}I]Hist and PtCl{sub 2}[{sup 131}I]Hist). The intensive and long-term concomitant scheduling of the radioactive platinum-histamine complexes labeled with I-125 and I-131 (Experiment 3) resulted in a significant inhibition of the tumor growth (GDF=1.9) and survival prolongation of the tumor-bearing mice (MS{sub tr}/MS{sub con}=1.5, P=.023). The treatment-related toxicity was mild. Conclusion: An enhancement of the antitumor activity due to the multidose concomitant treatment with a combination of cytotoxic/cytostatic dichloroplatinum(II)-histamine and the attached iodine radionuclides was shown in the murine model of experimental neoplasm.

  20. A novel murine model of Fusarium solani keratitis utilizing fluorescent labeled fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmin; Wang, Liya; Li, Zhijie; Liu, Susu; Xie, Yanting; He, Siyu; Deng, Xianming; Yang, Biao; Liu, Hui; Chen, Guoming; Zhao, Huiwen; Zhang, Junjie

    2013-05-01

    Fungal keratitis is a common disease that causes blindness. An effective animal model for fungal keratitis is essential for advancing research on this disease. Our objective is to develop a novel mouse model of Fusarium solani keratitis through the inoculation of fluorescent-labeled fungi into the cornea to facilitate the accurate and early identification and screening of fungal infections. F. solani was used as the model fungus in this study. In in vitro experiment, the effects of Calcofluor White (CFW) staining concentration and duration on the fluorescence intensity of F. solani were determined through the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI); the effects of CFW staining on the growth of F. solani were determined by the colony diameter. In in vivo experiment, the F. solani keratitis mice were induced and divided into a CFW-unlabeled and CFW-labeled groups. The positive rate, corneal lesion score and several positive rate determination methods were measured. The MFIs of F. solani in the 30 μg/ml CFW-30 min, 90 μg/ml CFW-10 min and 90 μg/ml CFW-30 min groups were higher than that in the 10 μg/ml CFW-10 min group (P  0.05). No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed for the positive rate or the corneal lesion scores between the CFW-unlabeled and the CFW-labeled group. On day 1 and 2, the positive rates of the infected corneas in the scraping group were lower than those in the fluorescence microscopy group (P  0.05). Thus, these experiments established a novel murine model of F. solani keratitis utilizing fluorescent labeled fungi. This model facilitates the accurate identification and screening of fungal infections during the early stages of fungal keratitis and provides a novel and reliable technology to study the fungal keratitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Innate immunity drives the initiation of a murine model of primary biliary cirrhosis.

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    Chao-Hsuan Chang

    Full Text Available Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells play complex roles in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by engaging with glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. Our earlier work suggested that iNKT cells were involved in the initiation of the original loss of tolerance in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC. To address this issue in more detail and, in particular, to focus on whether iNKT cells activated by a Th2-biasing agonist (2s,3s,4r-1-O-(α-D-galactopyranosyl-N-tetracosanoyl-2-amino-1,3,4-nonanetriol (OCH, can influence the development of PBC in a xenobiotic-induced PBC murine model. Groups of mice were treated with either OCH or, as a control, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer and thence serially followed for cytokine production, markers of T cell activation, liver histopathology and anti-mitochondrial antibody responses. Further, additional groups of CD1d deleted mice were similarly studied. Our data indicate that administration of OCH has a dramatic influence with exacerbation of portal inflammation and hepatic fibrosis similar to mice treated with α-GalCer. Further, iNKT cell deficient CD1d knockout mice have decreased inflammatory portal cell infiltrates and reduced anti-mitochondrial antibody responses. We submit that activation of iNKT cells can occur via overlapping and/or promiscuous pathways and highlight the critical role of innate immunity in the natural history of autoimmune cholangitis. These data have implications for humans with PBC and emphasize that therapeutic strategies must focus not only on suppressing adaptive responses, but also innate immunity.

  2. Particle-size dependent effects in the Balb/c murine model of inhalational melioidosis

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    Richard eThomas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of Burkholderia pseudomallei within either the lungs or nasal passages of the Balb/c murine model resulted in different infection kinetics. The infection resulting from the inhalation of B. pseudomallei within a 12 um particle aerosol was prolonged compared to a 1 um particle aerosol with a mean time-to-death (MTD of 73.8 ± 11.3 h and 174.7 ± 14.9 h respectively. Inhalation of B. pseudomallei within 1 um or 12 um particle aerosols resulted in a median lethal dose (MLD of 4 and 12 cfu respectively. The 12 mm particle inhalational infection was characterised by involvement of the respiratory epithelium and inflammation of the neurological path leading from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb (100%, culminating in abscessation of the brain (33%. Initial involvement of the upper respiratory tract lymphoid tissues (nasal-associated lymphoid tissue and cervical lymph nodes was observed in both the 1 and 12 um particle inhalational infections (80-85%. Necrotising alveolitis and bronchiolitis were evident in both inhalational infections however lung pathology was greater after inhalation of the 1 mm particle aerosol with pronounced involvement of the mediastinal lymph node (50%. Terminal disease was characterised by bacteraemia in both inhalational infections with dissemination to the spleen, liver, kidneys and thymus. Treatment with co-trimoxazole was more effective than treatment with doxycycline irrespective of the size of the particles inhaled. Doxycycline was more effective against the 12 um particle inhalational infection as evidenced by increased time to death. However, both treatment regimes exhibited significant relapse when therapy was discontinued with massive enlargement and abscessation of the lungs, spleen and cervical lymph nodes observed.

  3. Evaluation of profertility effect of probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 2621 in a murine model

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    Praveen Bhandari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Urogenital infections of bacterial origin have a high incidence among the female population at reproductive age, affecting the fertility. Strains of Escherichia coli can colonize the vagina and replace natural microflora. Lactobacillus the predominant vaginal microorganism in healthy women, maintains the acidic vaginal pH which inhibits pathogenic microorganisms. Studies on Lactobacillus have shown that these can inhibit E. coli growth and vaginal colonization. An alternative therapeutic approach to antimicrobial therapy is to re-establish Lactobacillus in this microbiome through probiotic administration to resurge fertility. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the capability of L. plantarum 2621 strain with probiotic properties, to prevent the vaginal colonization of E. coli causing agglutination of sperms and to evaluate its profertility effect in a murine model. m0 ethods: Screened mice were divided into five groups i.e. control group, E. coli group, Lactobacillus group, prophylactic and therapeutic groups. The control group was infused with 20 µl PBS, E.coli group was administered with 10 [6] cfu/20 µl E. coli, and probiotic group was administered with Lactobacillus (10 [8] cfu/20 µl for 10 consecutive days. In prophylactic group, the vagina was colonized with 10 consecutive doses of Lactobacillus (10 [8] cfu/20 µl. After 24 h, it was followed by 10 day intravaginal infection with E. coli (10 [6] cfu/20 µl whereas for the therapeutic group vagina was colonized with (10 [6] cfu/20 µl E. coli for 10 consecutive days, followed by 10 day intravaginal administration with Lactobacillus after 24 h. Results: Upon mating and completion of gestation period, control, probiotic and the therapeutic groups had litters in contrast to the prophylactic group and the group administered with E. coli. Interpretation & conclusions: Results indicated that Lactobacillus intermitted colonization of pathogenic

  4. B-Cell Depletion Reduces the Maturation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations in Murine Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Austin, Cecilia; Moore, Thomas; Lightle, Rhonda; Zhang, Lingjiao; Wu, Meijing; Cao, Ying; Gunel, Murat; Louvi, Angeliki; Rorrer, Autumn; Gallione, Carol; Marchuk, Douglas A; Awad, Issam A

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are relatively common vascular malformations, characterized by increased Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, vascular hyper-permeability and the presence of blood degradation products including non-heme iron. Previous studies revealed robust inflammatory cell infiltration, selective synthesis of IgG, in situ antigen driven B-cell clonal expansion, and deposition of immune complexes and complement proteins within CCM lesions. We aimed to evaluate the impact of suppressing the immune response on the formation and maturation of CCM lesions, as well as lesional iron deposition and ROCK activity. Two murine models of heterozygous Ccm3 (Pdcd10), which spontaneously develop CCM lesions with severe and milder phenotypes, were either untreated or received anti-mouse BR3 to deplete B cells. Brains from anti-mouse BR3-treated mice exhibited significantly fewer mature CCM lesions and smaller lesions compared to untreated mice. B cell depletion halted the progression of lesions into mature stage 2 lesions but did not prevent their genesis. Non-heme iron deposition and ROCK activity was decreased in lesions of B cell depleted mice. This represents the first report of the therapeutic benefit of B-cell depletion in the development and progression of CCMs, and provides a proof of principle that B cells play a critical role in CCM lesion genesis and maturation. These findings add biologics to the list of potential therapeutic agents for CCM disease. Future studies would characterize the putative antigenic trigger and further define the mechanism of immune response in the lesions.

  5. Nootropic potential of Bauhinia variegata: A systematic study on murine model

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    Nishikant Jatav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bauhinia variegata Linn (leguminosae is one of the important medicinal herbs used traditionally to treat fever, as tonic, astringent, diarrhea, dysentery, hemorrhoids, piles, edema. Recent findings on Bauhinia variegata Linn have demonstrated its antioxidant, anti-hyperlipidemic, and hepatoprotective potential. The present work is focused to evaluate nootropic potential of Bauhinia variegata Linn in rats. Materials and Methods: The leaves of Bauhinia variegata were collected in the month of January from Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwavidyalaya Jabalpur (Madhya Pradesh. Leaves were subjected for isolation of crude flavonoids and characterized by total flavonoid content assay. Flavonoid-rich extract of Bauhinia variegata was studied for acute oral toxicity as per revised Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development guidelines No. 423. Nootropic activity was determined by elevated plus maze, rotating rod apparatus, baclofen-induced catatonia, diazepam-induced amnesia. Results: Flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata caused no alteration in locomotion in animals. In the current study, animals treated with flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata (400 mg/kg showed a significant decrease in transfer latency as compared to the control group, which indicates cognitive enhancement effect flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata. In rota rod studies, flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata increased fall of time as compared to diazepam. In baclofen-induced catatonia, administration of flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata demonstrated protective effect on rats. Over all, flavonoid-rich fraction of Bauhinia variegata was found to enhance the performance of murine models. Conclusion: Thus, it could be concluded that flavonoids from Bauhinia variegata possess nootropic potential. However, more systematic studies are required to determine its exact mechanism of action.

  6. Superior protection elicited by live-attenuated vaccines in the murine model of paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pallab; Shippy, Daniel C; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-12-16

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a chronic enteric infection in ruminants with severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. Currently, available vaccines have limited protective efficacy against disease progression and does not prevent spread of the infection among animals. Because of their ability to elicit wide-spectrum immune responses, we adopted a live-attenuated vaccine approach based on a sigH knock-out strain of M. paratuberculosis (ΔsigH). Earlier analysis of the ΔsigH mutant in mice indicated their inadequate ability to colonize host tissues, unlike the isogenic wild-type strain, validating the role of this sigma factor in M. paratuberculosis virulence. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the ΔsigH mutant compared to inactivated vaccine constructs in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. The presented analysis indicated that ΔsigH mutant with or without QuilA adjuvant is capable of eliciting strong immune responses (such as interferon gamma-γ, IFN-γ) suggesting their immunogenicity and ability to potentially initiate effective vaccine-induced immunity. Following a challenge with virulent strains of M. paratuberculosis, ΔsigH conferred protective immunity as indicated by the reduced bacterial burden accompanied with reduced lesions in main body organs (liver, spleen and intestine) usually infected with M. paratuberculosis. More importantly, our data indicated better ability of the ΔsigH vaccine to confer protection compared to the inactivated vaccine constructs even with the presence of oil-adjuvant. Overall, our approach provides a rational basis for using live-attenuated mutant strains to develop improved vaccines that elicit robust immunity against this chronic infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Local transplantation is an effective method for cell delivery in the osteogenesis imperfecta murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauley, Penelope; Matthews, Brya G; Wang, Liping; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Matic, Igor; Rowe, David W; Kalajzic, Ivo

    2014-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a serious genetic disorder that results from improper type I collagen production. We aimed to evaluate whether bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) delivered locally into femurs were able to engraft, differentiate into osteoblasts, and contribute to formation of normal bone matrix in the osteogenesis imperfect murine (oim) model. Donor BMSCs from bone-specific reporter mice (Col2.3GFP) were expanded in vitro and transplanted into the femoral intramedullary cavity of oim mice. Engraftment was evaluated after four weeks. We detected differentiation of donor BMSCs into Col2.3GFP+ osteoblasts and osteocytes in cortical and trabecular bone of transplanted oim femurs. New bone formation was detected by deposition of dynamic label in the proximity to the Col2.3GFP+ osteoblasts, and new bone showed more organized collagen structure and expression of type I α2 collagen. Col2.3GFP cells were not found in the contralateral femur indicating that transplanted osteogenic cells did not disseminate by circulation. No osteogenic engraftment was observed following intravenous transplantation of BMSCs. BMSC cultures derived from transplanted femurs showed numerous Col2.3GFP+ colonies, indicating the presence of donor progenitor cells. Secondary transplantation of cells recovered from recipient femurs and expanded in vitro also showed Col2.3GFP+ osteoblasts and osteocytes confirming the persistence of donor stem/progenitor cells. We show that BMSCs delivered locally in oim femurs are able to engraft, differentiate into osteoblasts and osteocytes and maintain their progenitor potential in vivo. This suggests that local delivery is a promising approach for introduction of autologous MSC in which mutations have been corrected.

  8. Hyperoxygenation attenuated a murine model of atopic dermatitis through raising skin level of ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Ran; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Lee, Yeo Kyong; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Jang, Myoung Ho; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from excessive stimulation of immune cells. Traditionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases, but several opposing observations suggest the protective role of ROS in inflammatory disease. Recently, we demonstrated ROS prevented imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis through enhancing regulatory T cell function. Thus, we hypothesized AD might also be attenuated in elevated levels of ROS through tissue hyperoxygenation, such as by hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) or applying an oxygen-carrying chemical, perfluorodecalin (PFD). Elevated levels of ROS in the skin have been demonstrated directly by staining with dihydroethidum as well as indirectly by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). A murine model of AD was developed by repeated application of a chemical irritant (1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene) and house dust mite (Dermatophagoide farinae) extract on one ear of BALB/c mice. The results showed treatment with HBOT or PFD significantly attenuated AD, comparably with 0.1% prednicarbate without any signs of side effects, such as telangiectasia. The expressions of interleukin-17A and interferon-γ were also decreased in the AD lesions by treatment with HBOT or PFD. Enhanced expression of IDO and reduced level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, in association with increased frequency of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the AD lesions, might be involved in the underlying mechanism of oxygen therapy. Taken together, it was suggested that tissue hyperoxygenation, by HBOT or treatment with PFD, might attenuate AD through enhancing skin ROS level.

  9. Hyperoxygenation attenuated a murine model of atopic dermatitis through raising skin level of ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Ran Kim

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease resulting from excessive stimulation of immune cells. Traditionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases, but several opposing observations suggest the protective role of ROS in inflammatory disease. Recently, we demonstrated ROS prevented imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis through enhancing regulatory T cell function. Thus, we hypothesized AD might also be attenuated in elevated levels of ROS through tissue hyperoxygenation, such as by hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT or applying an oxygen-carrying chemical, perfluorodecalin (PFD. Elevated levels of ROS in the skin have been demonstrated directly by staining with dihydroethidum as well as indirectly by immunohistochemistry (IHC for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO. A murine model of AD was developed by repeated application of a chemical irritant (1% 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene and house dust mite (Dermatophagoide farinae extract on one ear of BALB/c mice. The results showed treatment with HBOT or PFD significantly attenuated AD, comparably with 0.1% prednicarbate without any signs of side effects, such as telangiectasia. The expressions of interleukin-17A and interferon-γ were also decreased in the AD lesions by treatment with HBOT or PFD. Enhanced expression of IDO and reduced level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, in association with increased frequency of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the AD lesions, might be involved in the underlying mechanism of oxygen therapy. Taken together, it was suggested that tissue hyperoxygenation, by HBOT or treatment with PFD, might attenuate AD through enhancing skin ROS level.

  10. Microporous Polysaccharide Hemospheres Potentiate Ischemia-Induced Skin Flap Necrosis in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offodile, Anaeze C; Chen, Bin; Aherrera, Andrew S; Guo, Lifei

    2017-01-01

    Microporous polysaccharide hemospheres are an increasingly used adjunctive measure for obtaining operative field hemostasis. However, the impact of these agents on survival of vascularly challenged tissues is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect, if any, of microporous hemospheres on tissue survival in a murine model. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats underwent creation of two flanking dorsal, modified McFarlane-style flaps using a length-to-width ratio of 4:1. Microporous polysaccharide hemospheres were applied to the underside of only one flap in each animal. In a subset of five rats, tissue malondialdehyde activity was measured at 24 hours. The remaining 13 animals were killed after 7 days, and the area of flap necrosis was measured photographically. Histopathologic analysis was also performed on the margins of the necrotic area. Size comparison showed a significantly larger area of necrosis in the microporous polysaccharide hemosphere-treated flaps relative to controls (1.69 ± 1.21 cm versus 0.28 ± 0.28 cm; p = 0.00135). Higher malondialdehyde levels were also found in the microporous polysaccharide hemosphere-treated flaps at 24 hours (0.462 ± 0.098 versus 0.315 ± 0.065; p = 0.047). The areas of skin necrosis were noted to be partial thickness on histologic examination. Microporous polysaccharide hemospheres are associated with an increased incidence of distal tip necrosis in dorsal rat skin flaps. Despite their efficacy in surgical hemostasis, their use should be judicious, especially with marginally perfused tissues such as mastectomy skin flaps.

  11. Pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of marbofloxacin in a Pasteurella multocida serious murine lung infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ying; Qiu, Zhenzhen; Cao, Changfu; Lu, Yan; Sun, Meizhen; Liang, Chaoping; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-12-02

    Marbofloxacin is a third-generation fluoroquinolone developed solely for veterinary medicine with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against some Gram-positive and most Gram-negative bacteria, including the bovine respiratory tract pathogen, Pasteurella multocida. The objective of our study was to elucidate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of marbofloxacin in a Pasteurella multocida infected murine lung model, and to estimate the magnitudes of pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics parameters associated with various effects. The pharmacokinetic studies revealed marbofloxacin kinetics in infected mice were linear over a dose ranging from 1.25 to 10 mg/kg of body weight. The protein binding in the plasma of neutropenic infected mice was 29.77 %. The magnitudes of the ratio of the free-drug area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h to MIC (fAUC 0-24h/MIC) associated with static effect, a 2 log10 reduction and a 3 log10 reduction of bacterial counts were 40.84, 139.34, and 278.08 h, respectively. Based on the dose range study, marbofloxacin exhibited concentration-dependent killing and the fAUC/MIC was the PK/PD index that correlated best with efficacy (R(2) = 83 %). On the basis of a bactericidal effect goal of fAUC 0-24h/MIC of 278.08 h, if marbofloxacin is used for the treatment of P. multocida serious lung infection with an MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml, the current dose (2 mg/kg) would fail to achieve a bactericidal effect. It would benefit from higher doses (4 ~ 6 mg/kg) than those commonly used in clinical practice.

  12. Size dependent skin penetration of nanoparticles in murine and porcine dermatitis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Try, Céline; Moulari, Brice; Béduneau, Arnaud; Fantini, Oscar; Pin, Didier; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-03-01

    A major limitation in the current topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases is the inability to selectively deliver the drug to the inflammation site. Recently, smart drug delivery systems such as nanocarriers are being investigated to enhance the selective deposition of anti-inflammatory drugs in inflamed areas of the skin to achieve higher therapeutic efficacy with minimal side effects. Of such systems, polymeric nanoparticles are considered very efficient carriers for the topical drug delivery. In the current work, poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles of nominal sizes of 70nm (NP70) and 300nm (NP300) were studied for their intra-epidermal distribution in murine and pig atopic dermatitis models over time against the respective healthy controls. Confocal laser scanning microscopical examination of skin biopsies was utilized for the qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of nanoparticles skin deposition and penetration depth. While no skin penetration was found for any of the particles in healthy skin, the accumulation of NP70 was significantly higher than NP300 in inflamed skin (15-fold in mice, 5-fold in pigs). Penetration depth of NP70 decreased over time in mice from 55±3μm to 20±2μm and similar tendencies were observed for the other formulations. In inflamed pig skin, a similar trend was found for the penetration depth (NP70: 46±12μm versus NP300: 23±3μm); however, the NP amount remained constant for the whole analyzed period. Their ability to penetrate specifically into inflamed skin combined with minimal effects on healthy skin underlines small polymeric nanoparticles' potential as selective drug carriers in future treatment of chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Partial Characterization of the Sox2+ Cell Population in an Adult Murine Model of Digit Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vineet; Siu, Bernard F.; Chao, Hsu; Hirschi, Karen K.; Raborn, Eric; Johnson, Scott A.; Tottey, Stephen; Hurley, Katherine B.; Medberry, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue regeneration in response to injury in adult mammals is generally limited to select tissues. Nonmammalian species such as newts and axolotls undergo regeneration of complex tissues such as limbs and digits via recruitment and accumulation of local and circulating multipotent progenitors preprogrammed to recapitulate the missing tissue. Directed recruitment and activation of progenitor cells at a site of injury in adult mammals may alter the default wound-healing response from scar tissue toward regeneration. Bioactive molecules derived from proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to recruit a variety of progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo to the site of injury. The present study further characterized the population of cells accumulating at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products in a well-established model of murine digit amputation. After a mid-second phalanx digit amputation in 6–8-week-old adult mice, treatment with ECM degradation products resulted in the accumulation of a heterogeneous population of cells, a subset of which expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a marker of pluripotent and adult progenitor cells. Sox2+ cells were localized lateral to the amputated P2 bone and coexpressed progenitor cell markers CD90 and Sca1. Transgenic Sox2 eGFP/+ and bone marrow chimeric mice showed that the bone marrow and blood circulation did not contribute to the Sox2+ cell population. The present study showed that, in addition to circulating progenitor cells, resident tissue-derived cells also populate at the site of injury after treatment with ECM degradation products. Although future work is necessary to determine the contribution of Sox2+ cells to functional tissue at the site of injury, recruitment and/or activation of local tissue-derived cells may be a viable approach to tissue engineering of more complex tissues in adult mammals. PMID:22530556

  14. Open Tracheostomy Gastric Acid Aspiration Murine Model of Acute Lung Injury Results in Maximal Acute Nonlethal Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alluri, Ravi; Kutscher, Hilliard L; Mullan, Barbara A; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul R

    2017-02-26

    Acid pneumonitis is a major cause of sterile acute lung injury (ALI) in humans. Acid pneumonitis spans the clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), characterized by neutrophilic alveolitis, and injury to both alveolar epithelium and vascular endothelium. Clinically, ARDS is defined by acute onset of hypoxemia, bilateral patchy pulmonary infiltrates and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Human studies have provided us with valuable information about the physiological and inflammatory changes in the lung caused by ARDS, which has led to various hypotheses about the underling mechanisms. Unfortunately, difficulties determining the etiology of ARDS, as well as a wide range of pathophysiology have resulted in a lack of critical information that could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies. Translational animal models are valuable when their pathogenesis and pathophysiology accurately reproduce a concept proven in both in vitro and clinical settings. Although large animal models (e.g., sheep) share characteristics of the anatomy of human trachea-bronchial tree, murine models provide a host of other advantages including: low cost; short reproductive cycle lending itself to greater data acquisition; a well understood immunologic system; and a well characterized genome leading to the availability of a variety of gene deletion and transgenic strains. A robust model of low pH induced ARDS requires a murine ALI that targets mainly the alveolar epithelium, secondarily the vascular endothelium, as well as the small airways leading to the alveoli. Furthermore, a reproducible injury with wide differences between different injurious and non-injurious insults is important. The murine gastric acid aspiration model presented here using hydrochloric acid employs an open tracheostomy and recreates a pathogenic scenario that reproduces the low pH pneumonitis injury in humans. Additionally, this model can be used to examine interaction of a

  15. Reproduction and Growth in a Murine Model of Early Life-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eniko Nagy

    Full Text Available Studies in transgenic murine models have provided insight into the complexity underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, a disease hypothesized to result from an injurious immune response against intestinal microbiota. We recently developed a mouse model of IBD that phenotypically and histologically resembles human childhood-onset ulcerative colitis (UC, using mice that are genetically modified to be deficient in the cytokines TNF and IL-10 ("T/I" mice. Here we report the effects of early life onset of colon inflammation on growth and reproductive performance of T/I mice. T/I dams with colitis often failed to get pregnant or had small litters with pups that failed to thrive. Production was optimized by breeding double homozygous mutant T/I males to females homozygous mutant for TNF deficiency and heterozygous for deficiency of IL-10 ("T/I-het" dams that were not susceptible to spontaneous colon inflammation. When born to healthy (T/I-het dams, T/I pups initially gained weight similarly to wild type (WT pups and to their non-colitis-susceptible T/I-het littermates. However, their growth curves diverged between 8 and 13 weeks, when most T/I mice had developed moderate to severe colitis. The observed growth failure in T/I mice occurred despite a significant increase in their food consumption and in the absence of protein loss in the stool. This was not due to TNF-induced anorexia or altered food consumption due to elevated leptin levels. Metabolic studies demonstrated increased consumption of oxygen and water and increased production of heat and CO2 in T/I mice compared to their T/I-het littermates, without differences in motor activity. Based on the clinical similarities of this early life onset model of IBD in T/I mice to human IBD, these results suggest that mechanisms previously hypothesized to explain growth failure in children with IBD require re-evaluation. The T/I mouse model may be useful for further investigation of such mechanisms and

  16. Dietary manipulation and social isolation alter disease progression in a murine model of coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Nakagawa-Toyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice with a deficiency in the HDL receptor SR-BI and low expression of a modified apolipoprotein E gene (SR-BI KO/ApoeR61(h/h called 'HypoE' when fed an atherogenic, 'Paigen' diet develop occlusive, atherosclerotic coronary arterial disease (CHD, myocardial infarctions (MI, and heart dysfunction and die prematurely (50% mortality ~40 days after initiation of this diet. Because few murine models share with HypoE mice these cardinal, human-like, features of CHD, HypoE mice represent a novel, small animal, diet-inducible and genetically tractable model for CHD. To better describe the properties of this model, we have explored the effects of varying the composition and timing of administration of atherogenic diets, as well as social isolation vs. group housing, on these animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HypoE mice were maintained on a standard lab chow diet (control until two months of age. Subsequently they received one of three atherogenic diets (Paigen, Paigen without cholate, Western or control diet for varying times and were housed in groups or singly, and we determined the plasma cholesterol levels, extent of cardiomegaly and/or survival. The rate of disease progression could be reduced by lowering the severity of the atherogenic diet and accelerated by social isolation. Disease could be induced by Paigen diets either containing or free of cholate. We also established conditions under which CHD could be initiated by an atherogenic diet and then subsequently, by replacing this diet with standard lab chow, hypercholesterolemia could be reduced and progression to early death prevented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HypoE mice provide a powerful, surgery-free, diet-'titratable' small animal model that can be used to study the onset of recovery from occlusive, atherosclerotic CHD and heart failure due to MI. HypoE mice can be used for the analysis of the effects of environment (diet, social isolation on a variety of features of

  17. Protection against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Induced by Recombinant Antigens in Murine and Nonhuman Primate Models of the Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Neto, Antonio; Porrozzi, Renato; Greeson, Kay; Coler, Rhea N.; Webb, John R.; Seiky, Yasir A. W.; Reed, Steven G.; Grimaldi, Gabriel

    2001-01-01

    Leishmaniasis affects approximately 2 million people each year throughout the world. This high incidence is due in part to the lack of an efficacious vaccine. We present evidence that the recombinant leishmanial antigens LmSTI1 and TSA, which we identified and characterized previously, induce excellent protection in both murine and nonhuman primate (rhesus monkey) models of human cutaneous leishmaniasis. The remarkable protection induced by LmSTI1 and TSA in an animal model that is evolutionarily close to humans qualifies this antigen combination as a promising candidate subunit vaccine against human leishmaniasis. PMID:11349082

  18. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  19. Experimental model for Porphyromonas gingivalis infection in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, P I; Rotimi, V O; Laughon, B E

    1996-03-01

    A virulence model suitable for studying the dynamics of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection, including the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis in experimentally induced infections of multiple organs was developed using mouse and hamster. Virulence of P. gingivalis strains was expressed contrastingly in subcutaneous (sc) infection in the Murine abscess model (MAM) and the Hamsters abscess model (HAM). Subcutaneous infection in the MAM was characterized by a gravity abscess, spreading from the primary site of inoculation downwards, frequently erupting as a secondary lesion. In contract, s.c. P. gingivalis infection in HAM was characterized as a palpable localized abscess at the primary site of inoculation. When the Semi-Solid Agar (SSA) was added to the mono-culture of P. gingivalis, reproducibility of infection in both models was enhanced. P. gingivalis culture supplemented with haemin, or combined with oral Actinomyces viscosus had its virulence overtly enhanced and often fatal in the MAM. Menadione, Eh reducing agents and mixture with the Streptococcus or A. neaslundii did not potentiate virulence in either mode. Transtracheal challenge of the lungs of hamster with P. gingivalis initiated an early pneumonitis and later sequelae of necrosis and abscess formation. Also, abscess was induced by direct inoculation of P. gingivalis in the muscles, liver and testes, but did not induce intra-abdominal abscesses. In conclusion, the HAM applied with the SSA procedure caused a localized P. gingivalis tissue infection with practical advantages for quantitative and qualitative studies of P. gingivalis infections. This study also demonstrates the pathogenic potential of P. gingivalis by reproducing similar infections in multiple anatomical sites.

  20. Modeling of Experimental Adsorption Isotherm Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunjun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption is considered to be one of the most effective technologies widely used in global environmental protection areas. Modeling of experimental adsorption isotherm data is an essential way for predicting the mechanisms of adsorption, which will lead to an improvement in the area of adsorption science. In this paper, we employed three isotherm models, namely: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich to correlate four sets of experimental adsorption isotherm data, which were obtained by batch tests in lab. The linearized and non-linearized isotherm models were compared and discussed. In order to determine the best fit isotherm model, the correlation coefficient (r2 and standard errors (S.E. for each parameter were used to evaluate the data. The modeling results showed that non-linear Langmuir model could fit the data better than others, with relatively higher r2 values and smaller S.E. The linear Langmuir model had the highest value of r2, however, the maximum adsorption capacities estimated from linear Langmuir model were deviated from the experimental data.

  1. Experimental Concepts for Testing Seismic Hazard Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, W.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic hazard analysis is the primary interface through which useful information about earthquake rupture and wave propagation is delivered to society. To account for the randomness (aleatory variability) and limited knowledge (epistemic uncertainty) of these natural processes, seismologists must formulate and test hazard models using the concepts of probability. In this presentation, we will address the scientific objections that have been raised over the years against probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Owing to the paucity of observations, we must rely on expert opinion to quantify the epistemic uncertainties of PSHA models (e.g., in the weighting of individual models from logic-tree ensembles of plausible models). The main theoretical issue is a frequentist critique: subjectivity is immeasurable; ergo, PSHA models cannot be objectively tested against data; ergo, they are fundamentally unscientific. We have argued (PNAS, 111, 11973-11978) that the Bayesian subjectivity required for casting epistemic uncertainties can be bridged with the frequentist objectivity needed for pure significance testing through "experimental concepts." An experimental concept specifies collections of data, observed and not yet observed, that are judged to be exchangeable (i.e., with a joint distribution independent of the data ordering) when conditioned on a set of explanatory variables. We illustrate, through concrete examples, experimental concepts useful in the testing of PSHA models for ontological errors in the presence of aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty. In particular, we describe experimental concepts that lead to exchangeable binary sequences that are statistically independent but not identically distributed, showing how the Bayesian concept of exchangeability generalizes the frequentist concept of experimental repeatability. We also address the issue of testing PSHA models using spatially correlated data.

  2. Py2T murine breast cancer cells, a versatile model of TGFβ-induced EMT in vitro and in vivo.

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    Lorenz Waldmeier

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Increasing evidence supports a role of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT process in endowing subsets of tumor cells with properties driving malignant tumor progression and resistance to cancer therapy. To advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms, we sought to generate a transplantable cellular model system that allows defined experimental manipulation and analysis of EMT in vitro and at the same time recapitulates oncogenic EMT in vivo. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: We have established a stable murine breast cancer cell line (Py2T from a breast tumor of an MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse. Py2T cells display a metastable epithelial phenotype characterized by concomitant expression of luminal and basal cytokeratins and sheet migration. Exposure of Py2T cells to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ in vitro induces reversible EMT accompanied by downregulation of E-cadherin and upregulation of mesenchymal markers, including EMT transcription factors, and a gain in single cell motility and invasiveness. Py2T cells give rise to tumors after orthotopic injection into syngeneic FVB/N mice. Notably, transplantation of epithelial Py2T cells results in the formation of invasive primary tumors with low to absent E-cadherin expression, indicating that the cells undergo EMT-like changes in vivo. This process appears to at least in part depend on TGFβ signaling, since tumors formed by Py2T cells expressing a dominant-negative version of TGFβ receptor widely maintain their epithelial differentiation status. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, the data demonstrate that the Py2T cell line represents a versatile model system to study the EMT process in vitro and in vivo. The observation that Py2T cells give rise to tumors and collectively undergo EMT-like changes in vivo highlights the suitability of the Py2T model system as a tool to study tumor-related EMT. In particular, Py2T cells may serve to corroborate recent findings relating EMT

  3. Enterococcal Biofilm Formation and Virulence in an Optimized Murine Model of Foreign Body-Associated Urinary Tract Infections▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiton, Pascale S.; Hung, Chia S.; Hancock, Lynn E.; Caparon, Michael G.; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2010-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) constitute the majority of nosocomial UTIs and pose significant clinical challenges. Enterococcal species are among the predominant causative agents of CAUTIs. However, very little is known about the pathophysiology of Enterococcus-mediated UTIs. We optimized a murine model of foreign body-associated UTI in order to mimic conditions of indwelling catheters in patients. In this model, the presence of a foreign body elicits major histological changes and induces the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines in the bladder. In addition, in contrast to naïve mice, infection of catheter-implanted mice with Enterococcus faecalis induced the specific expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α) in the bladder. These responses resulted in a favorable niche for the development of persistent E. faecalis infections in the murine bladders and kidneys. Furthermore, biofilm formation on the catheter implant in vivo correlated with persistent infections. However, the enterococcal autolytic factors GelE and Atn (also known as AtlA), which are important in biofilm formation in vitro, are dispensable in vivo. In contrast, the housekeeping sortase A (SrtA) is critical for biofilm formation and virulence in CAUTIs. Overall, this murine model represents a significant advance in the understanding of CAUTIs and underscores the importance of urinary catheterization during E. faecalis uropathogenesis. This model is also a valuable tool for the identification of virulence determinants that can serve as potential antimicrobial targets for the treatment of enterococcal infections. PMID:20696830

  4. Enterococcal biofilm formation and virulence in an optimized murine model of foreign body-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiton, Pascale S; Hung, Chia S; Hancock, Lynn E; Caparon, Michael G; Hultgren, Scott J

    2010-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) constitute the majority of nosocomial UTIs and pose significant clinical challenges. Enterococcal species are among the predominant causative agents of CAUTIs. However, very little is known about the pathophysiology of Enterococcus-mediated UTIs. We optimized a murine model of foreign body-associated UTI in order to mimic conditions of indwelling catheters in patients. In this model, the presence of a foreign body elicits major histological changes and induces the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines in the bladder. In addition, in contrast to naïve mice, infection of catheter-implanted mice with Enterococcus faecalis induced the specific expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α) in the bladder. These responses resulted in a favorable niche for the development of persistent E. faecalis infections in the murine bladders and kidneys. Furthermore, biofilm formation on the catheter implant in vivo correlated with persistent infections. However, the enterococcal autolytic factors GelE and Atn (also known as AtlA), which are important in biofilm formation in vitro, are dispensable in vivo. In contrast, the housekeeping sortase A (SrtA) is critical for biofilm formation and virulence in CAUTIs. Overall, this murine model represents a significant advance in the understanding of CAUTIs and underscores the importance of urinary catheterization during E. faecalis uropathogenesis. This model is also a valuable tool for the identification of virulence determinants that can serve as potential antimicrobial targets for the treatment of enterococcal infections.

  5. Experimental deep brain stimulation in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sonny Kh; Vlamings, Rinske; Lim, Leewei; Sesia, Thibault; Janssen, Marcus Lf; Steinbusch, Harry Wm; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Temel, Yasin

    2010-10-01

    DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION (DBS) as a therapy in neurological and psychiatric disorders is widely applied in the field of functional and stereotactic neurosurgery. In this respect, experimental DBS in animal models is performed to evaluate new indications and new technology. In this article, we review our experience with the concept of experimental DBS, including its development and validation. An electrode construction was developed using clinical principles to perform DBS unilaterally or bilaterally in freely moving rats. The stimulation parameters were adjusted for the rat using current density calculations. We performed validation studies in 2 animal models: a rat model of Parkinson's disease (bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine infusion in the striatum) and a rat model of Huntington's disease (transgenic rats). The effects of DBS were evaluated in different behavioral tasks measuring motor and cognitive functions. The electrode construction developed allows experimental DBS to be performed in freely moving rats. With the current setup, electrodes are placed in the target in 70% to 95% of the cases. Using a rat model, we showed that bilateral DBS of the subthalamic nucleus improves parkinsonian motor disability, but can induce behavioral side effects, similar to the clinical situation. In addition, we showed that DBS of the globus pallidus can improve motor and cognitive symptoms in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Nevertheless, during the process of the development and validation of experimental DBS, we encountered specific problems. These are discussed in detail. Experimental DBS in freely moving animals is an adequate tool to explore new indications for DBS and to refine DBS technology.

  6. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-06

    Jan 6, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 86; Issue 2. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model physics in inverse see-saw motivated SO(10) GUT. Ram Lal Awasthi. Special: Supersymmetric Unified Theories and Higgs Physics Volume 86 Issue 2 February 2016 pp 223- ...

  7. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-06

    Jan 6, 2016 ... also fit perfectly in the model framework. Despite the fact that SM has unravelled the gauge origin of fundamental forces and the structure of Universe while successfully confronting numerous experimental tests, it has various limitations. For a good summary on its excellencies and compulsions see [1], and.

  8. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

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    Kenichi Kumagai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis.

  9. Combination treatment with meropenem plus levofloxacin is synergistic against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in a murine model of pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Arnold; Liu, Weiguo; VanGuilder, Michael; Neely, Michael N; Schumitzky, Alan; Jelliffe, Roger; Fikes, Steven; Kurhanewicz, Stephanie; Robbins, Nichole; Brown, David; Baluya, Dodge; Drusano, George L

    2015-04-15

    Meropenem plus levofloxacin treatment was shown to be a promising combination in our in vitro hollow fiber infection model. We strove to validate this finding in a murine Pseudomonas pneumonia model. A dose-ranging study with meropenem and levofloxacin alone and in combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was performed in a granulocytopenic murine pneumonia model. Meropenem and levofloxacin were administered to partially humanize their pharmacokinetic profiles in mouse serum. Total and resistant bacterial populations were estimated after 24 hours of therapy. Pharmacokinetic profiling of both drugs was performed in plasma and epithelial lining fluid, using a population model. Meropenem and levofloxacin penetrations into epithelial lining fluid were 39.3% and 64.3%, respectively. Both monotherapies demonstrated good exposure responses. An innovative combination-therapy analytic approach demonstrated that the combination was statistically significantly synergistic (α = 2.475), as was shown in the hollow fiber infection model. Bacterial resistant to levofloxacin and meropenem was seen in the control arm. Levofloxacin monotherapy selected for resistance to itself. No resistant subpopulations were observed in any combination therapy arm. The combination of meropenem plus levofloxacin was synergistic, producing good bacterial kill and resistance suppression. Given the track record of safety of each agent, this combination may be worthy of clinical trial. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Interleukin-4 Receptor Alpha: From Innate to Adaptive Immunity in Murine Models of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Hurdayal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The interleukin (IL-4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα, ubiquitously expressed on both innate and adaptive immune cells, controls the signaling of archetypal type 2 immune regulators; IL-4 and IL-13, which elicit their signaling action by the type 1 IL-4Rα/gamma common and/or the type 2 IL-4Rα/IL-13Rα complexes. Global gene-deficient mouse models targeting IL-4, IL-13, or the IL-4Rα chain, followed by the development of conditional mice and generation of important cell-type-specific IL-4Rα-deficient mouse models, were indeed critical to gaining in-depth understanding of detrimental T helper (Th 2 mechanisms in type 1-controlled diseases. A primary example being cutaneous leishmaniasis, which is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania major, among others. The disease is characterized by localized self-healing cutaneous lesions and necrosis for which, currently, not a single vaccine has made it to a stage that can be considered effective. The spectrum of human leishmaniasis belongs to the top 10 infectious diseases according to the World Health Organization. As such, 350 million humans are at risk of infection and disease, with an incidence of 1.5–2 million new cases being reported annually. A major aim of our research is to identify correlates of host protection and evasion, which may aid in vaccine design and therapeutic interventions. In this review, we focus on the immune-regulatory role of the IL-4Rα chain from innate immune responses to the development of beneficial type 1 and detrimental type 2 adaptive immune responses during cutaneous Leishmania infection. We discuss the cell-specific requirements of the IL-4Rα chain on crucial innate immune cells during L. major infection, including, IL-4Rα-responsive skin keratinocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils, as well as dendritic cells (DCs. The latter, contributing to one of the paradigm shifts with respect to the role of IL-4 instructing DCs in vivo, to promote Th1 responses against L

  11. Murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is diminished by treatment with the angiogenesis inhibitors B20-4.1.1 and angiostatin (K1-3.

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    Carolyn J MacMillan

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels form pre-existing vasculature whose contribution to inflammatory conditions of the Central Nervous System is being studied in order to generate novel therapeutic targets. This study is the first to investigate the impact of two particular angiogenesis inhibitors on murine Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE, an inflammatory disease that mimics aspects of the human disease Multiple Sclerosis. The inhibitors were chosen to reduce angiogenesis by complimentary means. Extrinsic factors were targeted with B20-4.1.1 through its ability to bind to murine Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. Vascular processes connected to angiogenesis were targeted directly with K(1-3, the first three kringle domains of angiostatin. Mice treated with B20-4.1.1 and K(1-3 from onset of signs had reduced clinical scores 18-21 days after EAE induction. Both agents suppressed spinal cord angiogenesis without effect on local VEGF expression. B20-4.1.1 reduced spinal cord vascular permeability while K(1-3 had no effect. T cell infiltration into the spinal cord at day 21 was unaffected by either treatment. B20-4.1.1 reduced peripheral T cell proliferation while K(1-3 had no effect. Lymphoid cells from treated mice produced reduced levels of the T helper-17 (Th-17 cell cytokine interleukin (IL-17 with no effect on the Th-1 cytokine interferon (IFN-γ or Th-2 cytokine IL-4. However, when both drugs were added in vitro to naive T cells or to antigen stimulated T cells from mice with untreated EAE they had no effect on proliferation or levels of IL-17 or IFN-γ. We conclude that these angiogenesis inhibitors mitigate EAE by both suppressing spinal cord angiogenesis and reducing peripheral T cell activation.

  12. Biotherapeutic target or sink: analysis of the macrophage mannose receptor tissue distribution in murine models of lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin Sheen; Brondyk, William; Lydon, John T; Thurberg, Beth L; Piepenhagen, Peter A

    2011-06-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are metabolic disorders caused by enzyme deficiencies that lead to lysosomal accumulation of undegraded substrates. Enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) have been developed as treatments for patients with Gaucher, Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Pompe diseases. Depending on the disease, the corresponding therapeutic enzyme is designed to be internalized by diseased cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis via macrophage mannose receptors (MMR) or mannose-6-phosphate receptors (M6PR). Enzymes developed to treat Gaucher and Niemann-Pick diseases are meant to target MMR-expressing cells, and in the case of Cerezyme [recombinant human β-glucocerebrosidase (rhβGC)] for treating Gaucher disease, glycans on the enzyme are modified to increase specificity toward this receptor. Due to heterogeneity in glycosylation on enzymes intended to target the M6PR, however, there may also be some unintended targeting to MMR-expressing cells, which could act as unwanted sinks. Examples include Fabrazyme [recombinant human α-galactosidase A (rhαGal)] for treating Fabry disease and Myozyme [recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA)] for treating Pompe disease. It is therefore of great interest to better understand the cell type and tissue distribution of MMR in murine LSD models used to evaluate ERT efficacy and mechanism of action. In this study, we generated affinity-purified polyclonal antibody against murine MMR and used it to carry out a systematic examination of MMR protein localization in murine models of Gaucher, Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Pompe diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy, we examined MMR distribution in liver, spleen, lung, kidney, heart, diaphragm, quadriceps, and triceps in these animal models and compared them with MMR distribution in wild-type mice.

  13. Analgesic effects of intra-articular botulinum toxin Type B in a murine model of chronic degenerative knee arthritis pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Anderson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie Anderson1,2, Hollis Krug1,2, Christopher Dorman1, Pari McGarraugh1, Sandra Frizelle1, Maren Mahowald1,21Rheumatology Section, Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; 2Division of Rheumatology and Autoimmune Diseases, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USAObjective: To evaluate the analgesic effectiveness of intra-articular botulinum toxin Type B (BoNT/B in a murine model of chronic degenerative arthritis pain.Methods and materials: Chronic arthritis was produced in adult C57Bl6 mice by intra-articular injection of Type IV collagenase into the left knee. Following induction of arthritis, the treatment group received intra-articular BoNT/B. Arthritic control groups were treated with intra-articular normal saline or sham injections. Pain behavior testing was performed prior to arthritis, after induction of arthritis, and following treatments. Pain behavior measures included analysis of gait impairment (spontaneous pain behavior and joint tenderness evaluation (evoked pain response. Strength was measured as ability to grasp and cling.Results: Visual gait analysis showed significant impairment of gait in arthritic mice that improved 43% after intra-articular BoNT/B, demonstrating a substantial articular analgesic effect. Joint tenderness, measured with evoked pain response scores, increased with arthritis induction and decreased 49.5% after intra-articular BoNT/B treatment. No improvement in visual gait scores or decrease in evoked pain response scores were found in the control groups receiving intra-articular normal saline or sham injections. Intra-articular BoNT/B was safe, and no systemic effects or limb weakness was noted.Conclusions: This study is the first report of intra-articular BoNT/B for analgesia in a murine model of arthritis pain. The results of this study validate prior work using intra-articular neurotoxins in murine models. Our findings show chronic degenerative arthritis

  14. Electrochemical desalination of bricks - Experimental and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Gry; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    Chlorides, nitrates and sulfates play an important role in the salt-decay of porous materials in buildings and monuments. Electrochemical desalination is a technology able to remove salts from such porous materials in order to stop or prevent the decay. In this paper, experimental and numerical......-contaminated bricks with respect to the monovalent ions is discussed. Comparison between the experimental and the simulation results showed that the proposed numerical model is able to predict electrochemical desalination treatments with remarkable accuracy, and it can be used as a predictive tool...

  15. Bromelain limits airway inflammation in an ovalbumin-induced murine model of established asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Eric R; Shah, Sonali J; Guernsey, Linda A; Schramm, Craig M; Thrall, Roger S

    2012-01-01

    Allergic asthma continues to increase despite new pharmacological advances for both acute treatment and chronic-disease management. Asthma is a multifactorial disease process with genetic, allergic, infectious, environmental, and dietary origins. Researchers are investigating the benefits of lifestyle changes and alternative asthma treatments, including the ability of bromelain to inhibit inflammation. Bromelain is a commonly used, proteolytically active pineapple extract. The present study intended to determine the ability of bromelain to reduce the inflammation of preexisting asthma via an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine model of allergic airway disease (AAD). The research team designed a study examining the effects of bromelain in a control group of mice that received phosphate buffered saline (PBS) only and in an intervention group that received bromelain in PBS. Setting The study took place in the Department of Immunology at the University of Connecticut's School of Medicine, Farmington. Intervention The research team sensitized female C57BL/6J mice with intraperitoneal OVA/alum and then challenged them with OVA aerosolization for 10 consecutive days. On day 4, the team began administering daily doses of PBS to the control group (n = 10) and bromelain (6mg/kg) in PBS to the bromelain (intervention) group (n = 10). The primary measures included bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellular differential, cellular phenotype via flow cytometry, and lung histology. Additional outcomes included testing for serum cytokines and immunoglobulin. Bromelain treatment of AAD mice (bromelain group) resulted in significant anti-inflammatory activity as indicated by reduced BAL total leukocytes (P bromelain significantly reduced BAL CD4+ and CD8+ T cells without affecting cell numbers in the spleen or hilar lymph node. The study found decreased interleukins IL-4, IL-12, IL-17, as well as IFN-α in the serum of bromelain-treated animals. The results suggest that bromelain has a

  16. Effect of aging on airway remodeling and muscarinic receptors in a murine acute asthma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang JY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ji Young Kang, Sook Young Lee, Chin Kook Rhee, Seung Joon Kim, Soon Seog Kwon, Young Kyoon KimDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, KoreaBackground and objectives: The influence of aging on the development of asthma has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this study was to investigate age-related airway responses involving lung histology and expression of muscarinic receptors in a murine model of acute asthma. Methods: Female BALB/c mice at the ages of 6 weeks and 6, 9, and 12 months were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA for 1 month (n = 8–12 per group. We analyzed inflammatory cells and T-helper (Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and parameters of airway remodeling and expression of muscarinic receptors in lung tissue. Results: Among the OVA groups, total cell and eosinophil numbers in BAL fluid were significantly higher in the older (6-, 9-, and 12-month-old mice than in the young (6-week-old mice. Interleukin (IL 4 (IL-4 concentration increased, but IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations showed a decreased tendency, with age. IL-17 concentration tended to increase with age, which did not reach statistical significance. periodic acid-Schiff (PAS staining area, peribronchial collagen deposition, and area of α-smooth muscle staining were significantly higher in the 6-month older OVA group than in the young OVA group. The expression of the M3 and M2 muscarinic receptors tended to increase and decrease, respectively, with age. Conclusion: The aged mice showed an active and unique pattern not only on airway inflammation, but also on airway remodeling and expression of the muscarinic receptors during the development of acute asthma compared with the young mice. These findings suggest that the aging process affects the pathogenesis of acute asthma and age-specific approach might be more appropriate for better asthma control in a clinical practice.Keywords: aging, asthma

  17. A murine model of dry eye induced by topical administration of erlotinib eye drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi-Chen; Bao, Jing; Li, Cheng; Tan, Gang; Wu, An-Hua; Ye, Lei; Ye, Lin-Hong; Zhou, Qiong; Shao, Yi

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, the effects of erlotinib on mouse tear function and corneal epithelial tissue structure were investigated. Throughout the 3 weeks of treatment, no notable differences were observed in the body, eye or lacrimal gland weights of the control and experimental mice. However, in the experimental group, the tear volume and break‑up times of tear film were significantly lower following treatment with erlotinib compared with the control group. Corneal fluorescein staining in the experimental group revealed patchy staining, and the Lissamine green staining and inflammatory index were significantly higher in the experimental group at 3 weeks than in the control group. In the experimental group, the number of corneal epithelium layers increased significantly following treatment with erlotinib for 3 weeks and a significant increase in the number of vacuoles was observed compared with the control group. Treatment with erlotinib significantly increased the corneal epithelial cell apoptosis, and led to a significantly increased number of epithelial cell layers and increased keratin 10 expression. It also significantly reduced the number of conjunctival goblet cells. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the corneal epithelial surface was irregular and there was a substantial reduction and partial loss of the microvilli in the experimental group. Mice treated with erlotinib also exhibited an increased protein expression of tumor necrosis factor‑α and decreased protein expression of phosphorylated‑epidermal growth factor receptor in the corneal epithelial cells. The topical application of erlotinib eye drops was revealed to induce dry eyes in mice. This is a novel method of developing a model of dry eyes in mice.

  18. Translational Efficacy of Humanized Exposures of Cefepime, Ertapenem, and Levofloxacin against Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli in a Murine Model of Complicated Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monogue, Marguerite L; Nicolau, David P

    2017-11-01

    Validated animal models are required as bridging tools to assess the utility of novel therapies and potential microbiologic outcomes. Herein, we utilized uropathogenic extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in the neutropenic murine complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI) model with humanized exposures of cefepime, ertapenem, and levofloxacin to assess its translational value to human outcomes. Our data support the translational utility of this murine model to cUTI in humans as humanized exposures produced microbiologic outcomes consistent with the phenotypic profiles of the organisms. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Artemisia vulgaris L. ethanolic leaf extract reverses thrombocytopenia/thrombocytosis and averts end-stage disease of experimental severe Plasmodium berghei murine malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamunuarachchi, Gayan S; Ratnasooriya, Wanigasekara D; Premakumara, Sirimal; Udagama, Preethi V

    2014-12-01

    Artemisinin isolated from Artemisia annua is the most potent antimalarial against chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. We previously reported that the ethanolic leaf extract of Artemisia vulgaris, an invasive weed and the only Artemisia species in Sri Lanka, possess both potent and safe antimalarial activity (in terms of antiparasitic properties) in a P. berghei murine malaria model. We report here a prototype study that investigated antidisease activities of A. vulgaris ethanolic leaf extract (AVELE) in a P. berghei ANKA murine malaria model that elicit pathogenesis similar to falciparum malaria. Profound thrombocytosis and thrombocytopenia in mice were detected in early-stage (Day 3), and at a later stage of infection (Day 6), respectively. Plasmodium berghei infected mice, 7 or 8 days post-infection reached end-stage disease with rapid drop in body temperature and usually die within 24 h, as a consequence of cerebral malaria. Three doses of the AVELE (500, 750 and 1000 mg/kg) were used to assess antidisease activity of A. vulgaris in terms of survival, effects on thrombocyte related pathology and end-stage disease, antipyretic activity, and antinociception, using standard methodology. The 1000 mg/kg dose of AVELE significantly increased survival, reversed the profound thrombocytopenia/ thrombocytosis (p ≤0.01), altered the end-stage disease (p ≤0.05), and manifested significant antipyretic and antinociceptive (p ≤0.05) activities. We conclude that a crude ethanolic leaf extract of A. vulgaris, showed potent antimalarial properties, in terms of antidisease activities; antipyretic activity, peripheral and central antinociception, increased survival, averted end-stage disease and reversed thrombocytopenia/thrombocytosis.

  20. Experimental Animal Models in Periodontology: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struillou, Xavier; Boutigny, Hervé; Soueidan, Assem; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In periodontal research, animal studies are complementary to in vitro experiments prior to testing new treatments. Animal models should make possible the validation of hypotheses and prove the safety and efficacy of new regenerating approaches using biomaterials, growth factors or stem cells. A review of the literature was carried out by using electronic databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Science). Numerous animal models in different species such as rats, hamsters, rabbits, ferrets, canines and primates have been used for modeling human periodontal diseases and treatments. However, both the anatomy and physiopathology of animals are different from those of humans, making difficult the evaluation of new therapies. Experimental models have been developed in order to reproduce major periodontal diseases (gingivitis, periodontitis), their pathogenesis and to investigate new surgical techniques. The aim of this review is to define the most pertinent animal models for periodontal research depending on the hypothesis and expected results. PMID:20556202

  1. Safety and efficacy of the immunosuppressive agent 6-tioguanine in murine model of acute and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bodegraven Adriaan A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral thiopurines are effective and widely used in treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in humans, although their use is limited due the development of adverse events. Here, we examine the efficacy and toxicity of oral treatment with 6-tioguanine (6-TG and azathioprine (AZA in a murine model of IBD. Methods We induced acute or chronic colitis in BALB/c mice by one or four cycles of 3% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS, respectively. Mice were treated by daily gavages of various dosages of 6-tioguanine, azathioprine, or by phosphate buffered saline (PBS starting the first day of DSS or after two cycles of DSS, respectively. We monitored the efficacy and toxicity by measuring the weight change and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT activity and by disease severity and histology, at the end of the experiment. Moreover, we measured cytokine production after colon fragment cultivation by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay and numbers of apoptotic cells in the spleen by flow cytometry. Results 6-TG is effective in the treatment of acute DSS-induced colitis in a dose-dependent manner and 40 μg of 6-TG is significantly more effective in the treatment of acute colitis than both AZA and PBS. This effect is accompanied by decrease of IL-6 and IFN-γ production in colon. We did not observe histological abnormalities in liver samples from control (PBS or 6-TG treated mice. However, liver samples from most mice treated with AZA showed mild, yet distinct signs of hepatotoxicity. In chronic colitis, all thiopurine derivatives improved colitis, 20 μg of 6-TG per dose was superior. High doses of 6-TG led to significant weight loss at the end of the therapy, but none of the thiopurine derivatives increased levels of serum ALT. Both thiopurine derivatives reduced the proportion of apoptotic T helper cells, but a high production of both IL-6 and TGF-β was observed only in colon of AZA-treated mice. Conclusions Use of 6-TG in the treatment

  2. Phosphatidylcholine Coatings Deliver Local Antimicrobials and Reduce Infection in a Murine Model: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael A; Beenken, Karen E; Smeltzer, Mark S; Haggard, Warren O; Jennings, J Amber

    2017-07-01

    Phosphatidylcholine coatings have been shown to elute antibiotics for several days. A recently developed biofilm inhibitor, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), has been shown to exhibit synergistic activity with several common antibiotics. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of C2DA and amikacin dual drug delivery from a phosphatidylcholine coating. (1) What are the in vitro elution profiles of amikacin and C2DA from phosphatidylcholine-coated coupons in incubated phosphate-buffered saline? (2) Does the presence of C2DA in eluate samples lower the amount of amikacin needed for bacterial inhibition in overnight bacterial turbidity assays? (3) Does addition of amikacin and C2DA result in decreased colony-forming units (CFUs) on wire implants and bone when compared with phosphatidylcholine coatings alone in a mouse model of periprosthetic joint infection? Effects of loading concentrations were assessed during 7-day in vitro elution studies for coatings containing all mixtures of 0%, 5%, 15%, and 25% wt of amikacin and C2DA (n = 4) through quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography concentration determination and plotting concentration eluted over time. Antimicrobial activity was assessed by overnight turbidity testing of elution study samples against Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In vivo efficacy was assessed using phosphatidylcholine-coated wire implants in a murine (mouse) model of infection (n = 3). Wire implants were coated with phosphatidylcholine containing no antimicrobials, amikacin alone, C2DA alone, or amikacin and C2DA and then inserted into the intramedullary femur of each mouse and inoculated with S aureus. The number of viable bacterial colonies on the implant surface and in the surrounding bone was determined after 1 week with the goal of achieving complete bacterial clearance. Total viable CFU count and proportion of samples achieving complete clearance were compared between groups. Elution samples showed a burst response

  3. Development of a Murine Model for Aerosolized Ebolavirus Infection Using a Panel of Recombinant Inbred Mice

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    Malak Kotb

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Countering aerosolized filovirus infection is a major priority of biodefense research.  Aerosol models of filovirus infection have been developed in knock-out mice, guinea pigs and non-human primates; however, filovirus infection of immunocompetent mice by the aerosol route has not been reported.  A murine model of aerosolized filovirus infection in mice should be useful for screening vaccine candidates and therapies.  In this study, various strains of wild-type and immunocompromised mice were exposed to aerosolized wild-type (WT or mouse-adapted (MA Ebola virus (EBOV.  Upon exposure to aerosolized WT-EBOV, BALB/c, C57BL/6 (B6, and DBA/2 (D2 mice were unaffected, but 100% of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and 90% of signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat1 knock-out (KO mice became moribund between 7–9 days post-exposure (dpe.  Exposure to MA-EBOV caused 15% body weight loss in BALB/c, but all mice recovered.  In contrast, 10–30% lethality was observed in B6 and D2 mice exposed to aerosolized MA-EBOV, and 100% of SCID, Stat1 KO, interferon (IFN-γ KO and Perforin KO mice became moribund between 7–14 dpe. In order to identify wild-type, inbred, mouse strains in which exposure to aerosolized MA-EBOV is uniformly lethal, 60 BXD (C57BL/6 crossed with DBA/2 recombinant inbred (RI and advanced RI (ARI mouse strains were exposed to aerosolized MA-EBOV, and monitored for disease severity. A complete spectrum of disease severity was observed. All BXD strains lost weight but many recovered. However, infection was uniformly lethal within 7 to 12 days post-exposure in five BXD strains.  Aerosol exposure of these five BXD strains to 10-fold less MA-EBOV resulted in lethality ranging from 0% in two strains to 90–100% lethality in two strains.  Analysis of post-mortem tissue from BXD strains that became moribund and were euthanized at the lower dose of MA-EBOV, showed liver damage in all mice as well as lung lesions in

  4. Experimental superficial candidiasis on tissue models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilake, J A M S; Samaranayake, L P

    2010-07-01

    Candida species are common pathogens causing superficial mycoses primarily affecting the mucosa and the skin in humans. Crucial steps during pathogenesis of superficial candidiasis comprise fungal adhesion, colonisation and subsequent penetration of the respective tissues. Exploring these pathological events and perhaps fungal and tissue responses towards drug treatment is imperative in the management of this infection. Unfortunately, pathological biopsies of superficial candidiasis do not exhibit the early changes in the host-pathogen interaction as the tissues are already invaded by the fungi. In vivo experimental assessments of pathological processes of superficial candidiasis are also limited because of the difficulties in providing reproducible and comparable conditions in the host environment. Conversely, in vitro models have helped studying fungal-host interactions under more defined and controlled conditions. Some common in vitro models used to simulate superficial candidiasis are chick chorioallantoic membrane, mucosal explants and single layer or multiple layer cell cultures. Interestingly, these experimental approaches share advantages as well as disadvantages when compared with in vivo conditions. Hence, this review intends to discuss about the experimental superficial candidiasis produced in various tissue models and their advantages as well as disadvantages with a particular reference to further improvement of validity and reliability of such experiments.

  5. Seclazone Reactor Modeling And Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinga, T. [ETH-Zuerich (Switzerland); Olalde, G. [CNRS Odeillo (France); Steinfeld, A. [PSI and ETHZ (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model is formulated for the SOLZINC solar chemical reactor for the production of Zn by carbothermal reduction of ZnO. The model involves solving, by the finite-volume technique, a 1D unsteady state energy equation that couples heat transfer to the chemical kinetics for a shrinking packed bed exposed to thermal radiation. Validation is accomplished by comparison with experimentally measured temperature profiles and Zn production rates as a function of time, obtained for a 5-kW solar reactor tested at PSI's solar furnace. (author)

  6. Beyond the standard model, experimental summary

    CERN Document Server

    McPherson, R A

    2003-01-01

    An overview of experimental results in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. It is impossible to cover all topics in this field, so a set of examples is used to highlight the scope and breadth of the results. Selected topics include searches for compositeness, flavour changing neutral currents, SUSY, exotic Higgs particles, low scale gravity in extra dimensions, and non commutative geometry. Current results are presented from the LEP, Tevatron Run I, and HERA I experiments. No convincing evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model has been observed. Prospects for ongoing and upcoming experiments are discussed. (40 refs).

  7. Cell-delivered magnetic nanoparticles caused hyperthermia-mediated increased survival in a murine pancreatic cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Matthew T; Balivada, Sivasai; Wang, Hongwang; Shrestha, Tej B; Seo, Gwi Moon; Pyle, Marla; Abayaweera, Gayani; Dani, Raj; Koper, Olga B; Tamura, Masaaki; Chikan, Viktor; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2012-01-01

    Using magnetic nanoparticles to absorb alternating magnetic field energy as a method of generating localized hyperthermia has been shown to be a potential cancer treatment. This report demonstrates a system that uses tumor homing cells to actively carry iron/iron oxide nanoparticles into tumor tissue for alternating magnetic field treatment. Paramagnetic iron/ iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and loaded into RAW264.7 cells (mouse monocyte/ macrophage-like cells), which have been shown to be tumor homing cells. A murine model of disseminated peritoneal pancreatic cancer was then generated by intraperitoneal injection of Pan02 cells. After tumor development, monocyte/macrophage-like cells loaded with iron/ iron oxide nanoparticles were injected intraperitoneally and allowed to migrate into the tumor. Three days after injection, mice were exposed to an alternating magnetic field for 20 minutes to cause the cell-delivered nanoparticles to generate heat. This treatment regimen was repeated three times. A survival study demonstrated that this system can significantly increase survival in a murine pancreatic cancer model, with an average post-tumor insertion life expectancy increase of 31%. This system has the potential to become a useful method for specifically and actively delivering nanoparticles for local hyperthermia treatment of cancer.

  8. Mixed infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in a murine lesion model: potential synergistic effects on virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuille, F; Ebersole, J L; Kesavalu, L; Stepfen, M J; Holt, S C

    1996-06-01

    These studies determined the characteristics of tissue destruction in a murine abscess model elicited by mixed infection with the periodontopathogens Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The interbacterial effects of this synergism, the kinetics of the relationship of the bacterial interaction, and the characteristics of the bacteria required for the tissue destruction were studied. Infection of mice with P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum strains elicited lesions of various sizes as a function of infective dose. Primary infection with F. nucleatum plus P. gingivalis at various ratios (i.e., or = 1:1, spreading lesion formation and progression were significantly (P < 0.001) decreased, suggesting that bacterial interaction (i.e., coaggregation) may have inhibited the spread of the P. gingivalis infection to a site distant from the initial injection. Infection with F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis simultaneously (at different sites) or F. nucleatum administered within 4 h prior to or 1 h following P. gingivalis infection significantly enhanced the ability of P. gingivalis to form large phlegmonous lesions. Chemical inhibition of the P. gingivalis trypsin-like protease activity or the use of a trypsin-negative P. gingivalis strain abrogated tissue destruction either alone or in combination with F. nucleatum. Therefore, it was possible to examine aspects of virulence of these pathogens in a murine lesion model by either altering bacterial ratios, manipulating the time of infection, or targeting vital bacterial virulence factors.

  9. Impact of host age and parity on susceptibility to severe urinary tract infection in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Kline

    Full Text Available The epidemiology and bacteriology of urinary tract infection (UTI varies across the human lifespan, but the reasons for these differences are poorly understood. Using established monomicrobial and polymicrobial murine UTI models caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC and/or Group B Streptococcus (GBS, we demonstrate age and parity as inter-related factors contributing to UTI susceptibility. Young nulliparous animals exhibited 10-100-fold higher bacterial titers compared to older animals. In contrast, multiparity was associated with more severe acute cystitis in older animals compared to age-matched nulliparous controls, particularly in the context of polymicrobial infection where UPEC titers were ∼1000-fold higher in the multiparous compared to the nulliparous host. Multiparity was also associated with significantly increased risk of chronic high titer UPEC cystitis and ascending pyelonephritis. Further evidence is provided that the increased UPEC load in multiparous animals required TLR4-signaling. Together, these data strongly suggest that the experience of childbearing fundamentally and permanently changes the urinary tract and its response to pathogens in a manner that increases susceptibility to severe UTI. Moreover, this murine model provides a system for dissecting these and other lifespan-associated risk factors contributing to severe UTI in at-risk groups.

  10. Experimental in Vivo Models of Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Segal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candidiasis is a multifaceted fungal disease including mucosal-cutaneous, visceral, and disseminated infections caused by yeast species of the genus Candida. Candida infections are among the most common human mycoses. Candida species are the third to fourth most common isolates from bloodstream infections in neutropenic or immunocompromised hospitalized patients. The mucosal-cutaneous forms—particularly vaginal infections—have a high prevalence. Vaginitis caused by Candida species is the second most common vaginal infection. Hence, candidiasis is a major subject for research, including experimental in vivo models to study pathogenesis, prevention, or therapy of the disease. The following review article will focus on various experimental in vivo models in different laboratory animals, such as mammals (mice, rats, rabbits, the fruit fly–Drosophila melanogaster, the larvae of the moth Galleria mellonella, or the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The review will describe the induction of the different clinical forms of candidiasis in the various models and the validity of such models in mimicking the human clinical situations. The use of such models for the assessment of antifungal drugs, evaluation of potential vaccines to protect before candidiasis, exploration of Candida virulence factors, and comparison of pathogenicity of different Candida species will be included in the review. All of the above will be reported as based on published studies of numerous investigators as well as on the research of the author and his group.

  11. Endometriose: modelo experimental em ratas Endometriosis: experimental model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schor

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: divulgar a metodologia da indução de endometriose experimental em animais de laboratório. Método: utilizamos ratas albinas, virgens, adultas de aproximadamente três meses de idade, que foram inicialmente anestesiadas pelo éter etílico. Aberta a cavidade abdominal, identificamos os cornos uterinos e retiramos um fragmento de aproximadamente 4 cm do corno uterino direito. Esse fragmento foi mergulhado em solução fisiológica e sob lupa estereoscópica foi separado o endométrio do miométrio e feitos retângulos de aproximadamente 4 por 5 mm. Esses foram fixados por meio de fio de sutura, sobre vasos sangüíneos visíveis a olho nu, na parede lateral do abdômen, tomando-se sempre o cuidado de manter a porção do endométrio livre voltada para a luz da cavidade abdominal. Após 21 dias os animais foram novamente operados para verificarmos o tamanho dos implantes e para retirada do endométrio ectópico para análise histológica. Resultados: macroscopicamente observamos crescimento significativo dos implantes endometriais. Ao exame microscópico pudemos observar a presença de epitélio glandular e estroma semelhantes ao do endométrio tópico. Conclusões: o modelo utilizado reproduz a doença, em ratas, sendo método auxiliar de valia para estudar esta afecção, principalmente a ação de medicamentos sobre esses implantes.Purpose: to demonstrate the experimental endometriosis induction in animals. Method: we used adult female Wistar rats weighing 200 - 250 g anesthetized with ethyl ether to open the abdominal cavity. After identifying the uterine horns, we removed an approximately 4 cm fragment from the right uterine horn. This fragment was placed in physiological saline and, with the aid of a stereoscopic magnifying glass, the endometrium was separated from the myometrium and cut into rectangles of approximately 4 x 5 mm. These rectangles were fastened to the lateral abdominal wall near great blood vessels, taking care

  12. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of “in silico” and “ex vivo” models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals.

  13. Nonlinear hierarchical modeling of experimental infection data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Michael D; Breheny, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonlinear hierarchical model (NLHM) for analyzing longitudinal experimental infection (EI) data. The NLHM offers several improvements over commonly used alternatives such as repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA) and the linear mixed model (LMM). It enables comparison of relevant biological properties of the course of infection including peak intensity, duration and time to peak, rather than simply comparing mean responses at each observation time. We illustrate the practical benefits of this model and the insights it yields using data from experimental infection studies on equine arteritis virus. Finally, we demonstrate via simulation studies that the NLHM substantially reduces bias and improves the power to detect differences in relevant features of the infection response between two populations. For example, to detect a 20% difference in response duration between two groups (n=15) in which the peak time and peak intensity were identical, the RM-ANOVA test had a power of just 11%, and LMM a power of just 12%. By comparison, the nonlinear model we propose had a power of 58% in the same scenario, while controlling the Type I error rate better than the other two methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Models for Experimental High Density Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Swoboda, Julia; Nowak, Katarzyna; Dziechciarz, Klaudia

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the effects of research on models of high density housing. The authors present urban projects for experimental high density housing estates. The design was based on research performed on 38 examples of similar housing in Poland that have been built after 2003. Some of the case studies show extreme density and that inspired the researchers to test individual virtual solutions that would answer the question: How far can we push the limits? The experimental housing projects show strengths and weaknesses of design driven only by such indexes as FAR (floor attenuation ratio - housing density) and DPH (dwellings per hectare). Although such projects are implemented, the authors believe that there are reasons for limits since high index values may be in contradiction to the optimum character of housing environment. Virtual models on virtual plots presented by the authors were oriented toward maximising the DPH index and DAI (dwellings area index) which is very often the main driver for developers. The authors also raise the question of sustainability of such solutions. The research was carried out in the URBAN model research group (Gliwice, Poland) that consists of academic researchers and architecture students. The models reflect architectural and urban regulations that are valid in Poland. Conclusions might be helpful for urban planners, urban designers, developers, architects and architecture students.

  15. A Murine Effort Model for Studying the Influence of Trichinella on Muscular Activity of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionut MARIAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Trichinella are nematodes parasitic in the skeletal muscles of terrestrial vertebrates, generally transmitted via predatorism. It is expected that the infection would have certain influences on the muscular activity in infected animals. The aim of the study was to develop an experimental model for studying the muscular effort in laboratory mice prior to the experimental infection with Trichinella and to evaluate the method in trained (with free access to a voluntary activity wheel and untrained (without access to activity wheel animals. Ten laboratory mice (all adult males, equally divided in two groups were used: a control group (untrained mice and a second group (trained. The weight was evaluated individually. The muscular activity was evaluated using an effort-wheel. Values were expressed in instantaneous power (IP and data were recorded using a constant speed of 5 rpm for 5 and 20 minutes. The instantaneous power (IP developed by the effort wheel at 5 minutes was significantly lower in the control group than in trained mice. Similar results were obtained for the maximum power (MP. Interestingly, for the trained mice, there was no difference between the average IP at 5 and 20 minutes of activity. The results show the utility of trained mice, establish the necessary experiment time and validate the method for evaluating the influence of Trichinella spp. on the muscular activity of experimentally infected mice.

  16. The ScpC Protease of Streptococcus pyogenes Affects the Outcome of Sepsis in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Lövkvist, Lena; Plant, Laura; Eriksson, Jens; Aro, Helena; Jones, Allison; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2008-01-01

    The ScpC protease of Streptococcus pyogenes degrades interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemokine that mediates neutrophil transmigration and activation. The ability to degrade IL-8 differs dramatically among clinical isolates of S. pyogenes. Bacteria expressing ScpC overcome immune clearance by preventing the recruitment of neutrophils in soft tissue infection of mice. To study the role of ScpC in streptococcal sepsis, we generated an ScpC mutant that did not degrade IL-8 and thus failed to prevent the recruitment of immune cells as well as to cause disease after soft tissue infection. In a murine model of sepsis, challenge with the ScpC mutant resulted in more severe systemic disease with higher bacteremia levels and mortality than did challenge with the wild-type strain. As expected, the blood level of KC, the murine IL-8 homologue, increased in mice infected with the ScpC mutant. However, the elevated KC levels did not influence neutrophil numbers in blood, as it did in soft tissue, indicating that additional factors contributed to neutrophil transmigration in blood. In addition, the absence of ScpC increased tumor necrosis factor, IL-6, and C5a levels in blood, which contributed to disease severity. Thus, the ScpC mutant triggers high neutrophil infiltration but not lethal outcome after soft tissue infection, whereas intravenous infection leads to highly aggressive systemic disease. PMID:18573900

  17. The ScpC protease of Streptococcus pyogenes affects the outcome of sepsis in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Lövkvist, Lena; Plant, Laura; Eriksson, Jens; Aro, Helena; Jones, Allison; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2008-09-01

    The ScpC protease of Streptococcus pyogenes degrades interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemokine that mediates neutrophil transmigration and activation. The ability to degrade IL-8 differs dramatically among clinical isolates of S. pyogenes. Bacteria expressing ScpC overcome immune clearance by preventing the recruitment of neutrophils in soft tissue infection of mice. To study the role of ScpC in streptococcal sepsis, we generated an ScpC mutant that did not degrade IL-8 and thus failed to prevent the recruitment of immune cells as well as to cause disease after soft tissue infection. In a murine model of sepsis, challenge with the ScpC mutant resulted in more severe systemic disease with higher bacteremia levels and mortality than did challenge with the wild-type strain. As expected, the blood level of KC, the murine IL-8 homologue, increased in mice infected with the ScpC mutant. However, the elevated KC levels did not influence neutrophil numbers in blood, as it did in soft tissue, indicating that additional factors contributed to neutrophil transmigration in blood. In addition, the absence of ScpC increased tumor necrosis factor, IL-6, and C5a levels in blood, which contributed to disease severity. Thus, the ScpC mutant triggers high neutrophil infiltration but not lethal outcome after soft tissue infection, whereas intravenous infection leads to highly aggressive systemic disease.

  18. STORM: a general model to determine the number and adaptive changes of epithelial stem cells in teleost, murine and human intestinal tracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyuan Wang

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells play a pivotal role in the epithelial tissue renewal, homeostasis and cancer development. The lack of a general marker for intestinal stem cells across species has hampered analysis of stem cell number in different species and their adaptive changes upon intestinal lesions or during development of cancer. Here a two-dimensional model, named STORM, has been developed to address this issue. By optimizing epithelium renewal dynamics, the model examines the epithelial stem cell number by taking experimental input information regarding epithelium proliferation and differentiation. As the results suggest, there are 2.0-4.1 epithelial stem cells on each pocket section of zebrafish intestine, 2.0-4.1 stem cells on each crypt section of murine small intestine and 1.8-3.5 stem cells on each crypt section of human duodenum. The model is able to provide quick results for stem cell number and its adaptive changes, which is not easy to measure through experiments. Its general applicability to different species makes it a valuable tool for analysis of intestinal stem cells under various pathological conditions.

  19. Efficacy of Novel Rifamycin Derivatives against Rifamycin-Sensitive and -Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Murine Models of Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, David M. ; Farquhar, Ronald S.; Sirokman, Klari; Sondergaard, Karen L.; Hazlett, Charles; Doye, Angelia A.; Gwathmey, Judith K.; Mullin, Steve; van Duzer, John; Murphy, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    Novel rifamycins (new chemical entities [NCEs]) having MICs of 0.002 to 0.03 μg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus and retaining some activity against rifampin-resistant mutants were tested for in vivo efficacy against susceptible and rifampin-resistant strains of S. aureus. Rifalazil and rifampin had a 50% effective dose (ED50) of 0.06 mg/kg of body weight when administered as a single intravenous (i.v.) dose in a murine septicemia model against a susceptible strain of S. aureus. The majority of NCEs showed efficacy at a lower i.v. dose (0.003 to 0.06 mg/kg). In addition, half of the NCEs tested for oral efficacy had ED50s in the range of 0.015 to 0.13 mg/kg, i.e., lower or equivalent to the oral ED50s of rifampin and rifalazil. NCEs were also tested in the septicemia model against a rifampin-resistant strain of S. aureus. Twenty-four of 169 NCEs were efficacious when administered as a single oral dose of 80 mg/kg. These NCEs were examined in the murine thigh infection model against a susceptible strain of S. aureus. Several NCEs dosed by intraperitoneal injection at 0.06 mg/kg caused a significant difference in bacterial titer compared with placebo-treated animals. No NCEs showed efficacy in the thigh model against a highly rifampin-resistant strain. However, several NCEs showed an effect when tested against a partially rifampin-resistant strain. The NCEs having a 25-hydroxyl moiety were more effective as a group than their 25-O-acetyl counterparts. These model systems defined candidate NCEs as components of potential combination therapies to treat systemic infections or as monotherapeutic agents for topical applications. PMID:16940074

  20. Efficacy of novel rifamycin derivatives against rifamycin-sensitive and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in murine models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, David M; Farquhar, Ronald S; Sirokman, Klari; Sondergaard, Karen L; Hazlett, Charles; Doye, Angelia A; Gwathmey, Judith K; Mullin, Steve; van Duzer, John; Murphy, Christopher K

    2006-11-01

    Novel rifamycins (new chemical entities [NCEs]) having MICs of 0.002 to 0.03 microg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus and retaining some activity against rifampin-resistant mutants were tested for in vivo efficacy against susceptible and rifampin-resistant strains of S. aureus. Rifalazil and rifampin had a 50% effective dose (ED50) of 0.06 mg/kg of body weight when administered as a single intravenous (i.v.) dose in a murine septicemia model against a susceptible strain of S. aureus. The majority of NCEs showed efficacy at a lower i.v. dose (0.003 to 0.06 mg/kg). In addition, half of the NCEs tested for oral efficacy had ED50s in the range of 0.015 to 0.13 mg/kg, i.e., lower or equivalent to the oral ED50s of rifampin and rifalazil. NCEs were also tested in the septicemia model against a rifampin-resistant strain of S. aureus. Twenty-four of 169 NCEs were efficacious when administered as a single oral dose of 80 mg/kg. These NCEs were examined in the murine thigh infection model against a susceptible strain of S. aureus. Several NCEs dosed by intraperitoneal injection at 0.06 mg/kg caused a significant difference in bacterial titer compared with placebo-treated animals. No NCEs showed efficacy in the thigh model against a highly rifampin-resistant strain. However, several NCEs showed an effect when tested against a partially rifampin-resistant strain. The NCEs having a 25-hydroxyl moiety were more effective as a group than their 25-O-acetyl counterparts. These model systems defined candidate NCEs as components of potential combination therapies to treat systemic infections or as monotherapeutic agents for topical applications.

  1. Modeling of Experimental Atherosclerotic Plaque Delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiaochang; Chen, Xin; Deng, Xiaomin; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    A cohesive zone model (CZM) approach is applied to simulate atherosclerotic plaque delamination experiments in mouse abdominal aorta specimens. A three-dimensional finite element model is developed for the experiments. The aortic wall is treated as a fiber-reinforced, highly deformable, incompressible material, and the Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden (HGO) model is adopted for the aortic bulk material behavior. Cohesive elements are placed along the plaque-media interface along which delamination occurs. The 3D specimen geometry is created based on images from the experiments and certain simplifying approximations. A set of HGO and CZM parameter values is determined based on values suggested in the literature and through matching simulation predictions of the load vs. load-point displacement curve with experimental measurements for one loading-delamination-unloading cycle. Using this set of parameter values, simulation predictions for four other loading-delamination-unloading cycles are obtained, which show good agreement with experimental measurements. The findings of the current study demonstrate the applicability of the CZM approach in arterial tissue failure simulations.

  2. Superficial tension: experimental model with simple materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintori Ferreira, María Alejandra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work appears a didactic offer based on an experimental activity using materials of very low cost, orientated to achieving that the student understand and interpret the phenomenon of superficial tension together with the importance of the modeling in sciences. It has as principal aim of education bring the student over to the mechanics of the static fluids and the intermolecular forces, combining scientific contents with questions near to the student what provides an additional motivation to the reflection of the scientific investigation.

  3. Synchronous disease kinetics in a murine model for enterohemorrhagic E. coli infection using food-borne inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurice J Flowers

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Upon colonization of the intestinal epithelium, the attaching and effacing (AE pathogen Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC effaces microvilli and forms pedestal-like structures beneath the adherent bacterium. The production of one of its virulence factors, the phage-encoded Shiga toxin (Stx results in systemic disease, including the development of renal failure. Although EHEC does not productively infect conventional mice, EHEC infection can be modeled in mice utilizing a derivative of the natural murine AE pathogen Citrobacter rodentium(CR. Gavage of mice with CR(ΦStx2dact, a C. rodentium lysogenized by a phage encoding an Stx variant with high potency in mice, features AE lesion formation on intestinal epithelium and Stx-mediated systemic disease, including renal damage. This model is somewhat limited by mouse-to-mouse variation in the course of disease, with the time to severe morbidity (and required euthanasia varying by as many as 5 days, a feature that limits pathological analysis at defined stages of disease. In the current study, we altered and optimized the preparation, dose, and mode of delivery of CR(ΦStx2dact, using food-borne route of infection to generate highly synchronous disease model. We found that food-borne inoculation of as few as 3 x 104 CR(ΦStx2dact resulted in productive colonization and severe systemic disease. Upon inoculation of 1 x 108 bacteria, the majority of infected animals suffered weight loss beginning 5 days post-infection and all required euthanasia on day 6 or 7. This enhanced murine model for EHEC infection should facilitate characterization of the pathology associated with specific phases of Stx-mediated disease.

  4. Studies on the mechanisms responsible for inhibition of experimental metastasis of B16-F10 murine melanoma by pentoxifylline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, R P; Binda, M M; Presas, H L; Klein-Szanto, A J; Bonfil, R D

    1999-01-01

    Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine derivative widely used as a hemorheological agent in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease, was studied to unveil the mechanisms responsible for its inhibitory action on B16-F10 experimental metastasis. In vitro pretreatment of B16-F10 cells with noncytotoxic concentrations of PTX significantly inhibited their adhesion to reconstituted basement membrane Matrigel(R) and type IV collagen as well as the relative activity of secreted 92 kD metalloproteinase. However, PTX pretreatment of B16-F10 cells did not affect their in vitro invasiveness. Heterotypic organ adhesion assays carried out with B16-F10 cells and suspended organ tissues demonstrated that pretreatment with noncytotoxic concentrations of PTX of both, tumor cells or lung tissue, brought about a dose-dependent inhibition of melanoma cell adhesion to lung. Immunohistochemical studies using antibodies against CD31 adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) revealed that B16-F10 cells adhere to lung endothelial cells. Our results suggest that PTX may exert its inhibitory effect on tumor lodgment, and as a consequence of that on experimental metastases, through an inhibitory action on cell adhesion molecules.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of rebamipide eyedrop administration on ocular lesions in a murine model of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieko Arakaki

    Full Text Available Topical therapy is effective for dry eye, and its prolonged effects should help in maintaining the quality of life of patients with dry eye. We previously reported that the oral administration of rebamipide (Reb, a mucosal protective agent, had a potent therapeutic effect on autoimmune lesions in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome (SS. However, the effects of topical treatment with Reb eyedrops on the ocular lesions in the murine model of SS are unknown.Reb eyedrops were administered to the murine model of SS aged 4-8 weeks four times daily. Inflammatory lesions of the extraorbital and intraorbital lacrimal glands and Harderian gland tissues were histologically evaluated. The direct effects of Reb on the lacrimal glands were analyzed using cultured lacrimal gland cells. Tear secretions of Reb-treated mice were significantly increased compared with those of untreated mice. In addition to the therapeutic effect of Reb treatment on keratoconjunctivitis, severe inflammatory lesions of intraorbital lacrimal gland tissues in this model of SS were resolved. The mRNA expression levels of IL-10 and mucin 5Ac in conjunctival tissues from Reb-treated mice was significantly increased compared with those of control mice. Moreover, lactoferrin production from lacrimal gland cells was restored by Reb treatment.Topical Reb administration had an anti-inflammatory effect on the ocular autoimmune lesions in the murine model of SS and a protective effect on the ocular surfaces.

  6. North American coral snake antivenin for the neutralization of non-native elapid venoms in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, William H; Tanen, David A; Tong, Tri C; Betten, David P; Carstairs, Shaun D; Williams, Saralyn R; Cantrell, Frank L; Clark, Richard F

    2006-02-01

    North American coral snake antivenin (CSAV; Wyeth Antivenin [Micrurus fulvius], equine origin) is approved for the treatment of coral snake envenomations in the United States. The coral snake is the only elapid that is native to North America, but envenomations from non-native elapids are occurring more commonly in this country. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of CSAV in the neutralization of two exotic elapid envenomations: Naja naja (Indian cobra) and Dendroaspis polylepsis (black mamba). A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled murine model of intraperitoneal venom injection was employed. Venom potency was determined in preliminary dosing studies. Study animals then were divided into five groups: 1) N. naja venom + CSAV, 2) N. naja venom + 0.9% normal saline (NS), 3) D. polylepsis venom + CSAV, 4) D. polylepsis venom + NS, and 5) CSAV + NS. The venom dose was chosen to be twice the estimated LD50. The amount of CSAV injected was ten times the amount necessary for neutralization of a 2 x LD50 dose of M. f. fulvius venom in a murine model. Statistical analysis included Fisher's exact and log-rank testing to compare survival rates and times. Preliminary studies estimated the venom LD50 to be 2.58 mg/kg and 0.45 mg/kg, respectively, for the N. naja and D. polylepsis. A significant difference was shown in comparison of survival times between CSAV-venom groups and normal saline-venom groups despite all animals in both treatment and control arms dying. Animals receiving CSAV and N. naja venom survived (mean +/- SD) 24.4 +/- 3.0 minutes, versus 17.8 +/- 1.3 minutes in the control group (p < 0.001), whereas those receiving CSAV and D. polylepsis venom survived 203.8 +/- 37.0 minutes versus 130.0 +/- 42.6 minutes in the control group (p < 0.001). All animals in the CSAV + NS group survived to the conclusion of the study. When premixed with venom, CSAV increased survival time in a murine model of intraperitoneal N. naja and D. polylepsis venom injection

  7. Effects of Radix Adenophorae and Cyclosporine A on an OVA-Induced Murine Model of Asthma by Suppressing to T Cells Activity, Eosinophilia, and Bronchial Hyperresponsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Soo Roh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of Radix Adenophorae extract (RAE on ovalbumin-induced asthma murine model. To study the anti-inflammatory and antiasthmatic effects of RAE, we examined the development of pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation and inhibitory effects of T cells in murine by RAE and cyclosporine A (CsA. We examined determination of airway hyperresponsiveness, flow cytometric analysis (FACS, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, quantitative real time (PCR, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and Masson trichrome staining in lung tissue, lung weight, total cells, and eosinophil numbers in lung tissue. We demonstrated how RAE suppressed development on inflammation and decreased airway damage.

  8. Muscle injury: review of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Jaqueline de; Gottfried, Carmem

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in the human body. Its main characteristic is the capacity to regenerate after injury independent of the cause of injury through a process called inflammatory response. Mechanical injuries are the most common type of the skeletal muscle injuries and are classified into one of three areas strain, contusion, and laceration. First, this review aims to describe and compare the main experimental methods that replicate the mechanical muscle injuries. There are several ways to replicate each kind of mechanical injury; there are, however, specific characteristics that must be taken into account when choosing the most appropriate model for the experiment. Finally, this review discusses the context of mechanical injury considering types, variability of methods, and the ability to reproduce injury models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural and functional brain alterations in a murine model of Angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Anja; Minnerup, Jens; Soria, Guadalupe; Planas, Anna M

    2017-02-01

    Hypertension is a main risk factor for the development of cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) - a major contributor to stroke and the most common cause of vascular dementia. Despite the increasing socioeconomic importance arising from cSVD, currently only a few specific treatment strategies with proven efficacy are known. Fundamental to the lack of specific treatments is poor understanding of the disease pathogenesis and a lack of appropriate animal models resembling all symptoms of the human disease. However, chronic hypertensive rat models have been shown to bear similarities to most key features of cSVD. Despite a significantly larger toolbox available for genotypic and phenotypic modifications compared to rats, mouse models of hypertension are unusual when modeling cSVD and associated cognitive impairment experimentally. In the present study, we therefore characterized hypertension-mediated cerebrovascular alterations and accompanying structural and functional consequences by simultaneously treating adult wild-type mice (C57BL/6N) with Angiotensin II (AngII) and the nitric oxide synthases inhibitor L-NAME for 4 weeks. Hypertension associated to cerebral alterations reminiscent of early-onset cSVD and vascular cognitive impairment when combined with additional AngII bolus injections. Most importantly, preventing the elevation of blood pressure (BP) protected from the development of cSVD symptoms and associated cognitive decline. Our data strongly support the suitability of this particular mouse model of AngII-induced hypertension as an appropriate animal model for early-onset cSVD and hence, vascular cognitive impairment, pathologies commonly preceding vascular dementia. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Organ models in wound ballistics: experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Mustafa Tahir; Oğünç, Gökhan; Eryilmaz, Mehmet; Yiğit, Taner; Menteş, Mustafa Oner; Dakak, Mehmet; Uzar, Ali Ihsan; Oner, Köksal

    2007-01-01

    Effects of various types and diameters of guns and related treatment principles are different. Our study was performed to experimentally demonstrate the effects of different gunshots in body tissues. 9x19 mm hand-gun and 7.62x51 mm G-3 infantry rifle were used in the study. Injury models were created through hand-gun and rifle shootings at isolated soft tissue, lower extremity, liver and intestine tissue simulants made of ballistic candle. High-speed cameras were used to capture 1000 frames per second. Images were examined and wound mechanisms were evaluated. It was observed that the colon content distributed more within the surrounding tissues by the rifle shootings comparing with hand-gun shootings and could be an infection source due to the large size of the cavity in the colon. Especially when the bullets hitting the bone were investigated, it was seen that much more tissue injury occurs with high speed bullets due to bullet deformation and fragmentation. However, no significant difference was found between the effect of hand-gun and rifle bullets passing through the extremity without hitting the bone. To know the type of the gun that caused the injury and its characteristics will allow to estimate severity and size of the injury before the treatment and to focus on different alternatives of treatment. Therefore, use of appropriate models is required in experimental studies.

  11. Tryptase-PAR2 axis in experimental autoimmune prostatitis, a model for chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Kenny; Done, Joseph D; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Murphy, Stephen F; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-07-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) affects up to 15% of the male population and is characterized by pelvic pain. Mast cells are implicated in the murine experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) model as key to chronic pelvic pain development. The mast cell mediator tryptase-β and its cognate receptor protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) are involved in mediating pain in other visceral disease models. Prostatic secretions and urines from CP/CPPS patients were examined for the presence of mast cell degranulation products. Tryptase-β and PAR2 expression were examined in murine EAP. Pelvic pain and inflammation were assessed in the presence or absence of PAR2 expression and upon PAR2 neutralization. Tryptase-β and carboxypeptidase A3 were elevated in CP/CPPS compared to healthy volunteers. Tryptase-β was capable of inducing pelvic pain and was increased in EAP along with its receptor PAR2. PAR2 was required for the development of chronic pelvic pain in EAP. PAR2 signaling in dorsal root ganglia led to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation and calcium influx. PAR2 neutralization using antibodies attenuated chronic pelvic pain in EAP. The tryptase-PAR2 axis is an important mediator of pelvic pain in EAP and may play a role in the pathogenesis of CP/CPPS. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mouse models of multiple sclerosis: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Derrick P; Richards, Maureen H; Miller, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler's Murine Encephalitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease (TMEV-IDD) are two clinically relevant murine models of multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, both are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the CNS and demyelination. EAE is induced by either the administration of myelin protein or peptide in adjuvant or by the adoptive transfer of encephalitogenic T cell blasts into naïve recipients. The relative merits of each of these protocols are compared. Depending on the type of question being asked, different mouse strains and peptides are used. Different disease courses are observed with different strains and different peptides in active EAE. These variations are also addressed. Additionally, issues relevant to clinical grading of EAE in mice are discussed. In addition to EAE induction, useful references for other disease indicators such as DTH, in vitro proliferation, and immunohistochemistry are provided. TMEV-IDD is a useful model for understanding the possible viral etiology of MS. This section provides detailed information on the preparation of viral stocks and subsequent intracerebral infection of mice. Additionally, virus plaque assay and clinical disease assessment are discussed. Recently, recombinant TMEV strains have been created for the study of molecular mimicry which incorporate various 30 amino acid myelin epitopes within the leader region of TMEV.

  13. Suppression of murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 with autophagy modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Chao; Feng, Xuedan; Li, Zhe; Wang, Yabo; Li, Bin; Li, Lin; Quan, Moyuan; Wang, Gaoning; Guo, Li

    2015-03-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been associated with a history of sub-optimal exposure to ultraviolet light, implicating vitamin D3 as a possible protective agent. We evaluated whether 1,25(OH)2D3 attenuates the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and explored its potential mechanisms. EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice via immunization with MOG35-55, and some mice received 1,25(OH)2D3. 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibited EAE progression. Additionally, 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced inflammation, demyelination, and neuron loss in the spinal cord. The protective effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 was associated with significantly elevated expression of Beclin1, increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and decreased LC3-II accumulation. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D3 may represent a promising new MS treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Peritoneal administration of Met-RANTES attenuates inflammatory and nociceptive responses in a murine neuropathic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jiin-Tarng; Mao, Chih-Chieh; Ching-Wah Sum, Daniel; Liu, Fu-Chao; Lai, Ying-Shu; Li, Jui-Chin; Day, Yuan-Ji

    2013-01-01

    The C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5; also known as regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted, or RANTES) is a member of the CC family of chemokines that specifically attract and activate leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Although CCL5 has been implicated in the processing of pain, its detailed mechanisms of action are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential of the Met-RANTES, a selective CCL5 receptor antagonist, via peritoneal administration to modulate the recruitment of inflammatory cells in injured sites and attenuate nociceptive responses in a neuropathic pain model in mice. Nociceptive sensitization, immune cell infiltration, multiple cytokine secretion, and opioid peptide expression in damaged nerves were studied. Our results indicated that Met-RANTES-treated mice had less behavioral hypersensitivity after partial sciatic nerve ligation. Macrophage infiltration, pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFNγ) protein secretion, and enkephalin, β-endorphin, and dynorphin mRNA expression in damaged nerves following partial sciatic nerve ligation were significantly decreased, and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) protein was significantly increased in Met-RANTES-treated mice. These results suggest that CCL5 is capable of regulating the microenvironment that controls behavioral hypersensitivity at the level of the peripheral injured site in a murine chronic neuropathic pain model. The present study identifies the potent pro-inflammatory potential of CCL5 and verifies the possible role of selective CCL5 receptor inhibitor in a murine neuropathic pain model. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression of intronic miRNAs and their host gene Igf2 in a murine unilateral ureteral obstruction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, N.Q. [Nephrology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Yang, J. [Nephrology Department, Daqing Oilfield General Hospital, Daqing (China); Cui, L. [Nephrology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Ma, N. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Zhang, L.; Hao, L.R. [Nephrology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China)

    2015-03-27

    The objective of this study was to determine the expression of miR-483 and miR-483* and the relationship among them, their host gene (Igf2), and other cytokines in a murine model of renal fibrosis. The extent of renal fibrosis was visualized using Masson staining, and fibrosis was scored 3 days and 1 and 2 weeks after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Expression of miR-483, miR-483* and various cytokine mRNAs was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Expression of miR-483 and miR-483* was significantly upregulated in the UUO model, particularly miR-483 expression was the greatest 2 weeks after surgery. Additionally, miR-483 and miR-483* expression negatively correlated with Bmp7 expression and positively correlated with Igf2, Tgfβ, Hgf, and Ctgf expression, as determined by Pearson's correlation analysis. Hgf expression significantly increased at 1 and 2 weeks after the surgery compared to the control group. This study showed that miR-483 and miR-483* expression was upregulated in a murine UUO model. These data suggest that miR-483 and miR-483* play a role in renal fibrosis and that miR-483* may interact with miR-483 in renal fibrosis. Thus, these miRNAs may play a role in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis and coexpression of their host gene Igf2.

  16. Fetal origins of hematopoietic failure in a murine model of Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimae-Lanning, Ashley N; Goloviznina, Natalya A; Kurre, Peter

    2013-03-14

    Hematopoietic failure is the predominant clinical manifestation of Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare, recessively inherited disorder. Mutations in 1 of 15 genes that coordinately function in a complex pathway to maintain DNA integrity also predispose patients to constitutional defects in growth and development. The hematologic manifestations have been considered to reflect the progressive loss of stem cells from the postnatal bone marrow microenvironment. Ethical concerns preclude the study of human hematopoiesis in utero. We report significant late gestational lethality and profound quantitative and qualitative deficiencies in the murine Fancc(-/-) fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell pool. Fancc(-/-) fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells revealed a significant loss of quiescence and decline in serial repopulating capacity, but no substantial difference in apoptosis or levels of reactive oxygen species. Our studies suggest that compromised hematopoiesis in Fancc(-/-) animals is developmentally programmed and does not arise de novo in bone marrow.

  17. Allergen immunotherapy inhibits airway eosinophilia and hyperresponsiveness associated with decreased IL-4 production by lymphocytes in a murine model of allergic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosterhout, A. J.; van Esch, B.; Hofman, G.; Hofstra, C. L.; van Ark, I.; Nijkamp, F. P.; Kapsenberg, M. L.; Savelkoul, H. F.; Weller, F. R.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether allergen immunotherapy is effective in a murine model with immunologic and pathophysiologic features reminiscent of allergic asthma. Ovalbumin-sensitized mice received increasing (1 microgram to 1 mg) subcutaneous doses of ovalbumin twice a week for 8 wk

  18. Limited Activity of Miltefosine in Murine Models of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis and Disseminated Cryptococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najvar, Laura K.; Bocanegra, Rosie; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Sorrell, Tania C.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Miltefosine is an alkyl phosphocholine with good oral bioavailability and in vitro activity against Cryptococcus species that has gained interest as an additional agent for cryptococcal infections. Our objective was to further evaluate the in vivo efficacy of miltefosine in experimental in vivo models of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and disseminated cryptococcosis. Mice were infected intracranially or intravenously with either C. neoformans USC1597 or H99. Miltefosine treatment (1.8 to 45 mg/kg of body weight orally once daily) began at either 1 h or 1 day postinoculation. Fluconazole (10 mg/kg orally twice daily) or amphotericin B deoxycholate (3 mg/kg intraperitoneally once daily) served as positive controls. In our standard models, miltefosine did not result in significant improvements in survival or reductions in fungal burden against either C. neoformans isolate. There was a trend toward improved survival with miltefosine at 7.2 mg/kg against disseminated cryptococcosis with the H99 strain but only at a low infecting inoculum. In contrast, both fluconazole and amphotericin B significantly improved survival in mice with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and disseminated cryptococcosis due to USC1597. Amphotericin B also improved survival against both cryptococcal infections caused by H99. Combination therapy with miltefosine demonstrated neither synergy nor antagonism in both models. These results demonstrate limited efficacy of miltefosine and suggest caution with the potential use of this agent for the treatment of C. neoformans infections. PMID:23165465

  19. Cross-reactivity of autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with murine collagen VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Kinga; Sesarman, Alina; Oswald, Eva; Feldrihan, Vasile; Fritsch, Anja; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2010-04-01

    The pathomechanism of antibody-mediated tissue damage in autoimmune diseases can be best studied in experimental models by passively transferring specific autoantibodies into animals. The reproduction of the disease in animals depends on several factors, including the cross-reactivity of patient autoantibodies with the animal tissue. Here, we show that autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease, recognize multiple epitopes on murine collagen VII. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that EBA patients' IgG cross-reacts with mouse skin. Overlapping, recombinant fragments of murine collagen VII were used to characterize the reactivity of EBA sera and to map the epitopes on the murine antigen by ELISA and immunoblotting. The patients' autoantibody binding to murine collagen VII triggered pathogenic events as demonstrated by a complement fixing and an ex vivo granulocyte-dependent dermal-epidermal separation assay. These findings should greatly facilitate the development of improved disease models and novel therapeutic strategies.

  20. Experimental Basis for IED Particle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng-Johansson, J.

    2009-05-01

    The internally electrodynamic (IED) particle model is built on three experimental facts: a) electric charges present in all matter particles, b) an accelerated charge generates electromagnetic (EM) waves by Maxwell's equations and Planck energy equation, and c) source motion gives Doppler effect. A set of well-kwon basic particle equations have been predicted based on first-principles solutions for IED particle (e.g. arxiv:0812.3951, J Phys CS128, 012019, 2008); the equations are long experimentally validated. A critical review of the key experiments suggests that the IED process underlies these equations not just sufficiently but also necessarily. E.g.: 1) A free IED electron solution is a plane wave ψ= Ce^i(kdX-φT) requisite for producing the diffraction fringe in a Davisson-Germer experiment, and of also all basic point-like attributes facilitated by a linear momentum kd and the model structure. It needs not further be a wave packet which produces not a diffraction fringe. 2)The radial partial EM waves, hence the total ψ, of an IED electron will, on both EM theory and experiment basis -not by assumption, enter two slits at the same time, as is requisite for an electron to interfere with itself as shown in double slit experiments. 3) On annihilation, an electron converts (from mass m) to a radiation energy φ without an acceleration which is externally observable and yet requisite by EM theory. So a charge oscillation of frequency φ and its EM waves must regularly present internal of a normal electron, whence the IED model.

  1. Similar response in male and female B10.RIII mice in a murine model of allergic airway inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matheu, Victor; Barrios, Ysamar; Arnau, Maria-Rosa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several reports have been published on the gender differences associated with allergies in mice. GOAL: In the present study we investigate the influence of gender on allergy response using a strain of mice, B10.RIII, which is commonly used in the collagen-induced arthritis murine model......, and antigen-specific T-cell proliferation were measured. RESULTS: Immunization in both male and female B10.RIII mice with OVA elicited a classical Th2-type response. Results showed no significant differences among male and female mice. Also a high eosinophilia in BAL fluid and parenchyma was produced in both....... METHODS: Both male and female B10.RIII young mice were immunized with OVA and challenged four times with OVA intranasally. Samples were taken 24 h after the last challenge, and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and parenchyma, Th-2 cytokines in BAL, total and antigen-specific IgE in sera...

  2. Cardiac Imaging Using Clinical 1.5 T MRI Scanners in a Murine Ischemia/Reperfusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob G. J. Voelkl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To perform cardiac imaging in mice without having to invest in expensive dedicated equipment, we adapted a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner for use in a murine ischemia/reperfusion model. Phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR sequence facilitated the determination of infarct sizes in vivo by late gadolinium enhancement. Results were compared to histological infarct areas in mice after ischemia/reperfusion procedure with a good correlation (=0.807, <.001. In addition, fractional area change (FAC was assessed with single slice cine MRI and was matched to infarct size (=−0.837 and fractional shortening (FS measured with echocardiography (=0.860; both <.001. Here, we demonstrate the use of clinical 1.5 MRI scanners as a feasible method for basic phenotyping in mice. These widely available scanners are capable of investigating in vivo infarct dimensions as well as assessment of cardiac functional parameters in mice with reasonable throughput.

  3. Efficacy of a synthetic antimicrobial peptidomimetic versus vancomycin in a Staphylococcus epidermidis device-related murine peritonitis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavanagh, Jorunn Pauline; Granslo, Hildegunn Norbakken; Fredheim, Elizabeth Aarag

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Biofilm-forming Staphylococcus epidermidis is a prevalent cause of peritonitis during peritoneal dialysis. We compared the efficacy of a synthetic antimicrobial peptidomimetic (Ltx21) versus vancomycin in a murine model mimicking a device-related peritonitis. Methods Silicone implants......, pre-colonized with an S. epidermidis biofilm, were inserted into the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice. Three groups (36 mice in each) with pre-colonized implants received intraperitoneal treatment with Ltx21, vancomycin or placebo. Mice were euthanized on day 3 (n = 12), day 6 (n = 12) or day 8 (n...... = 12) post-implantation. Controls were mice with sterile implants (n = 18) and mice without surgery (n = 6). Bacterial reductions in cfu were analysed from implants and peritoneal fluid (PF). Inflammatory responses in serum and PF were measured. Results Vancomycin resulted in a stronger reduction...

  4. Plasmodium berghei ANKA: erythropoietin activates neural stem cells in an experimental cerebral malaria model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Core, Andrew; Hempel, Casper; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) causes substantial mortality and neurological sequelae in survivors, and no neuroprotective regimens are currently available for this condition. Erythropoietin (EPO) reduces neuropathology and improves survival in murine CM. Using the Plasmodium berghei model of CM, we...

  5. Gallium Nitrate Is Efficacious in Murine Models of Tuberculosis and Inhibits Key Bacterial Fe-Dependent Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Kesavalu, Banurekha; Pasula, Rajamouli; Abdalla, Maher Y.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2013-01-01

    Acquiring iron (Fe) is critical to the metabolism and growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Disruption of Fe metabolism is a potential approach for novel antituberculous therapy. Gallium (Ga) has many similarities to Fe. Biological systems are often unable to distinguish Ga3+ from Fe3+. Unlike Fe3+, Ga3+ cannot be physiologically reduced to Ga2+. Thus, substituting Ga for Fe in the active site of enzymes may render them nonfunctional. We previously showed that Ga inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis in broth and within cultured human macrophages. We now report that Ga(NO3)3 shows efficacy in murine tuberculosis models. BALB/c SCID mice were infected intratracheally with M. tuberculosis, following which they received daily intraperitoneal saline, Ga(NO3)3, or NaNO3. All mice receiving saline or NaNO3 died. All Ga(NO3)3-treated mice survived. M. tuberculosis CFU in the lungs, liver, and spleen of the NaNO3-treated or saline-treated mice were significantly higher than those in Ga-treated mice. When BALB/c mice were substituted for BALB/c SCID mice as a chronic (nonlethal) infection model, Ga(NO3)3 treatment significantly decreased lung CFU. To assess the mechanism(s) whereby Ga inhibits bacterial growth, the effect of Ga on M. tuberculosis ribonucleotide reductase (RR) (a key enzyme in DNA replication) and aconitase activities was assessed. Ga decreased M. tuberculosis RR activity by 50 to 60%, but no additional decrease in RR activity was seen at Ga concentrations that completely inhibited mycobacterial growth. Ga decreased aconitase activity by 90%. Ga(NO3)3 shows efficacy in murine M. tuberculosis infection and leads to a decrease in activity of Fe-dependent enzymes. Additional work is warranted to further define Ga's mechanism of action and to optimize delivery forms for possible therapeutic uses in humans. PMID:24060870

  6. Curative effect of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus fermentum L23 in a murine model of vaginal infection by Gardnerella vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, M; Pascual, L; Barberis, L

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common vaginal infection characterized by changes in the vaginal microbiota. The objective of this work was to evaluate the colonization ability and curative effect of Lactobacillus fermentum L23 after vaginal administration in female BALB/c mice infected with Gardnerella vaginalis. One dose of Lact. fermentum L23 containing 10(9 ) CFU ml(-1) was administered locally in a murine vaginal model. L23 colonized the vaginal tract of BALB-c mice after one inoculation. The infection by G. vaginalis in a murine model was induced by vaginal administration of a 1 × 10(6 ) CFU ml(-1) suspension. Infection with the pathogen was observed in the vaginal tract for 4 days. At 144 h after inoculation, levels of 4 log10 CFU ml(-1) were observed. The curative effect of L23 was evaluated with one administration at 1 × 10(9 ) CFU ml(-1) 72 h after the inoculation with G. vaginalis. Lactobacillus fermentum L23 inhibited the growth of G. vaginalis. The results of suppression of G. vaginalis using different concentrations of L23 were favourable due that these concentrations are normally used in commercial formulas. The obtained results indicate that Lact. fermentum L23 inhibited the growth of G. vaginalis. Therefore, L23 might be used as a potential biotherapeutic agent for the elimination of this bacterium. The use of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus fermentum L23 as a biotherapeutic agent can be expected to prevent and treat genital infections, particularly recurrent bacterial vaginosis, with similar concentrations to those normally used in commercial formulas. It is likely that the use of this probiotic strain for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis will provide a natural and nontoxic treatment modality. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Improvement of Outcome Measures of Dry Eye by a Novel Integrin Antagonist in the Murine Desiccating Stress Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Achim H.; Corrales, Rosa M.; Pelegrino, Flavia S. A.; Tukler-Henriksson, Johanna; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the effects of GW559090, a novel, competitive, and high-affinity α4 integrin antagonist, in a murine model of dry eye. Through interaction with vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and fibronectin α4β1 integrin is involved in leukocyte trafficking and activation. Methods Female C57BL/6 mice, aged 6 to 8 weeks, were subjected to desiccating stress (DS). Bilateral topical twice daily treatment with GW559090 was compared to vehicle-treated controls. Treatment was initiated at the time of DS induction. Treatment effects were assessed on corneal staining with Oregon Green Dextran (OGD) and expression of inflammatory markers in ocular surface tissues by real time PCR. Dendritic cell activation was measured in draining cervical lymph nodes (CLN) by flow cytometry. Separate groups of mice received GW559090 subcutaneously to evaluate the effects of systemic administration on corneal staining and cells in CLN. Results Topical GW559090 significantly reduced corneal uptake of OGD compared to vehicle-treated disease controls in a dose-dependent manner (1, 3, 10, and 30 mg/mL) with 30 mg/mL showing the greatest reduction in OGD staining. When administered topically, corneal expression of IL-1α, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)–9, chemokine ligand 9 (CXCL9), and TGF-β1 was reduced in GW559090-treated eyes. Topical treatment with GW559090 decreased dendritic cell activation in lymph nodes. The effects on corneal staining and cellular composition in CLN were not reproduced by systemic administration of GW559090, suggestive of a local role for integrin antagonism in the treatment of dry eye. Conclusion. The novel α4 integrin antagonist, GW559090, improved outcome measures of corneal staining and ocular surface inflammation in this murine model of dry eye. These results indicate the potential of this novel agent for the treatment of dry eye disease. PMID:26348638

  8. Limitations of Murine Models for Assessment of Antibody-Mediated Therapies or Vaccine Candidates against Staphylococcus epidermidis Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinrong; Kesselly, Augustus; Lam, Hubert; Kleanthous, Harry; Yethon, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is normally a commensal colonizer of human skin and mucus membranes, but, due to its ability to form biofilms on indwelling medical devices, it has emerged as a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteremia or bloodstream infection is a frequent and costly complication resulting from biofilm fouling of medical devices. Our goal was to develop a murine model of S. epidermidis infection to identify potential vaccine targets for the prevention of S. epidermidis bacteremia. However, assessing the contribution of adaptive immunity to protection against S. epidermidis challenge was complicated by a highly efficacious innate immune response in mice. Naive mice rapidly cleared S. epidermidis infections from blood and solid organs, even when the animals were immunocompromised. Cyclophosphamide-mediated leukopenia reduced the size of the bacterial challenge dose required to cause lethality but did not impair clearance after a nonlethal challenge. Nonspecific innate immune stimulation, such as treatment with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist, enhanced bacterial clearance. TLR2 signaling was confirmed to accelerate the clearance of S. epidermidis bacteremia, but TLR2−/− mice could still resolve a bloodstream infection. Furthermore, TLR2 signaling played no role in the clearance of bacteria from the spleen. In conclusion, these data suggest that S. epidermidis bloodstream infection is cleared in a highly efficient manner that is mediated by both TLR2-dependent and -independent innate immune mechanisms. The inability to establish a persistent infection in mice, even in immunocompromised animals, rendered these murine models unsuitable for meaningful assessment of antibody-mediated therapies or vaccine candidates. PMID:26857577

  9. Modelling and characterization of photothermal effects assisted with gold nanorods in ex vivo samples and in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamela Rivera, Horacio; Rodríguez Jara, Félix; Cunningham, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    We discuss in this article the implementation of a laser-tissue interaction and bioheat-transfer 2-D finite-element model for Photothermal Therapy assisted with Gold Nanorods. We have selected Gold Nanorods as absorbing nanostructures in order to improve the efficiency of using compact diode lasers because of their high opto-thermal conversion efficiency at 808 and 850 nm. The goal is to model the distribution of the optical energy among the tissue including the skin absorption effects and the tissue thermal response, with and without the presence of Gold Nanorods. The heat generation due to the optical energy absorption and the thermal propagation will be computationally modeled and optimized. The model has been evaluated and compared with experimental ex-vivo data in fresh chicken muscle samples and in-vivo BALB/c mice animal model.

  10. The new strains Brucella inopinata BO1 and Brucella species 83-210 behave biologically like classic infectious Brucella species and cause death in murine models of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez de Bagüés, María P; Iturralde, María; Arias, Maykel A; Pardo, Julián; Cloeckaert, Axel; Zygmunt, Michel S

    2014-08-01

    Recently, novel atypical Brucella strains isolated from humans and wild rodents have been reported. They are phenotypically close to Ochrobactrum species but belong to the genus Brucella, based on genetic relatedness, although genetic diversity is higher among the atypical Brucella strains than between the classic species. They were classified within or close to the novel species Brucella inopinata. However, with the exception of Brucella microti, the virulence of these novel strains has not been investigated in experimental models of infection. The type species B. inopinata strain BO1 (isolated from a human) and Brucella species strain 83-210 (isolated from a wild Australian rodent) were investigated. A classic infectious Brucella reference strain, B. suis 1330, was also used. BALB/c, C57BL/6, and CD1 mice models and C57BL/6 mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) were used as infection models. Strains BO1 and 83-210 behaved similarly to reference strain 1330 in all mouse infection models: there were similar growth curves in spleens and livers of mice and similar intracellular replication rates in BMDMs. However, unlike strain 1330, strains BO1 and 83-210 showed lethality in the 3 mouse models. The novel atypical Brucella strains of this study behave like classic intracellular Brucella pathogens. In addition, they cause death in murine models of infection, as previously published for B. microti, another recently described environmental and wildlife species. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Extra-virgin olive oil and its phenolic extract prevent inflammatory response and joint damage in murine experimental arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Rosillo, M.A.; M. Sánchez-Hidalgo; Alarcón-de-la-Lastra, C

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of EVOO in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that the phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, we evaluated the effects of dietary EVOO and treatment with its phenolic extract (PE) in a model of RA, the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice. On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine collagen type II (CII). On day 21, the mice received a booster injection. We...

  12. Anti-Toxoplasma Activity of Estragole and Thymol in Murine Models of Congenital and Noncongenital Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Claudio B S; Meurer, Ywlliane S R; Medeiros, Thales L; Pohlit, Adrian M; Silva, Murilo V; Mineo, Tiago W P; Andrade-Neto, Valter F

    2016-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by Toxoplasma gondii , an obligatory intracellular protozoan. Normally benign, T. gondii infections can cause devastating disease in immunosuppressed patients and through congenital infection of newborn babies. Few prophylactic and therapeutic drugs are available to treat these infections. The goal of the present study was to assess the anti-Toxoplasma effects in a congenital and noncongenital model of toxoplasmosis (using ME49 strain), besides assessing immunological changes, in vitro cytotoxicity, and in vivo acute toxicity of commercial estragole and thymol. The congenital experimental model was used with intermediate stages of maternal infection. The serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)M, IgG, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-12, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were quantified from infected and treated C57Bl/6 mice. Estragole and thymol respectively exhibited low to moderate in vivo toxicity and cytotoxicity. Animals treated with estragole showed high IFN-γ and strong type 1 helper T cell response. Both compounds were active against T. gondii ME49 strain. Furthermore, orally administered estragole in infected pregnant mice improved the weight of offspring compared with untreated controls. Subcutaneous administration of both compounds also increased the weight of mouse offspring born to infected mothers, compared with untreated controls. Estragole and thymol display important anti-Toxoplasma activity. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of action of these compounds.

  13. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  14. Mouse macrophage metalloelastase gene delivery by HVJ-cationic liposomes in experimental antiangiogenic gene therapy for murine CT-26 colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrin-Rivas, M J; Arii, S; Mori, A; Kaneda, Y; Imamura, M

    2001-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that gene replacement of mouse macrophage metalloelastase (MME) into murine melanoma cells that grow rapidly and are MME deficient suppresses the primary tumor growth in vivo by halting angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of gene therapy against cancer using a cDNA-encoding MME gene. In a subcutaneous tumor model of CT-26 mouse colon cancer cells that are MME deficient, syngeneic mice repetitively treated with direct injections into the tumors of MME- hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ), a type of HVJ-cationic liposome encapsulating a plasmid expressing MME, developed smaller tumors (210 +/- 47.2 mm(3) versus 925 +/- 156 mm(3) mean +/- SEM; p = 0.0004) with fewer microvessels (10.25 +/- 1.03 vs. 17.25 +/- 2.14; p = 0.03) than control mice. TUNEL staining revealed a significant increase of apoptotic cells in the MME-HVJ liposomes-treated tumors compared with control tumors. MME was effectively expressed in the s.c. tumors treated with MME-HVJ liposomes, inducing angiostatin generation in those tumors, as demonstrated by Western blot analysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that repeated in vivo transduction of the MME gene directly into the tumors using HVJ-cationic liposomes suppressed the tumor growth by an antiangiogenic mechanism, providing, then, a feasible strategy for gene therapy of cancer. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. A human experimental model of episodic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi

    2014-01-01

    were subjected to 45 min of intense painful cutaneous electrical stimulation (episodic pain session), using a stimulus paradigm that in animals has been shown to induce long-term potentiation. These electrical stimulations produced a verbal pain rating of approximately 85 on a 0-100 verbal rating scale......An experimental model of daily episodic pain was developed to investigate peripheral sensitization and cortical reorganization in healthy individuals. Two experiments (A and B) were conducted. Experiments A and B consisted of one and five consecutive days, respectively, in which the participants...... (VRS). Physiological (blood flow and axon flare reflex), psychophysical (perception threshold and verbal pain ratings) and electrophysiological (128 channels recorded somatosensory evoked potential (SEP)) measurements were recorded. The stimulation evoked a visible axon flare reflex and caused...

  16. Experimental validation of model Hortel Whillier; Validacion experimental del model de Hottel-Whillier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez Munoz, F.; Cejudo Lopez, J. M.; Carrillo andres, A.

    2010-07-01

    Comparing the results of testing of a commercial flat-plate solar collector with a detailed implementation model of Hottel Whillier fin and tube. The validation procedure is based on comparing experimental and theoretical curves and more likely uncertainty bands. the model correctly predicts the end of profits and underestimates the 5% of losses, although a sensitivity analysis shows that this result is not attributable to the model itself but to the inputs with which it was implemented. The model has difficulty differentiating between the terms of linear and quadratic losses that appear in the quadratic fit curve. (Author) 1 refs.

  17. Therapeutic immunization with radio-attenuated Leishmania parasites through i.m. route revealed protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sanchita; Manna, Madhumita; Khanra, Supriya; Ghosh, Moumita; Bhar, Radhaballav; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal

    2012-07-01

    After our promising results from prophylactic and therapeutic study (i.p. route) with the radio-attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites against experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis, we prompted to check their therapeutic efficacy through i.m route. BALB/c mice were infected with highly virulent L. donovani parasites. After 75 days, mice were treated with gamma (γ)-irradiated parasites. A second therapeutic immunization was given after 15 days of first immunization. The protection against kala-azar was estimated with the reduction of Leishman-Donovan unit from spleen and liver that scored up to 80% and 93%, respectively, while a twofold increase in nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions has been observed in the immunized groups of animals. These groups of mice also showed disease regression by skewing Th2 cytokines (IL-10) towards Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) bias along with the increased generation of NO and ROS, while the infected control group of mice without such treatment surrendered to the disease. Establishment of Th1 ambience in the treated groups has also been supported from the measured antileishmanial antibody IgG subsets (IgG2a and IgG1) with higher anti-soluble Leishmania antigen-specific IgG2a titer. As seen in our previous studies, doses of attenuation by γ-radiation should be taken into serious consideration. Attenuation of parasites at 50 Gy of absorbed dose of gamma rays has not worked well. Thus, therapeutic use of L. donovani parasites radio-attenuated at particular doses can be exploited as a promising vaccine agent. Absence of any adjuvant may increase its acceptability as vaccine candidate further.

  18. Determinants of Bluetongue Virus Virulence in Murine Models of Disease ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporale, Marco; Wash, Rachael; Pini, Attilio; Savini, Giovanni; Franchi, Paola; Golder, Matthew; Patterson-Kane, Janet; Mertens, Peter; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Armillotta, Gisella; Lelli, Rossella; Kellam, Paul; Palmarini, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Bluetongue is a major infectious disease of ruminants that is caused by bluetongue virus (BTV). In this study, we analyzed virulence and genetic differences of (i) three BTV field strains from Italy maintained at either a low (L strains) or high (H strains) passage number in cell culture and (ii) three South African “reference” wild-type strains and their corresponding live attenuated vaccine strains. The Italian BTV L strains, in general, were lethal for both newborn NIH-Swiss mice inoculated intracerebrally and adult type I interferon receptor-deficient (IFNAR−/−) mice, while the virulence of the H strains was attenuated significantly in both experimental models. Similarly, the South African vaccine strains were not pathogenic for IFNAR−/− mice, while the corresponding wild-type strains were virulent. Thus, attenuation of the virulence of the BTV strains used in this study is not mediated by the presence of an intact interferon system. No clear distinction in virulence was observed for the South African BTV strains in newborn NIH-Swiss mice. Full genomic sequencing revealed relatively few amino acid substitutions, scattered in several different viral proteins, for the strains found to be attenuated in mice compared to the pathogenic related strains. However, only the genome segments encoding VP1, VP2, and NS2 consistently showed nonsynonymous changes between all virulent and attenuated strain pairs. This study established an experimental platform for investigating the determinants of BTV virulence. Future studies using reverse genetics will allow researchers to precisely map and “weight” the relative influences of the various genome segments and viral proteins on BTV virulence. PMID:21865388

  19. Granulocytes as effective anticancer agent in experimental solid tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganjac, Morana; Poljak-Blazi, Marija; Kirac, Iva; Borovic, Suzana; Joerg Schaur, Rudolf; Zarkovic, Neven

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the effects of murine granulocytes on the growth of solid murine tumors when administrated in the vicinity of W256 carcinoma growing in Sprague Dawley rats, and in the vicinity of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) growing in BALBc mice. The administration of granulocytes significantly improved the survival of W256-bearing rats, and increased the tumor regression incidence from 17% up to 75%. Rats with regressing tumors had 2.5 times increased levels of granulocytes in peripheral blood, which were also cytotoxic in vitro for W256 carcinoma cells. However, blood levels of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-2, tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6 were similar between rats with regressing tumors and control healthy rats, suggesting that the observed regression of W256 carcinoma was caused by specific anticancer effects of the applied granulocytes. Anticancer effects of granulocytes were also found in BALBc mice bearing solid form of EAT, resulting in a 20% increase of survival in EAT-bearing mice. Therefore, the administration of granulocytes, isolated from healthy animals and applied at the site of solid tumors in rats and in mice, reduced experimental tumor growth, and extended the survival of tumor-bearing animals, while in some rats it even caused a W256 regression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. INFLUENCE OF MODIFIED BIOFLAVONOIDS UPON EFFECTOR LYMPHOCYTES IN MURINE MODEL OF CONTACT SENSITIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Z. Albegova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact sensitivity reaction (CSR to 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB in mice is a model of in vivo immune response, being an experimental analogue to contact dermatitis in humans. CSR sensitization phase begins after primary contact with antigen, lasting for 10-15 days in humans, and 5-7 days, in mice. Repeated skin exposure to the sensitizing substance leads to its recognition and triggering immune inflammatory mechanisms involving DNFB-specific effector T lymphocytes. The CSR reaches its maximum 18-48 hours after re-exposure to a hapten. There is only scarce information in the literature about effects of flavonoids on CSR, including both stimulatory and inhibitory effects. Flavonoids possessed, predominantly, suppressive effects against the CSR development. In our laboratory, a model of contact sensitivity was reproduced in CBA mice by means of cutaneous sensitization by 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene. The aim of the study was to identify the mechanisms of immunomodulatory action of quercetin dihydrate and modified bioflavonoids, using the method of adoptive transfer contact sensitivity by splenocytes and T-lymphocytes. As shown in our studies, a 30-min pre-treatment of splenocytes and T-lymphocytes from sensitized mice with modified bioflavonoids before the cell transfer caused complete prevention of contact sensitivity reaction in syngeneic recipient mice. Meanwhile, this effect was not associated with cell death induction due to apoptosis or cytotoxicity. Quercetin dihydrate caused only partially suppression the activity of adaptively formed T-lymphocytes, the contact sensitivity effectors. It was shown that the modified bioflavonoid more stronger suppress adoptive transfer of contact sensitivity in comparison with quercetin dehydrate, without inducing apoptosis of effector cells. Thus, the modified bioflavonoid is a promising compound for further studies in a model of contact sensitivity, due to its higher ability to suppress transfer of CSR with

  1. Efficacy of Proveblue (Methylene Blue) in an Experimental Cerebral Malaria Murine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Dormoi, Jérome; Briolant, Sébastien; Desgrouas, Camille; Pradines, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Although 100% of untreated mice infected with Plasmodium berghei died with specific signs of cerebral malaria and 100% of mice treated with 3 mg/kg dihydroartemisinin, the active metabolite of artesunate, which is used as the first-line treatment for severe malaria, also died but showed no specific signs of cerebral malaria, 78% of mice treated with 10 mg/kg Proveblue (methylene blue) and 78% of mice treated with a combination of 3 mg dihydroartemisinin and 10 mg/kg Proveblue survived and sho...

  2. Augmentation of arginase 1 expression by exposure to air pollution exacerbates the airways hyperresponsiveness in murine models of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amatullah Hajera

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginase overexpression contributes to airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR in asthma. Arginase expression is further augmented in cigarette smoking asthmatics, suggesting that it may be upregulated by environmental pollution. Thus, we hypothesize that arginase contributes to the exacerbation of respiratory symptoms following exposure to air pollution, and that pharmacologic inhibition of arginase would abrogate the pollution-induced AHR. Methods To investigate the role of arginase in the air pollution-induced exacerbation of airways responsiveness, we employed two murine models of allergic airways inflammation. Mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA and challenged with nebulized PBS (OVA/PBS or OVA (OVA/OVA for three consecutive days (sub-acute model or 12 weeks (chronic model, which exhibit inflammatory cell influx and remodeling/AHR, respectively. Twenty-four hours after the final challenge, mice were exposed to concentrated ambient fine particles plus ozone (CAP+O3, or HEPA-filtered air (FA, for 4 hours. After the CAP+O3 exposures, mice underwent tracheal cannulation and were treated with an aerosolized arginase inhibitor (S-boronoethyl-L-cysteine; BEC or vehicle, immediately before determination of respiratory function and methacholine-responsiveness using the flexiVent®. Lungs were then collected for comparison of arginase activity, protein expression, and immunohistochemical localization. Results Compared to FA, arginase activity was significantly augmented in the lungs of CAP+O3-exposed OVA/OVA mice in both the sub-acute and chronic models. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining revealed that the increased activity was due to arginase 1 expression in the area surrounding the airways in both models. Arginase inhibition significantly reduced the CAP+O3-induced increase in AHR in both models. Conclusions This study demonstrates that arginase is upregulated following environmental exposures in murine models of

  3. Targeted disruption of the murine Facc gene: Towards the establishment of a mouse model for Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M.; Auerbach, W.; Buchwald, M. [Hospital for Sick Childern, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital malformations and predisposition to malignancies. The gene responsible for the defect in FA group C has been cloned and designated the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C gene (FACC). A murine cDNA for this gene (Facc) was also cloned. Here we report our progress in the establishment of a mouse model for FA. The mouse Facc cDNA was used as probe to screen a genomic library of mouse strain 129. More than twenty positive clones were isolated. Three of them were mapped and found to be overlapping clones, encompassing the genomic region from exon 8 to the end of the 3{prime} UTR of the mouse cDNA. A targeting vector was constructed using the most 5{prime} mouse genomic sequence available. The end result of the homologous recombination is that exon 8 is deleted and the neo gene is inserted. The last exon, exon 14, is essential for the complementing function of the FACC gene product; the disruption in the middle of the murine Facc gene should render this locus biologically inactive. This targeting vector was linearized and electroporated into R1 embryonic stem (ES) cells which were derived from the 129 mouse. Of 102 clones screened, 19 positive cell lines were identified. Four targeted cell lines have been used to produce chimeric mice. 129-derived ES cells were aggregated ex vivo into the morulas derived from CD1 mice and then implanted into foster mothers. 22 chimeras have been obtained. Moderately and strongly chimeric mice have been bred to test for germline transmission. Progeny with the expected coat color derived from 2 chimeras are currently being examined to confirm transmission of the targeted allele.

  4. Comparison of effects of ivabradine versus carvedilol in murine model with the Coxsackievirus B3-induced viral myocarditis.

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    Li Yue-Chun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated heart rate is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. The selective I(f current inhibitor ivabradine reduces heart rate without affecting cardiac contractility, and has been shown to be cardioprotective in the failing heart. Ivabradine also exerts some of its beneficial effects by decreasing cardiac proinflammatory cytokines and inhibiting peroxidants and collagen accumulation in atherosclerosis or congestive heart failure. However, the effects of ivabradine in the setting of acute viral myocarditis and on the cytokines, oxidative stress and cardiomyocyte apoptosis have not been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was designed to compare the effects of ivabradine and carvedilol in acute viral myocarditis. In a coxsackievirus B3 murine myocarditis model (Balb/c, effects of ivabradine and carvedilol (a nonselective β-adrenoceptor antagonist on myocardial histopathological changes, cardiac function, plasma noradrenaline, cytokine levels, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase contents were studied. Both ivabradine and carvedilol similarly and significantly reduced heart rate, attenuated myocardial lesions and improved the impairment of left ventricular function. In addition, ivabradine treatment as well as carvedilol treatment showed significant effects on altered myocardial cytokines with a decrease in the amount of plasma noradrenaline. The increased myocardial MCP-1, IL-6, and TNF-α. in the infected mice was significantly attenuated in the ivabradine treatment group. Only carvedilol had significant anti-oxidative and anti-apoptoic effects in coxsackievirus B3-infected mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results show that the protective effects of heart rate reduction with ivabradine and carvedilol observed in the acute phase of coxsackievirus B3 murine myocarditis may be due not only to the heart rate reduction itself but also to the downregulation of

  5. Interferon-inducible CXC chemokines directly contribute to host defense against inhalational anthrax in a murine model of infection.

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    Matthew A Crawford

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines have been found to exert direct, defensin-like antimicrobial activity in vitro, suggesting that, in addition to orchestrating cellular accumulation and activation, chemokines may contribute directly to the innate host response against infection. No observations have been made, however, demonstrating direct chemokine-mediated promotion of host defense in vivo. Here, we show that the murine interferon-inducible CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 each exert direct antimicrobial effects in vitro against Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain spores and bacilli including disruptions in spore germination and marked reductions in spore and bacilli viability as assessed using CFU determination and a fluorometric assay of metabolic activity. Similar chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity was also observed against fully virulent Ames strain spores and encapsulated bacilli. Moreover, antibody-mediated neutralization of these CXC chemokines in vivo was found to significantly increase host susceptibility to pulmonary B. anthracis infection in a murine model of inhalational anthrax with disease progression characterized by systemic bacterial dissemination, toxemia, and host death. Neutralization of the shared chemokine receptor CXCR3, responsible for mediating cellular recruitment in response to CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, was not found to increase host susceptibility to inhalational anthrax. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel, receptor-independent antimicrobial role for the interferon-inducible CXC chemokines in pulmonary innate immunity in vivo. These data also support an immunomodulatory approach for effectively treating and/or preventing pulmonary B. anthracis infection, as well as infections caused by pathogenic and potentially, multi-drug resistant bacteria including other spore-forming organisms.

  6. Roles of chaperone/usher pathways of Yersinia pestis in a murine model of plague and adhesion to host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatkoff, Matthew; Runco, Lisa M; Pujol, Celine; Jayatilaka, Indralatha; Furie, Martha B; Bliska, James B; Thanassi, David G

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia pestis and many other Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria use the chaperone/usher (CU) pathway to assemble virulence-associated surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae. Y. pestis has two well-characterized CU pathways: the caf genes coding for the F1 capsule and the psa genes coding for the pH 6 antigen. The Y. pestis genome contains additional CU pathways that are capable of assembling pilus fibers, but the roles of these pathways in the pathogenesis of plague are not understood. We constructed deletion mutations in the usher genes for six of the additional Y. pestis CU pathways. The wild-type (WT) and usher deletion strains were compared in the murine bubonic (subcutaneous) and pneumonic (intranasal) plague infection models. Y. pestis strains containing deletions in CU pathways y0348-0352, y1858-1862, and y1869-1873 were attenuated for virulence compared to the WT strain by the intranasal, but not subcutaneous, routes of infection, suggesting specific roles for these pathways during pneumonic plague. We examined binding of the Y. pestis WT and usher deletion strains to A549 human lung epithelial cells, HEp-2 human cervical epithelial cells, and primary human and murine macrophages. Y. pestis CU pathways y0348-0352 and y1858-1862 were found to contribute to adhesion to all host cells tested, whereas pathway y1869-1873 was specific for binding to macrophages. The correlation between the virulence attenuation and host cell binding phenotypes of the usher deletion mutants identifies three of the additional CU pathways of Y. pestis as mediating interactions with host cells that are important for the pathogenesis of plague.

  7. Artificial sweeteners and mixture of food additives cause to break oral tolerance and induce food allergy in murine oral tolerance model for food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, H; Matsuhara, H; Miotani, S; Sako, Y; Matsui, T; Tanaka, H; Inagaki, N

    2017-09-01

    Processed foods are part of daily life. Almost all processed foods contain food additives such as sweeteners, preservatives and colourants. From childhood, it is difficult to avoid consuming food additives. It is thought that oral tolerance for food antigens is acquired during early life. If tolerance fails, adverse immune responses to food proteins may occur. We hypothesized that food additives prevent acquisition of oral tolerance and aimed to verify the safety of food additives. We induced experimental oral tolerance in mice for ovalbumin (OVA), a food antigen, by previous oral treatment with OVA before sensitization with OVA injections. Food additives were administered at the induction of oral tolerance, and food allergy was induced by repeated administration of OVA. Symptoms of food allergy were defined as a change in body temperature and allergic diarrhoea. Saccharin sodium and a mixture of food additives inhibited acquisition of oral tolerance. Hypothermia and allergic diarrhoea with elevation of OVA-specific IgE were induced in the murine model of oral tolerance. Analyses of antigen-presenting cells in mesenteric lymph nodes showed that food additives affected their manner of migration. Additionally, food additives decreased the proportion of CD25hi regulatory T cells among CD4+ T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. A large amount of food additives may prevent acquisition of oral tolerance. Intake of food additives in early life may increase the risk of food allergies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Extra-virgin olive oil and its phenolic extract prevent inflammatory response and joint damage in murine experimental arthritis

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    M. A. Rosillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of EVOO in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that the phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, we evaluated the effects of dietary EVOO and treatment with its phenolic extract (PE in a model of RA, the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in mice. On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine collagen type II (CII. On day 21, the mice received a booster injection. We have demonstrated that EVOO and its PE decreases joint edema, cell migration, cartilage degradation and bone erosion. Our data indicate that dietary EVOO and PE treatment inhibit JNK, p38 and signal transducer and STAT-3. In addition, both EVOO and PE decrease NF-κB translocation leading to the down-regulation of the arthritic process. These results support the interest of natural diet components in the development of therapeutic products for arthritic conditions.

  9. Effects of Anethole in Nociception Experimental Models

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    Alessandra Mileni Versuti Ritter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl, major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum, in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg, and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg. In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators.

  10. Tendon healing in vivo. An experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, S O; Lundborg, G; Lohmander, L S

    1989-01-01

    Flexor tendon segments were incubated in a diffusion chamber in the subcutis of rabbits. Tendons incubated up to 6 weeks in the diffusion chamber showed proliferating and migrating cells from the epitenon cell layer as well as viable endotenon cells. Explants frozen in liquid nitrogen prior to incubation showed no signs of extrinsic cell contamination and remained non-viable indicating that no cell penetration occurred through the Millipore filter and that cell division seen in non-frozen and incubated tendons was an expression of intrinsic cellular proliferative capacity of the tendon. In tendon segments incubated in chambers for three weeks, collagen synthesis was reduced by 50% and the rate of cell proliferation measured as 3H-thymidine incorporation, was 15 times that of native tendons. Frozen and incubated tendons showed only traces of remaining matrix synthesis or cell proliferation. With this experimental model we have histologically and biochemically shown that tendons may survive and heal while the nutrition exclusively could be based on diffusion and the tendons have an intrinsic capacity of healing. The described model enables further studies on tendon healing and its regulation.

  11. Strain Differences in a Murine Model of Air Pollutant-induced Nonatopic Asthma and Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkema, Jack R; Hotchkiss, Lucas A; Vetter, Nicholas A; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Wagner, James G

    2017-01-01

    Ozone is an irritating gas found in photochemical smog. Epidemiological associations have been made between the onset of asthma and childhood exposures to increasing levels of ambient ozone (i.e., air pollutant-induced nonatopic asthma). Individuals, however, vary in their susceptibility to this outdoor air pollutant, which may be due, in part, to their genetic makeup. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that there are murine strain-dependent differences in pulmonary and nasal pathologic responses to repeated ozone exposures. C57BL/6NTac and BALB/cNTac mice were exposed to 0 or 0.8 ppm ozone, 4 hr/day, for 9 consecutive weekdays. In both strains of mice, ozone induced eosinophilic inflammation and mucous cell metaplasia in the nasal and pulmonary airways. Lungs of ozone-exposed C57BL/6NTac mice, however, had greater eosinophilic inflammation, mucous cell metaplasia, and expression of genes related to type 2 immunity and airway mucus hypersecretion, as compared to similarly exposed BALB/cNTac mice. Ozone-exposed C57BL/6NTac mice also had greater eosinophilic rhinitis but a similar degree of mucous cell metaplasia in nasal epithelium, as ozone-exposed BALB/cNTac mice. These findings suggest that nonatopic individuals may differ in their inflammatory and epithelial responses to repeated ozone exposures that are due, in part, to genetic factors.

  12. SCLLTargeting FGFR1 to suppress leukemogenesis in syndromic and de novo AML in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing; Bhole, Aaron; Qin, Haiyan; Karp, Judith; Malek, Sami; Cowell, John K; Ren, Mingqiang

    2016-08-02

    Although over expression of chimeric FGFR1 kinase consistently leads to the development of AML in the rare Stem Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma syndrome, we now show that overexpression of FGFR1 is also seen in up to 20% of non-syndromic, de novo AML. To determine whether targeting FGFR1 in both of these AML subtypes can suppress leukemogenesis, we evaluated the effects of different FGFR1 inhibitors in a side-by-side comparison for their ability to affect in vitro proliferation in FGFR1 overexpressing murine and human cells lines. Three newly developed pan-FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547, BGJ398 and JNJ42756493, show a significantly improved efficacy over the more established FGFR inhibitors, PD173074 and TKI258. To examine whether targeting FGFR1 suppresses leukemogenesis in de novo AML in vivo, we created xenografts in immunocompromized mice from primary, de novo AML that showed > 3-fold increased expression of FGFR1. Using BGJ398, the most potent inhibitor identified in the in vitro studies, AML progression in these mice was significantly suppressed compared with vehicle treated animals and overall survival improved. Importantly, no difference in disease course or survival was seen in AML xenografts that did not show overexpression of FGFR1. These observations support the idea that FGFR1 is a driver oncogene in de novo, FGFR1-overexpressing AML and that molecularly targeted therapies using FGFR1 inhibitors may provide a valuable therapeutic regimen for all FGFR1-overexpressing AML.

  13. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D.; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53-3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall.

  14. Tocotrienol-adjuvanted dendritic cells inhibit tumor growth and metastasis: a murine model of breast cancer.

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    Sitti Rahma Abdul Hafid

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL from 4T1 cells (DC+TL once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF inhibited (p<0.05 tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05 levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05 by CD8(+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines.

  15. Anti-asthmatic activity of osthole in an ovalbumin-induced asthma murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Fu, Yunhe; Wei, Zhengkai; He, Xuexiu; Shi, Mingyu; Kou, Jinhua; Zhou, Ershun; Liu, Weijian; Yang, Zhengtao; Guo, Changming

    2017-05-01

    Osthole, an active coumarin extracted from the dried fruits of Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, is known to possess a variety of pharmacological activities. In the present study, we investigated and illuminated the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of osthole in an experimental model of allergic asthma. Our results show that osthole treatment significantly reduced the OVA-induced increase in serum IgE and inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and decreased the recruitment of inflammatory cells in BALF and the lung. It also effectively attenuated goblet cell hyperplasia and mucus overproduction in lung tissue. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that osthole blocked NF-κB activation, which may be associated with a reduction in inflammatory cytokine production. These data suggest that osthole attenuated OVA-induced allergic asthma inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB activation. The present study identified the molecular mechanisms of action of osthole, which support the potential pharmaceutical application of osthole treatment for asthma and other airway inflammation disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The role of pneumolysin in mediating lung damage in a lethal pneumococcal pneumonia murine model

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    Pirofski Liise-Anne

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intranasal inoculation of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 serotype 2 causes fatal pneumonia in mice. The cytotoxic and inflammatory properties of pneumolysin (PLY have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods To examine the role of PLY in this experimental model we performed ELISA assays for PLY quantification. The distribution patterns of PLY and apoptosis were established by immunohistochemical detection of PLY, caspase-9 activity and TUNEL assay on tissue sections from mice lungs at various times, and the results were quantified with image analysis. Inflammatory and apoptotic cells were also quantified on lung tissue sections from antibody treated mice. Results In bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, total PLY was found at sublytic concentrations which were located in alveolar macrophages and leukocytes. The bronchoalveolar epithelium was PLY-positive, while the vascular endothelium was not PLY reactive. The pattern and extension of cellular apoptosis was similar. Anti-PLY antibody treatment decreased the lung damage and the number of apoptotic and inflammatory cells in lung tissues. Conclusion The data strongly suggest that in vivo lung injury could be due to the pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory activity of PLY, rather than its cytotoxic activity. PLY at sublytic concentrations induces lethal inflammation in lung tissues and is involved in host cell apoptosis, whose effects are important to pathogen survival.

  17. Dissemination of Orientia tsutsugamushi and inflammatory responses in a murine model of scrub typhus.

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    Christian A Keller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Central aspects in the pathogenesis of scrub typhus, an infection caused by Orientia (O. tsutsugamushi, have remained obscure. Its organ and cellular tropism are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze the kinetics of bacterial dissemination and associated inflammatory responses in infected tissues in an experimental scrub typhus mouse model, following infection with the human pathogenic strain Karp. We provide a thorough analysis of O. tsutsugamushi infection in inbred Balb/c mice using footpad inoculation, which is close to the natural way of infection. By a novel, highly sensitive qPCR targeting the multi copy traD genes, we quantitatively monitored the spread of O. tsutsugamushi Karp from the skin inoculation site via the regional lymph node to the internal target organs. The highest bacterial loads were measured in the lung. Using confocal imaging, we also detected O. tsutsugamushi at the single cell level in the lung and found a predominant macrophage rather than endothelial localization. Immunohistochemical analysis of infiltrates in lung and brain revealed differently composed lesions with specific localizations: iNOS-expressing macrophages were frequent in infiltrative parenchymal noduli, but uncommon in perivascular lesions within these organs. Quantitative analysis of the macrophage response by immunohistochemistry in liver, heart, lung and brain demonstrated an early onset of macrophage activation in the liver. Serum levels of interferon (IFN-γ were increased during the acute infection, and we showed that IFN-γ contributed to iNOS-dependent bacterial growth control. Our data show that upon inoculation to the skin, O. tsutsugamushi spreads systemically to a large number of organs and gives rise to organ-specific inflammation patterns. The findings suggest an essential role for the lung in the pathogenesis of scrub typhus. The model will allow detailed studies on host-pathogen interaction and provide further

  18. A locus on chromosome 2 influences the development of acute graft-versus-host disease in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J M; Slayback, D L; Dobkins, J A; Allen, R D

    1999-06-01

    Despite contemporary typing procedures for bone marrow transplantation (BMT), graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) continues to be a major complication of transplants performed between MHC-matched donors and recipients. Although GVHD can be alleviated by T cell depletion, this procedure increases the risk of graft failure and leukemic relapse and therefore is not a solution to the GVHD problem. The high degree of variation in the intensity of GVHD observed in different patients suggests that multiple non-MHC genetic factors influence GVHD severity. We hypothesize that, in addition to minor histocompatibility antigen disparities, polymorphisms in genes encoding immunologic effector molecules may be important factors influencing GVHD development. This study aims to explore this hypothesis by identifying non-MHC genes that influence the outcome of BMT in a murine model. In this model, B10.D2 donor leukocytes cause acute GVHD in (C57BL/6xDBA/2)F1 (B6D2F1) recipients, whereas DBA/2 donor leukocytes do not. To date, a locus on chromosome 1 has been identified as influencing the severity of GVHD in this model. Our current study shows that a locus on chromosome 2 acts independently of the chromosome 1 locus to also influence GVHD severity in this model. The region of chromosome 2 implicated in our study contains genes encoding beta2-microglobulin, the minor histocompatibility antigen H-3 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1.

  19. TGF-β Blockade Reduces Mortality and Metabolic Changes in a Validated Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer Cachexia.

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    Stephanie H Greco

    Full Text Available Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition characterized by a combination of anorexia, muscle wasting, weight loss, and malnutrition. This condition affects an overwhelming majority of patients with pancreatic cancer and is a primary cause of cancer-related death. However, few, if any, effective therapies exist for both treatment and prevention of this syndrome. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer cachexia, appropriate animal models are necessary. In this study, we developed and validated a syngeneic, metastatic, murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia. Using our model, we investigated the ability of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β blockade to mitigate the metabolic changes associated with cachexia. We found that TGF-β inhibition using the anti-TGF-β antibody 1D11.16.8 significantly improved overall mortality, weight loss, fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral density, and skeletal muscle proteolysis in mice harboring advanced pancreatic cancer. Other immunotherapeutic strategies we employed were not effective. Collectively, we validated a simplified but useful model of pancreatic cancer cachexia to investigate immunologic treatment strategies. In addition, we showed that TGF-β inhibition can decrease the metabolic changes associated with cancer cachexia and improve overall survival.

  20. TGF-β Blockade Reduces Mortality and Metabolic Changes in a Validated Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer Cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Stephanie H; Tomkötter, Lena; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Rokosh, Rae; Avanzi, Antonina; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Deutsch, Michael; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos; Mohaimin, Tasnima; Rendon, Mauricio; Levie, Elliot; Pansari, Mridul; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Pachter, H Leon; Tippens, Daniel; Malik, Hassan; Boutajangout, Allal; Wisniewski, Thomas; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition characterized by a combination of anorexia, muscle wasting, weight loss, and malnutrition. This condition affects an overwhelming majority of patients with pancreatic cancer and is a primary cause of cancer-related death. However, few, if any, effective therapies exist for both treatment and prevention of this syndrome. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer cachexia, appropriate animal models are necessary. In this study, we developed and validated a syngeneic, metastatic, murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia. Using our model, we investigated the ability of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) blockade to mitigate the metabolic changes associated with cachexia. We found that TGF-β inhibition using the anti-TGF-β antibody 1D11.16.8 significantly improved overall mortality, weight loss, fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral density, and skeletal muscle proteolysis in mice harboring advanced pancreatic cancer. Other immunotherapeutic strategies we employed were not effective. Collectively, we validated a simplified but useful model of pancreatic cancer cachexia to investigate immunologic treatment strategies. In addition, we showed that TGF-β inhibition can decrease the metabolic changes associated with cancer cachexia and improve overall survival.

  1. TGF-β Blockade Reduces Mortality and Metabolic Changes in a Validated Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer Cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokosh, Rae; Avanzi, Antonina; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Deutsch, Michael; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos; Mohaimin, Tasnima; Rendon, Mauricio; Levie, Elliot; Pansari, Mridul; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Pachter, H. Leon; Tippens, Daniel; Malik, Hassan; Boutajangout, Allal; Wisniewski, Thomas; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition characterized by a combination of anorexia, muscle wasting, weight loss, and malnutrition. This condition affects an overwhelming majority of patients with pancreatic cancer and is a primary cause of cancer-related death. However, few, if any, effective therapies exist for both treatment and prevention of this syndrome. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer cachexia, appropriate animal models are necessary. In this study, we developed and validated a syngeneic, metastatic, murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia. Using our model, we investigated the ability of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) blockade to mitigate the metabolic changes associated with cachexia. We found that TGF-β inhibition using the anti-TGF-β antibody 1D11.16.8 significantly improved overall mortality, weight loss, fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral density, and skeletal muscle proteolysis in mice harboring advanced pancreatic cancer. Other immunotherapeutic strategies we employed were not effective. Collectively, we validated a simplified but useful model of pancreatic cancer cachexia to investigate immunologic treatment strategies. In addition, we showed that TGF-β inhibition can decrease the metabolic changes associated with cancer cachexia and improve overall survival. PMID:26172047

  2. Technical Advance: Function and efficacy of an {alpha}4-integrin antagonist using bioluminescence imaging to detect leukocyte trafficking in murine experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Carola T; Moloney, Gerard; Macsharry, John; Haynes, Andrea; Faivre, Emilie; Quinlan, Aoife; McLean, Peter G; Lee, Kevin; O'Mahony, Liam; Shanahan, Fergus; Melgar, Silvia; Nally, Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    Leukocyte trafficking is a therapeutic target in IBD. The integrins α₄β and α₄β₁ regulate leukocyte migration into tissues and lymphoid organs. Current strategies rely on biologics, such as mAb, to inhibit leukocyte recruitment. Here we show the in vivo therapeutic effects of a small molecule α4-integrin antagonist (GSK223618A) in a leukocyte-trafficking model and a murine model of colitis. Leukocytes isolated from MLNs of transgenic β-actin-luc+ mice were injected i.v. into recipients with DSS-induced colitis. Recipient mice were orally gavaged with vehicle or an α₄-integrin antagonist 1 h pre-adoptive transfer, followed by bioluminescence whole body and ex vivo organ imaging 4 h post-transfer. To confirm its therapeutic effect, the α₄-integrin antagonist was given orally twice daily for 6 days to mice with DSS-induced colitis, starting on Day 3. Clinical, macroscopic, and histological signs of inflammation were assessed and gene-expression profiles analyzed. Using bioluminescence imaging, we tracked and quantified leukocyte migration to the inflamed gut and demonstrated its inhibition by a small molecule α₄-integrin antagonist. Additionally, the therapeutic effect of the antagonist was confirmed in DSS-induced colitis in terms of clinical, macroscopic, and histological signs of inflammation. Gene expression analysis suggested enhancement of tissue healing in compound-treated animals. Inhibition of leukocyte trafficking using small molecule integrin antagonists is a promising alternative to large molecule biologics. Furthermore, in vivo bioluminescence imaging is a valuable strategy for preclinical evaluation of potential therapeutics that target leukocyte trafficking in inflammatory diseases.

  3. Detection of invasive infection caused by Fusarium solani and non-Fusarium solani species using a duplex quantitative PCR-based assay in a murine model of fusariosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Martínez, Leticia; Buitrago, Maria J; Castelli, Maria V; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2012-04-01

    A duplex Real Time PCR (RT-PCR) assay for detecting DNA of members of the genus Fusarium has been developed and validated by using two mouse models of invasive infection. The duplex RT-PCR technique employed two specific molecular beacon probes targeting a highly conserved region of the fungal rDNA gene. This technique showed a detection limit of 10 fg DNA per μl of sample and a specificity of 100%. The sensitivity in a total of 48 samples from a murine model of Fusarium solani infection was 93.9% for lung tissues and 86.7% for serum samples. In comparison, the sensitivity in a total of 45 samples of a F. oxysporum murine model infection was 87% for lung tissues and 42.8% for serum samples. This molecular technique could be a reliable method for the quantification and the evaluation of the disease in animal models and for the clinical diagnosis of fusariosis.

  4. Differences in the Thoracic Aorta by Region and Sex in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Siegert, Anna-Maria; Bonorino, Fabio; Meirelles, Thayna; Barberà, Laura; Dantas, Ana P; Vila, Elisabet; Egea, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a hereditary disorder of the connective tissue that causes life-threatening aortic aneurysm, which initiates at the aortic root and can progress into the ascending portion. However, analysis of ascending aorta reactivity in animal models of MFS has remained elusive. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that although MFS is equally prevalent in men and women, men are at a higher risk of aortic complications than non-pregnant women. Nevertheless, there is no experimental evidence to support this hypothesis. The aim of this study was to explore whether there are regional and sex differences in the thoracic aorta function of mice heterozygous for the fibrillin 1 ( Fbn1 ) allele encoding a missense mutation ( Fbn1 C1039G/+ ), the most common class of mutation in MFS. Ascending and descending thoracic aorta reactivity was evaluated by wire myography. Ascending aorta mRNA and protein levels, and elastic fiber integrity were assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and Verhoeff-Van Gieson histological staining, respectively. MFS differently altered reactivity in the ascending and descending thoracic aorta by either increasing or decreasing phenylephrine contractions, respectively. When mice were separated by sex, contractions to phenylephrine increased progressively from 3 to 6 months of age in MFS ascending aortas of males, whereas contractions in females were unchanged. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was unaltered in the MFS ascending aorta of either sex; an effect related to augmented endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization-type dilations. In MFS males, the non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin prevented the MFS-induced enhancement of phenylephrine contractions linked to increased COX-2 expression. In MFS mice of both sexes, the non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME revealed negative feedback of nitric oxide on phenylephrine contractions, which was associated with upregulation of eNOS in females. Finally, MFS

  5. Differences in the Thoracic Aorta by Region and Sex in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Jiménez-Altayó

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome (MFS is a hereditary disorder of the connective tissue that causes life-threatening aortic aneurysm, which initiates at the aortic root and can progress into the ascending portion. However, analysis of ascending aorta reactivity in animal models of MFS has remained elusive. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that although MFS is equally prevalent in men and women, men are at a higher risk of aortic complications than non-pregnant women. Nevertheless, there is no experimental evidence to support this hypothesis. The aim of this study was to explore whether there are regional and sex differences in the thoracic aorta function of mice heterozygous for the fibrillin 1 (Fbn1 allele encoding a missense mutation (Fbn1C1039G/+, the most common class of mutation in MFS. Ascending and descending thoracic aorta reactivity was evaluated by wire myography. Ascending aorta mRNA and protein levels, and elastic fiber integrity were assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and Verhoeff-Van Gieson histological staining, respectively. MFS differently altered reactivity in the ascending and descending thoracic aorta by either increasing or decreasing phenylephrine contractions, respectively. When mice were separated by sex, contractions to phenylephrine increased progressively from 3 to 6 months of age in MFS ascending aortas of males, whereas contractions in females were unchanged. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was unaltered in the MFS ascending aorta of either sex; an effect related to augmented endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization-type dilations. In MFS males, the non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitor indomethacin prevented the MFS-induced enhancement of phenylephrine contractions linked to increased COX-2 expression. In MFS mice of both sexes, the non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME revealed negative feedback of nitric oxide on phenylephrine contractions, which was associated with upregulation of eNOS in females. Finally

  6. Hypocretin Receptor Expression in Canine and Murine Narcolepsy Models and in Hypocretin-Ligand Deficient Human Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kazuo; Fujiki, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Yasushi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Honda, Makoto; Mignot, Emmanuel; Nishino, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine whether hypocretin receptor gene (hcrtR1 and hcrtR2) expression is affected after long-term hypocretin ligand loss in humans and animal models of narcolepsy. Design: Animal and human study. We measured hcrtR1 and hcrtR2 expression in the frontal cortex and pons using the RT-PCR method in murine models (8-week-old and 27-week-old orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic (TG) hypocretin cell ablated mice and wild-type mice from the same litter, 10 mice for each group), in canine models (8 genetically narcoleptic Dobermans with null mutations in the hcrtR2, 9 control Dobermans, 3 sporadic ligand-deficient narcoleptics, and 4 small breed controls), and in humans (5 narcolepsy-cataplexy patients with hypocretin deficiency (average age 77.0 years) and 5 control subjects (72.6 years). Measurement and Results: 27-week-old (but not 8-week-old) TG mice showed significant decreases in hcrtR1 expression, suggesting the influence of the long-term ligand loss on the receptor expression. Both sporadic narcoleptic dogs and human narcolepsy-cataplexy subjects showed a significant decrease in hcrtR1 expression, while declines in hcrtR2 expression were not significant in these cases. HcrtR2-mutated narcoleptic Dobermans (with normal ligand production) showed no alteration in hcrtR1 expression. Conclusions: Moderate declines in hcrtR expressions, possibly due to long-term postnatal loss of ligand production, were observed in hypocretin-ligand deficient narcoleptic subjects. These declines are not likely to be progressive and complete. The relative preservation of hcrtR2 expression also suggests that hypocretin based therapies are likely to be a viable therapeutic options in human narcolepsy-cataplexy. Citation: Mishima K; Fujiki N; Yoshida Y; Sakurai T; Honda M; Mignot E; Nishino S. Hypocretin receptor expression in canine and murine narcolepsy models and in hypocretin-ligand deficient human narcolepsy. SLEEP 2008;31(8):1119-1126. PMID:18714784

  7. Delayed contrast enhancement imaging of a murine model for ischemia reperfusion with carbon nanotube micro-CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel M Burk

    Full Text Available We aim to demonstrate the application of free-breathing prospectively gated carbon nanotube (CNT micro-CT by evaluating a myocardial infarction model with a delayed contrast enhancement technique. Evaluation of murine cardiac models using micro-CT imaging has historically been limited by extreme imaging requirements. Newly-developed CNT-based x-ray sources offer precise temporal resolution, allowing elimination of physiological motion through prospective gating. Using free-breathing, cardiac-gated CNT micro-CT, a myocardial infarction model can be studied non-invasively and with high resolution. Myocardial infarction was induced in eight male C57BL/6 mice aged 8-12 weeks. The ischemia reperfusion model was achieved by surgically occluding the LAD artery for 30 minutes followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Tail vein catheters were placed for contrast administration. Iohexol 300 mgI/mL was administered followed by images obtained in diastole. Iodinated lipid blood pool contrast agent was then administered, followed with images at systole and diastole. Respiratory and cardiac signals were monitored externally and used to gate the scans of free-breathing subjects. Seven control animals were scanned using the same imaging protocol. After imaging, the heart was harvested, cut into 1mm slices and stained with TTC. Post-processing analysis was performed using ITK-Snap and MATLAB. All animals demonstrated obvious delayed contrast enhancement in the left ventricular wall following the Iohexol injection. The blood pool contrast agent revealed significant changes in cardiac function quantified by 3-D volume ejection fractions. All subjects demonstrated areas of myocardial infarct in the LAD distribution on both TTC staining and micro-CT imaging. The CNT micro-CT system aids straightforward, free-breathing, prospectively-gated 3-D murine cardiac imaging. Delayed contrast enhancement allows identification of infarcted myocardium after a myocardial ischemic

  8. CNTO 530 Increases Expression of HbA and HbF in Murine Models of ?-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Makropoulos, Dorie A; Achuthanandam, Ram; Avery, Justin; Wilson, Krista; Brosnan, Kerry; Miller, Andrew; Nesspor, Thomas; Chroscinski, Denise; Walker, Mindi; Egenolf, Devon; Huang, Chichi; Bugelski, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    CNTO 530 is an erythropoietin receptor agonist MIMETIBODYTM construct. CNTO 530 has been shown to be active in a number of rodent models of acquired anemia (e.g. renal insufficiency and chemotherapy induced anemia). We investigated the efficacy of CNTO 530 in murine models of ?-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (Berkeley mice). ?- thalassemic mice are deficient in expression of ?-globin chain and heterozygous mice are characterized by a clinical syndrome similar to the human ?-thalassemia in...

  9. Enhanced gene transfer efficiency in the murine striatum and an orthotopic glioblastoma tumor model, using AAV-7- and AAV-8-pseudotyped vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Thomas C; Dickinson, Peter J; Roberts, Byron N; Yendluri, Satya; Gonzalez-Edick, Melissa; Lecouteur, Richard A; Jooss, Karin U

    2006-08-01

    In this study, recombinant AAV vectors pseudotyped with viral capsids derived from AAV serotypes 7 and 8 were evaluated for gene transfer in the murine striatum relative to vectors pseudotyped with AAV serotypes 2, 5, and 6. In comparison with rAAV serotype 2, pseudotyped vectors derived from AAV-7 and AAV-8 have increased transduction efficiency in the murine CNS, with the rank order rAAV-7 > rAAV-8 > rAAV-5 > rAAV-2 = rAAV-6, with all vectors demonstrating a marked tropism for neuronal transduction. Pseudotyped rAAV vector gene transfer in the brain after preimplantation of a murine 4C8 glioblastoma tumor was also evaluated. Efficiency of gene transfer to the orthotopic tumor was increased when using AAV-6, -7, and -8 capsid proteins in comparison with serotype 2, with the order rAAV-8 = rAAV-7 > rAAV-6 > rAAV-2 > rAAV-5. The increased gene transfer efficiency of rAAV vectors pseudotyped with the rAAV-8 capsid also provided enhanced therapeutic efficacy in a mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme, using vectors encoding an inhibitor of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. These studies demonstrate that rAAV vectors pseudotyped with capsids derived from AAV serotypes 7 and 8 provide enhanced gene transfer in the murine CNS and may offer increased therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of neurological disease.

  10. The haploinsufficient hematopoietic microenvironment is critical to the pathological fracture repair in murine models of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Wu

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cause neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, a complex genetic disorder with a high predisposition of numerous skeletal dysplasias including short stature, osteoporosis, kyphoscoliosis, and fracture non-union (pseudoarthrosis. We have developed murine models that phenocopy many of the skeletal dysplasias observed in NF1 patients, including reduced bone mass and fracture non-union. We also show that the development of these skeletal manifestations requires an Nf1 haploinsufficient background in addition to nullizygous loss of Nf1 in mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs and/or their progenies. This is replicated in two animal models of NF1, PeriCre(+;Nf1(flox/- and Col2.3Cre(+;Nf1(flox/- mice. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrate a critical role of the Nf1+/- marrow microenvironment in the impaired fracture healing in both models and adoptive transfer of WT bone marrow cells improves fracture healing in these mice. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a non-cell autonomous mechanism in non-malignant NF1 manifestations. Collectively, these data provide evidence of a combinatory effect between nullizygous loss of Nf1 in osteoblast progenitors and haploinsufficiency in hematopoietic cells in the development of non-malignant NF1 manifestations.

  11. Neuroprotective effect of bilberry extract in a murine model of photo-stressed retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Hideto; Okamoto, Tomohiro; Kawashima, Hirohiko; Toda, Eriko; Miyake, Seiji; Nagai, Norihiro; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Excessive exposure to light promotes degenerative and blinding retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, the underlying mechanisms of photo-induced retinal degeneration are not fully understood, and a generalizable preventive intervention has not been proposed. Bilberry extract is an antioxidant-rich supplement that ameliorates ocular symptoms. However, its effects on photo-stressed retinas have not been clarified. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effects of bilberry extract against photo-stress in murine retinas. Light-induced visual function impairment recorded by scotopic and phototopic electroretinograms showing respective rod and cone photoreceptor function was attenuated by oral administration of bilberry extract through a stomach tube in Balb/c mice (750 mg/kg body weight). Bilberry extract also suppressed photo-induced apoptosis in the photoreceptor cell layer and shortening of the outer segments of rod and cone photoreceptors. Levels of photo-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, as measured by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, were reduced by bilberry extract treatment. Reduction of ROS by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a well-known antioxidant also suppressed ER stress. Immunohistochemical analysis of activating transcription factor 4 expression showed the presence of ER stress in the retina, and at least in part, in Müller glial cells. The photo-induced disruption of tight junctions in the retinal pigment epithelium was also attenuated by bilberry extract, repressing an oxidative stress marker, although ER stress markers were not repressed. Our results suggest that bilberry extract attenuates photo-induced apoptosis and visual dysfunction most likely, and at least in part, through ROS reduction, and subsequent ER stress attenuation in the retina. This study can help understand the mechanisms of photo-stress and

  12. Expression and function of S100A8/A9 (calprotectin in human typhoid fever and the murine Salmonella model.

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    Hanna K De Jong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is a major cause of community-acquired bacteremia and death worldwide. S100A8 (MRP8 and S100A9 (MRP14 form bioactive antimicrobial heterodimers (calprotectin that can activate Toll-like receptor 4, promoting lethal, endotoxin-induced shock and multi-organ failure. We aimed to characterize the expression and function of S100A8/A9 in patients with typhoid fever and in a murine invasive Salmonella model.S100A8/A9 protein levels were determined in acute phase plasma or feces from 28 Bangladeshi patients, and convalescent phase plasma from 60 Indonesian patients with blood culture or PCR-confirmed typhoid fever, and compared to 98 healthy control subjects. To functionally characterize the role of S100A8/A9, we challenged wildtype (WT and S100A9-/- mice with S. Typhimurium and determined bacterial loads and inflammation 2- and 5- days post infection. We further assessed the antimicrobial function of recombinant S100A8/A9 on S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi replication in vitro. Typhoid fever patients demonstrated a marked increase of S100A8/A9 in acute phase plasma and feces and this increases correlated with duration of fever prior to admission. S100A8/A9 directly inhibited the growth of S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi in vitro in a dose and time dependent fashion. WT mice inoculated with S. Typhimurium showed increased levels of S100A8/A9 in both the liver and the systemic compartment but S100A9-/- mice were indistinguishable from WT mice with respect to bacterial growth, survival, and inflammatory responses, as determined by cytokine release, histopathology and organ injury.S100A8/A9 is markedly elevated in human typhoid, correlates with duration of fever prior to admission and directly inhibits the growth of S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi in vitro. Despite elevated levels in the murine invasive Salmonella model, S100A8/A9 does not contribute to an effective host response

  13. Dose-response model of murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi: time post inoculation and host age dependency analysis

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    Tamrakar Sushil B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rickettsia typhi (R. mooseri is the causative agent of murine typhus. It is one of the most widely distributed flea-borne diseases with a relatively mild febrile initial illness with six to 14 days of incubation period. The bacterium is gram negative and an obligate intracellular pathogen. The disease is transmitted to humans and vertebrate host through fleabites or via contact with infected feces. This paper develops dose-response models of different routes of exposure for typhus in rodents. Methods Data from published articles were analyzed using parametric dose-response relationship models. Dose-response relationships were fit to data using the method of maximum likelihood estimation (MLE. Results Dose-response models quantifying the effects of different ages of rats and time post inoculation in BALB/c mice were analyzed in the study. Both the adult rats (inoculated intradermally and newborn rats (inoculated subcutaneously were best fit by exponential models and both distributions could be described by a single dose-response relationship. The BALB/C mice inoculated subcutaneously were best fit by Beta-Poisson models. The time post inoculation analysis showed that there was a definite time and response relationship existed in this case. Conclusions Intradermally or subcutaneously inoculated rats (adult and newborn models suggest that less than 1 plaque-forming unit (PFU (1.33 to 0.38 in 95% confidence limits of the pathogen is enough to seroconvert 50% of the exposed population on average. For the BALB/c mouse time post inoculation model, an average dose of 0.28 plaque-forming units (PFU (0.75 to 0.11 in 95% confidence limits will seroconvert 50% of the exposed mice.

  14. Validation of two reference genes for mRNA level studies of murine disease models in neurobiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldgaard, Michael; Fenger, Christina; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2006-01-01

    Reverse transcription of extracted cellular RNA combined with real-time PCR is now an established method for sensitive detection and quantification of specific mRNA level changes in experimental models of neurological diseases. To neutralize the impact of experimental error and make quantificatio...

  15. Local effect of zoledronic acid on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion with demineralized bone matrix in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Pawel; Farei-Campagna, Jan; Jentzsch, Thorsten; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Werner, Clément M

    2017-10-10

    Posterolateral spinal fusion is a common orthopaedic surgery performed to treat degenerative and traumatic deformities of the spinal column. In posteriolateral spinal fusion, different osteoinductive demineralized bone matrix products have been previously investigated. We evaluated the effect of locally applied zoledronic acid in combination with commercially available demineralized bone matrix putty on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion in a murine in vivo model. A posterolateral sacral spine fusion in murine model was used to evaluate the new bone formation. We used the sacral spine fusion model to model the clinical situation in which a bone graft or demineralized bone matrix is applied after dorsal instrumentation of the spine. In our study, group 1 received decortications only (n = 10), group 2 received decortication, and absorbable collagen sponge carrier, group 3 received decortication and absorbable collagen sponge carrier with zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg, group 4 received demineralized bone matrix putty (DBM putty) plus decortication (n = 10), and group 5 received DBM putty, decortication and locally applied zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg. Imaging was performed using MicroCT for new bone formation assessment. Also, murine spines were harvested for histopathological analysis 10 weeks after surgery. The surgery performed through midline posterior approach was reproducible. In group with decortication alone there was no new bone formation. Application of demineralized bone matrix putty alone produced new bone formation which bridged the S1-S4 laminae. Local application of zoledronic acid to demineralized bone matrix putty resulted in significant increase of new bone formation as compared to demineralized bone matrix putty group alone. A single local application of zoledronic acid with DBM putty during posterolateral fusion in sacral murine spine model increased significantly new bone formation in situ in our model. Therefore, our

  16. Oral treatment with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 modulates immune responses and interferes with signal pathways involved in the activation of inflammation in a murine model of typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Flaviano S; Elian, Samir D A; Vieira, Angélica T; Tiago, Fabiana C P; Martins, Ariane K S; Silva, Flávia C P; Souza, Ericka L S; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Araújo, Helena R C; Pimenta, Paulo F; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Arantes, Rosa M E; Teixeira, Mauro M; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2011-04-01

    Salmonella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens that cause several diarrheal diseases ranging from self-limiting gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. Previous results from our laboratory showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 isolated from 'cachaça' production presented probiotic properties due to its ability to protect against experimental infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In this study, the effects of oral treatment with S. cerevisiae 905 were evaluated at the immunological level in a murine model of typhoid fever. Treatment with S. cerevisiae 905 inhibited weight loss and increased survival rate after Salmonella challenge. Immunological data demonstrated that S. cerevisiae 905 decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and modulated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 and JNK, but not ERK1/2), NF-κB and AP-1, signaling pathways which are involved in the transcriptional activation of proinflammatory mediators. Experiments in germ-free mice revealed that probiotic effects were due, at least in part, to the binding of Salmonella to the yeast. In conclusion, S. cerevisiae 905 acts as a potential new biotherapy against S. Typhimurium infection due to its ability to bind bacteria and modulate signaling pathways involved in the activation of inflammation in a murine model of typhoid fever. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Coexpression of PPE 34.9 Antigen of Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis with Murine Interferon Gamma in HeLa Cell Line and Study of Their Immunogenicity in Murine Model

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    Rajib Deb

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map is the causative agent of johne's disease whose immunopathology mainly depends on cell mediated immuneresponse. Genome sequencing revealed various PPE (Proline-Proline-Glutamic acid protein family of Map which are immunologically importance candidate genes In present study we have developed a bicistrionic construct pIR PPE/IFN containing a 34.9 kDa PPE protein (PPE 34.9 of Map along with a cytokine gene encoding murine gamma Interferon gene (IFNγ and a monocistrionic construct pIR PPE using a mammalian vector system pIRES 6.1. The construct were transfected in HeLa cell line and expression were studied by Western blot as well as Immunefluroscent assay using recombinant sera. Further we have compared the immunereactivity of these two constructs in murine model by means of DTH study, LTT, NO assay and ELISA. DTH response was higher in pIR PPE/IFN than pIR PPE group of mice, similar finding also observed in case of LTT and NO production assay . ELISA titer of the pIR PPE/IFN was less than that with PPE only. These preliminary finding can revealed a CMI response of this PPE protein of Map and IFNγ having synergistic effect on this PPE protein to elicit a T cell based immunity in mice.

  18. Optimization of a murine and human tissue model to recapitulate dermal and pulmonary features of systemic sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Watanabe

    Full Text Available The murine bleomycin (BLM-induced fibrosis model is the most widely used in systemic sclerosis (SSc studies. It has been reported that systemic delivery of BLM via continuous diffusion from subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps can cause fibrosis of the skin, lungs, and other internal organs. However, the mouse strain, dosage of BLM, administration period, and additional important features differ from one report to the next. In this study, by employing the pump model in C57BL/6J mice, we show a dose-dependent increase in lung fibrosis by day 28 and a transient increase in dermal thickness. Dermal thickness and the level of collagen in skin treated with high-dose BLM was significantly higher than in skin treated with low dose BLM or vehicle. A reduction in the thickness of the adipose layer was noted in both high and low dose groups at earlier time points suggesting that the loss of the fat layer precedes the onset of fibrosis. High-dose BLM also induced dermal fibrosis and increased expression of fibrosis-associated genes ex vivo in human skin, thus confirming and extending the in vivo findings, and demonstrating that a human organ culture model can be used to assess the effect of BLM on skin. In summary, our findings suggest that the BLM pump model is an attractive model to analyze the underlying mechanisms of fibrosis and test the efficacy of potential therapies. However, the choice of mouse strain, duration of BLM administration and dose must be carefully considered when using this model.

  19. A live, attenuated Bordetella pertussis vaccine provides long-term protection against virulent challenge in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerry, Ciaran M; Mahon, Bernard P

    2011-02-01

    Despite successful mass vaccination programs, whooping cough remains a significant cause of neonatal mortality. Immunity induced by current vaccines wanes in adolescence, requiring additional immunizations to prevent resurgence. There is a need for a new generation of vaccines capable of conferring long-lasting immunity from birth. Recently, a live, attenuated whooping cough vaccine, BPZE1, has been developed. Here, an established murine immunization model was used to examine the induction and longevity of immunological memory. In this predictive model, BPZE1 conferred a level of protection against virulent bacterial challenge comparable to that conferred by recovery from prior infection, up to 1 year after immunization. One year after immunization with BPZE1, a pertussis-specific persistent response, with high levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), could be detected from spleen cells restimulated with inactivated Bordetella pertussis. BPZE1 induced low levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17) and no IL-10 or IL-5. BPZE1 immunization induced long-lasting, efficacious memory B-cell and specific antibody responses dominated by IgG2a, which were boosted by subsequent challenge. Finally, the antibody induced by BPZE1 was functionally relevant and could clear a virulent B. pertussis infection in antibody-deficient mice following passive transfer. This study suggests that BPZE1 is capable of conferring a high level of long-lived effective protection against virulent B. pertussis.

  20. Comparison of the effects of vitamin D products in a psoriasis plaque test and a murine psoriasis xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Vibeke

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of Daivobet® and calcipotriol on clinical score and biomarker responses in a modified version of the Scholtz-Dumas psoriasis plaque assay. Furthermore, it was the aim to compare the effects of calcipotriol and betamethasone in the murine psoriasis xenograft model. Twenty four patients with psoriasis were treated topically once daily for three weeks, whereas the grafted mice were treated for four weeks. Clinical responses were scored twice weekly and biopsies were taken at the end of each study to analyse for skin biomarkers by histology and immunohistochemistry. The results clearly demonstrate effects on both clinical signs and biomarkers. In the patient study the total clinical score was reduced significantly with both Daivobet® and calcipotriol. Both treatments reduced epidermal thickness, Ki-67 and cytokeratin 16 expression. T cell infiltration was significantly reduced by Daivobet® but only marginally by calcipotriol. Both treatments showed strong effects on the epidermal psoriatic phenotype. Results from the xenograft model essentially showed the same results. However differences were observed when investigating subtypes of T cells. The study demonstrates the feasibility of obtaining robust biomarker data in the psoriasis plaque test that correlate well with those obtained in other clinical studies. Furthermore, the biomarker data from the plaque test correlate with biopsy data from the grafted mice.

  1. Dual Differentiation-Exogenous Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Repair in a Murine Hemisection Model

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    Hai Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation has shown tremendous promise as a therapy for repair of various tissues of the musculoskeletal, vascular, and central nervous systems. Based on this success, recent research in this field has focused on complex tissue damage, such as that which occurs from traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI. As the critical event for successful exogenous, MSC therapy is their migration to the injury site, which allows for their anti-inflammatory and morphogenic effects on fracture healing, neuronal regeneration, and functional recover. Thus, there is a need for a cost-effective in vivo model that can faithfully recapitulate the salient features of the injury, therapy, and recovery. To address this, we review the recent advances in exogenous MSC therapy for TSCI and traumatic vertebral fracture repair and the existing challenges regarding their translational applications. We also describe a novel murine model designed to take advantage of multidisciplinary collaborations between musculoskeletal and neuroscience researchers, which is needed to establish an efficacious MSC therapy for TSCI.

  2. RAGE-Mediated Suppression of Interleukin-10 Results in Enhanced Mortality in a Murine Model of Acinetobacter baumannii Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Michael J; Becker, Kyle W; Boyd, Kelli L; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Skaar, Eric P

    2017-03-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern recognition receptor capable of recognizing multiple pathogen-associated and danger-associated molecular patterns that contributes to the initiation and potentiation of inflammation in many disease processes. During infection, RAGE functions to either exacerbate disease severity or enhance pathogen clearance depending on the pathogen studied. Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing severe infections, including pneumonia and sepsis, in impaired hosts. The role of RAGE signaling in response to opportunistic bacterial infections is largely unknown. In murine models of A. baumannii pneumonia, RAGE signaling alters neither inflammation nor bacterial clearance. In contrast, RAGE -/- mice systemically infected with A. baumannii exhibit increased survival and reduced bacterial burdens in the liver and spleen. The increased survival of RAGE -/- mice is associated with increased circulating levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Neutralization of IL-10 in RAGE -/- mice results in decreased survival during systemic A. baumannii infection that mirrors that of wild-type (WT) mice, and exogenous IL-10 administration to WT mice enhances survival in this model. These findings demonstrate the role for RAGE-dependent IL-10 suppression as a key modulator of mortality from Gram-negative sepsis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. A murine oral model for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and immunomodulation with Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Meagan A.; Steele, James L.; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) the causative agent of Johne's disease, is one of the most serious infectious diseases in dairy cattle worldwide. Due to the chronic nature of this disease and no feasible control strategy, it is essential to have an efficient animal model which is representative of the natural route of infection as well as a viable treatment option. In this report, we evaluated the effect of different doses of M. paratuberculosis in their ability to colonize murine tissues following oral delivery and the ability of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, a nascent probiotic, to combat paratuberculosis. Oral inoculation of mice was able to establish paratuberculosis in a dose-dependent manner. Two consecutive doses of approximately 109 CFU per mouse resulted in a disseminated infection, whereas lower doses were not efficient to establish infection. All inoculated mice were colonized with M. paratuberculosis, maintained infection for up to 24 weeks post infection and generated immune responses that reflect M. paratuberculosis infection in cattle. Notably, oral administration of L. casei ATCC 334 did not reduce the level of M. paratuberculosis colonization in treated animals. Interestingly, cytokine responses and histology indicated a trend for the immunomodulation and reduction of pathology in animals receiving L. casei ATCC 334 treatment. Overall, a reproducible oral model of paratuberculosis in mice was established that could be used for future vaccine experiments. Although the L. casei ATCC 334 was not a promising candidate for controlling paratuberculosis, we established a protocol to screen other probiotic candidates. PMID:24551602

  4. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

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    Kim, Manbok, E-mail: manbok66@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Rahman, Masmudur M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cogle, Christopher R. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McFadden, Grant [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  5. Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor-1 (CNF1) does not promote E. coli infection in a murine model of ascending pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Jason E; Kim, Kwang Sik; Harty, William; Kasprenski, Matthew; Wang, Ming-Hsien

    2017-05-25

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common and costly infections in both hospitalized and ambulatory patients. Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) represent the majority of UTI isolates and are a diverse group of bacteria that utilize a variety of virulence factors to establish infection of the genitourinary tract. The virulence factor cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1 (CNF1) is frequently expressed in clinical UPEC isolates. To date, there have been conflicting reports on the role of CNF1 in the pathogenesis of E. coli urinary tract infections. We examined the importance of CNF1 in a murine ascending kidney infection/ pyelonephritis model by performing comparative studies between a clinical UPEC isolate strain and a CNF1-deletion mutant. We found no alterations in bacterial burden with the loss of CNF1, whereas loss of the virulence factor fimH decreased bacterial burdens. In addition, we found no evidence that CNF1 contributed to the recruitment of inflammatory infiltrates in the kidney or bladder in vivo. While further examination of CNF-1 may reveal a role in UTI pathogenesis, our data casts doubt on the role of CNF-1 in the pathogenesis of UPEC UTI. As with other infections, different models and approaches are needed to elucidate the contribution of CNF1 to E. coli UTI.

  6. Murine depression model and its potential applications for discovering foods and farm products with antidepressant-like effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko eGoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced societies face increased health problems related to various stresses. Chronic psychological stress is a major risk factor for psychiatric disorders such as depression. Although therapeutic agents reduce several symptoms of depression, most have side effects in a broad range of the population. Furthermore, some victims of depression do not show significant improvement with any drugs, so alternative approaches are needed. Good dietary habits may potentially reduce depressive symptoms, but there is little scientific evidence thus far. Murine depression models are useful to test nutritional approaches in vivo. Our model mice subjected to a subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS paradigm show several alterations in physiological parameters and social behavior. These stress-induced symptoms in sCSDS mice can be used as cues to identify antidepressant-like natural resources including foods and farm products. We previously discovered that sCSDS mice show more vulnerability to social stress by changing dietary condition. In addition, we developed a more objective system for analyzing mouse behavior using a 3D depth-sensing camera to understand relationships between diet and behavior. The combination of sCSDS mice with 3D behavioral analysis is a powerful method for screening ingredients in foods and farm products for antidepressant-like effects.

  7. Vitamin D3 levels and NLRP3 expression in murine models of obese asthma: association with asthma outcomes

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    J-H. Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D (25(OHD3 is an essential nutrient that plays a role in the immune system. Serum 25(OHD3 is found to be associated with asthma. However, the role of vitamin D in obese asthma remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between vitamin D levels and asthma outcomes in a murine model of obese asthma. We also evaluated NLRP3 inflammasome activity in the pathogenesis of obese asthma. We divided 20 male Balb/c mice (3–4 weeks old into 4 groups: normal control, asthma, obese, and obese asthma and developed an obese asthma mouse model. Airway hyperreactivity, cytokine concentrations, 25(OHD3 levels, NLRP3 mRNA and IL-1β mRNA expressions were measured. Lung histology and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cell count were also determined. Obese asthma mice showed a significant increase in airway hyper-responsiveness, airway inflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and NLRP3 mRNA, IL-1β mRNA expression. Both asthma and obese groups had lower 25(OHD3 levels. Vitamin D levels in obese asthma were the lowest among all groups. Vitamin D levels correlated negatively with body weight, lung resistance levels at 25 mg/mL of methacholine, total inflammatory cells, and IL-1β and IL-17 concentrations in BALF. These data demonstrated an association between serum vitamin D levels and outcomes of obese asthma, and indicated that NLRP3 inflammasome may play a role in this disorder.

  8. Low-dose hydralazine prevents fibrosis in a murine model of acute kidney injury-to-chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampe, Björn; Steinle, Ulrike; Tampe, Désirée; Carstens, Julienne L; Korsten, Peter; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M; Müller, Gerhard A; Kalluri, Raghu; Zeisberg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) are intrinsically tied syndromes. In this regard, the acutely injured kidney often does not achieve its full regenerative capacity and AKI directly transitions into progressive CKD associated with tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Underlying mechanisms of such AKI-to-CKD progression are still incompletely understood and specific therapeutic interventions are still elusive. Because epigenetic modifications play a role in maintaining tissue fibrosis, we used a murine model of ischemia-reperfusion injury to determine whether aberrant promoter methylation of RASAL1 contributes causally to the switch between physiological regeneration and tubulointerstitial fibrogenesis, a hallmark of AKI-to-CKD progression. It is known that the antihypertensive drug hydralazine has demethylating activity, and that its optimum demethylating activity occurs at concentrations below blood pressure-lowering doses. Administration of low-dose hydralazine effectively induced expression of hydroxylase TET3, which catalyzed RASAL1 hydroxymethylation and subsequent RASAL1 promoter demethylation. Hydralazine-induced CpG promoter demethylation subsequently attenuated renal fibrosis and preserved excretory renal function independent of its blood pressure-lowering effects. In comparison, RASAL1 demethylation and inhibition of tubulointerstitial fibrosis was not detected upon administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor Ramipril in this model. Thus, RASAL1 promoter methylation and subsequent transcriptional RASAL1 suppression plays a causal role in AKI-to-CKD progression. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Revertant fibers in the mdx murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: an age- and muscle-related reappraisal.

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    Sarah R Pigozzo

    Full Text Available Muscles in Duchenne dystrophy patients are characterized by the absence of dystrophin, yet transverse sections show a small percentage of fibers (termed "revertant fibers" positive for dystrophin expression. This phenomenon, whose biological bases have not been fully elucidated, is present also in the murine and canine models of DMD and can confound the evaluation of therapeutic approaches. We analyzed 11 different muscles in a cohort of 40 mdx mice, the most commonly model used in pre-clinical studies, belonging to four age groups; such number of animals allowed us to perform solid ANOVA statistical analysis. We assessed the average number of dystrophin-positive fibers, both absolute and normalized for muscle size, and the correlation between their formation and the ageing process. Our results indicate that various muscles develop different numbers of revertant fibers, with different time trends; besides, they suggest that the biological mechanism(s behind dystrophin re-expression might not be limited to the early development phases but could actually continue during adulthood. Importantly, such finding was seen also in cardiac muscle, a fact that does not fit into the current hypothesis of the clonal origin of "revertant" myonuclei from satellite cells. This work represents the largest, statistically significant analysis of revertant fibers in mdx mice so far, which can now be used as a reference point for improving the evaluation of therapeutic approaches for DMD. At the same time, it provides new clues about the formation of revertant fibers/cardiomyocytes in dystrophic skeletal and cardiac muscle.

  10. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M; Cogle, Christopher R; McFadden, Grant

    2015-07-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Establishment of new murine embryonic stem cell lines for the generation of mouse models of human genetic diseases

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    M.A. Sukoyan

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells are totipotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Recently, the development of appropriate culture conditions for the differentiation of these cells into specific cell types has permitted their use as potential therapeutic agents for several diseases. In addition, manipulation of their genome in vitro allows the creation of animal models of human genetic diseases and for the study of gene function in vivo. We report the establishment of new lines of murine embryonic stem cells from preimplantation stage embryos of 129/Sv mice. Most of these cells had a normal karyotype and an XY sex chromosome composition. The pluripotent properties of the cell lines obtained were analyzed on the basis of their alkaline phosphatase activity and their capacity to form complex embryoid bodies with rhythmically contracting cardiomyocytes. Two lines, USP-1 and USP-3, with the best in vitro characteristics of pluripotency were used in chimera-generating experiments. The capacity to contribute to the germ line was demonstrated by the USP-1 cell line. This cell line is currently being used to generate mouse models of human diseases.

  12. Lactoferrin Dampens High-Fructose Corn Syrup-Induced Hepatic Manifestations of the Metabolic Syndrome in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Chieh; Hsieh, Chang-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24816278

  13. Aqueous extracts from Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex Schult.) DC. reduce bronchial hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in a murine model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, Bruna Cestari; de Freitas Morel, Lucas Junqueira; Carmona, Fábio; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Contini, Silvia Helena Taleb; Delprete, Piero Giuseppe; Ramalho, Fernando Silva; Crevelin, Eduardo; Bertoni, Bianca Waléria; de Castro França, Suzelei; de Carvalho Borges, Marcos; Pereira, Ana Maria Soares

    2018-02-09

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. Ex Schult) DC is used by indigenous tribes in the Amazonian region of Central and South America to treat inflammation, allergies and asthma. The therapeutic properties of U. tomentosa have been attributed to the presence of tetracyclic and pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids and to phenolic acids. To characterize aqueous bark extracts (ABE) and aqueous leaf extracts (ALE) of U. tomentosa and to compare their anti-inflammatory effects. Constituents of the extracts were identified by ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Anti-inflammatory activities were assessed in vitro by exposing lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage cells (RAW264.7-Luc) to ABE, ALE and standard mitraphylline. In vivo assays were performed using a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma. OVA-sensitized animals were treated with ABE or ALE while controls received dexamethasone or saline solution. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness, production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, total and differential counts of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were determined. Mitraphylline, isomitraphylline, chlorogenic acid and quinic acid were detected in both extracts, while isorhyncophylline and rutin were detected only in ALE. ABE, ALE and mitraphylline inhibited the transcription of nuclear factor kappa-B in cell cultures, ALE and mitraphylline reduced the production of interleukin (IL)-6, and mitraphylline reduced production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Treatment with ABE and ALE at 50 and 200mgkg -1 , respectively, reduced respiratory elastance and tissue damping and elastance. ABE and ALE reduced the number of eosinophils in BAL, while ALE at 200mgkg -1 reduced the levels of IL-4 and IL-5 in the lung homogenate. Peribronchial inflammation was significantly reduced by treatment with ABE and ALE at 50 and 100mgkg -1 respectively. The results clarify for the first time the anti-inflammatory activity of U. tomentosa in a murine

  14. Metformin therapy in a hyperandrogenic anovulatory mutant murine model with polycystic ovarian syndrome characteristics improves oocyte maturity during superovulation

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    Sabatini Mary E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metformin, an oral biguanide traditionally used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, is widely used for the management of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS-related anovulation. Because of the significant prevalence of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in PCOS patients, and their putative role in ovulatory dysfunction, the use of metformin was touted as a means to improve ovulatory function and reproductive outcomes in PCOS patients. To date, there has been inconsistent evidence to demonstrate a favorable effect of metformin on oocyte quality and competence in women with PCOS. Given the heterogeneous nature of this disorder, we hypothesized that metformin may be beneficial in mice with aberrant metabolic characteristics similar to a significant number of PCOS patients. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the in vitro and in vivo effects of metformin on oocyte development and ovulatory function. Methods We utilized metformin treatment in the transgenic ob/ob and db/db mutant murine models which demonstrate metabolic and reproductive characteristics similar to women with PCOS. Results: Metformin did not improve in vitro oocyte maturation nor did it have an appreciable effect on in vitro granulosa cell luteinization (progesterone production in any genotype studied. Although both mutant strains have evidence of hyperandrogenemia, anovulation, and hyperinsulinemia, only db/db mice treated with metformin had a greater number of mature oocytes and