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Sample records for experimental meningitis models

  1. Experimental pneumococcal meningitis in mice: a model of intranasal infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenburg, P. J.; van der Poll, T.; Florquin, S.; van Deventer, S. J.; Roord, J. J.; van Furth, A. M.

    2001-01-01

    Effective laboratory animal models of bacterial meningitis are needed to unravel the pathophysiology of this disease. Previous models have failed to simulate human meningitis by using a directly intracerebral route of infection. Hyaluronidase is a virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In

  2. Noninvasive Monitoring of Pneumococcal Meningitis and Evaluation of Treatment Efficacy in an Experimental Mouse Model*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagath L. Kadurugamuwa

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive real-time in vivo bioluminescent imaging was used to assess the spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae throughout the spinal cord and brain during the acute stages of bacterial meningitis. A mouse model was established by lumbar (LP or intracisternal (IC injection of bioluminescent S. pneumoniae into the subarachnoid space. Bacteria replicated initially at the site of inoculation and spread progressively from the spinal cord to the brain or from the brain down to the cervical part of the spinal column and to the lower vertebral levels. After 24 hr, animals showed strong bioluminescent signals throughout the spinal canal, indicating acute meningitis of the intracranial and intraspinal meninges. A decline in bacterial cell viability, as judged by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal, was observed over time in animals treated with ceftriaxone, but not in untreated groups. Mice treated with the antibiotic survived infection, whereas all mice in untreated groups became moribund, first in the IC group then in the LP group. No untreated animal survived beyond 48 hr after induction of infection. Colony counts of infected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF correlated positively with bioluminescent signals. This methodology is especially appealing because it allows detecting infected mice as early as 3 hr after inoculation, provide temporal, sequential, and spatial distribution of bacteria within the brain and spinal cord throughout the entire disease process and the rapid monitoring of treatment efficacy in a nondestructive manner. Moreover, it avoids the need to sacrifice the animals for CSF sampling and the potential manipulative damage that can occur with other conventional methods.

  3. Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningitis - bacterial; Meningitis - viral; Meningitis - fungal; Meningitis - vaccine ... treatment, meningitis may result in the following: Brain damage Buildup ... that leads to brain swelling ( hydrocephalus ) Seizures Death

  4. Some pathogenetic aspects of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in acute period

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    V. V. Pilipenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphological displays of cerebral microcirculation derangements in a brain cortex with their semiquantitative estimation have been studied in experimental mice model of the first 24-72 hours period of pneumococcal meningitis.Also displays oxidative stress and activity antioxidative protectional system by means of definition of markers of these processes – malondialdehide, reduced glutathione and glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase activity have been investigated. The received results testify to morphological signs of the expressed derangements of cerebral microcirculation in a brain cortex already by first 24 hour of an experimental meningitis. The maximum expressiveness oxidative stress and activity antioxidative protectional system of reduced glutathione with the max activity of glucose-6-phosphatedehydrogenase in a mice brain cortex was noted at first 48hour durations of experimental disease. Signs of irreversible changes of mice cortex neurons are not revealed at 24–72-hour duration of experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

  5. Bacteremia causes hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Leib, S.L.; Rowland, Ian J

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bacteremia and systemic complications both play important roles in brain pathophysiological alterations and the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. Their individual contributions to the development of brain damage, however, still remain to be defined. METHODS: Using an adult...... rat pneumococcal meningitis model, the impact of bacteremia accompanying meningitis on the development of hippocampal injury was studied. The study comprised of the three groups: I. Meningitis (n=11), II. meningitis with attenuated bacteremia resulting from iv injection of serotype......-specific pneumococcal antibodies (n=14), and III. uninfected controls (n=6). RESULTS: Pneumococcal meningitis resulted in a significantly higher apoptosis score 0.22 (0.18-0.35) compared to uninfected controls (0.02 (0.00-0.02), Mann Whitney test, P=0.0003). Also, meningitis with an attenuation of bacteremia...

  6. Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around. Even more protection is given by the meninges (say: muh-NIN-jeez), which are the membranes ... disease involving inflammation (swelling), or irritation, of the meninges. There are different kinds of meningitis, but most ...

  7. Systemic steroid reduces long-term hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have...... generated conflicting results. The objective of the present study was to determine whether systemic steroid treatment had an effect on hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis.......Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have...

  8. Experimental bacterial meningitis in rabbit; evaluation with CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chu, Sung Nam; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chung, Hyon De

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in experimental bacterial meningitis. CT and MR images of experimental bacterial meningitis were obtained after inoculation of 1ml suspension of 10-6/ml Staphylococcus aureus directly into the supratentorial arachnoid space of 18 New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal was studied with both pre-enhanced and post-enhanced CT and MRI at 12, 24, 48 hours and 1 week. Cerebrospinal fluid of all of 18 rabbits were sampled and cultured for bacterial growth. All of 18 rabbits had the clinical symptoms such as neck stiffness and anorexia within 24 hours after the inoculation. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus growth. Gd-enhanced MRI exhibited diffuse enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement ratio(CER) at supratentorial meninges increased to 1.93 at 12 hours and 2.99 at 24 hours from 1.06 at 0 hour. Histologic evaluation demonstrated inflammatory cell infiltration into the meninges. MRI also identified the complications of meningitis such as ependymitis and hydrocephalus more effectively than CT. These results indicated that Fd-enhanced MRI detectred earlier the abnormal findingfs of bacterial meningitis and evaluated more effectively the complications of meningitis compared with CT. MRI was more useful than CT in evaluation of the bacterial meningitis

  9. Experimental bacterial meningitis in rabbit; evaluation with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chu, Sung Nam; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in experimental bacterial meningitis. CT and MR images of experimental bacterial meningitis were obtained after inoculation of 1ml suspension of 10-6/ml Staphylococcus aureus directly into the supratentorial arachnoid space of 18 New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal was studied with both pre-enhanced and post-enhanced CT and MRI at 12, 24, 48 hours and 1 week. Cerebrospinal fluid of all of 18 rabbits were sampled and cultured for bacterial growth. All of 18 rabbits had the clinical symptoms such as neck stiffness and anorexia within 24 hours after the inoculation. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus growth. Gd-enhanced MRI exhibited diffuse enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement ratio(CER) at supratentorial meninges increased to 1.93 at 12 hours and 2.99 at 24 hours from 1.06 at 0 hour. Histologic evaluation demonstrated inflammatory cell infiltration into the meninges. MRI also identified the complications of meningitis such as ependymitis and hydrocephalus more effectively than CT. These results indicated that Fd-enhanced MRI detectred earlier the abnormal findingfs of bacterial meningitis and evaluated more effectively the complications of meningitis compared with CT. MRI was more useful than CT in evaluation of the bacterial meningitis.

  10. Environmental enrichment restores cognitive deficits induced by experimental childhood meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barichello

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of environmental enrichment (EE on memory, cytokines, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the brain of adult rats subjected to experimental pneumococcal meningitis during infancy. Methods: On postnatal day 11, the animals received either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF or Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension intracisternally at 1 × 106 CFU/mL and remained with their mothers until age 21 days. Animals were divided into the following groups: control, control + EE, meningitis, and meningitis + EE. EE began at 21 days and continued until 60 days of age (adulthood. EE consisted of a large cage with three floors, ramps, running wheels, and objects of different shapes and textures. At 60 days, animals were randomized and subjected to habituation to the open-field task and the step-down inhibitory avoidance task. After the tasks, the hippocampus and CSF were isolated for analysis. Results: The meningitis group showed no difference in performance between training and test sessions of the open-field task, suggesting habituation memory impairment; in the meningitis + EE group, performance was significantly different, showing preservation of habituation memory. In the step-down inhibitory avoidance task, there were no differences in behavior between training and test sessions in the meningitis group, showing aversive memory impairment; conversely, differences were observed in the meningitis + EE group, demonstrating aversive memory preservation. In the two meningitis groups, IL-4, IL-10, and BDNF levels were increased in the hippocampus, and BDNF levels in the CSF. Conclusions: The data presented suggest that EE, a non-invasive therapy, enables recovery from memory deficits caused by neonatal meningitis.

  11. Systemic steroid reduces long-term hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have...... generated conflicting results. The objective of the present study was to determine whether systemic steroid treatment had an effect on hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis....

  12. Impact of bacteremia on the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Holm, David; Liptrot, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteremia plays a major role in the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. This experimental study investigated how bacteremia influences the pathophysiologic profile of the brain. METHODS: Rats with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis were randomized to 1 of 3 groups of infected study...... rats: (1) rats with attenuated bacteremia resulting from intravenous injection of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody, (2) rats with early-onset bacteremia resulting from concomitant intravenous infection, or (3) a meningitis control group. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, ventricle size......, brain water distribution, and brain pathologic findings were analyzed using magnetic resonance morphological and functional imaging. Laboratory data and clinical disease scores were obtained. RESULTS: Attenuation of the bacteremic component of pneumococcal meningitis improved clinical disease symptoms...

  13. Does Spinal Block Through Tattooed Skin Cause Histological Changes in Nervous Tissue and Meninges?: An Experimental Model in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Isabela Leite; Barros, Guilherme Antônio Moreira de; Ferreira Neto, Patrícia Gomes; Solanki, Daneshivari; Marques, Mariângela Alencar; Machado, Vânia Maria de Vasconcelos; Cabral, Lucas Wynne; Lima, Rodrigo Moreira E; Vianna, Pedro Thadeu Galvão; Navarro, Lais Helena Camacho; Ganen, Eliana Marisa

    2015-01-01

    Although there is no documented evidence that tattoo pigments can cause neurological complications, the implications of performing neuraxial anesthesia through tattooed skin are unknown. In this study, we aimed to assess whether spinal puncture performed through tattooed skin of rabbits determines changes over the spinal cord and meninges. In addition, we sought to evaluate the presence of ink fragments entrapped in spinal needles. Thirty-six young male adult rabbits, each weighing between 3400 and 3900 g and having a spine length between 38.5 and 39 cm, were divided by lot into 3 groups as follows: GI, spinal puncture through tattooed skin; GII, spinal puncture through tattooed skin and saline injection; and GIII, spinal puncture through skin free of tattoo and saline injection. After intravenous anesthesia with ketamine and xylazine, the subarachnoid space was punctured at S1-S2 under ultrasound guidance with a 22-gauge 2½ Quincke needle. Animals in GII and GIII received 5 μL/cm of spinal length (0.2 mL) of saline intrathecally. In GI, the needle tip was placed into the yellow ligament, and no solution was injected into the intrathecal space; after tattooed skin puncture, 1 mL of saline was injected through the needle over a histological slide to prepare a smear that was dyed by the Giemsa method to enable tissue identification if present. All animals remained in captivity for 21 days under medical observation and were killed by decapitation. The lumbosacral spinal cord portion was removed for histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin stain. None of the animals had impaired motor function or decreased nociception during the period of clinical observation. None of the animals from the control group (GIII) showed signs of injuries to meninges. In GII, however, 4 animals presented with signs of meningeal injury. The main histological changes observed were focal areas of perivascular lymphoplasmacyte infiltration in the pia mater and arachnoid. There was no

  14. Genome-wide identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae genes essential for bacterial replication during experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molzen, T E; Burghout, P; Bootsma, H J

    2010-01-01

    Meningitis is the most serious of invasive infections caused by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Vaccines protect only against a limited number of serotypes, and evolving bacterial resistance to antimicrobials impedes treatment. Further insight into the molecular pathogenesis...... as targets for future therapy and prevention of pneumococcal meningitis, since their mutants were attenuated in both models of infection as well as in competitive growth in human cerebrospinal fluid in vitro.......Meningitis is the most serious of invasive infections caused by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Vaccines protect only against a limited number of serotypes, and evolving bacterial resistance to antimicrobials impedes treatment. Further insight into the molecular pathogenesis...... genes mutants of which had become attenuated or enriched, respectively, during infection. The results point to essential roles for capsular polysaccharides, nutrient uptake, and amino acid biosynthesis in bacterial replication during experimental meningitis. The GAF phenotype of a subset of identified...

  15. Characterization of a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model

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    Mook-Kanamori Barry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. pneumoniae is the most common causative agent of meningitis, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to develop an integrated and representative pneumococcal meningitis mouse model resembling the human situation. Methods Adult mice (C57BL/6 were inoculated in the cisterna magna with increasing doses of S. pneumoniae serotype 3 colony forming units (CFU; n = 24, 104, 105, 106 and 107 CFU and survival studies were performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, brain, blood, spleen, and lungs were collected. Subsequently, mice were inoculated with 104 CFU S. pneumoniae serotype 3 and sacrificed at 6 (n = 6 and 30 hours (n = 6. Outcome parameters were bacterial outgrowth, clinical score, and cytokine and chemokine levels (using Luminex® in CSF, blood and brain. Meningeal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, parenchymal and subarachnoidal hemorrhages, microglial activation and hippocampal apoptosis were assessed in histopathological studies. Results Lower doses of bacteria delayed onset of illness and time of death (median survival CFU 104, 56 hrs; 105, 38 hrs, 106, 28 hrs. 107, 24 hrs. Bacterial titers in brain and CSF were similar in all mice at the end-stage of disease independent of inoculation dose, though bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment was less at lower inoculation doses. At 30 hours after inoculation with 104 CFU of S. pneumoniae, blood levels of KC, IL6, MIP-2 and IFN- γ were elevated, as were brain homogenate levels of KC, MIP-2, IL-6, IL-1β and RANTES. Brain histology uniformly showed meningeal inflammation at 6 hours, and, neutrophil infiltration, microglial activation, and hippocampal apoptosis at 30 hours. Parenchymal and subarachnoidal and cortical hemorrhages were seen in 5 of 6 and 3 of 6 mice at 6 and 30 hours, respectively. Conclusion We have developed and validated a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  16. Meningitis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-24

    This podcast gives a general overview of meningitis, including what it is, the five types, and the causes.  Created: 10/24/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/24/2012.

  17. Increase in hippocampal water diffusion and volume during experimental pneumococcal meningitis is aggravated by bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon G; Brandt, Christian T; Leib, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hippocampus undergoes apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis leading to neurofunctional deficits in learning and memory function. The aim of the present study was 1) to investigate hippocampal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and volume with MRI during the course...... and the volume and size of brain ventricles were positively correlated (Spearman Rank, p volume and the extent of apoptosis (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In experimental meningitis increase in volume and water diffusion of the hippocampus are significantly...... of experimental pneumococcal meningitis, 2) to explore the influence of accompanying bacteremia on hippocampal water distribution and volume, 3) and to correlate these findings to the extent of apoptosis in the hippocampus. METHODS: Experimental meningitis in rats was induced by intracisternal injection of live...

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor reduces inflammation and hippocampal apoptosis in experimental Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Danfeng; Lian, Di; Wu, Jing; Liu, Ying; Zhu, Mingjie; Sun, Jiaming; He, Dake; Li, Ling

    2017-08-04

    Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis is a serious inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The inflammatory processes initiated by recognition of bacterial components contribute to apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has long been recommended for the treatment of CNS diseases due to its powerful neuro-survival properties, as well as its recently reported anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of BDNF-related signaling on the inflammatory response and hippocampal apoptosis in experimental models of pneumococcal meningitis. Pretreatment with exogenous BDNF or the tropomyosin-receptor kinase B (TrkB) inhibitor k252a was performed to assess the activation or inhibition of the BDNF/TrkB-signaling axis prior to intracisternal infection with live S. pneumoniae. At 24 h post-infection, rats were assessed for clinical severity and sacrificed to harvest the brains. Paraffin-embedded brain sections underwent hematoxylin and eosin staining to evaluate pathological severity, and cytokine and chemokine levels in the hippocampus and cortex were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, apoptotic neurons were detected in the hippocampal dentate gyrus by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-nick-end labeling, key molecules associated with the related signaling pathway were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot, and the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Rats administered BDNF exhibited reduced clinical impairment, pathological severity, and hippocampal apoptosis. Furthermore, BDNF pretreatment suppressed the expression of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6, and increased the expression of the anti

  19. The role of perivascular and meningeal macrophages in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polfliet, Machteld M. J.; van de Veerdonk, F.; Döpp, Ed A.; van Kesteren-Hendrikx, Esther M. L.; van Rooijen, Nico; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2002-01-01

    The perivascular (PVM) and meningeal (MM) macrophages constitute a major population of resident macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS). To investigate a possible role of PVM and MM during CNS inflammation, we have analysed PVM and MM during experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an

  20. Mathematical Modelling of Bacterial Meningitis Transmission Dynamics with Control Measures

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    Joshua Kiddy K. Asamoah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination and treatment are the most effective ways of controlling the transmission of most infectious diseases. While vaccination helps susceptible individuals to build either a long-term immunity or short-term immunity, treatment reduces the number of disease-induced deaths and the number of infectious individuals in a community/nation. In this paper, a nonlinear deterministic model with time-dependent controls has been proposed to describe the dynamics of bacterial meningitis in a population. The model is shown to exhibit a unique globally asymptotically stable disease-free equilibrium E0, when the effective reproduction number RVT≤1, and a globally asymptotically stable endemic equilibrium E1, when RVT>1; and it exhibits a transcritical bifurcation at RVT=1. Carriers have been shown (by Tornado plot to have a higher chance of spreading the infection than those with clinical symptoms who will sometimes be bound to bed during the acute phase of the infection. In order to find the best strategy for minimizing the number of carriers and ill individuals and the cost of control implementation, an optimal control problem is set up by defining a Lagrangian function L to be minimized subject to the proposed model. Numerical simulation of the optimal problem demonstrates that the best strategy to control bacterial meningitis is to combine vaccination with other interventions (such as treatment and public health education. Additionally, this research suggests that stakeholders should press hard for the production of existing/new vaccines and antibiotics and their disbursement to areas that are most affected by bacterial meningitis, especially Sub-Saharan Africa; furthermore, individuals who live in communities where the environment is relatively warm (hot/moisture are advised to go for vaccination against bacterial meningitis.

  1. Evaluation of anti-pneumococcal capsular antibodies as adjunctive therapy in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian; Frimodt-Moller, N; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bacteraemia concomitant with meningitis has been shown to greatly affect outcome. Consequently, the efficacy of serotype-specific anti-pneumococcal antiserum (APAS) was investigated in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. METHODS: Rats were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae...... serotype 3. All rats received ceftriaxone starting 26 h post-infection. APAS was administered either at the time of infection or 26 h post-infection and effects were compared with rats treated with antibiotics only. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A significant clinical benefit was found when APAS was given...... at the time of infection whereas no effect was found when administered 26 h after infection. This work indicates that the clinical value of using APAS in pneumococcal meningitis may be limited...

  2. Hearing loss and cochlear damage in experimental pneumococcal meningitis, with special reference to the role of neutrophil granulytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, CT; Caye-Thomsen, P; Lund, SP

    2006-01-01

    of an augmented neutrophil response on the development of hearing loss and cochlear damage in a model of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rats. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and histopathology in rats...... infection. Pretreatment with G-CSF increased hearing loss 24 h after infection and on day 8 compared to untreated rats (Mann-Whitney, P = 0.012 and P = 0.013 respectively). The increased sensorineural hearing loss at day 8 was associated with significantly decreased spiral ganglion cell counts (P = 0...

  3. Therapeutic Efficacy of Meropenem for Treatment of Experimental Penicillin-Resistant Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Woo; Jin, Joung Hwa; Kang, Soo Jung; Jung, Sook-In; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Kim, Choon-Kwan; Lee, Hyuck; Oh, Won Sup; Kim, Sungmin; Peck, Kyong Ran

    2004-01-01

    With the widespread emergence of antimicrobial resistance, combination regimens of ceftriaxone and vancomycin (C+V) or ceftriaxone and rifampin (C+R) are recommended for empirical treatment of pneumococcal meningitis. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of meropenem (M), we compared various treatment regimens in arabbit model of meningitis caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP). Therapeutic efficacy was also evaluated by the final bacterial concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at 24 hr. Each group consisted of six rabbits. C+V cleared the CSF at 10 hr, but regrowth was noted in 3 rabbits at 24 hr. Meropenem monotherapy resulted in sterilization at 10 hr, but regrowth was observed in all 6 rabbits at 24 hr. M+V also resulted in sterilization at 10 hr, but regrowth was observed in 2 rabbits at 24 hr. M+V was superior to the meropenem monotherapy at 24 hr (reduction of 4.8 vs. 1.8 log10 cfu/mL, respectively; p=0.003). The therapeutic efficacy of M+V was comparable to that of C+V (reduction of 4.8 vs. 4.0 log10 cfu/mL, respectively; p=0.054). The meropenem monotherapy may not be a suitable choice for PRSP meningitis, while combination of meropenem and vancomycin could be a possible alternative in the treatment of PRSP meningitis. PMID:14966336

  4. Intratympanic steroid prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis: Intratympanic steroid treatment prevents hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. Background: Sensorineural hearing loss is a long-term complication of meningitis affecting up to a third of survivors. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the bacterial species...... for 3 days. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem response at 16 kHz, and spiral ganglion neuron density. Results: Fifty-six days after infection, auditory brainstem response showed no significant differences between groups...... in the spiral ganglion compared with both intratympanic and systemic saline (p = 0.0082 and p = 0.0089; Mann-Whitney test). Histology revealed fibrosis of the tympanic membrane and cavity in steroid-treated animals, which plausibly caused the low-frequency hearing loss. Conclusion: Intratympanic betamethasone...

  5. Modeling tuberculous meningitis in zebrafish using Mycobacterium marinum

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    Lisanne M. van Leeuwen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is one of the most severe extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis, with a high morbidity and mortality. Characteristic pathological features of TBM are Rich foci, i.e. brain- and spinal-cord-specific granulomas formed after hematogenous spread of pulmonary tuberculosis. Little is known about the early pathogenesis of TBM and the role of Rich foci. We have adapted the zebrafish model of Mycobacterium marinum infection (zebrafish–M. marinum model to study TBM. First, we analyzed whether TBM occurs in adult zebrafish and showed that intraperitoneal infection resulted in granuloma formation in the meninges in 20% of the cases, with occasional brain parenchyma involvement. In zebrafish embryos, bacterial infiltration and clustering of infected phagocytes was observed after infection at three different inoculation sites: parenchyma, hindbrain ventricle and caudal vein. Infection via the bloodstream resulted in the formation of early granulomas in brain tissue in 70% of the cases. In these zebrafish embryos, infiltrates were located in the proximity of blood vessels. Interestingly, no differences were observed when embryos were infected before or after early formation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, indicating that bacteria are able to cross this barrier with relatively high efficiency. In agreement with this observation, infected zebrafish larvae also showed infiltration of the brain tissue. Upon infection of embryos with an M. marinum ESX-1 mutant, only small clusters and scattered isolated phagocytes with high bacterial loads were present in the brain tissue. In conclusion, our adapted zebrafish–M. marinum infection model for studying granuloma formation in the brain will allow for the detailed analysis of both bacterial and host factors involved in TBM. It will help solve longstanding questions on the role of Rich foci and potentially contribute to the development of better diagnostic tools and therapeutics.

  6. In vivo study of experimental pneumococcal meningitis using magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østergaard Christian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI methods were evaluated as a tool for the study of experimental meningitis. The identification and characterisation of pathophysiological parameters that vary during the course of the disease could be used as markers for future studies of new treatment strategies. Methods Rats infected intracisternally with S. pneumoniae (n = 29 or saline (n = 13 were randomized for imaging at 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 42 or 48 hours after infection. T1W, T2W, quantitative diffusion, and post contrast T1W images were acquired at 4.7 T. Dynamic MRI (dMRI was used to evaluate blood-brain-barrier (BBB permeability and to obtain a measure of cerebral and muscle perfusion. Clinical- and motor scores, bacterial counts in CSF and blood, and WBC counts in CSF were measured. Results MR images and dMRI revealed the development of a highly significant increase in BBB permeability (P Changes in brain water distribution, assessed by ADC, and categorization of brain 'perfusion' by cortex ΔSI(bolus were subject to increased inter-rat variation as the disease progressed, but without overall differences compared to uninfected rats (P > 0.05. Areas of well-'perfused' muscle decreased with the progression of infection indicative of septicaemia (P = 0.05. Conclusion The evolution of bacterial meningitis was successfully followed in-vivo with MRI. Increasing BBB-breakdown and ventricle size was observed in rats with meningitis whereas changes in brain water distribution were heterogeneous. MRI will be a valuable technique for future studies aiming at evaluating or optimizing adjunctive treatments

  7. In vivo study of experimental pneumococcal meningitis using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Christian T; Simonsen, Helle; Liptrot, Matthew; Søgaard, Lise V; Lundgren, Jens D; Østergaard, Christian; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Rowland, Ian J

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods were evaluated as a tool for the study of experimental meningitis. The identification and characterisation of pathophysiological parameters that vary during the course of the disease could be used as markers for future studies of new treatment strategies. Rats infected intracisternally with S. pneumoniae (n = 29) or saline (n = 13) were randomized for imaging at 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 42 or 48 hours after infection. T1W, T2W, quantitative diffusion, and post contrast T1W images were acquired at 4.7 T. Dynamic MRI (dMRI) was used to evaluate blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability and to obtain a measure of cerebral and muscle perfusion. Clinical- and motor scores, bacterial counts in CSF and blood, and WBC counts in CSF were measured. MR images and dMRI revealed the development of a highly significant increase in BBB permeability (P < 0.002) and ventricle size (P < 0.0001) among infected rats. Clinical disease severity was closely related to ventricle expansion (P = 0.024). Changes in brain water distribution, assessed by ADC, and categorization of brain 'perfusion' by cortex ΔSI (bolus) were subject to increased inter-rat variation as the disease progressed, but without overall differences compared to uninfected rats (P > 0.05). Areas of well-'perfused' muscle decreased with the progression of infection indicative of septicaemia (P = 0.05). The evolution of bacterial meningitis was successfully followed in-vivo with MRI. Increasing BBB-breakdown and ventricle size was observed in rats with meningitis whereas changes in brain water distribution were heterogeneous. MRI will be a valuable technique for future studies aiming at evaluating or optimizing adjunctive treatments

  8. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococcal meningitis; Pneumococcus - meningitis ... Pneumococcal meningitis is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria (also called pneumococcus, or S pneumoniae ). This type of bacteria is the ...

  9. Cerebral Metabolic Changes Related to Oxidative Metabolism in a Model of Bacterial Meningitis Induced by Lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Michael; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Larsen, Lykke

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction is prominent in the pathophysiology of severe bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we hypothesize that the metabolic changes seen after intracisternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection in a piglet model of meningitis is compatible...... with mitochondrial dysfunction and resembles the metabolic patterns seen in patients with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Eight pigs received LPS injection in cisterna magna, and four pigs received NaCl in cisterna magna as a control. Biochemical variables related to energy metabolism were monitored by intracerebral...... dysfunction with increasing cerebral LPR due to increased lactate and normal pyruvate, PbtO2, and ICP. The metabolic pattern resembles the one observed in patients with bacterial meningitis. Metabolic monitoring in these patients is feasible to monitor for cerebral metabolic derangements otherwise missed...

  10. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2005-01-01

    , blocking leukocyte entry to the central nervous system in experimental pneumococcal meningitis compromises the survival prognosis but does not affect the risk of brain damage or level of infection in this compartment. Conversely, poorer prognosis was associated with an increase in bacterial load in blood......The role of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the evolution of the pathophysiological changes that occur in bacterial meningitis is unclear. Here, we investigate how leukocyte recruitment to the CSF, modulated by the leukocyte blocker fucoidin, affects the extent of brain......, suggesting that leukocyte blockage affects the host's ability to control systemic infection....

  11. In vivo study of experimental pneumococcal meningitis using magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.T.; Simonsen, H.; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2008-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods were evaluated as a tool for the study of experimental meningitis. The identification and characterisation of pathophysiological parameters that vary during the course of the disease could be used as markers for future studies of new treatment...... strategies. Methods: Rats infected intracisternally with S. pneumoniae (n = 29) or saline (n = 13) were randomized for imaging at 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 42 or 48 hours after infection. T1W, T2W, quantitative diffusion, and post contrast T1W images were acquired at 4.7 T. Dynamic MRI (dMRI) was used to evaluate...... blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability and to obtain a measure of cerebral and muscle perfusion. Clinical- and motor scores, bacterial counts in CSF and blood, and WBC counts in CSF were measured. Results: MR images and dMRI revealed the development of a highly significant increase in BBB permeability...

  12. Modeling tuberculous meningitis in zebrafish using Mycobacterium marinum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, L.M.; van der Kuip, M.; Youssef, S.A.; de Bruin, A.; Bitter, W.; van Furth, A.M.; van der Sar, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is one of the most severe extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis, with a high morbidity and mortality. Characteristic pathological features of TBM are Rich foci, i.e. brain- and spinal-cord-specific granulomas formed after hematogenous spread of pulmonary

  13. Routes, dynamics, and correlates of cochlear inflammation in terminal and recovering experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Worsøe, Lise; Brandt, Christian Thomas

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To examine the routes, dynamics and correlates of cochlear inflammation in meningitis to provide information on the pathogenesis of the associated hearing loss and indications for rational pharmacotherapeutical intervention. STUDY DESIGN: A well-established rat model...... with inflammatory cells via cochlear aqueduct, whereas the endolymphatic space was infiltrated from the spiral ligament. Rosenthal's canal was infiltrated through osseous spiral lamina canaliculi. In the untreated group, the degree of inflammation correlated with time of death, whereas antibiotic treatment reversed...... this development. Perilymphatic inflammation correlated significantly with the CSF leukocyte count, whereas endolymphatic inflammation correlated with spiral ligament inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: Meningogenic inflammation of the rat cochlea occurs via the cochlear aqueduct and the spiral ligament capillary bed...

  14. Prevention of Memory Impairment and Neurotrophic Factors Increased by Lithium in Wistar Rats Submitted to Pneumococcal Meningitis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutiana R. Simões

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lithium on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF expression in the hippocampus and on memory in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. The mood-stabilizer lithium is known as a neuroprotective agent with many effects on the brain. In this study, animals received either artificial cerebrospinal fluid or Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at a concentration of 5 × 109 CFU/mL. Eighteen hours after induction, all animals received ceftriaxone. The animals received saline or lithium (47.5 mg/kg or tamoxifen (1 mg/kg as adjuvant treatment, and they were separated into six groups: control/saline, control/lithium, control/tamoxifen, meningitis/saline, meningitis/lithium, and meningitis/tamoxifen. Ten days after meningitis induction, animals were subjected to open-field habituation and the step-down inhibitory avoidance tasks. Immediately after these tasks, the animals were killed and their hippocampus was removed to evaluate the expression of BDNF, NGF, and GDNF. In the meningitis group, treatment with lithium and tamoxifen resulted in improvement in memory. Meningitis group showed decreased expression of BDNF and GDNF in the hippocampus while lithium reestablished the neurotrophin expression. Lithium was able to prevent memory impairment and reestablishes hippocampal neurotrophin expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

  15. Addition of host genetic variants in a prediction rule for post meningitis hearing loss in childhood: a model updating study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Marieke S.; de Jonge, Rogier C. J.; Terwee, Caroline B.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Koomen, Irene; Ouburg, Sander; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Morré, Servaas A.; van Furth, A. Marceline

    2013-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common sequela in survivors of bacterial meningitis (BM). In the past we developed a validated prediction model to identify children at risk for post-meningitis hearing loss. It is known that host genetic variations, besides clinical factors, contribute to

  16. Meningitis - meningococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal meningitis; Gram negative - meningococcus ... Meningococcal meningitis is caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis (also known as meningococcus). Meningococcus is the most common cause ...

  17. Evaluation of fusidic acid in therapy of experimental Staphylococcus aureus meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian; Yieng-Kow, Runa Vavia; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl

    2003-01-01

    Combination therapy that includes fusidic acid, an antimicrobial agent highly active against staphylococci, has been recommended in the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus meningitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic, CSF bactericidal and anti-inflammatory pr...

  18. Enhanced attenuation of meningeal inflammation and brain edema by concomitant administration of anti-CD18 monoclonal antibodies and dexamethasone in experimental Haemophilus meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Llorens, X; Jafari, H S; Severien, C; Parras, F; Olsen, K D; Hansen, E J; Singer, I I; McCracken, G H

    1991-12-01

    Antiinflammatory therapy has been shown to reduce the adverse pathophysiological consequences that occur in bacterial meningitis and to improve outcome from disease. In the present study, modulation of two principal steps of the meningeal inflammatory cascade was accomplished by concomitant administration of dexamethasone to diminish overproduction of cytokines in response to a bacterial stimulus and of a monoclonal antibody directed against adhesion-promoting receptors on leukocytes to inhibit recruitment of white blood cells into the subarachnoid space. Dexamethasone and antibody therapy produced a marked attenuation of all indices of meningeal inflammation and reduction of brain water accumulation after H. influenzae-induced meningitis in rabbits compared with results of each agent given alone and of untreated animals. In addition, the enhanced host's meningeal inflammatory reaction that follows antibiotic-induced bacterial lysis was profoundly ameliorated when dual therapy was administered without affecting clearance rates of bacteria from cerebrospinal fluid and vascular compartments. The combination of both therapeutic approaches may offer a promising mode of treatment to improve further the outcome from bacterial meningitis.

  19. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Suppresses Meningitic E. coli K1 Penetration across Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells In Vitro and Protects Neonatal Rats against Experimental Hematogenous Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-He Huang; Lina He; Yanhong Zhou; Chun-Hua Wu; Ambrose Jong

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine prophylactic efficacy of probiotics in neonatal sepsis and meningitis caused by E. coli K1. The potential inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on meningitic E. coli K1 infection was examined by using (i) in vitro inhibition assays with E44 (a CSF isolate from a newborn baby with E. coli meningitis), and (ii) the neonatal rat model of E. coli sepsis and meningitis. The in vitro studies demonstrated that LGG blocked E44 adhesion, invasio...

  20. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  1. Fungal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Fungal Meningitis Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... the brain or spinal cord. Investigation of Fungal Meningitis, 2012 In September 2012, the Centers for Disease ...

  2. Linkages between observed, modeled Saharan dust loading and meningitis in Senegal during 2012 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diokhane, Aminata Mbow; Jenkins, Gregory S.; Manga, Noel; Drame, Mamadou S.; Mbodji, Boubacar

    2016-04-01

    The Sahara desert transports large quantities of dust over the Sahelian region during the Northern Hemisphere winter and spring seasons (December-April). In episodic events, high dust concentrations are found at the surface, negatively impacting respiratory health. Bacterial meningitis in particular is known to affect populations that live in the Sahelian zones, which is otherwise known as the meningitis belt. During the winter and spring of 2012, suspected meningitis cases (SMCs) were with three times higher than in 2013. We show higher surface particular matter concentrations at Dakar, Senegal and elevated atmospheric dust loading in Senegal for the period of 1 January-31 May during 2012 relative to 2013. We analyze simulated particulate matter over Senegal from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model during 2012 and 2013. The results show higher simulated dust concentrations during the winter season of 2012 for Senegal. The WRF model correctly captures the large dust events from 1 January-31 March but has shown less skill during April and May for simulated dust concentrations. The results also show that the boundary conditions are the key feature for correctly simulating large dust events and initial conditions are less important.

  3. Meningitis - H. influenzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. influenzae meningitis; H. flu meningitis; Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis ... H. influenzae meningitis is caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria. This illness is not the same ...

  4. Possible impact of climate change on meningitis in northwest Nigeria: an assessment using CMIP5 climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdussalam, Auwal; Monaghan, Andrew; Steinhoff, Daniel; Dukic, Vanja; Hayden, Mary; Hopson, Thomas; Thornes, John; Leckebusch, Gregor

    2014-05-01

    Meningitis remains a major health burden throughout Sahelian Africa, especially in heavily-populated northwest Nigeria. Cases exhibit strong sensitivity to intra- and inter-annual climate variability, peaking during the hot and dry boreal spring months, raising concern that future climate change may increase the incidence of meningitis in the region. The impact of future climate change on meningitis risk in northwest Nigeria is assessed by forcing an empirical model of meningitis with monthly simulations from an ensemble of thirteen statistically downscaled global climate model projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Experiment Phase 5 (CMIP5) for RCPs 2.6, 6.0 and 8.5 scenarios. The results suggest future temperature increases due to climate change has the potential to significantly increase meningitis cases in both the early and late 21st century, and to increase the length of the meningitis season in the late century. March cases may increase from 23 per 100,000 people for present day (1990-2005), to 29-30 per 100,000 (p<0.01) in the early century (2020-2035) and 31-42 per 100,000 (p<0.01) in the late century (2060-2075), the range being dependent on the emissions scenario. It is noteworthy that these results represent the climatological potential for increased cases due to climate change, as we assume current prevention and treatment strategies remain similar in the future.

  5. Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid reveals a predictive model for differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis, and novel putative therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Meningitis is the inflammation of the meninges in response to infection or chemical agents. While aseptic meningitis, most frequently caused by enteroviruses, is usually benign with a self-limiting course, bacterial meningitis remains associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, despite advances in antimicrobial therapy and intensive care. Fast and accurate differential diagnosis is crucial for assertive choice of the appropriate therapeutic approach for each form of meningitis. Methods We used 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry to identify the cerebrospinal fluid proteome specifically related to the host response to pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis. The disease-specific proteome signatures were inspected by pathway analysis. Results Unique cerebrospinal fluid proteome signatures were found to the three aetiological forms of meningitis investigated, and a qualitative predictive model with four protein markers was developed for the differential diagnosis of these diseases. Nevertheless, pathway analysis of the disease-specific proteomes unveiled that Kallikrein-kinin system may play a crucial role in the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. Proteins taking part in this cellular process are proposed as putative targets to novel adjunctive therapies. Conclusions Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid disclosed candidate biomarkers, which were combined in a qualitative and sequential predictive model with potential to improve the differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal and enteroviral meningitis. Moreover, we present the first evidence of the possible implication of Kallikrein-kinin system in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. PMID:26040285

  6. Adjunctive Corticosteroids in Adults with Bacterial Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; de Gans, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a complex disorder in which neurologic injury is caused, in part, by the causative organism and, in part, by the host's own inflammatory response. In studies of experimental bacterial meningitis, adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids, specifically dexamethasone, has

  7. Meningitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is Meningitis? Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, the membranes that cover the brain and spinal ... of bacterial meningitis, the bacteria spread to the meninges from a severe head trauma or a severe ...

  8. Recurrent Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jon; Galen, Benjamin T

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent meningitis is a rare clinical scenario that can be self-limiting or life threatening depending on the underlying etiology. This review describes the causes, risk factors, treatment, and prognosis for recurrent meningitis. As a general overview of a broad topic, the aim of this review is to provide clinicians with a comprehensive differential diagnosis to aide in the evaluation and management of a patient with recurrent meningitis. New developments related to understanding the pathophysiology of recurrent meningitis are as scarce as studies evaluating the treatment and prevention of this rare disorder. A trial evaluating oral valacyclovir suppression after HSV-2 meningitis did not demonstrate a benefit in preventing recurrences. The data on prophylactic antibiotics after basilar skull fractures do not support their use. Intrathecal trastuzumab has shown promise in treating leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from HER-2 positive breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases are new potential causes of drug-induced aseptic meningitis. Despite their potential for causing recurrent meningitis, the clinical entities reviewed herein are not frequently discussed together given that they are a heterogeneous collection of unrelated, rare diseases. Epidemiologic data on recurrent meningitis are lacking. The syndrome of recurrent benign lymphocytic meningitis described by Mollaret in 1944 was later found to be closely related to HSV-2 reactivation, but HSV-2 is by no means the only etiology of recurrent aseptic meningitis. While the mainstay of treatment for recurrent meningitis is supportive care, it is paramount to ensure that reversible and treatable causes have been addressed for further prevention.

  9. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningitis - syphilitic; Neurosyphilis - syphilitic meningitis ... Syphilitic meningitis is a form of neurosyphilis . This condition is a life-threatening complication of syphilis infection. Syphilis is ...

  10. Viral Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better from treatment such as an antiviral medicine. Antibiotics do not help viral infections, so they are not useful in the treatment of viral meningitis. However, antibiotics do fight bacteria, so they are very important ...

  11. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certain places, such as: The meningitis belt in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly during the dry season Mecca during the ... a serious Hib infection Your doctor or local health department will tell you if you or someone ...

  12. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Definition Meningitis is an infection of the meninges, the membranes that surround the brain and spinal ... immediately. × Definition Meningitis is an infection of the meninges, the membranes that surround the brain and spinal ...

  13. Edaravone attenuates hippocampal damage in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis by reducing HMGB1 and iNOS expression via the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Ma, Qian-Qian; Yan, Yan; Xu, Feng-Dan; Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Wei-Qin; Feng, Zhi-Chun

    2016-09-01

    Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) is a free radical scavenger that has shown potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in variety of disease models. In this study, we investigated whether edaravone produced neuroprotective actions in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were infected on postnatal d 11 by intracisternal injection of a certain inoculum of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The mice received intracisternal injection of 10 μL of saline containing edaravone (3 mg/kg) once a day for 7 d. The severity of pneumococcal meningitis was assessed with a clinical score. In mice with severe meningitis, the survival rate from the time of infection to d 8 after infection was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves. In mice with mild meningitis, the CSF inflammation and cytokine levels in the hippocampus were analyzed d 7 after infection, and the clinical neurological deficit score was evaluated using a neurological scoring system d 14 after infection. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice and heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1 KO) mice were used to confirm the involvement of Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in the neuroprotective actions of edaravone. In mice with severe meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly increased the survival rate (76.4%) compared with the meningitis model group (32.2%). In mice with mild meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly decreased the number of leukocytes and TNF- levels in CSF, as well as the neuronal apoptosis and protein levels of HMGB1 and iNOS in the hippocampus, but did not affect the high levels of IL-10 and IL-6 in the hippocampus. Moreover, edaravone treatment significantly improved the neurological function of mice with mild meningitis. In Nrf2 KO or HO-1 KO mice with the meningitis, edaravone treatment was no longer effective in improving the survival rate of the mice with severe meningitis (20.2% and 53.6%, respectively), nor it affected the

  14. Addition of host genetic variants in a prediction rule for post meningitis hearing loss in childhood: a model updating study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Marieke S; de Jonge, Rogier C J; Terwee, Caroline B; Heymans, Martijn W; Koomen, Irene; Ouburg, Sander; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Morré, Servaas A; van Furth, A Marceline

    2013-07-23

    Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common sequela in survivors of bacterial meningitis (BM). In the past we developed a validated prediction model to identify children at risk for post-meningitis hearing loss. It is known that host genetic variations, besides clinical factors, contribute to severity and outcome of BM. In this study it was determined whether host genetic risk factors improve the predictive abilities of an existing model regarding hearing loss after childhood BM. Four hundred and seventy-one Dutch Caucasian childhood BM were genotyped for 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven different genes involved in pathogen recognition. Genetic data were added to the original clinical prediction model and performance of new models was compared to the original model by likelihood ratio tests and the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic curves. Addition of TLR9-1237 SNPs and the combination of TLR2 + 2477 and TLR4 + 896 SNPs improved the clinical prediction model, but not significantly (increase of AUC's from 0.856 to 0.861 and from 0.856 to 0.875 (p = 0.570 and 0.335, respectively). Other SNPs analysed were not linked to hearing loss. Although addition of genetic risk factors did not significantly improve the clinical prediction model for post-meningitis hearing loss, AUC's of the pre-existing model remain high after addition of genetic factors. Future studies should evaluate whether more combinations of SNPs in larger cohorts has an additional value to the existing prediction model for post meningitis hearing loss.

  15. Experimental validation of the predicted binding site of Escherichia coli K1 outer membrane protein A to human brain microvascular endothelial cells: identification of critical mutations that prevent E. coli meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Tod A; Abrol, Ravinder; Mittal, Rahul; Wang, Ying; Prasadarao, Nemani V; Goddard, William A

    2010-11-26

    Escherichia coli K1, the most common cause of meningitis in neonates, has been shown to interact with GlcNAc1-4GlcNAc epitopes of Ecgp96 on human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) via OmpA (outer membrane protein A). However, the precise domains of extracellular loops of OmpA interacting with the chitobiose epitopes have not been elucidated. We report the loop-barrel model of these OmpA interactions with the carbohydrate moieties of Ecgp96 predicted from molecular modeling. To test this model experimentally, we generated E. coli K1 strains expressing OmpA with mutations of residues predicted to be critical for interaction with the HBMEC and tested E. coli invasion efficiency. For these same mutations, we predicted the interaction free energies (including explicit calculation of the entropy) from molecular dynamics (MD), finding excellent correlation (R(2) = 90%) with experimental invasion efficiency. Particularly important is that mutating specific residues in loops 1, 2, and 4 to alanines resulted in significant inhibition of E. coli K1 invasion in HBMECs, which is consistent with the complete lack of binding found in the MD simulations for these two cases. These studies suggest that inhibition of the interactions of these residues of Loop 1, 2, and 4 with Ecgp96 could provide a therapeutic strategy to prevent neonatal meningitis due to E. coli K1.

  16. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, C; O´Reilly, T; Brandt, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite bacteraemia is present in the majority of patients with pneumococcal, little is known about the influence of the systemic infection on the meningeal inflammatory response. METHODS: To explore the role of systemic infection on the meningeal inflammation, experimental meningitis...... levels in 153 pneumococcal meningitis patients with and without presence of bacteraemia. RESULTS: As designed, blood bacterial concentrations were significantly different among three experimental groups during the 16 hours study period (Kruskal Wallis test, P ... to the two other groups between 12-16 hours from time of infection (P meningitis, no significant difference in CSF WBC was observed between patients with or without bacteraemia at admission (n = 103, 1740...

  17. Treating Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Beek D. Dexamethasone and long-term survival in bacterial meningitis. Neurology 2012; 79:2177 – 2179. e190 © 2012 American Academy of Neurology ª 2012 American Academy of Neurology. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. PATIENT PAGE Section ...

  18. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  19. Cryptococcal Meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-16

    Mar 16, 1974 ... Cryptococcal meningitis occurred in an elderly Coloured woman in the Northern Cape. She presented with symp- toms and signs suggestive of encephalitis 4 weeks after a cholecystectomy. After the administration of cortisone, cryptococcal organisms were isolated in her cerebrospinal fluid. She was first ...

  20. Tuberculous meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, R.J.; Rohlwink, U.; Misra, U.K.; Crevel, R. van; Mai, N.T.H.; Dooley, K.E.; Caws, M.; Figaji, A.; Savic, R.; Solomons, R.; Thwaites, G.E.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health problem, with an estimated 10.4 million cases and 1.8 million deaths resulting from the disease in 2015. The most lethal and disabling form of tuberculosis is tuberculous meningitis (TBM), for which more than 100,000 new cases are estimated to occur per year. In

  1. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  2. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-zhi YANG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features of meningeal hemangiopericytoma.  Methods One case of meningeal hemangiopericytoma was reported, and the relevant literatures were also reviewed.  Results A 40-year-old male had caught a headache for about 3 months with muscle weakness in the left limb, and became progressively serious for 2 weeks. Brain MRI displayed a space-occupying lesion in the right temporal lobe with equal signals in T1WI, mixed signals in T2WI and obvious enhancements. In surgery, the tumor was found to be located in the cranial fossa, and was completely removed. The tumor was large, with rich blood supply, and had no capsule. In histology, the neoplasm was composed of dense spindle cells with mild atypia. The boundary of the tumor cells was unclear. The nuclei were circular, oval or spindle with obvious mitoses (4/10 HPF. There were plenty of thick-wall blood vessels and blood sinuses with characteristic "staghorn" shape. In immunohistochemistry, CD34 and vimentin (Vim were positive, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA was focally positive and Ki-67 labeling index was 17%-20%. Postoperative radiotherapy was adopted and no relapse was found during the 20-month follow-up period. Conclusions The meningeal hemangiopericytoma is easy to be misdiagnosed as meningioma, however, the prognosis of meningeal hemangiopericytoma is quite worse, thus the differential diagnosis is very important. A clear diagnosis often depends on pathological examination. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.011

  3. [Carcinomatous meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserni, Gábor; Vágó, Tibor; Török, Norbert; Gaál, Zoltán; Velkei, Tamás; Serényi, Péter; Göczo, Katalin; Tusa, Magdolna; Kovács, Katalin; Szucs, Miklós

    2007-10-01

    Carcinomatous meningitis is a serious complication of advanced stage solid tumours, which may become more common with improved survival. A 53-year-old woman with a recent history of breast cancer (pT2pN2M0) had been treated by mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. She presented with weakness, diplopia and vertigo raising the possibility of vertebrobasilar ischaemia or an intracranial mass. In another patient, a 62-year-old man with hypertension, a stenotic common bile duct had been diagnosed when examined for abdominal complaints. When he presented with a high blood pressure value accompanied by intensive headache, vomiting and bilateral hearing loss, he was thought to have a hypertensive crisis. The rapidly progressive neurological symptoms and the history of breast cancer and findings suggesting pancreatic head tumour, respectively, led to the clinical diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis in both cases, despite any evidence on CT scans or a negative MR scan, though of limited value, in the first case. This diagnosis was confirmed by the laboratory and cytological findings of the cerebrospinal fluid, and also by the post mortem examination, since both patients died within a month after the onset of the symptoms. The primary tumour in the second patient proved to be a widely metastasizing diffuse type gastric cancer. Carcinomatous meningitis has a varying but characteristic presentation which generally makes it easy to diagnose, but it can sometimes present differential diagnostic problems. What we can learn from these two cases may help in recognizing this complication.

  4. Perceptions of measles, pneumonia, and meningitis vaccines among caregivers in Shanghai, China, and the health belief model: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Abram L; Boulton, Matthew L; Sun, Xiaodong; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Huang, Zhuoying; Harmsen, Irene A; Ren, Jia; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J

    2017-06-12

    In China, the measles vaccine is offered for free whereas the pneumococcal vaccine is a for-fee vaccine. This difference has the potential to influence how caregivers evaluate whether a vaccine is important or necessary for their child, but it is unclear if models of health behavior, such as the Health Belief Model, reveal the same associations for different diseases. This study compares caregiver perceptions of different diseases (measles, pneumonia and meningitis); and characterizes associations between Health Belief Model constructs and both pneumococcal vaccine uptake and perceived vaccine necessity for pneumonia, measles, and meningitis. Caregivers of infants and young children between 8 months and 7 years of age from Shanghai (n = 619) completed a written survey on their perceptions of measles, pneumonia, and meningitis. We used logistic regression models to assess predictors of pneumococcal vaccine uptake and vaccine necessity. Only 25.2% of children had received a pneumococcal vaccine, although most caregivers believed that pneumonia (80.8%) and meningitis (92.4%), as well as measles (93.2%), vaccines were serious enough to warrant a vaccine. Perceived safety was strongly associated with both pneumococcal vaccine uptake and perceived vaccine necessity, and non-locals had 1.70 times higher odds of pneumonia vaccine necessity than non-locals (95% CI: 1.01, 2.88). Most factors had a similar relationship with vaccine necessity, regardless of disease, indicating a common mechanism for how Chinese caregivers decided which vaccines are necessary. Because more caregivers believed meningitis needed a vaccine than pneumonia, health care workers should emphasize pneumococcal vaccination's ability to protect against meningitis.

  5. Cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DING Wen-ting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a kind of encapsulated fungal organism that widely exists in the nature. Because of its neurotropic nature, the central nervous system becomes its major target organ. Cryptococcus neoformans can use "transcellular pathway", "paracellular pathway" and "Trojan horse approach" to cross blood-brain barrier, and then make the devastating diffusion. Despite antifungal therapy, the mortality rate remains between 10% and 25% in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, and at least one-third of patients have experienced failure of antifungal therapy. Consequently, it is very important for us to understand the pathogenesis of CM, to diagnose as soon as possible and to explore more reasonable treatment.

  6. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Infographic Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  7. Medicininduceret aseptisk meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina Podlekareva; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a rare adverse effect of some drugs. We report a patient with four episodes of meningitis caused by ibuprofen. In all episodes the patient had taken ibuprofen for pain, and subsequently developed fever and cerebrovascular symptoms. Drug-induced meningitis cannot...

  8. Experimental Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    through, e.g., technical prototyping and active user involvement. We introduce and examine “experimental object-oriented modelling” as the intersection of these practices. The contributions of this thesis are expected to be within three perspectives on models and modelling in experimental system...... development: Grounding We develop an empirically based conceptualization of modelling and use of models in system development projects characterized by a high degree of uncertainty in requirements and point to implications for tools and techniques for modelling in such a setting. Techniques We introduce......This thesis examines object-oriented modelling in experimental system development. Object-oriented modelling aims at representing concepts and phenomena of a problem domain in terms of classes and objects. Experimental system development seeks active experimentation in a system development project...

  9. CSF LACTATE IN MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjampakuthikal Aboobekar Haris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningitis is an infection within the subarachnoid space characterised by a CNS inflammatory reaction. It is a serious condition requiring immediate diagnosis and appropriate treatment to be started at the earliest to prevent mortality as well as irreversible neurological deficits. CSF lactate has been found useful in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in many studies in the western population, but studies in Indian population are limited. The aim of the study is to study whether CSF lactate can be used to distinguish bacterial from viral meningitis and to study the levels of CSF lactate in tuberculosis meningitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a descriptive study conducted in a tertiary care hospital. In this study, 78 cases of meningitis were selected. Cases are patients with bacterial, viral or tuberculosis meningitis admitted to the hospital under the Department of Medicine and Neurology. Cases are grouped into bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis based on clinical picture, CSF analysis and imaging characteristics. CSF lactate estimation was done by dry chemistry method. Using appropriate statistical methods and SPSS software, CSF lactate levels were compared among these groups and analysed for any association with the final outcome. RESULTS The levels of CSF lactate in bacterial meningitis were higher than viral meningitis with a statistical significance of p 35 mg/dL for bacterial meningitis in this study was 95% and 100% respectively and the positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value was 96%. The mean CSF lactate values in bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis were 124.40 ± 35.85 mg/dL, 24.34 ± 6.05 mg/dL and 50.13 ± 9.89 mg/dL, respectively. CONCLUSION CSF lactate level was significantly elevated in bacterial meningitis than tuberculosis or viral meningitis and can be used as a marker for differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis.

  10. Medicininduceret aseptisk meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina Podlekareva; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a rare adverse effect of some drugs. We report a patient with four episodes of meningitis caused by ibuprofen. In all episodes the patient had taken ibuprofen for pain, and subsequently developed fever and cerebrovascular symptoms. Drug-induced meningitis cannot...... be distinguished from meningitis caused by other agents. Diagnosis is therefore based on close association between drug administration and onset of symptoms, as well as negative microbiology tests results, especially if previous episodes of drug-induced meningitis have occurred....

  11. Estudio experimental de la eficacia de meropenem y rifampicina en el tratamiento de la meningitis neumocócica sensible y resistente a betalactámicos

    OpenAIRE

    Force Sanmartín, Enriqueta

    2008-01-01

    La meningitis neumocócica es una enfermedad grave con elevada morbimortalidad y su tratamiento constituye un problema no completamente resuelto desde la aparición en todo el mundo de resistencias a penicilina y cefalosporinas. Meropenem es un carbapenémico que tiene una buena actividad in vitro frente a los principales patógenos que causan meningitis. El clásico modelo de meningitis en el conejo puede no ser adecuado para estudiar meropenem por la facilidad en hidrolizar la Dehidropeptidasa I...

  12. The Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaForce, F Marc; Konde, Kader; Viviani, Simonetta; Préziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2007-09-03

    Epidemic meningococcal meningitis is an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control measures rely on reactive immunizations with polysaccharide (PS) vaccines that do not induce herd immunity and are of limited effectiveness in those under 2 years of age. Conversely, polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are effective in infants and have consistently shown an important effect on decreasing carriage, two characteristics that facilitate disease control. In 2001 the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was created as a partnership between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) with the goal of eliminating meningococcal epidemics in Africa through the development, licensure, introduction, and widespread use of conjugate meningococcal vaccines. Since group A Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) is the dominant pathogen causing epidemic meningitis in Africa MVP is developing an affordable (US$ 0.40 per dose) meningococcal A (Men A) conjugate vaccine through an innovative international partnership that saw transfer of a conjugation and fermentation technology to a developing country vaccine manufacturer. A Phase 1 study of the vaccine in India has shown that the product is safe and immunogenic. Phase 2 studies have begun in Africa, and a large demonstration study of the conjugate vaccine is envisioned for 2008-2009. After extensive consultations with African public health officials a vaccine introduction plan has been developed that includes introduction of the Men A conjugate vaccine into standard Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedules but also emphasizes mass vaccination of 1-29 years old to induce herd immunity, a strategy that has been shown to be highly effective when the meningococcal C (Men C) conjugate vaccine was introduced in several European countries. The MVP model is a clear example of the usefulness of a "push mechanism" to finance the development of a needed vaccine for the developing world.

  13. The clinical features and meningeal histochemistry of meningeal malignant melanosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xue-wu; CHI Zhao-fu; ZHAO Xiu-he; WU Wei

    2008-01-01

    @@ Meningeal malignant melanosis is a meninges tumor that can produce melanin.Primary intracranial neurocutaneous melanosis is rare.It grows fast with a high degree of malignancy and is associated with earlier intracranial hypertension and meningeal irritation.

  14. Brain ventricular dimensions and relationship to outcome in adult patients with bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sporrborn, Janni L; Knudsen, Gertrud B; Sølling, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental studies suggest that changes in brain ventricle size are key events in bacterial meningitis. This study investigated the relationship between ventricle size, clinical condition and risk of poor outcome in patients with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Adult patients diagnos...

  15. Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Controls Pathogen Load and Brain Damage by Enhancing Phagocytosis of Escherichia coli K1 in Neonatal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Rahul; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Goth, Kerstin A.; Prasadarao, Nemani V.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 is a leading cause of neonatal meningitis in humans. In this study, we sought to determine the pathophysiologic relevance of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) in experimental E. coli K1 meningitis. By using a newborn mouse model of meningitis, we demonstrate that E. coli infection triggered the expression of iNOS in the brains of mice. Additionally, iNOS−/− mice were resistant to E. coli K1 infection, displaying normal brain histology, no bacteremia, no disruption of the blood...

  16. [Meningitis carcinomatosa (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhäusl, H

    1979-06-20

    On the basis of a case report the clinical picture of meningitis carcinomatosa is discussed. The cerebrospinal fluid is the most important criterion for the diagnosis. All other examinations (EEG, brain-scan, X-ray) yield only imperfect information. The clinical picture of meningitis carcinomatosa is similar above all to meningitis tuberculosa. If cerebrospinal fluid shows inflammatory signs and there is a breakdown of cerebral nerves (blindness, deafness) meningitis carcinomatosa always should be considered, even if thorough examination does not succeed in proving a primary tumour.

  17. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. BOX 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2006-11-15

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  18. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du

    2006-01-01

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  19. Meninges in cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendru, G; Chong, V

    2009-10-02

    Primary malignant tumours arising from the meninges are distinctly uncommon, and when they occur, they are usually sarcomas. In contrast, metastatic meningeal involvement is increasingly seen as advances in cancer therapy have changed the natural history of malignant disease and prolonged the life span of cancer patients. The meninges can either be infiltrated by contiguous extension of primary tumours of the central nervous system, paranasal sinuses and skull base origin or can be diffusely infiltrated from haematogenous dissemination from distant primary malignancies. Imaging in these patients provides crucial information in planning management. This article reviews the pertinent anatomy that underlies imaging findings, discusses the mechanism of meningeal metastasis and highlights different imaging patterns of meningeal carcinomatosis and the pitfalls.

  20. Mast cell activation and neutrophil recruitment promotes early and robust inflammation in the meninges in EAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Alison L; Walker, Margaret E; Hessner, Martin J; Brown, Melissa A

    2013-05-01

    The meninges are often considered inert tissues that house the CSF and provide protection for the brain and spinal cord. Yet emerging data demonstrates that they are also active sites of immune responses. Furthermore, the blood-CSF barrier surrounding meningeal blood vessels, together with the blood-brain barrier (BBB), is postulated to serve as a gateway for the pathological infiltration of immune cells into the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous studies using mast cell-deficient (Kit(W/Wv)) mice demonstrated that mast cells resident in the dura mater and pia mater exacerbate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of MS, by facilitating CNS inflammatory cell influx. Here we examined the underlying mechanisms that mediate these effects. We demonstrate that there are dramatic alterations in immune associated gene expression in the meninges in pre-clinical disease, including those associated with mast cell and neutrophil function. Meningeal mast cells are activated within 24 h of disease induction, but do not directly compromise CNS vascular integrity. Rather, through production of TNF, mast cells elicit an early influx of neutrophils, cells known to alter vascular permeability, into the meninges. These data add to the growing evidence that inflammation in the meninges precedes CNS immune cell infiltration and establish that mast cells are among the earliest participants in these disease-initiating events. We hypothesize that mast cell-dependent neutrophil recruitment and activation in the meninges promotes early breakdown of the local BBB and CSF-blood barrier allowing initial immune cell access to the CNS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. PEMFC modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, J.V.C. [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br; Ordonez, J.C.; Martins, L.S. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Advanced Power Systems], Emails: ordonez@caps.fsu.edu, martins@caps.fsu.edu

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a simplified and comprehensive PEMFC mathematical model introduced in previous studies is experimentally validated. Numerical results are obtained for an existing set of commercial unit PEM fuel cells. The model accounts for pressure drops in the gas channels, and for temperature gradients with respect to space in the flow direction, that are investigated by direct infrared imaging, showing that even at low current operation such gradients are present in fuel cell operation, and therefore should be considered by a PEMFC model, since large coolant flow rates are limited due to induced high pressure drops in the cooling channels. The computed polarization and power curves are directly compared to the experimentally measured ones with good qualitative and quantitative agreement. The combination of accuracy and low computational time allow for the future utilization of the model as a reliable tool for PEMFC simulation, control, design and optimization purposes. (author)

  2. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The commonest sequelae of bacterial meningitis are related to the inner ear. Little is known about the inner ear immune defense. Evidence suggests that the endolymphatic sac provides some protection against infection. A potential involvement of the endolymphatic sac in bacterial meningitis...... is largely unaccounted for, and thus the object of the present study. A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was employed. Thirty adult rats were inoculated intrathecally with Streptococcus pneumoniae and received no additional treatment. Six rats were sham...... days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges...

  3. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack

    2006-01-01

    An engineering course, Simulation and Experimental Modeling, has been developed that is based on a method for direct estimation of physical parameters in dynamic systems. Compared with classical system identification, the method appears to be easier to understand, apply, and combine with physical...

  4. Laboratorial diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    Full Text Available Meningitis is the main infectious central nervous system (CNS syndrome. Viruses or bacteria can cause acute meningitis of infectious etiology. The term "Aseptic Meningitis" denotes a clinical syndrome with a predominance of lymphocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, with no common bacterial agents identified in the CSF. Viral meningitis is considered the main cause of lymphocyte meningitis. There are other etiologies of an infectious nature. CSF examination is essential to establish the diagnosis and to identify the etiological agent of lymphocytic meningitis. We examined CSF characteristics and the differential diagnosis of the main types of meningitis.

  5. Meningeal mast cell-T cell crosstalk regulates T cell encephalitogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russi, Abigail E; Walker-Caulfield, Margaret E; Guo, Yong; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-09-01

    GM-CSF is a cytokine produced by T helper (Th) cells that plays an essential role in orchestrating neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a rodent model of multiple sclerosis. Yet where and how Th cells acquire GM-CSF expression is unknown. In this study we identify mast cells in the meninges, tripartite tissues surrounding the brain and spinal cord, as important contributors to antigen-specific Th cell accumulation and GM-CSF expression. In the absence of mast cells, Th cells do not accumulate in the meninges nor produce GM-CSF. Mast cell-T cell co-culture experiments and selective mast cell reconstitution of the meninges of mast cell-deficient mice reveal that resident meningeal mast cells are an early source of caspase-1-dependent IL-1β that licenses Th cells to produce GM-CSF and become encephalitogenic. We also provide evidence of mast cell-T cell co-localization in the meninges and CNS of recently diagnosed acute MS patients indicating similar interactions may occur in human demyelinating disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental models of sepsis and septic shock: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido Alejandra G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients and trauma victims, mainly due to sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction. In contrast to preclinical studies, most clinical trials of promising new treatment strategies for sepsis have fails to demonstrate efficacy. Although many reasons could account for this discrepancy, the misinterpretation of preclinical data obtained from experimental studies, and especially the use of animal models that do not adequately mimic human sepsis may have been contributing factors. In this review, the benefits and limitations of various animal models of sepsis are discussed to clarify the extend to which findings are relevant to human sepsis, particularly with respect to the subsequent design and execution of clinical trials. Such models include intravascular infusion of endotoxin or live bacteria, bacterial peritonitis, cecal ligation and perforation, soft tissue infection, pneumonia or meningitis models, using different animal species including rats, mice, rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep and nonhuman primates. Despite several limitations, animal models remain essential in the development of all new therapies for sepsis and septic shock, because they provide fundamental information about the pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and mechanism of drug action that cannot be duplicated by other methods. New therapeutic agents should be studies in infection models, even after the initiation of the septic process. Furthermore, debility conditions need to be reproduced to avoid the exclusive use of healthy animals, which often do not represent the human septic patient.

  7. Pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldhoff, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a serious infectious disease, involving the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord, and the subarachnoid space. In the Netherlands most common causative agents are Streptococcus pneumoniae (72%) and Neisseria meningitidis (11%). The incidence of pneumococcal

  8. Cetuximab induced aseptic meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, A; Weiler, S; Weller, M; Rordorf, T; Tarnutzer, A A

    2015-01-01

    We report a 67-year-old man with recurrent advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who developed aseptic meningitis, with first symptoms arising approximately 9hours after the first administration of cetuximab, and review the literature to identify key signs and symptoms of this condition. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor which has been rarely associated with aseptic meningitis. Besides the case description, a MEDLINE search was performe...

  9. Intrathecal enzyme replacement therapy reduces lysosomal storage in the brain and meninges of the canine model of MPS I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkis, E; McEntee, M; Vogler, C; Le, S; Levy, B; Belichenko, P; Mobley, W; Dickson, P; Hanson, S; Passage, M

    2004-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been developed for several lysosomal storage disorders, including mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I), and is effective at reducing lysosomal storage in many tissues and in ameliorating clinical disease. However, intravenous ERT does not adequately treat storage disease in the central nervous system (CNS), presumably due to effects of the blood-brain barrier on enzyme distribution. To circumvent this barrier, we studied whether intrathecal (IT) recombinant human alpha-L-iduronidase (rhIDU) could penetrate and treat the brain and meninges. An initial dose-response study showed that doses of 0.46-4.14 mg of IT rhIDU successfully penetrated the brain of normal dogs and reached tissue levels 5.6 to 18.9-fold normal overall and 2.7 to 5.9-fold normal in deep brain sections lacking CSF contact. To assess the efficacy and safety in treating lysosomal storage disease, four weekly doses of approximately 1 mg of IT rhIDU were administered to MPS I-affected dogs resulting in a mean 23- and 300-fold normal levels of iduronidase in total brain and meninges, respectively. Quantitative glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analysis showed that the IT treatment reduced mean total brain GAG to normal levels and achieved a 57% reduction in meningeal GAG levels accompanied by histologic improvement in lysosomal storage in all cell types. The dogs did develop a dose-dependent immune response against the recombinant human protein and a meningeal lymphocytic/plasmacytic infiltrate. The IT route of ERT administration may be an effective way to treat the CNS disease in MPS I and could be applicable to other lysosomal storage disorders.

  10. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittwer Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30% and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI and (ii the self-organizing map (SOM, a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05, 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential

  11. Experimental models of developmental hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argumedo, G S; Sanz, C R; Olguín, H J

    2012-02-01

    Hypothyroidism is a systemic disease resulting from either thyroid gland's anatomical and functional absence or lack of hypophyseal stimulation, both of which can lead to deficiency in thyroid hormone (TH) production. TH is essential for human and animal development, growth, and function of multiple organs. Children with deficient TH can develop alterations in central nervous system (CNS), striated muscle, bone tissue, liver, bone marrow, and cardiorespiratory system. Among the clinical outlook are signs like breathing difficulty, cardiac insufficiency, dysphagia, and repeated bronchial aspiration, constipation, muscle weakness, cognitive alterations, cochlear dysfunction, reduced height, defects in temperature regulation, anaemia, jaundice, susceptibility to infection, and others. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that TH is very essential for normal brain development. Other research work based on mice pointed out that a reduced level of TH in pregnant mother leads to congenital hypothyroidism in animal models and it is associated with mental retardation, deep neurologic deficiency that impacts on cognitive, learning, and memory functions. The principal experimental model studies that have focused on hypothyroidism are reviewed in this study. This is important on considering the fact that almost all animal species require thyroid hormones for their metabolism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive

  13. Meninges of the brain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... covered by connective tissue layers collectively called the meninges. Consisting of the pia mater (closest to the ... the dura mater (farthest from the CNS), the meninges also support blood vessels and contain cerebrospinal fluid. ...

  14. Meninges of the spine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by 3 connective tissue layers collectively called the meninges. Consisting of the pia mater (closest to the ... the dura mater (farthest from the CNS), the meninges also support blood vessels and contain cerebrospinal fluid. ...

  15. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

  16. Bacterial meningitis in immunocompromised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K.E.B.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an acute infection of the meninges, in The Netherlands most commonly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitides. Risk factors for acquiring bacterial meningitis include a decreased function of the immune system. The aim of this thesis was to study

  17. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  18. Human Meningitis-Associated Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, KWANG SIK

    2016-01-01

    E. coli is the most common Gram-negative bacillary organism causing meningitis and E. coli meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Our incomplete knowledge of its pathogenesis contributes to such mortality and morbidity. Recent reports of E. coli strains producing CTX-M-type or TEM-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases create a challenge. Studies using in vitro and in vivo models of the blood-brain barrier have shown that E. coli meningitis follows a high-degree of bacteremia and invasion of the blood-brain barrier. E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier, the essentials step in the development of E. coli meningitis, requires specific microbial and host factors as well as microbe- and host-specific signaling molecules. Blockade of such microbial and host factors contributing to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier is shown to be efficient in preventing E. coli penetration into the brain. The basis for requiring a high-degree of bacteremia for E. coli penetration of the blood-brain barrier, however, remains unclear. Continued investigation on the microbial and host factors contributing to a high-degree of bacteremia and E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier is likely to identify new targets for prevention and therapy of E. coli meningitis. PMID:27223820

  19. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depreitere, Bart; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Güiza, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The literature on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in meningitis is limited to case reports and a handful of descriptive series. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships among ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and outcome in meningitis and to identify whether ICP affected clinical decisions. Between 1999 and 2011, a total of 17 patients with meningitis underwent ICP monitoring at the University Hospitals Leuven. Charts were reviewed for clinical history, ICP/CPP data, imaging findings, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Univariate correlations were computed for outcome and ICP/CPP variables, computed tomography characteristics, and Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head Injury outcome model variables. Treatment decisions were assessed regarding whether or not they were based on ICP. At drain placement, Glasgow Coma Scale scores showed a median of 8 (range 3-12). Six of 17 patients had either one or two nonreactive pupils. Significant correlations with outcome were found for the highest documented ICP value (r = -0.70), the number of episodes when CPP meningitis high ICP and low CPP represent secondary insults. The poor condition of the patients illustrates that the level of suspicion for increased ICP in meningitis may not be high enough.

  20. Primary Meningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Riedel, Richard F.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Cummings, Thomas J.; Green, Scott; Chang, Zheng; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare primary brain malignancy, with scant case reports. While most reports of primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma occur in pediatric patients, a handful of cases in adult patients have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 44-year-old male who developed primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma. After developing episodes of right lower extremity weakness, word finding difficulty, and headaches, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a vertex lesion with radiographic appearance of a meningeal-derived tumor. Subtotal surgical resection was performed due to sagittal sinus invasion and initial pathology was interpreted as an anaplastic meningioma. Re-review of pathology demonstrated rhabdomyosarcoma negative for alveolar translocation t(2;13). Staging studies revealed no evidence of disseminated disease. He was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with concurrent temozolamide to be followed by vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) systemic therapy. PMID:21772793

  1. Primary Meningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Palta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare primary brain malignancy, with scant case reports. While most reports of primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma occur in pediatric patients, a handful of cases in adult patients have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 44-year-old male who developed primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma. After developing episodes of right lower extremity weakness, word finding difficulty, and headaches, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated a vertex lesion with radiographic appearance of a meningeal-derived tumor. Subtotal surgical resection was performed due to sagittal sinus invasion and initial pathology was interpreted as an anaplastic meningioma. Re-review of pathology demonstrated rhabdomyosarcoma negative for alveolar translocation t(2;13. Staging studies revealed no evidence of disseminated disease. He was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with concurrent temozolamide to be followed by vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide (VAC systemic therapy.

  2. Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Riedel, Richard F; Vredenburgh, James J; Cummings, Thomas J; Green, Scott; Chang, Zheng; Kirkpatrick, John P

    2011-01-01

    Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare primary brain malignancy, with scant case reports. While most reports of primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma occur in pediatric patients, a handful of cases in adult patients have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 44-year-old male who developed primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma. After developing episodes of right lower extremity weakness, word finding difficulty, and headaches, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a vertex lesion with radiographic appearance of a meningeal-derived tumor. Subtotal surgical resection was performed due to sagittal sinus invasion and initial pathology was interpreted as an anaplastic meningioma. Re-review of pathology demonstrated rhabdomyosarcoma negative for alveolar translocation t(2;13). Staging studies revealed no evidence of disseminated disease. He was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with concurrent temozolamide to be followed by vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) systemic therapy.

  3. Bacterial meningitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marji, S.

    2007-01-01

    To demonstrate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations and bacteriological profile of bacterial meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period in our hospital. This was a retrospective descriptive study conducted at Prince Rashid Hospital in Irbid, Jordan. The medical records of 50 children with the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis during 4 years period, were reviewed. The main cause of infection was streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenza and Niesseria meningitides. Mortality was higher in infants and meningococcal infection, while complications were more encountered in cases of streptococcus pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid culture was positive in 11 cases and Latex agglutination test in 39. There is a significant reduction of the numbers of bacterial meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenza type B species. (author)

  4. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...

  5. Drug induced aseptic meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-09-29

    Sep 29, 2013 ... Abstract. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is a rare but important and often challenging diagnosis for the physician. Intake of antimicrobials, steroids, anal- gesics amongst others has been implicated. Signs and symptoms generally develop within 24-48 hours of drug ingestion. The pa- tient often ...

  6. Stroke? Localized, otogenic meningitis!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingolfsdottir, Harpa Maria; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted with aphasia, treated for a stroke. Subsequently, it was revealed that the symptoms were caused by complicated otitis media with localized meningitis. This case draws attention to the possible intracranial spread of infection when neurological symptoms occur...

  7. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT, ANALYSIS AND MODELLING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    30 juin 2010 ... We obtain a good agreement between the resolution of the nonlinear equation of heat and the results obtained by the experimentation. . Keywords: Emissivity, Température, optimal Linearisation, finite elements. 1. ..... basse température, Rapport de Stage de D.E.A, Université Paris 12 – Val de Marne.

  8. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with

  9. Fibrosarcoma of the meninges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishwar Chand Premsagar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal fibrosarcomas are rare tumors. Only 41 cases have been reported in the literature to date. Primary central nervous system fibrosarcomas are very aggressive neoplasms and have a poor prognosis. Hence they need to be correctly diagnosed. This is a case of a 13-year old boy with intracranial space occupying lesion. The mass was completely removed and histological examination was characteristic of meningeal fibrosarcoma. The pathological diagnosis is usually made on routine light microscopic examination; however, occasionally these may be difficult to distinguish from other malignant neoplasms such as gliomas, meningiomas and metastases. The diagnosis of fibrosarcoma is based on the identification of a predominant herringbone architectural pattern, the overall uniformity of the spindle cell population, the prominent vimentin positivity, and the presence of pericellular reticulin fibre network. IHC helps to exclude other diagnoses.

  10. Management of neoplastic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Patrick; Weller, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of tumor cells, also referred to as neoplastic meningitis, is most frequently seen in patients with late-stage cancer and mostly associated with a poor prognosis. Basically, neoplastic meningitis may affect all patients with a malignant tumor but is most common in patients affected by lung cancer, breast carcinoma, melanoma or hematologic neoplasms such as lymphoma and leukemia. Controlled clinical trials are largely lacking which results in various non-standardized treatment regimens. The presence of solid tumor manifestations in the CNS as well as the extracranial tumor load defines the most appropriate treatment approach. Radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy and intrathecal treatment must be considered. For each patient, the individual situation needs to be carefully evaluated to determine the potential benefit as well as putative side effects associated with any therapy. A moderate survival benefit and particularly relief from pain and neurological deficits are the main treatment goals. Here, we summarize the management of patients with neoplastic meningitis and review the available treatment options.

  11. Mondini dysplasia with recurrent meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, M Y; Lee, P I; Lee, C Y; Hsu, C J

    1996-01-01

    Mondini dysplasia is a congenital malformation of the inner ear, commonly associated with hearing impairment, cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea/rhinorrhea and recurrent meningitis. Two such cases are described, with hearing impairment, cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, and several episodes of meningitis. Diagnosis was confirmed by high-resolution computed tomography. After surgical correction of the malformation, there was no recurrent episode of meningitis at subsequent follow-up. To avoid the suffering and the sequelae of recurrent meningitis, an early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention are crucial for such patients.

  12. Total antioxidant/oxidant status in meningism and meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycicek, Ali; Iscan, Akin; Erel, Ozcan; Akcali, Mustafa; Selek, Sahbettin

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antioxidant/oxidant status of serum and cerebrospinal fluid in children with meningismus and acute bacterial meningitis. Twenty-three children (age range, 0.75 to 9 years) with fever and meningeal signs that required analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid, but no cytologic or biochemical evidence of meningitis in their serum and cerebrospinal fluid, constituted the meningismus group. Thirty-one children (age range, 0.5 to 10 years) with acute bacterial meningitis constituted the meningitis group. Twenty-nine healthy children (age range, 0.5 to 11 years) were recruited as control subjects. Antioxidant status (ascorbic acid, albumin, thiol, uric acid, total bilirubin, total antioxidant capacity, catalase and ceruloplasmin concentrations) and oxidant status (lipid hydroperoxide and total oxidant status) were measured. The serum antioxidant status was lower, and oxidant status levels higher in both meningitis and meningismus subjects than in the control children (P antioxidant status was lower, and serum oxidant status was higher in children in the meningismus and meningitis groups, whereas cerebrospinal fluid oxidant status was higher in the meningismus group than in the meningitis group.

  13. Pituitary apoplexy masquerading as meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    meningeal irritation is not considered a classic feature of pituitary apoplexy.2,3 The pathophysiology behind this symptom complex involves leakage of blood into the subarachnoid space, which, in conjunction with the necrotic tissue in the pituitary itself, induces a cytokine response, resulting in meningeal irritation and the.

  14. Chemical meningitis in metrizamide myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Hesselberg, J.P.; Anda, S.; Dale, L.; Hellum, K.

    1986-01-01

    Seven patients with acute chemcial meningitis after metrizamide myelography are described. Five of the cases occurred within a time span of two months. Clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings in the acute stage of the illness were similar to findings in acute bacterial meningitis. Possible causes of this complication are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Bacteriële meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M. C.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe disease which affects 35.000 Europeans each year and has a mortality rate of about 20%. During the past 25 years the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed significantly due to the implementation of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria

  16. Efficacy of Closed Continuous Lumbar Drainage on the Treatment of Postcraniotomy Meningitis: A Retrospective Analysis of 1062 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanming; Liu, Xuesong; You, Chao; Zhang, Yuekang; Du, Liang; Hui, Xuhui; Liu, Wenke; Ma, Lu; Liu, Jiagang

    2017-10-01

    Postcraniotomy meningitis is a severe complication in neurosurgery, and can result in high morbidity and mortality. Closed continuous lumbar drainage (CCLD) as an adjuvant method for treating postcraniotomy meningitis in adults is rarely assessed. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of CCLD in the treatment of postcraniotomy meningitis. A total of 1062 patients older than 16 years with postcraniotomy meningitis were included, between January 2000 and December 2015. Of these, 474 received intravenous antibiotic therapy, steroid administration and adjuvant CCLD (experimental Group). The remaining 588 patients only received intravenous antibiotic and steroid therapies (control Group). Data were extracted from medical records. In the experimental group, meningitis-related mortality was 2.7%, and 77.4% individuals achieved a Glasgow Outcome Scale of 4-5. In the control group, meningitis-related mortality reached 11.6%, with only 61.1% of patients achieving a GOS of 4-5. The time to negative cerebrospinal fluid laboratory test and the duration of meningitis-related symptoms were significantly shorter in the experimental group compared with controls (P meningitis after craniotomy. Laboratory results negative for cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis-related symptom relief occurred faster in the experimental group. Intravenous antibiotic and steroid therapies combined with CCLD appear to be an effective and safe treatment for postcraniotomy meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tuberculous Meningitis: Diagnosis and Treatment Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E. Marx

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is the most common form of central nervous system tuberculosis (TB and has very high morbidity and mortality. TBM is typically a subacute disease with symptoms that may persist for weeks before diagnosis. Characteristic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings of TBM include a lymphocytic-predominant pleiocytosis, elevated protein, and low glucose. CSF acid-fast smear and culture have relatively low sensitivity but yield is increased with multiple, large volume samples. Nucleic acid amplification of the CSF by PCR is highly specific but suboptimal sensitivity precludes ruling out TBM with a negative test. Treatment for TBM should be initiated as soon as clinical suspicion is supported by initial CSF studies. Empiric treatment should include at least four first-line drugs, preferably isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and streptomycin or ethambutol; the role of fluoroquinolones remains to be determined. Adjunctive treatment with corticosteroids has been shown to improve mortality with TBM. In HIV-positive individuals with TBM, important treatment considerations include drug interactions, development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, unclear benefit of adjunctive corticosteroids, and higher rates of drug-resistant TB. Testing the efficacy of second-line and new anti-TB drugs in animal models of experimental TBM is needed to help determine the optimal regimen for drug-resistant TB.

  18. Meningitis por Streptococcus suis

    OpenAIRE

    Geffner Sclarsky, D. E.; Moreno Muñoz, R.; Campillo Alpera, Mª.S.; Pardo Serrano, F.J.; Gómez Gómez, A.; Martínez-Lozano, Mª.D.

    2001-01-01

    La infección humana por Streptococcus suis (S. suis) es una zoonosis, con un riesgo ocupacional conocido y que suele presentarse como meningitis purulenta, que tiene baja mortalidad y frecuentes secuelas de hipoacusia y ataxia. Se han publicado menos de 150 casos humanos desde el informe original de hace 30 años. Hay una reconocida distribución geográfica viviendo la mayoría de los afectados en el norte de Europa y el sudeste Asiático. En España se han comunicado dos pacientes con enfermedad ...

  19. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Rode; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  20. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  1. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Campylobacter Fetus Meningitis in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome of C fetus meningitis in adults. We report cases of C fetus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of adult bacterial meningitis patients in the Netherlands and performed a review of the literature. Two patients with C fetus meningitis were identified from January 2006 through May 2015. The calculated annual incidence was 0.02 per million adults. Combined with the literature, we identified 22 patients with a median age of 48 years. An immunocompromised state was present in 16 patients (73%), mostly due to alcoholism (41%) and diabetes mellitus (27%). The source of infection was identified in 13 out of 19 patients (68%), consisting of regular contact with domestic animals in 5 and working on a farm in 4. Recurrent fever and illness was reported in 4 patients (18%), requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment. Two patients died (9%) and 3 survivors (15%) had neurological sequelae. C fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with an immunocompromised state. Based on the apparent slow clinical response seen in this limited number of cases, the authors of this study recommend a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy when C fetus is identified as a causative agent of bacterial meningitis. Cases appeared to do best with carbapenem therapy. PMID:26937916

  3. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-06

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

  4. Understanding Leadership: An Experimental-Experiential Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, George T.

    2014-01-01

    Books about leadership are dangerous to readers who fantasize about being leaders or apply leadership ideas as if they were proven formulas. As an antidote, I offer an experimental framework in which any leadership-management model can be tested to gain experiential understanding of the model. As a result one can gain reality-based insights about…

  5. CT in meningitis purulenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Akira; Fujiwara, Katsuhiko; Iino, Shigeru; Ochi, Masaharu; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Twenty nine infants with meningitis purulenta were classified into 5 groups according to CT findings in the acute stage: cerebral infarction group, subdural hygroma group, ventricular enlargement group, and a group of other diseases. In each group, clinical findings, surgical procedures and prognosis were evaluated. In the cerebral infarction group, although 3 of 4 patients underwent V-P shunt or subdural drainage, remarkable sequelae were found in all the cases. Of 4 subdural hygroma patients, 2 had subdural drainage, and 4 of 8 patients with ventricular enlargement underwent V-P shunt. All the patients of the two groups had favorable prognosis without any sequela. A patient with cerebral herniation in the group of other diseases died in its acute stage. Eleven infants without abnormal CT findings showed normal psychomotor development. (Ueda, J.)

  6. EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF THE PRIMARY MALE HYPOGONADISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Kulikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of the new methods of treatment of primary male hypogonadism is an urgent medical problem. Its solution requires a suitable experimental model of the disease. Aim: The creation of new experimental model of primary male hypogonadism. Materials and methods: The study was conducted on the male Wistar rats, hypogonadism was modeled by temporary ligation of the distal part of the spermatic cord. Results: It was shown that three-day ligation of the spermatic cord led to persistent disturbance of the testosterone-producing and reproductive functions. These manifestations were reversible at shorter duration of the exposure. Conclusion: The created model of primary male hypogonadism is characterized by the persistent testosterone-producing and reproductive functions disturbance, technical availability, non-toxicity to the other organs and systems. Availability of the model provides new opportunities for the development of approaches to treating diseases of the reproductive organs in men.

  7. Modeling of Experimental Adsorption Isotherm Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunjun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption is considered to be one of the most effective technologies widely used in global environmental protection areas. Modeling of experimental adsorption isotherm data is an essential way for predicting the mechanisms of adsorption, which will lead to an improvement in the area of adsorption science. In this paper, we employed three isotherm models, namely: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich to correlate four sets of experimental adsorption isotherm data, which were obtained by batch tests in lab. The linearized and non-linearized isotherm models were compared and discussed. In order to determine the best fit isotherm model, the correlation coefficient (r2 and standard errors (S.E. for each parameter were used to evaluate the data. The modeling results showed that non-linear Langmuir model could fit the data better than others, with relatively higher r2 values and smaller S.E. The linear Langmuir model had the highest value of r2, however, the maximum adsorption capacities estimated from linear Langmuir model were deviated from the experimental data.

  8. Computed tomography of tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Noriko; Sato, Hiromi; Kawaguchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Katsuzo; Tanaka, Makoto

    1982-01-01

    Recently, tuberculous meningitis has become rather rare except in areas where tuberculosis is still endemic. Six adolescents and young adults with tuberculous meningitis were evaluated by means of serial computerized tomography (CT), and the results were correlated with the findings of surgical specimens or autopsies. All cases showed meningeal irritation and fever at onset. CSF cultures revealed the presence of tuberculous bacilli. Four cases advanced rapidly to the clinical stage III and expired in a short period-between two weeks to one month from onset. On initial CT scanning, the disappearance of the basal cistern was a characteristic finding in all these cases. With the progression, an enhancement of the basal cistern on contrast injection, a localized hypodensity in adjacent parenchyma, and symmetrical ventricular dilatation appeared. Two autopsied cases showed tuberculous granulomas with purulent materials, thickened meninges, and caseous necrosis in the parenchyma around the basal cistern. The other two cases progressed rather slowly. CT findings at Stage II showed multiple enhanced spots in the basal subcortical area following contrast injection. Tuberculous granulomas were identified in these parts by means of explorative craniotomy. The authors point out the pathognomonic CT findings of tuberculous meningitis and emphasize the necessity of serial CT for the early detection and management of tuberculous meningitis. (author)

  9. Anatomy of the Spinal Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Gabrillargues, Jean; Coll, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The spinal meninges have received less attention than the cranial meninges in the literature, although several points remain debatable and poorly understood, like their phylogenesis, their development, and their interactions with the spinal cord. Their constancy among the chordates shows their crucial importance in central nervous system homeostasis and suggests a role far beyond mechanical protection of the neuraxis. This work provides an extensive study of the spinal meninges, from an overview of their phylogenesis and embryology to a descriptive and topographic anatomy with clinical implications. It examines their involvement in spinal cord development, functioning, and repair. This work is a review of the literature using PubMed as a search engine on Medline. The stages followed by the meninges along the phylogenesis could not be easily compared with their development in vertebrates for methodological aspects and convergence processes throughout evolution. The distinction between arachnoid and pia mater appeared controversial. Several points of descriptive anatomy remain debatable: the functional organization of the arterial network, and the venous and lymphatic drainages, considered differently by classical anatomic and neuroradiological approaches. Spinal meninges are involved in neurodevelopment and neurorepair producing neural stem cells and morphogens, in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and neuraxis functioning by the synthesis of active molecules, and the elimination of waste products of central nervous system metabolism. The spinal meninges should be considered as dynamic functional formations evolving over a lifetime, with ultrastructural features and functional interactions with the neuraxis remaining not fully understood.

  10. Hemorrhoids: an experimental model in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plapler Hélio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hemorrhoids are a matter of concern due to a painful outcome. We describe a simple, easy and reliable experimental model to produce hemorrhoids in monkeys. METHODS: 14 monkeys (Cebus apella were used. After general anesthesia, hemorrhoids were induced by ligation of the inferior hemorrhoidal vein, which is very alike to humans. The vein was located through a perianal incision, dissected and ligated with a 3-0 vicryl. The skin was sutured with a 4-0 catgut thread. Animals were kept in appropriate cages and evaluated daily. RESULTS: Nine days later there were hemorrhoidal piles in the anus in fifty percent (50% of the animals. Outcome was unremarkable. There was no bleeding and all animals showed no signs of pain or suffering. CONCLUSION: This is an affordable and reliable experimental model to induce hemorrhoids for experimental studies.

  11. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it…

  12. CHEMICAL VERSUS SERUM TREATMENT OF EPIDEMIC MENINGITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexner, S; Amoss, H L

    1916-05-01

    Claims of efficiency have been made at two widely separated periods for the chemical treatment of epidemic meningitis, in the first instance for lysol and in the second for protargol. The use of lysol was long since abandoned; the recommendation for protargol is based on a single series of cases, small in number. Because of the variable severity of epidemics of meningitis, small reliance can be placed on results of treatment limited in extent to small numbers of cases and to one locality. A more uniform and accurate measure of the value of a method of treatment is provided by animals infected experimentally with pathogenic cultures of meningococci. Young guinea pigs respond in a definite manner to intraperitoneal inoculation of virulent meningococci. Neither protargol nor lysol proved to have any curative action on the experimental infection thus produced in these animals. Monkeys respond in a characteristic manner to the inoculation of virulent cultures into the subarachnoid space. Protargol displayed no curative action on the experimental infection thus produced in these animals. On the contrary, both lysol and protargol exert antileukotactic and antiphagocytic effects, and are also potent protoplasmic poisons, and the leukocytes with which they come in contact are injured and made to degenerate. According to the extent to which these harmful properties are exerted, the chemicals promote the advance rather than restrain the progress of meningococcic infection. Recovery from meningococcic infection in man and animals is accomplished chiefly through the process of phagocytosis. The specific antiserum acts curatively by increasing the emigration of leukocytes, by promoting phagocytosis directly, and by agglutinating the meningococci, and also by neutralizing endotoxin. Any means which interfere with and reduce these essential processes retard or prevent recovery. Both lysol and protargol interfere with and diminish the emigration of leukocytes and the phagocytosis

  13. The astrocyte/meningeal cell interface is a barrier to neurite outgrowth which can be overcome by manipulation of inhibitory molecules or axonal signalling pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shearer, Morven C; Niclou, Simone P; Brown, David; Asher, Richard A; Holtmaat, Anthony J D G; Levine, Joel M; Verhaagen, J.; Fawcett, James W

    2003-01-01

    Invading meningeal cells form a barrier to axon regeneration after damage to the spinal cord and other parts of the CNS, axons stopping at the interface between meningeal cells and astrocytes. Axon behavior was examined using an in vitro model of astrocyte/meningeal cell interfaces, created by

  14. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Mérida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution.

  15. Electrochemical desalination of bricks - Experimental and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Gry; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    Chlorides, nitrates and sulfates play an important role in the salt-decay of porous materials in buildings and monuments. Electrochemical desalination is a technology able to remove salts from such porous materials in order to stop or prevent the decay. In this paper, experimental and numerical......-contaminated bricks with respect to the monovalent ions is discussed. Comparison between the experimental and the simulation results showed that the proposed numerical model is able to predict electrochemical desalination treatments with remarkable accuracy, and it can be used as a predictive tool...

  16. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-01-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  17. Voriconazole in an infant with cryptococcal meningitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) is the most common cause of fungal meningitis worldwide.1 Cryptococcal meningitis is an opportunistic infection commonly found in immunocompromised hosts,especially HIV-infected adults. It also occurs in apparently immunocompetent individuals.

  18. Huntington disease: Experimental models and therapeutic perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano Sanchez, Teresa; Blanco Lezcano, Lisette; Garcia Minet, Rocio; Alberti Amador, Esteban; Diaz Armesto, Ivan and others

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a degenerative dysfunction of hereditary origin. Up to date there is not, an effective treatment to the disease which having lapsed 15 or 20 years advances inexorably, in a slow form, toward the total inability or death. This paper reviews the clinical and morphological characteristics of Huntington's disease as well as the experimental models more commonly used to study this disease, having as source the articles indexed in Medline data base, published in the last 20 years. Advantages and disadvantages of all experimental models to reproduce the disease as well as the perspectives to therapeutic assay have been also considered. the consent of outline reported about the toxic models, those induced by neurotoxins such as quinolinic acid, appears to be the most appropriate to reproduce the neuropathologic characteristic of the disease, an genetic models contributing with more evidence to the knowledge of the disease etiology. Numerous treatments ameliorate clinical manifestations, but none of them has been able to stop or diminish the affectations derived from neuronal loss. At present time it is possible to reproduce, at least partially, the characteristics of the disease in experimentation animals that allow therapy evaluation in HD. from the treatment view point, the more promissory seems to be transplantation of no neuronal cells, taking into account ethical issues and factibility. On the other hand the new technology of interference RNA emerges as a potential therapeutic tool for treatment in HD, and to respond basic questions on the development of the disease.

  19. Dynamic CT of tuberculous meningeal reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinkins, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of intravenous dynamic cranial computed tomography has been applied to the patient population at this location in Saudi Arabia with meningeal tuberculosis. The various manifestations and sequelae including meningitis, arteritis, infarct, and true meningeal tuberculomata all have characteristic if not specific appearances. The dynamic study enhances an otherwise static examination and reveals a great deal about the pathophysiology of tuberculosis involving the cerebral meningeal surfaces. (orig.)

  20. Meningeal cysts in the sacral canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salatkova, A.; Matejka, J.

    1996-01-01

    Meningeal cysts develop from the meningeal cover, contain liquor, are localised in the spinal canal. Clinical demonstration are different, often with no clinical manifestation, or with manifestation from compression surrounding structures. Meningeal cysts is possible diagnostic imaging with perimyelography, CT and MRI. In the paper it was discussed different feature in the diagnosis meningeal cysts with perimyelography and CT of the spine, position and time of the examination.(authors). 7 figs., 11 refs

  1. Adjustment model of thermoluminescence experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno y Moreno, A.; Moreno B, A.

    2002-01-01

    This model adjusts the experimental results for thermoluminescence according to the equation: I (T) = I (a i * exp (-1/b i * (T-C i )) where: a i , b i , c i are the i-Th peak adjusted to a gaussian curve. The adjustments of the curve can be operated manual or analytically using the macro function and the solver.xla complement installed previously in the computational system. In this work it is shown: 1. The information of experimental data from a LiF curve obtained from the Physics Institute of UNAM which the data adjustment model is operated in the macro type. 2. A LiF curve of four peaks obtained from Harshaw information simulated in Microsoft Excel, discussed in previous works, as a reference not in macro. (Author)

  2. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with a ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining around ...

  3. Experimental tests of proton spin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, G.P.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1989-01-01

    We have developed models for the spin-weighted quark and gluon distribution in a longitudinally polarized proton. The model parameters are determined from current algebra sum rules and polarized deep-inelastic scattering data. A number of different scenarios are presented for the fraction of spin carried the constituent parton distributions. A possible long-range experimental program is suggested for measuring various hard scattering processes using polarized lepton and proton beams. With the knowledge gained from these experiments, we can begin to understand the parton contributions to the proton spin. 28 refs., 5 figs

  4. Experimental In Vivo Models of Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Segal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candidiasis is a multifaceted fungal disease including mucosal-cutaneous, visceral, and disseminated infections caused by yeast species of the genus Candida. Candida infections are among the most common human mycoses. Candida species are the third to fourth most common isolates from bloodstream infections in neutropenic or immunocompromised hospitalized patients. The mucosal-cutaneous forms—particularly vaginal infections—have a high prevalence. Vaginitis caused by Candida species is the second most common vaginal infection. Hence, candidiasis is a major subject for research, including experimental in vivo models to study pathogenesis, prevention, or therapy of the disease. The following review article will focus on various experimental in vivo models in different laboratory animals, such as mammals (mice, rats, rabbits, the fruit fly–Drosophila melanogaster, the larvae of the moth Galleria mellonella, or the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The review will describe the induction of the different clinical forms of candidiasis in the various models and the validity of such models in mimicking the human clinical situations. The use of such models for the assessment of antifungal drugs, evaluation of potential vaccines to protect before candidiasis, exploration of Candida virulence factors, and comparison of pathogenicity of different Candida species will be included in the review. All of the above will be reported as based on published studies of numerous investigators as well as on the research of the author and his group.

  5. Stroke in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Maurya, Pradeep Kumar

    2011-04-15

    Stroke in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) occurs in 15-57% of patients especially in advance stage and severe illness. The majority of strokes may be asymptomatic because of being in a silent area, deep coma or associated pathology such as spinal arachnoiditis or tuberculoma. Methods of evaluation also influence the frequency of stroke. MRI is more sensitive in detecting acute (DWI) and chronic (T2, FLAIR) stroke. Most of the strokes in TBM are multiple, bilateral and located in the basal ganglia especially the 'tubercular zone' which comprises of the caudate, anterior thalamus, anterior limb and genu of the internal capsule. These are attributed to the involvement of medial striate, thalamotuberal and thalamostriate arteries which are embedded in exudates and likely to be stretched by a coexistent hydrocephalus. Cortical stroke can also occur due to the involvement of proximal portion of the middle, anterior and posterior cerebral arteries as well as the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid and basilar arteries which are documented in MRI, angiography and autopsy studies. Arteritis is more common than infarction in autopsy study. The role of cytokines especially tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metaloproteineases (MMPs) in damaging the blood brain barrier, attracting leucocytes and release of vasoactive autocoids have been suggested. The prothrombotic state may also contribute to stroke in TBM. Corticosteroids with antitubercular therapy were thought to reduce mortality and morbidity but their role in reducing strokes has not been proven. Aspirin also reduces mortality and its role in reducing stroke in TBM needs further studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental modeling of eddy current inspection capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junker, W.R.; Clark, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter examines the experimental modeling of eddy current inspection capabilities based upon the use of liquid mercury samples designed to represent metal components containing discontinuities. A brief summary of past work with mercury modeling and a detailed discussion of recent experiments designed to further evaluate the technique are presented. The main disadvantages of the mercury modeling concept are that mercury is toxic and must be handled carefully, liquid mercury can only be used to represent nonferromagnetic materials, and wetting and meniscus problems can distort the effective size of artificial discontinuities. Artificial discontinuities placed in a liquid mercury sample can be used to represent discontinuities in solid metallic structures. Discontinuity size and type cannot be characterized from phase angle and signal amplitude data developed with a surface scanning, pancake-type eddy current probe. It is concluded that the mercury model approach can greatly enhance the overall understanding and applicability of eddy current inspection techniques

  7. Endometriose: modelo experimental em ratas Endometriosis: experimental model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schor

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: divulgar a metodologia da indução de endometriose experimental em animais de laboratório. Método: utilizamos ratas albinas, virgens, adultas de aproximadamente três meses de idade, que foram inicialmente anestesiadas pelo éter etílico. Aberta a cavidade abdominal, identificamos os cornos uterinos e retiramos um fragmento de aproximadamente 4 cm do corno uterino direito. Esse fragmento foi mergulhado em solução fisiológica e sob lupa estereoscópica foi separado o endométrio do miométrio e feitos retângulos de aproximadamente 4 por 5 mm. Esses foram fixados por meio de fio de sutura, sobre vasos sangüíneos visíveis a olho nu, na parede lateral do abdômen, tomando-se sempre o cuidado de manter a porção do endométrio livre voltada para a luz da cavidade abdominal. Após 21 dias os animais foram novamente operados para verificarmos o tamanho dos implantes e para retirada do endométrio ectópico para análise histológica. Resultados: macroscopicamente observamos crescimento significativo dos implantes endometriais. Ao exame microscópico pudemos observar a presença de epitélio glandular e estroma semelhantes ao do endométrio tópico. Conclusões: o modelo utilizado reproduz a doença, em ratas, sendo método auxiliar de valia para estudar esta afecção, principalmente a ação de medicamentos sobre esses implantes.Purpose: to demonstrate the experimental endometriosis induction in animals. Method: we used adult female Wistar rats weighing 200 - 250 g anesthetized with ethyl ether to open the abdominal cavity. After identifying the uterine horns, we removed an approximately 4 cm fragment from the right uterine horn. This fragment was placed in physiological saline and, with the aid of a stereoscopic magnifying glass, the endometrium was separated from the myometrium and cut into rectangles of approximately 4 x 5 mm. These rectangles were fastened to the lateral abdominal wall near great blood vessels, taking care

  8. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of “in silico” and “ex vivo” models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals.

  9. Models for Experimental High Density Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Swoboda, Julia; Nowak, Katarzyna; Dziechciarz, Klaudia

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the effects of research on models of high density housing. The authors present urban projects for experimental high density housing estates. The design was based on research performed on 38 examples of similar housing in Poland that have been built after 2003. Some of the case studies show extreme density and that inspired the researchers to test individual virtual solutions that would answer the question: How far can we push the limits? The experimental housing projects show strengths and weaknesses of design driven only by such indexes as FAR (floor attenuation ratio - housing density) and DPH (dwellings per hectare). Although such projects are implemented, the authors believe that there are reasons for limits since high index values may be in contradiction to the optimum character of housing environment. Virtual models on virtual plots presented by the authors were oriented toward maximising the DPH index and DAI (dwellings area index) which is very often the main driver for developers. The authors also raise the question of sustainability of such solutions. The research was carried out in the URBAN model research group (Gliwice, Poland) that consists of academic researchers and architecture students. The models reflect architectural and urban regulations that are valid in Poland. Conclusions might be helpful for urban planners, urban designers, developers, architects and architecture students.

  10. Experimental data and dose-response models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Dose-response relationships for radiation carcinogenesis have been of interest to biologists, modelers, and statisticians for many years. Despite his interest there are few instances in which there are sufficient experimental data to allow the fitting of various dose-response models. In those experimental systems for which data are available the dose-response curves for tumor induction for the various systems cannot be described by a single model. Dose-response models which have been observed following acute exposures to gamma rays include threshold, quadratic, and linear models. Data on sex, age, and environmental influences of dose suggest a strong role of host factors on the dose response. With decreasing dose rate the effectiveness of gamma ray irradiation tends to decrease in essentially every instance. In those cases in which the high dose rate dose response could be described by a quadratic model, the effect of dose rate is consistent with predictions based on radiation effects on the induction of initial events. Whether the underlying reasons for the observed dose-rate effect is a result of effects on the induction of initial events or is due to effects on the subsequent steps in the carcinogenic process is unknown. Information on the dose response for tumor induction for high LET (linear energy transfer) radiations such as neutrons is even more limited. The observed dose and dose rate data for tumor induction following neutron exposure are complex and do not appear to be consistent with predictions based on models for the induction of initial events

  11. Surface physics theoretical models and experimental methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mamonova, Marina V; Prudnikova, I A

    2016-01-01

    The demands of production, such as thin films in microelectronics, rely on consideration of factors influencing the interaction of dissimilar materials that make contact with their surfaces. Bond formation between surface layers of dissimilar condensed solids-termed adhesion-depends on the nature of the contacting bodies. Thus, it is necessary to determine the characteristics of adhesion interaction of different materials from both applied and fundamental perspectives of surface phenomena. Given the difficulty in obtaining reliable experimental values of the adhesion strength of coatings, the theoretical approach to determining adhesion characteristics becomes more important. Surface Physics: Theoretical Models and Experimental Methods presents straightforward and efficient approaches and methods developed by the authors that enable the calculation of surface and adhesion characteristics for a wide range of materials: metals, alloys, semiconductors, and complex compounds. The authors compare results from the ...

  12. CT scan of bacterial and aseptic meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemoto, Kazumasa; Saiwai, Shigeo; Tamaoka, Koichi

    1983-01-01

    CT scans of the patients with aseptic and bacterial meningitis were reviewed and compared to previous reports. In aseptic meningitis, no abnormal CT findings were observed. In bacterial meningitis, CT findings were ventricular dilatation, subdural fluid collection, parenchymal low density, intracerebral hematoma and meningeal enhancement after contrast injection. Three patients among 48 suffered from status epileptics during the course of the illness. All of 3 patients developed parenchymal inhomogeneous low density and progressive ventricular dilatation which did not improve after ventricular peritoneal shunt surgery. We believe that these changes are most likely due to hypoxic hypoxemia during epileptic seizure and meningitis itself seems to play a little role. (author)

  13. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality and morbidity have remained high in bacterial meningitis. Impairment of cerebral energy metabolism probably contributes to unfavorable outcome. Intracerebral microdialysis is routinely used to monitor cerebral energy metabolism, and recent experimental studies indicate...... that this technique may separate ischemia and non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is a retrospective interpretation of biochemical data obtained in a series of patients with severe community-acquired meningitis. METHODS: Cerebral energy metabolism was monitored in 15 patients with severe...... community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level

  14. Superficial tension: experimental model with simple materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintori Ferreira, María Alejandra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work appears a didactic offer based on an experimental activity using materials of very low cost, orientated to achieving that the student understand and interpret the phenomenon of superficial tension together with the importance of the modeling in sciences. It has as principal aim of education bring the student over to the mechanics of the static fluids and the intermolecular forces, combining scientific contents with questions near to the student what provides an additional motivation to the reflection of the scientific investigation.

  15. Onkologisk behandling af meningeal carcinomatose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulim, S.; Høyer, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Meningeal carcinomatosis (MC) occurs in 5-8% of cancer patients. In the       majority of cases, MC appears in patients with advanced disease. The       increase in incidence is probably caused by improved survival due to       improvements in systemic therapy and an increased awareness of MC among...

  16. Cochlear implant after bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bille, Jesper; Ovesen, Therese

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective case study at a tertiary referral center was to investigate the outcome of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with sensorineural hearing loss due to meningitis compared to CI in children with deafness due to other reasons. This post-meningial group (PMG) consisted of 22 children undergoing CI due to deafness induced by meningitis, between December 1996 and January 2012. Five children had bilateral simultaneous implantation. None was excluded and the children were followed for at least 3 years. Operations were carried out by one of two surgeons using similar techniques in all cases. Each patient from the PMG was matched 2:1 with children having implantation for other reasons according to age and follow up (control group). Overall, the median category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) score were not statistically significantly different between the two groups. The presence of additional central nervous system (CNS) disorders (post-meningeal sequelae), however, correlated significantly with poorer outcome CI was a safe procedure without surgical complications in the present study. It is possible to restore auditory capacity and speech performance to a degree comparable to children undergoing implantation for other reasons. A statistically important variable is secondary CNS involvement. The rehabilitation program after CI should be adjusted according to these additional handicaps. It is recommended to screen meningitis patients as fast as possible to identify those with hearing loss and initiate treatment with hearing aids or CI. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  17. Computed tomography in meningeal carcinomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H; Ono, N; Horikoshi, S; Uki, J; Takeda, F [Saitama Cancer Center (Japan)

    1982-04-01

    CT findings of meningeal carcinomatosis were studied in 17 patients (seven with lung cancer, two with breast cancer, one with gastric cancer, one with malignant melanoma, five with leukemia, and one with malignant lymphoma). The diagnosis was confirmed by a cytological survey of the cerebrospinal fluid and/or autopsy. Signs and symptoms caused by meningeal carcinomatosis at the CT examination varied from individual to individual. Those most frequently observed were signs of increased intracranial pressure, often accompanied by cranial nerve palsies, paresthesia, motor weakness, cerebellar signs, and nuchal stiffness, CT scan revealed evidence of meningeal carcinomatosis in ten cases out of the seventeen. CT evidences were obtained in 16.7% of the cases with hematologic malignancy and in 81.8% of those with non-hematologic malignancies. The CT findings of meningeal carcinomatosis may be summarized as follows: I. 1) Obliteration and narrowing of the cisterns and sulci, with contrast enhancement along them. 2) Enhanced spots/areas beneath the brain surface, with contrast enhancement. 3) Diffuse, slightly high density of the brain surface, with contrast enhancement. 4) Enhancement of the ventricular wall. 5) Hydrocephalus. II. 1) No CT abnormalities.

  18. Computed tomography in meningeal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Hidehito; Ono, Nobuo; Horikoshi, Satoru; Uki, Jiro; Takeda, Fumikazu

    1982-01-01

    CT findings of meningeal carcinomatosis were studied in 17 patients (seven with lung cancer, two with breast cancer, one with gastric cancer, one with malignant melanoma, five with leukemia, and one with malignant lymphoma). The diagnosis was confirmed by a cytological survey of the cerebrospinal fluid and/or autopsy. Signs and symptoms caused by meningeal carcinomatosis at the CT examination varied from individual to individual. Those most frequently observed were signs of increased intracranial pressure, often accompanied by cranial nerve palsies, paresthesia, motor weakness, cerebellar signs, and nuchal stiffness, CT scan revealed evidence of meningeal carcinomatosis in ten cases out of the seventeen. CT evidences were obtained in 16.7% of the cases with hematologic malignancy and in 81.8% of those with non-hematologic malignancies. The CT findings of meningeal carcinomatosis may be summarized as follows: I. 1) Obliteration and narrowing of the cisterns and sulci, with contrast enhancement along them. 2) Enhanced spots/areas beneath the brain surface, with contrast enhancement. 3) Diffuse, slightly high density of the brain surface, with contrast enhancement. 4) Enhancement of the ventricular wall. 5) Hydrocephalus. II. 1) No CT abnormalities. (author)

  19. Experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasteghin K.T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Propose a new experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits after partial bladder obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty North Folk male rabbits, weighting 1,700 to 2,820 g (mean: 2,162 g were studied. The animals were distributed in 2 experimental groups, formed by 15 rabbits each: Group 1 - clinical control. In this group there was no surgical intervention; Group 2 - bladder outlet obstruction. In this group, after anesthetizing the animal, urethral cannulation with Foley catheter 10F was performed and then an adjustable plastic bracelet was passed around the bladder neck. It was then adjusted in order to not constrict the urethra. The following parameters were studied in M1 - pre-operative period; M2 - 4 weeks post-operatively moments: 1- urine culture; 2- cystometric study; 3- serum creatinine and BUN. RESULTS: Bladder weight was 2.5 times larger in the group with obstruction than in the control group. Cystometric evaluation showed a significant increase in maximal vesical volume in the final moment at Group G2. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the groups studied. There was no statistically significant difference between maximal detrusor pressure and vesical compliance in the different moments or in the studied groups. There was an absence of uninhibited detrusor contractions in all the animals in group 1, and involuntary contractions were detected in 93% of group 2 animals. There was no significant variation in BUN and serum creatinine either among the groups or in the same group. CONCLUSIONS: We observed in the group with obstruction a bladder weight 2.5 higher than normal bladders. We detected involuntary contractions in 93% of the animals in group 2, establishing this experimental model as appropriate to secondary bladder instability and partial bladder outlet obstruction.

  20. Experimental Oral Candidiasis in Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Yuthika H.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.

    2001-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is as much the final outcome of the vulnerability of the host as of the virulence of the invading organism. We review here the extensive literature on animal experiments mainly appertaining to the host predisposing factors that initiate and perpetuate these infections. The monkey, rat, and mouse are the choice models for investigating oral candidiasis, but comparisons between the same or different models appear difficult, because of variables such as the study design, the number of animals used, their diet, the differences in Candida strains, and the duration of the studies. These variables notwithstanding, the following could be concluded. (i) The primate model is ideal for investigating Candida-associated denture stomatitis since both erythematous and pseudomembranous lesions have been produced in monkeys with prosthetic plates; they are, however, expensive and difficult to obtain and maintain. (ii) The rat model (both Sprague-Dawley and Wistar) is well proven for observing chronic oral candidal colonization and infection, due to the ease of breeding and handling and their ready availability. (iii) Mice are similar, but in addition there are well characterized variants simulating immunologic and genetic abnormalities (e.g., athymic, euthymic, murine-acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficient models) and hence are used for short-term studies relating the host immune response and oral candidiasis. Nonetheless, an ideal, relatively inexpensive model representative of the human oral environment in ecological and microbiological terms is yet to be described. Until such a model is developed, researchers should pay attention to standardization of the experimental protocols described here to obtain broadly comparable and meaningful data. PMID:11292645

  1. Experimental models of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abbondanza, Josephine A; Loch Macdonald, R

    2014-02-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical problem. Most studies of pathogenesis and treatment involve humans. Advances in understanding of human diseases may be made using animal models. We reviewed all animal models of CSDH and report here their results, conclusions and limitations in order to set a baseline upon which further advanced experimental work related to this disease can be made. PubMed, Medline, Embase and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched with no time limits using the keyword 'chronic subdural hematoma' and MeSH term 'hematoma, subdural, chronic'. The authors reviewed all papers written related to this disease and selected all publications involving animals. There were no other restrictions. The findings and conclusions of the papers are summarized here. No formal analysis was done because of the variation in species used, methods for induction of CSDH, times of assessment and reporting of results. Attempts to create CSDH have been made in mice, rats, cats, dogs and monkeys. Methods include injection or surgical implantation of clotted blood or various other blood products and mixtures into the potential subdural space or the subcutaneous space. No intracranial model produced a progressively expanding CSDH. Transient hematoma expansion with liquification could be produced by subcutaneous injections in some models. Spontaneous subdural blood collections were found after creation of hydrocephalus in mice by systemic injection of the neurotoxin, 6-aminonicotinamide. The histology of the hematoma membranes in several models resembles the appearance in humans. None of the models has been replicated since its first description. We did not find a report of a reproducible, well-described animal model of human CSDH.

  2. Experimental and theoretical requirements for fuel modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatesoupe, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    From a scientific point of view it may be considered that any event in the life of a fuel pin under irradiation should be perfectly well understood and foreseen from that deterministic point of view, the whole behaviour of the pin maybe analysed and dismantled with a specific function for every component part and each component part related to one basic phenomenon which can be independently studied on pure physical grounds. When extracted from the code structure the subroutine is studied for itself by specialists who try to keep as close as possible to the physics involved in the phenomenon; that often leads to an impressive luxury in details and a subsequent need for many unavailable input data. It might seem more secure to follow that approach since it tries to be firmly based on theoretical grounds. One should think so if the phenomenological situation in the pin were less complex than it is. The codes would not be adequate for off-normal operating conditions since for the accidental transient conditions the key-phenomena would not be the same as for steady-state or slow transient conditions. The orientation given to fuel modelling is based on our two main technological constraints which are: no fuel melting; no cladding failure; no excessive cladding deformation. In this context, the only relevant models are those which have a significant influence on the maximum temperatures in the fuel or on the cladding damage hence the selection between key models and irrelevant models which will next be done. A rather pragmatic view is kept on codification with a special focus on a few determinant aspects of fuel behaviour and no attention to models which are nothing but decorative. Fuel modeling is merely considered as a link between experimental knowledge; it serves as a guide for further improvements in fuel design and as so happens to be quite useful. On this basis the main lacks in of fuel behaviour is described. These are mainly concerning: thermal transfer through

  3. Experimental study and modelling of transient boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    A failure in the control system of the power of a nuclear reactor can lead to a Reactivity Initiated Accident in a nuclear power plant. Then, a power peak occurs in some fuel rods, high enough to lead to the coolant film boiling. It leads to an important increase of the temperature of the rod. The possible risk of the clad failure is a matter of interest for the Institut de Radioprotection et de Securite Nucleaire. The transient boiling heat transfer is not yet understood and modelled. An experimental set-up has been built at the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT). Subcooled HFE-7000 flows vertically upward in a semi annulus test section. The inner half cylinder simulates the clad and is made of a stainless steel foil, heated by Joule effect. Its temperature is measured by an infrared camera, coupled with a high speed camera for the visualization of the flow topology. The whole boiling curve is studied in steady state and transient regimes: convection, onset of boiling, nucleate boiling, critical heat flux, film boiling and rewetting. The steady state heat transfers are well modelled by literature correlations. Models are suggested for the transient heat flux: the convection and nucleate boiling evolutions are self-similar during a power step. This observation allows to model more complex evolutions, as temperature ramps. The transient Hsu model well represents the onset of nucleate boiling. When the intensity of the power step increases, the film boiling begins at the same temperature but with an increasing heat flux. For power ramps, the critical heat flux decreases while the corresponding temperature increases with the heating rate. When the wall is heated, the film boiling heat transfer is higher than in steady state but it is not understood. A two-fluid model well simulates the cooling film boiling and the rewetting. (author)

  4. Increase of Meningitis Risk in Stroke Patients in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chie-Hong Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposeThe blood–brain barrier (BBB not only provides a physical obstruction but also recruits and activates neutrophils in cases of infection. Hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke reportedly induces the disruption of the BBB. However, few studies have reported a correlation between the incidence of meningitis in patients with a history of stroke. This study tested the hypothesis that patients with a history of stroke may be more vulnerable to meningitis.MethodsStroke and age-matched comparison (n = 29,436 and 87,951, respectively cohorts were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database (2000–2011. Correlations between the two cohorts were evaluated by Cox proportional hazard regression model, Kaplan–Meier curve, and log-rank tests.ResultsThe incidence of meningitis was higher in the stroke cohort compared to that in the comparison cohort [hazard ratio (HR, 2.89; 95% confidence interval (CI, 2.23–3.74, p < 0.001]. After adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities, the estimated HR in the stroke cohort was 2.55-fold higher than that in the comparison cohort (CI, 1.94–3.37; p < 0.001. Notably, patients who had experienced hemorrhagic stroke had a higher incidence rate of meningitis than those with a history of ischemic stroke, except for patients older than 75 years (incidence rates in hemorrhagic/ischemic stroke patients, 3.14/1.48 in patients younger than 45 years, 1.52/0.41 in 45- to 64-year group, 1.15/0.90 in 65- to 74-year group, 0.74/0.93 in patients older than 75 years. Moreover, stroke patients who had undergone head surgery had the highest meningitis risk (adjusted HR, 8.66; 95% CI, 5.55–13.5; p < 0.001 followed by stroke patients who had not undergone head surgery (adjusted HR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.57–2.82; p < 0.001.ConclusionOur results indicated that stroke patients have higher risks of meningitis. Compromised BBB integrity in stroke patients may lead to increased

  5. Using Relative Humidity Forecasts to Manage Meningitis in the Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Akweogno, P.; Awine, T.; Dalaba, M.; Dukic, V.; Dumont, A.; Hayden, M.; Hodgson, A.; Hopson, T. M.; Hugonnet, S.; Yoksas, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur quasi-regularly and with devastating impact. In 2008, for example, eighty-eight thousand people contracted meningitis and over five thousand died. Until very recently, the protection provided by the only available vaccine was so limited and short-lived that the only practical strategy for vaccination was reactive: waiting until an epidemic occurred in the region and then vaccinating in that region to prevent the epidemic's further growth. Even with that strategy, there were still times when demand outpaced available vaccine. While a new vaccine has recently been developed that is effective and inexpensive enough to be used more broadly and proactively, it is only effective against the strain of bacteria that causes the most common kind of bacterial meningitis. As a result, there will likely be continued need for reactive vaccination strategies. It is widely known that meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur only in the dry season. Our project investigated this relationship, and several independent lines of evidence demonstrate a robust relationship between the onset of the rainy season, as marked by weekly average relative humidity above 40%, and the end of meningitis epidemics. These lines of evidence include statistical analysis of two years of weekly meningitis and weather data across the Sahel, cross-correlation of ten years of meningitis and weather data in the Upper East region of northern Ghana, and high-resolution weather simulations of past meningitis seasons to interpolate available weather data. We also adapted two techniques that have been successfully used in public health studies: generalized additive models, which have been used to relate air quality and health, and a linearized version of the compartmental epidemics model that has been used to understand MRSA. Based on these multiple lines of evidence, average weekly relative humidity forecast two weeks in advance appears consistently and strongly related to

  6. Meningitis tras anestesia espinal Meningitis after a spinal anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    A. L. Vázquez-Martínez; F. Castro; G. Illodo; E. Freiré; M. A. Camba

    2008-01-01

    La meningitis post-punción es una importante complicación de la anestesia espinal. Describimos el caso de un varón de cuarenta y seis años que ingresó para tratamiento quirúrgico de una hernia umbilical, la cirugía se realizó bajo anestesia intradural. Tras la intervención el paciente comenzó con un cuadro clínico compatible con meningitis, que se confirmó tras examen del líquido cefalorraquídeo. Se trató con antibióticos a pesar de la no identificación de gérmenes, siendo la evolución favora...

  7. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  8. Modeling a nuclear reactor for experimental purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility is a scale model of a commercial PWR and is as fully functional and operational as the generic commercial counterpart. LOFT was designed and built for experimental purposes as part of the overall NRC reactor safety research program. The purpose of LOFT is to assess the capability of reactor safety systems to perform their intended functions during occurrences of off-normal conditions in a commercial nuclear reactor. Off-normal conditions arising from large and small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), operational transients, and anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) were to be investigated. This paper describes the LOFT model of the generic PWR and summarizes the experiments that have been conducted in the context of the significant findings involving the complex transient thermal-hydraulics and the consequent effects on the commercial reactor analytical licensing techniques. Through these techniques the validity of the LOFT model as a scaled counterpart of the generic PWR is shown

  9. Increased anisotropy in neonatal meningitis: an indicator of meningeal inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Nath, Kavindra; Malik, Gyanendra K.; Gupta, Amit; Prasad, Kashi N.; Purwar, Ankur; Rathore, Divya; Rathore, Ram K.S.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2007-01-01

    Increased anisotropy in brain abscesses has been shown to be due to adhesion of inflammatory cells and is suggestive of an active inflammatory process. The objective of this study was to determine if similar changes occur in the pia-arachnoid on the surface of the cerebral cortex in patients with pyogenic meningitis, and if these changes regress following antibiotic therapy. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed on 14 term neonates (mean age 13 days) with bacterial meningitis and 10 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on areas including the leptomeninges, the cerebral cortex and adjoining subcortical white matter for quantitation of mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity (MD) values. Follow-up MRI was performed in five of the neonates in the patient group after 2 weeks of antibiotic treatment. FA and MD values were compared in patients before and after antibiotic treatment as well as with those in the healthy controls. Significantly higher FA values but no difference in MD values were observed in the patient group as compared to the healthy controls at both time points (before and after antibiotic treatment). Significantly decreased FA values in the frontal, occipital and temporal cortical regions were observed in patients following antibiotic treatment. DTI-derived FA may be of value in the noninvasive assessment of meningeal inflammatory activity and treatment response in neonates. (orig.)

  10. Increased anisotropy in neonatal meningitis: an indicator of meningeal inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Nath, Kavindra [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Lucknow, UP (India); Malik, Gyanendra K.; Gupta, Amit [King George' s Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Lucknow (India); Prasad, Kashi N. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Lucknow (India); Purwar, Ankur; Rathore, Divya; Rathore, Ram K.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Kanpur (India); Narayana, Ponnada A. [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Increased anisotropy in brain abscesses has been shown to be due to adhesion of inflammatory cells and is suggestive of an active inflammatory process. The objective of this study was to determine if similar changes occur in the pia-arachnoid on the surface of the cerebral cortex in patients with pyogenic meningitis, and if these changes regress following antibiotic therapy. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed on 14 term neonates (mean age 13 days) with bacterial meningitis and 10 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on areas including the leptomeninges, the cerebral cortex and adjoining subcortical white matter for quantitation of mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity (MD) values. Follow-up MRI was performed in five of the neonates in the patient group after 2 weeks of antibiotic treatment. FA and MD values were compared in patients before and after antibiotic treatment as well as with those in the healthy controls. Significantly higher FA values but no difference in MD values were observed in the patient group as compared to the healthy controls at both time points (before and after antibiotic treatment). Significantly decreased FA values in the frontal, occipital and temporal cortical regions were observed in patients following antibiotic treatment. DTI-derived FA may be of value in the noninvasive assessment of meningeal inflammatory activity and treatment response in neonates. (orig.)

  11. Proton NMR metabolic profiling of CSF reveals distinct differentiation of meningitis from negative controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Tanushri; Singh, Suruchi; Sen, Manodeep; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Agarwal, Gaurav Raj; Singh, Deepak Kumar; Srivastava, Janmejai Kumar; Singh, Alka; Srivastava, Rajeshwar Nath; Roy, Raja

    2017-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an essential bio-fluid of the central nervous system (CNS), playing a vital role in the protection of CNS and performing neuronal function regulation. The chemical composition of CSF varies during onset of meningitis, neurodegenerative disorders (positive controls) and in traumatic cases (negative controls). The study design was broadly categorized into meningitis cases, negative controls and positive controls. Further differentiation among the three groups was carried out using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) followed by supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). The statistical analysis of meningitis vs. negative controls using PLS-DA model resulted in R 2 of 0.97 and Q 2 of 0.85. There was elevation in the levels of ketone bodies, total free amino acids, glutamine, creatine, citrate and choline containing compounds (choline and GPC) in meningitis cases. Similarly, meningitis vs. positive controls resulted in R 2 of 0.80 and Q 2 of 0.60 and showed elevation in the levels of total free amino acids, glutamine, creatine/creatinine and citrate in the meningitis group. Four cases of HIV were identified by PLS-DA model as well as by clinical investigations. On the basis of metabolic profile it was found that negative control CSF samples are more appropriate for differentiation of meningitis than positive control CSF samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High Yield of Adult Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells Obtained from Meningeal Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sissi Dolci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte loss can lead to cognitive and motor deficits. Current remyelinating therapeutic strategies imply either modulation of endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors or transplantation of in vitro expanded oligodendrocytes. Cell therapy, however, still lacks identification of an adequate source of oligodendrocyte present in adulthood and able to efficiently produce transplantable cells. Recently, a neural stem cell-like population has been identified in meninges. We developed a protocol to obtain high yield of oligodendrocyte lineage cells from one single biopsy of adult rat meningeal tissue. From 1 cm2 of adult rat spinal cord meninges, we efficiently expanded a homogenous culture of 10 millions of meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells in a short period of time (approximately 4 weeks. Meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells show typical mature oligodendrocyte morphology and express specific oligodendrocyte markers, such as galactosylceramidase and myelin basic protein. Moreover, when transplanted in a chemically demyelinated spinal cord model, meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells display in vivo-remyelinating potential. This oligodendrocyte lineage cell population derives from an accessible and adult source, being therefore a promising candidate for autologous cell therapy of demyelinating diseases. In addition, the described method to differentiate meningeal-derived neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte lineage cells may represent a valid in vitro model to dissect oligodendrocyte differentiation and to screen for drugs capable to promote oligodendrocyte regeneration.

  13. C-reactive protein and bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Jørgensen, P E; Nexø, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review published articles on the diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests with cerebrospinal fluid and serum in diagnosing bacterial meningitis. The literature from 1980 and onwards was searched using the electronic databases of MEDLINE, and we used summary...... measured in serum, and 4 in which it had been measured in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum. The odds ratio for bacterial meningitis versus aseptic meningitis for a positive CRP test with cerebrospinal fluid was estimated at 241 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 59-980), and the central tendencies.......06-0.08, respectively, the post-test probability of not having bacterial meningitis given a negative test is very high (> or = 97%), in the range of a pre-test probability (prevalence of bacterial meningitis) from 10 to 30%, whereas the post-test probability of bacterial meningitis given a positive test is considerably...

  14. Clinical Case of Listeria Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.O. Kuzmina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a case of listeria meningitis in a 41-year-old man. At the time of admission to hospital, the patient complained of fever, headache, vomiting, general weakness. An objective examination revealed cervical lymphadenopathy, meningeal signs (positive Kernig’s sign and doubtful rigidity of occipitals, with no focal symptoms. On the right hand it was revealed an abscess in the stage of healing. In the liquor we have detected: pleocytosis — 222 cells with a predominance of neutrophils — 73 %, рrotein — 0.49 g/l, the sugar level in the liquor is slightly reduced. During the bacteriological study of liquor we have isolated Listeria monocytogenes. Serological survey of blood serum using passive hemagglutination test and indirect hemagglutination test revealed levels of antibodies to Listeria monocytogenes — 1 : 800 and 3 (+, respectively.

  15. Gallium-67 uptake in meningeal sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, J.G.; Hicks, B.H.; Maisey, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    A case of sarcoidosis limited to the central nervous system is described in which the diagnosis was suggested by high Ga-67 uptake in the cranial and spinal meninges. The diagnosis was confirmed by meningeal biopsy. Treatment with oral corticosteroids resulted in clinical improvement and marked reduction in Ga-67 uptake in the meninges. This is the first reported case of the central nervous system sarcoid diagnosed by Ga-67 imaging

  16. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of cranial nerve involvement in cryptococcal meningitis.

  17. Pediatric bacterial meningitis in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenga, N; Sicard, S; Cuadro-Alvarez, E; Long, L; Njuieyon, F; Martin, E; Kom-Tchameni, R; Balcaen, J; Moreau, B; Boukhari, R

    2015-01-01

    Controlling vaccine-preventable infectious diseases is a public health priority in French Guiana but there is currently no epidemiological data on pediatric bacterial meningitis in this overseas department. Our aim was to describe data related to pediatric bacterial meningitis in French Guiana and compare it with that of metropolitan France. We conducted a multicenter retrospective study from 2000 to 2010 to describe the clinical picture, biological data, epidemiology, and outcome of pediatric bacterial meningitis case patients in French Guiana. The median age of bacterial meningitis patients was 6months [0-15] and the sex ratio 1.06. We observed a total of 60 bacterial meningitis case patients. Most presented with pneumococcal meningitis (24 patients; 40%); 11 with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis (23%), five with group B streptococcal meningitis (8.5%), and five others (8.5%) with staphylococcal meningitis (three patients presented with coagulase-negative staphylococci and two with Staphylococcus aureus). Only one patient presented with group B meningococcal meningitis, an 18-month-old infant. We recorded 14 deaths (overall case fatality: 23%); eight were due to Streptococcus pneumoniae (case fatality: 33%). The overall sequelae rate was 28%. It was 32% for patients presenting with pneumococcal meningitis. We observed that 38% of children who had never been vaccinated were infected by a vaccine-preventable bacterium. We observed many differences in the distribution of the bacteria and in the patients' prognosis when comparing the French Guiana data with that of metropolitan France. Improving vaccination coverage would decrease the incidence of H. influenzae meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. The bacterial meningitis score to distinguish bacterial from aseptic meningitis in children from Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekitarian Filho, Eduardo; Horita, Sérgio Massaru; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Alves, Anna Cláudia Dominguez; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2013-09-01

    In a retrospective cohort of 494 children with meningitis in Sao Paulo, Brazil, the Bacterial Meningitis Score identified all the children with bacterial meningitis (sensitivity 100%, 95% confidence interval: 92-100% and negative predictive value 100%, 95% confidence interval: 98-100%). Addition of cerebrospinal fluid lactate to the score did not improve clinical prediction rule performance.

  19. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D.; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53-3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall.

  20. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53–3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall. (paper)

  1. Post spinal meningitis and asepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videira, Rogerio L R; Ruiz-Neto, P P; Brandao Neto, M

    2002-07-01

    Post spinal meningitis (PSM) is a complication still currently being reported. After two PSM cases in our hospital an epidemiological study was initiated, which included a survey of techniques for asepsis that are applied in our department. Cases defined as PSM comprised meningitis within a week after spinal anesthesia. Anesthesia records, anesthesia complication files and the records of the Hospital Commission for Infection Control from 1997 to 2000 were reviewed. Asepsis techniques applied were surveyed by a questionnaire answered by all our department's anesthesiologists. The equipment and procedures for spinal anesthesia were listed. Current anesthesia textbooks were reviewed for recommendations regarding asepsis techniques in conjunction with spinal anesthesia. Three cases of PSM were identified following 38,128 spinal anesthesias whereas none was observed in 12,822 patients subjected to other types of regional or general anesthesia (P>0.05). Culture of cerebrospinal fluid yielded Streptococcus in two patients and was negative in the other patient. The asepsis technique applied by the anesthesiologists varied considerably. The literature review showed that aspects on asepsis for spinal anesthesia are poorly covered. The incidence of meningitis was similar in patients subjected to spinal anesthesia and in those subjected to other anesthetic techniques. Asepsis techniques were found to differ considerably among our staff members, reflecting the lack of well-defined published standards for this procedure. We recommend that asepsis for spinal anesthesia should not be less rigorous than for surgical asepsis.

  2. Purulent Bacterial Meningitis at Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Karimi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis is an acute inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, which are known as the meninges. This infection may be caused by Streptococcus pneumonia bacteria. In this study, we presented the case of a female newborn with meningitis secondary to Streptococcus pneumonia. Her birth weight and height were normal. After 24 hours of birth, the neonate was diagnosed with tachypnea, without presenting any signs of fever or respiratory distress. The newborn was referred to Sheikh Children's Hospital, where chest X-ray showed clear lungs with no evidence of abnormality. Furthermore, the cardiothoracic ratio was normal. A complete blood count demonstrated white blood cell (WBC count of 5400/uL. In Blood/Culcture ratio (B/C test, Streptococcus pneumonia was reported, and the results of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis confirmed this result. Following 14 days of receiving antibiotic therapy, the results of CSF analysis were within the normal range. Her visual and hearing examinations were normal, and demonstrated improved situation. The infant was discharged with exclusive breastfeeding.

  3. Radiation in the treatment of meningeal leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    At the present time, a successful regimen for the eradication of occult meningeal leukemia is the combination of cranial radiotherapy in a dose of 1800 rads in 10 fractions in 12 to 14 days with six doses of intrathecal methotrexate. This regimen, when given with prednisone and vincristine can be expected to give a relapse rate for isolated meningeal leukemia of approximately 5% during the first 2 years of follow-up. A modification of this regimen utilizing craniospinal radiation with prior and concurrent intrathecal methotrexate is given for the treatment of overt meningeal leukemia at diagnosis or for an isolated first relapse with meningeal leukemia. Radiation technique and morbidity are discussed

  4. Standard Model theory calculations and experimental tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.

    2015-01-01

    To present knowledge, all the physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be described in the framework of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed the newly discovered Higgs boson with a mass close to 125 GeV seems to confirm the predictions of the SM. Thus, besides looking for direct manifestations of the physics beyond the SM, one of the primary missions of the LHC is to perform ever more stringent tests of the SM. This requires not only improved theoretical developments to produce testable predictions and provide experiments with reliable event generators, but also sophisticated analyses techniques to overcome the formidable experimental environment of the LHC and perform precision measurements. In the first section, we describe the state of the art of the theoretical tools and event generators that are used to provide predictions for the production cross sections of the processes of interest. In section 2, inclusive cross section measurements with jets, leptons and vector bosons are presented. Examples of differential cross sections, charge asymmetries and the study of lepton pairs are proposed in section 3. Finally, in section 4, we report studies on the multiple production of gauge bosons and constraints on anomalous gauge couplings

  5. IVIM: modeling, experimental validation and application to animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournet, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    This PhD thesis is centered on the study of the IVIM ('Intravoxel Incoherent Motion') MRI sequence. This sequence allows for the study of the blood microvasculature such as the capillaries, arterioles and venules. To be sensitive only to moving groups of spins, diffusion gradients are added before and after the 180 degrees pulse of a spin echo (SE) sequence. The signal component corresponding to spins diffusing in the tissue can be separated from the one related to spins travelling in the blood vessels which is called the IVIM signal. These two components are weighted by f IVIM which represents the volume fraction of blood inside the tissue. The IVIM signal is usually modelled by a mono-exponential (ME) function and characterized by a pseudo-diffusion coefficient, D*. We propose instead a bi-exponential IVIM model consisting of a slow pool, characterized by F slow and D* slow corresponding to the capillaries as in the ME model, and a fast pool, characterized by F fast and D* fast, related to larger vessels such as medium-size arterioles and venules. This model was validated experimentally and more information was retrieved by comparing the experimental signals to a dictionary of simulated IVIM signals. The influence of the pulse sequence, the repetition time and the diffusion encoding time was also studied. Finally, the IVIM sequence was applied to the study of an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. (author) [fr

  6. Myeloid-Related Protein 14 Promotes Inflammation and Injury in Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wache, Christina; Klein, Matthias; Andersen, Christian Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Neutrophilic inflammation often persists for days despite effective antibiotic treatment and contributes to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. We propose here that myeloid-related protein 14 (MRP14), an abundant cytosolic protein in myeloid cells, acts as an endogenous danger signal......, driving inflammation and aggravating tissue injury. METHODS:  The release pattern of MRP14 was analyzed in human and murine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as well as in isolated neutrophils. Its functional role was assessed in a mouse meningitis model, using MRP14-deficient mice. RESULTS:  We detected large...... quantities of MRP14 in CSF specimens from patients and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Immunohistochemical analyses and a cell-depletion approach indicated neutrophils as the major source of MRP14. In a meningitis model, MRP14-deficient mice showed a better resolution of inflammation during antibiotic...

  7. Soil Dust Aerosols and Wind as Predictors of Seasonal Meningitis Incidence in Niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Garcia Pando, Carlos; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Trzaska, Sylwia; Miller, Ron L.; Perlwitz, Jan P.; Baldasano, Jose M.; Cuevas, Emilio; Ceccato, Pietro; Yaka, Pascal; hide

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis are concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa during the dry season, a period when the region is affected by the Harmattan, a dry and dusty northeasterly trade wind blowing from the Sahara into the Gulf of Guinea.Objectives: We examined the potential of climate-based statistical forecasting models to predict seasonal incidence of meningitis in Niger at both the national and district levels.Data and methods: We used time series of meningitis incidence from 1986 through 2006 for 38 districts in Niger. We tested models based on data that would be readily available in an operational framework, such as climate and dust, population, and the incidence of early cases before the onset of the meningitis season in January-May. Incidence was used as a proxy for immunological state.

  8. Efeitos de concentrações crescentes de lidocaína hiperbárica, administradas no espaço subaracnóideo, sobre a medula espinhal e as meninges: estudo experimental em cães Efectos de concentraciones crecientes de lidocaína hiperbara, administradas en el espacio subaracnoideo, sobre la médula espinal y las meninges: estudio experimental en perros Effects of increasing spinal hyperbaric lidocaine concentrations on spinal cord and meninges: experimental study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvânia R.O. Pires

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Ainda não está bem estabelecida a concentração de lidocaína que é potencialmente capaz de determinar lesão no tecido nervoso. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi estudar os efeitos sobre a medula espinhal e as meninges, de concentrações crescentes de lidocaína administrada por via subaracnóidea, em injeção única através de agulha de Quincke. MÉTODO: Após a aprovação da Comissão de Ética em Experimentação Animal, 40 cães adultos foram anestesiados com fentanil e etomidato e submetidos a punção subaracnóidea com agulha de Quincke 22G 21/2 para introdução de 1 mL, em 10 segundos, de solução glicosada a 7,5% - Grupo 1; lidocaína a 5% em solução glicosada a 7,5% - Grupo 2; lidocaína a 7,5% em solução glicosada a 7,5% - Grupo 3; lidocaína a 10% em solução glicosada a 7,5% - Grupo 4. Após a recuperação da anestesia venosa, foram observados, no período em que os animais estavam em vigência do bloqueio subaracnóideo, a presença de bloqueio motor, o tônus do esfíncter anal (normal ou relaxado e o nível de bloqueio sensitivo nos diferentes dermátomos das regiões cervical, torácica, lombar e sacral. Os animais permaneceram em cativeiro por 72 horas. Foram avaliados o tônus do esfíncter anal, a motricidade das patas posteriores, a sensibilidade dolorosa nas patas anteriores e posteriores e nos dermátomos sacrais, lombares e torácicos. Após serem sacrificados por eletrocussão sob anestesia, foram retiradas porções lombar e sacral da medula espinhal e das meninges para exame histológico por microscopia óptica. RESULTADOS: Nenhum animal dos Grupos 1 e 2 apresentou lesões clínicas ou histológicas. Três animais do Grupo 3 apresentaram alterações motoras nas patas posteriores e relaxamento do esfíncter anal. Nestes, foram observados focos de necrose na região posterior (dois cães e necrose em faixa em toda a superfície medular (um cão. Em um outro animal deste grupo, no

  9. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  10. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-05-21

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2012. Endocarditis was identified in 24 of 1025 episodes (2%) of bacterial meningitis. Cultures yielded Streptococcus pneumoniae in 13 patients, Staphylococcus aureus in 8 patients, and Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus salivarius in 1 patient each. Clues leading to the diagnosis of endocarditis were cardiac murmurs, persistent or recurrent fever, a history of heart valve disease, and S aureus as the causative pathogen of bacterial meningitis. Treatment consisted of prolonged antibiotic therapy in all patients and surgical valve replacement in 10 patients (42%). Two patients were treated with oral anticoagulants, and both developed life-threatening intracerebral hemorrhage. Systemic (70%) and neurological (54%) complications occurred frequently, leading to a high proportion of patients with unfavorable outcome (63%). Seven of 24 patients (29%) with meningitis and endocarditis died. Endocarditis is an uncommon coexisting condition in bacterial meningitis but is associated with a high rate of unfavorable outcome.

  11. MRI of intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, A.; Ochi, M.; Hayashi, K.; Hirata, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yasunaga, A.; Shibata, S.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the CT and MRI findings in a patient with primary intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). CT delineated the anatomical relations and MRI aided in tissue characterisation. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings in primary intracranial meningeal MFH. (orig.). With 1 fig

  12. Antibiotikavalg ved purulent meningitis uden bakteriologisk diagnose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, H B

    1989-01-01

    A case of meningitis in a 16 month old boy caused by Hemophilus influenzae resistant to ampicillin is presented. The question is raised whether a third generation cephalosporin such as cefotaxime should be the drug of choice in the treatment of bacterial meningitis with unknown etiology...

  13. Risk factors for meningitis after transsphenoidal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aken, M. O.; de Marie, S.; van der Lely, A. J.; Singh, R.; van den Berge, J. H.; Poublon, R. M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Lamberts, S. W.; de Herder, W. W.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate possible risk factors for meningitis, we retrospectively reviewed 228 transsphenoidal operations (in which a standard regimen of amoxicillin prophylaxis was used) for sellar pathology. The incidence of meningitis was 3.1% (seven of 228 cases). Cultures of preoperative specimens from the

  14. Effect of vaccines on bacterial meningitis worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McIntyre, Peter B.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Greenwood, Brian; van de Beek, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    Three bacteria-Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis-account for most acute bacterial meningitis. Measurement of the effect of protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines is most reliable for H influenzae meningitis because one serotype and one age group account

  15. Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis And Dexamethasone Adjunctive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: Babies admitted from1992 to 1995 in the Special Care Baby Unit of the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maduguri, Nigeria, with bacterial meningitis were studied prospectively. Neonatal bacterial meningitis was confirmed if the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microbiological, chemical, immunological and ...

  16. Streptococcus suis meningitis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; de Gans, Jan

    2008-01-01

    We present four patients with Streptococcus suis meningitis identified during a 3.5-year prospective surveillance study in the Netherlands. All cases were associated with exposure to pigs. Patients presented with classic symptoms and signs of bacterial meningitis. Outcome was characterized by severe

  17. Outbreak of Enterovirus - 71 Meningitis in Calicut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Sasidharan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Enterovirus 71(EV 71 causes wide spectrum of infections ranging from asymptomatic conditions to clinical syndromes like diarrhea, rash, hand-foot-and mouth disease (HFMD, herpangina, aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, bulbar and brainstem encephalitis Guillain Barre syndrome, pulmonary haemorrhage. This study deals with an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in children caused by EV 71 virus. Methods: The authors report an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in children in and around Calicut in June 2008. Clinical and laboratory study was done in collaboration with National Centre for Disease Control, New Delhi. 149 children with aseptic meningitis were studied and followed up from June 2008 to May 2009. Result: All children had clinical features suggestive of aseptic meningitis and serology showed the rising antibody titre against EV 71 virus infection. CSF analysis also showed four fold rise in antibodies in one and ≥ 1:2 neutralising antibodies titer against EV- 71 in four samples indicating meningitis due to EV-71. Conclusion: EV 71 was identified as the causative agent of the outbreak of aseptic meningitis in the study and the fact that the EV 71 infection has evolved from minor illness like HFMD to major illness like aseptic meningitis from the same locality is truly alarming.

  18. neonatal bacterial meningitis in Cape Town children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neonatal bacterial meningitis in Cape Town children. Bacterial meningitis is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in South Africa. However, comprehensive regional or national epidemiological data, essential for rational public health interventions, are lacking. The purpose of this 1-year prospective study, from.

  19. Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mendes-Braz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered.

  20. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-06

    Jan 6, 2016 ... Since then, the theory has been experimentally verified to a ... Despite the fact that SM has unravelled the gauge origin of fundamental forces and the structure of Universe while successfully confronting numerous ...

  1. Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Piotrowska, Anna

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014. In the last three years in Poland, about 3000 cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis of viral or bacterial etiology were recorded annually. Assessment of the epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014, was based on the results of the analysis of epidemiological reports sent to the NIZP-PZH by the Regional Sanitary-Epidemiological Stations published in the annual bulletin “Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2014” and “Preventive immunizations in Poland in 2014”. In 2014 in Poland 3488 cases of bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis were recorded. Almost 61.3% of these were viral infections. In 2014, in comparison to 2013, a 1.1% increase in the number of cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis was observed and 91% with viral etiology.

  2. Meningitis due to Xanthomonas maltophilia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girijaratnakumari T

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available During 1st week of post-operative period, a 28 year old female patient operated for left cerebellopontine angle tumor, continued to get fever. Lumbar puncture did not reveal any organisms. She responded to ciprofloxacin. Two months later, she was readmitted with signs and symptoms of meningitis. The CSF tapped on lumbar puncture grew Xanthomonas maltophilia, Gram negative bacilli, sensitive to various antibiotics, ciprofloxacin being one of them. The patient was given ciprofloxacin for 3 weeks. On follow up, a year later she was found to be asymptomatic.

  3. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriani, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the

  4. The K1 capsule is the critical determinant in the development of Escherichia coli meningitis in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, K S; Itabashi, H; Gemski, P; Sadoff, J; Warren, R L; Cross, A S

    1992-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli strains possessing the K1 capsule are predominant among isolates from neonatal E. coli meningitis and most of these K1 isolates are associated with a limited number of 0 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) types, the basis of this association of K1 and certain 0 antigens with neonatal E. coli meningitis is not clear. The present study examined in experimental E. coli bacteremia and meningitis in newborn and adult rats whether or not the K1 capsule and/or O-LPS antigen are criti...

  5. Two cases of rheumatoid meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaki, Shino; Chang, Edward; Hammond, Robert R; Yang, Isaac; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Chou, Benedict T; Choi, Soo I; Jen, Joanna C; Pope, Whitney B; Bell, David A; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the form of rheumatoid meningitis (RM) is rare and most commonly occurs in the setting of longstanding severe RA. Due to a wide range of clinical presentations and nonspecific laboratory findings, it presents a diagnostic challenge often requiring brain biopsy. Only a few histopathologically confirmed cases have been described in the literature. Our aim is to describe two cases of RM and review the literature. The first case is of a previously healthy 37-year-old man who presented with severe headaches and focal neurologic deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement in the left frontal and parietal sulci. The second case is of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild chronic joint pain who presented with confusion, personality changes and seizures. Both patients ultimately underwent brain biopsy which demonstrated RM on pathologic examination. Administration of corticosteroids resulted in significant clinical improvement in both cases. To our knowledge, our unusual case of RM in the young man is the fifth reported case of rheumatoid meningitis in a patient with no prior history of RA. Such an atypical presentation makes diagnosis even more difficult and highlights the need for awareness of this entity in the diagnostic consideration of a patient presenting with unexplained neurologic symptoms. Our literature review underscores the clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of CNS involvement in RA. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  6. In Brief: Forecasting meningitis threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in conjunction with a team of health and weather organizations, has launched a project to provide weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis. The forecasts will enable local health care providers to target vaccination programs more effectively. In 2009, meteorologists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which is managed by UCAR, will begin issuing 14-day forecasts of atmospheric conditions in Ghana. Later, UCAR plans to work closely with health experts from several African countries to design and test a decision support system to provide health officials with useful meteorological information. ``By targeting forecasts in regions where meningitis is a threat, we may be able to help vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we hope to build on this project and provide information to public health programs battling weather-related diseases in other parts of the world,'' said Rajul Pandya, director of UCAR's Community Building Program. Funding for the project comes from a $900,000 grant from Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Internet search company.

  7. The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Sadie A; Koci, Remzie A; Qehaja-Buçaj, Emine; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Mehmeti, Murat

    2014-07-14

    The purpose of this study was to present the epidemiologic features of bacterial meningitis in the developing country of Kosovo. Data were collected from active surveillance of bacterial meningitis cases treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo in the years 2000 (first post-war year) and 2010. Meningitis cases in 2000 compared with 2010 showed a 35.5% decline in incidence (from 4.8 to 3.1 cases per 100,000 population) and a decrease in the case fatality rate from 10% to 5%. In children, there was a lower mortality rate (5% versus 2%) and a lower incidence of neurological complications (13% versus 16%) as compared to adults (32% versus 10% and 16% versus 35%, respectively). Neisseria meningitidis was the most common pathogen of bacterial meningitis in both study periods. Bacterial meningitis was most prevalent in the pediatric population, and showed an increase in the median age, from three years in 2000 to seven years in 2010. A steady number of bacterial meningitis cases in adults throughout last decade (around 20 cases per year) was recorded. During the last decade, gradual changes have been observed in the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis that are unrelated to the introduction of new vaccines, but are partly due to the improvement of living conditions.

  8. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche

    OpenAIRE

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every pare...

  9. Meninges-derived cues control axon guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Tracey A C S; DeLoughery, Zachary J; Jaworski, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    The axons of developing neurons travel long distances along stereotyped pathways under the direction of extracellular cues sensed by the axonal growth cone. Guidance cues are either secreted proteins that diffuse freely or bind the extracellular matrix, or membrane-anchored proteins. Different populations of axons express distinct sets of receptors for guidance cues, which results in differential responses to specific ligands. The full repertoire of axon guidance cues and receptors and the identity of the tissues producing these cues remain to be elucidated. The meninges are connective tissue layers enveloping the vertebrate brain and spinal cord that serve to protect the central nervous system (CNS). The meninges also instruct nervous system development by regulating the generation and migration of neural progenitors, but it has not been determined whether they help guide axons to their targets. Here, we investigate a possible role for the meninges in neuronal wiring. Using mouse neural tissue explants, we show that developing spinal cord meninges produce secreted attractive and repulsive cues that can guide multiple types of axons in vitro. We find that motor and sensory neurons, which project axons across the CNS-peripheral nervous system (PNS) boundary, are attracted by meninges. Conversely, axons of both ipsi- and contralaterally projecting dorsal spinal cord interneurons are repelled by meninges. The responses of these axonal populations to the meninges are consistent with their trajectories relative to meninges in vivo, suggesting that meningeal guidance factors contribute to nervous system wiring and control which axons are able to traverse the CNS-PNS boundary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Models of experimental saccular aneurysms of carotid arteries in canine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haixia; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the availability by making experimental saccular aneurysm models of carotid arteries in canine similar to human intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Twenty healthy canines with experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries were created successfully by surgery. Results: Forty experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries were created successfully with 36 aneurysms and parent arteries maintaining patency with each other and four spontaneously occluded confirmed by angiography. Model successful rate reached 90%. Conclusions: Experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries in canines were one of best models created for simulating human intracranial aneurysms. (authors)

  11. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases.

  12. Experimental comparison of models for ultrafast impact ionization is silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-01-01

    We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses.......We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses....

  13. Experimental modeling of swirl flows in power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtork, S. I.; Litvinov, I. V.; Gesheva, E. S.; Tsoy, M. A.; Skripkin, S. G.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents an overview of the methods and approaches to experimental modeling of various thermal and hydropower units - furnaces of pulverized coal boilers and flow-through elements of hydro turbines. The presented modeling approaches based on a combination of experimentation and rapid prototyping of working parts may be useful in optimizing energy equipment to improve safety and efficiency of industrial energy systems.

  14. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C.; Cha, Chae Y.; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S.; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these

  15. Experimental models of the gut microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Abbeele, P. van den

    2013-01-01

    The human gut contains a diverse microbiota with large potential to influence health. Given the difficulty to access the main sites of the gut, in vitro models have been developed to dynamically monitor microbial processes at the site of metabolic activity. These models range from simple batch

  16. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, P.; Trzaska, S.; Perez, C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; del Corral, J.; Cousin, R.; Blumenthal, M. B.; Connor, S.; Thomson, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use, and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular Meningitis and Malaria. In this paper we present the new and improved products that have been developed for monitoring dust, temperature, rainfall and vectorial capacity model for monitoring and forecasting risks of Meningitis and Malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  17. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, Pietro; Trzaska, Sylwia; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Kalashnikova, Olga; del Corral, John; Cousin, Remi; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Bell, Michael; Connor, Stephen J.; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2013-01-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular meningitis and malaria. In this paper, we present the new and improved products that have been developed for: (i) estimating dust aerosol for forecasting risks of meningitis and (ii) for monitoring temperature and rainfall and integrating them into a vectorial capacity model for forecasting risks of malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map Room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  18. [An experimental model of transgastric ooforectomy using a porcine model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomulescu, V; Gheorghe, C; Piţigoi, D; Kosa, A; Ciocarlan, M; Pietrăreanu, D; Turcu, F; Copăescu, C; Droc, G; Popescu, H; Grigorescu, B; Stănciulea, O; Herlea, V; Popescu, I

    2010-01-01

    Transabdominal routes for surgery entail general anaesthesia with its inherent risks and complications (prolonged hospital stay, abdominal incisions that may be difficult in obese patients). Minimally invasive procedures require shorter hospitalization, have shorter recovery periods, less postoperative discomfort, and lower morbidity and complications. The purpose of this study was to use a porcine model to determine the feasibility and the safety of organ resection (oophorectomy and tubectomy). 10 Big White pigs between 25-30 kg underwent transgastric ooforectomy. The first 5 cases were performed in a hybrid procedure (laparoscopic-NOTES) in order to have a better control and supervise the maneuvers done by the mobile endoscope and to guide in the abdominal cavity. Adnexectomy was possible in all ten experiments. Full operative time (from starting endoscopy to complete gastrectomy closing) was 180 min to 270 min. The gastric defect closing was the most difficult manoever lasting from 10 min with OTSC clips to 100 using endoloops and clips. The animals have tolerated well the experiments and there have been no remarkable incidents during our 10 experments. In only one case a bleeding from gastotomy required electric coagulation. Transgastric ooforectomy in an experimental model is a procedure that requires advanced laparoscopical and endoscopical skills. Our early results are promissing. Its application in humans needs further confirmation of the method.

  19. Cooking Potatoes: Experimentation and Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory activity involving a mathematical model of cooking potatoes that can be solved analytically. Highlights the microstructure aspects of the experiment. Provides the key aspects of the results, detailed background readings, laboratory procedures and data analyses. (MM)

  20. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  1. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and dive...

  2. MR angiography in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalita, Jayantee; Prasad, Sreeram; Maurya, Pradeep K.; Misra, Usha K. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)), Email: drukmisra@rediffmail.com; Kumar, Sunil (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India))

    2012-04-15

    Background: Infarctions in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) are common but there is a paucity of studies on MR angiography (MRA). Purpose: To evaluate the pattern and predictors of MRA abnormality in patients with TBM. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven patients with TBM were subjected to clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRA evaluation. The severity of meningitis, focal deficit, CSF findings, and stroke co-morbidities were recorded. Presence of exudates, infarction, hydrocephalous, and tuberculoma on MRI were noted. On intracranial MRA, occlusion or more than 50% narrowing of proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and basilar artery were considered abnormal. The MRA abnormality was correlated with clinical, laboratory, and MRI findings. Results: Sixty-seven patients, aged 3-75 years (median 34 years) were included. MRI was abnormal in 61 (91%) patients; basal exudates in 24, hydrocephalous in 23, tuberculoma in 33, and infarction in 40. MRA was abnormal in 34 (50.7%); MCA was most commonly involved (n = 21), followed by PCA (n = 14), ICA (n = 8), ACA (n 5), basilar artery (n = 5), and vertebral and superior cerebellar artery (1 each). One-fourth of the patients had abnormality in both anterior and posterior circulations. MRA abnormality was related to hydrocephalous and infarction; corresponding infarct was present in 61.8% patients; 41.7% patients with abnormal MRA developed infarct at 3 months but none with normal MRA. Conclusion: Half the patients with TBM had MRA abnormality involving both anterior and posterior circulations and 61.8% of them had corresponding infarcts

  3. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes.

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Cryptococcus and lymphocytic meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-08-20

    Aug 20, 2008 ... of presumptive meningitis, we reviewed results of CSF cultures and cell .... AIDS patients with cryptococcal CSF infections.3 A third of the culture-positive cases ... is no indication that cryptococcal infection is unlikely. Thirdly,.

  5. Experimental Verification of the Transient Model in an Enrichment Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandino, Maria; Brasnarof, Daniel; Delmastro, Dario

    2003-01-01

    In the present work an experimental closed loop representing a single stage of an uranium gaseous diffusion enrichment cascade is described, loop that is used to experimentally validate an analytical model that describes the dynamics inside such a loop.The conditions established inside the experimental loop after a few working hours were reproduced by the analytical model, leaving the slower thermal phenomena taking place for future studies.Two kinds of perturbations were experimentally introduced: a change in the range of operation of one of the compressors and the addition of mass into the loop.Numerical and experimental results are compared and presented in this work. The analytical model proposed was verified against these two changes, with very good agreement in the time response and measured values.This analytical model allows us to determine the characteristic time response of the system

  6. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  7. Experimental modeling of a deoiling hydrocyclone system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bram, Mads Valentin; Hassan, Abdiladif Ahmed; Hansen, Dennis Severin

    2015-01-01

    responses of PDR via dedicated experiments a set of first-order-plus-dead-time (FOPDT) models that represent the main characteristics of the concerned hydrocyclone system is developed and analyzed for the entire operating range. The obtained multiple FOPDT models can illustrate the system performance...... acrylic hydrocyclone was tested as proof of concept for obtaining its steady-state and dynamic performances. The steady-state performance is able to provide the proportional correlation between PDR and flow split which is essential for optimizing steady-state separation efficiency. By analyzing step...

  8. Experimental and modelling studies of infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giudici, M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes a study of infiltration in the unsaturated soil with the objective of estimating the recharge to a phreatic aquifer. The study area is at the border of the city of Milan (Northern Italy), which draws water for both domestic and industrial purposes from ground water resources located beneath the urban area. The rate of water pumping from the aquifer system has been varying during the XX century, depending upon the number of inhabitants and the development of industrial activities. This caused variations with time of the depth of the water table below the ground surface and in turn some emergencies: the two most prominent episodes correspond to the middle '70s, when the water table in the city centre was about 30 m below the undisturbed natural conditions, and to the last decade, when the water table has raised at a rate of approximately 1 m/year and caused infiltrations in deep constructions (garages and building foundations, the underground railways, etc.). We have developed four ground water flow models at different scales, which share some characteristics: they are based on quasi-3D approximation (horizontal flow in the aquifers and vertical flow in the aquitards), conservative finite-differences schemes for regular grid with square cells in the horizontal plane and are implemented with proprietary computer codes. Among the problems that were studied for the development of these models, I recall some numerical problems, related to the behaviour of the phreatic aquifer under conditions of strong exploitation. Model calibration and validation for ModMil has been performed with a two-stage process, i.e., using some of the available data for model calibration and the remaining data for model validation. The application of geophysical exploration techniques, in particular seismic and geo-electrical prospecting, has been very useful to complete the data and information on the hydro-geological structure obtained from stratigraphic logs

  9. MRI enhancing patterns of non-meningioma meningeal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Xiaofeng; Ding Juan; Xiao Xiangsheng; Shi Zengru; Yu Hong; Gu Qian

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the MRI appearances of meningeal diseases and to study MRI diagnostic value of enhancing patterns in different meningeal processes. Methods: Sixty-one patients with integrated clinical data, including 27 infectious meningitis, 4 inflammatory meningitis (2 eosinophilic granuloma, 1 Wegener granuloma, and 1 unknown etiological factor), 12 meningeal metastasis, 2 meningeal lymphoma, 8 cerebrovascular disease, and 8 postoperative changes, were reviewed retrospectively. All patients were examined on MRI before and after contrast administration. Results: (1) MR plain scan: positive findings of plain scan were revealed in only 3 cases, including 1 linear meningeal thickening pattern and 2 nodular pattern. (2) MR enhancement: All cases showed 3 kinds of enhancing patterns: 19 dural-arachnoid pattern, 32 pia-arachnoid pattern, and 10 total meninges pattern, respectively. Conclusion: Different meningeal diseases have different MR imaging manifestations. Creating the enhancement patterns of various diseases can have great clinical significance. (authors)

  10. Mondini Dysplasia Presenting as Otorrhea without Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Yu Lin; Hung-Ching Lin; Chun-Chih Peng; Kuo-Sheng Lee; Nan-Chang Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Mondini dysplasia is a rare inner ear malformation that is usually only diagnosed after recurrent meningitis. Surgical intervention is mandatory. This report highlights the case of a patient with Mondini dysplasia who presented with hearing impairment and otorrhea and was diagnosed and treated before the occurrence of meningitis, thus preventing morbidity and neurologic sequelae. Hearing impairment may be the only manifestation of Mondini dysplasia, and the benefit of hearing screening is emp...

  11. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan A; Kumar A; Santosh V; Satishchandra P; Shankar S.K

    2000-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of...

  12. Lung cancer risk models from experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1988-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present analyses of data based on methods that adequately account for time-related factors and competiting risks, and that yield results that are expressed in a form comparable to results obtained from recent analyses of epidemiological studies of humans exposed to radon and radon daughters. These epidemiological analyses have modeled the hazard, or age-specific death rates, as a function of factors such as dose and dose rate, time from exposure, and time from cessation of exposure. The starting point for many of the analyses of human data has been the constant relative risk modeling which the age-specific death rates are assumed to be a function of cumulative dose, and the risks due to exposure are assumed to be proportional to the age-specific baseline death rates. However, departures from this initial model, such as dependence of risks on age at risk and/or time from exposure, have been investigated. These analyses have frequently been based on a non-parametric model that requires minimal assumptions regarding the baseline risks and their dependence on age

  13. Isothermal coarse mixing: experimental and CFD modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbertson, M.A.; Kenning, D.B.R.; Hall, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    A plane, two-dimensional flow apparatus has been built which uses a jet of solid 6mm diameter balls to model a jet of molten drops falling into a tank of water to study premixing prior to a vapour explosion. Preliminary experiments with unheated stainless steel balls are here compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations by the code CHYMES. (6 figures) (Author)

  14. New experimental model of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegin, G B; Kalinina, A R; Ponomarenko, N A; Ovsepyan, A A; Smirnov, S V; Tsybenko, V V; Homeriki, S G

    2001-06-01

    NSO/1 (P3x63Ay 8Ut) and SP20 myeloma cells were inoculated to BALB/c OlaHsd mice. NSO/1 cells allowed adequate stage-by-stage monitoring of tumor development. The adequacy of this model was confirmed in experiments with conventional cytostatics: prospidium and cytarabine caused necrosis of tumor cells and reduced animal mortality.

  15. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  16. [The meninges, an anatomical point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, L; Chazal, J

    2005-03-01

    The meninges correspond to an anatomical concept. For the morphologist, the microscopic organization, the hypothetical presence of a subdural space, the nature of the interface between the deep meningeal layer and the nervous parenchyma in the perivascular spaces are the central issues. For the clinician, dynamic aspects of cerebrospinal fluid flow, secretion, and resorption are essential factors with practical consequences in terms of disease and patient management. Comparative anatomy, embryology, and organogenesis provide an interesting perspective for the descriptive and functional anatomy of the meninges. Usually considered as protective membranes, the meninges play a prominent role in the development and maintenance of the central nervous system. The meninges are in constant evolution, from their formation to senescence. The meninges present three layers in children and adults: the dura mater, the arachnoid and the pia mater. The cerebrospinal fluid is secreted by the choroid plexuses, flows through the ventricles and the subarachnoid space, and is absorbed by arachnoid granulations. Other sites of secretion and resorption are suggested by comparative anatomy and human embryology and organogenesis.

  17. Experimental Validation of a Permeability Model for Enrichment Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellano, Pablo; Brasnarof, Daniel; Florido Pablo

    2003-01-01

    An experimental loop with a real scale diffuser, in a single enrichment-stage configuration, was operated with air at different process conditions, in order to characterize the membrane permeability.Using these experimental data, an analytical geometric-and-morphologic-based model was validated.It is conclude that a new set of independent measurements, i.e. enrichment, is necessary in order to fully characterize diffusers, because of its internal parameters are not univocally determinated with permeability experimental data only

  18. New experimental model for training in videosurgery Novo modelo experimental para treinamento em videocirurgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Malta Batista

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a new experimental model of lower cost for training in videosurgery. METHODS: This project was performed at the Nucleus of Experimental Surgery of the Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health, based on previous models described in the literature and under the supervision of the full professor of Operative Technique and Experimental Surgery II. It was made a model cube-shaped, made of wood, with holes distributed in various locations, rubber stoppers for the holes and lined externally with carpet, and internally with laminate. RESULTS: The new experimental model is of low cost and reproduces quite faithfully several videosurgical procedures. CONCLUSION: Medical schools interested in the subject may adopt the new model for training in videosurgery without the need of high costs for making and using these models.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um novo modelo experimental de baixo custo para treinamento em videocirurgia MÉTODOS: Este projeto foi conduzido no Núcleo de Cirurgia Experimental da Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, baseado em modelos prévios descritos na literatura e sob a supervisão do professor titular de Técnica Operatória e Cirurgia Experimental II. Foi feito um modelo em formato de cubo, de madeira, com furos distribuídos em vários locais, tampas de borracha para os orifícios e forrado externamente com carpete e internamente com laminado. RESULTADOS: O novo modelo experimental desenvolvido é de baixo custo e reproduz de forma bastante fiel diversos procedimentos videocirúrgicos. CONCLUSÃO: Faculdades médicas interessadas no tema poderão adotar o novo modelo para o treinamento em videocirurgia sem que sejam necessários gastos elevados para a confecção e o uso desses modelos.

  19. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, Ω b , remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that Ω b ∼ 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming Ω total = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since Ω visible b . Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M x approx-gt 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z 0 coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for ν-masses may imply that the ν τ is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs

  1. Experimental modeling methods in Industrial Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Trebuňa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic approaches to a management system of the present industrial practice, forcing businesses to address management issues in-house continuous improvement of production and non-production processes. Experience has repeatedly demonstrated the need for a system approach not only in analysis but also in the planning and actual implementation of these processes. Therefore, the contribution is focused on the description of the modeling in industrial practice by a system approach, in order to avoid erroneous application of the decision to the implementation phase, and thus prevent any longer applying methods "attempt - fallacy".

  2. CS model coil experimental log book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  3. Tesla coil theoretical model and experimental verification

    OpenAIRE

    Voitkans, Janis; Voitkans, Arnis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract – In this paper a theoretical model of a Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wired format, where the line voltage is measured against electrically neutral space. It is shown that equivalent two-wired scheme can be found for a single-wired scheme and already known long line theory can be applied to a Tesla coil. Formulas for calculation of voltage in a Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance fre...

  4. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-01-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model

  5. CS model coil experimental log book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  6. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, E.; Lormand, G.; Gobin, P.F.; Fougeres, R.

    1993-01-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.)

  7. Experimental Tests of the Algebraic Cluster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Moshe

    2018-02-01

    The Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) of Bijker and Iachello that was proposed already in 2000 has been recently applied to 12C and 16O with much success. We review the current status in 12C with the outstanding observation of the ground state rotational band composed of the spin-parity states of: 0+, 2+, 3-, 4± and 5-. The observation of the 4± parity doublet is a characteristic of (tri-atomic) molecular configuration where the three alpha- particles are arranged in an equilateral triangular configuration of a symmetric spinning top. We discuss future measurement with electron scattering, 12C(e,e’) to test the predicted B(Eλ) of the ACM.

  8. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, E. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Lormand, G. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Gobin, P.F. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Fougeres, R. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-11-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.).

  9. Supporting meningitis diagnosis amongst infants and children through the use of fuzzy cognitive mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Meningitis is characterized by an inflammation of the meninges, or the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial for a positive outcome, yet identifying meningitis is a complex process involving an array of signs and symptoms and multiple causal factors which require novel solutions to support clinical decision-making. In this work, we explore the potential of fuzzy cognitive map to assist in the modeling of meningitis, as a support tool for physicians in the accurate diagnosis and treatment of the condition. Methods Fuzzy cognitive mapping (FCM) is a method for analysing and depicting human perception of a given system. FCM facilitates the development of a conceptual model which is not limited by exact values and measurements and thus is well suited to representing relatively unstructured knowledge and associations expressed in imprecise terms. A team of doctors (physicians), comprising four paediatricians, was formed to define the multifarious signs and symptoms associated with meningitis and to identify risk factors integral to its causality, as indicators used by clinicians to identify the presence or absence of meningitis in patients. The FCM model, consisting of 20 concept nodes, has been designed by the team of paediatricians in collaborative dialogue with the research team. Results The paediatricians were supplied with a form containing various input parameters to be completed at the time of diagnosing meningitis among infants and children. The paediatricians provided information on a total of 56 patient cases amongst children whose age ranged from 2 months to 7 years. The physicians’ decision to diagnose meningitis was available for each individual case which was used as the outcome measure for evaluating the model. The FCM was trained using 40 cases with an accuracy of 95%, and later 16 test cases were used to analyze the accuracy and reliability of the model. The system produced the results

  10. Multiphysics modelling and experimental validation of high concentration photovoltaic modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theristis, Marios; Fernández, Eduardo F.; Sumner, Mike; O'Donovan, Tadhg S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A multiphysics modelling approach for concentrating photovoltaics was developed. • An experimental campaign was conducted to validate the models. • The experimental results were in good agreement with the models. • The multiphysics modelling allows the concentrator’s optimisation. - Abstract: High concentration photovoltaics, equipped with high efficiency multijunction solar cells, have great potential in achieving cost-effective and clean electricity generation at utility scale. Such systems are more complex compared to conventional photovoltaics because of the multiphysics effect that is present. Modelling the power output of such systems is therefore crucial for their further market penetration. Following this line, a multiphysics modelling procedure for high concentration photovoltaics is presented in this work. It combines an open source spectral model, a single diode electrical model and a three-dimensional finite element thermal model. In order to validate the models and the multiphysics modelling procedure against actual data, an outdoor experimental campaign was conducted in Albuquerque, New Mexico using a high concentration photovoltaic monomodule that is thoroughly described in terms of its geometry and materials. The experimental results were in good agreement (within 2.7%) with the predicted maximum power point. This multiphysics approach is relatively more complex when compared to empirical models, but besides the overall performance prediction it can also provide better understanding of the physics involved in the conversion of solar irradiance into electricity. It can therefore be used for the design and optimisation of high concentration photovoltaic modules.

  11. Experimental tests of the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodulman, L.

    1998-01-01

    The title implies an impossibly broad field, as the Standard Model includes the fermion matter states, as well as the forces and fields of SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1). For practical purposes, I will confine myself to electroweak unification, as discussed in the lectures of M. Herrero. Quarks and mixing were discussed in the lectures of R. Aleksan, and leptons and mixing were discussed in the lectures of K. Nakamura. I will essentially assume universality, that is flavor independence, rather than discussing tests of it. I will not pursue tests of QED beyond noting the consistency and precision of measurements of α EM in various processes including the Lamb shift, the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron, and the quantum Hall effect. The fantastic precision and agreement of these predictions and measurements is something that convinces people that there may be something to this science enterprise. Also impressive is the success of the ''Universal Fermi Interaction'' description of beta decay processes, or in more modern parlance, weak charged current interactions. With one coupling constant G F , most precisely determined in muon decay, a huge number of nuclear instabilities are described. The slightly slow rate for neutron beta decay was one of the initial pieces of evidence for Cabbibo mixing, now generalized so that all charged current decays of any flavor are covered

  12. Mutant mice: experimental organisms as materialised models in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Lara; Keuck, Lara K

    2013-09-01

    Animal models have received particular attention as key examples of material models. In this paper, we argue that the specificities of establishing animal models-acknowledging their status as living beings and as epistemological tools-necessitate a more complex account of animal models as materialised models. This becomes particularly evident in animal-based models of diseases that only occur in humans: in these cases, the representational relation between animal model and human patient needs to be generated and validated. The first part of this paper presents an account of how disease-specific animal models are established by drawing on the example of transgenic mice models for Alzheimer's disease. We will introduce an account of validation that involves a three-fold process including (1) from human being to experimental organism; (2) from experimental organism to animal model; and (3) from animal model to human patient. This process draws upon clinical relevance as much as scientific practices and results in disease-specific, yet incomplete, animal models. The second part of this paper argues that the incompleteness of models can be described in terms of multi-level abstractions. We qualify this notion by pointing to different experimental techniques and targets of modelling, which give rise to a plurality of models for a specific disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Meningitis and Climate: From Science to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Thomson, Madeleine C.; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Hopson, Thomas; Pandya, Rajul; Miller, Ron L.; Hugonnet, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a climate sensitive infectious disease. The regional extent of the Meningitis Belt in Africa, where the majority of epidemics occur, was originally defined by Lapeysonnie in the 1960s. A combination of climatic and environmental conditions and biological and social factors have been associated to the spatial and temporal patterns of epidemics observed since the disease first emerged in West Africa over a century ago. However, there is still a lack of knowledge and data that would allow disentangling the relative effects of the diverse risk factors upon epidemics. The Meningitis Environmental Risk Information Technologies Initiative (MERIT), a collaborative research-to-practice consortium, seeks to inform national and regional prevention and control strategies across the African Meningitis Belt through the provision of new data and tools that better determine risk factors. In particular MERIT seeks to consolidate a body of knowledge that provides evidence of the contribution of climatic and environmental factors to seasonal and year-to-year variations in meningococcal meningitis incidence at both district and national scales. Here we review recent research and practice seeking to provide useful information for the epidemic response strategy of National Ministries of Health in the Meningitis Belt of Africa. In particular the research and derived tools described in this paper have focused at "getting science into policy and practice" by engaging with practitioner communities under the umbrella of MERIT to ensure the relevance of their work to operational decision-making. We limit our focus to that of reactive vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. Important but external to our discussion is the development and implementation of the new conjugate vaccine, which specifically targets meningococcus A

  14. Morphofunctional analysis of experimental model of esophageal achalasia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirov, A G; Raginov, I S; Burmistrov, M V; Chelyshev, Y A; Khasanov, R Sh; Moroshek, A A; Grigoriev, P N; Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedyarov, M A

    2010-10-01

    We carried out a detailed analysis of rat model of esophageal achalasia previously developed by us. Manifest morphological and functional disorders were observed in experimental achalasia: hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium, reduced number of nerve fibers, excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue in the esophageal wall, high contractile activity of the lower esophageal sphincter, and reduced motility of the longitudinal muscle layer. Changes in rat esophagus observed in experimental achalasia largely correlate with those in esophageal achalasia in humans. Hence, our experimental model can be used for the development of new methods of disease treatment.

  15. The experimental and shell model approach to 100Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.; Maier, K.H.; Fitzgerald, J.B.; Heese, J.; Spohr, K.; Schubart, R.; Gorska, M.; Rejmund, M.

    1995-01-01

    The present status of experimental approach to 100 Sn and its shell model structure is given. New developments in experimental techniques, such as low background isomer spectroscopy and charged particle detection in 4π are surveyed. Based on recent experimental data shell model calculations are used to predict the structure of the single- and two-nucleon neighbours of 100 Sn. The results are compared to the systematic of Coulomb energies and spin-orbit splitting and discussed with respect to future experiments. (author). 51 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  16. Meningeal defects alter the tangential migration of cortical interneurons in Foxc1hith/hith mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarbalis Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tangential migration presents the primary mode of migration of cortical interneurons translocating into the cerebral cortex from subpallial domains. This migration takes place in multiple streams with the most superficial one located in the cortical marginal zone. While a number of forebrain-expressed molecules regulating this process have emerged, it remains unclear to what extent structures outside the brain, like the forebrain meninges, are involved. Results We studied a unique Foxc1 hypomorph mouse model (Foxc1hith/hith with meningeal defects and impaired tangential migration of cortical interneurons. We identified a territorial correlation between meningeal defects and disruption of interneuron migration along the adjacent marginal zone in these animals, suggesting that impaired meningeal integrity might be the primary cause for the observed migration defects. Moreover, we postulate that the meningeal factor regulating tangential migration that is affected in homozygote mutants is the chemokine Cxcl12. In addition, by using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we provide evidence that the Cxcl12 gene is a direct transcriptional target of Foxc1 in the meninges. Further, we observe migration defects of a lesser degree in Cajal-Retzius cells migrating within the cortical marginal zone, indicating a less important role for Cxcl12 in their migration. Finally, the developmental migration defects observed in Foxc1hith/hith mutants do not lead to obvious differences in interneuron distribution in the adult if compared to control animals. Conclusions Our results suggest a critical role for the forebrain meninges to promote during development the tangential migration of cortical interneurons along the cortical marginal zone and Cxcl12 as the factor responsible for this property.

  17. Does antimicrobial usage before meningitis lead to a higher risk of adult postsurgical Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis than that of Enterobacteriaceae meningitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiraslan, Hayati; Ulutabanca, Halil; Ercal, Baris Derya; Metan, Gokhan; Alp, Emine

    2016-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Enterobacteriaceae are two pathogens responsible for postneurosurgical meningitis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the factors that influenced the outcomes in patients with postneurosurgical meningitis caused by A. baumannii and Enterobacteriaceae. Patients with post-surgical meningitis were identified from infection control committee charts between 2007 and 2015. Subjects over 16 years old who had positive cerebral spinal fluid cultures for A. baumannii or Enterobacteriaceae were enrolled in the study. Clinical and laboratory data for 30 patients with A. baumannii meningitis were compared with those of 12 patients with Enterobacteriaceae meningitis. The mean age of patients was 51.9 years and 57.1% were male. Eleven patients had comorbidities, the most common being diabetes mellitus. Most patients were due to intracranial haemorrhage (78.6%). The rate of the patients who received an appropriate antimicrobial therapy was 35.7%, and the crude mortality rate was 64.3%. In univariate analysis, previous antibiotic use, an infection before meningitis and mechanical ventilation had an increased risk of A. baumannii meningitis. Moreover, intrathecal antimicrobial use, inappropriate empirical antimicrobial use, antimicrobial resistance and alanine aminotransferase elevation were significantly higher in patients with A. baumannii meningitis than in those with Enterobacteriaceae meningitis. Antimicrobial use before meningitis (8.84 times) and mechanical ventilation (7.28 times) resulted in an increased risk of A. baumannii meningitis. None of the results affected 30-day mortality. Avoidance of unnecessarily prolonged antimicrobial usage may help to prevent a selection of A. baumannii.

  18. The effects of subarachnoid administration of preservative-free S(+)-ketamine on spinal cord and meninges in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Alfredo Cury; Alves, Juliana Gaiotto; Moreira E Lima, Rodrigo; Esther Alencar Marques, Mariângela; Moreira de Barros, Guilherme Antônio; Fukushima, Fernanda Bono; Modolo, Norma Sueli Pinheiro; Ganem, Eliana Marisa

    2012-02-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine and its active enantiomer, S(+)-ketamine, have been injected in the epidural and subarachnoid spaces to treat acute postoperative pain and relieve neuropathic pain syndrome. In this study we evaluated the effects of a single dose of preservative-free S(+)-ketamine, in doses usually used in clinical practice, in the spinal cord and meninges of dogs. Under anesthesia (IV etomidate (2 mg/kg) and fentanyl (0.005 mg/kg), 16 dogs (6 to 15 kg) were randomized to receive a lumbar intrathecal injection (L5/6) of saline solution of 0.9% (control group) or S(+)-ketamine 1 mg/kg(-1) (ketamine group). All doses were administered in a volume of 1 mL over a 10-second interval. Accordingly, injection solution ranged from 0.6% to 1.5%. After 21 days of clinical observation, the animals were killed; spinal cord, cauda equina root, and meninges were removed for histological examination with light microscopy. Tissues were examined for demyelination (Masson trichrome), neuronal death (hematoxylin and eosin) and astrocyte activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein). No clinical or histological alterations of spinal tissue or meninges were found in animals from either control or ketamine groups. A single intrathecal injection of preservative-free S(+)-ketamine, at 1 mg/kg(-1) dosage, over a concentration range of 6 to 15 mg/mL injected in the subarachnoid space in a single puncture, did not produce histological alterations in this experimental model.

  19. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H

    2015-01-01

    hyperalgesia models (6 studies), 'pain' models (25 studies), summation models (2 studies), nociceptive reflex models (3 studies) and miscellaneous models (2 studies). A consistent reversal of analgesia by a MOR-antagonist was demonstrated in 10 of the 25 ITP-studies, including stress-induced analgesia and r...... ratings, threshold assessments and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), did not appear consistent in 28 out of 32 'pain' model studies. In conclusion, only in 2 experimental human pain models, i.e., stress-induced analgesia and rTMS, administration of MOR-antagonist demonstrated a consistent effect......Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double...

  20. Label-free in vivo optical imaging of functional microcirculations within meninges and cortex in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Wang, Ruikang K

    2010-12-15

    Abnormal microcirculation within meninges is common in many neurological diseases. There is a need for an imaging method that is capable of monitoring dynamic meningeal microcirculations, preferably decoupled from cortical blood flow. Optical microangiography (OMAG) is a recently developed label-free imaging method capable of producing 3D images of dynamic blood perfusion within micro-circulatory tissue beds at an imaging depth up to ∼2 mm, with an unprecedented imaging sensitivity to blood flow at ∼4 μm/s. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of OMAG in imaging the detailed blood flow distributions, at a capillary level resolution, within the meninges and cortex in mice with the cranium left intact. Using a thrombotic mouse model, we show that the OMAG can yield longitudinal measurements of meningeal vascular responses to the insult and can decouple these responses from those in the cortex, giving valuable information regarding the localized hemodynamics along with the dynamic formation of thrombotic event. The results indicate that OMAG can be a useful tool to study therapeutic strategies in preclinical animal models in order to mitigate various pathologies that are mainly related to the meningeal circulations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential diagnosis of scrub typhus meningitis from tuberculous meningitis using clinical and laboratory features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valappil, Ashraf V; Thiruvoth, Sohanlal; Peedikayil, Jabir M; Raghunath, Praveenkumar; Thekkedath, Manojan

    2017-12-01

    The involvement of the central nervous system in the form of meningitis or meningoencephalitis is common in scrub typhus and is an important differential diagnosis of other lymphocytic meningitis like tuberculous meningitis (TBM). The aim of this study was to identify the clinical and laboratory parameters that may be helpful in differentiating scrub typhus meningitis from TBM. We compared of the clinical and laboratory features of 57 patients admitted with scrub typhus meningitis or TBM during a 3-year period. Patients who had abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and positive scrub typhus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay serology (n=28) were included in the scrub typhus meningitis group, while the TBM group included those who satisfied the consensus diagnostic criteria of TBM (n=29). Compared with the TBM group, the mean duration of symptoms was less in patients with scrub typhus meningitis, who also had a lower magnitude of neurological deficits, such as altered mental status and cranial nerve and motor deficits. Patients with scrub typhus meningitis had a lower CSF white blood-cell count (WBC) than the TBM group (130.8±213 195±175 cells/mm 3 , P=0.002), lower CSF protein elevation (125±120 vs. 195.2±108.2mg/dl, P=0.002), and higher CSF sugar (70.1±32.4 vs. 48.7±23.4mg/dl, P=0.006). Features predictive of the diagnosis of scrub typhus meningitis included the absence of neurological impairment at presentation, blood serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase>40 international units (IU)/L, serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase>60 IU/L, total blood leukocyte count>10,000/mm 3 , CSF protein50mg/dl, CSF WBC<100 cells/mm 3 . All patients with scrub typhus meningitis recovered completely following doxycycline therapy CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that, clinical features, including duration of fever, neurological deficits at presentation and laboratory parameters such as CSF pleocytosis,CSF protein elevation, CSF sugar levels and liver enzyme values are helpful in

  2. Cholinesterase modulations in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Ofek, Keren; Qvist, Tavs

    2011-01-01

    The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis.......The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis....

  3. Bacterial Meningitis in Adults After Splenectomy and Hyposplenic States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriani, Kirsten S.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the occurrence, disease course, prognosis, and vaccination status of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis with a history of splenectomy or functional hyposplenia. Patients and Methods: Patients with bacterial meningitis proven by cerebrospinal fluid culture

  4. Cerebral tryptophan metabolism and outcome of tuberculous meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, van Arjan; Dian, Sofiati; Aguirre-Gamboa, Raúl; Avila-Pacheco, Julian; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Ruesen, Carolien; Annisa, Jessi; Koeken, Valerie A.C.M.; Chaidir, Lidya; Li, Yang; Achmad, Tri Hanggono; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Notebaart, Richard A.; Ruslami, Rovina; Netea, Mihai G.; Verbeek, Marcel M.; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Kumar, Vinod; Clish, Clary B.; Ganiem, A.R.; Crevel, van Reinout

    2018-01-01

    Background: Immunopathology contributes to the high mortality of tuberculous meningitis, but the biological pathways involved are mostly unknown. We aimed to compare cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum metabolomes of patients with tuberculous meningitis with that of controls without tuberculous

  5. Meningeal enhancement on MRI after craniotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Motohiro; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Yamashita, Junkoh; Suzuki, Masayuki

    1991-01-01

    Gd-DPTA-enhanced MR images in 94 patients who had undergone craniotomy were studied, with particular attention paid to the meningeal enhancement. Such enhancement was noted in 26 of the 94 (27.6%) in the portion surrounding the craniotomy site. Meningeal enhancement, presumably of the subdural neomembrane, was apparent as a third line of a high signal intensity on T 1 -weighted MR images. The outer two high-intensity lines were derived from fat in the subcutaneous tissues of the scalp and fat in the bone marrow of the calvaria. We designated this characteristic enhancement as a 'triple white line'. Of the 26 patients with meningeal enhancement, 22 cases (23.4%) showed such a 'triple white line', 11 cases (11.7%) showed falx enhancement, and 12 cases (12.8%) showed tentorial enhancement. The intervals between surgery and the appearance of the meningeal enhancement ranged from 4 days to 88 weeks. A small amount of bleeding into the dura-arachnoid interface induced by surgery might result in the subdural neomembrane, as has previously been reported. This neomembrane might be enhanced by the leakage of Gd-DTPA through the proliferating capillaries. As meningeal enhancement occurs in approximately a third of the cases following craniotomy, much care should be taken in the differential diagnosis of the infection, inflammation, and metastasis or dissemination of malignant brain tumors. (author)

  6. MR imaging of the meningeal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Henkes, H.; Felix, R.

    1988-01-01

    The value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of meningeal diseases was studied in 22 patients with various meningeal alterations (tumor, inflammation, trauma, radiation). MR studies (0.5 T) included T2-weighted (spin echo [SE] 1,600/70 [repetition time msec/echo time msec]) images in 20 of 22 patients and T1-weighted images (SE 400/30) in all patients, before and after Gd-DTPA enhancement. As compared with a control group (20 cases), 16 of 20 T2-weighted studies of the patient group showed pathologically increased signal intensity of the subarchnoidal space. Whereas only normal findings were seen on T1-weighted images in the patient group, 21 of 22 patients had pathologically increased contrast accumulation of the meninges. In conclusion, pathologic changes of the meninges could be demonstrated on plain T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. In selected cases, detection of meningeal disease could be achieved only with Gd-DTPA-enhanced studies

  7. Development and plasticity of meningeal lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Salli; Karaman, Sinem; Nurmi, Harri; Airavaara, Mikko; Voutilainen, Merja H; Mathivet, Thomas; Chilov, Dmitri; Li, Zhilin; Koppinen, Tapani; Park, Jun-Hee; Fang, Shentong; Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Saarma, Mart; Eichmann, Anne; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Alitalo, Kari

    2017-12-04

    The recent discovery of meningeal lymphatic vessels (LVs) has raised interest in their possible involvement in neuropathological processes, yet little is known about their development or maintenance. We show here that meningeal LVs develop postnatally, appearing first around the foramina in the basal parts of the skull and spinal canal, sprouting along the blood vessels and cranial and spinal nerves to various parts of the meninges surrounding the central nervous system (CNS). VEGF-C, expressed mainly in vascular smooth muscle cells, and VEGFR3 in lymphatic endothelial cells were essential for their development, whereas VEGF-D deletion had no effect. Surprisingly, in adult mice, the LVs showed regression after VEGF-C or VEGFR3 deletion, administration of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib, or expression of VEGF-C/D trap, which also compromised the lymphatic drainage function. Conversely, an excess of VEGF-C induced meningeal lymphangiogenesis. The plasticity and regenerative potential of meningeal LVs should allow manipulation of cerebrospinal fluid drainage and neuropathological processes in the CNS. © 2017 Antila et al.

  8. Leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Young Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The CNS involvement by leukemia may either be meningeal or parenchymal, although meningeal infiltration of leukemic cells, known as leukemic meningitis is more common. We report a case of leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina in a patient with an acute lymphoblastic crisis which transformed from the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia. An MR image revealed diffuse enlargement and peripheral ring enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina

  9. Leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Young Hwan [School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    The CNS involvement by leukemia may either be meningeal or parenchymal, although meningeal infiltration of leukemic cells, known as leukemic meningitis is more common. We report a case of leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina in a patient with an acute lymphoblastic crisis which transformed from the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia. An MR image revealed diffuse enlargement and peripheral ring enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina.

  10. Optical coherence tomography imaging of cranial meninges post brain injury in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woo June Choi; Ruikang K.Wang

    2017-01-01

    We report a new application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate the cranial meninges in an animal model of brain injury in vivo.The injury is induced in a mouse due to skull thinning,in which the repeated and excessive drilling exerts mechanical stress on the mouse brain through the skull,resulting in acute and mild brain injury.Transcranial OCT imaging reveals an interesting virtual space between the cranial meningeal layers post skull thinning,which is gradually closed within hours.The finding suggests a promise of OCT as an effective tool to monitor the mechanical trauma in the small animal model of brain injury.

  11. Review for 'Nattoh' model and experimental findings during cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takaaki

    1993-01-01

    A review is described for the Nattoh model that provides the framework of the mechanisms of cold fusion. The model classifies the reactions into two categories: fundamental and associated reactions. The former involves the new 'hydrogen-catalyzed' fusion reaction and the chain-reactions of hydrogens. And extremely exciting physics are involved in the latter. Furthermore experimental findings are described. (author)

  12. Experimental study and modeling of a novel magnetorheological elastomer isolator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jian; Li, Weihua; Sun, Shuaishuai; Du, Haiping; Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun; Deng, H X

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental setup aiming at evaluating the performance of a newly designed magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) seismic isolator. As a further effort to explore the field-dependent stiffness/damping properties of the MRE isolator, a series of experimental testing were conducted. Based upon the analysis of the experimental responses and the characteristics of the MRE isolator, a new model that is capable of reproducing the unique MRE isolator dynamics behaviors is proposed. The validation results verify the model’s effectiveness to portray the MRE isolator. A study on the field-dependent parameters is then provided to make the model valid with fluctuating magnetic fields. To fully explore the mechanism of the proposed model, an investigation relating the dependence of the proposed model on every parameter is carried out. (technical note)

  13. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maes, Michaël [Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vinken, Mathieu, E-mail: mvinken@vub.ac.be [Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Jaeschke, Hartmut [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. - Highlights: • The murine APAP model is very close to what is observed in patients. • The Gal/ET model is useful to study TNFα-mediated apoptotic signaling mechanisms. • Fas receptor activation is an effective model of apoptosis and secondary necrosis. • The ConA model is a relevant model of auto-immune hepatitis and viral hepatitis. • Multiple time point evaluation needed in experimental models of acute liver injury.

  14. Screening the cytokines for diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽豪

    2014-01-01

    Objective To select cytokines for diagnosis of tuber-culous meningitis.Methods One hundred and twenty kinds of cytokines were detected with protein chips among two tuberculous meningitis cases,two viral meningitis cases and two noninfectious neurologic disease cases.The results were compared among different disease groups to select the differential cytokines,which were

  15. Using an experimental model for the study of therapeutic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniella Soares; Marta, Ilda Estéfani Ribeiro; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari; de Quadros, Andreza Urba; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos

    2013-02-01

    to verify whether the Paw Edema Model can be used in investigations about the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation by measuring the variables pain, edema and neutrophil migration. this is a pilot and experimental study, involving ten male mice of the same genetic strain and divided into experimental and control group, submitted to the chemical induction of local inflammation in the right back paw. The experimental group received a daily administration of Therapeutic Touch for 15 minutes during three days. the data showed statistically significant differences in the nociceptive threshold and in the paw circumference of the animals from the experimental group on the second day of the experiment. the experiment model involving animals can contribute to study the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation, and adjustments are suggested in the treatment duration, number of sessions and experiment duration.

  16. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  17. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  18. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Jennifer E.; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R.; Gray, Katherine J.; Kiran, Anmol M.; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Faragher, Brian E.; Everett, Dean B.; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. PMID:26259813

  19. Olfactory nerve--a novel invasion route of Neisseria meningitidis to reach the meninges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sjölinder

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival.

  20. Olfactory nerve--a novel invasion route of Neisseria meningitidis to reach the meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2010-11-18

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival.

  1. Olfactory Nerve—A Novel Invasion Route of Neisseria meningitidis to Reach the Meninges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2010-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival. PMID:21124975

  2. Use of radiologic modalities in coccidioidal meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadalnik, R.C.; Goldstein, E.; Hoeprich, P.D.; McGahan, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of pentetate indium trisodium CSF studies, technetium Tc 99m brain scans, and computerized tomographic (CT) scans was evaluated in eight patients in whom coccidioidal meningitis developed following a dust storm in the Central Valley of California. The 111In flow studies and the CT scans demonstrated hydrocephalus in five patients with clinical findings suggesting this complication. Ventriculitis has not previously been diagnosed before death in patients with coccidioidal meningitis; however, it was demonstrated in two patients by the technetium Tc 99m brain scan. The finding that communicating hydrocephalus occurs early in meningitis and interferes with CSF flow into infected basilar regions has important therapeutic implications in that antifungal agents injected into the lumbar subarachnoid space may not reach these regions

  3. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth.

  4. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Lind, I

    1977-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) would facilitate the rapid, etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis when used in parallel with other routine methods in a medical bacteriological laboratory. Of 3,674 consecutive specimens of cerebros......The aim of the present study was to investigate whether counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) would facilitate the rapid, etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis when used in parallel with other routine methods in a medical bacteriological laboratory. Of 3,674 consecutive specimens....../139) of the culture-negative specimens. CSF specimens from 21 patients with bacterial meningitis caused by other species were all negative in CIE, except four, three of which contained Escherichia coli antigen reacting with antiserum to N. meningitidis group B and one E. coli antigen reacting with antiserum to H...

  5. Investigation of wax precipitation in crude oil: Experimental and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Jafari Behbahani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a series of experiments were carried to investigation of rheological behavior of crude oil using waxy crude oil sample in the absence/presence of flow improver such as ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The rheological data covered the temperature range of 5–30 °C. The results indicated that the performance of flow improver was dependent on its molecular weight. Addition of small quantities of flow improver, can improve viscosity and pour point of crude oil. Also, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model using Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP topology has been developed to account wax appearance temperature and the amount of precipitated wax and the model was verified using experimental data given in this work and reported in the literature. In order to compare the performance of the proposed model based on Artificial Neural Network, the wax precipitation experimental data at different temperatures were predicted using solid solution model and multi-solid phase model. The results showed that the developed model based on Artificial Neural Network can predict more accurately the wax precipitation experimental data in comparison to the previous models such as solid solution and multi-solid phase model with AADs less than 0.5%. Furthermore, the number of parameters required for the Artificial Neural Network (ANN model is less than the studied thermodynamic models.

  6. Optimality models in the age of experimental evolution and genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, J. J.; Wang, I.-N.

    2010-01-01

    Optimality models have been used to predict evolution of many properties of organisms. They typically neglect genetic details, whether by necessity or design. This omission is a common source of criticism, and although this limitation of optimality is widely acknowledged, it has mostly been defended rather than evaluated for its impact. Experimental adaptation of model organisms provides a new arena for testing optimality models and for simultaneously integrating genetics. First, an experimen...

  7. Confrontation of thermoluminescence models in lithium fluoride with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewiadomski, T.

    1976-12-01

    The thermoluminescent properties of lithium fluoride depend on numerous factors and are much more complex than those of other phosphors. The so far developed fragmentary models are meant to explain the relationships between crystal defect structure and the processes involved in TL. An attempt has been made to compare these models with the veryfied experimental data and to point out the observations which are inconsistant with the models. (author)

  8. Tuberculous and brucellosis meningitis differential diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, Hakan; Senbayrak, Seniha; Gencer, Serap

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Thwaites and Lancet scoring systems have been used in the rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). However, brucellar meningoencephalitis (BME) has similar characteristics with TBM. The ultimate aim of this study is to infer data to see if BME should be included in the dif......BACKGROUND: The Thwaites and Lancet scoring systems have been used in the rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). However, brucellar meningoencephalitis (BME) has similar characteristics with TBM. The ultimate aim of this study is to infer data to see if BME should be included...

  9. Innervation of the human middle meningeal artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Gulbenkian, S; Barroso, C P

    1998-01-01

    The majority of nerve fibers in the middle meningeal artery and branching arterioles are sympathetic, storing norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y (NPY). A sparse supply of fibers contain acetylcholinesterase activity and immunoreactivity toward vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), peptidine histidine...... methionine (PHM), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Only few substance P and neuropeptide K immunoreactive fibers are noted. Electronmicroscopy shows axons and terminals at the adventitial medial border of the human middle meningeal artery, with a fairly large distance to the smooth muscle cells...

  10. Meningeal involvement in Behcet's disease: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guma, A.; Aguilera, C.; Pons, L.; Acebes, J.; Arruga, J.

    1998-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease that involves the central nervous system up to half of cases. Presentation with neurologic symptoms occurs in 5 % of cases and cerebral venous thrombosis is one of its major manifestations. A feature not previously reported is progressive meningeal thickening with involvement of both optic nerves. We report a patient with cerebral venous thrombosis, meningeal thickening and contrast enhancement on MRI. This patient had two other unusual features: positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and later development of central diabetes insipidus. (orig.)

  11. Anthrax Meningitis - Report Of An Autopsied Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a rare cause of hemorrhagic meningitis in man. This report illustrates the characteristic hemorrhagic manifestations in the brain of a patient dying of anthrax meningitis secondary to overwhelming bacteremia. Gross examination of the brain revealed a thick dense subarachnoid hemorrhage with numerous petechial hemorrhages in the cortex. Histologically, meningoencephalitis with vascular necrosis, edema, perivascular cortical hemorrhages and clumps of Gram positive bacilli in the vascular lumen and invading vessel wall were the salient features. The anthrax bacillus was isolated from CSF and brain tissue and further its pathogenecity was confirmed by animal inoculation.

  12. The microbiological diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, H; Ozturk-Engin, D; Elaldi, N

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to provide data on the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in this largest case series ever reported. The Haydarpasa-1 study involved patients with microbiologically confirmed TBM in Albania, Croatia, Denmark, Egypt, France, Hungary, Iraq, Italy, Macedonia, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia......, Syria and Turkey between 2000 and 2012. A positive culture, PCR or Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen staining (EZNs) from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was mandatory for inclusion of meningitis patients. A total of 506 TBM patients were included. The sensitivities of the tests were as follows: interferon-γ release.......05). Combination of L-J and ACS was superior to using these tests alone (p

  13. Nasopharyngeal glial heterotopia with delayed postoperative meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kenichi; Furuno, Kenji; Chong, Pin Fee; Morioka, Takato

    2017-06-22

    A male infant, who underwent radical resection of a large glial heterotopia at the nasopharynx at 8 days, developed delayed postoperative bacterial meningitis at 9 months. Neuroradiological examination clearly demonstrated that meningitis had occurred because of the intracranial and extracranial connections, which were scarcely seen in the perioperative period. A transsphenoidal extension of hypothalamic hamartoma is possible because the connection started from the right optic nerve, running through the transsphenoidal canal in the sphenoid bone and terminating at the recurrent mass in the nasopharyngeal region. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Tuberculosis meningitis presenting as isolated interhemispheric exudates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharath, R.D.; Vasudev, M.K.; Sinha, S.; Ravishankar, S.; Chandrashekar, N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The total number of tuberculosis cases in the world is increasing, and less common forms of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) with varying imaging manifestations are being encountered more often. We describe anterior interhemispheric variety of TBM, which has not been previously described to the best of our knowledge in the literature. Common imaging findings in these five patients include predominant involvement of the meninges in the anterior interhemispheric fissure with relatively little enhancement of the basal cisterns. Knowledge of uncommon radiological findings is vital in early diagnosis and treatment of this common disease.

  15. Mondini Dysplasia Presenting as Otorrhea without Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yu Lin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mondini dysplasia is a rare inner ear malformation that is usually only diagnosed after recurrent meningitis. Surgical intervention is mandatory. This report highlights the case of a patient with Mondini dysplasia who presented with hearing impairment and otorrhea and was diagnosed and treated before the occurrence of meningitis, thus preventing morbidity and neurologic sequelae. Hearing impairment may be the only manifestation of Mondini dysplasia, and the benefit of hearing screening is emphasized. Temporal bone computed tomography should be considered in children with unilateral sensorineural or mixed-type hearing impairment.

  16. Mondini dysplasia presenting as otorrhea without meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Lin, Hung-Ching; Peng, Chun-Chih; Lee, Kuo-Sheng; Chiu, Nan-Chang

    2012-12-01

    Mondini dysplasia is a rare inner ear malformation that is usually only diagnosed after recurrent meningitis. Surgical intervention is mandatory. This report highlights the case of a patient with Mondini dysplasia who presented with hearing impairment and otorrhea and was diagnosed and treated before the occurrence of meningitis, thus preventing morbidity and neurologic sequelae. Hearing impairment may be the only manifestation of Mondini dysplasia, and the benefit of hearing screening is emphasized. Temporal bone computed tomography should be considered in children with unilateral sensorineural or mixed-type hearing impairment. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Anatomy and imaging of the normal meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neel; Kirmi, Olga

    2009-12-01

    The meninges are an important connective tissue envelope investing the brain. Their function is to provide a protective coating to the brain and also participate in the formation of blood-brain barrier. Understanding their anatomy is fundamental to understanding the location and spread of pathologies in relation to the layers. It also provides an insight into the characteristics of such pathologies when imaging them. This review aims to describe the anatomy of the meninges, and to demonstrate the imaging findings of specific features.

  18. Experimental Validation of a Dynamic Model for Lightweight Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gasparetto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the main topics in robotics research is dynamic performance improvement by means of a lightening of the overall system structure. The effective motion and control of these lightweight robotic systems occurs with the use of suitable motion planning and control process. In order to do so, model-based approaches can be adopted by exploiting accurate dynamic models that take into account the inertial and elastic terms that are usually neglected in a heavy rigid link configuration. In this paper, an effective method for modelling spatial lightweight industrial robots based on an Equivalent Rigid Link System approach is considered from an experimental validation perspective. A dynamic simulator implementing the formulation is used and an experimental test-bench is set-up. Experimental tests are carried out with a benchmark L-shape mechanism.

  19. MODERN CLINICAL AND LABORATORY FEATURES OF ENTEROVIRAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Usacheva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Among numerous viral meningitises from 80% to 90% of cases are accounted for meningitis of enteroviral etiology according to the international data. Despite the favorable disease course, there are forms which are characterized by severe damage of CNS. In order to improve diagnostics of enteroviral meningitis in this article we have made a comparative analysis of clinical and laboratory parameters in 23 patients with enteroviral meningitis and 18 patients with serous meningitis of non-enteroviral etiology. Anamnesis data and the major clinical manifestations of the disease dynamics were analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the comparison of diagnoses, by which patients were sent to infectious hospital, the symptoms that occurred during patients’ admission into hospitals and their severity. The presence and severity of meningeal symptoms and the indices of cerebrospinal fluid in the patients of the comparison group were analyzed in detail. It is shown that enteroviruses are the important factor in the development of meningitis in the children of younger age. The clinical picture of enteroviral meningitis often develops gradually for 2-3 days and includes the typical syndromes: intoxication and meningeal ones. Every third patient with enterovirus infection has diarrhea and catarrhal symptoms, that’s why it is difficult to diagnose meningitis in its early stages, but it allows to assume enteroviral etiology of the disease. The meningitis of enteroviral etiology is characterized by multiple meningeal signs, while the non-enteroviral meningitis is characterized by dissociation with the prevalence of the of Kernig’s and Brudzinski’s symptoms. The analysis of the laboratory data showed that the enteroviral meningitis is characterized by low (over 50-100 cells "mixed" pleocytosis (the ratio of lymphocytes and neutrophils is about 1:1. These data can be used for differential diagnosis between enteroviral meningitis and serous meningitis of

  20. A sEMG model with experimentally based simulation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Katherine A; Shimada, Hiroshima; Kumar, Dinesh K; Arjunan, Sridhar P

    2010-01-01

    A differential, time-invariant, surface electromyogram (sEMG) model has been implemented. While it is based on existing EMG models, the novelty of this implementation is that it assigns more accurate distributions of variables to create realistic motor unit (MU) characteristics. Variables such as muscle fibre conduction velocity, jitter (the change in the interpulse interval between subsequent action potential firings) and motor unit size have been considered to follow normal distributions about an experimentally obtained mean. In addition, motor unit firing frequencies have been considered to have non-linear and type based distributions that are in accordance with experimental results. Motor unit recruitment thresholds have been considered to be related to the MU type. The model has been used to simulate single channel differential sEMG signals from voluntary, isometric contractions of the biceps brachii muscle. The model has been experimentally verified by conducting experiments on three subjects. Comparison between simulated signals and experimental recordings shows that the Root Mean Square (RMS) increases linearly with force in both cases. The simulated signals also show similar values and rates of change of RMS to the experimental signals.

  1. Experimental modeling of injectivity loss; Modelagem experimental da perda de injetividade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonato, Adriano Jose do Amaral Mello; Silva, Pedro Glauto de Farias e; Gomes, Vanessa Limeira Azevedo; Santos, Adriano dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Produced water reinjection, suspended particles are retained in the porous media causing formation damage and injectivity decline. In general the retention of the particles occurs near the side of injection, this fact occurs in most cases, due to the size exclusion. The modeling of filtration and the consequent formation damage is essential to the project management of water injection in oil reservoirs. Thus, mathematical models are studied to better predict the distribution of particles throughout the porous media and determine the parameters of adjustment to injectivity decline. Among these models, there is the classic model which consists in determining these parameters (coefficient of filtration and formation damage). The methodology used in modeling is given from the equations the mass conservation, kinetic particle retention, the modified Darcy equation and the function formation damage. This study aimed to improve experimental modeling, including development of software for acquisition and processing of experimental data, considering the variable number of pressure measurements along the sample. The software was developed using the Labview 2011 platform and allows the determination of relevant parameters to predict injectivity loss in water injection wells. Furthermore, based on the traditional model of filtration in porous media (including depth filtration and formation of the external plaster), the software was applied to predict injectivity loss in addition to the properties of the grout. Finally, the classical models for transporting suspensions and damage to the formation were observed. (author)

  2. Investigation of approximate models of experimental temperature characteristics of machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, I. V.; Polyakov, A. N.

    2018-05-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of various approaches to the approximation of experimental data and the creation of simulation mathematical models of thermal processes in machines with the aim of finding ways to reduce the time of their field tests and reducing the temperature error of the treatments. The main methods of research which the authors used in this work are: the full-scale thermal testing of machines; realization of various approaches at approximation of experimental temperature characteristics of machine tools by polynomial models; analysis and evaluation of modelling results (model quality) of the temperature characteristics of machines and their derivatives up to the third order in time. As a result of the performed researches, rational methods, type, parameters and complexity of simulation mathematical models of thermal processes in machine tools are proposed.

  3. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...

  4. Meningococcal meningitis: clinical and laboratorial characteristics, fatality rate and variables associated with in-hospital mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Strelow

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meningococcal meningitis is a public health problem. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with meningococcal meningitis, and to identify associated factors with mortality. This was a retrospective study, between 2006 and 2011, at a referral center in São Paulo, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with mortality. We included 316 patients. The median age was 16 years (IQR: 7–27 and 60% were male. The clinical triad: fever, headache and neck stiffness was observed in 89% of the patients. The cerebrospinal triad: pleocytosis, elevated protein levels and low glucose levels was present in 79% of patients. Factors associated with mortality in the multivariate model were age above 50 years, seizures, tachycardia, hypotension and neck stiffness. The classic clinical and laboratory triads of meningococcal meningitis were variable. The fatality rate was low. Age, seizures and shock signs were independently associated with mortality.

  5. Bacterial Invasion of the Inner Ear in Association With Pneumococcal Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the pathways of bacterial invasion and subsequent spreading in the inner ear during pneumococcal meningitis. STUDY DESIGN: A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was used. METHODS: Thirty rats were inoculated intrathecally with S. pneumoniae...... scala vestibuli of the basal turn of the cochlea, hematogenous spreading occurred to the spiral ligament and into the cochlear endolymph, subsequently to the vestibular endolymph. We found no evidence of alternative routes for bacterial invasion in the inner ear. Several internal barriers to bacterial...... spreading were found within the inner ear. Bacterial elimination was evidenced by engulfment by macrophages within the inner ear. CONCLUSION: From the meninges, pneumococci invade the inner ear through the cochlear aqueduct during the first days of infection, whereas hematogenous invasion via the spiral...

  6. Optimality models in the age of experimental evolution and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, J J; Wang, I-N

    2010-09-01

    Optimality models have been used to predict evolution of many properties of organisms. They typically neglect genetic details, whether by necessity or design. This omission is a common source of criticism, and although this limitation of optimality is widely acknowledged, it has mostly been defended rather than evaluated for its impact. Experimental adaptation of model organisms provides a new arena for testing optimality models and for simultaneously integrating genetics. First, an experimental context with a well-researched organism allows dissection of the evolutionary process to identify causes of model failure--whether the model is wrong about genetics or selection. Second, optimality models provide a meaningful context for the process and mechanics of evolution, and thus may be used to elicit realistic genetic bases of adaptation--an especially useful augmentation to well-researched genetic systems. A few studies of microbes have begun to pioneer this new direction. Incompatibility between the assumed and actual genetics has been demonstrated to be the cause of model failure in some cases. More interestingly, evolution at the phenotypic level has sometimes matched prediction even though the adaptive mutations defy mechanisms established by decades of classic genetic studies. Integration of experimental evolutionary tests with genetics heralds a new wave for optimality models and their extensions that does not merely emphasize the forces driving evolution.

  7. MR demonstration of the meninges: Normal and pathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Henkes, H.; Sander, B.; Felix, R.

    1988-01-01

    The MR appearance of normal and pathological meninges was studied in 23 patients. Amongst twelve normals, T 1 -weighted images demonstrated the meninges as slightly hyperintense density structures (compared with CSF) which increased in signal intensity somewhat after the administration of gadolinium-DTPA. On T 2 -weighted images, the subarachnoid space and meninges were isointense. In eleven patients with inflammatory disease or tumourous infiltration of the meninges, abnormal findings were evident in the unenhanced images as well as after administration of gadolinium-DTPA. Compared with CT, MR proved greatly superior in the diagnosis of meningeal abnormalities. (orig.) [de

  8. C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN BACTERIAL MENINGITIS: DOSE IT HELP TO DIFFERENTIATE BACTERIAL FROM VIRAL MENINGITIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR EMAMI NAEINI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Central nervous system infections are among the most serious conditions in of medical practice. C-reactive Protein has recently been evaluated in terms of its ability to diffeccentiate bacterial from nonbacterial central nervous system inflammations.
    Methods. We studied the frequency of positive CRP in 61 patients who had signs of meningitis. All the specimens referred to one laboratory and were examined by Slide method.
    Results. Positive CRP was found in 97.6 percent of those who were finally diagnosed as bacterial meningitis. The frequency of CRP for other types of meningitis was 16.6 percent (P < 0.05.
    Discussion. In the absence of infection, CSF is free of CRP. Positive CRP may help to the differentiate the different types of meningitis.

  9. Team Modelling: Review of Experimental Scenarios and Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    les auteurs ont réuni et examiné des scénarios ayant servi dans le cadre d’études antérieures sur les équipes, ils ont développé d’importants...cognition, perception, sensation, motor action and knowledge, that embody a principled underlying theory or framework for human information...Processing) integrates Qinetiq’s (POP) model with DRDC’s IP/PCT (Perceptual Control Theory ) models. In particular, the POP/IP model includes the

  10. Functional polymorphisms of macrophage migration inhibitory factor as predictors of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Athina; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Le Roy, Didier; Ferwerda, Bart; van der Ende, Arie; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; van de Beek, Diederik; Calandra, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most frequent and critical type of bacterial meningitis. Because cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis, we examined whether functional polymorphisms of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were associated with morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis. Two functional MIF promoter polymorphisms, a microsatellite (−794 CATT5–8; rs5844572) and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (−173 G/C; rs755622) were genotyped in a prospective, nationwide cohort of 405 patients with pneumococcal meningitis and in 329 controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. Carriages of the CATT7 and −173 C high-expression MIF alleles were associated with unfavorable outcome (P = 0.005 and 0.003) and death (P = 0.03 and 0.01). In a multivariate logistic regression model, shock [odds ratio (OR) 26.0, P = 0.02] and carriage of the CATT7 allele (OR 5.12, P = 0.04) were the main predictors of mortality. MIF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid were associated with systemic complications and death (P = 0.0002). Streptococcus pneumoniae strongly up-regulated MIF production in whole blood and transcription activity of high-expression MIF promoter Luciferase reporter constructs in THP-1 monocytes. Consistent with these findings, treatment with anti-MIF immunoglogulin G (IgG) antibodies reduced bacterial loads and improved survival in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. The present study provides strong evidence that carriage of high-expression MIF alleles is a genetic marker of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis and also suggests a potential role for MIF as a target of immune-modulating adjunctive therapy. PMID:26976591

  11. Instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Watanabe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animal models offer possibilities of physiology knowledge, pathogenesis of disease and action of drugs that are directly related to quality nursing care. This integrative review describes the current state of the instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models, including the main recommendations of ethics committees that focus on animal welfare and raises questions about the impact of their findings in nursing care. Data show that, in Brazil, the progress in ethics for the use of animals for scientific purposes was consolidated with Law No. 11.794/2008 establishing ethical procedures, attending health, genetic and experimental parameters. The application of ethics in handling of animals for scientific and educational purposes and obtaining consistent and quality data brings unquestionable contributions to the nurse, as they offer subsidies to relate pathophysiological mechanisms and the clinical aspect on the patient.

  12. Constitutive Model Calibration via Autonomous Multiaxial Experimentation (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-17

    ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Modern plasticity models contain numerous parameters that can be difficult and time consuming to fit using current...Abstract Modern plasticity models contain numerous parameters that can be difficult and time consuming to fit using current methods. Additional...complexity, is a difficult and time consuming process that has historically be a separate process from the experimental testing. As such, additional

  13. Experimental Analysis and Model Validation of an Opaque Ventilated Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, F. Peci; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated façade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was ...

  14. Capillary microreactors for lactic acid extraction: experimental and modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanti, Susanti; Winkelman, Jozef; Schuur, Boelo; Heeres, Hero; Yue, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important biobased chemical and, among others, is used for the production of poly-lactic acid. Down-stream processing using state of the art technology is energy intensive and leads to the formation of large amounts of salts. In this presentation, experimental and modeling studies

  15. Experimental data available for radiation damage modelling in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberger, H.

    Radiation damage modelling requires rate constants for production, annihilation and trapping of defects. The literature is reviewed with respect to experimental determination of such constants. Useful quantitative information exists only for Cu and Al. Special emphasis is given to the temperature dependence of the rate constants

  16. Low dose CT simulation using experimental noise model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Satori; Zamyatin, Alexander A. [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Tochigi, Otawarashi (Japan); Silver, Michael D. [Toshiba Medical Research Institute, Vernon Hills, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We suggest a method to obtain system noise model experimentally without relying on assumptions on statistical distribution of the noise; also, knowledge of DAS gain and electronic noise level are not required. Evaluation with ultra-low dose CT data (5 mAs) shows good match between simulated and real data noise. (orig.)

  17. Novel sensors for food inspection modelling, fabrication and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Abdul Rahman, Mohd Syaifudin; Yu, Pak-Lam

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses presents recent developments of novel planar interdigital sensors for food inspection. It covers the fundamentals of sensors, their design, modelling and simulations, fabrications, characterizations, experimental investigations and analyses. This book will be useful for the engineers and researchers especially higher undergraduate, postgraduate students as well as practitioners working on the development of Electromagnetic Sensors.

  18. Meningeal infiltration in recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Fan, Y.-F.

    2000-01-01

    Permeative infiltration of the meninges appears to be a distinct form of recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The present report of eight patients with recurrent NPC illustrates meningeal infiltration following basal foramina extension. Seven of the eight patients (88%) showed jugular foramen involvement. Three patients had concomitant infiltration of the foramen magnum. There was one patient showing spread through the foramen lacerum. Only four (50%) of these patients had clinically detectable tumour in the nasopharynx, while the other half showed deep submucosal recurrence with endoscopically unremarkable findings. Permeative meningeal infiltration appears to be a distinct form of NPC recurrence. It is important to recognize this phenomenon so as to optimize the treatment options. The imaging studies were reviewed and the following features were recorded: local nasopharyngeal recurrence, the manner of intracranial spread and site of meningeal infiltration. Four patients had only MRI, two had only CT and two patients had both CT and MRI. The presence or absence of intracranial tumour before treatment was also recorded. Two observers reviewed the images and results were arrived at by consensus. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  19. The meningeal sign: a new appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutzelmann, A.; Palmie, S.; Zimmer, C.; Benz, T.; Leweke, F.; Freund, M.

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of the meningeal sign in meningiomas and metastases. We studied 20 patients with meningiomas and 17 patients with cerebral metastases adjacent to the dura. MRI studies (Siemens, Magnetom 1,5) included axial T 1 -weighted and T 2 -weighted unenhanced as well as gadolinium-DTPA enhanced T 1 -weighted (axial, coronal, sagittal) SE imaging. In all patients the tumours were resected with the attached dura mater. Histopathological examinations were done, which corresponded to the area of marked enhancement by gadolinium-DTPA. There was no correlation between the occurrence of the meningeal sign and the histopathological examinations. In 20 patients with meningiomas adjacent to the dura we found the meningeal sign in 11 cases. Histologically we observed an increase of collagen fibres and fibrocytes. In 5 to 17 cases with superficial cerebral as dura infiltrations and microbleedings. The meningeal sign is not specific for meningiomas and can be observed in a wide variety of pathological entities. (orig.) [de

  20. Communication between Paranasal Sinuses and Meninges after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases are presented, both demonstrating the value of the painstaking use of pleuridirectional spiral tomography to map out the exact situation and extent of defects where a communication exists between the paranasal sinuses and the meninges. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 909 (1974) ...

  1. Prediction of unfavorable outcomes in cryptococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakyemez, I N; Erdem, H; Beraud, G

    2018-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is mostly seen in immunocompromised patients, particularly human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients, but CM may also occur in apparently immunocompetent individuals. Outcome analyses have been performed in such patients but, due to the high prevalence of HIV...

  2. Bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsura T

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Keisho Hirota1,2, Masayuki Akimoto1,3, Toshiaki Katsura21Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Medical Center, National Hospital Organization, 2Internal Medicine, Kyoto Medical Center, 3Clinical Research Center, Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto, JapanPurpose: The report of a case of bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis.Case report: A 47-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaint of persistent high fever and transient loss of consciousness. Although his general condition improved after intravenous acyclovir administration, the patient presented with visual loss in both eyes 4 days after admission. Visual acuity in his right eye was 20/200 and his left eye had light perception alone. Both eyes showed panretinal arteritis diagnosed as acute retinal necrosis. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed for both eyes. Progression of retinal detachment was prevented in both eyes; however, visual acuity of the left eye was totally lost because of neovascular glaucoma. Visual acuity of the right eye recovered to 20/20.Conclusion: Although cases of bilateral acute retinal necrosis have been reported after herpetic encephalitis, this condition is rare after herpetic meningitis. Prophylactic acyclovir therapy and early panretinal photocoagulation may prevent retinal detachment and improve the prognosis. Neurologists and ophthalmologists should be aware that not only herpetic encephalitis but also herpetic meningitis can lead to acute retinal necrosis within a very short interval.Keywords: acute retinal necrosis, herpetic meningitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster virus

  3. Cryptococcal meningitis: epidemiology, immunology, diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Peter R; Jarvis, Joseph N; Panackal, Anil A; Fisher, Matthew C; Molloy, Síle F; Loyse, Angela; Harrison, Thomas S

    2017-01-01

    HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis is by far the most common cause of adult meningitis in many areas of the world that have high HIV seroprevalence. In most areas in Sub-Saharan Africa, the incidence of cryptococcal meningitis is not decreasing despite availability of antiretroviral therapy, because of issues of adherence and retention in HIV care. In addition, cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-seronegative individuals is a substantial problem: the risk of cryptococcal infection is increased in transplant recipients and other individuals with defects in cell-mediated immunity, and cryptococcosis is also reported in the apparently immunocompetent. Despite therapy, mortality rates in these groups are high. Over the past 5 years, advances have been made in rapid point-of-care diagnosis and early detection of cryptococcal antigen in the blood. These advances have enabled development of screening and pre-emptive treatment strategies aimed at preventing the development of clinical infection in patients with late-stage HIV infection. Progress in optimizing antifungal combinations has been aided by evaluation of the clearance rate of infection by using serial quantitative cultures of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Measurement and management of raised CSF pressure, a common complication, is a vital component of care. In addition, we now better understand protective immune responses in HIV-associated cases, immunogenetic predisposition to infection, and the role of immune-mediated pathology in patients with non-HIV associated infection and in the context of HIV-associated immune reconstitution reactions.

  4. Bilateral optic neuropathy in acute cryptococcal meningitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Zhe Ngoo; Li Min Evelyn Tai; Wan Hazabbah Wan Hitam; John Tharakan

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of cryptococcal meningitis presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy in an immunocompetent patient. A 64-year-old Malay gentleman with no medical comorbidities presented with acute bilateral blurring of vision for a week, which was associated with generalised throbbing headache and low grade fever. He also had som-nolence and altered consciousness. Visual acuity in both eyes was no perception of light with poor pupillary reflexes. Extraocular muscle movements were normal. Anterior segments were unremarkable bilaterally. Fundoscopy revealed bilateral optic disc swelling. CT scan of the brain showed multifocal infarct, but no meningeal enhancement or mass. Cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure was normal, while its culture grew Cryptococcus neoformans. A diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis with bilateral optic neuropathy was made. Patient was treated with a six-week course of intravenous flu-conazole and started concomitantly on a fortnight's course of intravenous amphotericin B. After that, his general condition improved, but there was still no improvement in his visual acuity. On reviewing at two months post-initiation of treatment, fundi showed bilateral optic atrophy. Bilateral optic neuropathy secondary to cryptococcal meningitis was rare. The prognosis was guarded due to the sequelae of optic atrophy. Anti-fungal medication alone may not be sufficient to manage this condition. However, evidence for other treatment modalities is still lacking and further clinical studies are required.

  5. a rare complication of tuberculous meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report one such case of tuberculous meningitis where the patient developed cortical venous thrombosis after 5 days of illness. She was treated empirically, initially, till confirmation of the diagnosis and later was put on antitubercular drugs along with prednisolone therapy and anticoagulation, which led to complete ...

  6. Endophthalmitis in a Child with Meningococcal Meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    most obvious abnormality was that the left eye, entirely normal six hours previously, was completely opaque and appeared to be filled with thick white material. A lumbar puncture was performed, yielding cloudy CSF and, based on the microscopy and Gram stain appearance, a diagno- sis of meningococcal meningitis was ...

  7. Childhood bacterial meningitis in Mbarara Hospital, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background : The recommended antibiotic treatment of bacterial meningitis has come under scrutiny following frequent reports of in-vitro resistance by the common causative organisms to penicillin and chloramphenicol. Objective : The study recorded the causative organisms, antibiotic sensitivity patterns and outcome of ...

  8. October 2012 Multistate Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-17

    This podcast gives an overview of the October 2012 multistate fungal meningitis outbreak, including symptoms to watch for and a website for up-to-date information.  Created: 10/17/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  9. Angiostrongylus cantonensis Meningitis and Myelitis, Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hammoud, Roukaya; Nayes, Stacy L; Murphy, James R; Heresi, Gloria P; Butler, Ian J; Pérez, Norma

    2017-06-01

    Infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis roundworms is endemic in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. A. cantonensis meningitis and myelitis occurred in summer 2013 in a child with no history of travel outside of Texas, USA. Angiostrongyliasis is an emerging neurotropic helminthic disease in Texas and warrants increased awareness among healthcare providers.

  10. Computed Tomography Study Of Complicated Bacterial Meningitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To monitor the structural intracranial complications of bacterial meningitis using computed tomography (CT) scan. Retrospective study of medical and radiological records of patients who underwent CT scan over a 4 year period. AUniversityTeachingHospital in a developing country. Thirty three patients with clinically and ...

  11. Advances in treatment of bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Thwaites, Guy E.; Tunkel, Allan R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis kills or maims about a fifth of people with the disease. Early antibiotic treatment improves outcomes, but the effectiveness of widely available antibiotics is threatened by global emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. New antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones, could have a

  12. Clinical and MRI evaluation of tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Chunjing; Shu Jiner; Chen Jian; Sheng Sanlan; Lu Jinhua; Cai Xiaoxiao; Li Huimin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and to improve the understanding of TBM. Methods: The clinical and MRI findings in 42 patients with confirmed TBM were analyzed retrospectively. MRI examination was performed using a 1 Tesla system, including SE T 1 WI and T 2 WI. Intravenous contrast was injected in 29 patients, and follow-up scans were performed on 17 patients. Results: Of 24 patients with early TBM, MRI was abnormal in 5(21%) with slight Tl-hypointense meningeal (4) or ependymal thickening (1). MRI on 33/35 (94%) patients with late stage TBM was abnormal with T 1 hypointensity and T 2 hyperintensity including meningeal thickening (19), mild surrounding brain edema (10), nodules (11), tuberculoma (5) and abscess (2). There was significant plaque-like, nodular or rim enhancement with surrounding brain edema. Conclusion: Tuberculous meningitis has minimal clinical and MRI findings in the early phase and significant clinical and MRI findings in the late phase. The enhanced scan may help to detect the abnormality. (authors)

  13. Emergency diagnosis and treatment of adult meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitch, Michael T.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2007-01-01

    Despite the existence of antibiotic therapies against acute bacterial meningitis, patients with the disease continue to suffer significant morbidity and mortality in both high and low-income countries. Dilemmas exist for emergency medicine and primary-care providers who need to accurately diagnose

  14. Streptococcus suis meningitis, a poacher's risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halaby, T.; Hoitsma, E.; Hupperts, R.; Spanjaard, L.; Luirink, M.; Jacobs, J.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus suis infection is a zoonosis that has been mainly reported in pig-rearing and pork-consuming countries. The most common disease manifestation is meningitis, often associated with cochleovestibular signs. The causative agent is Streptococcus suis serotype 2, found as a commensal in the

  15. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every parenchymal vessel. Thus, meninges may modulate most of the physiological and pathological events of the CNS throughout the life. Meninges are present since the very early embryonic stages of cortical development and appear to be necessary for normal corticogenesis and brain structures formation. In adulthood meninges contribute to neural tissue homeostasis by secreting several trophic factors including FGF2 and SDF-1. Recently, for the first time, we have identified the presence of a stem cell population with neural differentiation potential in meninges. In addition, we and other groups have further described the presence in meninges of injury responsive neural precursors. In this review we will give a comprehensive view of meninges and their multiple roles in the context of a functional network with the neural tissue. We will highlight the current literature on the developmental feature of meninges and their role in cortical development. Moreover, we will elucidate the anatomical distribution of the meninges and their trophic properties in adult CNS. Finally, we will emphasize recent evidences suggesting the potential role of meninges as stem cell niche harbouring endogenous precursors that can be activated by injury and are able to contribute to CNS parenchymal reaction.

  16. Robust Bayesian Experimental Design for Conceptual Model Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, H. V.; Tsai, F. T. C.

    2015-12-01

    A robust Bayesian optimal experimental design under uncertainty is presented to provide firm information for model discrimination, given the least number of pumping wells and observation wells. Firm information is the maximum information of a system can be guaranteed from an experimental design. The design is based on the Box-Hill expected entropy decrease (EED) before and after the experiment design and the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) framework. A max-min programming is introduced to choose the robust design that maximizes the minimal Box-Hill EED subject to that the highest expected posterior model probability satisfies a desired probability threshold. The EED is calculated by the Gauss-Hermite quadrature. The BMA method is used to predict future observations and to quantify future observation uncertainty arising from conceptual and parametric uncertainties in calculating EED. Monte Carlo approach is adopted to quantify the uncertainty in the posterior model probabilities. The optimal experimental design is tested by a synthetic 5-layer anisotropic confined aquifer. Nine conceptual groundwater models are constructed due to uncertain geological architecture and boundary condition. High-performance computing is used to enumerate all possible design solutions in order to identify the most plausible groundwater model. Results highlight the impacts of scedasticity in future observation data as well as uncertainty sources on potential pumping and observation locations.

  17. Systematic integration of experimental data and models in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peter; Dada, Joseph O; Jameson, Daniel; Spasic, Irena; Swainston, Neil; Carroll, Kathleen; Dunn, Warwick; Khan, Farid; Malys, Naglis; Messiha, Hanan L; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Weichart, Dieter; Winder, Catherine; Wishart, Jill; Broomhead, David S; Goble, Carole A; Gaskell, Simon J; Kell, Douglas B; Westerhoff, Hans V; Mendes, Pedro; Paton, Norman W

    2010-11-29

    The behaviour of biological systems can be deduced from their mathematical models. However, multiple sources of data in diverse forms are required in the construction of a model in order to define its components and their biochemical reactions, and corresponding parameters. Automating the assembly and use of systems biology models is dependent upon data integration processes involving the interoperation of data and analytical resources. Taverna workflows have been developed for the automated assembly of quantitative parameterised metabolic networks in the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). A SBML model is built in a systematic fashion by the workflows which starts with the construction of a qualitative network using data from a MIRIAM-compliant genome-scale model of yeast metabolism. This is followed by parameterisation of the SBML model with experimental data from two repositories, the SABIO-RK enzyme kinetics database and a database of quantitative experimental results. The models are then calibrated and simulated in workflows that call out to COPASIWS, the web service interface to the COPASI software application for analysing biochemical networks. These systems biology workflows were evaluated for their ability to construct a parameterised model of yeast glycolysis. Distributed information about metabolic reactions that have been described to MIRIAM standards enables the automated assembly of quantitative systems biology models of metabolic networks based on user-defined criteria. Such data integration processes can be implemented as Taverna workflows to provide a rapid overview of the components and their relationships within a biochemical system.

  18. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  19. Modeling RERTR experimental fuel plates using the PLATE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Brazener, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling results using the PLATE dispersion fuel performance code are presented for the U-Mo/Al experimental fuel plates from the RERTR-1, -2, -3 and -5 irradiation tests. Agreement of the calculations with experimental data obtained in post-irradiation examinations of these fuels, where available, is shown to be good. Use of the code to perform a series of parametric evaluations highlights the sensitivity of U-Mo dispersion fuel performance to fabrication variables, especially fuel particle shape and size distributions. (author)

  20. Physics of human cooperation: experimental evidence and theoretical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Angel

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, many physicists have used evolutionary game theory combined with a complex systems perspective in an attempt to understand social phenomena and challenges. Prominent among such phenomena is the issue of the emergence and sustainability of cooperation in a networked world of selfish or self-focused individuals. The vast majority of research done by physicists on these questions is theoretical, and is almost always posed in terms of agent-based models. Unfortunately, more often than not such models ignore a number of facts that are well established experimentally, and are thus rendered irrelevant to actual social applications. I here summarize some of the facts that any realistic model should incorporate and take into account, discuss important aspects underlying the relation between theory and experiments, and discuss future directions for research based on the available experimental knowledge.

  1. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig

  2. Development of experimental alloxan model of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Semenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the main causes that lead to the disability of diabetic patients is diabetic retinopathy (DR. The relevance of the problem of DR necessitates the development of optimal experimental models on experimental animals to find effective ways of correcting this pathology. The purpose of our work was to develop an experimental alloxan model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM for the study of DR, which would not result in the lethal outcome of experimental animals under the action of alloxan; histological examination of changes in the tissues of the eyeball in the reproduction of the DM model for the selection of new effective methods for the metabolic treatment of DR in the early stages. Materials and methods. The experiment was carried out on white outbred Wistar rats weighing 180–200 g. The first group consisted of 20 animals that were not subjected to any influence, served as a control; second group — 30 animals, in which DM was modeled by administration of alloxan and fructose. Results. When modeling DR, vessel changes in the form of wall fibrosis, edema of the endothelium and vasospasm were found. There was also a decrease in the amount of pigment granules, dystrophic changes in the cells of the ganglionic layer and a layer of retinal rods and cones, which coincides with the descriptions of damage to the coats of the eyeball in patients with DM. Conclusions. In our studies, we have calculated the optimal dose of alloxan administration, which does not lead to the death of rats (the lethality of rats was absent and is an effective model not only of DM in general, but also of DR.

  3. Experimental Evaluation of Equivalent-Fluid Models for Melamine Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Melamine foam is a soft porous material commonly used in noise control applications. Many models exist to represent porous materials at various levels of fidelity. This work focuses on rigid frame equivalent fluid models, which represent the foam as a fluid with a complex speed of sound and density. There are several empirical models available to determine these frequency dependent parameters based on an estimate of the material flow resistivity. Alternatively, these properties can be experimentally educed using an impedance tube setup. Since vibroacoustic models are generally sensitive to these properties, this paper assesses the accuracy of several empirical models relative to impedance tube measurements collected with melamine foam samples. Diffuse field sound absorption measurements collected using large test articles in a laboratory are also compared with absorption predictions determined using model-based and measured foam properties. Melamine foam slabs of various thicknesses are considered.

  4. Experimental validation of a Bayesian model of visual acuity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dalimier, Eugénie

    2009-01-01

    Based on standard procedures used in optometry clinics, we compare measurements of visual acuity for 10 subjects (11 eyes tested) in the presence of natural ocular aberrations and different degrees of induced defocus, with the predictions given by a Bayesian model customized with aberrometric data of the eye. The absolute predictions of the model, without any adjustment, show good agreement with the experimental data, in terms of correlation and absolute error. The efficiency of the model is discussed in comparison with image quality metrics and other customized visual process models. An analysis of the importance and customization of each stage of the model is also given; it stresses the potential high predictive power from precise modeling of ocular and neural transfer functions.

  5. Genetic Variation in the β2-Adrenocepter Gene Is Associated with Susceptibility to Bacterial Meningitis in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, Kirsten S.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Baas, Frank; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the biased β2-adrenoceptor/β-arrestin pathway was shown to play a pivotal role in crossing of the blood brain barrier by Neisseria meningitidis. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the β2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2) may influence susceptibility to bacterial meningitis. In a prospective genetic association study we genotyped 542 patients with CSF culture proven community acquired bacterial meningitis and 376 matched controls for 2 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2). Furthermore, we analyzed if the use of non-selective beta-blockers, which bind to the β2-adrenoceptor, influenced the risk of bacterial meningitis. We identified a functional polymorphism in ADRB2 (rs1042714) to be associated with an increased risk for bacterial meningitis (Odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.76; p = 0.026). The association remained significant after correction for age and was more prominent in patients with pneumococcal meningitis (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.12–2.07; p = 0.007). For meningococcal meningitis the difference in genotype frequencies between patients and controls was similar to that in pneumococcal meningitis, but this was not statistically significant (OR 1.43, 95% CI 0.60–3.38; p = 0.72). Patients with bacterial meningitis had a lower frequency of non-selective beta-blockers use compared to the age matched population (0.9% vs. 1.8%), although this did not reach statistical significance (OR 1.96 [95% CI 0.88–4.39]; p = 0.09). In conclusion, we identified an association between a genetic variant in the β2-adrenoceptor and increased susceptibility to bacterial meningitis. The potential benefit of pharmacological treatment targeting the β2-adrenoceptor to prevent bacterial meningitis in the general population or patients with bacteraemia should be further studied in both experimental studies and observational cohorts. PMID:22624056

  6. Uterus transplantation: Experimental animal models and recent experience in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadık Şahin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Uterus transplantation has been considered as an alternative management modality in the last few years for adoption or gestational surrogacy for women with absence of uterus due to congenital or acquired reasons. Surrogacy is legal in only a few countries because of ethical, social and legal issues. Up to date, a total of 11 uterus transplantation cases have been reported in which uteri were harvested from ten live donors and one donor with brain death. After unsuccessful attempt of first uterus transplantation, many studies have been conducted in animals and these experimental models enabled our knowledge to increase on this topic. First experimental studies were performed in rodents; later uterus transplantation was accomplished in sheep, pigs and rabbits. Recently, researches in non-human primates have led the experience regarding transplantation technique and success to improve. In this review, we reviewed the experimental animal researches in the area of uterus transplantation and recent experience in humans.

  7. The rabbit as an experimental model in laryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro, Christiano de Giacomo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the research in laryngology we normally use animal models. The animal experimentation may also contribute largely for this evolution, mainly for the easy access compared to human larynxes and for they are more easily controlled. Objective: The objective of this work is to analyze the laryngofissure with vocal cords graft as an experimental surgical technique in male adult rabbits. Method: We studied 46 New Zealand albino rabbits submitted to microsurgery in both vocal cords with autologous unilateral or bilateral graft of fat or fascia. Results: There were 4 losses of 3 animals until the first week of the postoperative period and another after 19 days after surgery. In the subsequent animals there were no infection, hematoma or sutures dehiscence. Conclusion: The study enables the conclusion that the experimental laryngofissure in rabbits is a safe method that may be used for laryngological studies.

  8. Genetic algorithms and experimental discrimination of SUSY models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allanach, B.C.; Quevedo, F.; Grellscheid, D.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce genetic algorithms as a means to estimate the accuracy required to discriminate among different models using experimental observables. We exemplify the technique in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. If supersymmetric particles are discovered, models of supersymmetry breaking will be fit to the observed spectrum and it is beneficial to ask beforehand: what accuracy is required to always allow the discrimination of two particular models and which are the most important masses to observe? Each model predicts a bounded patch in the space of observables once unknown parameters are scanned over. The questions can be answered by minimising a 'distance' measure between the two hypersurfaces. We construct a distance measure that scales like a constant fraction of an observable, since that is how the experimental errors are expected to scale. Genetic algorithms, including concepts such as natural selection, fitness and mutations, provide a solution to the minimisation problem. We illustrate the efficiency of the method by comparing three different classes of string models for which the above questions could not be answered with previous techniques. The required accuracy is in the range accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) when combined with a future linear collider (LC) facility. The technique presented here can be applied to more general classes of models or observables. (author)

  9. Transvaginal ultrasound ovarian diathermy: sheep as an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimentel Anita M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some techniques of transvaginal ovarian drilling have been previously described. Nevertheless a monopolar transvaginal ovarian cauterization, that use the expertise and safety of transvaginal puncture for oocyte captation seems to be an easier and feasible approach. The aim of this study was to develop a minimally invasive ovarian cauterization technique under transvaginal ultrasound control, and to evaluate the safety of the transvaginal ovarian monopolar cauterization, female sheep at reproductive age were used as an experimental model. Findings An experimental study was performed in a university research center. Seventeen female sheep (15 Corriedale e 2 Suffolk in reproductive age were submitted to transvaginal ovarian cauterization with a monopolar Valleylab Force 2 electrocautery. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions were assessed. Ovarian size were 1.31 cm2 ± 0,43 (Corriedale and 3.41 cm2 ± 0,64 (Suffolk. From 30 ovaries from Corriedale sheep punctured, only 3 were cauterized, presenting macroscopic and typical microscopic lesion. In the Suffolk sheep group, only one ovary was cauterized. No lesion could be found in the needle path. Conclusions This is the first experimental animal model described for ovarian cauterization needle guided by transvaginal ultrasound. The sheep does not seem to be the ideal animal model to study this technique. Another animal model, whose ovaries are better identified by transvaginal ultrasound should be sought for this technique, theoretically less invasive, before it could be offered safely to women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

  10. Experimental designs for autoregressive models applied to industrial maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amo-Salas, M.; López-Fidalgo, J.; Pedregal, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Some time series applications require data which are either expensive or technically difficult to obtain. In such cases scheduling the points in time at which the information should be collected is of paramount importance in order to optimize the resources available. In this paper time series models are studied from a new perspective, consisting in the use of Optimal Experimental Design setup to obtain the best times to take measurements, with the principal aim of saving costs or discarding useless information. The model and the covariance function are expressed in an explicit form to apply the usual techniques of Optimal Experimental Design. Optimal designs for various approaches are computed and their efficiencies are compared. The methods working in an application of industrial maintenance of a critical piece of equipment at a petrochemical plant are shown. This simple model allows explicit calculations in order to show openly the procedure to find the correlation structure, needed for computing the optimal experimental design. In this sense the techniques used in this paper to compute optimal designs may be transferred to other situations following the ideas of the paper, but taking into account the increasing difficulty of the procedure for more complex models. - Highlights: • Optimal experimental design theory is applied to AR models to reduce costs. • The first observation has an important impact on any optimal design. • Either the lack of precision or small starting observations claim for large times. • Reasonable optimal times were obtained relaxing slightly the efficiency. • Optimal designs were computed in a predictive maintenance context

  11. Effects of Erdosteine on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Banu; Karapolat, Sami; Gurleyik, Emin; Yasar, Mehmet

    2017-10-01

    To create acute pancreatitis condition experimentally in rats using cerulein, and to reveal histopathological effects in pancreatic tissue with erdosteine. An experimental study. Department of General Surgery, Duzce University, Turkey, from June to October 2014. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. No procedures were applied to Group 1. The rats in Group 2 and Group 3 were injected cerulein, to establish an experimental pancreatitis model and the blood amylase and lipase values were examined. The rats in Group 3 were given 10 mg/kg erdosteine. This treatment was continued for another 2 days and the rats were sacrificed. The pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically for edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization. The lipase and amylase values and the histopathological examination of pancreatic tissues evidenced that the experimental acute pancreatitis model was established and edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization were observed in the pancreatic tissues. The statistical results suggest that erdosteine can decrease the edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis and vacuolization scores in the tissues. The severity of acute pancreatitis, induced by cerulein in rats, is reduced with the use of erdosteine.

  12. Experimental animal data and modeling of late somatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This section is restricted to radiation-induced life shortening and cancer and mainly to studies with external radiation. The emphasis will be on the experimental data that are available and the experimental systems that could provide the type of data with which to either formulate or test models. Genetic effects which are of concern are not discussed in this section. Experimental animal radiation studies fall into those that establish general principles and those that demonstrate mechanisms. General principles include the influence of dose, radiation quality, dose rate, fractionation, protraction and such biological factors as age and gender. The influence of these factors are considered as general principles because they are independent, at least qualitatively, of the species studied. For example, if an increase in the LET of the radiation causes an increased effectiveness in cancer induction in a mouse a comparable increase in effectiveness can be expected in humans. Thus, models, whether empirical or mechanistic, formulated from experimental animal data should be generally applicable

  13. Validation of the newborn larynx modeling with aerodynamical experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollas, R; Giordano, J; Garrel, R; Medale, M; Caminat, P; Giovanni, A; Ouaknine, M; Triglia, J M

    2009-06-01

    Many authors have studied adult's larynx modelization, but the mechanisms of newborn's voice production have very rarely been investigated. After validating a numerical model with acoustic data, studies were performed on larynges of human fetuses in order to validate this model with aerodynamical experiments. Anatomical measurements were performed and a simplified numerical model was built using Fluent((R)) with the vocal folds in phonatory position. The results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and high-frame rate particle image velocimetry (HFR-PIV), on an experimental bench with excised human fetus larynges. It appears that computing with first cry physiological parameters leads to a model which is close to those obtained in experiments with real organs.

  14. Experimental Damage Identification of a Model Reticulated Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage identification of a reticulated shell is a challenging task, facing various difficulties, such as the large number of degrees of freedom (DOFs, the phenomenon of modal localization and transition, and low modeling accuracy. Based on structural vibration responses, the damage identification of a reticulated shell was studied. At first, the auto-regressive (AR time series model was established based on the acceleration responses of the reticulated shell. According to the changes in the coefficients of the AR model between the damaged conditions and the undamaged condition, the damage of the reticulated shell can be detected. In addition, the damage sensitive factors were determined based on the coefficients of the AR model. With the damage sensitive factors as the inputs and the damage positions as the outputs, back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs were then established and were trained using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (L–M algorithm. The locations of the damages can be predicted by the back-propagation neural networks. At last, according to the experimental scheme of single-point excitation and multi-point responses, the impact experiments on a K6 shell model with a scale of 1/10 were conducted. The experimental results verified the efficiency of the proposed damage identification method based on the AR time series model and back-propagation neural networks. The proposed damage identification method can ensure the safety of the practical engineering to some extent.

  15. Peltier cells as temperature control elements: Experimental characterization and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannella, Gianluca A.; La Carrubba, Vincenzo; Brucato, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    The use of Peltier cells to realize compact and precise temperature controlled devices is under continuous extension in recent years. In order to support the design of temperature control systems, a simplified modeling of heat transfer dynamics for thermoelectric devices is presented. By following a macroscopic approach, the heat flux removed at the cold side of Peltier cell can be expressed as Q . c =γ(T c −T c eq ), where γ is a coefficient dependent on the electric current, T c and T c eq are the actual and steady state cold side temperature, respectively. On the other hand, a microscopic modeling approach was pursued via finite element analysis software packages. To validate the models, an experimental apparatus was designed and build-up, consisting in a sample vial with the surfaces in direct contact with Peltier cells. Both modeling approaches led to reliable prediction of transient and steady state sample temperature. -- Highlights: • Simplified modeling of heat transfer dynamics in Peltier cells. • Coupled macroscopic and microscopic approach. • Experimental apparatus: temperature control of a sample vial. • Both modeling approaches predict accurately the transient and steady state sample temperature

  16. Target Soil Impact Verification: Experimental Testing and Kayenta Constitutive Modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Scott Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, Gregory Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newell, Pania [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report details experimental testing and constitutive modeling of sandy soil deformation under quasi - static conditions. This is driven by the need to understand constitutive response of soil to target/component behavior upon impact . An experimental and constitutive modeling program was followed to determine elastic - plastic properties and a compressional failure envelope of dry soil . One hydrostatic, one unconfined compressive stress (UCS), nine axisymmetric compression (ACS) , and one uniaxial strain (US) test were conducted at room temperature . Elastic moduli, assuming isotropy, are determined from unload/reload loops and final unloading for all tests pre - failure and increase monotonically with mean stress. Very little modulus degradation was discernable from elastic results even when exposed to mean stresses above 200 MPa . The failure envelope and initial yield surface were determined from peak stresses and observed onset of plastic yielding from all test results. Soil elasto - plastic behavior is described using the Brannon et al. (2009) Kayenta constitutive model. As a validation exercise, the ACS - parameterized Kayenta model is used to predict response of the soil material under uniaxial strain loading. The resulting parameterized and validated Kayenta model is of high quality and suitable for modeling sandy soil deformation under a range of conditions, including that for impact prediction.

  17. WWER reactor fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, S.; Chantoin, P.; Kolev, I.

    1994-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of 36 papers presented at the International Seminar on WWER Reactor Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support, organised by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (BG), in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Seminar was attended by 76 participants from 16 countries, including representatives of all major Russian plants and institutions responsible for WWER reactor fuel manufacturing, design and research. The reports are grouped in four chapters: 1) WWER Fuel Performance and Economics: Status and Improvement Prospects: 2) WWER Fuel Behaviour Modelling and Experimental Support; 3) Licensing of WWER Fuel and Fuel Analysis Codes; 4) Spent Fuel of WWER Plants. The reports from the corresponding four panel discussion sessions are also included. All individual papers are recorded in INIS as separate items

  18. WWER reactor fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, S; Chantoin, P; Kolev, I [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This publication is a compilation of 36 papers presented at the International Seminar on WWER Reactor Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support, organised by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (BG), in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Seminar was attended by 76 participants from 16 countries, including representatives of all major Russian plants and institutions responsible for WWER reactor fuel manufacturing, design and research. The reports are grouped in four chapters: (1) WWER Fuel Performance and Economics: Status and Improvement Prospects: (2) WWER Fuel Behaviour Modelling and Experimental Support; (3) Licensing of WWER Fuel and Fuel Analysis Codes; (4) Spent Fuel of WWER Plants. The reports from the corresponding four panel discussion sessions are also included. All individual papers are recorded in INIS as separate items.

  19. An Interactive Multimedia Based Instruction in Experimental Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Nielsen, J.N.; Østergaard, J.

    1997-01-01

    A CD-ROM based interactive multimedia instruction in experimental modelling for Danish Engineering School teachers is described. The content is based on a new sensitivity approach for direct estimation of physical parameters in linear and nonlinear dynamic systems. The presentation is inspired of...... of Solomans=s inventory of learning styles. To enhance active learning and motivation by real life problems, the simulation tool Matlab is integrated in the authoring program Medi8or....

  20. Numerical modeling of nitrogen oxide emission and experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecowka Lech

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of nitrogen reduction in combustion process with application of primary method are presented in paper. The reduction of NOx emission, by the recirculation of combustion gasses, staging of fuel and of air was investigated, and than the reduction of NOx emission by simultaneous usage of the mentioned above primary method with pulsatory disturbances.The investigations contain numerical modeling of NOx reduction and experimental verification of obtained numerical calculation results.

  1. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Rafael Panisi de Campos [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Hochman, Bernardo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia; Helene Junior, Americo; Fraga, Murillo Francisco Pires [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia. Divisao de Cirurgia Plastica; Lellis, Rute [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Divisao de Patologia; Ferreira, Lydia Masako, E-mail: rpcmeirelles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: lydia.dcir@epm.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Divisao de Cirugia Plastica

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: to describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. Methods: on this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. Results: after 30 days, the animals from the control group had all their hair grown. In spite of that, the animals from group 2000 cGy had a 60-day alopecia and from group 3000 cGy, a 90-day alopecia. After the 30th day, the 3000cGy group demonstrated 90-day cutaneous radiation injuries, graded 3 and 4. One of the animals from group 4500 cGy died on the 7th day with visceral necrosis. The other from the same group had total skin necrosis. A progressive reduction of glands and blood vessels count and an increase on collagen deposition was observed. Conclusion: The proposed experimental model is reproducible. This study suggests that the dosage 4500cGy is excessive and the 3000 cGy is the most effective for this experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. (author)

  2. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of glycerol pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, F.; Frassoldati, A.; Bartocci, P.; Cinti, G.; Quagliarini, F.; Bidini, G.; Ranzi, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Glycerol pyrolysis can produce about 44–48%v hydrogen at 750–800 °C. • A simplified 452 reactions kinetic model of glycerol pyrolysis has been developed. • The model has good agreement with experimental data. • Non condensable gas yields can reach 70%. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of glycerol, a by-product of the biodiesel industry, is an important potential source of hydrogen. The obtained high calorific value gas can be used either as a fuel for combined heat and power (CHP) generation or as a transportation fuel (for example hydrogen to be used in fuel cells). Optimal process conditions can improve glycerol pyrolysis by increasing gas yield and hydrogen concentration. A detailed kinetic mechanism of glycerol pyrolysis, which involves 137 species and more than 4500 reactions, was drastically simplified and reduced to a new skeletal kinetic scheme of 44 species, involved in 452 reactions. An experimental campaign with a batch pyrolysis reactor was properly designed to further validate the original and the skeletal mechanisms. The comparisons between model predictions and experimental data strongly suggest the presence of a catalytic process promoting steam reforming of methane. High pyrolysis temperatures (750–800 °C) improve process performances and non-condensable gas yields of 70%w can be achieved. Hydrogen mole fraction in pyrolysis gas is about 44–48%v. The skeletal mechanism developed can be easily used in Computational Fluid Dynamic software, reducing the simulation time.

  3. Survey of experimental tests of the IBA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of experimental tests of the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) Model is presented covering even and odd mass nuclei in the region from A approx. 80 to A approx. 230. Both positive and negative parity states with both high and low spin are discussed. Topics included concern energy levels, electromagnetic transition rates, two nucleon transfer and inelastic scattering. Special attention is given to nuclear symmetries and transitional regions. Comparison with other models is made where appropriate. The distinction between IBA-1 and IBA-2 is discussed including their respective areas of applicability

  4. Dynamic Modeling of Wind Turbine Gearboxes and Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune

    Grinding corrections are often applied to gear teeth, which will alter the load distribution across the tooth. Grinding corrections will also change the load sharing between neighboring tooth pairs, and in turn the gear mesh stiffness. In this thesis, a model for calculating the gear mesh stiffness...... is presented. The model takes into account the effects of load and applied grinding corrections. The results are verified by comparing to simulated and experimental results reported in the existing literature. Using gear data loosely based on a 1 MW wind turbine gearbox, the gear mesh stiffness is expanded...

  5. Finite element modeling and experimentation of bone drilling forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lughmani, W A; Bouazza-Marouf, K; Ashcroft, I

    2013-01-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. This paper presents a 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results

  6. Inflammasome activation mediates inflammation and outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammasomes are multi-protein intracellular signaling complexes that have recently been hypothesized to play a role in the regulation of the inflammation response. We studied associations between inflammasome-associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial meningitis and clinical outcome, and pneumococcal serotype. In a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis we examined the pathophysiological roles of two inflammasome proteins, NLRP3 (Nod-like receptor protein-3) and adaptor protein ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein). Methods In a nationwide prospective cohort study, CSF cytokine levels were measured and related to clinical outcome and pneumococcal serotype. In a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis using Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, we examined bacterial titers, cytokine profiles and brain histology at 6 and 30 hours after inoculation in wild-type (WT), Asc and Nlrp3 deficient mice. Results In patients with bacterial meningitis, CSF levels of inflammasome associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were related to complications, and unfavorable disease outcome. CSF levels of IL-1β were associated with pneumococcal serotype (pmeningitis, which may dependent on the pneumococcal serotype. PMID:23902681

  7. Pneumatic Adaptive Absorber: Mathematical Modelling with Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Mikułowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of mechanical energy absorbers utilized in engineering structures are hydraulic dampers, since they are simple and highly efficient and have favourable volume to load capacity ratio. However, there exist fields of applications where a threat of toxic contamination with the hydraulic fluid contents must be avoided, for example, food or pharmacy industries. A solution here can be a Pneumatic Adaptive Absorber (PAA, which is characterized by a high dissipation efficiency and an inactive medium. In order to properly analyse the characteristics of a PAA, an adequate mathematical model is required. This paper proposes a concept for mathematical modelling of a PAA with experimental verification. The PAA is considered as a piston-cylinder device with a controllable valve incorporated inside the piston. The objective of this paper is to describe a thermodynamic model of a double chamber cylinder with gas migration between the inner volumes of the device. The specific situation considered here is that the process cannot be defined as polytropic, characterized by constant in time thermodynamic coefficients. Instead, the coefficients of the proposed model are updated during the analysis. The results of the experimental research reveal that the proposed mathematical model is able to accurately reflect the physical behaviour of the fabricated demonstrator of the shock absorber.

  8. Ultraviolet radiation-induced carcinogenesis: mechanisms and experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Balupillai, Agilan; Govindhasamy, Kanimozhi; Gunaseelan, Srithar; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Robert, Beualah Mary; Nagarajan, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a very prominent environmental toxic agent. UVR has been implicated in the initiation and progression of photocarcinogenesis. UVR exposure elicits numerous cellular and molecular events which include the generation of inflammatory mediators, DNA damage, epigenetic modifications, and oxidative damages mediated activation of signaling pathways. UVR-initiated signal transduction pathways are believed to be responsible for tumor promotion effects. UVR-induced carcinogenic mechanism has been well studied using various animal and cellular models. Human skin-derived dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and melanocytes served as excellent cellular model systems for the understanding of UVR-mediated carcinogenic events. Apart from this, scientists developed reconstituted three-dimensional normal human skin equivalent models for the study of UVR signaling pathways. Moreover, hairless mice such as SKH-1, devoid of Hr gene, served as a valuable model for experimental carcinogenesis. Scientists have also used transgenic mice and dorsal portion shaved Swiss albino mice for UVR carcinogenesis studies. In this review, we have discussed the current progress in the study on ultraviolet B (UVB)-mediated carcinogenesis and outlined appropriate experimental models for both ultraviolet A- and UVB-mediated carcinogenesis. (author)

  9. Extramedullary spinal teratoma presenting with recurrent aseptic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpayo, Lucy L; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Man; Wang, Kai; Wang, Jiao; Yang, Li

    2014-06-01

    Spinal teratomas are extremely rare; they constitute meningitis. A 7-year-old boy presented with paroxysmal abdominal pain and a history of recurrent aseptic meningitis. Kernig and Brudzinski signs were present. Lumber puncture revealed pleocytosis with no evidence of bacteria growth. Imaging of the spine revealed a cystic lesion in spinal cord at thoracic level 9-11. Endoscopic excision of the cyst was successfully performed. Surgical and histopathological findings confirmed extramedullary matured teratoma. As the symptomatic attacks of spontaneous rupture of spinal teratoma resemble presentations of Mollaret meningitis, spinal teratoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Mollaret meningitis. We describe a rare example of spinal teratoma causing recurrent meningitis. Spine imaging should be considered in individuals with recurrent aseptic meningitis as this promotes earlier diagnosis, more appropriate treatment, and improved neurological outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1993-11-01

    A chemical model of glass corrosion will be used to predict the rates of release of radionuclides from borosilicate glass waste forms in high-level waste repositories. The model will be used both to calculate the rate of degradation of the glass, and also to predict the effects of chemical interactions between the glass and repository materials such as spent fuel, canister and container materials, backfill, cements, grouts, and others. Coupling between the degradation processes affecting all these materials is expected. Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  11. Epidemiologic and microbiologic characteristics of recurrent bacterial and fungal meningitis in the Netherlands, 1988-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, Joris J.; Bekker, Vincent; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van der Ende, Arie; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Patients may experience multiple episodes of bacterial meningitis. Information from large studies of recurrent meningitis is limited. We evaluated the incidence of recurrent bacterial meningitis and the distribution of causative organisms in The Netherlands. Methods. Data for patients

  12. Experimental evaluation of analytical penumbra calculation model for wobbled beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Yusa, Ken; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2004-01-01

    The goal of radiotherapy is not only to apply a high radiation dose to a tumor, but also to avoid side effects in the surrounding healthy tissue. Therefore, it is important for carbon-ion treatment planning to calculate accurately the effects of the lateral penumbra. In this article, for wobbled beams under various irradiation conditions, we focus on the lateral penumbras at several aperture positions of one side leaf of the multileaf collimator. The penumbras predicted by an analytical penumbra calculation model were compared with the measured results. The results calculated by the model for various conditions agreed well with the experimental ones. In conclusion, we found that the analytical penumbra calculation model could predict accurately the measured results for wobbled beams and it was useful for carbon-ion treatment planning to apply the model

  13. A new dietary model to study colorectal carcinogenesis: experimental design, food preparation, and experimental findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, P; Liberman, V; Lubin, F; Angel, S; Owen, R; Trostler, N; Shkolnik, T; Kritchevsky, D

    1996-01-01

    Experimental dietary studies of human colorectal carcinogenesis are usually based on the AIN-76A diet, which is dissimilar to human food in source, preparation, and content. The aims of this study were to examine the feasibility of preparing and feeding rats the diet of a specific human population at risk for colorectal neoplasia and to determine whether changes in the colonic morphology and metabolic contents would differ from those resulting from a standard rat diet. The mean daily food intake composition of a previously evaluated adenoma patient case-control study was used for the "human adenoma" (HA) experimental diet. Foods were prepared as for usual human consumption and processed by dehydration to the physical characteristics of an animal diet. Sixty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized and fed ad libitum the HA or the AIN-76A diet. Every eight weeks, eight rats from each group were sacrificed, and the colons and contents were examined. Analysis of the prepared food showed no significant deleterious changes; food intake and weight gain were similar in both groups. Compared with the controls, the colonic contents of rats fed the HA diet contained significantly less calcium, concentrations of neutral sterols, total lipids, and cholic and deoxycholic acids were increased, and there were no colonic histological changes other than significant epithelial hyperproliferation. This initial study demonstrated that the HA diet can be successfully processed for feeding to experimental animals and is acceptable and adequate for growth but induces significant metabolic and hyperproliferative changes in the rat colon. This dietary model may be useful for studies of human food, narrowing the gap between animal experimentation and human nutritional research.

  14. MRI of primary meningeal tumours in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, H.K.; Na, D.G.; Byun, H.S.; Han, B.K.; Kim, S.S.; Kim, I.O.; Shin, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Childhood meningeal tumours are uncommon and mostly meningiomas. We reviewed the histological and radiological findings in meningeal tumours in six children aged 12 years or less (four benign meningiomas, one malignant meningioma and one haemangiopericytoma). Compared to the adult counterpart, childhood meningiomas showed atypical features: cysts, haemorrhage, aggressiveness and unusual location. MRI features varied according to the site of the tumour, histology, haemorrhage, and presence of intra- or peritumoral cysts. Diagnosis of the extra-axial tumour was relatively easy in two patients with meningiomas, one malignant meningioma and one haemangiopericytoma. MRI findings strongly suggested an intra-axial tumour in two patients with benign meningiomas, because of severe adjacent edema. Awareness of the variable findings of childhood meningiomas and similar tumours may help in differentiation from brain tumours. (orig.)

  15. Mumps vaccine virus strains and aseptic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Marie-Claude; Dutta, Anil; Weinberger, Clement; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2006-11-30

    Mumps immunization can easily be included in national schedules, particularly if combined with measles or measles and rubella vaccines, but debate continues concerning the relative safety of various licensed mumps vaccine strains. The opportunities for control of mumps are also being affected by differences in the cost of the vaccines prepared with different strains of mumps virus. The present report evaluates available data on the association of the Urabe and other strains of mumps vaccine with the occurrence of aseptic meningitis. We also review the comparative immunogenicity and efficacies of the most widely used mumps vaccines in controlled clinical trials and field evaluations, and briefly examine relative cost as it relates to the implementation of national immunization programs. We conclude that extensive experience with the most widely used mumps vaccine strains in many countries has shown that the risk-benefit ratio of live mumps vaccines is highly favourable for vaccination, despite the occasional occurence of aseptic meningitis.

  16. Transethmoidal intranasal meningoencephalocele in an adult with recurrent meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takafumi; Sugeno, Naoto; Shiga, Yusei; Takeda, Atsushi; Karibe, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2005-08-01

    Intranasal meningoencephalocele is a rarely encountered congenital malformation. We report a case of transethmoidal intranasal meningoencephalocele in a 52-year old man with recurrent purulent meningitis. After treatment of the acute meningitis, frontal craniotomy followed by the removal of the stalk of the meningoencephalocele and repair of the bony defect was successfully performed. He has had no further meningitis or CSF rhinorrhea post-operatively. Detailed neuroradiological examination and appropriate surgical treatment are important to prevent fatal neurological complications of intranasal meningoencephalocele.

  17. Isolated Meningeal Recurrence of Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Butchart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal carcinomatosis occurs in 1–18% of patients with solid tumours, most commonly carcinomas of the breast and lung or melanomas. There are relatively few reports of meningeal carcinomatosis in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Isolated meningeal recurrence is particularly uncommon, and we present an unusual case of this in a 58-year-old man. The case was further complicated by the somewhat atypical presentation with a confirmed ischaemic stroke. The patient died one month after presentation.

  18. CARBAPENEM-RESISTANT ACINETOBACTER BAUMANII POSTOPERATIVE MENINGITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Ghibu; Egidia Miftode; Olivia Dorneanu; Carmen Dorobat

    2011-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing relevance in hospital infections during the last 15 years.This organism causes a wide range of infection .Extensive use of antibiotics within hospitals has contribute to the emergence of multidrug-resistent A.baumannii strains that exhibit resistance to a wide range of antibiotics ,including carbapenems.We report the case of an 37 years old man diagnosed with Acinetobacter multidrug-resistant post-neurosurgical meningitis with...

  19. Congenital malformations of the skull and meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanev, Paul M

    2007-02-01

    The surgery and management of children who have congenital malformations of the skull and meninges require multidisciplinary care and long-term follow-up by multiple specialists in birth defects. The high definition of three-dimensional CT and MRI allows precise surgery planning of reconstruction and management of associated malformations. The reconstruction of meningoencephaloceles and craniosynostosis are challenging procedures that transform the child's appearance. The embryology, clinical presentation, and surgical management of these malformations are reviewed.

  20. The Role of Vancomycin on Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed I. Shatat and P.I.C.U team

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: After the previous discussion of the results obtained from this study, the researchers concluded that most of the cases diagnosed meningitis was aseptic and there was no need for antibiotics. Also in those who diagnosed as bacterial vancomycin was not essential in all cases, this confirmed by the absence of any differences in the outcome. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 501-511

  1. Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Massachusetts General Hospital RICHARD BRINGHURST, M.D. 55 FRUIT ST BOSTON...Martuza. The cell lines were tested for mycoplasma, Hoechst DNA staining, PCR, and culture testing for contaminant bacteria, yeast, and fungi ...complication of breast cancer affects 5-8% of patients when circulating cancer cells seed in the meninges. Their subsequent growth causes severe

  2. Experimental model of cultured keratinocytes Modelo experimental de cultura de queratinócitos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Gragnani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioengineering research is essential in the development of ideal combination of biomaterials and cultured cells to produce the permanent wound coverage. The experimental model of cultured keratinocytes presents all steps of the culture, since the isolation of the keratinocytes, preparation of the human acellular dermis, preparation of the composite skin graft and their elevation to the air-liquid interface. The research in cultured keratinocytes model advances in two main ways: 1. optimization of the methods in vitro to the skin cells culture and proliferation and 2. developing biomaterials that present similar skin properties.A pesquisa em bioengenharia é primordial no desenvolvimento da combinação ideal de biomateriais e células cultivadas para produzir a cobertura definitiva das lesões. O modelo experimental da cultura de queratinócitos apresenta toda as etapas do cultivo, desde o isolamento dos queratinócitos, preparação da derme acelular humana, do enxerto composto e da sua elevação à interface ar-líquido. A pesquisa em modelo de cultura de queratinócitos desenvolve-se em duas vias principais: 1. otimização dos métodos in vitro para cultivo e proliferação de células da pele e 2. desenvolvimento de biomateriais que mimetizem as propriedades da pele.

  3. DMFC anode polarization: Experimental analysis and model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalegno, A.; Marchesi, R. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2008-01-03

    Anode two-phase flow has an important influence on DMFC performance and methanol crossover. In order to elucidate two-phase flow influence on anode performance, in this work, anode polarization is investigated combining experimental and modelling approach. A systematic experimental analysis of operating conditions influence on anode polarization is presented. Hysteresis due to operating condition is observed; experimental results suggest that it arises from methanol accumulation and has to be considered in evaluating DMFC performances and measurements reproducibility. A model of DMFC anode polarization is presented and utilised as tool to investigate anode two-phase flow. The proposed analysis permits one to produce a confident interpretation of the main involved phenomena. In particular, it confirms that methanol electro-oxidation kinetics is weakly dependent on methanol concentration and that methanol transport in gas phase produces an important contribution in anode feeding. Moreover, it emphasises the possibility to optimise anode flow rate in order to improve DMFC performance and reduce methanol crossover. (author)

  4. Numerical modelling of negative discharges in air with experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, T N; Golosnoy, I O; Lewin, P L; Georghiou, G E

    2011-01-01

    Axisymmetric finite element models have been developed for the simulation of negative discharges in air without and with the presence of dielectrics. The models are based on the hydrodynamic drift-diffusion approximation. A set of continuity equations accounting for the movement, generation and loss of charge carriers (electrons, positive and negative ions) is coupled with Poisson's equation to take into account the effect of space and surface charges on the electric field. The model of a negative corona discharge (without dielectric barriers) in a needle-plane geometry is analysed first. The results obtained show good agreement with experimental observations for various Trichel pulse characteristics. With dielectric barriers introduced into the discharge system, the surface discharge exhibits some similarities and differences to the corona case. The model studies the dynamics of volume charge generation, electric field variations and charge accumulation over the dielectric surface. The predicted surface charge density is consistent with experimental results obtained from the Pockels experiment in terms of distribution form and magnitude.

  5. Modeling and experimental tests of a copper thermosyphon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Dias dos Santos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy, solar energy, and/or direct combustion of a fuel are the most common thermal sources for home water heating. In recent years, the use of solar energy has become popular because it is a renewable and economic energy source. Among the solar collectors, those assisted by thermosyphons are more efficient; therefore, they can enhance the heat transfer to water. A thermosyphon is basically a sealed tube filled with a working fluid and, normally, it has three regions: the evaporator, the adiabatic section and the condenser. The great advantage of this device is that the thermal resistance to heat transfer between its regions is very small, and as a result, there is a small temperature difference. This article aims to model a thermosyphon by using correlations based on its operation limits. This modeling will be used as a design tool for compact solar collectors assisted by thermosyphons. Based on the results obtained with the mathematical modeling, one copper thermosyphon, with deionized water as the working fluid, was developed and experimentally tested. The tests were carried out for a heat load varying from 30 to 60W in a vertical position. The theoretical and experimental results were compared to verify the mathematical model.

  6. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Curran, Henry J.; Polo-Có rdoba, Á ngel David; Pitz, William J.; Dagaut, P.; Togbé , Casimir; Sarathy, Mani; Mehl, Marco; Agudelo, John Ramiro; Bustamante, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  7. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi

    2015-04-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  8. Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging in meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, M.H.; Chang, K.H.; Roh, J.K.; Kim, I.O.; Han, M.C.; Kim, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    Gd-DPTA-enhanced MR imaging was performed in 16 patients with meningitis (seven tuberculous, four bacterial, three fungal, and two viral) on a 2.0-T unit. Hemorrhagic infarcts of basal ganglia and localized enhancement of thickened dura adjacent were demonstrated on T1-weighted images in three patients with tuberculous meningitis and four with bacterial meningitis, respectively, that were not seen on CT. Enhanced T1-weighted images readily differentiated leptomeningeal enhancement from vessels in two cases with CT of equivocal meningeal enhancement. Nonenhanced T2-weighted images were most sensitive for demonstrating ischemia/infarct and edema. Otherwise, MR images generally matched CT scans

  9. Postoperative meningeal enhancement on MRI in children with brain neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Hee; Han, Bokyung Kim; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2000-01-01

    The meninges composed of the dura, the arachnoid and the pia are significant sites of blood-brain barrier. Physical disruption of the integrity of the meninges from a variety of causes including surgery results in various patterns of meningeal enhancement on contrast enhanced MR images. It is important to distinguish normal reactive or benign postoperative enhancement from more serious leptomeningeal metastasis or infection, particularly in children with intracranial neoplasms. We present various patterns of meningeal enhancement on MRI in children following surgery for brain neoplasms. (author)

  10. Recurrent meningitis--a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janocha-Litwin, Justyna; Simon, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses epidemiology, aetiology and the most important predisposing factors associated with recurrent meningitis, as well as the possibilities to prevent this particularly challenging clinical problem. The frequency of recurrent meningitis is estimated to be 2-9%. However, the case fatality is lower compared to a single episode of meningitis. The main causes of recurrent meningitis are considered to be: head injury, congenital or acquired (post-traumatic or post-surgical) cranial or spinal defects, chronic intracranial inflammation, complement system dysfunction, as well as congenital and acquired humoral or cellular immunodeficiency.

  11. Pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation: preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Both clinical data and laboratory studies demonstrated the risk of pneumococcal meningitis post-cochlear implantation. This review examines strategies to prevent post-implant meningitis. Medline/PubMed database; English articles after 1980. Search terms: cochlear implants, pneumococcus meningitis, streptococcus pneumonia, immunization, prevention. Narrative review. All articles relating to post-implant meningitis without any restriction in study designs were assessed and information extracted. The presence of inner ear trauma as a result of surgical technique or cochlear implant electrode array design was associated with a higher risk of post-implant meningitis. Laboratory data demonstrated the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in preventing meningitis induced via the hematogenous route of infection. Fibrous sealing around the electrode array at the cochleostomy site, and the use of antibiotic-coated electrode array reduced the risk of meningitis induced via an otogenic route. The recent scientific data support the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommendation of pneumococcal vaccination for the prevention of meningitis in implant recipients. Nontraumatic cochlear implant design, surgical technique, and an adequate fibrous seal around the cochleostomy site further reduce the risk of meningitis. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Concurrent tubercular and staphylococcus meningitis in a child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit Agrawal

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous,non-surgical haematogenous Staphylococcus aureus meningitis is rare and associated with high mortality.Mixed infection causing meningitis (pyogenic and tubercular)is further rarer,poses a difficult diag-nostic and management challenge,which warrants early diagnosis and aggressive therapy.We present a case of concurrent pyogenic and tubercular meningitis in a child managed successfully.It seems that in present case initial pyogenic infection resulted in the immunocompromised state for the child that would had lead to the acti-vation of tubercular foci resulting in tubercular meningitis.

  13. Incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in aplasia cutis congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Katharine; Zedek, Daniel; Sayed, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both rare congenital conditions that most commonly occur on the scalp and may appear clinically and histologically similar. A subtype of aplasia cutis congenita, membranous aplasia cutis congenita, and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both proposed to result from neural tube closure errors. However, neither non-membranous nor membranous aplasia cutis congenita are known to occur together with cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in the same lesion. We report the incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia within a lesion of aplasia cutis congenita. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Sub-meninges implantation reduces immune response to neural implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwardt, Neil T; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L

    2013-04-15

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Experimental validation of solid rocket motor damping models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riso, Cristina; Fransen, Sebastiaan; Mastroddi, Franco; Coppotelli, Giuliano; Trequattrini, Francesco; De Vivo, Alessio

    2017-12-01

    In design and certification of spacecraft, payload/launcher coupled load analyses are performed to simulate the satellite dynamic environment. To obtain accurate predictions, the system damping properties must be properly taken into account in the finite element model used for coupled load analysis. This is typically done using a structural damping characterization in the frequency domain, which is not applicable in the time domain. Therefore, the structural damping matrix of the system must be converted into an equivalent viscous damping matrix when a transient coupled load analysis is performed. This paper focuses on the validation of equivalent viscous damping methods for dynamically condensed finite element models via correlation with experimental data for a realistic structure representative of a slender launch vehicle with solid rocket motors. A second scope of the paper is to investigate how to conveniently choose a single combination of Young's modulus and structural damping coefficient—complex Young's modulus—to approximate the viscoelastic behavior of a solid propellant material in the frequency band of interest for coupled load analysis. A scaled-down test article inspired to the Z9-ignition Vega launcher configuration is designed, manufactured, and experimentally tested to obtain data for validation of the equivalent viscous damping methods. The Z9-like component of the test article is filled with a viscoelastic material representative of the Z9 solid propellant that is also preliminarily tested to investigate the dependency of the complex Young's modulus on the excitation frequency and provide data for the test article finite element model. Experimental results from seismic and shock tests performed on the test configuration are correlated with numerical results from frequency and time domain analyses carried out on its dynamically condensed finite element model to assess the applicability of different equivalent viscous damping methods to describe

  16. Experimental study of mass boiling in a porous medium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript presents a pore-scale experimental study of convective boiling heat transfer in a two-dimensional porous medium. The purpose is to deepen the understanding of thermohydraulics of porous media saturated with multiple fluid phases, in order to enhance management of severe accidents in nuclear reactors. Indeed, following a long-lasting failure in the cooling system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) or a boiling water reactor (BWR) and despite the lowering of the control rods that stops the fission reaction, residual power due to radioactive decay keeps heating up the core. This induces water evaporation, which leads to the drying and degradation of the fuel rods. The resulting hot debris bed, comparable to a porous heat-generating medium, can be cooled down by reflooding, provided a water source is available. This process involves intense boiling mechanisms that must be modelled properly. The experimental study of boiling in porous media presented in this thesis focuses on the influence of different pore-scale boiling regimes on local heat transfer. The experimental setup is a model porous medium made of a bundle of heating cylinders randomly placed between two ceramic plates, one of which is transparent. Each cylinder is a resistance temperature detector (RTD) used to give temperature measurements as well as heat generation. Thermal measurements and high-speed image acquisition allow the effective heat exchanges to be characterized according to the observed local boiling regimes. This provides precious indications precious indications for the type of correlations used in the non-equilibrium macroscopic model used to model reflooding process. (author) [fr

  17. Experimental validation of solid rocket motor damping models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riso, Cristina; Fransen, Sebastiaan; Mastroddi, Franco; Coppotelli, Giuliano; Trequattrini, Francesco; De Vivo, Alessio

    2018-06-01

    In design and certification of spacecraft, payload/launcher coupled load analyses are performed to simulate the satellite dynamic environment. To obtain accurate predictions, the system damping properties must be properly taken into account in the finite element model used for coupled load analysis. This is typically done using a structural damping characterization in the frequency domain, which is not applicable in the time domain. Therefore, the structural damping matrix of the system must be converted into an equivalent viscous damping matrix when a transient coupled load analysis is performed. This paper focuses on the validation of equivalent viscous damping methods for dynamically condensed finite element models via correlation with experimental data for a realistic structure representative of a slender launch vehicle with solid rocket motors. A second scope of the paper is to investigate how to conveniently choose a single combination of Young's modulus and structural damping coefficient—complex Young's modulus—to approximate the viscoelastic behavior of a solid propellant material in the frequency band of interest for coupled load analysis. A scaled-down test article inspired to the Z9-ignition Vega launcher configuration is designed, manufactured, and experimentally tested to obtain data for validation of the equivalent viscous damping methods. The Z9-like component of the test article is filled with a viscoelastic material representative of the Z9 solid propellant that is also preliminarily tested to investigate the dependency of the complex Young's modulus on the excitation frequency and provide data for the test article finite element model. Experimental results from seismic and shock tests performed on the test configuration are correlated with numerical results from frequency and time domain analyses carried out on its dynamically condensed finite element model to assess the applicability of different equivalent viscous damping methods to describe

  18. Experimental investigations and modelling of sodium-concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, G.F.; Deeg, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    The use of sodium as a coolant in liquid metal fast breeder reactors, fusion reactors, and solar plants requires special consideration of its chemical reactivity and related safety problems in the case of sodium leckage. On contact between hot sodium and concrete an interaction takes place resulting in energy release and hydrogen generation, which may contribute to containment loading by pressurization in a hypothetical accident situation. For this reason, sodium-concrete interactions were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments revealed important effects of quartzitic material within the concrete and of the sodium temperature on the interaction mechanisms, the energy release and the consequent hydrogen production. The numerical model shows good agreement with the experimental results. (orig.) [de

  19. Numerical modeling and experimental validation of thermoplastic composites induction welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Barbara; Nele, Luigi; Galise, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    In this work, a numerical simulation and experimental test of the induction welding of continuous fibre-reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTPCs) was provided. The thermoplastic Polyamide 66 (PA66) with carbon fiber fabric was used. Using a dedicated software (JMag Designer), the influence of the fundamental process parameters such as temperature, current and holding time was investigated. In order to validate the results of the simulations, and therefore the numerical model used, experimental tests were carried out, and the temperature values measured during the tests were compared with the aid of an optical pyrometer, with those provided by the numerical simulation. The mechanical properties of the welded joints were evaluated by single lap shear tests.

  20. Fatigue crack propagation: Probabilistic models and experimental evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucia, A.C.; Jovanovic, A.

    1987-01-01

    The central aim of the LWR Primary Circuit Component Life Prediction Project, going on at JRC-Ispra, is to develop and check a 'procedure' (encompassing monitoring and inspection, data collection and analysis, prediction) allowing the quantitatives estimation of the accumulation of structural damage and of the residual lifetime. The ongoing activity matches theoretical development and experimentation, the latter being at present essentially based on a test-rig for room-temperature fatigue cycling of 1:5 scaled models of pressure vessels. During Phase I of fatigue testing of vessel R2, different pieces of information coming from material characterization, non-destructive inspection, continuous monitoring, stress analysis, have been merged and used to infere the future behaviour of the structure. The prediction of residual lifetime (cycles to failure), based on the outcomes of the ultrasonic continuous monitoring and made by means of the COVASTOL code, was in quite good agreement with experimental evidence. (orig./HP)

  1. Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production.

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production in the mass range 110-600 GeV. The solid curve reflects the observed experimental limits for the production of a Higgs of each possible mass value (horizontal axis). The region for which the solid curve dips below the horizontal line at the value of 1 is excluded with a 95% confidence level (CL). The dashed curve shows the expected limit in the absence of the Higgs boson, based on simulations. The green and yellow bands correspond (respectively) to 68%, and 95% confidence level regions from the expected limits. Higgs masses in the narrow range 123-130 GeV are the only masses not excluded at 95% CL

  2. Experimental model of the burn wound topical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Čabaravdić

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:Clinical research of drugs is a researching step subsequent to the preclinical studies in experimental animals. The aim of our research was to evaluate animal model of wound healing process after the burninducement and effects of the ointment containing natural plants on the process of burn healing.MATERIAL AND METHODS:Burn wounds were experimentally induced in two species of experimental animals which were treated with topically applied herbal preparation with concomitant monitoring of the healing process. Experimental groups (1 of 15 animals each (mice and rats, while control group (2 of 10 animals each (mice and rats that were not being treated with herbal ointment. After the hair removal, burn was induced on the back of animals by heated brass seal. Different clinical symptoms including oedema of surrounding tissue, redness, exudation, size of the burn surface, histological and microbiological findings were monitored on the days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21. A statistically significant difference was observed throughout descriptive statistics and paired Student's t-test.CONCLUSION:Physiological healing processes of the acute burn wound following the topical application of herbal preparation can be monitored on the utilized animal model. A three-week treatment resulted in the 90% of completed epithelization in both animal species, indicating the effectiveness of topically applied herbal preparation.

  3. Interaction of Fibrinogen and Muramidase-released Protein Promotes the Development of Streptococcus suis Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping eWang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Muramidase-released protein (MRP is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg; however, the function of this interaction in S.suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3. Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis.

  4. A Seroepidemiological Study of Serogroup A Meningococcal Infection in the African Meningitis Belt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Manigart

    Full Text Available The pattern of epidemic meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt may be influenced by the background level of population immunity but this has been measured infrequently. A standardised enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measuring meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibodies was established at five centres within the meningitis belt. Antibody concentrations were then measured in 3930 individuals stratified by age and residence from six countries. Seroprevalence by age was used in a catalytic model to determine the force of infection. Meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high in each country but showed heterogeneity across the meningitis belt. The geometric mean concentration (GMC was highest in Ghana (9.09 μg/mL [95% CI 8.29, 9.97] and lowest in Ethiopia (1.43 μg/mL [95% CI 1.31, 1.57] on the margins of the belt. The force of infection was lowest in Ethiopia (λ = 0.028. Variables associated with a concentration above the putative protective level of 2 μg/mL were age, urban residence and a history of recent vaccination with a meningococcal vaccine. Prior to vaccination with the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high across the African meningitis belt and yet the region remained susceptible to epidemics.

  5. Short note: the experimental geopotential model XGM2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, R.; Fecher, T.; Barnes, D.; Factor, J. F.; Holmes, S. A.; Gruber, T.; Zingerle, P.

    2018-04-01

    As a precursor study for the upcoming combined Earth Gravitational Model 2020 (EGM2020), the Experimental Gravity Field Model XGM2016, parameterized as a spherical harmonic series up to degree and order 719, is computed. XGM2016 shares the same combination methodology as its predecessor model GOCO05c (Fecher et al. in Surv Geophys 38(3): 571-590, 2017. doi: 10.1007/s10712-016-9406-y). The main difference between these models is that XGM2016 is supported by an improved terrestrial data set of 15^' × 15^' gravity anomaly area-means provided by the United States National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), resulting in significant upgrades compared to existing combined gravity field models, especially in continental areas such as South America, Africa, parts of Asia, and Antarctica. A combination strategy of relative regional weighting provides for improved performance in near-coastal ocean regions, including regions where the altimetric data are mostly unchanged from previous models. Comparing cumulative height anomalies, from both EGM2008 and XGM2016 at degree/order 719, yields differences of 26 cm in Africa and 40 cm in South America. These differences result from including additional information of satellite data, as well as from the improved ground data in these regions. XGM2016 also yields a smoother Mean Dynamic Topography with significantly reduced artifacts, which indicates an improved modeling of the ocean areas.

  6. Statistical approach for uncertainty quantification of experimental modal model parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, M.; Peeters, B.; Kahsin, M.

    2014-01-01

    Composite materials are widely used in manufacture of aerospace and wind energy structural components. These load carrying structures are subjected to dynamic time-varying loading conditions. Robust structural dynamics identification procedure impose tight constraints on the quality of modal models...... represent different complexity levels ranging from coupon, through sub-component up to fully assembled aerospace and wind energy structural components made of composite materials. The proposed method is demonstrated on two application cases of a small and large wind turbine blade........ This paper aims at a systematic approach for uncertainty quantification of the parameters of the modal models estimated from experimentally obtained data. Statistical analysis of modal parameters is implemented to derive an assessment of the entire modal model uncertainty measure. Investigated structures...

  7. A two-Higgs-doublet model facing experimental hints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crivellin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physics beyond the Standard Model has so far eluded our experimental probes. Nevertheless, a number of interesting anomalies have accumulated that can be taken as hints towards new physics: BaBar, Belle, and LHCb have found deviations of approximately 3:8σ in B → Dτν and B → D*τν; the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon differs by about 3σ from the theoretic prediction; the branching ratio for τ → μνν is about 2σ above the Standard Model expectation; and CMS and ATLAS found hints for a non-zero decay rate of h → μτ at 2.6σ. Here we consider these processes within a lepton-specific two-Higgs doublet model with additional non-standard Yukawa couplings and show how (and which of these excesses can be accommodated.

  8. Electrode-tissues interface: modeling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, M; Laaziri, Y; Mounaim, F; Elzayat, E; Corcos, J; Elhilali, M M

    2007-01-01

    The electrode-tissues interface (ETI) is one of the key issues in implantable devices such as stimulators and sensors. Once the stimulator is implanted, safety and reliability become more and more critical. In this case, modeling and monitoring of the ETI are required. We propose an empirical model for the ETI and a dedicated integrated circuit to measure its corresponding complex impedance. These measurements in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 100 kHz were achieved in acute dog experiments. The model demonstrates a closer fitting with experimental measurements. In addition, a custom monitoring device based on a stimuli current generator has been completed to evaluate the phase shift and voltage across the electrodes and to transmit wirelessly the values to an external controller. This integrated circuit has been fabricated in a CMOS 0.18 μm process, which consumes 4 mW only during measurements and occupies an area of 1 mm 2 . (review article)

  9. Comparison of mixed layer models predictions with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggian, P.; Riva, G.M. [CISE Spa, Divisione Ambiente, Segrate (Italy); Brusasca, G. [ENEL Spa, CRAM, Milano (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The temporal evolution of the PBL vertical structure for a North Italian rural site, situated within relatively large agricultural fields and almost flat terrain, has been investigated during the period 22-28 June 1993 by experimental and modellistic point of view. In particular, the results about a sunny day (June 22) and a cloudy day (June 25) are presented in this paper. Three schemes to estimate mixing layer depth have been compared, i.e. Holzworth (1967), Carson (1973) and Gryning-Batchvarova models (1990), which use standard meteorological observations. To estimate their degree of accuracy, model outputs were analyzed considering radio-sounding meteorological profiles and stability atmospheric classification criteria. Besides, the mixed layer depths prediction were compared with the estimated values obtained by a simple box model, whose input requires hourly measures of air concentrations and ground flux of {sup 222}Rn. (LN)

  10. Spinal meningeal uptake of technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate in meningeal seeding by malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, T.; Or, R.; Matzner, Y.; Samuels, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    Definite diagnosis of meningeal seeding by systemic cancer relies on the presence of malignant cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In the absence of such cells in the CSF, only two other tests strongly suggest the diagnosis - a CT scan and a myelogram. This paper reports a case in which the diagnosis was strongly suggested by an unusual uptake of Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate by the leptomeninges during a skeletal scan and later established by the presence of malignant cells in the CSF. The radionuclide scan may be an additional diagnostic test in some cases with meningeal seeding by systemic cancer

  11. From Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa to the Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, M Teresa; Jodar, Luis; Granoff, Dan; Rabinovich, Regina; Ceccarini, Costante; Perkin, Gordon W

    2015-11-15

    Polysaccharide vaccines had been used to control African meningitis epidemics for >30 years but with little or modest success, largely because of logistical problems in the implementation of reactive vaccination campaigns that are begun after epidemics are under way. After the major group A meningococcal meningitis epidemics in 1996-1997 (250,000 cases and 25,000 deaths), African ministers of health declared the prevention of meningitis a high priority and asked the World Health Organization (WHO) for help in developing better immunization strategies to eliminate meningitis epidemics in Africa. WHO accepted the challenge and created a project called Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa (EVA) that served as an organizational framework for external consultants, PATH, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Consultations were initiated with major vaccine manufacturers. EVA commissioned a costing study/business plan for the development of new group A or A/C conjugate vaccines and explored the feasibility of developing these products as a public-private partnership. Representatives from African countries were consulted. They confirmed that the development of conjugate vaccines was a priority and provided information on preferred product characteristics. In parallel, a strategy for successful introduction was also anticipated and discussed. The expert consultations recommended that a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine be developed and introduced into the African meningitis belt. The results of the costing study indicated that the "cost of goods" to develop a group A - containing conjugate vaccine in the United States would be in the range of US$0.35-$1.35 per dose, depending on composition (A vs A/C), number of doses/vials, and presentation. Following an invitation from BMGF, a proposal was submitted in the spring of 2001. In June 2001, BMGF awarded a grant of US$70 million to create the Meningitis

  12. Experimentally driven atomistic model of 1,2 polybutadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkourmpis, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.gkourmpis@borealisgroup.com [Polymer Science Centre, J. J. Thomson Physical Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AF (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Geoffrey R. [Polymer Science Centre, J. J. Thomson Physical Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AF (United Kingdom); Centre for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development, Institute Polytechnic Leiria, Marinha Grande (Portugal)

    2014-02-07

    We present an efficient method of combining wide angle neutron scattering data with detailed atomistic models, allowing us to perform a quantitative and qualitative mapping of the organisation of the chain conformation in both glass and liquid phases. The structural refinement method presented in this work is based on the exploitation of the intrachain features of the diffraction pattern and its intimate linkage with atomistic models by the use of internal coordinates for bond lengths, valence angles, and torsion rotations. Atomic connectivity is defined through these coordinates that are in turn assigned by pre-defined probability distributions, thus allowing for the models in question to be built stochastically. Incremental variation of these coordinates allows for the construction of models that minimise the differences between the observed and calculated structure factors. We present a series of neutron scattering data of 1,2 polybutadiene at the region 120–400 K. Analysis of the experimental data yields bond lengths for Cî—¸C and C î—» C of 1.54 Å and 1.35 Å, respectively. Valence angles of the backbone were found to be at 112° and the torsion distributions are characterised by five rotational states, a three-fold trans-skew± for the backbone and gauche± for the vinyl group. Rotational states of the vinyl group were found to be equally populated, indicating a largely atactic chan. The two backbone torsion angles exhibit different behaviour with respect to temperature of their trans population, with one of them adopting an almost all trans sequence. Consequently, the resulting configuration leads to a rather persistent chain, something indicated by the value of the characteristic ratio extrapolated from the model. We compare our results with theoretical predictions, computer simulations, RIS models and previously reported experimental results.

  13. Experimental and numerical modeling of sulfur plugging in carbonate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Kassem, J.H. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, UAE University, PO Box 17555, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2000-05-01

    Sour gas, mainly in the form of hydrogen sulfide, is produced in large amounts from many oil and gas reservoirs in the United Arab Emirates. In addition to creating problems in production lines, the precipitation of elemental sulfur in vicinity of the wellbore is often reported to cause wellbore damage. While there have been several studies performed on the role of solid deposition in gas reservoirs, the role of sulfur deposition in oil reservoirs has not been investigated. This paper presents experimental results along with a comprehensive wellbore model that predicts sulfur precipitation as well as plugging. Two separate sets of experiments, one for a gas phase system and another for a crude oil system, were conducted to investigate the deposition of elemental sulfur in (linear) carbonate cores. The gas flow tests were conducted with elemental sulfur being carried with nitrogen through limestone cores. Changes in gas flow rate were monitored while the injection pressure was held constant. A series of experiments generated valuable data for plugging with elemental sulfur. X-ray diffraction tests provided evidence of sulfur deposition along the cores. The oil flow tests were carried out to observe sulfur precipitation and plugging in a carbonate core. The crude oil was de-asphalted before conducting these tests in order to isolate the effect of asphaltene plugging. Significant plugging was observed and was found to be dependent on flow rate and initial sulfur concentration. This information was used in a phenomenological model that was incorporated in the wellbore numerical model. The data for the numerical model were obtained from both test tube and oil flow experiments. By using a phenomenological model, the wellbore plugging was modeled with an excellent match (with experimental results)

  14. 脑膜癌病%Meningeal carcinomatosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪伟光

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨脑膜癌病的临床表现、 EEG、 CT、 MRI及脑脊液细胞学检查与诊断之间的关系。进一步提高对脑膜癌病的认识。方法对 4例脑膜癌病的临床资料及 EEG、 CT、 MRI、脑脊液检查进行综合分析。结果脑膜癌病主要病变累及软脑膜、颅神经及脊神经根。临床表现复杂,主要出现脑症状,颅神经症状和脊神经症状。脑脊液检查,多数患者蛋白与细胞数轻-中度增高,葡萄糖及氯化物减少。结论 EEG、 CT、 MRI检查对诊断脑膜癌病有重要参考价值。诊断时需注意与结核性脑膜炎,新型隐球菌性脑膜炎及脑囊虫病相鉴别。脑脊液发现癌细胞是诊断本病的可靠依据。%Objective To improve the knowledge about meningeal carcinomatosis by exploring the relationship between the clinical characteristics、 EEG、 CT、 MRI、 cerebrospinal fluid(CSF) and diagnosis. Methods The clinical materials of 4 patients with meningeal carcinomatosis and EEG、 CT、 MRI、 Cytomorphology in CFS were analysed. Results Meningeal carcinomatosis mainly involve some tissues such as cranial nerves、 pia mater、 spinal nervous roots and appear some symptoms associated with these diseased tissues. In CSF of most patients with this disease there is a slight- middle increase in protein and amount of cells, decrease in glucose and chloride. Conclusion EEG、 CT and MRI play an important role in the diagnosis of meningeal carcinomatosis. There is a necessity to differentiate it from cerebral tuberculosis, cytoccous meningitis and cerebral cysticercosis. It is reliable evidence to find cancer cell in CSF.

  15. Chronic Meningitis Investigated via Metagenomic Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donovan, Brian D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.; Sample, Hannah A.; Chow, Felicia C.; Betjemann, John P.; Shah, Maulik P.; Richie, Megan B.; Gorman, Mark P.; Hajj-Ali, Rula A.; Calabrese, Leonard H.; Zorn, Kelsey C.; Chow, Eric D.; Greenlee, John E.; Blum, Jonathan H.; Green, Gary; Khan, Lillian M.; Banerji, Debarko; Langelier, Charles; Bryson-Cahn, Chloe; Harrington, Whitney; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Shanbhag, Niraj M.; Green, Ari J.; Brew, Bruce J.; Soldatos, Ariane; Strnad, Luke; Doernberg, Sarah B.; Jay, Cheryl A.; Douglas, Vanja; Josephson, S. Andrew; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2018-01-01

    Importance Identifying infectious causes of subacute or chronic meningitis can be challenging. Enhanced, unbiased diagnostic approaches are needed. Objective To present a case series of patients with diagnostically challenging subacute or chronic meningitis using metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) supported by a statistical framework generated from mNGS of control samples from the environment and from patients who were noninfectious. Design, Setting, and Participants In this case series, mNGS data obtained from the CSF of 94 patients with noninfectious neuroinflammatory disorders and from 24 water and reagent control samples were used to develop and implement a weighted scoring metric based on z scores at the species and genus levels for both nucleotide and protein alignments to prioritize and rank the mNGS results. Total RNA was extracted for mNGS from the CSF of 7 participants with subacute or chronic meningitis who were recruited between September 2013 and March 2017 as part of a multicenter study of mNGS pathogen discovery among patients with suspected neuroinflammatory conditions. The neurologic infections identified by mNGS in these 7 participants represented a diverse array of pathogens. The patients were referred from the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center (n = 2), Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center (n = 2), Cleveland Clinic (n = 1), University of Washington (n = 1), and Kaiser Permanente (n = 1). A weighted z score was used to filter out environmental contaminants and facilitate efficient data triage and analysis. Main Outcomes and Measures Pathogens identified by mNGS and the ability of a statistical model to prioritize, rank, and simplify mNGS results. Results The 7 participants ranged in age from 10 to 55 years, and 3 (43%) were female. A parasitic worm (Taenia solium, in 2 participants), a virus (HIV-1), and 4 fungi (Cryptococcus neoformans

  16. A Statistical Classifier to Support Diagnose Meningitis in Less Developed Areas of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lélis, Viviane-Maria; Guzmán, Eduardo; Belmonte, María-Victoria

    2017-08-11

    This paper describes the development of statistical classifiers to help diagnose meningococcal meningitis, i.e. the most sever, infectious and deadliest type of this disease. The goal is to find a mechanism able to determine whether a patient has this type of meningitis from a set of symptoms that can be directly observed in the earliest stages of this pathology. Currently, in Brazil, a country that is heavily affected by meningitis, all suspected cases require immediate hospitalization and the beginning of a treatment with invasive tests and medicines. This procedure, therefore, entails expensive treatments unaffordable in less developed regions. For this purpose, we have gathered together a dataset of 22,602 records of suspected meningitis cases from the Brazilian state of Bahia. Seven classification techniques have been applied from input data of nine symptoms and other information about the patient such as age, sex and the area they live in, and a 10 cross-fold validation has been performed. Results show that the techniques applied are suitable for diagnosing the meningococcal meningitis. Several indexes, such as precision, recall or ROC area, have been computed to show the accuracy of the models. All of them provide good results, but the best corresponds to the J48 classifier with a precision of 0.942 and a ROC area over 0.95. These results indicate that our model can indeed help lead to a non-invasive and early diagnosis of this pathology. This is especially useful in less developed areas, where the epidemiologic risk is usually high and medical expenses, sometimes, unaffordable.

  17. Neuroinflammatory targets and treatments for epilepsy validated in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Bauer, Sebastian; Bozzi, Yuri; Caleo, Matteo; Dingledine, Raymond; Gorter, Jan A; Henshall, David C; Kaufer, Daniela; Koh, Sookyong; Löscher, Wolfgang; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Mishto, Michele; Norwood, Braxton A; Palma, Eleonora; Poulter, Michael O; Terrone, Gaetano; Vezzani, Annamaria; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2017-07-01

    A large body of evidence that has accumulated over the past decade strongly supports the role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of human epilepsy. Specific inflammatory molecules and pathways have been identified that influence various pathologic outcomes in different experimental models of epilepsy. Most importantly, the same inflammatory pathways have also been found in surgically resected brain tissue from patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy. New antiseizure therapies may be derived from these novel potential targets. An essential and crucial question is whether targeting these molecules and pathways may result in anti-ictogenesis, antiepileptogenesis, and/or disease-modification effects. Therefore, preclinical testing in models mimicking relevant aspects of epileptogenesis is needed to guide integrated experimental and clinical trial designs. We discuss the most recent preclinical proof-of-concept studies validating a number of therapeutic approaches against inflammatory mechanisms in animal models that could represent novel avenues for drug development in epilepsy. Finally, we suggest future directions to accelerate preclinical to clinical translation of these recent discoveries. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  18. Tyre tread-block friction: modelling, simulation and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallaschek, Jörg; Wies, Burkard

    2013-07-01

    Pneumatic tyres are used in vehicles since the beginning of the last century. They generate braking and steering forces for bicycles, motor cycles, cars, busses, trucks, agricultural vehicles and aircraft. These forces are generated in the usually very small contact area between tyre and road and their performance characteristics are of eminent importance for safety and comfort. Much research has been addressed to optimise tyre design with respect to footprint pressure and friction. In this context, the development of virtual tyre prototypes, that is, simulation models for the tyre, has grown to a science in its own. While the modelling of the structural dynamics of the tyre has reached a very advanced level, which allows to take into account effects like the rate-independent inelasticity of filled elastomers or the transient 3D deformations of the ply-reinforced tread, shoulder and sidewalls, little is known about the friction between tread-block elements and road. This is particularly obvious in the case when snow, ice, water or a third-body layer are present in the tyre-road contact. In the present paper, we give a survey on the present state of knowledge in the modelling, simulation and experimental validation of tyre tread-block friction processes. We concentrate on experimental techniques.

  19. Hepatoprotective activity of Musa paradisiaca on experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, M; Girija, K; Lakshman, K; Divya, T

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the hepatoprotective activity of stem of Musa paradisiaca (M. paradisiaca) in CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity models in rats. Hepatoprotective activity of alcoholic and aqueous extracts of stem of M. paradisiaca was demonstrated by using two experimentally induced hepatotoxicity models. Administration of hepatotoxins (CCl4 and paracetamol) showed significant biochemical and histological deteriorations in the liver of experimental animals. Pretreatment with alcoholic extract (500 mg/kg), more significantly and to a lesser extent the alcoholic extract (250 mg/kg) and aqueous extract (500 mg/kg), reduced the elevated levels of the serum enzymes like serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bilirubin levels and alcoholic and aqueous extracts reversed the hepatic damage towards the normal, which further evidenced the hepatoprotective activity of stem of M. paradisiaca. The alcoholic extract at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o. and aqueous extract at a dose of 500 mg/kg, p.o. of stem of M. paradisiaca have significant effect on the liver of CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity animal models.

  20. Experimental oligopolies modeling: A dynamic approach based on heterogeneous behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerboni Baiardi, Lorenzo; Naimzada, Ahmad K.

    2018-05-01

    In the rank of behavioral rules, imitation-based heuristics has received special attention in economics (see [14] and [12]). In particular, imitative behavior is considered in order to understand the evidences arising in experimental oligopolies which reveal that the Cournot-Nash equilibrium does not emerge as unique outcome and show that an important component of the production at the competitive level is observed (see e.g.[1,3,9] or [7,10]). By considering the pioneering groundbreaking approach of [2], we build a dynamical model of linear oligopolies where heterogeneous decision mechanisms of players are made explicit. In particular, we consider two different types of quantity setting players characterized by different decision mechanisms that coexist and operate simultaneously: agents that adaptively adjust their choices towards the direction that increases their profit are embedded with imitator agents. The latter ones use a particular form of proportional imitation rule that considers the awareness about the presence of strategic interactions. It is noteworthy that the Cournot-Nash outcome is a stationary state of our models. Our thesis is that the chaotic dynamics arousing from a dynamical model, where heterogeneous players are considered, are capable to qualitatively reproduce the outcomes of experimental oligopolies.

  1. Experimental dynamic characterizations and modelling of disk vibrations for HDDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chee Khiang; Ong, Eng Hong; Guo, Guoxiao; Qian, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the rotational speed of spindle motors in HDDs (Hard-Disk Drives) are increasing to improve high data throughput and decrease rotational latency for ultra-high data transfer rates. However, the disk platters are excited to vibrate at their natural frequencies due to higher air-flow excitation as well as eccentricities and imbalances in the disk-spindle assembly. These factors contribute directly to TMR (Track Mis-Registration) which limits achievable high recording density essential for future mobile HDDs. In this paper, the natural mode shapes of an annular disk mounted on a spindle motor used in current HDDs are characterized using FEM (Finite Element Methods) analysis and verified with SLDV (Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer) measurements. The identified vibration frequencies and amplitudes of the disk ODS (Operating Deflection Shapes) at corresponding disk mode shapes are modelled as repeatable disturbance components for servo compensation in HDDs. Our experimental results show that the SLDV measurements are accurate in capturing static disk mode shapes without the need for intricate air-flow aero-elastic models, and the proposed disk ODS vibration model correlates well with experimental measurements from a LDV.

  2. A comprehensive experimental and modeling study of 2-methylbutanol combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo

    2015-05-01

    2-Methylbutanol (2-methyl-1-butanol) is one of several next-generation biofuels that can be used as an alternative fuel or blending component for combustion engines. This paper presents new experimental data for 2-methylbutanol, including ignition delay times in a high-pressure shock tube and premixed laminar flame speeds in a constant volume combustion vessel. Shock tube ignition delay times were measured for 2-methylbutanol/air mixtures at three equivalence ratios, temperatures ranging from 750 to 1250. K, and at nominal pressures near 20 and 40. bar. Laminar flame speed data were obtained using the spherically propagating premixed flame configuration at pressures of 1, 2, and 5. bar. A detailed chemical kinetic model for 2-methylbutanol oxidation was developed including high- and low-temperature chemistry based on previous modeling studies on butanol and pentanol isomers. The proposed model was tested against new and existing experimental data at pressures of 1-40. atm, temperatures of 740-1636. K, equivalence ratios of 0.25-2.0. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were conducted for identifying key reactions at various combustion conditions, and to obtain better understanding of the combustion characteristics of larger alcohols.

  3. Utility of clinical assessment, imaging, and cryptococcal antigen titer to predict AIDS-related complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandel Sean

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of AIDS-related complicated cryptococcal meningitis. The outcome was complicated cryptococcal meningitis: prolonged (≥ 14 days altered mental status, persistent (≥ 14 days focal neurologic findings, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF shunt placement or death. Predictor variable operating characteristics were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of the outcome. Results From 1990-2009, 82 patients with first episode of cryptococcal meningitis were identified. Of these, 14 (17% met criteria for complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis (prolonged altered mental status 6, persistent focal neurologic findings 7, CSF surgical shunt placement 8, and death 5. Patients with complicated cryptococcal meningitis had higher frequency of baseline focal neurological findings, head computed tomography (CT abnormalities, mean CSF opening pressure, and cryptococcal antigen (CRAG titers in serum and CSF. ROC area of log2 serum and CSF CRAG titers to predict complicated forms of cryptococcal meningitis were comparable, 0.78 (95%CI: 0.66 to 0.90 vs. 0.78 (95% CI: 0.67 to 0.89, respectively (χ2, p = 0.95. The ROC areas to predict the outcomes were similar for CSF pressure and CSF CRAG titers. In a multiple logistic regression model, the following were significant predictors of the outcome: baseline focal neurologic findings, head CT abnormalities and log2 CSF CRAG titer. Conclusions During initial clinical evaluation, a focal neurologic exam, abnormal head CT and large cryptococcal burden measured by CRAG titer are associated with the outcome of complicated cryptococcal meningitis following 2 weeks from antifungal therapy initiation.

  4. Protection of estrogen in portal hypertension gastropathy: an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Morgan-Martins

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Portal hypertension is a complication secondary to cirrhosis that is characterized by increased blood flow and/or vascular resistance in the portal system, causing the appearance of a hyperdynamic collateral circulation. Partial portal vein ligation is an experimental model used in rats to study the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in pre-hepatic portal hypertension. Estrogen E2 is an antioxidant molecule with various physiological actions. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the antioxidant activity of endogenous estrogen in an experimental model of partial portal vein ligation by comparing intact with castrated rats. METHODS: Twenty Wistar rats, weighing on average 250 g were used and divided into four groups: sham-operated (SO; intact (I with partial portal vein ligation (I + PPVL, castrated (C and castrated with partial ligation of the vein (C + PPVL. Day 1: castration or sham-operation; day 7, PPVL surgery; on day 15 post-PPVL, portal pressure in the mesenteric vein of rats was measured on polygraph Letica. Lipid peroxidation in the stomach was assessed using the technique of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Statistical analysis was done with ANOVA - Student-Newman-Keuls (mean ± SE, and P<0.05 was considered as significant. RESULTS: Portal pressure was significantly increased in C + PPVL as compared to the other groups. There was no significant difference in the group of intact rats. TBARS showed significant damage in C and C + PPVL in relation to others. Antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the castrated rats with subsequent PPVL as compared to the other groups. CONCLUSION: We suggest that estrogen E2 plays a protective role in intact compared with castrated rats because it presents hydrophenolic radicals in its molecule, thus acting as an antioxidant in this experimental model.

  5. Protection of estrogen in portal hypertension gastropathy: an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Martins, Maria Isabel; Jacques, Simone Iahnig; Hartmann, Renata Minuzzo; Marques, Camila Moraes; Marroni, Cláudio Augusto; Marroni, Norma Possa

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a complication secondary to cirrhosis that is characterized by increased blood flow and/or vascular resistance in the portal system, causing the appearance of a hyperdynamic collateral circulation. Partial portal vein ligation is an experimental model used in rats to study the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in pre-hepatic portal hypertension. Estrogen E2 is an antioxidant molecule with various physiological actions. To evaluate the antioxidant activity of endogenous estrogen in an experimental model of partial portal vein ligation by comparing intact with castrated rats. Twenty Wistar rats, weighing on average 250 g were used and divided into four groups: sham-operated (SO); intact (I) with partial portal vein ligation (I + PPVL), castrated (C) and castrated with partial ligation of the vein (C + PPVL). Day 1: castration or sham-operation; day 7, PPVL surgery; on day 15 post-PPVL, portal pressure in the mesenteric vein of rats was measured on polygraph Letica. Lipid peroxidation in the stomach was assessed using the technique of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Statistical analysis was done with ANOVA - Student-Newman-Keuls (mean ± SE), and P<0.05 was considered as significant. Portal pressure was significantly increased in C + PPVL as compared to the other groups. There was no significant difference in the group of intact rats. TBARS showed significant damage in C and C + PPVL in relation to others. Antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the castrated rats with subsequent PPVL as compared to the other groups. We suggest that estrogen E2 plays a protective role in intact compared with castrated rats because it presents hydrophenolic radicals in its molecule, thus acting as an antioxidant in this experimental model.

  6. Multiscale modelling and experimentation of hydrogen embrittlement in aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothi, Sathiskumar

    Pulse plated nickel and nickel based superalloys have been used extensively in the Ariane 5 space launcher engines. Large structural Ariane 5 space launcher engine components such as combustion chambers with complex microstructures have usually been manufactured using electrodeposited nickel with advanced pulse plating techniques with smaller parts made of nickel based superalloys joined or welded to the structure to fabricate Ariane 5 space launcher engines. One of the major challenges in manufacturing these space launcher components using newly developed materials is a fundamental understanding of how different materials and microstructures react with hydrogen during welding which can lead to hydrogen induced cracking. The main objective of this research has been to examine and interpret the effects of microstructure on hydrogen diffusion and hydrogen embrittlement in (i) nickel based superalloy 718, (ii) established and (iii) newly developed grades of pulse plated nickel used in the Ariane 5 space launcher engine combustion chamber. Also, the effect of microstructures on hydrogen induced hot and cold cracking and weldability of three different grades of pulse plated nickel were investigated. Multiscale modelling and experimental methods have been used throughout. The effect of microstructure on hydrogen embrittlement was explored using an original multiscale numerical model (exploiting synthetic and real microstructures) and a wide range of material characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy, 2D and 3D electron back scattering diffraction, in-situ and ex-situ hydrogen charged slow strain rate tests, thermal spectroscopy analysis and the Varestraint weldability test. This research shows that combined multiscale modelling and experimentation is required for a fundamental understanding of microstructural effects in hydrogen embrittlement in these materials. Methods to control the susceptibility to hydrogen induced hot and cold cracking and

  7. Experimental measurements and modelling of the WEGA boundary layer plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Shaer, M.; Ichtchenko, G.

    1983-02-01

    The boundary layer of the WEGA Tokamak has been investigated by using specific diagnostics: movable 4 mm microwave interferometer, several types of movable and fixed probes, Katsumata probe, and multigrid electrostatic analyzer. During the RF heating at the lower hybrid frequency, some modifications in the parameters of the boundary layer are observed which are interpreted by the ponderomotive force effects. A comparison between the measured reflection coefficients of the grill waveguides and their predicted values by a coupling theory (not taking into account the real conditions facing the Grill) is presented. A diffusion model was also made to describe this particular region and to fit the experimental results

  8. An investigation to evaluate the analgesic and central nervous system depressant activities of Solanum nigrum (Linn. in Homoeopathic potencies in experimental animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Echur Natarajan Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: In Homoeopathy, Solanum nigrum is clinically used in the treatment of ergotism, meningitis, irritation during dentition and some of the symptoms of neurological disorders but its Central Nervous System (CNS potential has not been explored experimentally yet. Therefore, a preliminary study was conducted with an objective to evaluate the analgesic and CNS depressant effects of homoeopathic potencies of S. nigrum in experimental animal models. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Wistar albino rats using a hot plate, ice plate and Randall-Selitto assay for analgesic; rota-rod and open field test for CNS depressant activities. The different potencies (3X, 6X, 12X and 30C of Solanum nigrum were administered orally (0.5 ml/rat/day for 30 days and response was assessed after 30 minutes of drug administration on 10 th , 20 th and 30 th day. Results: The result shows that all the four potencies of Solanum nigrum has increased the latency time required to raise and lick the paws for thermal sensation on hot plate test and for cold sensation on ice plate test and also increased the degree of threshold pressure to mechanically induced pain on Randall-Selitto assay but depressed the motor coordination and locomotor activities. Conclusion: The result obtained from this preliminary study suggests that homoeopathic preparation of Solanum nigrum in different potencies possess analgesic and CNS depressant activities. Further detailed investigations are required for its possible human use.

  9. Establishment of selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model in experimental sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Jihai; Gu Xiulian; Chao Shengwu; Zhang Peng; Fan Ruilin; Wang Li'na; Wang Lulu; Wang Ling; Li Bo; Chen Taotao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To establish a selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model in experimental sheep suitable for animal experiment. Methods: By using Seldinger's technique the catheter sheath was placed in both the femoral vein and femoral artery in ten sheep. Under C-arm DSA guidance the catheter was inserted through the catheter sheath into the pulmonary artery. Via the catheter appropriate amount of sheep autologous blood clots was injected into the selected pulmonary arteries. The selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model was thus established. Pulmonary angiography was performed to check the results. The pulmonary arterial pressure, femoral artery pressure,heart rates and partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO 2 ) were determined both before and after the treatment. The above parameters obtained after the procedure were compared with the recorded parameters measured before the procedure, and the sheep model quality was evaluated. Results: The baseline of pulmonary arterial pressure was (27.30 ± 9.58) mmHg,femoral artery pressure was (126.4 ± 13.72) mmHg, heart rate was (103 ± 15) bpm and PaO 2 was (87.7 ± 12.04) mmHg. Sixty minutes after the injection of (30 ± 5) ml thrombotic agglomerates, the pulmonary arterial pressures rose to (52 ± 49) mmHg, femoral artery pressures dropped to (100 ± 21) mmHg. The heart rates went up to (150 ± 26) bpm. The PaO 2 fell to (25.3 ± 11.2) mmHg. After the procedure the above parameters were significantly different from that measured before the procedure in all ten animals (P < 0.01). The pulmonary arteriography clearly demonstrated that the selected pulmonary arteries were successfully embolized. Conclusion: The anatomy of sheep's femoral veins,vena cava system, pulmonary artery and right heart system are suitable for the establishment of the catheter passage, for this reason, selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model can be easily created in experimental sheep. The technique is feasible and the model

  10. CFD Modeling and Experimental Validation of a Solar Still

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Tahir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth is the densest planet of the solar system with total area of 510.072 million square Km. Over 71.68% of this area is covered with water leaving a scant area of 28.32% for human to inhabit. The fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of the total volume and the rest is the brackish water. Presently, the world is facing chief problem of lack of potable water. This issue can be addressed by converting brackish water into potable through a solar distillation process and solar still is specially assigned for this purpose. Efficiency of a solar still explicitly depends on its design parameters, such as wall material, chamber depth, width and slope of the zcondensing surface. This study was aimed at investigating the solar still parameters using CFD modeling and experimental validation. The simulation data of ANSYS-FLUENT was compared with actual experimental data. A close agreement among the simulated and experimental results was seen in the presented work. It reveals that ANSYS-FLUENT is a potent tool to analyse the efficiency of the new designs of the solar distillation systems.

  11. Computational and experimental model of transdermal iontophorethic drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Nenad; Saveljic, Igor; Rac, Vladislav; Graells, Beatriz Olalde; Bijelic, Goran

    2017-11-30

    The concept of iontophoresis is often applied to increase the transdermal transport of drugs and other bioactive agents into the skin or other tissues. It is a non-invasive drug delivery method which involves electromigration and electroosmosis in addition to diffusion and is shown to be a viable alternative to conventional administration routs such as oral, hypodermic and intravenous injection. In this study we investigated, experimentally and numerically, in vitro drug delivery of dexamethasone sodium phosphate to porcine skin. Different current densities, delivery durations and drug loads were investigated experimentally and introduced as boundary conditions for numerical simulations. Nernst-Planck equation was used for calculation of active substance flux through equivalent model of homogeneous hydrogel and skin layers. The obtained numerical results were in good agreement with experimental observations. A comprehensive in-silico platform, which includes appropriate numerical tools for fitting, could contribute to iontophoretic drug-delivery devices design and correct dosage and drug clearance profiles as well as to perform much faster in-silico experiments to better determine parameters and performance criteria of iontophoretic drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An efficient approach to bioconversion kinetic model generation based on automated microscale experimentation integrated with model driven experimental design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, B. H.; Micheletti, M.; Baganz, F.

    2009-01-01

    -erythrulose. Experiments were performed using automated microwell studies at the 150 or 800 mu L scale. The derived kinetic parameters were then verified in a second round of experiments where model predictions showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained under conditions not included in the original......Reliable models of enzyme kinetics are required for the effective design of bioconversion processes. Kinetic expressions of the enzyme-catalysed reaction rate however, are frequently complex and establishing accurate values of kinetic parameters normally requires a large number of experiments....... These can be both time consuming and expensive when working with the types of non-natural chiral intermediates important in pharmaceutical syntheses. This paper presents ail automated microscale approach to the rapid and cost effective generation of reliable kinetic models useful for bioconversion process...

  13. Experimental Characterization and Modeling of PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk

    fundamental knowledge of the transport and electrochemical processes of PEM fuel cells and to provide methods for obtaining high quality data for PEM fuel cell simulation model validation. In this thesis three different areas of experimental characterization techniques was investigated, they include: Stack...... for obtaining very detailed data of the manifold flow. Moreover, the tools complement each other well, as high quality validation data can be obtained from PIV measurements to verify CFD models. AC Impedance Spectroscopy was used to thoroughly characterize a HTPEM single cell. The measurement method...... was furthermore transferred onto a Labview platform, which signiffcantly improves the exibility and lowers the cost of using this method. This technique is expected to bea very important future tool, used both for material characterization, celldiagnostic, system optimization and as a control input parameter...

  14. Experimental validation of models for Plasma Focus devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Palomino, Luis; Gonzalez, Jose; Clausse, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Plasma Focus(PF) Devices are thermonuclear pulsators that produce short pulsed radiation (X-ray, charged particles and neutrons). Since Filippov and Mather, investigations have been used to study plasma properties. Nowadays the interest about PF is focused in technology applications, related to the use of these devices as pulsed neutron sources. In the numerical calculus the Inter institutional PLADEMA (PLAsmas DEnsos MAgnetizados) network is developing three models. Each one is useful in different engineering stages of the Plasma Focus design. One of the main objectives in this work is a comparative study on the influence of the different parameters involved in each models. To validate these results, several experimental measurements under different geometry and initial conditions were performed. (author)

  15. Astrocyte regulation of sleep circuits: experimental and modeling perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso eFellin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrated within neural circuits, astrocytes have recently been shown to modulate brain rhythms thought to mediate sleep function. Experimental evidence suggests that local impact of astrocytes on single synapses translates into global modulation of neuronal networks and behavior. We discuss these findings in the context of current conceptual models of sleep generation and function, each of which have historically focused on neural mechanisms. We highlight the implications and the challenges introduced by these results from a conceptual and computational perspective. We further provide modeling directions on how these data might extend our knowledge of astrocytic properties and sleep function. Given our evolving understanding of how local cellular activities during sleep lead to functional outcomes for the brain, further mechanistic and theoretical understanding of astrocytic contribution to these dynamics will undoubtedly be of great basic and translational benefit.

  16. An experimental and modeling study of n-octanol combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the first investigation on the combustion chemistry of n-octanol, a long chain alcohol. Ignition delay times were determined experimentally in a high-pressure shock tube, and stable species concentration profiles were obtained in a jet stirred reactor for a range of initial conditions. A detailed kinetic model was developed to describe the oxidation of n-octanol at both low and high temperatures, and the model shows good agreement with the present dataset. The fuel\\'s combustion characteristics are compared to those of n-alkanes and to short chain alcohols to illustrate the effects of the hydroxyl moiety and the carbon chain length on important combustion properties. Finally, the results are discussed in detail. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  17. Experimentally supported mathematical modeling of continuous baking processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenby Andresen, Mette

    and temperature) and control the process (air flow, temperature, and humidity) are therefore emphasized. The oven is furthermore designed to work outside the range of standard tunnel ovens, making it interesting for manufacturers of both baking products and baking equipment. A mathematical model describing......The scope of the PhD project was to increase knowledge on the process-to-product interactions in continuous tunnel ovens. The work has focused on five main objectives. These objectives cover development of new experimental equipment for pilot plant baking experiments, mathematical modeling of heat...... and mass transfer in a butter cookie product, and evaluation of quality assessment methods. The pilot plant oven is a special batch oven designed to emulate continuous convection tunnel oven baking. The design, construction, and validation of the oven has been part of the project and is described...

  18. Simulator for candu600 fuel handling system. the experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, N.; Predescu, D.; Valeca, S.

    2013-01-01

    A main way to increase the nuclear plant safety is related to selection and continuous training of the operation staff. In this order, the computer programs for training, testing and evaluation of the knowledge get, or training simulators including the advanced analytical models of the technological systems are using. The Institute for Nuclear Research from Pitesti, Romania intend to design and build an Fuel Handling Simulator at his F/M Head Test Rig facility, that will be used for training of operating personnel. This paper presents simulated system, advantages to use the simulator, and the experimental model of simulator, that has been built to allows setting of the requirements and fabrication details, especially for the software kit that will be designed and implement on main simulator. (authors)

  19. Antioxidant Capacity: Experimental Determination by EPR Spectroscopy and Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Justyna; Bartoszek, Mariola; Chorążewski, Mirosław

    2015-07-22

    A new method of determining antioxidant capacity based on a mathematical model is presented in this paper. The model was fitted to 1000 data points of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements of various food product samples such as tea, wine, juice, and herbs with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values from 20 to 2000 μmol TE/100 mL. The proposed mathematical equation allows for a determination of TEAC of food products based on a single EPR spectroscopy measurement. The model was tested on the basis of 80 EPR spectroscopy measurements of herbs, tea, coffee, and juice samples. The proposed model works for both strong and weak antioxidants (TEAC values from 21 to 2347 μmol TE/100 mL). The determination coefficient between TEAC values obtained experimentally and TEAC values calculated with proposed mathematical equation was found to be R(2) = 0.98. Therefore, the proposed new method of TEAC determination based on a mathematical model is a good alternative to the standard EPR method due to its being fast, accurate, inexpensive, and simple to perform.

  20. Experimental Human Cell and Tissue Models of Pemphigus

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wier, Gerda; Pas, Hendri H.; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    2010-01-01

    Pemphigus is a chronic mucocutaneous autoimmune bullous disease that is characterized by loss of cell-cell contact in skin and/or mucous membranes. Past research has successfully identified desmosomes as immunological targets and has demonstrated that acantholysis is initiated through direct binding of IgG. The exact mechanisms of acantholysis, however, are still missing. Experimental model systems have contributed considerably to today's knowledge and are still a favourite tool of research. In this paper we will describe to what extent human cell and tissue models represent the in vivo situation, for example, organ cultures of human skin, keratinocyte cultures, and human skin grafted on mice and, furthermore, how suitable they are to study the pathogenesis of pemphigus. Organ cultures closely mimic the architecture of the epidermis but are less suitable to answer posed biochemical questions. Cultured keratinocyte monolayers are convenient in this respect, but their desmosomal make-up in terms of adhesion molecules does not exactly reflect the in vivo situation. Reconstituted skin is a relatively new model that approaches organ culture. In models of human skin grafted on mice, acantholysis can be studied in actual human skin but now with all the advantages of an animal model. PMID:20585596

  1. Experimental and modeling investigation on structure H hydrate formation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazraeno, M. Seyfi; Varaminian, F.; Vafaie sefti, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Applying affinity model for the formation kinetics of sH hydrate and two stage kinetics. • Performing the experiments of hydrate formation of sH with MCP. • A unique path for the SH hydrate formation. - Abstract: In this work, the kinetics of crystal H hydrate and two stage kinetics formation is modeled by using the chemical affinity model for the first time. The basic idea is that there is a unique path for each experiment by which the crystallization process decays the affinity. The experiments were performed at constant temperatures of 274.15, 275.15, 275.65, 276.15 and 277.15 K. The initial pressure of each experiment is up to 25 bar above equilibrium pressure of sI. Methylcyclohexane (MCH), methylcyclopentane (MCP) and tert-butyl methyl ether (TBME) are used as sH former and methane is used as a help gas. The parameters of the affinity model (A r and t k ) are determined and the results show that the parameter of (A r )/(RT) has not a constant value when temperature changes in each group of experiments. The results indicate that this model can predict experimental data very well at several conditions

  2. Maternal hypothyroidism: An overview of current experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Mahboubeh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2017-10-15

    Maternal hypothyroidism (MH) is the most common cause of transient congenital hypothyroidism. Different animal models are used for assessing developmental effects of MH in offspring. The severity and status of hypothyroidism in animal models must be a reflection of the actual conditions in humans. To obtain comparable results with different clinical conditions, which lead to MH in humans, several factors have been suggested for researchers to consider before designing the experimental models. Regarding development of fetal body systems during pregnancy, interference at different times provides different results and the appropriate time for induction of hypothyroidism should be selected based on accurate time of development of the system under assessment. Other factors that should be taken into consideration include, physiological and biochemical differences between humans and other species, thyroid hormone-independent effects of anti-thyroid drugs, circadian rhythms in TSH secretion, sex differences, physical and psychological stress. This review addresses essential guidelines for selecting and managing the optimal animal model for MH as well as discussing the pros and cons of currently used models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An experimental methodology for a fuzzy set preference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turksen, I. B.; Willson, Ian A.

    1992-01-01

    models and vague linguistic preferences has greatly limited the usefulness and predictive validity of existing preference models. A fuzzy set preference model that uses linguistic variables and a fully interactive implementation should be able to simultaneously address these issues and substantially improve the accuracy of demand estimates. The parallel implementation of crisp and fuzzy conjoint models using identical data not only validates the fuzzy set model but also provides an opportunity to assess the impact of fuzzy set definitions and individual attribute choices implemented in the interactive methodology developed in this research. The generalized experimental tools needed for conjoint models can also be applied to many other types of intelligent systems.

  4. Experimental model for research on the blood-ocular barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hak Jin; Jea, Seung Youn; Park, Jae Sung; Jung, Yeon Joo [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Woo [Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung Rae [Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    The eyeball has 2 blood-ocular barriers, i.e, the blood-retinal and blood-aqueous barriers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if triolein emulsion could disrupt the barriers, and we wanted to suggest as an experimental model for future blood-ocular barrier studies. The triolein emulsion was made of 0.1 ml triolein and 20 ml normal saline, and this was infused into the carotid artery of ten cats (the experimental group). As a control group, only normal saline was infused in another ten cats. Precontrast and postcontrast T1-weighted MR images were obtained at 30 minutes and 3 hours after embolization in both groups. The signal intensities were evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively in the anterior and posterior chambers and also in the vitreus fluid. Statistical analysis was performed by employing the Kruskal Wallist test, Dunn's Multiple Comparison test and the wilcoxon signed rank test. In the control group, no contrast enhancement was demonstrated in the anterior or posterior chamber or in the vitreus fluid of the ipsilateral or contralateral eyeball on the 30 minutes MR images. The anterior chambers of the ipsilateral and contralateral eyeballs revealed delayed contrast enhancement on the 3 hour MR images. In the experimental group, the 30 minute-postembolization MR images were not different from those of the control group. The 30 minute-postembolization MR images demonstrated delayed contrast enhancement in the anterior chamber of the ipsilateral and contralateral eyeballs and in the posterior chamber of the ipsilateral eyeball. The delayed contrast enhancement of the posterior chamber of the ipsilateral eyeball was statistically significant ({rho} < 0.05). The present study demonstrated significant contrast enhancement in the posterior chamber with infusion of the triolein emulsion, and this can serve as a model for blood-aqueous barrier studies.

  5. Experimental model for research on the blood-ocular barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Jin; Jea, Seung Youn; Park, Jae Sung; Jung, Yeon Joo; Kim, Yong Woo; Park, Byung Rae

    2006-01-01

    The eyeball has 2 blood-ocular barriers, i.e, the blood-retinal and blood-aqueous barriers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if triolein emulsion could disrupt the barriers, and we wanted to suggest as an experimental model for future blood-ocular barrier studies. The triolein emulsion was made of 0.1 ml triolein and 20 ml normal saline, and this was infused into the carotid artery of ten cats (the experimental group). As a control group, only normal saline was infused in another ten cats. Precontrast and postcontrast T1-weighted MR images were obtained at 30 minutes and 3 hours after embolization in both groups. The signal intensities were evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively in the anterior and posterior chambers and also in the vitreus fluid. Statistical analysis was performed by employing the Kruskal Wallist test, Dunn's Multiple Comparison test and the wilcoxon signed rank test. In the control group, no contrast enhancement was demonstrated in the anterior or posterior chamber or in the vitreus fluid of the ipsilateral or contralateral eyeball on the 30 minutes MR images. The anterior chambers of the ipsilateral and contralateral eyeballs revealed delayed contrast enhancement on the 3 hour MR images. In the experimental group, the 30 minute-postembolization MR images were not different from those of the control group. The 30 minute-postembolization MR images demonstrated delayed contrast enhancement in the anterior chamber of the ipsilateral and contralateral eyeballs and in the posterior chamber of the ipsilateral eyeball. The delayed contrast enhancement of the posterior chamber of the ipsilateral eyeball was statistically significant (ρ < 0.05). The present study demonstrated significant contrast enhancement in the posterior chamber with infusion of the triolein emulsion, and this can serve as a model for blood-aqueous barrier studies

  6. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed

  7. Sparse linear models: Variational approximate inference and Bayesian experimental design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, Matthias W

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of problems such as signal reconstruction, denoising, source separation, feature selection, and graphical model search are addressed today by posterior maximization for linear models with sparsity-favouring prior distributions. The Bayesian posterior contains useful information far beyond its mode, which can be used to drive methods for sampling optimization (active learning), feature relevance ranking, or hyperparameter estimation, if only this representation of uncertainty can be approximated in a tractable manner. In this paper, we review recent results for variational sparse inference, and show that they share underlying computational primitives. We discuss how sampling optimization can be implemented as sequential Bayesian experimental design. While there has been tremendous recent activity to develop sparse estimation, little attendance has been given to sparse approximate inference. In this paper, we argue that many problems in practice, such as compressive sensing for real-world image reconstruction, are served much better by proper uncertainty approximations than by ever more aggressive sparse estimation algorithms. Moreover, since some variational inference methods have been given strong convex optimization characterizations recently, theoretical analysis may become possible, promising new insights into nonlinear experimental design.

  8. Sparse linear models: Variational approximate inference and Bayesian experimental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Matthias W [Saarland University and Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Campus E1.4, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2009-12-01

    A wide range of problems such as signal reconstruction, denoising, source separation, feature selection, and graphical model search are addressed today by posterior maximization for linear models with sparsity-favouring prior distributions. The Bayesian posterior contains useful information far beyond its mode, which can be used to drive methods for sampling optimization (active learning), feature relevance ranking, or hyperparameter estimation, if only this representation of uncertainty can be approximated in a tractable manner. In this paper, we review recent results for variational sparse inference, and show that they share underlying computational primitives. We discuss how sampling optimization can be implemented as sequential Bayesian experimental design. While there has been tremendous recent activity to develop sparse estimation, little attendance has been given to sparse approximate inference. In this paper, we argue that many problems in practice, such as compressive sensing for real-world image reconstruction, are served much better by proper uncertainty approximations than by ever more aggressive sparse estimation algorithms. Moreover, since some variational inference methods have been given strong convex optimization characterizations recently, theoretical analysis may become possible, promising new insights into nonlinear experimental design.

  9. Experimental Investigation and Theoretical Modeling of Nanosilica Activity in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental investigations and theoretical modeling of the hydration reaction of nanosilica blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different nanosilica replacement ratios. The developments of chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength of Portland cement control specimens and nanosilica blended specimens were measured at different ages: 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Due to the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica, the contents of calcium hydroxide in nanosilica blended pastes are considerably lower than those in the control specimens. Compared with the control specimens, the extent of compressive strength enhancement in the nanosilica blended specimens is much higher at early ages. Additionally, a blended cement hydration model that considers both the hydration reaction of cement and the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica is proposed. The properties of nanosilica blended concrete during hardening were evaluated using the degree of hydration of cement and the reaction degree of nanosilica. The calculated chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength were generally consistent with the experimental results.

  10. Tobacco experimental model to induce urinary bladder neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Colli Neto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to develop an experimental model of exposure to tobacco burning (cigarette products to assess the effects of its chronic use in relation to cancers of the bladder. METHODS: the animals were chronically exposed to the burning tobacco products in a semi-open chamber to simulate smoking. Thirty young Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one with 20 animals simulating smoking for six months, and ten not exposed control animals for the same period. After exposure by inhalation of cigarette smoke, animals were euthanized and subjected to histopathological study of the bladder wall. RESULTS: no tumor was found but mild and non significant alterations. The studies of hemo-oximetry (carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin and the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 confirm that the animals were exposed to high concentrations of tobacco smoke and its derivatives. CONCLUSION: no bladder mucosal neoplasia was found in the pathological study of animals. The developed experimental models were highly efficient, practical and easy to use and can be used in other similar studies to determine the harmful effects caused by smoking.

  11. Fibronectin changes in eosinophilic meningitis with blood-CSF barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Hu, Ming-E; Chou, Chun-Hui; Chen, Ke-Min; Chiu, Ping-Sung; Lai, Shih-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Fibronectin, which is present at relatively low levels in healthy central nervous systems (CNS), shows increased levels in meningitis. In this study, fibronectin processing was correlated with the increased permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier as well as with the formation of eosinophil infiltrates in angiostrongyliasis meningitis. The immunohistochemistry results show matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is localized in the choroid plexus epithelium. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated fibronectin strongly binds MMP-9. Furthermore, treatment with the MMP-9 inhibitor GM6001 significantly inhibited fibronectin processing, reduced the blood-CSF barrier permeability, and decreased the eosinophil counts. The decreased fibronectin processing in CSF implies decreased cellular invasion of the subarachnoid space across the blood-CSF barrier. Therefore, increased fibronectin processing may be associated with barrier disruption and participate in the extravasation and migration of eosinophils into the CNS during experimental parasitic infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of Mycoplasma hominis meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Elisabeth H. L.; Winter, Heinrich L. J.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Metzemaekers, Joannes D. M.; Arends, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Meningitis in adults due to infection with Mycoplasma hominis is rarely reported. Here, we document the third case of M. hominis meningitis in an adult individual, developed upon neurosurgery following a subarachnoid haemorrhage. Our findings are noteworthy, because the presence of M. hominis in

  13. Spontaneous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, William D; Sheele, Johnathan M

    2018-05-01

    Spontaneous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) meningitis is extremely rare and has a high mortality rate. We report a case of MRSA meningitis in an otherwise healthy young adult female with no recent trauma or neurosurgical interventions. Despite antibiotics she suffered a vasculitis-induced cerebral vascular ischemic event. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spinal meningeal cyst: analysis with low-field MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hongzhou; Chen Yejia; Chen Ronghua; Chen Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of spinal meningeal cyst in low-field MRI and to discuss its classification, subtype, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis. Methods: Forty-two patients (20 male, 22 female) were examined with sagittal T 1 -and T 2 -, axial T 2 -weighted MR imaging. Twelve patients were also examined with contrast-enhanced MRI. Results: The cysts were classified using Nakors' classification as type Ia extradural meningeal cysts (4 patients), type Ib sacral meningeal cysts (32), type II extradural meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers (4), and type III spinal intradural meningeal cysts (2). All 42 spinal meningeal cysts had well-defined boundaries with low T 1 and high T 2 signal intensities similar to cerebral spinal fluid. In type Ia, the lesions were often on the dorsum of mid-lower thoracic spinal cord compressing the spinal cord and displacing the extradural fat. In type Ib, the lesions were in the sacral canal with fat plane between the cyst and dural sac. In type II, the lesions contained nerve roots and were lateral to the dural sac. In type III, the lesions were often on the dorsum of spinal cord compressing and displacing the spinal cord anteriorly. Conclusion: Low-field MRI can clearly display the spinal meningeal cyst. Types Ia and Ib spinal meningeal cysts had typical features and can be easily diagnosed. Types II and III should be differentiated from cystic schwannomas and enterogenous cysts, respectively. (authors)

  15. An autopsied case of tuberculous meningitis showing interesting CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abiko, Takashi; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Imada, Ryuichi; Nagai, Kenichi

    1983-01-01

    A 61-year-old female patient died of a neurological disorder of unknown origin one month after the first visit and was found to have had tuberculous meningitis at autopsy. CT revealed a low density area showing an enlargement of the cerebral ventricle but did not reveal contrast enhancement in the basal cistern peculiar to tuberculous meningitis. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of bacterial meningitis in the newborn

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... Wales has not changed remarkably from the known 0.2. – 0.4 cases/1000 live ... ing world, mortality associated with neonatal meningitis also varies between ... tively, the classic signs of meningeal irritation in the older children ...

  17. Haemophilus influenzae type f meningitis in a previously healthy boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Andreas; Berg, Ronan M G; Bruunsgaard, Helle

    2013-01-01

    Non-serotype b strains of Haemophilus influenzae are extremely rare causes of acute bacterial meningitis in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 14-year-old boy, who was previously healthy and had been immunised against H influenzae serotype b (Hib...

  18. Infectious meningitis and encephalitis in adults in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Storgaard, Merete; Larsen, Lykke

    2018-01-01

    -haemolytic streptococci (n=14). Meningococcal meningitis was rare (n=11). In encephalitis, Herpes simplex virus-1 was most common (n=37) followed by Varicella zoster virus (n=20), while Varicella zoster virus (n=61) was most common in viral meningitis followed by enterovirus (n=50) and Herpes simplex virus-2 (n=46). Case...

  19. An unusual case of neonatal meningococcal meningitis complicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of pyogenic meningitis worldwide, as well as causing large epidemics in parts of Africa. With the dramatic decline in cases of Haemophilus inuenzae B, N. meningitidis has emerged as one of the most common causes of acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults in South ...

  20. Symptomatic relapse of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common cause of adult meningitis in southern Africa. Much of this disease burden is thought to be due to symptomatic relapse of previously treated infection. We studied the contribution of inadequate secondary fluconazole prophylaxis to symptomatic relapses of cryptococcal ...

  1. Empiric Treatment of Acute Meningitis Syndrome in a Resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-01

    Nov 1, 2017 ... ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Bacterial meningitis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. However, limited research has focused on the diagnosis and management of meningitis in resource-limited settings. METHODS: We designed a prospective case series of children.

  2. Meningitis in a College Student in Connecticut, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Lynn E.; Gupta, Shaili; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Hadler, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aseptic meningitis in a college student that was ultimately attributed to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The authors also provide a review of LCMV infection, epidemiology, and public health implications. Providers should be aware of LCMV as a cause of meningitis in college students,…

  3. Unusual Presentation of Meningitis following Stab Neck | Motsitsi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A case report of stab neck presenting at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria, South Africa with atypical meningitis. The objective was to illustrate the challenge of diagnosing this unusual and late presentation of meningitis. Case Report: A 48 year-old male patient presented to us two days after a stab neck. He was ...

  4. Is it possible to differentiate tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis (TBM and CM) are the most common causes of opportunistic meningitis in HIVinfected patients from resource-limited settings, and the differential diagnosis is challenging. Objective. To compare clinical and basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics between TBM ...

  5. outbreak of cerebrospinal meningitis in kebbi state, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Cerebrospinal meningitis, also called epidemic meningococcal meningitis, is a major public health problem still affecting tropical countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. It is highly contagious and mortality from the disease remains high, despite major achievements in the treatment modalities.

  6. Medical audit of the management of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) has become the most common type of community-acquired meningitis. CM has a poor outcome if the initial in-hospital treatment does not adhere to standard guidelines. The aim of this audit was to improve the quality of the care of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive ...

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of bacterial meningitis in the newborn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bacterial meningitis in the newborn is globally renowned for high mortality. The associated morbidities also include audiologic, motor, visual and mental deficits. Objective: To highlight the peculiarities in the current diagnostic and management strategies in newborn meningitis. Methods: Relevant literature on ...

  8. Dynamics of germs responsible for acute bacterial meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to analyze ten (10) years of epidemiological surveillance data of meningitis in Burkina Faso for high risk germs patterns identification in order to contribute to the strengthening of prevention strategies. A retrospective study of the past decade (2005- 2014) of cases of acute bacterial meningitis ...

  9. Meningococcal meningitis C in Tamil Nadu, public health perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Kirubah Vasandhi; Pricilla, Ruby Angeline; Thomas, Beeson

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis has rarely been reported in Tamil Nadu. We report here two children diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis in Vellore, Tamil Nadu, on May 2014. The causative strain was Neisseria meningitidis serotype C. The role of the primary care physician in early diagnosis, appropriate referral, and preventive measures of this disease to the immediate family and community is stressed.

  10. Bacterial meningitis in adults at the University of Calabar Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The common complications associated with adult bacterial meningitis were septicemia, aspiration pneumonia and cranial nerve palsies. Bacterial meningitis still remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in this environment. Adequate therapeutic coverage, health education, and immunization where available, ...

  11. Streptococcus suis meningitis can require a prolonged treatment course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Dejace

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of recrudescent Streptococcus suis meningitis requiring a prolonged treatment course. A few similar cases can be found in the burgeoning literature on what remains a relatively uncommon disease in humans, and these patients should be monitored carefully upon completion of therapy. Keywords: Meningitis, Relapse, Duration, Streptococcus suis

  12. Haemophilus influenzae Type a Meningitis in Immunocompetent Child, Oman, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawardekar, Kiran P

    2017-07-01

    Meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was eliminated in Oman after the introduction of Hib vaccine in 2001. However, a case of H. influenzae type a meningitis was diagnosed in a child from Oman in 2015, which highlights the need to monitor the incidence of invasive non-Hib H. influenzae disease.

  13. Outcomes of tuberculous meningitis in children: a case review study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazid Dimyati

    2011-10-01

    Conclusions Tuberculous meningitis starts with nonspecific symptoms and is often only diagnosed when brain damage has already occurred. Outcome is directly associated with age and the stage of tuberculous meningitis. Earlier diagnosis may significantly improve outcomes. [Paediatr Indones. 2011;51:288-93].

  14. Purulent meningitis with unusual diffusion-weighted MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, M.; Takayama, Y.; Yamashita, H.; Noguchi, M.; Sagoh, T.

    2002-01-01

    We describe unusual findings obtained by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a patient with acute purulent meningitis caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Along cerebral convexities and the Sylvian fissure, multiple small intense lesions showed high signal intensity in these sequences. This may be the first report of diffusion-weighted in purulent meningitis

  15. Crystals in brain and meninges in primary hyperoxaluria and oxalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqqani, M T

    1977-01-01

    A case of primary hyperoxaluria and oxalosis with chronic renal failure, crystalline myocarditis, and disseminated calcium oxalate crystal deposition in various tissues including the brain and meninges is described. Deposition of crystals in brain and meninges is exceptionally rare in primary oxalosis. Images PMID:838867

  16. [Alarm symptoms of meningitis in children with fever].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.F. Geurts (Dorien); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractA 15-year-old girl presented with fever and pain in her legs. A viral infection was suspected, but within 24 hours she became confused and developed meningeal signs, based on which she was diagnosed as having meningitis. Within a few hours a 6-month-old boy developed fever, a grey

  17. Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical-pathological correlations (MeninGene-Path)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, J.Y.; Brouwer, M.C.; Aronica, E.; van de Beek, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and

  18. Pneumococcal meningitis: Clinical-pathological correlations (meningene-path)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and

  19. Application of Iterative Robust Model-based Optimal Experimental Design for the Calibration of Biocatalytic Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Daele, Timothy; Gernaey, Krist V.; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer

    2017-01-01

    The aim of model calibration is to estimate unique parameter values from available experimental data, here applied to a biocatalytic process. The traditional approach of first gathering data followed by performing a model calibration is inefficient, since the information gathered during...... experimentation is not actively used to optimise the experimental design. By applying an iterative robust model-based optimal experimental design, the limited amount of data collected is used to design additional informative experiments. The algorithm is used here to calibrate the initial reaction rate of an ω......-transaminase catalysed reaction in a more accurate way. The parameter confidence region estimated from the Fisher Information Matrix is compared with the likelihood confidence region, which is a more accurate, but also a computationally more expensive method. As a result, an important deviation between both approaches...

  20. Integral Reactor Containment Condensation Model and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-05-02

    This NEUP funded project, NEUP 12-3630, is for experimental, numerical and analytical studies on high-pressure steam condensation phenomena in a steel containment vessel connected to a water cooling tank, carried out at Oregon State University (OrSU) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW-Madison). In the three years of investigation duration, following the original proposal, the planned tasks have been completed: (1) Performed a scaling study for the full pressure test facility applicable to the reference design for the condensation heat transfer process during design basis accidents (DBAs), modified the existing test facility to route the steady-state secondary steam flow into the high pressure containment for controllable condensation tests, and extended the operations at negative gage pressure conditions (OrSU). (2) Conducted a series of DBA and quasi-steady experiments using the full pressure test facility to provide a reliable high pressure condensation database (OrSU). (3) Analyzed experimental data and evaluated condensation model for the experimental conditions, and predicted the prototypic containment performance under accidental conditions (UW-Madison). A film flow model was developed for the scaling analysis, and the results suggest that the 1/3 scaled test facility covers large portion of laminar film flow, leading to a lower average heat transfer coefficient comparing to the prototypic value. Although it is conservative in reactor safety analysis, the significant reduction of heat transfer coefficient (50%) could under estimate the prototypic condensation heat transfer rate, resulting in inaccurate prediction of the decay heat removal capability. Further investigation is thus needed to quantify the scaling distortion for safety analysis code validation. Experimental investigations were performed in the existing MASLWR test facility at OrST with minor modifications. A total of 13 containment condensation tests were conducted for pressure

  1. Experimental investigation and mathematical modeling of triode PEM fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, E.; Koilias, G.; Athanasiou, M.; Katsaounis, A.; Dimakopoulos, Y.; Tsamopoulos, J.; Vayenas, C.G.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The triode fuel cell operation was tested using novel comb-type electrode designs. •Triode operation enhances the PEMFC power output by up to 500%. •Power output enhancement exceeds auxiliary power by up to 20%. •Good agreement with mathematical model based on the laws of Kirchhoff. •Proton fluxes in the membrane found via solution of the Nernst Planck equation -- Abstract: The triode operation of humidified PEM fuel cells has been investigated both with pure H 2 and with CO poisoned H 2 feed over commercial Vulcan supported Pt(30%)-Ru(15%) anodes. It was found that triode operation, which involves the use of a third, auxiliary, electrode, leads to up to 400% power output increase with the same CO poisoned H 2 gas feed. At low current densities, the power increase is accompanied by an increase in overall thermodynamic efficiency. A mathematical model, based on Kirchhoff’s laws, has been developed which is in reasonably good agreement with the experimental results. In order to gain some additional insight into the mechanism of triode operation, the model has been also extended to describe the potential distribution inside the Nafion membrane via the numerical solution of the Nernst-Planck equation. Both model and experiment have shown the critical role of minimizing the auxiliary-anode or auxiliary-cathode resistance, and this has led to improved comb-shaped anode or cathode electrode geometries.

  2. Experimental study and modelling of iron ore reduction by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to find new ways to drastically reduce the CO 2 emissions from the steel industry (ULCOS project), the reduction of iron ore by pure hydrogen in a shaft furnace was investigated. The work consisted of literature, experimental, and modelling studies. The chemical reaction and its kinetics were analysed on the basis of thermogravimetric experiments and physicochemical characterizations of partially reduced samples. A specific kinetic model was designed, which simulates the successive reactions, the different steps of mass transport, and possible iron sintering, at the particle scale. Finally, a 2-dimensional numerical model of a shaft furnace was developed. It depicts the variation of the solid and gas temperatures and compositions throughout the reactor. One original feature of the model is using the law of additive characteristic times for calculating the reaction rates. This allowed us to handle both the particle and the reactor scale, while keeping reasonable calculation time. From the simulation results, the influence of the process parameters was assessed. Optimal operating conditions were concluded, which reveal the efficiency of the hydrogen process. (author)

  3. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-09-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  4. The Non-Human Primate Experimental Glaucoma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the current strengths and weaknesses of the non-human primate (NHP) experimental glaucoma (EG) model through sections devoted to its history, methods, important findings, alternative optic neuropathy models and future directions. NHP EG has become well established for studying human glaucoma in part because the NHP optic nerve head (ONH) shares a close anatomic association with the human ONH and because it provides the only means of systematically studying the very earliest visual system responses to chronic IOP elevation, i.e. the conversion from ocular hypertension to glaucomatous damage. However, NHPs are impractical for studies that require large animal numbers, demonstrate spontaneous glaucoma only rarely, do not currently provide a model of the neuropathy at normal levels of IOP, and cannot easily be genetically manipulated, except through tissue-specific, viral vectors. The goal of this summary is to direct NHP EG and non-NHP EG investigators to the previous, current and future accomplishment of clinically relevant knowledge in this model. PMID:26070984

  5. Autonomous learning derived from experimental modeling of physical laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabec, Igor

    2013-05-01

    This article deals with experimental description of physical laws by probability density function of measured data. The Gaussian mixture model specified by representative data and related probabilities is utilized for this purpose. The information cost function of the model is described in terms of information entropy by the sum of the estimation error and redundancy. A new method is proposed for searching the minimum of the cost function. The number of the resulting prototype data depends on the accuracy of measurement. Their adaptation resembles a self-organized, highly non-linear cooperation between neurons in an artificial NN. A prototype datum corresponds to the memorized content, while the related probability corresponds to the excitability of the neuron. The method does not include any free parameters except objectively determined accuracy of the measurement system and is therefore convenient for autonomous execution. Since representative data are generally less numerous than the measured ones, the method is applicable for a rather general and objective compression of overwhelming experimental data in automatic data-acquisition systems. Such compression is demonstrated on analytically determined random noise and measured traffic flow data. The flow over a day is described by a vector of 24 components. The set of 365 vectors measured over one year is compressed by autonomous learning to just 4 representative vectors and related probabilities. These vectors represent the flow in normal working days and weekends or holidays, while the related probabilities correspond to relative frequencies of these days. This example reveals that autonomous learning yields a new basis for interpretation of representative data and the optimal model structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mass spectrometry analysis of hepcidin peptides in experimental mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Tjalsma

    Full Text Available The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1 and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2 at the peptide level. To this purpose, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics.

  7. Meningitis following spinal anaesthesia in an obstetric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Mine; Kizilkaya, Mehmet; Dostbil, Aysenur; Dogan, Nazim; Parlak, Mehmet; Can, Fatma Kesmez; Bayar, Meral

    2014-07-01

    Meningitis following lumbar puncture and spinal anaesthesia is a rare but serious complication. A 19-year-old woman was administered spinal anaesthesia at another centre prior to a Caesarean section. The following day she experienced headaches. On the fourth day, she started vomiting and having convulsions, and became agitated. Meningitis was diagnosed based on a clinical examination and analysis of a lumbar puncture sample. After 21 days of treatment, she was discharged. Meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with headaches following spinal anaesthesia. The causes of meningitis following spinal anaesthesia are debated, and it is difficult to distinguish between aseptic and bacterial meningitis. It should be compulsory to wear a face mask while performing a dural puncture. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Malignant melanomas of the meninges (MR and CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuknecht, B.; Nadjmi, M.; Mueller, J.

    1990-01-01

    Malignant melanoma of the meninges is a rare neoplasm derived from melanocytes of the cranial or spinal meninges. Histologically classified as grade IV tumours, malignant melanoma may present either as a diffuse meningeal neoplasm, first described by Virchow in 1859, or as a circumscribed tumour attached to the meninges. Although diagnosis is rarely established prior to surgery or autopsy, MR and CT may provide indispensable information probably leading to earlier diagnosis. In 4 patients, diagnosis of a primary meningeal melanoma was based on MR and CT findings and histology. Histology was obtained in 3 cases by surgery, in one patient by autopsy and showed a melanotic and an amelanotic malignant melanoma in 2 patients each. Autopsy was carried out in 3 cases after survival of 4, 5, and 18 months; in a single case, the follow-up period is almost 3 years. (orig.) [de

  9. Retinoic acid from the meninges regulates cortical neuron generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Julie A; Ashique, Amir M; Zarbalis, Konstantinos; Patterson, Katelin P; Hecht, Jonathan H; Kane, Maureen A; Folias, Alexandra E; Choe, Youngshik; May, Scott R; Kume, Tsutomu; Napoli, Joseph L; Peterson, Andrew S; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2009-10-30

    Extrinsic signals controlling generation of neocortical neurons during embryonic life have been difficult to identify. In this study we demonstrate that the dorsal forebrain meninges communicate with the adjacent radial glial endfeet and influence cortical development. We took advantage of Foxc1 mutant mice with defects in forebrain meningeal formation. Foxc1 dosage and loss of meninges correlated with a dramatic reduction in both neuron and intermediate progenitor production and elongation of the neuroepithelium. Several types of experiments demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) is the key component of this secreted activity. In addition, Rdh10- and Raldh2-expressing cells in the dorsal meninges were either reduced or absent in the Foxc1 mutants, and Rdh10 mutants had a cortical phenotype similar to the Foxc1 null mutants. Lastly, in utero RA treatment rescued the cortical phenotype in Foxc1 mutants. These results establish RA as a potent, meningeal-derived cue required for successful corticogenesis.

  10. Intraventricular antibiotics for bacterial meningitis in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin S; Ohlsson, Arne; Shah, Vibhuti S

    2012-07-11

    Neonatal meningitis may be caused by bacteria, especially gram-negative bacteria, which are difficult to eradicate from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using safe doses of antibiotics. In theory, intraventricular administration of antibiotics would produce higher antibiotic concentrations in the CSF than intravenous administration alone, and eliminate the bacteria more quickly. However, ventricular taps may cause harm. To assess the effectiveness and safety of intraventricular antibiotics (with or without intravenous antibiotics) in neonates with meningitis (with or without ventriculitis) as compared to treatment with intravenous antibiotics alone. The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2007; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL and Science Citation Index were searched in June 2007. The Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials was searched in June 2004. Pediatric Research (abstracts of proceedings) were searched (1990 to April 2007) as were reference lists of identified trials and personal files. No language restrictions were applied.This search was updated in May 2011. Selection criteria for study inclusion were: randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials in which intraventricular antibiotics with or without intravenous antibiotics were compared with intravenous antibiotics alone in neonates (antibiotics compared to the group receiving intravenous antibiotics alone (RR 3.43; 95% CI 1.09 to 10.74; RD 0.30; 95% CI 0.08 to 0.53); NNTH 3; 95% CI 2 to 13). Duration of CSF culture positivity did not differ significantly (MD -1.20 days; 95% CI -2.67 to 0.27). In one trial that enrolled infants with gram-negative meningitis and ventriculitis, the use of intraventricular antibiotics in addition to intravenous antibiotics resulted in a three-fold increased RR for mortality compared to standard treatment with intravenous antibiotics alone. Based on this result, intraventricular antibiotics as tested in this trial should be avoided. Further trials comparing these interventions are not justified in

  11. Modelling and Experimental Investigation of an Active Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luís Teixeira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation methodology of the dynamic behavior of an active viscous damper. The damper has two flexible metallic bellows connected to a rigid reservoir filled with fluid. When one of the bellows is connected to a vibrating structure a periodic flow passes through a variable internal orifice and the damping effect is produced. The size of the orifice is adjusted by a controlled linear piezoelectric actuator that positions the conical core into a conical cavity. The device finite element structural model consists of the valve body and its conical core that are assumed rigid and the flexible bellows are represented by two pistons with elastic suspensions. The flow developed inside the damper is modeled considering the fluid-structure interation, using the Lagrangean-Eulerian formulation. To validate the proposed model a prototype was constructed and experimental tests and numerical simulations are accomplished in the time domain, applying harmonic excitations. The results are compared using curves that relate the damping coefficient with the orifice size and with the input velocity applied at the bellows face. However, for the proper control design and system operation, the direct use of the finite element model becomes unviable due to its high computational time. Then, a reduced second order discrete dynamic model for the damper was developed. The model parameters are identified by analysis in the frequency domain, using impulsive excitation force, for constant and variable orifice sizes. At low excitation frequencies, the damper prototype behaves like a single degree of freedom system which damping factor changes with the orifice size A fuzzy controller was designed and it generates the orifice reference size associated to the desired damping factor. The active system presented better performance when compared to the passive one.

  12. Hearing Loss in Cryptococcal Meningitis Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Lofgren, Sarah; Montgomery, Martha; Yueh, Nathan; Namudde, Alice; Rhein, Joshua; Abassi, Mahsa; Musubire, Abdu; Meya, David; Boulware, David

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Hearing loss is a known complication cryptococcal meningitis (CM); however, there is a paucity of data. We aimed to describe hearing loss in CM survivors. Methods We assessed hearing via audiometry 8 and 18 weeks after diagnosis of CM in Kampala, Uganda from 2015-2016. We measured at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 Hz. Normal hearing was defined as minimum hearing level at 25 cm H2O 113 24 (71%) 28 (45%) 0.017 Average Opening Pressure >20 cm H20 96 34 (81%) 43 (61%) 0.025 Quantitative Cultur...

  13. Locations of cerebral infarctions in tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, F.Y.; Chia, L.G.; Shen, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The locations of cerebral infarctions were studied in 14 patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and 173 patients with noninflammatory ischemic stroke (IS). In patients with TBM, 75% of infarctions occurred in the 'TB zone' supplied by medial striate and thalamoperforating arteries; only 11% occurred in the 'IS zone' supplied by lateral striate, anterior choroidal and thalamogeniculate arteries. In patients with IS, 29% of infarctions occurred in the IS zone, 29% in the subcortical white matter, and 24% in (or involving) the cerebral cortex. Only 11% occurred in the TB zone. Bilaterally symmetrical infarctions of the TB zone were common with TBM (71%) but rare with IS (5%). (orig.)

  14. Experimental investigation and mechanistic modelling of dilute bubbly bulk boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutnjak, Josip

    2013-06-27

    During evaporation the geometric shape of the vapour is not described using thermodynamics. In bubbly flows the bubble shape is considered spheric with small diameters and changing into various shapes upon growth. The heat and mass transfer happens at the interfacial area. The forces acting on the bubbles depend on the bubble diameter and shape. In this work the prediction of the bubble diameter and/or bubble number density in bulk boiling was considered outside the vicinity of the heat input area. Thus the boiling effects that happened inside the nearly saturated bulk were under investigation. This situation is relevant for nuclear safety analysis concerning a stagnant coolant in the spent fuel pool. In this research project a new experimental set-up to investigate was built. The experimental set-up consists of an instrumented, partly transparent, high and slender boiling container for visual observation. The direct visual observation of the boiling phenomena is necessary for the identification of basic mechanisms, which should be incorporated in the simulation model. The boiling process has been recorded by means of video images and subsequently was evaluated by digital image processing methods, and by that data concerning the characteristics of the boiling process were generated for the model development and validation. Mechanistic modelling is based on the derivation of relevant mechanisms concluded from observation, which is in line with physical knowledge. In this context two mechanisms were identified; the growth/-shrink mechanism (GSM) of the vapour bubbles and sudden increases of the bubble number density. The GSM was implemented into the CFD-Code ANSYS-CFX using the CFX Expression Language (CEL) by calculation of the internal bubble pressure using the Young-Laplace-Equation. This way a hysteresis is realised as smaller bubbles have an increased internal pressure. The sudden increases of the bubble number density are explainable by liquid super

  15. Experimental investigation and mechanistic modelling of dilute bubbly bulk boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutnjak, Josip

    2013-01-01

    During evaporation the geometric shape of the vapour is not described using thermodynamics. In bubbly flows the bubble shape is considered spheric with small diameters and changing into various shapes upon growth. The heat and mass transfer happens at the interfacial area. The forces acting on the bubbles depend on the bubble diameter and shape. In this work the prediction of the bubble diameter and/or bubble number density in bulk boiling was considered outside the vicinity of the heat input area. Thus the boiling effects that happened inside the nearly saturated bulk were under investigation. This situation is relevant for nuclear safety analysis concerning a stagnant coolant in the spent fuel pool. In this research project a new experimental set-up to investigate was built. The experimental set-up consists of an instrumented, partly transparent, high and slender boiling container for visual observation. The direct visual observation of the boiling phenomena is necessary for the identification of basic mechanisms, which should be incorporated in the simulation model. The boiling process has been recorded by means of video images and subsequently was evaluated by digital image processing methods, and by that data concerning the characteristics of the boiling process were generated for the model development and validation. Mechanistic modelling is based on the derivation of relevant mechanisms concluded from observation, which is in line with physical knowledge. In this context two mechanisms were identified; the growth/-shrink mechanism (GSM) of the vapour bubbles and sudden increases of the bubble number density. The GSM was implemented into the CFD-Code ANSYS-CFX using the CFX Expression Language (CEL) by calculation of the internal bubble pressure using the Young-Laplace-Equation. This way a hysteresis is realised as smaller bubbles have an increased internal pressure. The sudden increases of the bubble number density are explainable by liquid super

  16. Experimental Modeling of the Formation of Saucer-Shaped sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.

    2007-12-01

    Many magma intrusions in sedimentary basins are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features are observed in many places (i.e. South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; Siberia; Argentina). Sand injectites exhibit similar geometries. The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes in sedimentary basins. To understand such processes, we performed experimental modeling of saucer-shaped sill emplacement. The experiments consist of injecting a molten low viscosity vegetable oil (model magma) at a constant flow rate into a fine-grained Coulomb silica flour (model rock). When the oil starts intruding, the initially flat surface of the model inflates and forms a smooth dome. At the end of the experiment, the oil erupts at the edge of the dome. After the experiment, the oil cools and solidifies, the resulting solid intrusion is unburied and exposed, and its upper surface digitalized. For our purpose, we did our experiments without external deformation. We performed two series of experiments with varying depth of injection. The first series consisted of injection into a homogeneous medium. The resulting intrusions were cone-sheets and dykes. The second series consisted of heterogeneous models where the heterogeneity was a weak layer made of a flexible net. The resulting intrusions were made of (1) a horizontal basal sill emplaced along the weakness, and (2) inclined sheets nucleating at the edges of the basal sill and propagating upward and outward. The inclined sheets exhibited a convex shape, i.e. a decreasing slope outward. In addition, the deeper the sills emplaced, the larger they were. Our experimental results are consistent with saucer-shaped features in nature. We infer from our results that the transition between the basal sills and the inclined sheets results from a transition of emplacement processes. We suggest that the basal sill emplace by open (mode I) fracturing, whereas

  17. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  18. [Intestinal lengthening techniques: an experimental model in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibay González, Francisco; Díaz Martínez, Daniel Alberto; Valencia Flores, Alejandro; González Hernández, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-01

    To compare two intestinal lengthening procedures in an experimental dog model. Intestinal lengthening is one of the methods for gastrointestinal reconstruction used for treatment of short bowel syndrome. The modification to the Bianchi's technique is an alternative. The modified technique decreases the number of anastomoses to a single one, thus reducing the risk of leaks and strictures. To our knowledge there is not any clinical or experimental report that studied both techniques, so we realized the present report. Twelve creole dogs were operated with the Bianchi technique for intestinal lengthening (group A) and other 12 creole dogs from the same race and weight were operated by the modified technique (Group B). Both groups were compared in relation to operating time, difficulties in technique, cost, intestinal lengthening and anastomoses diameter. There were no statistical difference in the anastomoses diameter (A = 9.0 mm vs. B = 8.5 mm, p = 0.3846). Operating time (142 min vs. 63 min) cost and technique difficulties were lower in group B (p anastomoses (of Group B) and intestinal segments had good blood supply and were patent along their full length. Bianchi technique and the modified technique offer two good reliable alternatives for the treatment of short bowel syndrome. The modified technique improved operating time, cost and technical issues.

  19. Tesla Coil Theoretical Model and its Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voitkans Janis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a theoretical model of Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wire form, where the line voltage is measured across electrically neutral space. By applying the principle of equivalence of single-wire and two-wire schemes an equivalent two-wire scheme can be found for a single-wire scheme and the already known long line theory can be applied to the Tesla coil. A new method of multiple reflections is developed to characterize a signal in a long line. Formulas for calculation of voltage in Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance frequencies are proposed. The theoretical calculations are verified experimentally. Resonance frequencies of Tesla coil are measured and voltage standing wave characteristics are obtained for different output capacities in the single-wire mode. Wave resistance and phase coefficient of Tesla coil is obtained. Experimental measurements show good compliance with the proposed theory. The formulas obtained in this paper are also usable for a regular two-wire long line with distributed parameters.

  20. An experimental model for the surgical correction of tracheomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, A R; Burnett, C; DiMaio, T; Jaffe, B M

    1991-10-01

    Tracheomalacia may result from large intrathoracic goiters. Due to the chronic compression, particularly within the confines of the thoracic inlet, the tracheal wall weakens, with disintegration of some of the cartilaginous rings. Tracheomalacia can cause acute airway distress, particularly during the post-operative period, and may occasionally result in death. The other major cause of tracheomalacia is related to either prolonged endotracheal intubation or over-inflation of the tracheostomy cuff. While various techniques such as internal stenting, external support devices, tracheostomy, and tracheal resection have been used based on individual circumstances, no one method appears to be perfect. To further study this difficult problem, an experimental model of tracheomalacia was created in eight dogs. Six to seven rings of the tracheal cartilages were dissected submucosally. More than half of the circumference of the tracheal rings was resected. The tracheal walls were reconstructed with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. The grafts strengthened the tracheal wall without causing luminal constriction. Tracheostomy was not performed on any of the dogs. All dogs tolerated the procedure well and were extubated at the conclusion of the experiment. The dogs were followed for 4 to 6 months and then sacrificed so that the tracheal wall could be examined histologically. There was considerable fibrosis leading to stiff neotrachea. The results of this experimental technique for prosthetic reconstruction to counteract problems simulating tracheomalacia are very encouraging.