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Sample records for experimental meningitis models

  1. Noninvasive Monitoring of Pneumococcal Meningitis and Evaluation of Treatment Efficacy in an Experimental Mouse Model*

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    Jagath L. Kadurugamuwa

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive real-time in vivo bioluminescent imaging was used to assess the spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae throughout the spinal cord and brain during the acute stages of bacterial meningitis. A mouse model was established by lumbar (LP or intracisternal (IC injection of bioluminescent S. pneumoniae into the subarachnoid space. Bacteria replicated initially at the site of inoculation and spread progressively from the spinal cord to the brain or from the brain down to the cervical part of the spinal column and to the lower vertebral levels. After 24 hr, animals showed strong bioluminescent signals throughout the spinal canal, indicating acute meningitis of the intracranial and intraspinal meninges. A decline in bacterial cell viability, as judged by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal, was observed over time in animals treated with ceftriaxone, but not in untreated groups. Mice treated with the antibiotic survived infection, whereas all mice in untreated groups became moribund, first in the IC group then in the LP group. No untreated animal survived beyond 48 hr after induction of infection. Colony counts of infected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF correlated positively with bioluminescent signals. This methodology is especially appealing because it allows detecting infected mice as early as 3 hr after inoculation, provide temporal, sequential, and spatial distribution of bacteria within the brain and spinal cord throughout the entire disease process and the rapid monitoring of treatment efficacy in a nondestructive manner. Moreover, it avoids the need to sacrifice the animals for CSF sampling and the potential manipulative damage that can occur with other conventional methods.

  2. Method for inducing experimental pneumococcal meningitis in outbred mice

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    Cintorino Marcella

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with the highest mortality among bacterial meningitis and it may also lead to neurological sequelae despite the use of antibiotic therapy. Experimental animal models of pneumococcal meningitis are important to study the pathogenesis of meningitis, the host immune response induced after infection, and the efficacy of novel drugs and vaccines. Results In the present work, we describe in detail a simple, reproducible and efficient method to induce pneumococcal meningitis in outbred mice by using the intracranial subarachnoidal route of infection. Bacteria were injected into the subarachnoid space through a soft point located 3.5 mm rostral from the bregma. The model was tested with several doses of pneumococci of three capsular serotypes (2, 3 and 4, and mice survival was recorded. Lethal doses killing 50 % of animals infected with type 2, 3 and 4 S. pneumoniae were 3.2 × 10, 2.9 × 10 and 1.9 × 102 colony forming units, respectively. Characterisation of the disease caused by the type 4 strain showed that in moribund mice systemic dissemination of pneumococci to blood and spleen occurred. Histological analysis of the brain of animals infected with type 4 S. pneumoniae proved the induction of meningitis closely resembling the disease in humans. Conclusions The proposed method for inducing pneumococcal meningitis in outbred mice is easy-to-perform, fast, cost-effective, and reproducible, irrespective of the serotype of pneumococci used.

  3. Intrathecal application of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP reduced mortality and neuroinflammation in an experimental model of pneumococcal meningitis.

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    Dörr, Arndt; Kress, Eugenia; Podschun, Rainer; Pufe, Thomas; Tauber, Simone C; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2015-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AP) are important components of the innate immune system. Our previous work revealed a higher mortality rate and up-regulation of proinflammatory gene expression as well as glial cell activation in cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP)-deficient mice after bacterial meningitis. However, the influence of CRAMP application on the progression of inflammation and its impact on mortality after bacterial meningitis remains unknown. To assess the effects of continuous CRAMP exposure in the brain, C57BL/6 wildtype mice were given intracerebroventricular infusion of CRAMP to investigate the effects on mortality, glial cell activation and inflammation in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis using immunohistochemistry and realtime RT-PCR. Our results revealed a decrease of mortality after CRAMP infusion. The intrathecal CRAMP infusion after pneumococcal meningitis resulted in a decreased mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas the immune responses including the expression of pattern recognition receptors and chemokines were increased in bacterial meningitis. Taken together, the results support the important role of CRAMP as part of the innate immune response against pathogens in bacterial CNS infections. The APs may be a promising approach for the development of an adjuvant therapy for bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with people who have meningococcal meningitis should receive antibiotics to prevent becoming infected. Alternative Names Meningitis - bacterial; Meningitis - viral; Meningitis - fungal; Meningitis - ...

  5. Bacteremia causes hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

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    Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Leib, S.L.; Rowland, Ian J

    2010-01-01

    by antibody treatment resulted in significantly reduced apoptosis (0.08 (0.02-0.20), P=0.01) as compared to meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that bacteremia accompanying meningitis plays an important role in the development of hippocampal injury in pneumococcal meningitis.......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bacteremia and systemic complications both play important roles in brain pathophysiological alterations and the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. Their individual contributions to the development of brain damage, however, still remain to be defined. METHODS: Using an adult...... rat pneumococcal meningitis model, the impact of bacteremia accompanying meningitis on the development of hippocampal injury was studied. The study comprised of the three groups: I. Meningitis (n=11), II. meningitis with attenuated bacteremia resulting from iv injection of serotype...

  6. Gemifloxacin Is Effective in Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis

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    Smirnov, A.; Wellmer, A.; Gerber, J.; Maier, K.; Henne, S.; Nau, R.

    2000-01-01

    In a rabbit model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis, 5 mg of gemifloxacin mesylate (SB-265805) per kg/h reduced the bacterial titers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) almost as rapidly as 10 mg of ceftriaxone per kg/h (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± standard deviation [SD], −0.25 ± 0.09 versus −0.38 ± 0.11; serum and CSF concentrations of gemifloxacin were 2.1 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.59 ± 0.38 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h). Coadministration of 1 mg of dexamethasone per kg did not affect gemifloxacin serum and CSF levels (2.7 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.75 ± 0.34 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h) or activity (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± SD, −0.26 ± 0.11). PMID:10681354

  7. Experimental bacterial meningitis in rabbit; evaluation with CT and MRI

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    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chu, Sung Nam; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in experimental bacterial meningitis. CT and MR images of experimental bacterial meningitis were obtained after inoculation of 1ml suspension of 10-6/ml Staphylococcus aureus directly into the supratentorial arachnoid space of 18 New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal was studied with both pre-enhanced and post-enhanced CT and MRI at 12, 24, 48 hours and 1 week. Cerebrospinal fluid of all of 18 rabbits were sampled and cultured for bacterial growth. All of 18 rabbits had the clinical symptoms such as neck stiffness and anorexia within 24 hours after the inoculation. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus growth. Gd-enhanced MRI exhibited diffuse enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement ratio(CER) at supratentorial meninges increased to 1.93 at 12 hours and 2.99 at 24 hours from 1.06 at 0 hour. Histologic evaluation demonstrated inflammatory cell infiltration into the meninges. MRI also identified the complications of meningitis such as ependymitis and hydrocephalus more effectively than CT. These results indicated that Fd-enhanced MRI detectred earlier the abnormal findingfs of bacterial meningitis and evaluated more effectively the complications of meningitis compared with CT. MRI was more useful than CT in evaluation of the bacterial meningitis.

  8. Systemic steroid reduces long-term hearing loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

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    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a common complication of pneumococcal meningitis. Treatment with corticosteroids reduces inflammatory response and may thereby reduce hearing loss. However, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the effect of corticosteroids on hearing loss have...... generated conflicting results. The objective of the present study was to determine whether systemic steroid treatment had an effect on hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis....

  9. Environmental enrichment restores cognitive deficits induced by experimental childhood meningitis

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    Tatiana Barichello

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the influence of environmental enrichment (EE on memory, cytokines, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the brain of adult rats subjected to experimental pneumococcal meningitis during infancy. Methods: On postnatal day 11, the animals received either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF or Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension intracisternally at 1 × 106 CFU/mL and remained with their mothers until age 21 days. Animals were divided into the following groups: control, control + EE, meningitis, and meningitis + EE. EE began at 21 days and continued until 60 days of age (adulthood. EE consisted of a large cage with three floors, ramps, running wheels, and objects of different shapes and textures. At 60 days, animals were randomized and subjected to habituation to the open-field task and the step-down inhibitory avoidance task. After the tasks, the hippocampus and CSF were isolated for analysis. Results: The meningitis group showed no difference in performance between training and test sessions of the open-field task, suggesting habituation memory impairment; in the meningitis + EE group, performance was significantly different, showing preservation of habituation memory. In the step-down inhibitory avoidance task, there were no differences in behavior between training and test sessions in the meningitis group, showing aversive memory impairment; conversely, differences were observed in the meningitis + EE group, demonstrating aversive memory preservation. In the two meningitis groups, IL-4, IL-10, and BDNF levels were increased in the hippocampus, and BDNF levels in the CSF. Conclusions: The data presented suggest that EE, a non-invasive therapy, enables recovery from memory deficits caused by neonatal meningitis.

  10. Impact of bacteremia on the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal meningitis

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    Brandt, Christian; Peters, David Alberg; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2008-01-01

    Background. Bacteremia plays a major role in the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. This experimental study investigated how bacteremia influences the pathophysiologic profile of the brain. Methods. Rats with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis were randomized to 1 of 3 groups of infected study...... rats: (1) rats with attenuated bacteremia resulting from intravenous injection of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody, (2) rats with early-onset bacteremia resulting from concomitant intravenous infection, or (3) a meningitis control group. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, ventricle size......, brain water distribution, and brain pathologic findings were analyzed using magnetic resonance morphological and functional imaging. Laboratory data and clinical disease scores were obtained. Results. Attenuation of the bacteremic component of pneumococcal meningitis improved clinical disease symptoms...

  11. Characterization of a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model

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    Mook-Kanamori Barry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. pneumoniae is the most common causative agent of meningitis, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to develop an integrated and representative pneumococcal meningitis mouse model resembling the human situation. Methods Adult mice (C57BL/6 were inoculated in the cisterna magna with increasing doses of S. pneumoniae serotype 3 colony forming units (CFU; n = 24, 104, 105, 106 and 107 CFU and survival studies were performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, brain, blood, spleen, and lungs were collected. Subsequently, mice were inoculated with 104 CFU S. pneumoniae serotype 3 and sacrificed at 6 (n = 6 and 30 hours (n = 6. Outcome parameters were bacterial outgrowth, clinical score, and cytokine and chemokine levels (using Luminex® in CSF, blood and brain. Meningeal inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, parenchymal and subarachnoidal hemorrhages, microglial activation and hippocampal apoptosis were assessed in histopathological studies. Results Lower doses of bacteria delayed onset of illness and time of death (median survival CFU 104, 56 hrs; 105, 38 hrs, 106, 28 hrs. 107, 24 hrs. Bacterial titers in brain and CSF were similar in all mice at the end-stage of disease independent of inoculation dose, though bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment was less at lower inoculation doses. At 30 hours after inoculation with 104 CFU of S. pneumoniae, blood levels of KC, IL6, MIP-2 and IFN- γ were elevated, as were brain homogenate levels of KC, MIP-2, IL-6, IL-1β and RANTES. Brain histology uniformly showed meningeal inflammation at 6 hours, and, neutrophil infiltration, microglial activation, and hippocampal apoptosis at 30 hours. Parenchymal and subarachnoidal and cortical hemorrhages were seen in 5 of 6 and 3 of 6 mice at 6 and 30 hours, respectively. Conclusion We have developed and validated a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis.

  12. Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also prescribe corticosteroids to protect a person from hearing loss as a result of bacterial meningitis. If there are problems caused by the infection, the doctor will need to treat those problems, too. Sometimes people can have permanent ...

  13. Intratympanic steroid prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis: Intratympanic steroid treatment prevents hearing loss and cochlear damage in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. Background: Sensorineural hearing loss is a long-term complication of meningitis affecting up to a third of survivors. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the bacterial species...... treatment prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. This finding is clinically relevant in relation to postmeningitic hearing rehabilitation by cochlear implantation. However, the drug instillation in the middle ear induced local fibrosis and a concurrent low...... most often associated with a hearing loss. Methods: Rats were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups: a group treated with intratympanic betamethasone and 2 control groups treated with either intratympanic or systemic saline. Treatment was initiated 21 hours after infection and repeated once a day...

  14. Meningitis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-24

    This podcast gives a general overview of meningitis, including what it is, the five types, and the causes.  Created: 10/24/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/24/2012.

  15. Murine model of TB meningitis

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    Umesh Datta Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated the design of a novel murine model of CNS-TB using a C3 strain and that replicated events of EPTB dissemination. This model will promote efforts to understand the pathogenesis CNS-TB infection for development of improved therapeutic interventions in the future.

  16. Increase in hippocampal water diffusion and volume during experimental pneumococcal meningitis is aggravated by bacteremia

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    Holler, Jon G; Brandt, Christian T; Leib, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    pneumococci. The study comprised of four experimental groups. I. Uninfected controls (n = 8); II. Meningitis (n = 11); III. Meningitis with early onset bacteremia by additional i.v. injection of live pneumococci (n = 10); IV. Meningitis with attenuated bacteremia by treatment with serotype-specific anti......BACKGROUND: The hippocampus undergoes apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis leading to neurofunctional deficits in learning and memory function. The aim of the present study was 1) to investigate hippocampal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and volume with MRI during the course...... of experimental pneumococcal meningitis, 2) to explore the influence of accompanying bacteremia on hippocampal water distribution and volume, 3) and to correlate these findings to the extent of apoptosis in the hippocampus. METHODS: Experimental meningitis in rats was induced by intracisternal injection of live...

  17. Pneumococcal meningitis: development of a new animal model.

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    Wei, Benjamin P C; Shepherd, Robert K; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Clark, Graeme M; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2006-09-01

    The rat is a suitable animal to establish a model for the study of pneumococcal meningitis postcochlear implantation. There has been an increase in the number of cases of cochlear implant-related meningitis. The most common organism identified was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis in healthy subjects without other risk factors remains to be determined. Previous animal studies do not focus on the pathogenesis and risk of pneumococcal meningitis postimplantation and are based on relatively small animal numbers, making it difficult to assess the cause-and-effect relationship. There is, therefore, a need to develop a new animal model allowing direct examination of the pathogenesis of meningitis in the presence of a cochlear implant. Eighteen nonimplanted rats were infected with 1 x 10 and 1 x 10 colony-forming units (CFU) of a clinical isolate of S. pneumoniae via three different inoculation routes (middle ear, inner ear, and i.p.) to examine for evidence of meningitis during 24 hours. Six implanted rats were infected with the highest amount of bacteria possible for each route of inoculation (4 x 10 CFU i.p., 3 x 10 CFU middle ear, and 1 x 10 CFU inner ear) to examine for evidence of meningitis with the presence of an implant. The histological pattern of cochlear infections for each of the three different inoculating routes were examined. Pneumococcal meningitis was evident in all 6 implanted animals for each of the three different routes of inoculation. Once in the inner ear, bacteria were found to enter the central nervous system via either the cochlear aqueduct or canaliculi perforantes of the osseous spiral lamina, reaching the perineural and perivascular space then the internal acoustic meatus. The rate, extent, and pattern of infection within the cochleae depended on the route of inoculation. Finally, there was no evidence of pneumococcal meningitis observed in 18 nonimplanted rats inoculated at

  18. Moxifloxacin in experimental Streptococcus pneumoniae cerebritis and meningitis.

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    Djukic, Marija; Böttcher, Tobias; Wellmer, Andreas; Gerber, Joachim; Brocke, Viola V; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Rifampin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, reduced mortality in a mouse model of meningitis compared to bacteriolytic cephalosporin standard therapy. To assess whether moxifloxacin (known to cause a less rapid bacteriolysis than cephalosporins) can similarly reduce mortality, mice infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae by deep intracerebral injection were treated subcutaneously with either 200 mg/kg of moxifloxacin or ceftriaxone every 8 hours for 5 days (n = 49 each). They were then observed for an additional 8 days. Overall mortalities were 35 and 29 in moxifloxacin- and ceftriaxone-treated mice, respectively (p = 0.29). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis also revealed no statistically significant differences (p = 0.32). Moxifloxacin failed to reduce mortality compared to cephalosporin standard therapy.

  19. Spatial memory and learning deficits after experimental pneumococcal meningitis in mice.

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    Wellmer, A; Noeske, C; Gerber, J; Munzel, U; Nau, R

    2000-12-22

    Survivors of bacterial meningitis frequently suffer from long-term sequelae, particularly from learning and memory deficits. For this reason, spatial memory and learning was studied in a mouse model of ceftriaxone-treated Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis. Persistent deficits of spatial learning despite normal motor function were observed in mice infected with 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU) in 25 microl of saline into the right forebrain in comparison to mice treated with an equal amount of saline. Survivors of meningitis performed significantly worse in memorizing a hidden platform in a Morris water maze. After 2 weeks, the difference between post-meningitis and control mice diminished. Yet, when the platform was moved after 180 days, learning of the new location was still strongly impaired in mice surviving meningitis.

  20. Effects of EDP-420 on penicillin-resistant and quinolone- and penicillin-resistant pneumococci in the rabbit meningitis model.

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    Stucki, Armin; Gerber, Peter; Acosta, Fernando; Cottagnoud, Marianne; Cottagnoud, Philippe; Jiang, Lijiang; Nguyen, Phong; Wachtel, Derek; Wang, Guoqiang; Phan, Ly T

    2008-03-01

    To test the efficacy of EDP-420, a new ketolide, in experimental pneumococcal meningitis and to determine its penetration into the CSF. The experimental rabbit model was used in this study and EDP-420 was tested against a penicillin-resistant and a penicillin- and quinolone-resistant mutant. EDP-420 was also tested against both strains in time-killing assays over 8 h in vitro. In experimental meningitis, EDP-420 produced a bactericidal activity comparable to the standard regimen based on a combination of vancomycin with ceftriaxone against a penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and a penicillin- and quinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae isolate. The penetration of EDP-420 into inflamed meninges was 38% after an i.v. injection of 10 mg/kg. The bactericidal activity of EDP-420 was also confirmed in in vitro time-killing assays. EDP-420 is an efficacious alternative treatment in pneumococcal meningitis, especially when resistant strains are suspected.

  1. The mood-stabilizer lithium prevents hippocampal apoptosis and improves spatial memory in experimental meningitis.

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    Fabian D Liechti

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Brain damage caused by this disease is characterized by apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, a morphological correlate of learning deficits in experimental paradigms. The mood stabilizer lithium has previously been found to attenuate brain damage in ischemic and inflammatory diseases of the brain. An infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis was used to investigate the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative potential of lithium. To assess an effect on the acute disease, LiCl was administered starting five days prior to intracisternal infection with live Streptococcus pneumoniae. Clinical parameters were recorded, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was sampled, and the animals were sacrificed 42 hours after infection to harvest the brain and serum. Cryosections of the brains were stained for Nissl substance to quantify brain injury. Hippocampal gene expression of Bcl-2, Bax, p53, and BDNF was analyzed. Lithium concentrations were measured in serum and CSF. The effect of chronic lithium treatment on spatial memory function and cell survival in the dentate gyrus was evaluated in a Morris water maze and by quantification of BrdU incorporation after LiCl treatment during 3 weeks following infection. In the hippocampus, LiCl significantly reduced apoptosis and gene expression of Bax and p53 while it increased expression of Bcl-2. IL-10, MCP-1, and TNF were significantly increased in animals treated with LiCl compared to NaCl. Chronic LiCl treatment improved spatial memory in infected animals. The mood stabilizer lithium may thus be a therapeutic alternative to attenuate neurofunctional deficits as a result of pneumococcal meningitis.

  2. Routes, dynamics, and correlates of cochlear inflammation in terminal and recovering experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Worsøe, Lise; Brandt, Christian Thomas

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To examine the routes, dynamics and correlates of cochlear inflammation in meningitis to provide information on the pathogenesis of the associated hearing loss and indications for rational pharmacotherapeutical intervention. STUDY DESIGN: A well-established rat model of Str....... The spiral ganglion is infiltrated through the osseous spiral lamina. The degree of inflammation correlates positively with time of death in untreated meningitis, whereas antibiotic treatment leads to subsiding infiltration during recovery.......OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To examine the routes, dynamics and correlates of cochlear inflammation in meningitis to provide information on the pathogenesis of the associated hearing loss and indications for rational pharmacotherapeutical intervention. STUDY DESIGN: A well-established rat model...... of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was employed. METHODS: Eight rats were inoculated intrathecally and not treated, whereas 26 were inoculated and treated with ceftriaxone. Six rats were sham-inoculated, making a total of 40 rats. The rats were sacrificed when reaching terminal illness or after 7 days...

  3. Hearing loss and cochlear damage in experimental pneumococcal meningitis, with special reference to the role of neutrophil granulytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, CT; Caye-Thomsen, P; Lund, SP

    2006-01-01

    of an augmented neutrophil response on the development of hearing loss and cochlear damage in a model of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rats. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and histopathology in rats...... infection. Pretreatment with G-CSF increased hearing loss 24 h after infection and on day 8 compared to untreated rats (Mann-Whitney, P = 0.012 and P = 0.013 respectively). The increased sensorineural hearing loss at day 8 was associated with significantly decreased spiral ganglion cell counts (P = 0...... pathology compared to controls. In conclusion, the inflammatory host reaction contributes significantly to the development of hearing loss in experimental meningitis....

  4. Genome-wide identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae genes essential for bacterial replication during experimental meningitis

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    Molzen, T E; Burghout, P; Bootsma, H J

    2010-01-01

    Meningitis is the most serious of invasive infections caused by the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Vaccines protect only against a limited number of serotypes, and evolving bacterial resistance to antimicrobials impedes treatment. Further insight into the molecular pathogenesis...... of invasive pneumococcal disease is required in order to enable the development of new or adjunctive treatments and/or pneumococcal vaccines that are efficient across serotypes. We applied genomic array footprinting (GAF) in the search for S. pneumoniae genes that are essential during experimental meningitis...... genes mutants of which had become attenuated or enriched, respectively, during infection. The results point to essential roles for capsular polysaccharides, nutrient uptake, and amino acid biosynthesis in bacterial replication during experimental meningitis. The GAF phenotype of a subset of identified...

  5. In vivo study of experimental pneumococcal meningitis using magnetic resonance imaging

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    Brandt, C.T.; Simonsen, H.; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2008-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods were evaluated as a tool for the study of experimental meningitis. The identification and characterisation of pathophysiological parameters that vary during the course of the disease could be used as markers for future studies of new treatment......-vivo with MRI. Increasing BBB-breakdown and ventricle size was observed in rats with meningitis whereas changes in brain water distribution were heterogeneous. MRI will be a valuable technique for future studies aiming at evaluating or optimizing adjunctive treatments. © 2008 Brandt et al; licensee Bio......-rat variation as the disease progressed, but without overall differences compared to uninfected rats (P > 0.05). Areas of well-'perfused' muscle decreased with the progression of infection indicative of septicaemia (P = 0.05). Conclusion: The evolution of bacterial meningitis was successfully followed in...

  6. Hearing loss and cochlear damage in experimental pneumococcal meningitis, with special reference to the role of neutrophil granulytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, CT; Caye-Thomsen, P; Lund, SP

    2006-01-01

    Hearing loss is a well-known sequelae from meningitis, affecting up to 25% of survivors. However, the principal components of the infectious and inflammatory reaction responsible for the sensorineural hearing loss remain to be identified. The present study aimed to investigate the impact...... of an augmented neutrophil response on the development of hearing loss and cochlear damage in a model of experimental pneumococcal meningitis in rats. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAE), auditory brainstem response (ABR) and histopathology in rats...... infection. Pretreatment with G-CSF increased hearing loss 24 h after infection and on day 8 compared to untreated rats (Mann-Whitney, P = 0.012 and P = 0.013 respectively). The increased sensorineural hearing loss at day 8 was associated with significantly decreased spiral ganglion cell counts (P = 0...

  7. Microglia activation in a pediatric rabbit model of tuberculous meningitis

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    Elizabeth W. Tucker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS tuberculosis (TB is the most severe form of extra-pulmonary TB and disproportionately affects young children where the developing brain has a unique host response. New Zealand white rabbits were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis via subarachnoid inoculation at postnatal day 4-8 and evaluated until 4-6 weeks post-infection. Control and infected rabbit kits were assessed for the development of neurological deficits, bacterial burden, and postmortem microbiologic and pathologic changes. The presence of meningitis and tuberculomas was demonstrated histologically and by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The extent of microglial activation was quantified by in vitro immunohistochemistry as well as non-invasive in vivo imaging of activated microglia/macrophages with positron emission tomography (PET. Subarachnoid infection induced characteristic leptomeningeal and perivascular inflammation and TB lesions with central necrosis, a cellular rim and numerous bacilli on pathologic examination. Meningeal and rim enhancement was visible on MRI. An intense microglial activation was noted in M. tuberculosis-infected animals in the white matter and around the TB lesions, as evidenced by a significant increase in uptake of the tracer 124I-DPA-713, which is specific for activated microglia/macrophages, and confirmed by quantification of Iba-1 immunohistochemistry. Neurobehavioral analyses demonstrated signs similar to those noted in children with delayed maturation and development of neurological deficits resulting in significantly worse composite behavior scores in M. tuberculosis-infected animals. We have established a rabbit model that mimics features of TB meningitis in young children. This model could provide a platform for evaluating novel therapies, including host-directed therapies, against TB meningitis relevant to a young child's developing brain.

  8. Microglia activation in a pediatric rabbit model of tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Elizabeth W; Pokkali, Supriya; Zhang, Zhi; DeMarco, Vincent P; Klunk, Mariah; Smith, Elizabeth S; Ordonez, Alvaro A; Penet, Marie-France; Bhujwalla, Zaver; Jain, Sanjay K; Kannan, Sujatha

    2016-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis (TB) is the most severe form of extra-pulmonary TB and disproportionately affects young children where the developing brain has a unique host response. New Zealand white rabbits were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis via subarachnoid inoculation at postnatal day 4-8 and evaluated until 4-6 weeks post-infection. Control and infected rabbit kits were assessed for the development of neurological deficits, bacterial burden, and postmortem microbiologic and pathologic changes. The presence of meningitis and tuberculomas was demonstrated histologically and by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The extent of microglial activation was quantified by in vitro immunohistochemistry as well as non-invasive in vivo imaging of activated microglia/macrophages with positron emission tomography (PET). Subarachnoid infection induced characteristic leptomeningeal and perivascular inflammation and TB lesions with central necrosis, a cellular rim and numerous bacilli on pathologic examination. Meningeal and rim enhancement was visible on MRI. An intense microglial activation was noted in M. tuberculosis-infected animals in the white matter and around the TB lesions, as evidenced by a significant increase in uptake of the tracer (124)I-DPA-713, which is specific for activated microglia/macrophages, and confirmed by quantification of Iba-1 immunohistochemistry. Neurobehavioral analyses demonstrated signs similar to those noted in children with delayed maturation and development of neurological deficits resulting in significantly worse composite behavior scores in M. tuberculosis-infected animals. We have established a rabbit model that mimics features of TB meningitis in young children. This model could provide a platform for evaluating novel therapies, including host-directed therapies, against TB meningitis relevant to a young child's developing brain. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of anti-pneumococcal capsular antibodies as adjunctive therapy in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

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    Brandt, Christian; Frimodt-Moller, N; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bacteraemia concomitant with meningitis has been shown to greatly affect outcome. Consequently, the efficacy of serotype-specific anti-pneumococcal antiserum (APAS) was investigated in a rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. METHODS: Rats were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae...... serotype 3. All rats received ceftriaxone starting 26 h post-infection. APAS was administered either at the time of infection or 26 h post-infection and effects were compared with rats treated with antibiotics only. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A significant clinical benefit was found when APAS was given...... at the time of infection whereas no effect was found when administered 26 h after infection. This work indicates that the clinical value of using APAS in pneumococcal meningitis may be limited...

  10. Adjuvant treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves outcome of experimental pneumococcal meningitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasanmoentalib, E Soemirien; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Morgan, B Paul; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-08-15

    We compared adjunctive treatment with placebo, dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, and the combination of dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. In this prospective, investigator-blinded, randomized trial, 96 mice were infected intracisternally with 10(7) CFU/ml Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, treated with intraperitoneal ceftriaxone at 20 h, and randomly assigned to intraperitoneal adjunctive treatment with placebo (saline), dexamethasone, anti-C5 antibodies, or dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies. The primary outcome was survival during a 72-h observational period that was analyzed with the log-rank test. Secondary outcome was clinical severity, scored on a validated scale using a linear mixed model. Mortality rates were 16 of 16 mice (100%) in the placebo group, 12 of 15 mice (80%) in the dexamethasone group, 25 of 31 mice (80%) in the anti-C5 antibody group, and 18 of 30 mice (60%) in the dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibody group (Fisher's exact test for overall difference, P = .012). Mortality of mice treated with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies was lower compared to the anti-C5 antibody-treated mice (log-rank P = .039) and dexamethasone-treated mice (log-rank P = .040). Clinical severity scores for the dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibody-treated mice increased more slowly (0.199 points/h) as compared to the anti-C5 antibody-treated mice (0.243 points/h, P = .009) and dexamethasone-treated mice (0.249 points/h, P = .012). Modeling of severity data suggested an additive effect of dexamethasone and anti-C5 antibodies. Adjunctive treatment with dexamethasone plus anti-C5 antibodies improves survival in severe experimental meningitis caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 3, posing an important new treatment strategy for patients with pneumococcal meningitis.

  11. Modeling tuberculous meningitis in zebrafish using Mycobacterium marinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisanne M. van Leeuwen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is one of the most severe extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis, with a high morbidity and mortality. Characteristic pathological features of TBM are Rich foci, i.e. brain- and spinal-cord-specific granulomas formed after hematogenous spread of pulmonary tuberculosis. Little is known about the early pathogenesis of TBM and the role of Rich foci. We have adapted the zebrafish model of Mycobacterium marinum infection (zebrafish–M. marinum model to study TBM. First, we analyzed whether TBM occurs in adult zebrafish and showed that intraperitoneal infection resulted in granuloma formation in the meninges in 20% of the cases, with occasional brain parenchyma involvement. In zebrafish embryos, bacterial infiltration and clustering of infected phagocytes was observed after infection at three different inoculation sites: parenchyma, hindbrain ventricle and caudal vein. Infection via the bloodstream resulted in the formation of early granulomas in brain tissue in 70% of the cases. In these zebrafish embryos, infiltrates were located in the proximity of blood vessels. Interestingly, no differences were observed when embryos were infected before or after early formation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, indicating that bacteria are able to cross this barrier with relatively high efficiency. In agreement with this observation, infected zebrafish larvae also showed infiltration of the brain tissue. Upon infection of embryos with an M. marinum ESX-1 mutant, only small clusters and scattered isolated phagocytes with high bacterial loads were present in the brain tissue. In conclusion, our adapted zebrafish–M. marinum infection model for studying granuloma formation in the brain will allow for the detailed analysis of both bacterial and host factors involved in TBM. It will help solve longstanding questions on the role of Rich foci and potentially contribute to the development of better diagnostic tools and therapeutics.

  12. Sodium Butyrate Prevents Memory Impairment by Re-establishing BDNF and GDNF Expression in Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Faller, Cristiano Julio; Ceretta, Renan A; Petronilho, Fabricia; Lopes-Borges, Jéssica; Valvassori, Samira S; Quevedo, João

    2015-08-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a serious infection of the central nervous system (CNS) with high fatality rates that causes reduced psychomotor performance, slight mental slowness, impairments in attention executive functions and learning and memory deficiencies. Previously, we demonstrated a correlation between memory impairment and decreased levels of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampi of rats subjected to pneumococcal meningitis. Emerging evidence demonstrates that histone acetylation regulates neurotrophins; therefore, a potential molecular intervention against cognitive impairment in bacterial meningitis may be the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, sodium butyrate, which stimulates the acetylation of histones and increases BDNF expression. In this study, animals received either artificial cerebrospinal fluid as a placebo or a Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at a concentration of 5 × 10(9) colony-forming units (CFU/mL). The animals received antibiotic treatment as usual and received saline or sodium butyrate as an adjuvant treatment. Ten days after, meningitis was induced; the animals were subjected to open-field habituation and the step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Immediately after these behavioural tasks, the animals were killed, and their hippocampi were removed to evaluate the expression of BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In the meningitis group that received saline, the animals presented memory impairment in both behavioural tasks, and hippocampal BDNF and GDNF expression was decreased. Sodium butyrate was able to prevent memory impairment and re-establish hippocampal neurotrophin expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

  13. Effect of dexamethasone on the efficacy of daptomycin in the therapy of experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, M; Force, E; Tubau, F; El Haj, C; Ariza, J; Cabellos, C

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of dexamethasone in combination with low-dose or high-dose daptomycin for the treatment of penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant pneumococcal meningitis. Efficacy (ΔCFU/mL) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of daptomycin at 15mg/kg and 25mg/kg were studied in a rabbit model of pneumococcal meningitis, comparing them with the same doses in combination with dexamethasone at 0.125mg/kg every 12h over a 26-h period against two different Streptococcus pneumoniae strains, HUB 2349 and ATCC 51916 with daptomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 0.09mg/L and 0.19mg/L, respectively. Daptomycin levels in CSF were lower when dexamethasone was given concurrently. Against strain HUB 2349, therapeutic failure occurred with daptomycin 15mg/kg+dexamethasone; daptomycin 25mg/kg+dexamethasone was better at reducing bacterial counts than the lower dose throughout treatment. Against the highly cephalosporin-resistant ATCC 51916 strain, daptomycin 15mg/kg+dexamethasone achieved a lower bacterial decrease than daptomycin 15mg/kg alone, and therapeutic failure at 24h occurred in the daptomycin 15mg/kg+dexamethasone group. Addition of dexamethasone to a 25mg/kg daptomycin dose did not affect the efficacy of daptomycin: it remained bactericidal throughout treatment. In conclusion, against the studied strains, low-dose (15mg/kg/day) daptomycin is affected by concomitant use of dexamethasone: CSF levels are reduced and its bacterial efficacy is affected. At a higher daptomycin dose (25mg/kg/day), however, the use of dexamethasone does not alter efficacy; the combination appears to be a good choice for the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. Meningococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Meningococcal meningitis Fact sheet Reviewed January 2018 Key facts Meningococcal meningitis is a bacterial form of meningitis, a serious ...

  15. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumococcal meningitis; Pneumococcus - meningitis ... Pneumococcal meningitis is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria (also called pneumococcus, or S pneumoniae ). This type of bacteria is the ...

  16. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The role of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the evolution of the pathophysiological changes that occur in bacterial meningitis is unclear. Here, we investigate how leukocyte recruitment to the CSF, modulated by the leukocyte blocker fucoidin, affects the extent of brain......, blocking leukocyte entry to the central nervous system in experimental pneumococcal meningitis compromises the survival prognosis but does not affect the risk of brain damage or level of infection in this compartment. Conversely, poorer prognosis was associated with an increase in bacterial load in blood......, suggesting that leukocyte blockage affects the host's ability to control systemic infection....

  17. Intratympanic steroid prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    for 3 days. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem response at 16 kHz, and spiral ganglion neuron density. Results: Fifty-six days after infection, auditory brainstem response showed no significant differences between groups......, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions showed significant hearing loss at the low frequencies in animals treated with intratympanic steroid compared with animals treated with systemic saline (p neurons...... treatment prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. This finding is clinically relevant in relation to postmeningitic hearing rehabilitation by cochlear implantation. However, the drug instillation in the middle ear induced local fibrosis and a concurrent low...

  18. Modeling tuberculous meningitis in zebrafish using Mycobacterium marinum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, Lisanne M.; Van Der Kuip, Martijn; Youssef, Sameh A.; De Bruin, Alain|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837261; Bitter, Wilbert; Marceline Van Furth, A.; Van Der Sar, Astrid M.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is one of the most severe extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis, with a high morbidity and mortality. Characteristic pathological features of TBM are Rich foci, i.e. brain- and spinal-cord-specific granulomas formed after hematogenous spread of pulmonary

  19. Modeling tuberculous meningitis in zebrafish using Mycobacterium marinum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, L.M.; van der Kuip, M.; Youssef, S.A.; de Bruin, A.; Bitter, W.; van Furth, A.M.; van der Sar, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is one of the most severe extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis, with a high morbidity and mortality. Characteristic pathological features of TBM are Rich foci, i.e. brain- and spinal-cord-specific granulomas formed after hematogenous spread of pulmonary

  20. Bacterial meningitis: insights into pathogenesis and evaluation of new treatment options: a perspective from experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechti, Fabian D; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. Bacterial components induce an overshooting inflammatory reaction, eventually leading to brain damage. Pathological correlates of neurofunctional deficits include cortical necrosis, damage of the inner ear and hippocampal apoptosis. The hippocampal dentate gyrus is important for memory acquisition and harbors a neuronal stem cell niche, thus being potentially well equipped for regeneration. Adjuvant therapies aimed at decreasing the inflammatory reaction, for example, dexamethasone, and those protecting the brain from injury have been evaluated in animal models of the disease. They include nonbacteriolytic antibiotics (e.g., daptomycin), metalloproteinase inhibitors and modulators of the immunological response, for example, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Increasing research interest has recently been focused on interventions aimed at supporting regenerative processes.

  1. Prevention of Memory Impairment and Neurotrophic Factors Increased by Lithium in Wistar Rats Submitted to Pneumococcal Meningitis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutiana R. Simões

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lithium on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF expression in the hippocampus and on memory in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. The mood-stabilizer lithium is known as a neuroprotective agent with many effects on the brain. In this study, animals received either artificial cerebrospinal fluid or Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at a concentration of 5 × 109 CFU/mL. Eighteen hours after induction, all animals received ceftriaxone. The animals received saline or lithium (47.5 mg/kg or tamoxifen (1 mg/kg as adjuvant treatment, and they were separated into six groups: control/saline, control/lithium, control/tamoxifen, meningitis/saline, meningitis/lithium, and meningitis/tamoxifen. Ten days after meningitis induction, animals were subjected to open-field habituation and the step-down inhibitory avoidance tasks. Immediately after these tasks, the animals were killed and their hippocampus was removed to evaluate the expression of BDNF, NGF, and GDNF. In the meningitis group, treatment with lithium and tamoxifen resulted in improvement in memory. Meningitis group showed decreased expression of BDNF and GDNF in the hippocampus while lithium reestablished the neurotrophin expression. Lithium was able to prevent memory impairment and reestablishes hippocampal neurotrophin expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

  2. Evaluation of fusidic acid in therapy of experimental Staphylococcus aureus meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian; Yieng-Kow, Runa Vavia; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl

    2003-01-01

    Combination therapy that includes fusidic acid, an antimicrobial agent highly active against staphylococci, has been recommended in the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus meningitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic, CSF bactericidal and anti...

  3. Unsuccessful validation of 2004 model for predicting academic or behavioural limitations after childhood bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, R.C.J.; Sanders, M.S.; Terwee, C.B.; Heijmans, M.W.; Gemke, R.J.B.J.; Koomen, I.; Spanjaard, L.; van Furth, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim In 2004, a model identifying children at risk of academic or behavioural limitations after bacterial meningitis (BM) was presented. Risk factors were male gender, low birthweight, lower educational level of the father, Streptococcus pneumoniae, lower cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leucocyte count,

  4. Meningitis - meningococcal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal meningitis; Gram negative - meningococcus ... Meningococcal meningitis is caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis (also known as meningococcus). Meningococcus is the most common cause ...

  5. Activity of LY333328 in Experimental Meningitis Caused by a Streptococcus pneumoniae Strain Susceptible to Penicillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Joachim; Smirnov, Alexander; Wellmer, Andreas; Ragheb, Jasmin; Prange, Juliane; Schütz, Eckhardt; Wettich, Klaus; Kalich, Siegfried; Nau, Roland

    2001-01-01

    In a rabbit model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis single doses of 10 and 2.5 mg of the glycopeptide LY333328 per kg of body weight reduced bacterial titers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) almost as rapidly as ceftriaxone at 10 mg/kg/h (changes in log CFU, −0.29 ± 0.21 and −0.26 ± 0.22 versus −0.34 ± 0.15/ml/h). A dose of 1 mg/kg was bacteriostatic (change in log CFU, 0.01 ± 0.11/ml/h). In two animals receiving LY333328 at a dose of 40 mg/kg the bacterial titers were reduced by 0.54 and 0.51 log CFU/ml/h. The penetration of CSF by LY333328 was 1 to 5%. The concentrations of lipoteichoic and teichoic acids in CSF and neuronal damage were similar in ceftriaxone- and LY333328-treated animals. PMID:11408247

  6. Zinc metalloproteinase ZmpC suppresses experimental pneumococcal meningitis by inhibiting bacterial invasion of central nervous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Nakata, Masanobu; Sumioka, Ryuichi; Hirose, Yujiro; Wada, Satoshi; Akeda, Yukihiro; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2017-05-10

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Here, we investigated whether pneumococcal paralogous zinc metalloproteases contribute to meningitis onset. Findings of codon-based phylogenetic analyses indicated 3 major clusters in the Zmp family; ZmpA, ZmpC, and ZmpB, with ZmpD as a subgroup. In vitro invasion assays of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) showed that deletion of the zmpC gene in S. pneumoniae strain TIGR4 significantly increased bacterial invasion into hBMECs, whereas deletion of either zmpA or zmpB had no effect. In a mouse meningitis model, the zmpC deletion mutant exhibited increased invasion of the brain and was associated with increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 in plasma and mortality as compared with the wild type. We concluded that ZmpC suppresses pneumococcal virulence by inhibiting bacterial invasion of the central nervous system. Furthermore, ZmpC illustrates the evolutional theory stating that gene duplication leads to acquisition of novel function to suppress excessive mortality.

  7. Experimental study of cerebrospinal fluid tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant pneumococcal meningitis treated with different antibiotic schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, M; Force, E; El Haj, C; Tubau, F; Ariza, J; Cabellos, C

    2017-08-01

    To measure the inflammatory response in terms of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), using bacteriolytic versus nonbacteriolytic antibiotic therapy and adjunctive treatment with dexamethasone in an experimental rabbit model of pneumococcal meningitis. In a rabbit model of pneumococcal meningitis, we tested CSF TNF-α levels in several samples from rabbits infected with the HUB 2349 strain and treated with ceftriaxone 100 mg/kg/d, ceftriaxone plus vancomycin 30 mg/kg/d, or daptomycin at 15 mg/kg or 25 mg/kg. Daptomycin schedules were compared with the same doses in combination with dexamethasone at 0.125 mg/kg every 12 hours over a 26-hour period. The ceftriaxone group had the highest levels of TNF-α. TNF-α levels were significantly higher after ceftriaxone administration than in both daptomycin groups. The high-dose daptomycin group presented the lowest inflammatory levels in CSF samples. Adjunctive treatment with dexamethasone in this group modulated the inflammatory response, bringing down CSF TNF-α levels. CSF TNF-α levels were significantly lower in rabbits treated with daptomycin than in rabbits treated with ceftriaxone. Daptomycin avoided the inflammatory peak after administration observed in ceftriaxone-treated rabbits. The use of daptomycin plus dexamethasone achieved a significantly larger reduction in CSF TNF-α levels. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Restoration of Akt activity by the bisperoxovanadium compound bpV(pic) attenuates hippocampal apoptosis in experimental neonatal pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sury, Matthias D; Vorlet-Fawer, Lorianne; Agarinis, Claudia; Yousefi, Shida; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L; Christen, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis causes apoptosis of developing neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The death of these cells is accompanied with long-term learning and memory deficits in meningitis survivors. Here, we studied the role of the PI3K/Akt (protein kinase B) survival pathway in hippocampal apoptosis in a well-characterized infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis. Meningitis was accompanied by a significant decrease of the PI3K product phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) and of phosphorylated (i.e., activated) Akt in the hippocampus. At the cellular level, phosphorylated Akt was decreased in both the granular layer and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, the region where the developing neurons undergo apoptosis. Protein levels and activity of PTEN, the major antagonist of PI3K, were unaltered by infection, suggesting that the observed decrease in PIP(3) and Akt phosphorylation is a result of decreased PI3K signaling. Treatment with the PTEN inhibitor bpV(pic) restored Akt activity and significantly attenuated hippocampal apoptosis. Co-treatment with the specific PI3K inhibitor LY294002 reversed the restoration of Akt activity and attenuation of hippocampal apoptosis, while it had no significant effect on these parameters on its own. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of bpV(pic) on apoptosis was mediated by PI3K-dependent activation of Akt, strongly suggesting that bpV(pic) acted on PTEN. Treatment with bpV(pic) also partially inhibited the concentration of bacteria and cytokines in the CSF, but this effect was not reversed by LY294002, indicating that the effect of bpV(pic) on apoptosis was independent of its effect on CSF bacterial burden and cytokine levels. These results indicate that the PI3K/Akt pathway plays an important role in the death and survival of developing hippocampal neurons during the acute phase of pneumococcal meningitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Linkages between observed, modeled Saharan dust loading and meningitis in Senegal during 2012 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diokhane, Aminata Mbow; Jenkins, Gregory S.; Manga, Noel; Drame, Mamadou S.; Mbodji, Boubacar

    2016-04-01

    The Sahara desert transports large quantities of dust over the Sahelian region during the Northern Hemisphere winter and spring seasons (December-April). In episodic events, high dust concentrations are found at the surface, negatively impacting respiratory health. Bacterial meningitis in particular is known to affect populations that live in the Sahelian zones, which is otherwise known as the meningitis belt. During the winter and spring of 2012, suspected meningitis cases (SMCs) were with three times higher than in 2013. We show higher surface particular matter concentrations at Dakar, Senegal and elevated atmospheric dust loading in Senegal for the period of 1 January-31 May during 2012 relative to 2013. We analyze simulated particulate matter over Senegal from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model during 2012 and 2013. The results show higher simulated dust concentrations during the winter season of 2012 for Senegal. The WRF model correctly captures the large dust events from 1 January-31 March but has shown less skill during April and May for simulated dust concentrations. The results also show that the boundary conditions are the key feature for correctly simulating large dust events and initial conditions are less important.

  10. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  11. Treating Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Treating meningitis Steven Karceski, MD WHAT DID THE AUTHORS STUDY? ... study, “ Dexamethasone and long-term survival in bacterial meningitis, ” Dr. Fritz and his colleagues carefully evaluated 2 ...

  12. Fungal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Fungal Meningitis Language: English Spanish Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... the brain or spinal cord. Investigation of Fungal Meningitis, 2012 In September 2012, the Centers for Disease ...

  13. Possible impact of climate change on meningitis in northwest Nigeria: an assessment using CMIP5 climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdussalam, Auwal; Monaghan, Andrew; Steinhoff, Daniel; Dukic, Vanja; Hayden, Mary; Hopson, Thomas; Thornes, John; Leckebusch, Gregor

    2014-05-01

    Meningitis remains a major health burden throughout Sahelian Africa, especially in heavily-populated northwest Nigeria. Cases exhibit strong sensitivity to intra- and inter-annual climate variability, peaking during the hot and dry boreal spring months, raising concern that future climate change may increase the incidence of meningitis in the region. The impact of future climate change on meningitis risk in northwest Nigeria is assessed by forcing an empirical model of meningitis with monthly simulations from an ensemble of thirteen statistically downscaled global climate model projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Experiment Phase 5 (CMIP5) for RCPs 2.6, 6.0 and 8.5 scenarios. The results suggest future temperature increases due to climate change has the potential to significantly increase meningitis cases in both the early and late 21st century, and to increase the length of the meningitis season in the late century. March cases may increase from 23 per 100,000 people for present day (1990-2005), to 29-30 per 100,000 (p<0.01) in the early century (2020-2035) and 31-42 per 100,000 (p<0.01) in the late century (2060-2075), the range being dependent on the emissions scenario. It is noteworthy that these results represent the climatological potential for increased cases due to climate change, as we assume current prevention and treatment strategies remain similar in the future.

  14. Bacterial Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Reference Español: Meningitis bacteriana Bacterial meningitis is very serious and can be deadly. Death ...

  15. Modeling Long-term Vaccination Strategies With MenAfriVac in the African Meningitis Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Andromachi; Conlan, Andrew J K; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Trotter, Caroline L

    2015-11-15

    The introduction of MenAfriVac in campaigns targeting people aged 1-29 years across the African meningitis belt has successfully reduced meningitis incidence and carriage due to Neisseria meningitidis group A (MenA). It is important to consider how best to sustain population protection in the long term. We created a mathematical model of MenA transmission and disease to investigate the potential impact of a range of immunization strategies. The model is age structured; includes classes of susceptible, carrier, ill, and immune people (who may be vaccinated or unvaccinated); and incorporates seasonal transmission and a stochastic forcing term that models between year variation in rates of transmission. Model parameters were primarily derived from African sources. The model can describe the typical annual incidence of meningitis in the prevaccine era, with irregular epidemics of varying size. Parameter and structural uncertainty were explored in sensitivity analyses. Following MenAfriVac introduction at high uptake, the model predicts excellent short-term disease control. With no subsequent immunization, strong resurgences in disease incidence were predicted after approximately 15 years (assuming 10 years' average vaccine protection). Routine immunization at 9 months of age resulted in lower average annual incidence than regular mass campaigns of 1- to 4-year-olds, provided coverage was above approximately 60%. The strategy with the lowest overall average annual incidence and longest time to resurgence was achieved using a combination strategy of introduction into the Expanded Programme on Immunization at 9 months, 5 years after the initial mass campaigns, with a catch-up targeting unvaccinated 1- to 4-year-olds. These results can be used to inform policy recommendations for long-term vaccination strategies with MenAfriVac. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  16. Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid reveals a predictive model for differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis, and novel putative therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Meningitis is the inflammation of the meninges in response to infection or chemical agents. While aseptic meningitis, most frequently caused by enteroviruses, is usually benign with a self-limiting course, bacterial meningitis remains associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, despite advances in antimicrobial therapy and intensive care. Fast and accurate differential diagnosis is crucial for assertive choice of the appropriate therapeutic approach for each form of meningitis. Methods We used 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry to identify the cerebrospinal fluid proteome specifically related to the host response to pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis. The disease-specific proteome signatures were inspected by pathway analysis. Results Unique cerebrospinal fluid proteome signatures were found to the three aetiological forms of meningitis investigated, and a qualitative predictive model with four protein markers was developed for the differential diagnosis of these diseases. Nevertheless, pathway analysis of the disease-specific proteomes unveiled that Kallikrein-kinin system may play a crucial role in the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. Proteins taking part in this cellular process are proposed as putative targets to novel adjunctive therapies. Conclusions Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid disclosed candidate biomarkers, which were combined in a qualitative and sequential predictive model with potential to improve the differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal and enteroviral meningitis. Moreover, we present the first evidence of the possible implication of Kallikrein-kinin system in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. PMID:26040285

  17. Adjunctive Corticosteroids in Adults with Bacterial Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; de Gans, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a complex disorder in which neurologic injury is caused, in part, by the causative organism and, in part, by the host's own inflammatory response. In studies of experimental bacterial meningitis, adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids, specifically dexamethasone, has

  18. Iatrogenic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Genaro Mutarelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic meningitis can be caused by a number of mechanisms. The recent case reports of fungal meningitis after application of epidural methylprednisolone caused warning in the medical community. Cases were caused by contaminated lots of methylprednisolone from a single compounding pharmacy. Several medications can cause meninigitis by probable hypersensitivity mechanism. Neurologists should be alert to the recent description of the use of lamotrigine and development of aseptic meningitis.

  19. Iatrogenic meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Genaro Mutarelli; Tarso Adoni

    2013-01-01

    Iatrogenic meningitis can be caused by a number of mechanisms. The recent case reports of fungal meningitis after application of epidural methylprednisolone caused warning in the medical community. Cases were caused by contaminated lots of methylprednisolone from a single compounding pharmacy. Several medications can cause meninigitis by probable hypersensitivity mechanism. Neurologists should be alert to the recent description of the use of lamotrigine and development of aseptic meningitis.

  20. Recurrent Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jon; Galen, Benjamin T

    2017-07-01

    Recurrent meningitis is a rare clinical scenario that can be self-limiting or life threatening depending on the underlying etiology. This review describes the causes, risk factors, treatment, and prognosis for recurrent meningitis. As a general overview of a broad topic, the aim of this review is to provide clinicians with a comprehensive differential diagnosis to aide in the evaluation and management of a patient with recurrent meningitis. New developments related to understanding the pathophysiology of recurrent meningitis are as scarce as studies evaluating the treatment and prevention of this rare disorder. A trial evaluating oral valacyclovir suppression after HSV-2 meningitis did not demonstrate a benefit in preventing recurrences. The data on prophylactic antibiotics after basilar skull fractures do not support their use. Intrathecal trastuzumab has shown promise in treating leptomeningeal carcinomatosis from HER-2 positive breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies used to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases are new potential causes of drug-induced aseptic meningitis. Despite their potential for causing recurrent meningitis, the clinical entities reviewed herein are not frequently discussed together given that they are a heterogeneous collection of unrelated, rare diseases. Epidemiologic data on recurrent meningitis are lacking. The syndrome of recurrent benign lymphocytic meningitis described by Mollaret in 1944 was later found to be closely related to HSV-2 reactivation, but HSV-2 is by no means the only etiology of recurrent aseptic meningitis. While the mainstay of treatment for recurrent meningitis is supportive care, it is paramount to ensure that reversible and treatable causes have been addressed for further prevention.

  1. Cryptococcal Meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-16

    Mar 16, 1974 ... Cryptococcal Meningitis. A CASE TREATED WITH 5-FLUOROCYTOSINE. 555. E. W. VAN DEN ENDE, J. A. HAMMOND, R. L. AMOILS. SUMMARY. Cryptococcal meningitis occurred in an elderly Coloured woman in the Northern Cape. She presented with symp- toms and signs suggestive of encephalitis 4 ...

  2. Role of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 receptors in rodent models of meningeal nociception - Experiments in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denner, A C; Vogler, B; Messlinger, K; De Col, R

    2017-05-01

    The TRP channel ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) is a nonselective cation channel known to be activated by environmental irritants, cold and endogenous mediators of inflammation. Activation of TRPA1 in trigeminal afferents innervating meningeal structures has recently been suggested to be involved in the generation of headaches. Two in vitro models of meningeal nociception were employed using the hemisected rodent head preparation, (1) recording of single meningeal afferents and (2) release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from the cranial dura mater. The role of TRPA1 was examined using the TRPA1 agonists acrolein and mustard oil (MO). BCTC, an inhibitor of TRP vanilloid type 1 receptor channels (TRPV1), and the TRPA1 inhibitor HC030031 as well as mice with genetically deleted TRPA1 and TRPV1 proteins, were used to differentiate between effects. Acrolein did not cause discharge activity in meningeal Aδ- or C-fibres but increased the electrical activation threshold. Acrolein was also effective in releasing CGRP from the dura of TRPV1(-/-) but not of TRPA1(-/-) mice. MO increased the discharge activity of afferent fibres from rat as well as C57 wild-type and TRPA1(-/-) but not TRPV1(-/-) mice. The effect was higher in C57 compared to TRPA1(-/-) mice. Sole TRPA1 receptor channel activation releases CGRP and increases the activation threshold of meningeal afferents but does not generate propagated activity, and so would be capable of causing local effects like vasodilatation but not pain generation. In contrast, combined TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation may be rather pronociceptive supporting headache generation. Sole activation of TRPA1 receptor channels increases the activation threshold but does not cause propagated action potentials in meningeal afferents. TRPA1 agonists cause CGRP release from rodent dura mater. Peripheral TRPA1 receptors may have a pronociceptive function in trigeminal nociception only in combination with TRPV1. © 2016 European Pain Federation

  3. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningitis - syphilitic; Neurosyphilis - syphilitic meningitis ... Syphilitic meningitis is a form of neurosyphilis . This condition is a life-threatening complication of syphilis infection. Syphilis is ...

  4. Bacterial meningitis: an update of new treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Spreer, Annette; Ribes, Sandra; Eiffert, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of bacterial meningitis critically depends on the rapid initiation of bactericidal antibiotic therapy and adequate management of septic shock. In community-acquired meningitis, the choice of an optimum initial empirical antibiotic regimen depends on the regional resistance patterns. Pathogens resistant to antibacterials prevail in nosocomial bacterial meningitis. Dexamethasone is recommended as adjunctive therapy for community-acquired meningitis in developed countries. In comatose patients, aggressive measures to lower intracranial pressure <20 mmHg (in particular, external ventriculostomy, osmotherapy and temporary hyperventilation) were effective in a case-control study. Although many experimental approaches were protective in animal models, none of them has been proven effective in patients. Antibiotics, which are bactericidal but do not lyse bacteria, and inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases or complement factor C5 appear the most promising therapeutic options. At present, vaccination is the most efficient method to reduce disease burden. Palmitoylethanolamide appears promising to enhance the resistance of the brain to infections.

  5. Meningitis - H. influenzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. influenzae meningitis; H. flu meningitis; Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis ... H. influenzae meningitis is caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria. This illness is not the same as the flu ( influenza ), ...

  6. Edaravone attenuates hippocampal damage in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis by reducing HMGB1 and iNOS expression via the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Ma, Qian-qian; Yan, Yan; Xu, Feng-dan; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Zhou, Wei-qin; Feng, Zhi-chun

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one) is a free radical scavenger that has shown potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in variety of disease models. In this study, we investigated whether edaravone produced neuroprotective actions in an infant mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were infected on postnatal d 11 by intracisternal injection of a certain inoculum of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The mice received intracisternal injection of 10 μL of saline containing edaravone (3 mg/kg) once a day for 7 d. The severity of pneumococcal meningitis was assessed with a clinical score. In mice with severe meningitis, the survival rate from the time of infection to d 8 after infection was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves. In mice with mild meningitis, the CSF inflammation and cytokine levels in the hippocampus were analyzed d 7 after infection, and the clinical neurological deficit score was evaluated using a neurological scoring system d 14 after infection. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice and heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1 KO) mice were used to confirm the involvement of Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in the neuroprotective actions of edaravone. Results: In mice with severe meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly increased the survival rate (76.4%) compared with the meningitis model group (32.2%). In mice with mild meningitis, edaravone treatment significantly decreased the number of leukocytes and TNF- levels in CSF, as well as the neuronal apoptosis and protein levels of HMGB1 and iNOS in the hippocampus, but did not affect the high levels of IL-10 and IL-6 in the hippocampus. Moreover, edaravone treatment significantly improved the neurological function of mice with mild meningitis. In Nrf2 KO or HO-1 KO mice with the meningitis, edaravone treatment was no longer effective in improving the survival rate of the mice with severe meningitis (20.2% and 53.6%, respectively

  7. Unsuccessful validation of 2004 model for predicting academic or behavioural limitations after childhood bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, R C J; Sanders, M S; Terwee, C B; Heymans, M W; Gemke, R J B J; Koomen, I; Spanjaard, L; van Furth, A M

    2013-12-01

    In 2004, a model identifying children at risk of academic or behavioural limitations after bacterial meningitis (BM) was presented. Risk factors were male gender, low birthweight, lower educational level of the father, Streptococcus pneumoniae, lower cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leucocyte count, delay between admission and start of antibiotics, dexamethasone validate that prediction model in an independent cohort. Academic or behavioural limitations were determined in 93 Dutch school-age BM survivors. Risk factors for limitations were obtained from medical files. Validation was performed by applying the model in the cohort, then assessing discrimination and goodness of fit. Multiple imputation techniques were used to deal with missing values. Although fit of the model appeared good when it came to similarity of expected and observed cases (p-value of the Hosmer-Lemeshow test 0.24-0.57), discrimination was poor. Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operated characteristics (ROC) curve of the model was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.77-0.89) in the development cohort and 0.53 (95% CI: 0.41-0.65) in the validation cohort. External validation of the model was unsuccessful. It is not suitable for implementation in practice. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Meningitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Meningitis KidsHealth / For Parents / Meningitis What's in this article? ... the Doctor? Print en español Meningitis What Is Meningitis? Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, the ...

  9. Influence of the blood bacterial load on the meningeal inflammatory response in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, C; O´Reilly, T; Brandt, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite bacteraemia is present in the majority of patients with pneumococcal, little is known about the influence of the systemic infection on the meningeal inflammatory response. METHODS: To explore the role of systemic infection on the meningeal inflammation, experimental meningitis...... levels in 153 pneumococcal meningitis patients with and without presence of bacteraemia. RESULTS: As designed, blood bacterial concentrations were significantly different among three experimental groups during the 16 hours study period (Kruskal Wallis test, P ... to the two other groups between 12-16 hours from time of infection (P meningitis, no significant difference in CSF WBC was observed between patients with or without bacteraemia at admission (n = 103, 1740...

  10. Models of experimental epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Ekici

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common serious neurological conditionin the world, with an estimated prevalence of 1% ofthe population. A large number of experimental modelsof seizure and epilepsy have been developed. These experimentalmodels are elicited by chemical convulsants,electrical stimulation, genetic models, structural lesions,physical stimuli (cold, pressure, hyperthermia, electricalin animals. Well-characterized animal models may allowthe understanding of the basic mechanisms underlyingepileptogenesis (it refers to the alteration of a normalneuronal network into a hyperexcitable network in whichrecurrent, spontaneous seizures occur. Moreover, thesemodels might also prove useful in identifying novel therapeuticapproaches to treatment of epilepsy. J Clin ExpInvest 2011; 2(1: 118-123

  11. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  12. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  13. Cochlear-Meningitis Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with cochlear implants are more likely to get bacterial meningitis than children without cochlear implants. In addition, some ... two main types of meningitis, viral and bacterial. Bacterial meningitis is the more serious type and the type ...

  14. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-zhi YANG

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical, neuroimaging and pathological features of meningeal hemangiopericytoma.  Methods One case of meningeal hemangiopericytoma was reported, and the relevant literatures were also reviewed.  Results A 40-year-old male had caught a headache for about 3 months with muscle weakness in the left limb, and became progressively serious for 2 weeks. Brain MRI displayed a space-occupying lesion in the right temporal lobe with equal signals in T1WI, mixed signals in T2WI and obvious enhancements. In surgery, the tumor was found to be located in the cranial fossa, and was completely removed. The tumor was large, with rich blood supply, and had no capsule. In histology, the neoplasm was composed of dense spindle cells with mild atypia. The boundary of the tumor cells was unclear. The nuclei were circular, oval or spindle with obvious mitoses (4/10 HPF. There were plenty of thick-wall blood vessels and blood sinuses with characteristic "staghorn" shape. In immunohistochemistry, CD34 and vimentin (Vim were positive, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA was focally positive and Ki-67 labeling index was 17%-20%. Postoperative radiotherapy was adopted and no relapse was found during the 20-month follow-up period. Conclusions The meningeal hemangiopericytoma is easy to be misdiagnosed as meningioma, however, the prognosis of meningeal hemangiopericytoma is quite worse, thus the differential diagnosis is very important. A clear diagnosis often depends on pathological examination. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.011

  15. Escherichia coli isolates from commercial chicken meat and eggs cause sepsis, meningitis and urinary tract infection in rodent models of human infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellata, M; Johnson, J R; Curtiss, R

    2018-02-01

    The zoonotic potential of Escherichia coli from chicken-source food products is important to define for public health purposes. Previously, genotypic and phenotypic screening of E. coli isolates from commercial chicken meat and shell eggs identified some E. coli strains that by molecular criteria resembled human-source extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Here, to clarify the zoonotic risk of such chicken-source E. coli, we compared selected E. coli isolates from chicken meat and eggs, stratified by molecularly defined ExPEC status, to human-source ExPEC and to laboratory E. coli for virulence in rodent models of sepsis, meningitis and UTI, and evaluated whether specific bacterial characteristics predict experimental virulence. Multiple chicken-source E. coli resembled human-source ExPEC in their ability to cause one or multiple different ExPEC-associated infections. Swimming ability corresponded with urovirulence, K1 capsule corresponded with ability to cause neonatal meningitis, and biofilm formation in urine corresponded with ability to cause sepsis. In contrast, molecularly defined ExPEC status and individual genotypic traits were uncorrelated with ability to cause sepsis, and neither complement sensitivity nor growth in human urine corresponded with virulence in any infection model. These findings establish that chicken-derived food products contain E. coli strains that, in rodent models of multiple human-associated ExPEC infections, are able to cause disease comparably to human-source E. coli clinical isolates, which suggests that they may pose a significant food safety threat. Further study is needed to define the level of risk they pose to human health, which if appreciable would justify efforts to monitor for and reduce or eliminate them. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Experimental pneumococcal meningitis: impaired clearance of bacteria from the blood due to increased apoptosis in the spleen in Bcl-2-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Andreas; von Mering, Matthias; Spreer, Annette; Diem, Ricarda; Eiffert, Helmut; Noeske, Christiane; Bunkowski, Stefanie; Gold, Ralf; Nau, Roland

    2004-06-01

    Necrotic and apoptotic neuronal cell death can be found in pneumococcal meningitis. We investigated the role of Bcl-2 as an antiapoptotic gene product in pneumococcal meningitis using Bcl-2 knockout (Bcl-2(-/-)) mice. By using a model of pneumococcal meningitis induced by intracerebral infection, Bcl-2-deficient mice and control littermates were assessed by clinical score and a tight rope test at 0, 12, 24, 32, and 36 h after infection. Then mice were sacrificed, the bacterial titers in blood, spleen, and cerebellar homogenates were determined, and the brain and spleen were evaluated histologically. The Bcl-2-deficient mice developed more severe clinical illness, and there were significant differences in the clinical score at 24, 32, and 36 h and in the tight rope test at 12 and 32 h. The bacterial titers in the blood were greater in Bcl-2-deficient mice than in the controls (7.46 +/- 1.93 log CFU/ml versus 5.16 +/- 0.96 log CFU/ml [mean +/- standard deviation]; P < 0.01). Neuronal damage was most prominent in the hippocampal formation, but there were no significant differences between groups. In situ tailing revealed only a few apoptotic neurons in the brain. In the spleen, however, there were significantly more apoptotic leukocytes in Bcl-2-deficient mice than in controls (5,148 +/- 3,406 leukocytes/mm2 versus 1,070 +/- 395 leukocytes/mm2; P < 0.005). Bcl-2 appears to counteract sepsis-induced apoptosis of splenic lymphocytes, thereby enhancing clearance of bacteria from the blood.

  17. Blocking of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid augments bacteremia and increases lethality in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Lundgren, Jens D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2005-01-01

    The role of leukocyte accumulation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the evolution of the pathophysiological changes that occur in bacterial meningitis is unclear. Here, we investigate how leukocyte recruitment to the CSF, modulated by the leukocyte blocker fucoidin, affects the extent of brain...... damage and outcome in pneumococcal meningitis in rats treated with ceftriaxone from 28 h after infection. Rats treated with fucoidin from time of infection had an excess risk of a fatal outcome compared to rats not receiving fucoidin (25/63 versus 5/34, p=0.012), whereas the risk of cortical damage...... in surviving animals was comparable (16/44 versus 9/29, p=0.8). Pre-treatment with fucoidin attenuated CSF pleocytosis 24 h after infection (median 400 versus 800x10(6) cells/l, p=0.01) without affecting CSF bacterial counts (2.3x10(5) versus 3.6x10(5) CFU/ml, p=0.54). A significant increase in blood bacterial...

  18. Pneumococcal meningitis in adults: new approaches to management and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2006-01-01

    Since the virtual eradication of meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type B by vaccination in the developed world, pneumococcal meningitis has become the leading cause of bacterial meningitis beyond the neonatal period. Clinical and experimental research has increased our knowledge about the

  19. Experimental Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    and discuss techniques for handling and representing uncertainty when modelling in experimental system development. These techniques are centred on patterns and styles for handling uncertainty in object-oriented software architectures. Tools We present the Knight tool designed for collaborative modelling......This thesis examines object-oriented modelling in experimental system development. Object-oriented modelling aims at representing concepts and phenomena of a problem domain in terms of classes and objects. Experimental system development seeks active experimentation in a system development project...... through, e.g., technical prototyping and active user involvement. We introduce and examine “experimental object-oriented modelling” as the intersection of these practices. The contributions of this thesis are expected to be within three perspectives on models and modelling in experimental system...

  20. Chronic Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle

    2000-07-01

    Treatment of chronic meningitis depends on the underlying cause. Once a specific cause has been established, appropriate targeted therapy is initiated. When the cause is unknown, a decision must be made whether to employ empiric therapy while the diagnostic evaluation is ongoing. This decision is based on three factors: 1) the clinical status of the patient; 2) the most likely cause based on demographic, historical, examination, and initial laboratory data; and 3) the risk-to-benefit ratio of the proposed treatment regimen. Initial efforts focus on deciding whether the meningitis is infectious or noninfectious. When a decision is made to start empiric therapy, antituberculous treatment is generally given for several weeks to judge therapeutic response. Patients who do not respond to antituberculous therapy are next treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics for unusual bacterial pathogens such as Actinomyces (penicillin), the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (ceftriaxone), Brucella (doxycycline plus rifampin), or Francisella tularensis (streptomycin plus gentamicin). Antifungal therapy is generally reserved for patients who are at particular risk for mycotic infection (owing to underlying immunosuppression or an extraneural infection site). Finally, empiric glucocorticoids are generally reserved for patients with consistently negative culture results and a probable noninfectious cause.

  1. Effects of Dopamine Infusion on Cerebral Blood Flow, Brain Cell Membrane Function and Energy Metabolism in Experimental Escherichia coli Meningitis in the Newborn Piglet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Won Soon; Chang, Yun Sil; Shim, Jae Won; Kim, Mi Jung; Ko, Sun Young; Kim, Sung Shin; Hwang, Jong Hee; Choi, Chang Won; Lee, Munhyang

    2003-01-01

    .... The decreased cerebral cortical cell membrane Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and increased lipid peroxidation products, indicative of meningitis-induced brain damage, were significantly attenuated by dopamine infusion...

  2. Cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DING Wen-ting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a kind of encapsulated fungal organism that widely exists in the nature. Because of its neurotropic nature, the central nervous system becomes its major target organ. Cryptococcus neoformans can use "transcellular pathway", "paracellular pathway" and "Trojan horse approach" to cross blood-brain barrier, and then make the devastating diffusion. Despite antifungal therapy, the mortality rate remains between 10% and 25% in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, and at least one-third of patients have experienced failure of antifungal therapy. Consequently, it is very important for us to understand the pathogenesis of CM, to diagnose as soon as possible and to explore more reasonable treatment.

  3. Cytogenetics and experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toretsky, J A; Helman, L J

    1997-07-01

    The use of cytogenetics has led to significant improvement in the diagnoses and classification of sarcomas. Many of the major sarcomas have been to have characteristic tumor-specific chromosomal translocations that are currently used in the diagnosis of these tumors. In the past year, a subset of Ewing's family of tumors and myxoid liposarcomas, which lack one of the characteristic translocations, were found to carry related translocations. New technologies such as a spectral karyotyping will likely increase out ability to identify additional tumor-specific translocations. The emergence of genetic alterations as prognostic factors, as illustrated by Ewing's family of tumors, osteosarcoma, and p53 expression in soft tissue sarcomas in general, is discussed. The review concludes with laboratory applications derived from either tumor cytogenetic or gene function abnormalities that are related to tumor-specific translocations. It is anticipated that advances in diagnosis, prognosis, and modeling will translate into future therapeutic advances.

  4. Toothpick meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Zhou, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 66-year-old male with a history of hypertension, back pain, diverticulosis and anal fistula presents with acute onset syncopal episodes, worsening back pain, and altered mental status. The patient exhibited considerable leukocytosis but was hemodynamically stable. CT imaging of the head revealed a gas pattern in the posterior fossa and velum interpositum. CT imaging of the abdomen and pelvis revealed a needle-like foreign body traversing the left sacrum to the sigmoid colon. A lumbar puncture revealed meningitis. Flexible sigmoidoscopies were performed without successful visualization of the foreign body. An explorative laparoscopy was successfully performed, enabling retrieval of what was determined to be a wooden toothpick. The patient remained hemodynamically stable with persistent altered mental status and was eventually discharged after completion of antibiotics on day 47 of hospitalization. This case illustrates a rare complication of ingesting a sharp foreign body that was identified by CT of the brain and abdomen/pelvis with successful surgical repair.

  5. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May 2014) 14 Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Infographic Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  6. Meningitis - gram-negative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... life-threatening illness. Prevention Prompt treatment of related infections may reduce the risk of meningitis. Alternative Names Gram-negative meningitis Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous ...

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Mediating both Excitatory and Inhibitory Effects in a Rat Model of Meningeal Nociception and Headache Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Teicher

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/purposeHydrogen sulfide (H2S is a neuromodulator acting through nitroxyl (HNO when it reacts with nitric oxide (NO. HNO activates transient receptor potential channels of the ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1 causing release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from primary afferents. Activation of meningeal nociceptors projecting to the human spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN may lead to headaches. In a rat model of meningeal nociception, the activity of spinal trigeminal neurons was used as read-out for the interaction between H2S and NO.MethodsIn anesthetized rats extracellular recordings from single neurons in the STN were made. Sodium sulfide (Na2S producing H2S in the tissue and the NO donor diethylamine-NONOate (DEA-NONOate were infused intravenously. H2S was also locally applied onto the exposed cranial dura mater or the medulla. Endogenous production of H2S was inhibited by oxamic acid, and NO production was inhibited by nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME to manipulate endogenous HNO formation.Key resultsSystemic administration of Na2S was followed either by increased ongoing activity (in 73% or decreased activity (in 27% of units. Topical application of Na2S onto the cranial dura mater caused a short-lasting activation followed by a long-lasting decrease in activity in the majority of units (70%. Systemic administration of DEA-NONOate increased neuronal activity, subsequent infusion of Na2S added to this effect, whereas DEA-NONOate did not augment the activity after Na2S. The stimulating effect of DEA-NONOate was inhibited by oxamic acid in 75% of units, and l-NAME following Na2S administration returned the activity to baseline.ConclusionIndividual spinal trigeminal neurons may be activated or (less frequently inhibited by the TRPA1 agonist HNO, presumably formed by H2S and NO in the STN, whereby endogenous H2S production seems to be rate-limiting. Activation of meningeal afferents by HNO may induce decreased spinal

  8. Drug induced aseptic meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-09-29

    Sep 29, 2013 ... Drug induced aseptic meningitis can mimic an infectious process as well as meningitis secondary to systemic disorders for which treatment of these drugs were used. 6,9,10. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis may develop in a pa- tient who initially was able to tolerate the causative drug. The patients in our ...

  9. CSF LACTATE IN MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjampakuthikal Aboobekar Haris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningitis is an infection within the subarachnoid space characterised by a CNS inflammatory reaction. It is a serious condition requiring immediate diagnosis and appropriate treatment to be started at the earliest to prevent mortality as well as irreversible neurological deficits. CSF lactate has been found useful in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in many studies in the western population, but studies in Indian population are limited. The aim of the study is to study whether CSF lactate can be used to distinguish bacterial from viral meningitis and to study the levels of CSF lactate in tuberculosis meningitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a descriptive study conducted in a tertiary care hospital. In this study, 78 cases of meningitis were selected. Cases are patients with bacterial, viral or tuberculosis meningitis admitted to the hospital under the Department of Medicine and Neurology. Cases are grouped into bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis based on clinical picture, CSF analysis and imaging characteristics. CSF lactate estimation was done by dry chemistry method. Using appropriate statistical methods and SPSS software, CSF lactate levels were compared among these groups and analysed for any association with the final outcome. RESULTS The levels of CSF lactate in bacterial meningitis were higher than viral meningitis with a statistical significance of p 35 mg/dL for bacterial meningitis in this study was 95% and 100% respectively and the positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value was 96%. The mean CSF lactate values in bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis were 124.40 ± 35.85 mg/dL, 24.34 ± 6.05 mg/dL and 50.13 ± 9.89 mg/dL, respectively. CONCLUSION CSF lactate level was significantly elevated in bacterial meningitis than tuberculosis or viral meningitis and can be used as a marker for differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis.

  10. Medicininduceret aseptisk meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina Podlekareva; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is a rare adverse effect of some drugs. We report a patient with four episodes of meningitis caused by ibuprofen. In all episodes the patient had taken ibuprofen for pain, and subsequently developed fever and cerebrovascular symptoms. Drug-induced meningitis cannot...... be distinguished from meningitis caused by other agents. Diagnosis is therefore based on close association between drug administration and onset of symptoms, as well as negative microbiology tests results, especially if previous episodes of drug-induced meningitis have occurred....

  11. PEMFC modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, J.V.C. [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br; Ordonez, J.C.; Martins, L.S. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Advanced Power Systems], Emails: ordonez@caps.fsu.edu, martins@caps.fsu.edu

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a simplified and comprehensive PEMFC mathematical model introduced in previous studies is experimentally validated. Numerical results are obtained for an existing set of commercial unit PEM fuel cells. The model accounts for pressure drops in the gas channels, and for temperature gradients with respect to space in the flow direction, that are investigated by direct infrared imaging, showing that even at low current operation such gradients are present in fuel cell operation, and therefore should be considered by a PEMFC model, since large coolant flow rates are limited due to induced high pressure drops in the cooling channels. The computed polarization and power curves are directly compared to the experimentally measured ones with good qualitative and quantitative agreement. The combination of accuracy and low computational time allow for the future utilization of the model as a reliable tool for PEMFC simulation, control, design and optimization purposes. (author)

  12. Dexamethasone treatment in adults with pneumococcal meningitis: risk factors for death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisfelt, M.; van de Beek, D.; de Gans, J.

    2006-01-01

    In experimental meningitis, adjunctive treatment with steroids reduces cerebrospinal fluid inflammation and thereby improves neurological outcome. On the basis of these findings, several clinical trials have assessed treatment with adjunctive steroids in bacterial meningitis, with conflicting

  13. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack

    2006-01-01

    An engineering course, Simulation and Experimental Modeling, has been developed that is based on a method for direct estimation of physical parameters in dynamic systems. Compared with classical system identification, the method appears to be easier to understand, apply, and combine with physical...

  14. Comparative pathogenesis of eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus mackerrasae and Angiostrongylus cantonensis in murine and guinea pig models of human infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh, Mahdis; Harvie, Marina C; Owen, Helen C; Veríssimo, Carolina; Aland, Kieran V; Reid, Simon A; Traub, Rebecca J; McMANUS, Donald P; McCARTHY, James S; Jones, Malcolm K

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated comparatively the pathogenicity of experimental infection of mice and guinea pigs, with Angiostrongylus mackerrasae and the closely related species A. cantonensis. Time course analyses showed that A. mackerrasae causes eosinophilic meningitis in these hosts, which suggests that the species has the potential to cause meningitis in humans and domestic animals. Both A. mackerrasae and the genetically similar A. cantonensis caused eosinophilic meningitis in mice at two time points of 14 and 21 days post infection (dpi). The brain lesions in mice infected with A. mackerrasae were more granulomatous in nature and the parasites were more likely to appear degenerate compared with lesions caused by A. cantonensis. This may indicate that the mouse immune system eliminates A. mackerrasae infection more effectively. The immunologic responses of mice infected with the two Angiostrongylus species was compared by assessing ex vivo stimulated spleen derived T cells and cytokines including interferon-gamma, interleukin 4 and interleukin 17 on 14 and 21 dpi. The results were similar for mice infected with A. cantonensis and A. mackerrasae. Serum from the infected animals with either A. cantonensis or A. mackerrasae recognized total soluble antigen of A. cantonensis female worms on Western blot.

  15. Th17-skewed immune response and cluster of differentiation 40 ligand expression in canine steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis, a large animal model for neutrophilic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundt-Revilla, Jessica; Maiolini, Arianna; Carlson, Regina; Beyerbach, Martin; Rentmeister, Kai; Flegel, Thomas; Fischer, Andrea; Tipold, Andrea

    2017-01-23

    Steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by neutrophilic pleocytosis and an arteritis particularly in the cervical leptomeninges. Previous studies of the disease have shown increased levels of IL-6 and TGF-ß1 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In the presence of these cytokines, naive CD4+ cells differentiate into Th17 lymphocytes which synthesize interleukin 17 (IL-17). It has been shown that IL-17 plays an active role in autoimmune diseases, it induces and mediates inflammatory responses and has an important role in recruitment of neutrophils. The hypothesis of a Th17-skewed immune response in SRMA should be supported by evaluating IL-17 and CD40L, inducing the vasculitis. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to measure IL-17 and CD40L in serum and CSF from a total of 79 dogs. Measurements of patients suffering from SRMA in the acute state (SRMA A) were compared with levels of patients under treatment with steroids (SRMA T), recurrence of the disease (SRMA R), other neurological disorders, and healthy dogs, using the two-part test. Additionally, secretion of IL-17 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was confirmed by an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay. Significant higher levels of IL-17 were found in CSF of dogs with SRMA A compared with SRMA T, other neurological disorders and healthy dogs (p < 0.0001). In addition, levels of CD40L in CSF in dogs with SRMA A and SRMA R were significantly higher than in those with SRMA T (p = 0.0004) and healthy controls (p = 0.014). Furthermore, CSF concentrations of IL-17 and CD40L showed a strong positive correlation among each other (rSpear = 0.6601; p < 0.0001) and with the degree of pleocytosis (rSpear = 0.8842; p < 0.0001 and rSpear = 0.6649; p < 0.0001, respectively). IL-17 synthesis from PBMCs in SRMA patients was confirmed; however, IL-17 is mainly intrathecally

  16. Toll-like receptors 4 and 9 are responsible for the maintenance of the inflammatory reaction in canine steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis, a large animal model for neutrophilic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiolini Arianna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA is a systemic inflammatory disease affecting young adult dogs and a potential large animal model for neutrophilic meningitis. Similarities between SRMA and infectious central nervous system (CNS diseases in lymphocyte subsets suggest an infectious origin. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors playing an important role in innate immunity. Due to their ability to recognize both self and non-self antigens, we hypothesize that TLRs are among the key factors for the induction of the inflammatory process in SRMA and provide an indirect hint on the etiology of the disease. Methods The expression profile of cell surface TLRs (TLR2, TLR4 and TLR5 and intracellular TLRs (TLR3 and TLR9 of canine leukocytes was analyzed by immunophenotyping and subsequent flow cytometric measurements. Experiments were performed on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and peripheral blood (PB samples of dogs affected with SRMA during the acute phase (n = 14 as well as during treatment (n = 23 and compared with those of dogs with bacterial meningitis (n = 3, meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology (n = 6, neoplasia of the central nervous system (n = 6 and a group of dogs with miscellaneous neurological diseases (n = 9. Two additional control groups consisted of dogs with pyogenic infections (n = 13 and of healthy dogs (n = 6. Results All examined groups showed a high percentage of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR5 positive PB polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs in comparison to healthy dogs. Very high values of TLR9 positive PB PMNs were detected in acute SRMA. Only a few similarities were found between SRMA patients and dogs with pyogenic infections, both groups were characterized by high expression of TLR4 positive PB monocytes. Glucocorticosteroid therapy reduced TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 expression in PB monocytes. Conclusions A relatively high expression of TLR4 and TLR9 in acute SRMA

  17. THE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF OSTEONECROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Netylko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigation for the purpose of modeling of knee osteonecrosis were performed in 36 rats. The chronic renal insufficiency by means of left nephrectomy and electrocoagulation in 25% cortical substance of right kidney was induced before 6 months till experiment with subsequent introduction of 0,1% adrenalin solution and methylprednisolone in paraarticular structures. The results of experiment showed the polyetiologic feature of disease.

  18. Streptococcus suis small RNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating capsule synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation in a mouse infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Genhui; Tang, Huanyu; Zhang, Shouming; Ren, Haiyan; Dai, Jiao; Lai, Liying; Lu, Chengping; Yao, Huochun; Fan, Hongjie; Wu, Zongfu

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is an important pathogen for pigs, and it is also considered as a zoonotic agent for humans. Meningitis is one of the most common features of the infection caused by SS, but little is known about the mechanisms of SS meningitis. Recent studies have revealed that small RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as key regulators of the virulence in several bacteria. In the previous study, we reported that SS sRNA rss04 was up-regulated in pig cerebrospinal fluid and contributes to SS virulence in a zebrafish infection model. Here, we show that rss04 facilitates SS invasion of mouse brain and lung in vivo. Label-free quantitation mass spectrometry analysis revealed that rss04 regulates transcriptional regulator CcpA and several virulence factors including LuxS. Transmission electron microscope and Dot-blot analyses indicated that rss04 represses capsular polysaccharide (CPS) production, which in turn facilitates SS adherence and invasion of mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells bEnd.3 in vitro and activates the mRNA expression of TLR2, CCL2, IL-6 and TNF-α in mouse brain in vivo at 12h post-infection. In addition, rss04 positively regulates SS biofilm formation. Survival analysis of infected mice showed that biofilm state in brain contributes to SS virulence by intracranial subarachnoidal route of infection. Together, our data reveal that SS sRNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating the CPS synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation, thereby increasing the virulence in a mouse infection model. To our knowledge, rss04 represents the first bacterial sRNA that plays definitive roles in bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental models of sepsis and septic shock: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido Alejandra G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients and trauma victims, mainly due to sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction. In contrast to preclinical studies, most clinical trials of promising new treatment strategies for sepsis have fails to demonstrate efficacy. Although many reasons could account for this discrepancy, the misinterpretation of preclinical data obtained from experimental studies, and especially the use of animal models that do not adequately mimic human sepsis may have been contributing factors. In this review, the benefits and limitations of various animal models of sepsis are discussed to clarify the extend to which findings are relevant to human sepsis, particularly with respect to the subsequent design and execution of clinical trials. Such models include intravascular infusion of endotoxin or live bacteria, bacterial peritonitis, cecal ligation and perforation, soft tissue infection, pneumonia or meningitis models, using different animal species including rats, mice, rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep and nonhuman primates. Despite several limitations, animal models remain essential in the development of all new therapies for sepsis and septic shock, because they provide fundamental information about the pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and mechanism of drug action that cannot be duplicated by other methods. New therapeutic agents should be studies in infection models, even after the initiation of the septic process. Furthermore, debility conditions need to be reproduced to avoid the exclusive use of healthy animals, which often do not represent the human septic patient.

  20. The updated experimental proteinoid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.; Przybylski, A.; Syren, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental proteinoid model includes new results indicating that polymers sufficiently rich in basic amino acid catalyze the synthesis of peptides from ATP and amino acids and of oligonucleotides from ATP. The need for simulation syntheses of amino acids yielding significant proportions of basic amino acids is now in focus. The modeled simultaneous protocellular synthesis of peptides and polynucleotides is part of a more comprehensive proposal for the origin of the coded genetic mechanism. The finding of membrane and action potentials in proteinoid microspheres, with or without added lecithin, is reported. The crucial nature of a nonrandom matrix for protocells is developed.

  1. Localized basal meningeal enhancement in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas; Grobbelaar, Marie; Steyn, Freda; Mapukata, Ayanda; Plessis, Jaco du [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. BOX 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2006-11-15

    Focal basal meningeal enhancement may produce a confusing CT picture in children with suspected tuberculous meningitis (TBM). To demonstrate the incidence, distribution and appearance of localized basal meningeal enhancement in children with TBM. CT scans of patients with definite (culture proven) and probable (CSF suggestive) TBM were retrospectively evaluated by two observers. Localized basal enhancement was documented as involving: unilateral cistern of the lateral fossa (CLF), unilateral sylvian fissure, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure in combination, unilateral CLF and sylvian fissure with ipsi- or contralateral ambient cistern and isolated quadrigeminal plate cistern. The study included 130 patients with TBM (aged 2 months to 13 years 9 months). Focal basal enhancement was seen in 11 patients (8.5%). The sylvian fissure was involved most commonly, followed by the lateral fossa cistern. The ambient cistern was involved in three patients and the quadrigeminal plate cistern in one. Focal areas of enhancement corresponded to the areas of infarction in every patient. Focal basal meningeal enhancement is common (8.5%) in paediatric TBM. This must be kept in mind when evaluating CT scans in children presenting with focal neurological findings, seizures or meningism in communities where TBM is endemic. (orig.)

  2. Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Experimental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, E; Burdette, JE; Kenny, HA; Matei, D; Pilrose, J; Haluska, P.; Nephew, KP; Hales, DB; Stack, MS

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) is associated with high mortality and, as the majority (>75%) of women with OvCa have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, rates of survival have not changed appreciably over 30 years. A mechanistic understanding of OvCa initiation and progression is hindered by the complexity of genetic and/or environmental initiating events and lack of clarity regarding the cell(s) or tissue(s) of origin. Metastasis of OvCa involves direct extension or exfoliation of cells and cellular aggregates into the peritoneal cavity, survival of matrix-detached cells in a complex ascites fluid phase, and subsequent adhesion to the mesothelium lining covering abdominal organs to establish secondary lesions containing host stromal and inflammatory components. Development of experimental models to recapitulate this unique mechanism of metastasis presents a remarkable scientific challenge and many approaches used to study other solid tumors (lung, colon, and breast, for example) are not transferable to OvCa research given the distinct metastasis pattern and unique tumor microenvironment. This review will discuss recent progress in the development and refinement of experimental models to study OvCa. Novel cellular, three-dimensional organotypic, and ex vivo models are considered and the current in vivo models summarized. The review critically evaluates currently available genetic mouse models of OvCa, the emergence of xenopatients, and the utility of the hen model to study OvCa prevention, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and chemoresistance. As these new approaches more accurately recapitulate the complex tumor microenvironment, it is predicted that new opportunities for enhanced understanding of disease progression, metastasis and therapeutic response will emerge. PMID:23934194

  3. ANDISCRIMINATED ASEPTIC MENINGITIS CASE BETWEEN RICKETTSIA AND LEPTOSPIRAL MENINGITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Davut; Sencan, İrfan; Yıldırım, Mustafa; Güçlü, Ertuğrul; Yavuz, Tevfik; Karabay, Oğuz

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsial meningitis and leptospiral meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of aseptic meningitis in patients exposed to endemic areas. In this report we describe a case of aseptic meningitis in which neither a rickettsial nor leptospiral etiology could be established

  4. Meningitis retention syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Krishna

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented with signs and symptoms of meningitis preceded by a 3 day history of flu-like symptoms and progressive difficulty with urination. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF analysis was consistent with aseptic meningitis. She was found to have a significant urinary retention secondary to atonic bladder. MRI of the brain and spine were normal and CSF-PCR (polymerase chain reaction was positive for HSV-2. Urinary retention in the context of meningitis and CSF pleocytosis is known as Meningitis Retention Syndrome (MRS. MRS is a rare but important complication of meningitis most commonly associated with HSV-2. Involvement of central pathways may have a role in the pathogenesis of MRS but this is poorly documented. MRS is different from Elsberg syndrome wherein patients display features of lumbosacral polyradiculitis or radiculomyelitis. Early treatment with antiviral therapy was associated with a favorable outcome in our patient.

  5. Meninges in cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, V.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Primary malignant tumours arising from the meninges are distinctly uncommon, and when they occur, they are usually sarcomas. In contrast, metastatic meningeal involvement is increasingly seen as advances in cancer therapy have changed the natural history of malignant disease and prolonged the life span of cancer patients. The meninges can either be infiltrated by contiguous extension of primary tumours of the central nervous system, paranasal sinuses and skull base origin or can be diffusely infiltrated from haematogenous dissemination from distant primary malignancies. Imaging in these patients provides crucial information in planning management. This article reviews the pertinent anatomy that underlies imaging findings, discusses the mechanism of meningeal metastasis and highlights different imaging patterns of meningeal carcinomatosis and the pitfalls. PMID:19965290

  6. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    is largely unaccounted for, and thus the object of the present study. A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was employed. Thirty adult rats were inoculated intrathecally with Streptococcus pneumoniae and received no additional treatment. Six rats were sham......The commonest sequelae of bacterial meningitis are related to the inner ear. Little is known about the inner ear immune defense. Evidence suggests that the endolymphatic sac provides some protection against infection. A potential involvement of the endolymphatic sac in bacterial meningitis...... days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges...

  7. Laboratorial diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    Full Text Available Meningitis is the main infectious central nervous system (CNS syndrome. Viruses or bacteria can cause acute meningitis of infectious etiology. The term "Aseptic Meningitis" denotes a clinical syndrome with a predominance of lymphocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, with no common bacterial agents identified in the CSF. Viral meningitis is considered the main cause of lymphocyte meningitis. There are other etiologies of an infectious nature. CSF examination is essential to establish the diagnosis and to identify the etiological agent of lymphocytic meningitis. We examined CSF characteristics and the differential diagnosis of the main types of meningitis.

  8. Experimental animal models of osteonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Meng; Peng, Jiang; Qin, Ling; Lu, Shibi

    2011-08-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) or avascular necrosis (AVN) is a common bone metabolic disorder, mostly affecting femoral head. Although many biological, biophysical, and surgical methods have been tested to preserve the femoral head with ON, none has been proven fully satisfactory. It lacks consensus on an optimal approach for treatment. This is due, at least in part, to the lack of ability to systematically compare treatment efficacy using an ideal animal model that mimics full-range osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) in humans with high incidence of joint collapse accompanied by reparative reaction adjacent to the necrotic bone in a reproducible and accessible way. A number of preclinical animal ON models have been established for testing potential efficacy of various modalities developed for prevention and treatment of ON before introduction into clinics for potential applications. This paper describes a number of different methods for creating animal experimental ON models. Advantages and disadvantages of such models are also discussed as reference for future research in battle against this important medical condition.

  9. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Corticosteroids for acute bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C; McIntyre, Peter; Prasad, Kameshwar; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-09-12

    In experimental studies, the outcome of bacterial meningitis has been related to the severity of inflammation in the subarachnoid space. Corticosteroids reduce this inflammatory response. To examine the effect of adjuvant corticosteroid therapy versus placebo on mortality, hearing loss and neurological sequelae in people of all ages with acute bacterial meningitis. We searched CENTRAL (2015, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 4, 2015), EMBASE (1974 to February 2015), Web of Science (2010 to February 2015), CINAHL (2010 to February 2015) and LILACS (2010 to February 2015). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of corticosteroids for acute bacterial meningitis. We scored RCTs for methodological quality. We collected outcomes and adverse effects. We performed subgroup analyses for children and adults, causative organisms, low-income versus high-income countries, time of steroid administration and study quality. We included 25 studies involving 4121 participants (2511 children and 1517 adults; 93 mixed population). Four studies were of high quality with no risk of bias, 14 of medium quality and seven of low quality, indicating a moderate risk of bias for the total analysis. Nine studies were performed in low-income countries and 16 in high-income countries.Corticosteroids were associated with a non-significant reduction in mortality (17.8% versus 19.9%; risk ratio (RR) 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80 to 1.01, P value = 0.07). A similar non-significant reduction in mortality was observed in adults receiving corticosteroids (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.05, P value = 0.09). Corticosteroids were associated with lower rates of severe hearing loss (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.51 to 0.88), any hearing loss (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.87) and neurological sequelae (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.00).Subgroup analyses for causative organisms showed that corticosteroids reduced mortality in Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) meningitis (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.98), but not in

  11. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recurs in nearly half of affected persons. Parasitic causes include cysticercosis, which is common in other parts of the world as well, and cerebral malaria. There are rare cases of amoebic meningitis, sometimes ...

  12. [Group A streptococcal meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhadi, Z; Sadiki, H; Lehlimi, M; Honsali, Z; Najib, J; Zerouali, K; Belabess, H; Mdaghri, N

    2012-12-01

    An increased incidence and severity of invasive group A streptococcus (GAS) infections over the past decade have been reported by several authors, but GAS remains an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the clinical and biological data of GAS meningitis by reporting 10 new cases of pediatric GAS meningitis and making a literature review. The mean age of patients, seven girls and three boys, was 3 years. There was a history of preexisting or concomitant community-acquired infection in five patients over 10. The outcome was fatal in two cases. All patients received an initial empirical antimicrobial therapy with a third generation cephalosporin switched in six cases to amoxicillin. The prognosis for this type of streptococcal meningitis is usually good, but death may occur even in children without any identified risk factor for severe infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology, etiology, clinical characteristics, treatment, outcome, and prevention of zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults. We identified 16 zoonotic bacteria causing meningitis in adults. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is uncommon compared to bacterial meningitis caused by

  14. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittwer Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30% and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI and (ii the self-organizing map (SOM, a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05, 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential

  15. Meninges of the brain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... covered by connective tissue layers collectively called the meninges. Consisting of the pia mater (closest to the ... the dura mater (farthest from the CNS), the meninges also support blood vessels and contain cerebrospinal fluid. ...

  16. Meninges of the spine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by 3 connective tissue layers collectively called the meninges. Consisting of the pia mater (closest to the ... the dura mater (farthest from the CNS), the meninges also support blood vessels and contain cerebrospinal fluid. ...

  17. Do not forget tuberculous meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alternative diagnoses to TBM must be considered especially in the HIV infected patient. In all cases the HIV status should be checked (after appropriate counselling) if not already known. The main differential diagnoses are: Fungal meningitis (especially cryptococcal. • meningitis),. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis,.

  18. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  19. Human Meningitis-Associated Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, KWANG SIK

    2016-01-01

    E. coli is the most common Gram-negative bacillary organism causing meningitis and E. coli meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Our incomplete knowledge of its pathogenesis contributes to such mortality and morbidity. Recent reports of E. coli strains producing CTX-M-type or TEM-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases create a challenge. Studies using in vitro and in vivo models of the blood-brain barrier have shown that E. coli meningitis follows a high-degree of bacteremia and invasion of the blood-brain barrier. E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier, the essentials step in the development of E. coli meningitis, requires specific microbial and host factors as well as microbe- and host-specific signaling molecules. Blockade of such microbial and host factors contributing to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier is shown to be efficient in preventing E. coli penetration into the brain. The basis for requiring a high-degree of bacteremia for E. coli penetration of the blood-brain barrier, however, remains unclear. Continued investigation on the microbial and host factors contributing to a high-degree of bacteremia and E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier is likely to identify new targets for prevention and therapy of E. coli meningitis. PMID:27223820

  20. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depreitere, Bart; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Güiza, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The literature on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in meningitis is limited to case reports and a handful of descriptive series. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships among ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and outcome in meningitis and to identify whether ICP affected clinical decisions. Between 1999 and 2011, a total of 17 patients with meningitis underwent ICP monitoring at the University Hospitals Leuven. Charts were reviewed for clinical history, ICP/CPP data, imaging findings, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Univariate correlations were computed for outcome and ICP/CPP variables, computed tomography characteristics, and Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head Injury outcome model variables. Treatment decisions were assessed regarding whether or not they were based on ICP. At drain placement, Glasgow Coma Scale scores showed a median of 8 (range 3-12). Six of 17 patients had either one or two nonreactive pupils. Significant correlations with outcome were found for the highest documented ICP value (r = -0.70), the number of episodes when CPP meningitis high ICP and low CPP represent secondary insults. The poor condition of the patients illustrates that the level of suspicion for increased ICP in meningitis may not be high enough.

  1. Fatal Prevotella oralis meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, S D; Hick, G; Rossiter, A; Callanan, J J

    2013-03-01

    Prevotella oralis, an obligate Gram-negative anaerobe, was detected as the cause of acute meningitis in a four-year-old cocker spaniel. Clinical signs included acute onset collapse and severe depression. Despite treatment, the animal died. A post-mortem examination was performed which revealed a fibrinosuppurative meningitis with no significant inflammation of the brain or spinal parenchyma. The aetiological diagnosis was confirmed by anaerobic bacterial culture. This report discusses the nature and extent of the lesions and possible routes of infection of the causative organism. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. Bacterial meningitis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Lawrence C; Boggess, Kim A; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bacterial meningitis is uncommon but devastating. Morbidity among survivors remains high. The types and distribution of pathogens are related to gestational age, postnatal age, and geographic region. Confirming the diagnosis is difficult. Clinical signs are often subtle, lumbar punctures are frequently deferred, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures can be compromised by prior antibiotic exposure. Infants with bacterial meningitis can have negative blood cultures and normal CSF parameters. Promising tests such as the polymerase chain reaction require further study. Prompt treatment with antibiotics is essential. Clinical trials investigating a vaccine for preventing neonatal Group B Streptococcus infections are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Yun, Na-Ra; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jun-Young; Han, Mi Ah; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2013-12-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi induces vasculitis leading to symptoms of systemic organ invasion including meningitis and meningoencephalitis. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of scrub typhus patients to investigate the clinical and laboratory features of patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and the therapeutic outcomes, and to determine the predictor factors. Cases were 22 patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and controls were 303 patients without meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of pneumonitis was associated with the occurrence of scrub typhus meningitis and meningoencephalitis (odds ratio [OR] 8.9; P meningitis or meningoencephalitis still occurred in some cases. Physicians should be aware that meningitis or meningoencephalitis may develop during appropriate drug therapy such as doxycycline. Close observation and great care are essential for patients with risk factors, particularly pneumonitis.

  4. Stroke? Localized, otogenic meningitis!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingolfsdottir, Harpa Maria; Thomasen, Per Caye

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a patient admitted with aphasia, treated for a stroke. Subsequently, it was revealed that the symptoms were caused by complicated otitis media with localized meningitis. This case draws attention to the possible intracranial spread of infection when neurological symptoms occur...

  5. New model systems for experimental evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sinéad

    2013-07-01

    Microbial experimental evolution uses a few well-characterized model systems to answer fundamental questions about how evolution works. This special section highlights novel model systems for experimental evolution, with a focus on marine model systems that can be used to understand evolutionary responses to global change in the oceans. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid concentration of fibronectin in meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Torre, D; Zeroli, C; Issi, M; Fiori, G P; Ferraro, G.; Speranza, F

    1991-01-01

    Fibronectin concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were assessed in 20 patients with acute meningitis using a turbidimetric immunoassay. A significant increase in fibronectin concentrations was observed in patients with bacterial meningitis; decreased concentrations were observed in patients with viral meningitis. The determination of fibronectin concentration in patients with bacterial meningitis may represent a useful marker in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis.

  7. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Rode; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-01-01

    unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance......A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  8. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance......A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  9. Model refinement for offshore platforms: Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Chen, Zongli; Wu, Yanjian

    2017-08-01

    Offshore jacket platforms are widely used in offshore oil and gas exploitation. Finite element models of such structures need to have many degrees of freedom (DOFs) to represent the geometrical detail of complex structures, thereby leading to incompatibility in the number of DOFs of experimental models. To bring them both to the same order while ensuring that the essential eigen- properties of the refined model match those of experimental models, an extended model refinement procedure is presented in this paper. Vibration testing of an offshore jacket platform model is performed to validate the applicability of the proposed approach. A full-order finite element model of the platform is established and then tuned to meet the measured modal properties identified from the acceleration signals. Both model reduction and modal expansion methods are investigated, as well as various scenarios of sensor arrangements. Upon completion of the refinement, the updated jacket platform model matches the natural frequencies of the measured model well.

  10. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francesco Corno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION.Surgically induced, combined volume and pressure overload has been used in rabbits to create a simplified and reproducible model of acute left ventricular (LV failure.MATERIALS AND METHODS.New Zealand white male rabbits (n=24, mean weight 3.1±0.2kg were randomly assigned to either the Control group (n=10 or to the Heart Failure group (HF, n=14. Animals in the Control group underwent sham procedures. Animals in the HF group underwent procedures to induce LV volume overload by inducing severe aortic valve regurgitation with aortic cusp disruption and pressure overload using an occlusive silver clip positioned around the pre-renal abdominal aorta.RESULTS.Following Procedure-1 (volume overload echocardiography confirmed severe aortic regurgitation in all animals in the HF group, with increased mean pulse pressure difference from 18±3mmHg to 38±3mmHg (P

  12. Dexamethasone in adults with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gans, Jan; van de Beek, Diederik

    2002-01-01

    Background: Mortality and morbidity rates are high among adults with acute bacterial meningitis, especially those with pneumococcal meningitis. In studies of bacterial meningitis in animals, adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids has beneficial effects. Methods: We conducted a prospective,

  13. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, Martine; van de Beek, Diederik; Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; Schmand, Ben

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy

  14. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, Marjolein J.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with

  15. Cognitive outcome in adults after bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogman, M.; Beek, D. van de; Weisfelt, M.; Gans, J. de; Schmand, B.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cognitive outcome in adult survivors of bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Data from three prospective multicentre studies were pooled and reanalysed, involving 155 adults surviving bacterial meningitis (79 after pneumococcal and 76 after meningococcal meningitis) and 72 healthy

  16. Adult bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Samuelsson, I S; Galle, M

    2004-01-01

    Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin susceptibi......Episodes of adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) at a Danish hospital in 1991-2000 were identified from the databases of the Department of Clinical Microbiology, and compared with data from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish National Notification System. Reduced penicillin...... susceptibility occurred in 21 (23%) of 92 cases of known aetiology, compared to an estimated 6% in nationally notified cases (p treatment was appropriate in 97% of ABM cases in the study population, and in 99.6% of nationally notified cases. The notification rate...... treatment for ABM should not be based exclusively on clinical notification systems with possible unbalanced under-reporting....

  17. Fibrosarcoma of the meninges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishwar Chand Premsagar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal fibrosarcomas are rare tumors. Only 41 cases have been reported in the literature to date. Primary central nervous system fibrosarcomas are very aggressive neoplasms and have a poor prognosis. Hence they need to be correctly diagnosed. This is a case of a 13-year old boy with intracranial space occupying lesion. The mass was completely removed and histological examination was characteristic of meningeal fibrosarcoma. The pathological diagnosis is usually made on routine light microscopic examination; however, occasionally these may be difficult to distinguish from other malignant neoplasms such as gliomas, meningiomas and metastases. The diagnosis of fibrosarcoma is based on the identification of a predominant herringbone architectural pattern, the overall uniformity of the spindle cell population, the prominent vimentin positivity, and the presence of pericellular reticulin fibre network. IHC helps to exclude other diagnoses.

  18. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-06

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

  19. Management of neoplastic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Patrick; Weller, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of tumor cells, also referred to as neoplastic meningitis, is most frequently seen in patients with late-stage cancer and mostly associated with a poor prognosis. Basically, neoplastic meningitis may affect all patients with a malignant tumor but is most common in patients affected by lung cancer, breast carcinoma, melanoma or hematologic neoplasms such as lymphoma and leukemia. Controlled clinical trials are largely lacking which results in various non-standardized treatment regimens. The presence of solid tumor manifestations in the CNS as well as the extracranial tumor load defines the most appropriate treatment approach. Radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy and intrathecal treatment must be considered. For each patient, the individual situation needs to be carefully evaluated to determine the potential benefit as well as putative side effects associated with any therapy. A moderate survival benefit and particularly relief from pain and neurological deficits are the main treatment goals. Here, we summarize the management of patients with neoplastic meningitis and review the available treatment options.

  20. Clinical prediction rule for differentiating tuberculous from viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristea, A; Olaru, I D; Baicus, C; Moroti, R; Arama, V; Ion, M

    2012-06-01

    The Professor Dr Matei Bals National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Bucharest, Romania. To create a prediction rule to enable clinicians to differentiate patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) from those with viral meningitis. We retrospectively analysed patients admitted to a tertiary care facility between 2001 and 2011 with viral meningitis and TBM. Patients were defined as having TBM according to a recently published consensus definition, and as viral meningitis if a viral aetiology was confirmed, or after ruling out bacterial, fungal and non-infectious causes of meningitis. We identified 433 patients with viral meningitis and 101 TBM patients and compared their clinical and laboratory features. Multivariable analysis showed a statistically significant association between TBM and the following variables: duration of symptoms before admission of ≥5 days, presence of neurological impairment (altered consciousness, seizures, mild focal signs, multiple cranial nerve palsies, dense hemiplegia or paraparesis), cerebrospinal fluid/blood glucose ratio 100 mg/dl. We propose a diagnostic score based on the coefficients derived from the logistic regression model with a sensitivity and specificity for TBM of respectively 92% and 94%. Our study suggests that easily available clinical and laboratory data are very useful for differentiating TBM from other causes of meningitis.

  1. Understanding Leadership: An Experimental-Experiential Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, George T.

    2014-01-01

    Books about leadership are dangerous to readers who fantasize about being leaders or apply leadership ideas as if they were proven formulas. As an antidote, I offer an experimental framework in which any leadership-management model can be tested to gain experiential understanding of the model. As a result one can gain reality-based insights about…

  2. Adjuvant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy results in improved spatial learning and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anna Kathrin; Reich, Arno; Falkenburger, Björn; Schulz, Jörg B; Brandenburg, Lars Ove; Ribes, Sandra; Tauber, Simone C

    2015-01-01

    Despite the development of new antibiotic agents, mortality of pneumococcal meningitis remains high. In addition, meningitis results in severe long-term morbidity, most prominently cognitive deficits. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulates proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells and increases the number of circulating neutrophil granulocytes. This study investigated the effect of adjuvant G-CSF treatment on cognitive function after pneumococcal meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were infected by subarachnoid injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 and treated with ceftriaxone and G-CSF subcutaneously or ceftriaxone alone for 5 days. Clinical scores, motor performance, and mortality during bacterial meningitis were unaffected by adjuvant G-CSF treatment. No effect of G-CSF treatment on production of proinflammatory cytokines or activation of microglia or astrocytes was observed. The G-CSF treatment did, however, result in hippocampal neurogenesis and improved spatial learning performance 6 weeks after meningitis. These results suggest that G-CSF might offer a new adjuvant therapeutic approach in bacterial meningitis to reduce long-term cognitive deficits.

  3. Tuberculous Meningitis: Diagnosis and Treatment Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E. Marx

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous meningitis (TBM is the most common form of central nervous system tuberculosis (TB and has very high morbidity and mortality. TBM is typically a subacute disease with symptoms that may persist for weeks before diagnosis. Characteristic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings of TBM include a lymphocytic-predominant pleiocytosis, elevated protein, and low glucose. CSF acid-fast smear and culture have relatively low sensitivity but yield is increased with multiple, large volume samples. Nucleic acid amplification of the CSF by PCR is highly specific but suboptimal sensitivity precludes ruling out TBM with a negative test. Treatment for TBM should be initiated as soon as clinical suspicion is supported by initial CSF studies. Empiric treatment should include at least four first-line drugs, preferably isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and streptomycin or ethambutol; the role of fluoroquinolones remains to be determined. Adjunctive treatment with corticosteroids has been shown to improve mortality with TBM. In HIV-positive individuals with TBM, important treatment considerations include drug interactions, development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, unclear benefit of adjunctive corticosteroids, and higher rates of drug-resistant TB. Testing the efficacy of second-line and new anti-TB drugs in animal models of experimental TBM is needed to help determine the optimal regimen for drug-resistant TB.

  4. Efficacy of Closed Continuous Lumbar Drainage on the Treatment of Postcraniotomy Meningitis: A Retrospective Analysis of 1062 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanming; Liu, Xuesong; You, Chao; Zhang, Yuekang; Du, Liang; Hui, Xuhui; Liu, Wenke; Ma, Lu; Liu, Jiagang

    2017-10-01

    Postcraniotomy meningitis is a severe complication in neurosurgery, and can result in high morbidity and mortality. Closed continuous lumbar drainage (CCLD) as an adjuvant method for treating postcraniotomy meningitis in adults is rarely assessed. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of CCLD in the treatment of postcraniotomy meningitis. A total of 1062 patients older than 16 years with postcraniotomy meningitis were included, between January 2000 and December 2015. Of these, 474 received intravenous antibiotic therapy, steroid administration and adjuvant CCLD (experimental Group). The remaining 588 patients only received intravenous antibiotic and steroid therapies (control Group). Data were extracted from medical records. In the experimental group, meningitis-related mortality was 2.7%, and 77.4% individuals achieved a Glasgow Outcome Scale of 4-5. In the control group, meningitis-related mortality reached 11.6%, with only 61.1% of patients achieving a GOS of 4-5. The time to negative cerebrospinal fluid laboratory test and the duration of meningitis-related symptoms were significantly shorter in the experimental group compared with controls (P meningitis after craniotomy. Laboratory results negative for cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis-related symptom relief occurred faster in the experimental group. Intravenous antibiotic and steroid therapies combined with CCLD appear to be an effective and safe treatment for postcraniotomy meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling of Experimental Adsorption Isotherm Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunjun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption is considered to be one of the most effective technologies widely used in global environmental protection areas. Modeling of experimental adsorption isotherm data is an essential way for predicting the mechanisms of adsorption, which will lead to an improvement in the area of adsorption science. In this paper, we employed three isotherm models, namely: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich to correlate four sets of experimental adsorption isotherm data, which were obtained by batch tests in lab. The linearized and non-linearized isotherm models were compared and discussed. In order to determine the best fit isotherm model, the correlation coefficient (r2 and standard errors (S.E. for each parameter were used to evaluate the data. The modeling results showed that non-linear Langmuir model could fit the data better than others, with relatively higher r2 values and smaller S.E. The linear Langmuir model had the highest value of r2, however, the maximum adsorption capacities estimated from linear Langmuir model were deviated from the experimental data.

  6. Do not forget tuberculous meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is relatively uncommon compared with other types of meningitis and so it is easy to forget to consider it as an explanation for a patient's presenting problem. If untreated TBM is fatal in most cases. Who is at risk? Children under aged 5 years,. •. The elderly,. •. HIV infected patients (in these ...

  7. Bacteriële meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M. C.; van de Beek, D.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe disease which affects 35.000 Europeans each year and has a mortality rate of about 20%. During the past 25 years the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed significantly due to the implementation of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria

  8. Experimental Concepts for Testing Seismic Hazard Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, W.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic hazard analysis is the primary interface through which useful information about earthquake rupture and wave propagation is delivered to society. To account for the randomness (aleatory variability) and limited knowledge (epistemic uncertainty) of these natural processes, seismologists must formulate and test hazard models using the concepts of probability. In this presentation, we will address the scientific objections that have been raised over the years against probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Owing to the paucity of observations, we must rely on expert opinion to quantify the epistemic uncertainties of PSHA models (e.g., in the weighting of individual models from logic-tree ensembles of plausible models). The main theoretical issue is a frequentist critique: subjectivity is immeasurable; ergo, PSHA models cannot be objectively tested against data; ergo, they are fundamentally unscientific. We have argued (PNAS, 111, 11973-11978) that the Bayesian subjectivity required for casting epistemic uncertainties can be bridged with the frequentist objectivity needed for pure significance testing through "experimental concepts." An experimental concept specifies collections of data, observed and not yet observed, that are judged to be exchangeable (i.e., with a joint distribution independent of the data ordering) when conditioned on a set of explanatory variables. We illustrate, through concrete examples, experimental concepts useful in the testing of PSHA models for ontological errors in the presence of aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty. In particular, we describe experimental concepts that lead to exchangeable binary sequences that are statistically independent but not identically distributed, showing how the Bayesian concept of exchangeability generalizes the frequentist concept of experimental repeatability. We also address the issue of testing PSHA models using spatially correlated data.

  9. Pediatric tuberculous meningitis: Model-based approach to determining optimal doses of the anti-tuberculosis drugs rifampin and levofloxacin for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, R M; Ruslami, R; Hibma, J E; Hesseling, A; Ramachandran, G; Ganiem, A R; Swaminathan, S; McIlleron, H; Gupta, A; Thakur, K; van Crevel, R; Aarnoutse, R; Dooley, K E

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is a highly morbid, often fatal disease. Standard treatment includes isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol. Current rifampin dosing achieves low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations, and CSF penetration of ethambutol is poor. In adult trials, higher-dose rifampin and/or a fluoroquinolone reduced mortality and disability. To estimate optimal dosing of rifampin and levofloxacin for children, we compiled plasma and CSF pharmacokinetic (PK) and outcomes data from adult TBM trials plus plasma PK data from children. A population PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) model using adult data defined rifampin target exposures (plasma area under the curve (AUC)0-24 = 92 mg*h/L). Levofloxacin targets and rifampin pediatric drug disposition information were literature-derived. To attain target rifampin exposures, children require daily doses of at least 30 mg/kg orally or 15 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.). From our pediatric population PK model, oral levofloxacin doses needed to attain exposure targets were 19-33 mg/kg. Our results provide data-driven guidance to maximize pediatric TBM treatment while we await definitive trial results. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  10. Aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, David N

    2008-08-01

    Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system, respectively. The number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal central nervous system infections, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with noninfectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis. This article reviews some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus is placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses, which as a group account for most aseptic meningitis cases and many focal infections of the spinal cord.

  11. Acute bacterial and viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartt, Russell

    2012-12-01

    Most cases of acute meningitis are infectious and result from a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Acute meningitis is infectious in most cases and caused by a potentially wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. Shifts in the epidemiology of bacterial pathogens have been influenced by changes in vaccines and their implementation. Seasonal and environmental changes influence the likely viral and rickettsial pathogens. The organized approach to the patient with suspected meningitis enables the prompt administration of antibiotics, possibly corticosteroids, and diagnostic testing with neuroimaging and spinal fluid analysis. Pertinent testing and treatment can vary with the clinical presentation, season, and possible exposures. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of acute meningitis.

  12. Experimental deep brain stimulation in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sonny Kh; Vlamings, Rinske; Lim, Leewei; Sesia, Thibault; Janssen, Marcus Lf; Steinbusch, Harry Wm; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Temel, Yasin

    2010-10-01

    DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION (DBS) as a therapy in neurological and psychiatric disorders is widely applied in the field of functional and stereotactic neurosurgery. In this respect, experimental DBS in animal models is performed to evaluate new indications and new technology. In this article, we review our experience with the concept of experimental DBS, including its development and validation. An electrode construction was developed using clinical principles to perform DBS unilaterally or bilaterally in freely moving rats. The stimulation parameters were adjusted for the rat using current density calculations. We performed validation studies in 2 animal models: a rat model of Parkinson's disease (bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine infusion in the striatum) and a rat model of Huntington's disease (transgenic rats). The effects of DBS were evaluated in different behavioral tasks measuring motor and cognitive functions. The electrode construction developed allows experimental DBS to be performed in freely moving rats. With the current setup, electrodes are placed in the target in 70% to 95% of the cases. Using a rat model, we showed that bilateral DBS of the subthalamic nucleus improves parkinsonian motor disability, but can induce behavioral side effects, similar to the clinical situation. In addition, we showed that DBS of the globus pallidus can improve motor and cognitive symptoms in a rat model of Huntington's disease. Nevertheless, during the process of the development and validation of experimental DBS, we encountered specific problems. These are discussed in detail. Experimental DBS in freely moving animals is an adequate tool to explore new indications for DBS and to refine DBS technology.

  13. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-06

    Jan 6, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 86; Issue 2. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model physics in inverse see-saw motivated SO(10) GUT. Ram Lal Awasthi. Special: Supersymmetric Unified Theories and Higgs Physics Volume 86 Issue 2 February 2016 pp 223- ...

  14. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-06

    Jan 6, 2016 ... also fit perfectly in the model framework. Despite the fact that SM has unravelled the gauge origin of fundamental forces and the structure of Universe while successfully confronting numerous experimental tests, it has various limitations. For a good summary on its excellencies and compulsions see [1], and.

  15. [Neuropsychiatric sequelae of viral meningitis in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2011-10-10

    Viral meningitis is considered to be a benign illness with only mild symptoms. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. However, retrospective studies have demonstrated that patients suffering from viral meningitis may experience cognitive impairment following the acute course of infection. Larger controlled studies are needed to elucidate the potential neuropsychiatric adverse outcome of viral meningitis.

  16. Electrochemical desalination of bricks - Experimental and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Gry; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    Chlorides, nitrates and sulfates play an important role in the salt-decay of porous materials in buildings and monuments. Electrochemical desalination is a technology able to remove salts from such porous materials in order to stop or prevent the decay. In this paper, experimental and numerical......-contaminated bricks with respect to the monovalent ions is discussed. Comparison between the experimental and the simulation results showed that the proposed numerical model is able to predict electrochemical desalination treatments with remarkable accuracy, and it can be used as a predictive tool...

  17. Campylobacter Fetus Meningitis in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome of C fetus meningitis in adults. We report cases of C fetus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of adult bacterial meningitis patients in the Netherlands and performed a review of the literature. Two patients with C fetus meningitis were identified from January 2006 through May 2015. The calculated annual incidence was 0.02 per million adults. Combined with the literature, we identified 22 patients with a median age of 48 years. An immunocompromised state was present in 16 patients (73%), mostly due to alcoholism (41%) and diabetes mellitus (27%). The source of infection was identified in 13 out of 19 patients (68%), consisting of regular contact with domestic animals in 5 and working on a farm in 4. Recurrent fever and illness was reported in 4 patients (18%), requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment. Two patients died (9%) and 3 survivors (15%) had neurological sequelae. C fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with an immunocompromised state. Based on the apparent slow clinical response seen in this limited number of cases, the authors of this study recommend a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy when C fetus is identified as a causative agent of bacterial meningitis. Cases appeared to do best with carbapenem therapy. PMID:26937916

  18. Viral meningitis: which patients can be discharged from the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Michael M; Wilde, James A

    2012-12-01

    Even in an era when cases of viral meningitis outnumber bacterial meningitis by at least 25:1, most patients with clinical meningitis are hospitalized. We describe the clinical characteristics of an unusual outbreak of viral meningitis that featured markedly elevated cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell counts (CSF WBC). A validated prediction model for viral meningitis was applied to determine which hospital admissions could have been avoided. Data were collected retrospectively from patients presenting to our tertiary care center. Charts were reviewed in patients with CSF pleocytosis (CSF WBC > 7 cells/mm(3)) and a clinical diagnosis of meningitis between March 1, 2003 and July 1, 2003. Cases were identified through hospital infection control and by surveying all CSF specimens submitted to the microbiology laboratory during the outbreak. There were 78 cases of viral meningitis and 1 case of bacterial meningitis identified. Fifty-eight percent of the viral meningitis cases were confirmed by culture or polymerase chain reaction to be due to Enterovirus. Mean CSF WBC count was 571 cells/mm(3), including 20 patients with a CSF WBC count > 750 cells/mm(3) (25%) and 11 patients with values > 1000 cells/mm(3) (14%). Sixty-four of 78 patients (82%) were hospitalized. Rates of headache, photophobia, nuchal rigidity, vomiting, and administration of intravenous fluids in the Emergency Department were no different between admitted and discharged patients. Only 26/78 (33%) patients with viral meningitis would have been admitted if the prediction model had been used. Although not all cases of viral meningitis are necessarily suitable for outpatient management, use of a prediction model for viral meningitis may have helped decrease hospitalization by nearly 60%, even though this outbreak was characterized by unusually high levels of CSF pleocytosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental Animal Models in Periodontology: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struillou, Xavier; Boutigny, Hervé; Soueidan, Assem; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In periodontal research, animal studies are complementary to in vitro experiments prior to testing new treatments. Animal models should make possible the validation of hypotheses and prove the safety and efficacy of new regenerating approaches using biomaterials, growth factors or stem cells. A review of the literature was carried out by using electronic databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Science). Numerous animal models in different species such as rats, hamsters, rabbits, ferrets, canines and primates have been used for modeling human periodontal diseases and treatments. However, both the anatomy and physiopathology of animals are different from those of humans, making difficult the evaluation of new therapies. Experimental models have been developed in order to reproduce major periodontal diseases (gingivitis, periodontitis), their pathogenesis and to investigate new surgical techniques. The aim of this review is to define the most pertinent animal models for periodontal research depending on the hypothesis and expected results. PMID:20556202

  20. Experimental superficial candidiasis on tissue models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilake, J A M S; Samaranayake, L P

    2010-07-01

    Candida species are common pathogens causing superficial mycoses primarily affecting the mucosa and the skin in humans. Crucial steps during pathogenesis of superficial candidiasis comprise fungal adhesion, colonisation and subsequent penetration of the respective tissues. Exploring these pathological events and perhaps fungal and tissue responses towards drug treatment is imperative in the management of this infection. Unfortunately, pathological biopsies of superficial candidiasis do not exhibit the early changes in the host-pathogen interaction as the tissues are already invaded by the fungi. In vivo experimental assessments of pathological processes of superficial candidiasis are also limited because of the difficulties in providing reproducible and comparable conditions in the host environment. Conversely, in vitro models have helped studying fungal-host interactions under more defined and controlled conditions. Some common in vitro models used to simulate superficial candidiasis are chick chorioallantoic membrane, mucosal explants and single layer or multiple layer cell cultures. Interestingly, these experimental approaches share advantages as well as disadvantages when compared with in vivo conditions. Hence, this review intends to discuss about the experimental superficial candidiasis produced in various tissue models and their advantages as well as disadvantages with a particular reference to further improvement of validity and reliability of such experiments.

  1. Seclazone Reactor Modeling And Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinga, T. [ETH-Zuerich (Switzerland); Olalde, G. [CNRS Odeillo (France); Steinfeld, A. [PSI and ETHZ (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model is formulated for the SOLZINC solar chemical reactor for the production of Zn by carbothermal reduction of ZnO. The model involves solving, by the finite-volume technique, a 1D unsteady state energy equation that couples heat transfer to the chemical kinetics for a shrinking packed bed exposed to thermal radiation. Validation is accomplished by comparison with experimentally measured temperature profiles and Zn production rates as a function of time, obtained for a 5-kW solar reactor tested at PSI's solar furnace. (author)

  2. Beyond the standard model, experimental summary

    CERN Document Server

    McPherson, R A

    2003-01-01

    An overview of experimental results in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. It is impossible to cover all topics in this field, so a set of examples is used to highlight the scope and breadth of the results. Selected topics include searches for compositeness, flavour changing neutral currents, SUSY, exotic Higgs particles, low scale gravity in extra dimensions, and non commutative geometry. Current results are presented from the LEP, Tevatron Run I, and HERA I experiments. No convincing evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model has been observed. Prospects for ongoing and upcoming experiments are discussed. (40 refs).

  3. Experimental in Vivo Models of Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Segal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candidiasis is a multifaceted fungal disease including mucosal-cutaneous, visceral, and disseminated infections caused by yeast species of the genus Candida. Candida infections are among the most common human mycoses. Candida species are the third to fourth most common isolates from bloodstream infections in neutropenic or immunocompromised hospitalized patients. The mucosal-cutaneous forms—particularly vaginal infections—have a high prevalence. Vaginitis caused by Candida species is the second most common vaginal infection. Hence, candidiasis is a major subject for research, including experimental in vivo models to study pathogenesis, prevention, or therapy of the disease. The following review article will focus on various experimental in vivo models in different laboratory animals, such as mammals (mice, rats, rabbits, the fruit fly–Drosophila melanogaster, the larvae of the moth Galleria mellonella, or the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The review will describe the induction of the different clinical forms of candidiasis in the various models and the validity of such models in mimicking the human clinical situations. The use of such models for the assessment of antifungal drugs, evaluation of potential vaccines to protect before candidiasis, exploration of Candida virulence factors, and comparison of pathogenicity of different Candida species will be included in the review. All of the above will be reported as based on published studies of numerous investigators as well as on the research of the author and his group.

  4. Endometriose: modelo experimental em ratas Endometriosis: experimental model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schor

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: divulgar a metodologia da indução de endometriose experimental em animais de laboratório. Método: utilizamos ratas albinas, virgens, adultas de aproximadamente três meses de idade, que foram inicialmente anestesiadas pelo éter etílico. Aberta a cavidade abdominal, identificamos os cornos uterinos e retiramos um fragmento de aproximadamente 4 cm do corno uterino direito. Esse fragmento foi mergulhado em solução fisiológica e sob lupa estereoscópica foi separado o endométrio do miométrio e feitos retângulos de aproximadamente 4 por 5 mm. Esses foram fixados por meio de fio de sutura, sobre vasos sangüíneos visíveis a olho nu, na parede lateral do abdômen, tomando-se sempre o cuidado de manter a porção do endométrio livre voltada para a luz da cavidade abdominal. Após 21 dias os animais foram novamente operados para verificarmos o tamanho dos implantes e para retirada do endométrio ectópico para análise histológica. Resultados: macroscopicamente observamos crescimento significativo dos implantes endometriais. Ao exame microscópico pudemos observar a presença de epitélio glandular e estroma semelhantes ao do endométrio tópico. Conclusões: o modelo utilizado reproduz a doença, em ratas, sendo método auxiliar de valia para estudar esta afecção, principalmente a ação de medicamentos sobre esses implantes.Purpose: to demonstrate the experimental endometriosis induction in animals. Method: we used adult female Wistar rats weighing 200 - 250 g anesthetized with ethyl ether to open the abdominal cavity. After identifying the uterine horns, we removed an approximately 4 cm fragment from the right uterine horn. This fragment was placed in physiological saline and, with the aid of a stereoscopic magnifying glass, the endometrium was separated from the myometrium and cut into rectangles of approximately 4 x 5 mm. These rectangles were fastened to the lateral abdominal wall near great blood vessels, taking care

  5. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of “in silico” and “ex vivo” models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals.

  6. Nonlinear hierarchical modeling of experimental infection data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Michael D; Breheny, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonlinear hierarchical model (NLHM) for analyzing longitudinal experimental infection (EI) data. The NLHM offers several improvements over commonly used alternatives such as repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA) and the linear mixed model (LMM). It enables comparison of relevant biological properties of the course of infection including peak intensity, duration and time to peak, rather than simply comparing mean responses at each observation time. We illustrate the practical benefits of this model and the insights it yields using data from experimental infection studies on equine arteritis virus. Finally, we demonstrate via simulation studies that the NLHM substantially reduces bias and improves the power to detect differences in relevant features of the infection response between two populations. For example, to detect a 20% difference in response duration between two groups (n=15) in which the peak time and peak intensity were identical, the RM-ANOVA test had a power of just 11%, and LMM a power of just 12%. By comparison, the nonlinear model we propose had a power of 58% in the same scenario, while controlling the Type I error rate better than the other two methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Models for Experimental High Density Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Swoboda, Julia; Nowak, Katarzyna; Dziechciarz, Klaudia

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the effects of research on models of high density housing. The authors present urban projects for experimental high density housing estates. The design was based on research performed on 38 examples of similar housing in Poland that have been built after 2003. Some of the case studies show extreme density and that inspired the researchers to test individual virtual solutions that would answer the question: How far can we push the limits? The experimental housing projects show strengths and weaknesses of design driven only by such indexes as FAR (floor attenuation ratio - housing density) and DPH (dwellings per hectare). Although such projects are implemented, the authors believe that there are reasons for limits since high index values may be in contradiction to the optimum character of housing environment. Virtual models on virtual plots presented by the authors were oriented toward maximising the DPH index and DAI (dwellings area index) which is very often the main driver for developers. The authors also raise the question of sustainability of such solutions. The research was carried out in the URBAN model research group (Gliwice, Poland) that consists of academic researchers and architecture students. The models reflect architectural and urban regulations that are valid in Poland. Conclusions might be helpful for urban planners, urban designers, developers, architects and architecture students.

  8. Neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-07-01

    We reported on occurrence and impact of neurological sequelae after bacterial meningitis. We reviewed occurrence of neurological sequelae in children and adults after pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Adults with pneumococcal meningitis have the highest risk of developing focal neurological deficits, which are most commonly caused by cerebral infarction, but can also be due to cerebritis, subdural empyema, cerebral abscess or intracerebral bleeding. Focal deficits may improve during clinical course and even after discharge, but a proportion of patients will have persisting focal neurological deficits that often interfere in patient's daily life. Hearing loss occurs in a high proportion of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and has been associated with co-existing otitis. Children and adults recovering from bacterial meningitis without apparent neurological deficits are at risk for long-term cognitive deficits. Early identification of neurological sequelae is important for children to prevent additional developmental delay, and for adults to achieve successful return in society after the disease. Neurological sequelae occur in a substantial amount of patients following bacterial meningitis. Most frequently reported sequelae are focal neurological deficits, hearing loss, cognitive impairment and epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prognostic factors related to sequelae in childhood bacterial meningitis: Data from a Greek meningitis registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilopoulou Vasiliki A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial meningitis (BM is a life-threatening disease, often related with serious complications and sequelae. Infants and children who survive bacterial meningitis often suffer neurological and other sequelae. Methods A total of 2,477 patients aged 1 month to 14 years old hospitalized in a Children's Hospital in Greece diagnosed with acute bacterial meningitis were collected through a Meningitis Registry, from 1974 to 2005. Clinical, laboratory and other parameters (sex, age, pathogen, duration of symptoms before and after admission were evaluated through univariate and multivariate analysis with regard to sequelae. Analysis of acute complications were also studied but not included in the final model. Results The rate of acute complications (arthritis and/or subdural effusion was estimated at 6.8% (152 out of 2,251 patients, 95%CI 5.8-7.9 while the rate of sequelae (severe hearing loss, ventriculitis, hydrocephalus or seizure disorder among survivors was estimated at 3.3% (73 out of 2,207 patients, 95%CI 2.6-4.2. Risk factors on admission associated with sequelae included seizures, absence of hemorrhagic rash, low CSF glucose, high CSF protein and the etiology of meningitis. A combination of significant prognostic factors including presence of seizures, low CSF glucose, high CSF protein, positive blood culture and absence of petechiae on admission presented an absolute risk of sequelae of 41.7% (95%CI 15.2-72.3. Conclusions A combination of prognostic factors of sequelae in childhood BM may be of value in selecting patients for more intensive therapy and in identifying possible candidates for new treatment strategies.

  10. Inhibition of DAMP signaling as an effective adjunctive treatment strategy in pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masouris, Ilias; Klein, Matthias; Dyckhoff, Susanne; Angele, Barbara; Pfister, H W; Koedel, Uwe

    2017-11-02

    Pneumococcal meningitis remains a potentially lethal and debilitating disease, mainly due to brain damage from sustained inflammation. The release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), like myeloid-related protein 14 (MRP14) and high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), plays a major role in persistence of inflammation. In this study, we evaluated if paquinimod, an MRP14-inhibitor, and an anti-HMGB1 antibody can improve clinical outcome as adjunctive therapeutics in pneumococcal meningitis. We tested the adjuvant administration of paquinimod and the anti-HMGB1 antibody in our pneumococcal meningitis mouse model assessing clinical (clinical score, open-field-test, temperature) and pathophysiological parameters (intracranial pressure, white blood cell count in CSF, bleeding area) as well as bacterial titers in blood and brain 24 h after administration and 48 h after infection. Furthermore, we explored the interactions of these two agents with dexamethasone, the standard adjuvant treatment in pneumococcal meningitis (PM), and daptomycin, a non-bacteriolytic antibiotic preventing pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) release. Adjunctive inhibition of MRP14 or HMGB1 reduced mortality in mice with PM. This effect was lost when the two anti-DAMP agents were given simultaneously, possibly due to excessive immunosuppression. Combining anti-PAMP (daptomycin) and anti-DAMP treatments did not produce synergistic results; instead, the anti-DAMP treatment alone was sufficient and superior. The combination of anti-HMGB1 with dexamethasone did not diminish the effect of the former. DAMP inhibition possesses good potential as an adjuvant treatment approach in PM, as it improves clinical outcome and can be given together with the standard adjuvant dexamethasone without drug effect loss in experimental PM.

  11. Modeling of Experimental Atherosclerotic Plaque Delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiaochang; Chen, Xin; Deng, Xiaomin; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    A cohesive zone model (CZM) approach is applied to simulate atherosclerotic plaque delamination experiments in mouse abdominal aorta specimens. A three-dimensional finite element model is developed for the experiments. The aortic wall is treated as a fiber-reinforced, highly deformable, incompressible material, and the Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden (HGO) model is adopted for the aortic bulk material behavior. Cohesive elements are placed along the plaque-media interface along which delamination occurs. The 3D specimen geometry is created based on images from the experiments and certain simplifying approximations. A set of HGO and CZM parameter values is determined based on values suggested in the literature and through matching simulation predictions of the load vs. load-point displacement curve with experimental measurements for one loading-delamination-unloading cycle. Using this set of parameter values, simulation predictions for four other loading-delamination-unloading cycles are obtained, which show good agreement with experimental measurements. The findings of the current study demonstrate the applicability of the CZM approach in arterial tissue failure simulations.

  12. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality and morbidity have remained high in bacterial meningitis. Impairment of cerebral energy metabolism probably contributes to unfavorable outcome. Intracerebral microdialysis is routinely used to monitor cerebral energy metabolism, and recent experimental studies indicate that ...

  13. Superficial tension: experimental model with simple materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintori Ferreira, María Alejandra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work appears a didactic offer based on an experimental activity using materials of very low cost, orientated to achieving that the student understand and interpret the phenomenon of superficial tension together with the importance of the modeling in sciences. It has as principal aim of education bring the student over to the mechanics of the static fluids and the intermolecular forces, combining scientific contents with questions near to the student what provides an additional motivation to the reflection of the scientific investigation.

  14. Evaluation of Bay R 3783 in rodent models of superficial and systemic candidiasis, meningeal cryptococcosis, and pulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, R F; Yee, E

    1990-01-01

    The triazole Bay R 3783 was compared with fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and amphotericin B in rodent models of superficial and systemic candidiasis, meningocerebral cryptococcosis, and pulmonary aspergillosis. Overall, Bay R 3783 was comparable or slightly superior to fluconazole and markedly superior to itraconazole and ketoconazole in both survival and short-term organ load experiments in models of candidiasis and cryptococcosis but was less effective than amphotericin B. Of the antifungal agents tested, only Bay R 3783 and itraconazole showed any efficacy in the model of pulmonary aspergillosis. PMID:2159257

  15. Muscle injury: review of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Jaqueline de; Gottfried, Carmem

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in the human body. Its main characteristic is the capacity to regenerate after injury independent of the cause of injury through a process called inflammatory response. Mechanical injuries are the most common type of the skeletal muscle injuries and are classified into one of three areas strain, contusion, and laceration. First, this review aims to describe and compare the main experimental methods that replicate the mechanical muscle injuries. There are several ways to replicate each kind of mechanical injury; there are, however, specific characteristics that must be taken into account when choosing the most appropriate model for the experiment. Finally, this review discusses the context of mechanical injury considering types, variability of methods, and the ability to reproduce injury models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Organ models in wound ballistics: experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Mustafa Tahir; Oğünç, Gökhan; Eryilmaz, Mehmet; Yiğit, Taner; Menteş, Mustafa Oner; Dakak, Mehmet; Uzar, Ali Ihsan; Oner, Köksal

    2007-01-01

    Effects of various types and diameters of guns and related treatment principles are different. Our study was performed to experimentally demonstrate the effects of different gunshots in body tissues. 9x19 mm hand-gun and 7.62x51 mm G-3 infantry rifle were used in the study. Injury models were created through hand-gun and rifle shootings at isolated soft tissue, lower extremity, liver and intestine tissue simulants made of ballistic candle. High-speed cameras were used to capture 1000 frames per second. Images were examined and wound mechanisms were evaluated. It was observed that the colon content distributed more within the surrounding tissues by the rifle shootings comparing with hand-gun shootings and could be an infection source due to the large size of the cavity in the colon. Especially when the bullets hitting the bone were investigated, it was seen that much more tissue injury occurs with high speed bullets due to bullet deformation and fragmentation. However, no significant difference was found between the effect of hand-gun and rifle bullets passing through the extremity without hitting the bone. To know the type of the gun that caused the injury and its characteristics will allow to estimate severity and size of the injury before the treatment and to focus on different alternatives of treatment. Therefore, use of appropriate models is required in experimental studies.

  17. Evaluation of Bay R 3783 in rodent models of superficial and systemic candidiasis, meningeal cryptococcosis, and pulmonary aspergillosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hector, R F; Yee, E.

    1990-01-01

    The triazole Bay R 3783 was compared with fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, and amphotericin B in rodent models of superficial and systemic candidiasis, meningocerebral cryptococcosis, and pulmonary aspergillosis. Overall, Bay R 3783 was comparable or slightly superior to fluconazole and markedly superior to itraconazole and ketoconazole in both survival and short-term organ load experiments in models of candidiasis and cryptococcosis but was less effective than amphotericin B. Of the ...

  18. Meningitis bacteriana aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rodrigo Blamey, Dr.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available La Meningitis Bacteriana Aguda (MBA de adquisición comunitaria es una enfermedad prevalente en todo el mundo; constituye siempre una emergencia médica y se asocia a una alta morbimortalidad. Su epidemiología es variable y los principales agentes en adultos son S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, H. influenzae y L. monocitogenes. En Chile existe un sistema de vigilancia recientemente implementado que permitirá un mejor diagnóstico epidemiológico. Las manifestaciones clínicas clásicas no siempre están presentes principalmente en adultos mayores. El diagnóstico requiere del estudio de líquido cefalorraquídeo, y las técnicas de biología molecular han significado un aporte relevante en los últimos años. El tratamiento antibiótico debe ser instaurado rápidamente para mejorar el pronóstico, mientras que la terapia coadyuvante con corticoides en adultos tiene sólo beneficios en etiología neumocócica. Se requieren mejores estrategias de prevención frente a una entidad que no ha cambiado su mortalidad a pesar del progreso de la medicina moderna.

  19. Experimental Basis for IED Particle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng-Johansson, J.

    2009-05-01

    The internally electrodynamic (IED) particle model is built on three experimental facts: a) electric charges present in all matter particles, b) an accelerated charge generates electromagnetic (EM) waves by Maxwell's equations and Planck energy equation, and c) source motion gives Doppler effect. A set of well-kwon basic particle equations have been predicted based on first-principles solutions for IED particle (e.g. arxiv:0812.3951, J Phys CS128, 012019, 2008); the equations are long experimentally validated. A critical review of the key experiments suggests that the IED process underlies these equations not just sufficiently but also necessarily. E.g.: 1) A free IED electron solution is a plane wave ψ= Ce^i(kdX-φT) requisite for producing the diffraction fringe in a Davisson-Germer experiment, and of also all basic point-like attributes facilitated by a linear momentum kd and the model structure. It needs not further be a wave packet which produces not a diffraction fringe. 2)The radial partial EM waves, hence the total ψ, of an IED electron will, on both EM theory and experiment basis -not by assumption, enter two slits at the same time, as is requisite for an electron to interfere with itself as shown in double slit experiments. 3) On annihilation, an electron converts (from mass m) to a radiation energy φ without an acceleration which is externally observable and yet requisite by EM theory. So a charge oscillation of frequency φ and its EM waves must regularly present internal of a normal electron, whence the IED model.

  20. Incidence, Carriage and Case-Carrier Ratios for Meningococcal Meningitis in the African Meningitis Belt: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutangni, Thibaut; Boubacar Maïnassara, Halima; Mueller, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    together with variations in frequency of carriage transmission should be considered in models attempting to capture the epidemiology of meningococcal meningitis and mainly to predict meningitis epidemics in the African meningitis belt. PMID:25658307

  1. Dynamic CT of tuberculous meningeal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinkins, J.R.

    1987-07-01

    The technique of intravenous dynamic cranial computed tomography has been applied to the patient population at this location in Saudi Arabia with meningeal tuberculosis. The various manifestations and sequelae including meningitis, arteritis, infarct, and true meningeal tuberculomata all have characteristic if not specific appearances. The dynamic study enhances an otherwise static examination and reveals a great deal about the pathophysiology of tuberculosis involving the cerebral meningeal surfaces.

  2. Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0387 TITLE: Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mikhail Papisov, PhD...SUBTITLE Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0387 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...for neoplastic meningitis ( meningeal metastasis of breast cancer). The proposed therapy will be based on direct (intrathecal) administration of

  3. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  4. A human experimental model of episodic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi

    2014-01-01

    were subjected to 45 min of intense painful cutaneous electrical stimulation (episodic pain session), using a stimulus paradigm that in animals has been shown to induce long-term potentiation. These electrical stimulations produced a verbal pain rating of approximately 85 on a 0-100 verbal rating scale......An experimental model of daily episodic pain was developed to investigate peripheral sensitization and cortical reorganization in healthy individuals. Two experiments (A and B) were conducted. Experiments A and B consisted of one and five consecutive days, respectively, in which the participants...... (VRS). Physiological (blood flow and axon flare reflex), psychophysical (perception threshold and verbal pain ratings) and electrophysiological (128 channels recorded somatosensory evoked potential (SEP)) measurements were recorded. The stimulation evoked a visible axon flare reflex and caused...

  5. neonatal bacterial meningitis in Cape Town children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with proven bacterial meningitis at all the hospitaJs in the. Cape Town ... children with haemophilus and pneumococcal meningitis were similar ..... treatment policies. The current treatment policy in most of the hospitals in the area is that meningococcal meningitis is treated for at least 7 days, while the other types are treated.

  6. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with a ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining around ...

  7. Experimental validation of model Hortel Whillier; Validacion experimental del model de Hottel-Whillier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez Munoz, F.; Cejudo Lopez, J. M.; Carrillo andres, A.

    2010-07-01

    Comparing the results of testing of a commercial flat-plate solar collector with a detailed implementation model of Hottel Whillier fin and tube. The validation procedure is based on comparing experimental and theoretical curves and more likely uncertainty bands. the model correctly predicts the end of profits and underestimates the 5% of losses, although a sensitivity analysis shows that this result is not attributable to the model itself but to the inputs with which it was implemented. The model has difficulty differentiating between the terms of linear and quadratic losses that appear in the quadratic fit curve. (Author) 1 refs.

  8. Effects of Anethole in Nociception Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Mileni Versuti Ritter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl, major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum, in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg, and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg. In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators.

  9. Tendon healing in vivo. An experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, S O; Lundborg, G; Lohmander, L S

    1989-01-01

    Flexor tendon segments were incubated in a diffusion chamber in the subcutis of rabbits. Tendons incubated up to 6 weeks in the diffusion chamber showed proliferating and migrating cells from the epitenon cell layer as well as viable endotenon cells. Explants frozen in liquid nitrogen prior to incubation showed no signs of extrinsic cell contamination and remained non-viable indicating that no cell penetration occurred through the Millipore filter and that cell division seen in non-frozen and incubated tendons was an expression of intrinsic cellular proliferative capacity of the tendon. In tendon segments incubated in chambers for three weeks, collagen synthesis was reduced by 50% and the rate of cell proliferation measured as 3H-thymidine incorporation, was 15 times that of native tendons. Frozen and incubated tendons showed only traces of remaining matrix synthesis or cell proliferation. With this experimental model we have histologically and biochemically shown that tendons may survive and heal while the nutrition exclusively could be based on diffusion and the tendons have an intrinsic capacity of healing. The described model enables further studies on tendon healing and its regulation.

  10. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D.; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53-3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall.

  11. CT scan of bacterial and aseptic meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Kazumasa; Saiwai, Shigeo; Tamaoka, Koichi (Kobe Central Municipal Hospital (Japan))

    1983-01-01

    CT scans of the patients with aseptic and bacterial meningitis were reviewed and compared to previous reports. In aseptic meningitis, no abnormal CT findings were observed. In bacterial meningitis, CT findings were ventricular dilatation, subdural fluid collection, parenchymal low density, intracerebral hematoma and meningeal enhancement after contrast injection. Three patients among 48 suffered from status epileptics during the course of the illness. All of the 3 patients developed parenchymal inhomogeneous low density and progressive ventricular dilatation which did not improve after ventricular peritoneal shunt surgery. We believe that these changes are most likely due to hypoxic hypoxemia during epileptic seizure and meningitis itself seems to play a little role.

  12. Kluyvera meningitis in a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Marisa; Rojas, Pilar; Garcia, Elisa; Marquez, Javier; Losada, Antonio; Muñoz, Miguel

    2007-11-01

    Kluyvera is described infrequently in association with clinically significant infections in humans. It can produce a wide range of clinically significant manifestations. We describe a newborn with ventriculoperitoneal shunt, who was successfully treated for Kluyvera meningitis. We believe that this is the first case of Kluyvera central nervous system infection reported in a child.

  13. Pituitary apoplexy masquerading as meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of pituitary apoplexy and often leads to a misdiagnosis of infectious meningoencephalitis. We present the case of a 52 year old male admitted with a diabetic ketoacidosis who subsequently developed a severe headache with features of meningism. Haematological tests revealed an elevated white cell count and C-reactive ...

  14. [Laboratory diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marí, José María Navarro; Ruiz, Mercedes Pérez; Anza, Diego Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocytic meningitis, mainly those with an acute and benign course, are caused by viruses. In our area, the most commonly involved agents are enteroviruses, herpes simplex, varicella zoster and Toscana viruses. Nucleic acids amplification techniques (NAAT) are the methods of choice to diagnose viral meningitis from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. They are more rapid and sensitive, and indeed, they are not influenced by the viability of the virus in the clinical specimen as traditional methods are. The development of commercial equipments, the degree of automation, and the use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems are the most important premises to choose the molecular method in each laboratory. Recently, commercial kits of real-time PCR are available for the detection of enteroviruses and herpesviruses, which are the most frequently viruses involved in meningitis. Although NAAT from the clinical sample have replaced cell culture for diagnostic purposes, the combination of both methods remain useful. When the detection of the causal agent from the CSF sample is not possible, other specimens (pharyngeal exudates, stools) or serological methods can be used. Serology is the reference method for meningitis caused by West Nile virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, which are less frequently detected in our area. 2010 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. [Aseptic meningitis during Sweet syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balass, S; Duparc, A; Zaïd, S; Bularca, S; Modiano, Ph

    2005-12-01

    Sweet syndrome is a neutrophilic skin disease that can involve extracutaneous signs. Here we describe a case of aseptic meningitis, a rare potential extracutaneous sign of Sweet syndrome. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for non-pruritic maculoerythematous skin lesions of the legs and back with subsequent myalgia. A histology specimen taken from a skin lesion revealed an acute neutrophilic disease consistent with Sweet syndrome. Marked inflammation and cholestasis were observed. Systemic corticosteroid therapy was given and resulted in good clinical and laboratory response. Two weeks later, in a setting of gradual dosage reduction, the patient was hospitalized for intense headaches associated with meningeal irritation in an inflammatory context. Liver function tests were again abnormal. We concluded on a diagnosis of Sweet syndrome complicated by aseptic meningitis and hepatic sites. Investigation for underlying disease, particularly digestive or hematologic, was negative. A favorable outcome was achieved following administration of higher doses of systemic corticosteroids. Aseptic meningitis constitutes an extracutaneous localization of Sweet syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach and exclusion of infectious origin are required in order to institute systemic corticosteroid therapy.

  16. Comparative efficacies of albendazole and the Chinese herbal medicine long-dan-xie-gan-tan, used alone or in combination, in the treatment of experimental eosinophilic meningitis induced by Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S C; Chen, K M; Chang, Y H; Lee, H H

    2008-03-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is the principal cause of human eosinophilic meningitis or meningoencephalitis world-wide. In the present study, the efficacies of early-stage treatment with the Chinese herbal medicine long-dan-xie-gan-tan (LDXGT) and albendazole, used alone or in combination, were evaluated in BALB/c mice with A. cantonensis-induced dysfunction of the blood-central-nervous-system barrier and eosinophilic meningo-encephalitis. Indicators of the therapeutic effect included worm recovery, histopathological scores for the meningitis, assays of tissue-type plasminogen activator (PA), urokinase-type PA and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the brain, the ratio between albumin concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum, and counts of eosinophils in the CSF. Combined treatment with albendazole and LDXGT gave better results than monotherapy based on either drug, apparently inhibiting eosinophilic meningitis via antagonists of the PA/MMP-9 system. LDXGT may have a therapeutic role in reducing inflammatory reaction in the subarachnoid space. Monotherapy with such an anti-inflammatory drug may relieve the symptoms of mild infection and the host's immune responses to A. cantonensis larvae. In severe infection, however, co-therapy with an anthelmintic (to kill the larvae) and an anti-inflammatory agent (to provide symptomatic relief) is probably a better approach. The therapeutic strategy should be tailored to the severity of the illness and the numbers of eosinophils in the CSF.

  17. Corticosteroids for parasitic eosinophilic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanaviratananich, Sikawat; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak; Ngamjarus, Chetta

    2015-02-17

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis (A. cantonensis) is the major cause of infectious eosinophilic meningitis. Dead larvae of this parasite cause inflammation and exacerbate symptoms of meningitis. Corticosteroids are drugs used to reduce the inflammation caused by this parasite. To assess the efficacy and safety of corticosteroids for the treatment of eosinophilic meningitis. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1950 to November Week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to December 2014), Scopus (1960 to December 2014), Web of Science (1955 to December 2014), LILACS (1982 to December 2014) and CINAHL (1981 to December 2014). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of corticosteroids versus placebo for eosinophilic meningitis. Two review authors (SiT, SaT) independently collected and extracted study data. We graded the methodological quality of the RCTs. We identified and analysed outcomes and adverse effects. We did not identifiy any new trials for inclusion or exclusion in this 2014 update. One study involving 110 participants (55 participants in each group) met our inclusion criteria. The corticosteroid (prednisolone) showed a benefit in shortening the median time to resolution of headaches (five days in the treatment group versus 13 days in the control group, P value treatment (9.1% versus 45.5%, P value treatment group (12.7% versus 40%, P value = 0.002). There was a reduction in the median time of analgesic use in participants receiving corticosteroids (10.5 versus 25.0, P value = 0.038). There were no reported adverse effects from prednisolone in the treatment group. Corticosteroids significantly help relieve headache in patients with eosinophilic meningitis, who have a pain score of four or more on a visual analogue scale. However, there is only one RCT supporting this benefit and this trial did not clearly mention allocation concealment and stratification. Therefore, we agreed to grade our included study as a moderate quality trial. Future well-designed RCTs are necessary.

  18. Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mendes-Braz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered.

  19. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  20. African meningitis belt pneumococcal disease epidemiology indicates a need for an effective serotype 1 containing vaccine, including for older children and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Judith E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine strategies in GAVI-eligible countries are focusing on infant immunization but this strategy may not be optimal in all settings. We aimed to collect all available population based data on pneumococcal meningitis throughout life in the African meningitis belt and then to model overall meningitis risk to help inform vaccine policy. Methods After a systematic review of literature published from 1970 through the present, we found robust population-based Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp meningitis data across age strata for four African meningitis belt countries that included 35 surveillance years spanning from 1970 to 2005. Using these data we modeled disease risk for a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons followed throughout life. Results Similar to meningococcal meningitis, laboratory-confirmed pneumococcal meningitis was seasonal, occurring primarily in the dry season. The mean annual Sp meningitis incidence rates were 98, 7.8 to 14, and 5.8 to 12 per 100,000 among persons Conclusions In the African meningitis belt, Sp is as important a cause of meningitis as Neisseria meningitidis, particularly among older children and working age adults. The meningitis belt population needs an effective serotype 1 containing vaccine and policy discussions should consider vaccine use outside of early childhood.

  1. Role of Rifampin in Reducing Inflammation and Neuronal Damage in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Lipi; Singhi, Sunit; Singhi, Pratibha; Aggarwal, Ritu

    2017-06-01

    Treatment of acute bacterial meningitis in children with bactericidal antibiotics causes cell wall lysis and a surge in inflammatory cascade, which in turn contributes to neuronal damage and morbidity. Pretreatment with a nonbacteriolytic antibiotic, such as rifampin, has been shown to attenuate the inflammatory response in experimental models of bacterial meningitis. In a pilot study, in children with bacterial meningitis, we have studied markers of inflammatory response and neuronal damage in 2 groups of children with bacterial meningitis; one group received rifampin pretreatment with ceftriaxone and the other group received ceftriaxone alone. Forty children with bacterial meningitis, who were 3 months to 12 years of age, were randomly assigned to receive either a single dose rifampin (20 mg/kg) 30 minutes before ceftriaxone or ceftriaxone alone was given. The primary outcome variables were cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), S100B and neuron-specific enolase on day 1 and day 5, and secondary outcome variables were the values of TNFα and interleukin 6 in serum on day 1 and day 5; hearing and neurologic sequelae at 3 months after recovery from the illness. Children in rifampin pretreatment group had significantly lower CSF TNFα concentrations [median (interquartile range [IQR]): 15.5 (7.2-22.0) vs. 53.0 (9.0-87.5) pg/mL, P = 0.019] and S100B [median (IQR): 145.0 (54.7-450.0) vs. 447.5 (221.0-804.6) pg/mL, P = 0.033] on day 1 and S100B [median (IQR): 109.7 (64.0-287.0) vs. 322 (106.7-578.0) pg/mL, P = 0.048] and neuron-specific enolase [median (IQR): 8.6 (5-14.75) vs. 18.2 (7.0-28.75) ng/mL, P = 0.035] on day 5 when compared with ceftriaxone alone group. The rifampin-treated group also had reduced morbidity and neurologic sequelae; however, these were not statistically significant. Pretreatment with single dose rifampin 30 minutes before ceftriaxone administration reduced the CSF concentrations of markers of

  2. PMWS: Experimental model and co-infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allan, G. M.; McNeilly, F.; Ellis, J

    2004-01-01

    and pneumonia and typical histological lesions include lymphocytic depletion and multinucleated giant cell formation in lymph nodes, degeneration and necrosis of hepatocytes, and multifocal lymphohistocytic interstitial pneumonia. This communication will review the results of experimental infections...

  3. Using Relative Humidity Forecasts to Manage Meningitis in the Sahel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Akweogno, P.; Awine, T.; Dalaba, M.; Dukic, V.; Dumont, A.; Hayden, M.; Hodgson, A.; Hopson, T. M.; Hugonnet, S.; Yoksas, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur quasi-regularly and with devastating impact. In 2008, for example, eighty-eight thousand people contracted meningitis and over five thousand died. Until very recently, the protection provided by the only available vaccine was so limited and short-lived that the only practical strategy for vaccination was reactive: waiting until an epidemic occurred in the region and then vaccinating in that region to prevent the epidemic's further growth. Even with that strategy, there were still times when demand outpaced available vaccine. While a new vaccine has recently been developed that is effective and inexpensive enough to be used more broadly and proactively, it is only effective against the strain of bacteria that causes the most common kind of bacterial meningitis. As a result, there will likely be continued need for reactive vaccination strategies. It is widely known that meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur only in the dry season. Our project investigated this relationship, and several independent lines of evidence demonstrate a robust relationship between the onset of the rainy season, as marked by weekly average relative humidity above 40%, and the end of meningitis epidemics. These lines of evidence include statistical analysis of two years of weekly meningitis and weather data across the Sahel, cross-correlation of ten years of meningitis and weather data in the Upper East region of northern Ghana, and high-resolution weather simulations of past meningitis seasons to interpolate available weather data. We also adapted two techniques that have been successfully used in public health studies: generalized additive models, which have been used to relate air quality and health, and a linearized version of the compartmental epidemics model that has been used to understand MRSA. Based on these multiple lines of evidence, average weekly relative humidity forecast two weeks in advance appears consistently and strongly related to

  4. High Yield of Adult Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells Obtained from Meningeal Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sissi Dolci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte loss can lead to cognitive and motor deficits. Current remyelinating therapeutic strategies imply either modulation of endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors or transplantation of in vitro expanded oligodendrocytes. Cell therapy, however, still lacks identification of an adequate source of oligodendrocyte present in adulthood and able to efficiently produce transplantable cells. Recently, a neural stem cell-like population has been identified in meninges. We developed a protocol to obtain high yield of oligodendrocyte lineage cells from one single biopsy of adult rat meningeal tissue. From 1 cm2 of adult rat spinal cord meninges, we efficiently expanded a homogenous culture of 10 millions of meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells in a short period of time (approximately 4 weeks. Meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells show typical mature oligodendrocyte morphology and express specific oligodendrocyte markers, such as galactosylceramidase and myelin basic protein. Moreover, when transplanted in a chemically demyelinated spinal cord model, meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells display in vivo-remyelinating potential. This oligodendrocyte lineage cell population derives from an accessible and adult source, being therefore a promising candidate for autologous cell therapy of demyelinating diseases. In addition, the described method to differentiate meningeal-derived neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte lineage cells may represent a valid in vitro model to dissect oligodendrocyte differentiation and to screen for drugs capable to promote oligodendrocyte regeneration.

  5. Proton NMR metabolic profiling of CSF reveals distinct differentiation of meningitis from negative controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Tanushri; Singh, Suruchi; Sen, Manodeep; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Agarwal, Gaurav Raj; Singh, Deepak Kumar; Srivastava, Janmejai Kumar; Singh, Alka; Srivastava, Rajeshwar Nath; Roy, Raja

    2017-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an essential bio-fluid of the central nervous system (CNS), playing a vital role in the protection of CNS and performing neuronal function regulation. The chemical composition of CSF varies during onset of meningitis, neurodegenerative disorders (positive controls) and in traumatic cases (negative controls). The study design was broadly categorized into meningitis cases, negative controls and positive controls. Further differentiation among the three groups was carried out using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) followed by supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). The statistical analysis of meningitis vs. negative controls using PLS-DA model resulted in R 2 of 0.97 and Q 2 of 0.85. There was elevation in the levels of ketone bodies, total free amino acids, glutamine, creatine, citrate and choline containing compounds (choline and GPC) in meningitis cases. Similarly, meningitis vs. positive controls resulted in R 2 of 0.80 and Q 2 of 0.60 and showed elevation in the levels of total free amino acids, glutamine, creatine/creatinine and citrate in the meningitis group. Four cases of HIV were identified by PLS-DA model as well as by clinical investigations. On the basis of metabolic profile it was found that negative control CSF samples are more appropriate for differentiation of meningitis than positive control CSF samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased anisotropy in neonatal meningitis: an indicator of meningeal inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Richa; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Nath, Kavindra [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Lucknow, UP (India); Malik, Gyanendra K.; Gupta, Amit [King George' s Medical University, Department of Pediatrics, Lucknow (India); Prasad, Kashi N. [Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Lucknow (India); Purwar, Ankur; Rathore, Divya; Rathore, Ram K.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Kanpur (India); Narayana, Ponnada A. [University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Increased anisotropy in brain abscesses has been shown to be due to adhesion of inflammatory cells and is suggestive of an active inflammatory process. The objective of this study was to determine if similar changes occur in the pia-arachnoid on the surface of the cerebral cortex in patients with pyogenic meningitis, and if these changes regress following antibiotic therapy. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed on 14 term neonates (mean age 13 days) with bacterial meningitis and 10 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on areas including the leptomeninges, the cerebral cortex and adjoining subcortical white matter for quantitation of mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivity (MD) values. Follow-up MRI was performed in five of the neonates in the patient group after 2 weeks of antibiotic treatment. FA and MD values were compared in patients before and after antibiotic treatment as well as with those in the healthy controls. Significantly higher FA values but no difference in MD values were observed in the patient group as compared to the healthy controls at both time points (before and after antibiotic treatment). Significantly decreased FA values in the frontal, occipital and temporal cortical regions were observed in patients following antibiotic treatment. DTI-derived FA may be of value in the noninvasive assessment of meningeal inflammatory activity and treatment response in neonates. (orig.)

  7. Dynamic vehicle model for handling performance using experimental data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SangDo Na

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An analytical vehicle model is essential for the development of vehicle design and performance. Various vehicle models have different complexities, assumptions and limitations depending on the type of vehicle analysis. An accurate full vehicle model is essential in representing the behaviour of the vehicle in order to estimate vehicle dynamic system performance such as ride comfort and handling. An experimental vehicle model is developed in this article, which employs experimental kinematic and compliance data measured between the wheel and chassis. From these data, a vehicle model, which includes dynamic effects due to vehicle geometry changes, has been developed. The experimental vehicle model was validated using an instrumented experimental vehicle and data such as a step change steering input. This article shows a process to develop and validate an experimental vehicle model to enhance the accuracy of handling performance, which comes from precise suspension model measured by experimental data of a vehicle. The experimental force data obtained from a suspension parameter measuring device are employed for a precise modelling of the steering and handling response. The steering system is modelled by a lumped model, with stiffness coefficients defined and identified by comparing steering stiffness obtained by the measured data. The outputs, specifically the yaw rate and lateral acceleration of the vehicle, are verified by experimental results.

  8. C-reactive protein and bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Jørgensen, P E; Nexø, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review published articles on the diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests with cerebrospinal fluid and serum in diagnosing bacterial meningitis. The literature from 1980 and onwards was searched using the electronic databases of MEDLINE, and we used summary...... measured in serum, and 4 in which it had been measured in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum. The odds ratio for bacterial meningitis versus aseptic meningitis for a positive CRP test with cerebrospinal fluid was estimated at 241 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 59-980), and the central tendencies.......06-0.08, respectively, the post-test probability of not having bacterial meningitis given a negative test is very high (> or = 97%), in the range of a pre-test probability (prevalence of bacterial meningitis) from 10 to 30%, whereas the post-test probability of bacterial meningitis given a positive test is considerably...

  9. Oxidative stress in children with bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ragni; Lohokare, Rajeev; Prasad, Rajniti

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The oxidative stress in bacterial meningitis is barely determined. Forty children with bacterial meningitis were studied for their oxidants and antioxidants status in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Fever (95%) was commonest presentation followed by seizure and vomiting. Neck rigidity and Kernig's sign were present in 37.5% and 27.5% cases, respectively. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and nitrite levels were significantly raised in cases (p ascorbic acid, glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels were significantly decreased in children with septic meningitis (p ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase indicates utilization of the antioxidants in septic meningitis. Thus, changes in oxidants and antioxidants observed suggest production of reactive oxygen species and their possible role in pathogenesis of septic meningitis.

  10. Neonatal meningitis complicating with pneumocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocephalus is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the cranial cavity. This gas may arise either from a trauma, a tumor, a surgical, or a diagnostic procedure or occasionally from an infection. Pneumocephalus as a complication of bacterial meningitis, in absence of trauma or a procedure, is extremely rare, particularly in a newborn. A case of pneumocephalus occurring in a baby, suffering from neonatal meningitis, acquired probably through unsafe cutting and tying of the cord, is reported here. Cutting, tying, and care of the umbilical cord is of utmost importance to prevent neonatal infection as the same is a potential cause of serious anaerobic infections, besides tetanus.

  11. Decreased virulence of a pneumolysin-deficient strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae in murine meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Andreas; Zysk, Gregor; Gerber, Joachim; Kunst, Tammo; Von Mering, Matthias; Bunkowski, Stefanie; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2002-11-01

    Pneumolysin, neuraminidases A and B, and hyaluronidase are virulence factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae that appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of meningitis. In a murine model of meningitis after intracerebral infection using mutants of S. pneumoniae D39, only mice infected with a pneumolysin-deficient strain were healthier at 32 and 36 h, had lower bacterial titers in blood at 36 h, and survived longer than the D39 parent strain. Cerebellar and spleen bacterial titers, meningeal inflammation, and neuronal damage scores remained uninfluenced by the lack of any of the virulence factors.

  12. Pediatric bacterial meningitis in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenga, N; Sicard, S; Cuadro-Alvarez, E; Long, L; Njuieyon, F; Martin, E; Kom-Tchameni, R; Balcaen, J; Moreau, B; Boukhari, R

    2015-01-01

    Controlling vaccine-preventable infectious diseases is a public health priority in French Guiana but there is currently no epidemiological data on pediatric bacterial meningitis in this overseas department. Our aim was to describe data related to pediatric bacterial meningitis in French Guiana and compare it with that of metropolitan France. We conducted a multicenter retrospective study from 2000 to 2010 to describe the clinical picture, biological data, epidemiology, and outcome of pediatric bacterial meningitis case patients in French Guiana. The median age of bacterial meningitis patients was 6months [0-15] and the sex ratio 1.06. We observed a total of 60 bacterial meningitis case patients. Most presented with pneumococcal meningitis (24 patients; 40%); 11 with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis (23%), five with group B streptococcal meningitis (8.5%), and five others (8.5%) with staphylococcal meningitis (three patients presented with coagulase-negative staphylococci and two with Staphylococcus aureus). Only one patient presented with group B meningococcal meningitis, an 18-month-old infant. We recorded 14 deaths (overall case fatality: 23%); eight were due to Streptococcus pneumoniae (case fatality: 33%). The overall sequelae rate was 28%. It was 32% for patients presenting with pneumococcal meningitis. We observed that 38% of children who had never been vaccinated were infected by a vaccine-preventable bacterium. We observed many differences in the distribution of the bacteria and in the patients' prognosis when comparing the French Guiana data with that of metropolitan France. Improving vaccination coverage would decrease the incidence of H. influenzae meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun; Park, Kang Min

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured ...

  14. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Adriani, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the brain and still has a high mortality. Bacterial meningitis is described as early as the 5th century B.C. in Hippocratic writings. Organisms causing meningitis were identified in the late 19th century. ...

  15. Acute bacterial meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Fiona; Heyderman, Robert S; Panagiotou, Stavros; Tunkel, Allan R; Solomon, Tom

    2016-12-17

    Over the past several decades, the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children has decreased but there remains a significant burden of disease in adults, with a mortality of up to 30%. Although the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis is not completely understood, knowledge of bacterial invasion and entry into the CNS is improving. Clinical features alone cannot determine whether meningitis is present and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid is essential for diagnosis. Newer technologies, such as multiplex PCR, and novel diagnostic platforms that incorporate proteomics and genetic sequencing, might help provide a quicker and more accurate diagnosis. Even with appropriate antimicrobial therapy, mortality is high and so attention has focused on adjunctive therapies; adjunctive corticosteroids are beneficial in certain circumstances. Any further improvements in outcome are likely to come from either modulation of the host response or novel approaches to therapy, rather than new antibiotics. Ultimately, the best hope to reduce the disease burden is with broadly protective vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental comparison of models for ultrafast impact ionization is silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-01-01

    We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses....

  17. Identifying low-risk patients for bacterial meningitis in adult patients with acute meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Yasuharu; Koizumi, Masahiro; Stein, Gerald H; Birrer, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    To derive and validate a clinical prediction model with high sensitivity for differentiating aseptic meningitis (AM) patients from bacterial meningitis (BM) patients. We developed the model using the derivation cohort in a community rural hospital in Okinawa and assessed its performance using the validation cohort in a metropolitan urban hospital in Tokyo. There were 66 (39.5%) and 5 (17.9%) adult patients with BM among the derivation (n=167) and the validation cohort (n=28), respectively. Recursive partitioning analysis was used to determine the important classification variables and to develop a sensitive model to safely exclude BM. The model produced high- and low-risk groups based on the following: 1) Gram stain, 2) CSF neutrophil percent < or =15%, 3) CSF neutrophil count < or =150 cells/mm(3), and, 4) mental status change. Among the derivation cohort, there were 65 patients with BM in the high-risk group (n=76), while only one patient with BM was noted (sensitivity, 99%) in the low-risk group (n=91). Among the validation cohort, there were 5 patients with BM in the high-risk group (n=7), while no patient was classified with BM (sensitivity, 100%) in the low-risk group (n=21). This simple and sensitive model might be useful to safely identify low-risk patients for BM who would not require antibiotic treatment.

  18. Efeitos de concentrações crescentes de lidocaína hiperbárica, administradas no espaço subaracnóideo, sobre a medula espinhal e as meninges: estudo experimental em cães Efectos de concentraciones crecientes de lidocaína hiperbara, administradas en el espacio subaracnoideo, sobre la médula espinal y las meninges: estudio experimental en perros Effects of increasing spinal hyperbaric lidocaine concentrations on spinal cord and meninges: experimental study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvânia R.O. Pires

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Ainda não está bem estabelecida a concentração de lidocaína que é potencialmente capaz de determinar lesão no tecido nervoso. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi estudar os efeitos sobre a medula espinhal e as meninges, de concentrações crescentes de lidocaína administrada por via subaracnóidea, em injeção única através de agulha de Quincke. MÉTODO: Após a aprovação da Comissão de Ética em Experimentação Animal, 40 cães adultos foram anestesiados com fentanil e etomidato e submetidos a punção subaracnóidea com agulha de Quincke 22G 21/2 para introdução de 1 mL, em 10 segundos, de solução glicosada a 7,5% - Grupo 1; lidocaína a 5% em solução glicosada a 7,5% - Grupo 2; lidocaína a 7,5% em solução glicosada a 7,5% - Grupo 3; lidocaína a 10% em solução glicosada a 7,5% - Grupo 4. Após a recuperação da anestesia venosa, foram observados, no período em que os animais estavam em vigência do bloqueio subaracnóideo, a presença de bloqueio motor, o tônus do esfíncter anal (normal ou relaxado e o nível de bloqueio sensitivo nos diferentes dermátomos das regiões cervical, torácica, lombar e sacral. Os animais permaneceram em cativeiro por 72 horas. Foram avaliados o tônus do esfíncter anal, a motricidade das patas posteriores, a sensibilidade dolorosa nas patas anteriores e posteriores e nos dermátomos sacrais, lombares e torácicos. Após serem sacrificados por eletrocussão sob anestesia, foram retiradas porções lombar e sacral da medula espinhal e das meninges para exame histológico por microscopia óptica. RESULTADOS: Nenhum animal dos Grupos 1 e 2 apresentou lesões clínicas ou histológicas. Três animais do Grupo 3 apresentaram alterações motoras nas patas posteriores e relaxamento do esfíncter anal. Nestes, foram observados focos de necrose na região posterior (dois cães e necrose em faixa em toda a superfície medular (um cão. Em um outro animal deste grupo, no

  19. Fluid therapy for acute bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maconochie, Ian K; Bhaumik, Soumyadeep

    2016-11-04

    Acute bacterial meningitis remains a disease with high mortality and morbidity rates. However, with prompt and adequate antimicrobial and supportive treatment, the chances for survival have improved, especially among infants and children. Careful management of fluid and electrolyte balance is an important supportive therapy. Both over- and under-hydration are associated with adverse outcomes. This is the latest update of a review first published in 2005 and updated in 2008 and 2014. To evaluate treatment of acute bacterial meningitis with differing volumes of initial fluid administration (up to 72 hours after first presentation) and the effects on death and neurological sequelae. For this 2016 update we searched the following databases up to March 2016: the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Global Health, and Web of Science. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of differing volumes of fluid given in the initial management of bacterial meningitis were eligible for inclusion. All four of the original review authors extracted data and assessed trials for quality in the first publication of this review (one author, ROW, has passed away since the original review; see Acknowledgements). The current authors combined data for meta-analysis using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data or mean difference (MD) for continuous data. We used a fixed-effect statistical model. We assessed the overall quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. We included three trials with a total of 420 children; there were no trials in adult populations. The largest of the three trials was conducted in settings with high mortality rates and was judged to have low risk of bias for all domains, except performance bias which was high risk. The other two smaller trials were not of high quality.The meta-analysis found no significant difference between the maintenance-fluid and restricted-fluid groups in number of deaths (RR 0.82, 95

  20. Validation of the bacterial meningitis score in adults presenting to the ED with meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Robert; Edlow, Jonathan A; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2016-07-01

    The Bacterial Meningitis Score classifies children with meningitis and none of the following high-risk predictors at very low risk for bacterial meningitis: positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram stain, CSF protein ≥80mg/dL, CSF absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ≥1000 cells/mm(3), peripheral ANC ≥10,000 cells/mm(3), and seizure at or prior to presentation. Although extensively validated in children, the Bacterial Meningitis Score has not been rigorously evaluated in adults. We performed a single-center cross-sectional retrospective study of adults presenting to the emergency department between 2003 and 2013 with meningitis (defined by CSF white blood cell count ≥10 cells/mm(3)). We defined a case of bacterial meningitis with either a positive CSF or blood culture. We report the performance of the Bacterial Meningitis Score in the study population. We identified 441 eligible patients of which, 4 (1%) had bacterial meningitis. The Bacterial Meningitis Score had a sensitivity of 100% [95% confidence interval (CI) 40%-100%], specificity 51% (95% CI, 46%-56%) and negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI, 98%-100%). None of the low risk adults had bacterial meningitis. If Bacterial Meningitis Score had been applied prospectively, the hospital admission rate would have dropped from 84% to 49% without missing any patients with bacterial meningitis. The Bacterial Meningitis Score accurately identified patients at low risk for bacterial meningitis and could assist clinical decision-making for adults with meningitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies on experimental models used for nutritional and biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anatomical location for a successful implantation in order to reduce complications to the hearest minimum has been suggested . The maintenance of the implanted cannulae for the purpose of keeping the modified experimental model in perfect health is discussed. Key Words: Experimental Models, Nutritional Biological ...

  2. Myeloid-Related Protein 14 Promotes Inflammation and Injury in Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wache, Christina; Klein, Matthias; Andersen, Christian Østergaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Neutrophilic inflammation often persists for days despite effective antibiotic treatment and contributes to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. We propose here that myeloid-related protein 14 (MRP14), an abundant cytosolic protein in myeloid cells, acts as an endogenous danger signal......, driving inflammation and aggravating tissue injury. METHODS:  The release pattern of MRP14 was analyzed in human and murine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as well as in isolated neutrophils. Its functional role was assessed in a mouse meningitis model, using MRP14-deficient mice. RESULTS:  We detected large...... quantities of MRP14 in CSF specimens from patients and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Immunohistochemical analyses and a cell-depletion approach indicated neutrophils as the major source of MRP14. In a meningitis model, MRP14-deficient mice showed a better resolution of inflammation during antibiotic...

  3. Soil Dust Aerosols and Wind as Predictors of Seasonal Meningitis Incidence in Niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Garcia Pando, Carlos; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Trzaska, Sylwia; Miller, Ron L.; Perlwitz, Jan P.; Baldasano, Jose M.; Cuevas, Emilio; Ceccato, Pietro; Yaka, Pascal; hide

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis are concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa during the dry season, a period when the region is affected by the Harmattan, a dry and dusty northeasterly trade wind blowing from the Sahara into the Gulf of Guinea.Objectives: We examined the potential of climate-based statistical forecasting models to predict seasonal incidence of meningitis in Niger at both the national and district levels.Data and methods: We used time series of meningitis incidence from 1986 through 2006 for 38 districts in Niger. We tested models based on data that would be readily available in an operational framework, such as climate and dust, population, and the incidence of early cases before the onset of the meningitis season in January-May. Incidence was used as a proxy for immunological state.

  4. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C.; Cha, Chae Y.; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S.; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these

  5. Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Al-awar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans.

  6. Experimental model to induce obesity in rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vinicius Von Diemen; Eduardo Neubarth Trindade; Manoel Roberto Maciel Trindade

    2006-01-01

    .... Obesity can be induced in animals by neuroendocrine, dietary or genetic changes. The most widely used models to induce obesity in rats are a lesion of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH...

  7. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  8. Experimental model of arteriovenous malformation in vitro using biological grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandu Aurelia Mihaela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs represent a serious health problem all around the world. Experimental models help to better understand the pathophysiology of these lesions. Experiment: We performed an experimental model of AVM using biological grafts, arteries and veins harvested from chicken wings at the elbow joint. We used 14 vessels and we performed 20 end-to-end anastomoses to create a nidus with a single feeding artery and a single draining vein. The system was irrigated with colored solution. The experiment was done according with law in force regarding experimental research activity. Conclusions: Experimental models allow us to understand the hemodynamics and predict the outcome of brain AVMs in humans. This experimental model is a useful tool in understanding the hemodynamic properties of brain AVMs. It is very useful in vascular anastomosis training

  9. An experimental comparison of modelling techniques for speaker ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most of the existing modelling techniques for the speaker recognition task make an implicit assumption of sufficient data for speaker modelling and hence may lead to poor modelling under limited data condition. The present work gives an experimental evaluation of the modelling techniques like Crisp Vector Quantization ...

  10. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-09-13

    To describe the epidemiology, etiology, clinical characteristics, treatment, outcome, and prevention of zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults. We identified 16 zoonotic bacteria causing meningitis in adults. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is uncommon compared to bacterial meningitis caused by human pathogens, and the incidence has a strong regional distribution. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is mainly associated with animal contact, consumption of animal products, and an immunocompromised state of the patient. In a high proportion of zoonotic bacterial meningitis cases, CSF analysis showed only a mildly elevated leukocyte count. The recommended antibiotic therapy differs per pathogen, and the overall mortality is low. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is uncommon but is associated with specific complications. The suspicion should be raised in patients with bacterial meningitis who have recreational or professional contact with animals and in patients living in regions endemic for specific zoonotic pathogens. An immunocompromised state is associated with a worse prognosis. Identification of risk factors and underlying disease is necessary to improve treatment. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Endophthalmitis in a Child with Meningococcal Meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endophthalmitis in a Child with Meningococcal Meningitis. BA Wills, S Lewallen. CASE REPORT. An eleven year old ... sis of meningococcal meningitis was made. She was commenced on intravenous Benzylpenicillin ... The left eye was treated with topical steroids (1 % hydrocortisone every two hours) and topical atropine.

  12. Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with human immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent times, the incidence of cryptococcal meningitis in patients infected with HIV has increased worldwide mainly because of the increased awareness by both the physicians and clinical microbiologists. We report here three cases of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV patients treated at the Port-of Spain General Hospital in ...

  13. Antibiotikavalg ved purulent meningitis uden bakteriologisk diagnose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, H B

    1989-01-01

    A case of meningitis in a 16 month old boy caused by Hemophilus influenzae resistant to ampicillin is presented. The question is raised whether a third generation cephalosporin such as cefotaxime should be the drug of choice in the treatment of bacterial meningitis with unknown etiology...

  14. Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis And Dexamethasone Adjunctive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: Babies admitted from1992 to 1995 in the Special Care Baby Unit of the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maduguri, Nigeria, with bacterial meningitis were studied prospectively. Neonatal bacterial meningitis was confirmed if the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microbiological, chemical, immunological and ...

  15. Outbreak of Enterovirus - 71 Meningitis in Calicut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CK Sasidharan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Enterovirus 71(EV 71 causes wide spectrum of infections ranging from asymptomatic conditions to clinical syndromes like diarrhea, rash, hand-foot-and mouth disease (HFMD, herpangina, aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, bulbar and brainstem encephalitis Guillain Barre syndrome, pulmonary haemorrhage. This study deals with an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in children caused by EV 71 virus. Methods: The authors report an outbreak of aseptic meningitis in children in and around Calicut in June 2008. Clinical and laboratory study was done in collaboration with National Centre for Disease Control, New Delhi. 149 children with aseptic meningitis were studied and followed up from June 2008 to May 2009. Result: All children had clinical features suggestive of aseptic meningitis and serology showed the rising antibody titre against EV 71 virus infection. CSF analysis also showed four fold rise in antibodies in one and ≥ 1:2 neutralising antibodies titer against EV- 71 in four samples indicating meningitis due to EV-71. Conclusion: EV 71 was identified as the causative agent of the outbreak of aseptic meningitis in the study and the fact that the EV 71 infection has evolved from minor illness like HFMD to major illness like aseptic meningitis from the same locality is truly alarming.

  16. Posaconazole for chronic refractory coccidioidal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Rebecca; Homans, James; Larsen, Robert A; Neely, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Coccidioidal meningitis is a potentially lethal infection. Disease progression while taking fluconazole is a common complication and safe, effective, alternative treatments are limited. Posaconazole therapy resulted in symptomatic and laboratory improvement in 2 patients and clinical improvement in a third patient with chronic, previously unresponsive coccidioidal meningitis.

  17. Hysteretic behavior of a belt tensioner: modeling and experimental investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Michon, Guilhem; Manin, Lionel; Dufour, Regis

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe the modeling of the hysteretic behavior of belt tensioners. An initial experimental device is composed only of the tensioner by using forcing frequencies, preloads and deflection amplitudes. It permits the identification of the parameters of the restoring force model used. Comparison of the measured and predicted force deflection loops of the tensioner subjected to large deflections permits preliminary validation of the model.The second experimental device consists o...

  18. D- and L-lactate in rabbit and human bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, A; Prange, J; Gerber, J; Zysk, G; Lange, P; Michel, U; Eiffert, H; Nau, R

    2001-01-01

    Increased total CSF lactate is an important indicator differentiating bacterial from aseptic meningitis. Bacteria can produce D- and L-lactate; mammalian cells produce only L-lactate. We measured D- and L-lactate production of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli in vitro, of S. pneumoniae and E. coli in rabbit experimental meningitis and of various common pathogens in CSF from patients with bacterial meningitis. Despite marked in vitro production of D-lactate by S. aureus (maximum: 4.59 mmol/l; i.e. 34.9% of total lactate), N. meningitidis (4.62 mmol/l; i.e. 98.1%) and E. coli (3.14 mmol/l; i.e. 97.2%), minimal amounts were measured in human S. aureus (0.38 mmol/l; i.e. 1.3% of total lactate) or N. meningitidis (0.28 mmol/l; i.e. 3.9%) and experimental E. coli meningitis (0.75 mmol/l; i.e. 4.4%). In only 9 of 54 human CSF samples did D-lactate exceed 0.15 mmol/l. S. pneumoniae did not produce significant amounts of D-lactate in vitro (maximum: 0.55 mmol/l; i.e. 2.7% of total lactate), in experimental meningitis (0.18 mmol/l; i.e. 3%) or in human cases of meningitis (0.28 mmol/l; i.e. 1.9%). In conclusion, increased total CSF lactate in meningitis consists mainly of L-lactate and originates predominantly from host cells. CSF D-lactate is of limited diagnostic value.

  19. Experimental Measurement, Analysis and Modelling of Dependency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We propose a direct method of measurement of the total emissivity of opaque samples on a range of temperature around the ambient one. The method rests on the modulation of the temperature of the sample and the infra-red signal processing resulting from the surface of the sample we model the total emissivity obtained ...

  20. Iatrogenic streptococcus salivarius meningitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Praper

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 28-year-old patient who underwent spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section, and developed meningitis, Streptococcus salivarius was isolated in the cerebrospinal fluid. The Viridans streptococci are a part of a normal human mouth flora, therefore the patient most likely developed iatrogenic meningitis due to droplet transmission of bacteria intrathecally. We discuss etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic tools, treatment and prognosis of meningitis afer intrathecal procedures and we emphasize the importance of strict aseptic technique while performing neuraxial procedures. Iatrogenic meningitis should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in patients who present with symptoms and signs of meningitis after neuraxial blockade.

  1. Cryptococcal Meningitis: Diagnosis and Management Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi, Mahsa; Boulware, David R; Rhein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the diagnosis and management of cryptococcal meningitis are promising and have been improving long-term survival. Point of care testing has made diagnosing cryptococcal meningitis rapid, practical, and affordable. Targeted screening and treatment programs for cryptococcal antigenemia are a cost effective method for reducing early mortality on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Optimal initial management with amphotericin and flucytosine improves survival against alternative therapies, although amphotericin is difficult to administer and flucytosine is not available in middle or low income countries, where cryptococcal meningitis is most prevalent. Controlling increased intracranial pressure with serial therapeutic lumbar punctures has a proven survival benefit. Delaying ART initiation for 4 weeks after the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis is associated with improved survival. Fortunately, new approaches have been leading the way toward improving care for cryptococcal meningitis patients. New trials utilizing different combinations of antifungal therapy are reviewed, and we summarize the efficacy of different regimens. PMID:26279970

  2. Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Piotrowska, Anna

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014. In the last three years in Poland, about 3000 cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis of viral or bacterial etiology were recorded annually. Assessment of the epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014, was based on the results of the analysis of epidemiological reports sent to the NIZP-PZH by the Regional Sanitary-Epidemiological Stations published in the annual bulletin “Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2014” and “Preventive immunizations in Poland in 2014”. In 2014 in Poland 3488 cases of bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis were recorded. Almost 61.3% of these were viral infections. In 2014, in comparison to 2013, a 1.1% increase in the number of cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis was observed and 91% with viral etiology.

  3. MR of childhood tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeman, J.; Donald, P.; Hewlett, R.

    1988-12-01

    MR imaging was performed on 27 children with stage II-III tuberculous meningitis for the specific purpose of examining the brainstem, as well as comparison with other CT features of the disease. In addition to defining the ischemic disturbances of basal ganglia and diencephalon more clearly, MR also demonstrates the frequent occurrence of parenchymal signal abnormalities in the brainstem and adjacent temporal lobes, which are invisible or uncertain on CT. Although the presence of brainstem abnormalities on MR correlated well with clinical findings of brainstem dysfunction, clinical staging on admission remains the best prognostic indicator in advanced TBM. We also review the MR features of basal exudation, hydrochephalus and tuberculoma.

  4. New experimental model for training in videosurgery Novo modelo experimental para treinamento em videocirurgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Malta Batista

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a new experimental model of lower cost for training in videosurgery. METHODS: This project was performed at the Nucleus of Experimental Surgery of the Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health, based on previous models described in the literature and under the supervision of the full professor of Operative Technique and Experimental Surgery II. It was made a model cube-shaped, made of wood, with holes distributed in various locations, rubber stoppers for the holes and lined externally with carpet, and internally with laminate. RESULTS: The new experimental model is of low cost and reproduces quite faithfully several videosurgical procedures. CONCLUSION: Medical schools interested in the subject may adopt the new model for training in videosurgery without the need of high costs for making and using these models.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um novo modelo experimental de baixo custo para treinamento em videocirurgia MÉTODOS: Este projeto foi conduzido no Núcleo de Cirurgia Experimental da Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, baseado em modelos prévios descritos na literatura e sob a supervisão do professor titular de Técnica Operatória e Cirurgia Experimental II. Foi feito um modelo em formato de cubo, de madeira, com furos distribuídos em vários locais, tampas de borracha para os orifícios e forrado externamente com carpete e internamente com laminado. RESULTADOS: O novo modelo experimental desenvolvido é de baixo custo e reproduz de forma bastante fiel diversos procedimentos videocirúrgicos. CONCLUSÃO: Faculdades médicas interessadas no tema poderão adotar o novo modelo para o treinamento em videocirurgia sem que sejam necessários gastos elevados para a confecção e o uso desses modelos.

  5. Different experimental approaches in modelling cataractogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyselova, Zuzana

    2010-01-01

    Cataract, the opacification of eye lens, is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. At present, the only remedy is surgical removal of the cataractous lens and substitution with a lens made of synthetic polymers. However, besides significant costs of operation and possible complications, an artificial lens just does not have the overall optical qualities of a normal one. Hence it remains a significant public health problem, and biochemical solutions or pharmacological interventions that will maintain the transparency of the lens are highly required. Naturally, there is a persistent demand for suitable biological models. The ocular lens would appear to be an ideal organ for maintaining culture conditions because of lacking blood vessels and nerves. The lens in vivo obtains its nutrients and eliminates waste products via diffusion with the surrounding fluids. Lens opacification observed in vivo can be mimicked in vitro by addition of the cataractogenic agent sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) to the culture medium. Moreover, since an overdose of sodium selenite induces also cataract in young rats, it became an extremely rapid and convenient model of nuclear cataract in vivo. The main focus of this review will be on selenium (Se) and its salt sodium selenite, their toxicological characteristics and safety data in relevance of modelling cataractogenesis, either under in vivo or in vitro conditions. The studies revealing the mechanisms of lens opacification induced by selenite are highlighted, the representatives from screening for potential anti-cataract agents are listed. PMID:21217865

  6. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Tesla coil theoretical model and experimental verification

    OpenAIRE

    Voitkans, Janis; Voitkans, Arnis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract – In this paper a theoretical model of a Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wired format, where the line voltage is measured against electrically neutral space. It is shown that equivalent two-wired scheme can be found for a single-wired scheme and already known long line theory can be applied to a Tesla coil. Formulas for calculation of voltage in a Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance fre...

  8. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriani, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the

  9. Mathematical Models and the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The use of mathematical models in the experimental analysis of behavior has increased over the years, and they offer several advantages. Mathematical models require theorists to be precise and unambiguous, often allowing comparisons of competing theories that sound similar when stated in words. Sometimes different mathematical models may make…

  10. The effect of Cordia platythyrsa on various experimental models of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Cordia platythyrsa on various experimental models of pain and carrageenan induced inflammation. Benedicta N Nkeh-Chungag, Eugene J Ndebia, Joseph T Mbafor, Lonwabo A Dotwana, OO Oyedeji, Jehu E Iputo ...

  11. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, E. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Lormand, G. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Gobin, P.F. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Fougeres, R. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-11-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.).

  12. Experimental investigation of a flapping wing model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Tropea, Cameron [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Fachgebiet Stroemungslehre und Aerodynamik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    The main objective of this research study was to investigate the aerodynamic forces of an avian flapping wing model system. The model size and the flow conditions were chosen to approximate the flight of a goose. Direct force measurements, using a three-component balance, and PIV flow field measurements parallel and perpendicular to the oncoming flow, were performed in a wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers between 28,000 and 141,000 (3-15 m/s), throughout a range of reduced frequencies between 0.04 and 0.20. The appropriateness of quasi-steady assumptions used to compare 2D, time-averaged particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the wake with direct force measurements was evaluated. The vertical force coefficient for flapping wings was typically significantly higher than the maximum coefficient of the fixed wing, implying the influence of unsteady effects, such as delayed stall, even at low reduced frequencies. This puts the validity of the quasi-steady assumption into question. The (local) change in circulation over the wing beat cycle and the circulation distribution along the wingspan were obtained from the measurements in the tip and transverse vortex planes. Flow separation could be observed in the distribution of the circulation, and while the circulation derived from the wake measurements failed to agree exactly with the absolute value of the circulation, the change in circulation over the wing beat cycle was in excellent agreement for low and moderate reduced frequencies. The comparison between the PIV measurements in the two perpendicular planes and the direct force balance measurements, show that within certain limitations the wake visualization is a powerful tool to gain insight into force generation and the flow behavior on flapping wings over the wing beat cycle. (orig.)

  13. Two cases of rheumatoid meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaki, Shino; Chang, Edward; Hammond, Robert R; Yang, Isaac; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Chou, Benedict T; Choi, Soo I; Jen, Joanna C; Pope, Whitney B; Bell, David A; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the form of rheumatoid meningitis (RM) is rare and most commonly occurs in the setting of longstanding severe RA. Due to a wide range of clinical presentations and nonspecific laboratory findings, it presents a diagnostic challenge often requiring brain biopsy. Only a few histopathologically confirmed cases have been described in the literature. Our aim is to describe two cases of RM and review the literature. The first case is of a previously healthy 37-year-old man who presented with severe headaches and focal neurologic deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement in the left frontal and parietal sulci. The second case is of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild chronic joint pain who presented with confusion, personality changes and seizures. Both patients ultimately underwent brain biopsy which demonstrated RM on pathologic examination. Administration of corticosteroids resulted in significant clinical improvement in both cases. To our knowledge, our unusual case of RM in the young man is the fifth reported case of rheumatoid meningitis in a patient with no prior history of RA. Such an atypical presentation makes diagnosis even more difficult and highlights the need for awareness of this entity in the diagnostic consideration of a patient presenting with unexplained neurologic symptoms. Our literature review underscores the clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of CNS involvement in RA. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  14. In Brief: Forecasting meningitis threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in conjunction with a team of health and weather organizations, has launched a project to provide weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis. The forecasts will enable local health care providers to target vaccination programs more effectively. In 2009, meteorologists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which is managed by UCAR, will begin issuing 14-day forecasts of atmospheric conditions in Ghana. Later, UCAR plans to work closely with health experts from several African countries to design and test a decision support system to provide health officials with useful meteorological information. ``By targeting forecasts in regions where meningitis is a threat, we may be able to help vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we hope to build on this project and provide information to public health programs battling weather-related diseases in other parts of the world,'' said Rajul Pandya, director of UCAR's Community Building Program. Funding for the project comes from a $900,000 grant from Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Internet search company.

  15. Statistical approach for uncertainty quantification of experimental modal model parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, M.; Peeters, B.; Kahsin, M.

    2014-01-01

    . This paper aims at a systematic approach for uncertainty quantification of the parameters of the modal models estimated from experimentally obtained data. Statistical analysis of modal parameters is implemented to derive an assessment of the entire modal model uncertainty measure. Investigated structures...... estimates obtained from vibration experiments. Modal testing results are influenced by numerous factors introducing uncertainty to the measurement results. Different experimental techniques applied to the same test item or testing numerous nominally identical specimens yields different test results...

  16. In silico simulations of experimental protocols for cardiac modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, Jesus; Rodriguez, Jose Felix; Pueyo, Esther

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical model of the AP involves the sum of different transmembrane ionic currents and the balance of intracellular ionic concentrations. To each ionic current corresponds an equation involving several effects. There are a number of model parameters that must be identified using specific experimental protocols in which the effects are considered as independent. However, when the model complexity grows, the interaction between effects becomes increasingly important. Therefore, model parameters identified considering the different effects as independent might be misleading. In this work, a novel methodology consisting in performing in silico simulations of the experimental protocol and then comparing experimental and simulated outcomes is proposed for parameter model identification and validation. The potential of the methodology is demonstrated by validating voltage-dependent L-type calcium current (ICaL) inactivation in recently proposed human ventricular AP models with different formulations. Our results show large differences between ICaL inactivation as calculated from the model equation and ICaL inactivation from the in silico simulations due to the interaction between effects and/or to the experimental protocol. Our results suggest that, when proposing any new model formulation, consistency between such formulation and the corresponding experimental data that is aimed at being reproduced needs to be first verified considering all involved factors.

  17. The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Sadie A; Koci, Remzie A; Qehaja-Buçaj, Emine; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Mehmeti, Murat

    2014-07-14

    The purpose of this study was to present the epidemiologic features of bacterial meningitis in the developing country of Kosovo. Data were collected from active surveillance of bacterial meningitis cases treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo in the years 2000 (first post-war year) and 2010. Meningitis cases in 2000 compared with 2010 showed a 35.5% decline in incidence (from 4.8 to 3.1 cases per 100,000 population) and a decrease in the case fatality rate from 10% to 5%. In children, there was a lower mortality rate (5% versus 2%) and a lower incidence of neurological complications (13% versus 16%) as compared to adults (32% versus 10% and 16% versus 35%, respectively). Neisseria meningitidis was the most common pathogen of bacterial meningitis in both study periods. Bacterial meningitis was most prevalent in the pediatric population, and showed an increase in the median age, from three years in 2000 to seven years in 2010. A steady number of bacterial meningitis cases in adults throughout last decade (around 20 cases per year) was recorded. During the last decade, gradual changes have been observed in the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis that are unrelated to the introduction of new vaccines, but are partly due to the improvement of living conditions.

  18. ETIOLOGY AND NEUROLOGICAL COMPLICATIONS OF BACTERIAL MENINGITIS IN 189 PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    P. Tabatabaie; Sayahtaheri, S; A. Siadati O. Alizad

    1997-01-01

    Results of a seven year (April 1985 to March 1992) prospoective study of bacterial meningitis in 189 infants and children admitted to our Center indicate that: 1) Tiie Gram-negative bacilli, especially Klebsiella species, are the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in neonates and young infants (<2 months), group B Streptococcus meningitis is rare, and Listeria monocytogenes meningitis is not observed. 2) Haemophilus influenzae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children...

  19. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche

    OpenAIRE

    Decimo, I.; Fumagalli, G.; Berton, V.; Krampera, M.; Bifari, F.

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every pare...

  20. Meteorological influences on the interannual variability of meningitis incidence in northwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdussalam, Auwal; Monaghan, Andrew; Dukic, Vanja; Hayden, Mary; Hopson, Thomas; Leckebusch, Gregor

    2013-04-01

    Northwest Nigeria is a region with high risk of bacterial meningitis. Since the first documented epidemic of meningitis in Nigeria in 1905, the disease has been endemic in the northern part of the country, with epidemics occurring regularly. In this study we examine the influence of climate on the interannual variability of meningitis incidence and epidemics. Monthly aggregate counts of clinically confirmed hospital-reported cases of meningitis were collected in northwest Nigeria for the 22-year period spanning 1990-2011. Several generalized linear statistical models were fit to the monthly meningitis counts, including generalized additive models. Explanatory variables included monthly records of temperatures, humidity, rainfall, wind speed, sunshine and dustiness from weather stations nearest to the hospitals, and a time series of polysaccharide vaccination efficacy. The effects of other confounding factors -- i.e., mainly non-climatic factors for which records were not available -- were estimated as a smooth, monthly-varying function of time in the generalized additive models. Results reveal that the most important explanatory climatic variables are mean maximum monthly temperature, relative humidity and dustiness. Accounting for confounding factors (e.g., social processes) in the generalized additive models explains more of the year-to-year variation of meningococcal disease compared to those generalized linear models that do not account for such factors. Promising results from several models that included only explanatory variables that preceded the meningitis case data by 1-month suggest there may be potential for prediction of meningitis in northwest Nigeria to aid decision makers on this time scale.

  1. The use of Alloxan and Streptozotocin in Experimental Diabetes Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kurçer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease which leads to several acute and chronic complications, morbidity and mortality, and decreased lifespan and quality of life. Therefore, in research studies that aim to enlighten the pathogenesis of diabetes and investigate possible treatment strategies, experimental animal models of diabetes provide many advantages to the investigator. Models of diabetes obtained by chemical induction, diet, surgical manipulations or combination thereof and also new genetically modified animal models are some of the experimental models. Alloxan and streptozotocin (STZ, which are toxic glucose analogues that preferentially accumulate in pancreatic beta cells, are widely used toxic agents to induce experimental diabetes in animals. This review gives an overview on the use of alloxan and STZ to induce chemical diabetes models with reference to their mechanisms, utilizable doses, advantages and disadvantages in diabetes research. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 34-40

  2. Interferon-γ from Brain Leukocytes Enhances Meningitis by Type 4 Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Cuppone, Anna Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. Immune targeting of S. pneumoniae is essential for clearance of infection; however, within the brain, the induced inflammatory response contributes to pathogenesis. In this study we investigate the local inflammatory response and the role of IFN-γ in a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis induced by intracranial injection of type 4 S. pneumoniae. Lymphoid and myeloid cell populations involved in meningitis, as well as cytokine gene expression, were investigated after infection. Animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody specific for murine IFN-γ to evaluate its role in animal survival. Intracranial inoculation of 3 × 104 colony-forming units of type 4 strain TIGR4 caused 75% of mice to develop meningitis within 4 days. The amount of lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages in the brain increased 48 h post infection. IFN-γ mRNA levels were about 240-fold higher in brains of infected mice compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α, and TLR2 were also upregulated. In vivo treatment with anti-IFN-γ antibody increased survival of infected mice. This study shows that IFN-γ produced during meningitis by type 4 S. pneumoniae enhances bacterial pathogenesis exerting a negative effect on the disease outcome. PMID:26648922

  3. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases.

  4. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, P.; Trzaska, S.; Perez, C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; del Corral, J.; Cousin, R.; Blumenthal, M. B.; Connor, S.; Thomson, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use, and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular Meningitis and Malaria. In this paper we present the new and improved products that have been developed for monitoring dust, temperature, rainfall and vectorial capacity model for monitoring and forecasting risks of Meningitis and Malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  5. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato, Pietro; Trzaska, Sylwia; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Kalashnikova, Olga; del Corral, John; Cousin, Remi; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Bell, Michael; Connor, Stephen J.; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2013-01-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular meningitis and malaria. In this paper, we present the new and improved products that have been developed for: (i) estimating dust aerosol for forecasting risks of meningitis and (ii) for monitoring temperature and rainfall and integrating them into a vectorial capacity model for forecasting risks of malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map Room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  6. Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Like most viruses, enteroviruses infect your body through saliva (spit), feces (poop), and nasal discharge (snot). This ... to get rid of the bacteria. Fluids containing glucose (sugar) and minerals may also be given through ...

  7. Design and Implementation of an Experimental Segway Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Wael; Abdelati, Mohammed

    2009-03-01

    The segway is the first transportation product to stand, balance, and move in the same way we do. It is a truly 21st-century idea. The aim of this research is to study the theory behind building segway vehicles based on the stabilization of an inverted pendulum. An experimental model has been designed and implemented through this study. The model has been tested for its balance by running a Proportional Derivative (PD) algorithm on a microprocessor chip. The model has been identified in order to serve as an educational experimental platform for segways.

  8. Experimental and modeling studies of mass transfer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gaining a better understanding of mass transfer problems in encapsulated cell systems and in tissue engineering requires both experimental investigations and mathematical modelling. Specific mass transfer studies are reviewed including oxygen transfer in immobilised animal cell culture systems, modelling of ...

  9. Onkologisk behandling af meningeal carcinomatose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulim, S.; Høyer, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Meningeal carcinomatosis (MC) occurs in 5-8% of cancer patients. In the       majority of cases, MC appears in patients with advanced disease. The       increase in incidence is probably caused by improved survival due to       improvements in systemic therapy and an increased awareness of MC among......       clinicians. Diagnosis is based on CSF cytology and neuroimaging. MC is a       devastating condition that is associated with a poor prognosis, with a       median survival time of 4-11 weeks. The treatment is in most cases       palliative and involves radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy...

  10. Using an experimental model for the study of therapeutic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniella Soares; Marta, Ilda Estéfani Ribeiro; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari; de Quadros, Andreza Urba; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos

    2013-02-01

    to verify whether the Paw Edema Model can be used in investigations about the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation by measuring the variables pain, edema and neutrophil migration. this is a pilot and experimental study, involving ten male mice of the same genetic strain and divided into experimental and control group, submitted to the chemical induction of local inflammation in the right back paw. The experimental group received a daily administration of Therapeutic Touch for 15 minutes during three days. the data showed statistically significant differences in the nociceptive threshold and in the paw circumference of the animals from the experimental group on the second day of the experiment. the experiment model involving animals can contribute to study the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation, and adjustments are suggested in the treatment duration, number of sessions and experiment duration.

  11. MR angiography in tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalita, Jayantee; Prasad, Sreeram; Maurya, Pradeep K.; Misra, Usha K. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)), Email: drukmisra@rediffmail.com; Kumar, Sunil (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India))

    2012-04-15

    Background: Infarctions in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) are common but there is a paucity of studies on MR angiography (MRA). Purpose: To evaluate the pattern and predictors of MRA abnormality in patients with TBM. Material and Methods: Sixty-seven patients with TBM were subjected to clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRA evaluation. The severity of meningitis, focal deficit, CSF findings, and stroke co-morbidities were recorded. Presence of exudates, infarction, hydrocephalous, and tuberculoma on MRI were noted. On intracranial MRA, occlusion or more than 50% narrowing of proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA), and basilar artery were considered abnormal. The MRA abnormality was correlated with clinical, laboratory, and MRI findings. Results: Sixty-seven patients, aged 3-75 years (median 34 years) were included. MRI was abnormal in 61 (91%) patients; basal exudates in 24, hydrocephalous in 23, tuberculoma in 33, and infarction in 40. MRA was abnormal in 34 (50.7%); MCA was most commonly involved (n = 21), followed by PCA (n = 14), ICA (n = 8), ACA (n 5), basilar artery (n = 5), and vertebral and superior cerebellar artery (1 each). One-fourth of the patients had abnormality in both anterior and posterior circulations. MRA abnormality was related to hydrocephalous and infarction; corresponding infarct was present in 61.8% patients; 41.7% patients with abnormal MRA developed infarct at 3 months but none with normal MRA. Conclusion: Half the patients with TBM had MRA abnormality involving both anterior and posterior circulations and 61.8% of them had corresponding infarcts

  12. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhar [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity between grain growth experiments and anisotropic three-dimensional simulations.

  13. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  14. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhur [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity

  15. Epidemiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has been dynamic in the past 30 years following introduction of conjugated vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type B, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in bacterial

  16. A Practical Approach to Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Megan B; Josephson, S Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Meningitis is an inflammatory syndrome involving the meninges that classically manifests with headache and nuchal rigidity and is diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid examination. In contrast, encephalitis refers to inflammation of the brain parenchyma itself and often results in focal neurologic deficits or seizures. In this article, the authors review the differential diagnosis of meningitis and encephalitis, with an emphasis on infectious etiologies. The recommended practical clinical approach focuses on early high-yield diagnostic testing and empiric antimicrobial administration, given the high morbidity associated with these diseases and the time-sensitive nature of treatment initiation. If the initial workup does not yield a diagnosis, further etiology-specific testing based upon risk factors and clinical characteristics should be pursued. Effective treatment is available for many causes of meningitis and encephalitis, and when possible should address both the primary disease process as well as potential complications. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Lymphocytic Meningitis in Patients with Sympathetic Ophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudot, Mathilde; Groh, Matthieu; Salah, Sawsen; Monnet, Dominique; Blanche, Philippe; Brézin, Antoine P

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed at reporting lymphocytic meningitis in patients diagnosed with sympathetic ophthalmia (SO). In this single-center retrospective observational case series, we reviewed cases diagnosed with SO. We analyzed the patients' inciting injuries, the characteristics of uveitis and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analyses. Nine patients were diagnosed with SO and CSF analyses were available in all cases. Four cases had lymphocytic pleocytosis, 3 of which showed marked CSF inflammation with more than 300 lymphocytes/mm 3 . The inciting event in these 3 patients was a globe perforation injury, whereas 4 patients without meningitis had SO following a surgical intervention. In this case series of patients with SO, lymphocytic meningitis was a common finding. The prevalence of meningitis in patients with SO and its value for the diagnosis of the disease needs to be further studied.

  18. Community acquired Staphylococcus aureus meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Keizerweerd, Gabriella D.; de Gans, Jan; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van de Beek, Diederik

    2009-01-01

    We present 9 patients with community acquired Staphylococcus aureus meningitis. Foci of infection outside the central nervous system were present in 8 (89%) patients, mostly endocarditis and pneumonia. Cardiorespiratory complications occurred frequently and 6 patients died (67%). Identification and

  19. [Chronic meningitis associated with lymph node sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielemans, P; Jann, E

    1989-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman with maturity-onset diabetes presented with symmetrical transient polyarthralgia and acido-cetosis. Bilateral hilar adenopathy and erythematous rash on lower limbs were demonstrated. While low-grade chronic meningeal irritation supervened, lymph node biopsy showed typical sarcoidosis. Administration of corticosteroids resulted in reduction of cerebrospinal fluid albumin content and of lymphocytosis in bronchoalveolar lavage. In this patient, sarcoidosis was therefore associated with Löfgren's syndrome and meningitis.

  20. Experimental-analytical method of technological processes modeling in education

    OpenAIRE

    Efremov German I.; Geller Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    The article considers general modeling techniques used in the study in education at different stages. The classification of different types of models and main stages of the simulation are considered. It is shown that in the course “Process of simulation” for technical areas of the Universities required the category of “Experimental-analytical simulation method”. For example, a new textbook for bachelors “Modeling of chemical-technological processes” shows that the section facilitates the comp...

  1. Experimental Validation of a Dynamic Model for Lightweight Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gasparetto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the main topics in robotics research is dynamic performance improvement by means of a lightening of the overall system structure. The effective motion and control of these lightweight robotic systems occurs with the use of suitable motion planning and control process. In order to do so, model-based approaches can be adopted by exploiting accurate dynamic models that take into account the inertial and elastic terms that are usually neglected in a heavy rigid link configuration. In this paper, an effective method for modelling spatial lightweight industrial robots based on an Equivalent Rigid Link System approach is considered from an experimental validation perspective. A dynamic simulator implementing the formulation is used and an experimental test-bench is set-up. Experimental tests are carried out with a benchmark L-shape mechanism.

  2. Group A Streptococcal meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Bovenkerk, Sandra; Man, Wing Kit; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-07-01

    We report on the incidence, clinical characteristics, and bacterial genotype of group A streptococcal (GAS) meningitis in the Netherlands. We assessed the incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome of patients with GAS meningitis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2013. GAS was identified in 26 of 1322 patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis (2%); 9 cases (35%) occurred in the first four months of 2013. GAS meningitis was often preceded by otitis or sinusitis (24 of 26 [92%]) and a high proportion of patients developed complications during clinical course (19 of 26 [73%]). Subdural empyema occurred in 8 of 26 patients (35%). Nine patients underwent mastoidectomy and in 5 patients neurosurgical evacuation of the subdural empyema was performed. Five of 26 patients (19%) died and 11 of 21 surviving patient had neurologic sequelae (52%). Infection with the emm1 and cc28 GAS genotype was associated with subdural empyema (both 4 of 6 [67%] vs. 2 of 14 [14%]; P = 0.037). GAS meningitis is an uncommon but severe disease. Patients are at risk for empyema, which is associated with infection with the emm1 and cc28 genotype. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A systematic review of animal models for experimental neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toia, Francesca; Giesen, Thomas; Giovanoli, Pietro; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2015-10-01

    Peripheral neuromas can result in an unbearable neuropathic pain and functional impairment. Their treatment is still challenging, and their optimal management is to be defined. Experimental research still plays a major role, but - although numerous neuroma models have been proposed on different animals - there is still no single model recognised as being the reference. Several models show advantages over the others in specific aspects of neuroma physiopathology, prevention or treatment, making it unlikely that a single model could be of reference. A reproducible and standardised model of peripheral neuroma would allow better comparison of results from different studies. We present a systematic review of the literature on experimental in vivo models, analysing advantages and disadvantages, specific features and indications, with the goal of providing suggestions to help their standardisation. Published models greatly differ in the animal and the nerve employed, the mechanisms of nerve injury and the evaluation methods. Specific experimental models exist for terminal neuromas and neuromas in continuity (NIC). The rat is the most widely employed animal, the rabbit being the second most popular model. NIC models are more actively researched, but it is more difficult to generate such studies in a reproducible manner. Nerve transection is considered the best method to cause terminal neuromas, whereas partial transection is the best method to cause NIC. Traditional histomorphology is the historical gold-standard evaluation method, but immunolabelling, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and proteomics are gaining increasing popularity. Computerised gait analysis is the gold standard for motor-recovery evaluation, whereas mechanical testing of allodynia and hyperalgesia reproducibly assesses sensory recovery. This review summarises current knowledge on experimental neuroma models, and it provides a useful tool for defining experimental protocols

  4. Experimental modeling of injectivity loss; Modelagem experimental da perda de injetividade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonato, Adriano Jose do Amaral Mello; Silva, Pedro Glauto de Farias e; Gomes, Vanessa Limeira Azevedo; Santos, Adriano dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Produced water reinjection, suspended particles are retained in the porous media causing formation damage and injectivity decline. In general the retention of the particles occurs near the side of injection, this fact occurs in most cases, due to the size exclusion. The modeling of filtration and the consequent formation damage is essential to the project management of water injection in oil reservoirs. Thus, mathematical models are studied to better predict the distribution of particles throughout the porous media and determine the parameters of adjustment to injectivity decline. Among these models, there is the classic model which consists in determining these parameters (coefficient of filtration and formation damage). The methodology used in modeling is given from the equations the mass conservation, kinetic particle retention, the modified Darcy equation and the function formation damage. This study aimed to improve experimental modeling, including development of software for acquisition and processing of experimental data, considering the variable number of pressure measurements along the sample. The software was developed using the Labview 2011 platform and allows the determination of relevant parameters to predict injectivity loss in water injection wells. Furthermore, based on the traditional model of filtration in porous media (including depth filtration and formation of the external plaster), the software was applied to predict injectivity loss in addition to the properties of the grout. Finally, the classical models for transporting suspensions and damage to the formation were observed. (author)

  5. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...... with the simulation prediction, showing the validity of the algorithm....

  6. Brain ventricular dimensions and relationship to outcome in adult patients with bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporrborn, Janni L; Knudsen, Gertrud B; Sølling, Mette; Seierøe, Karina; Farre, Annette; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø; Benfield, Thomas; Brandt, Christian T

    2015-08-25

    Experimental studies suggest that changes in brain ventricle size are key events in bacterial meningitis. This study investigated the relationship between ventricle size, clinical condition and risk of poor outcome in patients with bacterial meningitis. Adult patients diagnosed with bacterial meningitis admitted to two departments of infectious diseases from 2003 through 2010 were identified. Clinical and biochemical data as well as cerebral computed tomographic images were collected. The size of the brain ventricles were presented as a Ventricle to Brain Ratio (VBR). Normal range of VBR was defined from an age matched control group. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of 30-day mortality. One hundred and seven patients were included. Eighty-one patients had a CT scan at the time of diagnosis. VBR was identified as an independent risk factor of 30-day mortality, Mortality Rate Ratio: 6.03 (95 % confidence interval: 1.61-22.64, p = 0.008) for highest versus lowest tertile. A VBR deviating more than 2 standard deviations from the normal range was associated with increased mortality. Brain ventricles are commonly subject to marked changes in size as a consequence of meningitis. Increased brain ventricle size in the acute phase of bacterial meningitis was associated with increased mortality.

  7. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor influences disease severity in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, B B; Valls Serón, M; Geldhoff, M; Havik, S R; van der Ende, A; Baas, F; van der Poll, T; Meijers, J C M; P Morgan, B; Brouwer, M C; van de Beek, D

    2015-11-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with bacterial meningitis result from the proinflammatory response and dysregulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) is activated by free thrombin or thrombin in complex with thrombomodulin, and plays an antifibrinolytic role during fibrin clot degradation, but also has an anti-inflammatory role by inactivating proinflammatory mediators, such as complement activation products. To assess the role of TAFI in pneumococcal meningitis. We performed a prospective nationwide genetic association study in patients with bacterial meningitis, determined TAFI and complement levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and assessed the function of TAFI in a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model by using Cpb2 (TAFI) knockout mice. Polymorphisms (reference sequences: rs1926447 and rs3742264) in the CPB2 gene, coding for TAFI, were related to the development of systemic complications in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. Higher protein levels of TAFI in CSF were significantly associated with CSF complement levels (C3a, iC3b, and C5b-9) and with more systemic complications in patients with bacterial meningitis. The risk allele of rs1926447 (TT) was associated with higher levels of TAFI in CSF. In the murine model, consistent with the human data, Cpb2-deficient mice had decreased disease severity, as reflected by lower mortality, and attenuated cytokine levels and bacterial outgrowth in the systemic compartment during disease, without differences in the brain compartment, as compared with wild-type mice. These findings suggest that TAFI plays an important role during pneumococcal meningitis, which is likely to be mediated through inhibition of the complement system, and influences the occurrence of systemic complications and inflammation. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Brain ventricular dimensions and relationship to outcome in adult patients with bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sporrborn, Janni L; Knudsen, Gertrud B; Sølling, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental studies suggest that changes in brain ventricle size are key events in bacterial meningitis. This study investigated the relationship between ventricle size, clinical condition and risk of poor outcome in patients with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Adult patients diagnosed...... with bacterial meningitis admitted to two departments of infectious diseases from 2003 through 2010 were identified. Clinical and biochemical data as well as cerebral computed tomographic images were collected. The size of the brain ventricles were presented as a Ventricle to Brain Ratio (VBR). Normal range......-day mortality, Mortality Rate Ratio: 6.03 (95 % confidence interval: 1.61-22.64, p = 0.008) for highest versus lowest tertile. A VBR deviating more than 2 standard deviations from the normal range was associated with increased mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Brain ventricles are commonly subject to marked...

  9. Team Modelling: Review of Experimental Scenarios and Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    designed to be) Yes Yes No Yes (Model individuals, or sub-teams - groups of individuals.) 19 C3TRACE* (Command, Control, and Communicatio ...radar sensors, satellites, c2 structures, jammers, communicatio ns networks and devices, and fire support) Depends (EADSIM normally models at

  10. Supporting meningitis diagnosis amongst infants and children through the use of fuzzy cognitive mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mago, Vijay K; Mehta, Ravinder; Woolrych, Ryan; Papageorgiou, Elpiniki I

    2012-09-04

    Meningitis is characterized by an inflammation of the meninges, or the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial for a positive outcome, yet identifying meningitis is a complex process involving an array of signs and symptoms and multiple causal factors which require novel solutions to support clinical decision-making. In this work, we explore the potential of fuzzy cognitive map to assist in the modeling of meningitis, as a support tool for physicians in the accurate diagnosis and treatment of the condition. Fuzzy cognitive mapping (FCM) is a method for analysing and depicting human perception of a given system. FCM facilitates the development of a conceptual model which is not limited by exact values and measurements and thus is well suited to representing relatively unstructured knowledge and associations expressed in imprecise terms. A team of doctors (physicians), comprising four paediatricians, was formed to define the multifarious signs and symptoms associated with meningitis and to identify risk factors integral to its causality, as indicators used by clinicians to identify the presence or absence of meningitis in patients. The FCM model, consisting of 20 concept nodes, has been designed by the team of paediatricians in collaborative dialogue with the research team. The paediatricians were supplied with a form containing various input parameters to be completed at the time of diagnosing meningitis among infants and children. The paediatricians provided information on a total of 56 patient cases amongst children whose age ranged from 2 months to 7 years. The physicians' decision to diagnose meningitis was available for each individual case which was used as the outcome measure for evaluating the model. The FCM was trained using 40 cases with an accuracy of 95%, and later 16 test cases were used to analyze the accuracy and reliability of the model. The system produced the results with sensitivity of 83.3% and

  11. Supporting meningitis diagnosis amongst infants and children through the use of fuzzy cognitive mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mago Vijay K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningitis is characterized by an inflammation of the meninges, or the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial for a positive outcome, yet identifying meningitis is a complex process involving an array of signs and symptoms and multiple causal factors which require novel solutions to support clinical decision-making. In this work, we explore the potential of fuzzy cognitive map to assist in the modeling of meningitis, as a support tool for physicians in the accurate diagnosis and treatment of the condition. Methods Fuzzy cognitive mapping (FCM is a method for analysing and depicting human perception of a given system. FCM facilitates the development of a conceptual model which is not limited by exact values and measurements and thus is well suited to representing relatively unstructured knowledge and associations expressed in imprecise terms. A team of doctors (physicians, comprising four paediatricians, was formed to define the multifarious signs and symptoms associated with meningitis and to identify risk factors integral to its causality, as indicators used by clinicians to identify the presence or absence of meningitis in patients. The FCM model, consisting of 20 concept nodes, has been designed by the team of paediatricians in collaborative dialogue with the research team. Results The paediatricians were supplied with a form containing various input parameters to be completed at the time of diagnosing meningitis among infants and children. The paediatricians provided information on a total of 56 patient cases amongst children whose age ranged from 2 months to 7 years. The physicians’ decision to diagnose meningitis was available for each individual case which was used as the outcome measure for evaluating the model. The FCM was trained using 40 cases with an accuracy of 95%, and later 16 test cases were used to analyze the accuracy and reliability of the model. The

  12. Supporting meningitis diagnosis amongst infants and children through the use of fuzzy cognitive mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Meningitis is characterized by an inflammation of the meninges, or the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial for a positive outcome, yet identifying meningitis is a complex process involving an array of signs and symptoms and multiple causal factors which require novel solutions to support clinical decision-making. In this work, we explore the potential of fuzzy cognitive map to assist in the modeling of meningitis, as a support tool for physicians in the accurate diagnosis and treatment of the condition. Methods Fuzzy cognitive mapping (FCM) is a method for analysing and depicting human perception of a given system. FCM facilitates the development of a conceptual model which is not limited by exact values and measurements and thus is well suited to representing relatively unstructured knowledge and associations expressed in imprecise terms. A team of doctors (physicians), comprising four paediatricians, was formed to define the multifarious signs and symptoms associated with meningitis and to identify risk factors integral to its causality, as indicators used by clinicians to identify the presence or absence of meningitis in patients. The FCM model, consisting of 20 concept nodes, has been designed by the team of paediatricians in collaborative dialogue with the research team. Results The paediatricians were supplied with a form containing various input parameters to be completed at the time of diagnosing meningitis among infants and children. The paediatricians provided information on a total of 56 patient cases amongst children whose age ranged from 2 months to 7 years. The physicians’ decision to diagnose meningitis was available for each individual case which was used as the outcome measure for evaluating the model. The FCM was trained using 40 cases with an accuracy of 95%, and later 16 test cases were used to analyze the accuracy and reliability of the model. The system produced the results

  13. Kriptokokal meningitis: Aspek klinis dan diagnosis laboratorium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrida .

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Kriptokokosis merupakan infeksi yang disebabkan oleh jamur Cryptococcus neoformans, infeksi ini secara luas ditemukan di dunia dan umumya dialami oleh penderita dengan sistem imun yang rendah. Munculan klinis terutama adalah meningitis dan meningoensefalitis yang dikenal dengan kriptokokal meningitis. Sejalan dengan infeksi HIV yang menjadi pandemi, kriptokokosis sebagai infeksi oportunistik juga semakin berkembang di dunia. Kriptokokal meningitis merupakan infeksi oportunistik kedua paling umum yang terkait dengan AIDS di Afrika dan Asia Selatan dengan kejadian kriptokokosis 15%-30% ditemukan pada pasien dengan AIDS. Tanpa pengobatan dengan antifungal yang spesifik, mortalitas dilaporkan 100% dalam dua minggu setelah munculan klinis kriptokokosis dengan meningoensefalitis pada populasi terinfeksi HIV. Di Indonesia, sebelum pandemi AIDS kasus kriptokokosis jarang dilaporkan. Sejak tahun 2004, seiring dengan pertambahan pasien terinfeksi HIV, Departemen Parasitologi FKUI mencatat peningkatan insidensi kriptokokal meningitis pada penderita AIDS yaitu sebesar 21,9%. Faktor yang terkait dengan virulensi Cryptococcus neoformans adalah adanya kapsul polisakarida, produksi melanin dan sifat thermotolerance. Imunitas yang dimediasi oleh sel memiliki peranan penting dalam pertahanan pejamu terhadap Cryptococcus. Pemeriksaan laboratorium penunjang untuk diagnosis adalah pemeriksaan mikroskopis langsung menggunakan tinta India, deteksi antigen, metode enzyme immunoassay, kultur, dan metode molekular. Kata kunci: kriptokokal meningitis, Cryptococcus neoformans,infeksi oportunistik Abstract Cryptococcosis is an infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, that is widely found worldwide and generally experienced by patients with immunodeficiency. Meningitis and meningoencephalitis is the major clinical symptoms in cryptococcal meningitis. Coincide with the pandemic of HIV infection, cryptococcosis as an opportunistic infection is also growing in the

  14. Associations among habitat characteristics and meningeal worm prevalence in eastern South Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Christopher N.; Jenks, Jonathan A.; Klaver, Robert W.; Dubay, Shelli A.

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated how wetland and forest characteristics influence the prevalence of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) infection of deer throughout the grassland biome of central North America. We used previously collected, county-level prevalence data to evaluate associations between habitat characteristics and probability of meningeal worm infection in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) across eastern South Dakota, US. The highest-ranked binomial regression model for detecting probability of meningeal worm infection was spring temperature + summer precipitation + percent wetland; weight of evidence (wi=0.71) favored this model over alternative models, though predictive capability was low (Receiver operating characteristic=0.62). Probability of meningeal worm infection increased by 1.3- and 1.6-fold for each 1-cm and 1-C increase in summer precipitation and spring temperature, respectively. Similarly, probability of infection increased 1.2-fold for each 1% increase in wetland habitat. Our findings highlight the importance of wetland habitat in predicting meningeal worm infection across eastern South Dakota. Future research is warranted to evaluate the relationships between climatic conditions (e.g., drought, wet cycles) and deer habitat selection in maintaining P. tenuis along the western boundary of the parasite.

  15. Instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Watanabe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animal models offer possibilities of physiology knowledge, pathogenesis of disease and action of drugs that are directly related to quality nursing care. This integrative review describes the current state of the instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models, including the main recommendations of ethics committees that focus on animal welfare and raises questions about the impact of their findings in nursing care. Data show that, in Brazil, the progress in ethics for the use of animals for scientific purposes was consolidated with Law No. 11.794/2008 establishing ethical procedures, attending health, genetic and experimental parameters. The application of ethics in handling of animals for scientific and educational purposes and obtaining consistent and quality data brings unquestionable contributions to the nurse, as they offer subsidies to relate pathophysiological mechanisms and the clinical aspect on the patient.

  16. Modeling and experimentation of a positioning system of SMA wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, KinFong; Yam, Yeung

    2000-06-01

    This work reports two modeling and control attempts performed on a positioning system comprising of linking SMA wires and an overlooking video system for on-line measurements. The first attempt takes the model by Ikuta and identifies experimentally the parameters of the SMA wire. The identified single wire model is then extended to a system of two SMA wires joining together at their tips, based upon which open loop position control of the linkage is then conducted. The approach, however, becomes too complicated when more SMA wires are involved. The second attempt utilizes a neuro-fuzzy based approach for positioning control of a linkage point joining together four SMA wires. The second approach involves four ANFIS neuro-networks with hybrid learning algorithm trained to model the currents to the SMA wires as functions of present and target positions of the linkage point. Experimentation for both the two-wires and four-wires system yield quite satisfactory performance.

  17. Experimental bounds on collapse models from gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesso, Matteo; Bassi, Angelo; Falferi, Paolo; Vinante, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Wave function collapse models postulate a fundamental breakdown of the quantum superposition principle at the macroscale. Therefore, experimental tests of collapse models are also fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. Here, we compute the upper bounds on the collapse parameters, which can be inferred by the gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA Pathfinder, and AURIGA. We consider the most widely used collapse model, the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model. We show that these experiments exclude a huge portion of the CSL parameter space, the strongest bound being set by the recently launched space mission LISA Pathfinder. We also rule out a proposal for quantum-gravity-induced decoherence.

  18. Experimental model in rat for sentinel node biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Filho Renato Santos de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Although sentinel node procedure has been used world wide, there are many aspects to be defined and better standardized. This study address if the experimental model in rats is appropriate for sentinel node biopsy. In this model, the lymph nodes are showed by lymphoscintigraphy, they are dyed by patent blue and identified by intraoperative gamma probe detection. It isn?t necessary to use magnification for the procedure. The model demonstrated that sentinel node biopsy in rats is feasible. So, besides allowing researches in this field, the model is useful for training and diffusing this technique.

  19. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed among the three groups. In addition, we analyzed the predictive factors for a prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and the correlation between the level of procalcitonin and the GCS score at discharge. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a low level of procalcitonin (≤1.27 ng/mL) independently distinguished tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis. The sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis were 96.2% and 62.9%, respectively. However, the level of procalcitonin in patients with tuberculosis meningitis did not differ significantly from that in patients with viral meningitis. In patients with tuberculosis meningitis, a high level of procalcitonin (>0.4 ng/mL) was a predictor of a poor prognosis, and the level of procalcitonin was negatively correlated with the GCS score at discharge (r=-0.437, p=0.026). Conclusions We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis and is also valuable for predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:27165424

  20. Experimental Analysis and Model Validation of an Opaque Ventilated Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, F. Peci; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated façade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was ...

  1. Experimental model of capsular contracture in silicone implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastos Érika Malheiros

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The breast implant procedure is one of the most performed into Plastic Surgery and the contracture that occurs the capsule formed around the breast implants one of most frequent complication. We describe here one experimental model of capsule contracture in rats.

  2. Sciara as an experimental model for studies on the evolutionary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sciara as an experimental model for studies on the evolutionary relationships between the zygotic, maternal and environmental primary signals for sexual development. Lucas Sánchez. Review Article Volume ... Lucas Sánchez1. Centro de Investigaciones Biol´ogicas (C. S. I. C.), Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid, Spain ...

  3. Novel sensors for food inspection modelling, fabrication and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Abdul Rahman, Mohd Syaifudin; Yu, Pak-Lam

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses presents recent developments of novel planar interdigital sensors for food inspection. It covers the fundamentals of sensors, their design, modelling and simulations, fabrications, characterizations, experimental investigations and analyses. This book will be useful for the engineers and researchers especially higher undergraduate, postgraduate students as well as practitioners working on the development of Electromagnetic Sensors.

  4. numerical and numerical and experimental modeling of the static

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    recommendation for subsequent experiments and analysis of these types of structural elements. In this paper a report of numerical and experimental modeling of the static response of thin-walled reinforced concrete box girder bridges is given. The work is executed to verify the validity of a software developed by the authors ...

  5. An Interactive Multimedia Based Instruction in Experimental Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Nielsen, J.N.; Østergaard, J.

    1997-01-01

    A CD-ROM based interactive multimedia instruction in experimental modelling for Danish Engineering School teachers is described. The content is based on a new sensitivity approach for direct estimation of physical parameters in linear and nonlinear dynamic systems. The presentation is inspired...

  6. Pruning Chinese trees : an experimental and modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Bo

    2001-01-01

    Pruning of trees, in which some branches are removed from the lower crown of a tree, has been extensively used in China in silvicultural management for many purposes. With an experimental and modelling approach, the effects of pruning on tree growth and on the harvest of plant material were studied.

  7. [Establishment and evaluation of experimental sepsis mouse model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Yan; Xu, Ruo-Nan; Han, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Ren-Xi; Chen, Guo-Jiang; Xiao, He; Hou, Chun-Mei; Shen, Bei-Fen; Li, Yan

    2010-06-01

    After treating with chemotherapy or immunosuppressant, malignant diseases of hematopoietic system such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and aplastic anemia usually induced severe infection such as sepsis. Sepsis which is hard to be diagnosed causes high death rate. This study was purposed to establish an experimental sepsis mouse model so as to provide a basis for pathogenesis and intervention study. A classic caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used to establish experimental sepsis model. ELISA was used to detect levels of C5a, IL-6, TNFalpha, and IFN-gamma. Flow Cytometry was applied to measure apoptosis of lymphocytes in thymus and mesentery. The pathologic changes of thymus and spleen were confirmed by HE staining. The results showed that almost 70%-80% mice died at 72 hours after CLP. Only approximate 20% animal survived during finite time, mice in CLP group had significant weight lose. Meanwhile large release of different inflammatory mediators which are related with sepsis (C5a, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma) was observed after CLP. Apoptosis of lymphocytes in thymus and mesentery lymphonodus was enhanced markedly after CLP. Significantly pathologic injury was also observed in thymus and spleen. It is concluded that a mouse model of experimental sepsis was successfully established by caecal ligation and puncture which can well mimic the clinical symptom of sepsis. The experimental sepsis mouse model provides an excellent tool for exploring the pathogenesis and intervention ways for sepsis accompanied with complicated malignant hematological diseases in vivo.

  8. Meningitis and Climate: From Science to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Thomson, Madeleine C.; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Hopson, Thomas; Pandya, Rajul; Miller, Ron L.; Hugonnet, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a climate sensitive infectious disease. The regional extent of the Meningitis Belt in Africa, where the majority of epidemics occur, was originally defined by Lapeysonnie in the 1960s. A combination of climatic and environmental conditions and biological and social factors have been associated to the spatial and temporal patterns of epidemics observed since the disease first emerged in West Africa over a century ago. However, there is still a lack of knowledge and data that would allow disentangling the relative effects of the diverse risk factors upon epidemics. The Meningitis Environmental Risk Information Technologies Initiative (MERIT), a collaborative research-to-practice consortium, seeks to inform national and regional prevention and control strategies across the African Meningitis Belt through the provision of new data and tools that better determine risk factors. In particular MERIT seeks to consolidate a body of knowledge that provides evidence of the contribution of climatic and environmental factors to seasonal and year-to-year variations in meningococcal meningitis incidence at both district and national scales. Here we review recent research and practice seeking to provide useful information for the epidemic response strategy of National Ministries of Health in the Meningitis Belt of Africa. In particular the research and derived tools described in this paper have focused at "getting science into policy and practice" by engaging with practitioner communities under the umbrella of MERIT to ensure the relevance of their work to operational decision-making. We limit our focus to that of reactive vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. Important but external to our discussion is the development and implementation of the new conjugate vaccine, which specifically targets meningococcus A

  9. Meningeal defects alter the tangential migration of cortical interneurons in Foxc1hith/hith mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarbalis Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tangential migration presents the primary mode of migration of cortical interneurons translocating into the cerebral cortex from subpallial domains. This migration takes place in multiple streams with the most superficial one located in the cortical marginal zone. While a number of forebrain-expressed molecules regulating this process have emerged, it remains unclear to what extent structures outside the brain, like the forebrain meninges, are involved. Results We studied a unique Foxc1 hypomorph mouse model (Foxc1hith/hith with meningeal defects and impaired tangential migration of cortical interneurons. We identified a territorial correlation between meningeal defects and disruption of interneuron migration along the adjacent marginal zone in these animals, suggesting that impaired meningeal integrity might be the primary cause for the observed migration defects. Moreover, we postulate that the meningeal factor regulating tangential migration that is affected in homozygote mutants is the chemokine Cxcl12. In addition, by using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we provide evidence that the Cxcl12 gene is a direct transcriptional target of Foxc1 in the meninges. Further, we observe migration defects of a lesser degree in Cajal-Retzius cells migrating within the cortical marginal zone, indicating a less important role for Cxcl12 in their migration. Finally, the developmental migration defects observed in Foxc1hith/hith mutants do not lead to obvious differences in interneuron distribution in the adult if compared to control animals. Conclusions Our results suggest a critical role for the forebrain meninges to promote during development the tangential migration of cortical interneurons along the cortical marginal zone and Cxcl12 as the factor responsible for this property.

  10. Systematic integration of experimental data and models in systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeonidis Evangelos

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The behaviour of biological systems can be deduced from their mathematical models. However, multiple sources of data in diverse forms are required in the construction of a model in order to define its components and their biochemical reactions, and corresponding parameters. Automating the assembly and use of systems biology models is dependent upon data integration processes involving the interoperation of data and analytical resources. Results Taverna workflows have been developed for the automated assembly of quantitative parameterised metabolic networks in the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML. A SBML model is built in a systematic fashion by the workflows which starts with the construction of a qualitative network using data from a MIRIAM-compliant genome-scale model of yeast metabolism. This is followed by parameterisation of the SBML model with experimental data from two repositories, the SABIO-RK enzyme kinetics database and a database of quantitative experimental results. The models are then calibrated and simulated in workflows that call out to COPASIWS, the web service interface to the COPASI software application for analysing biochemical networks. These systems biology workflows were evaluated for their ability to construct a parameterised model of yeast glycolysis. Conclusions Distributed information about metabolic reactions that have been described to MIRIAM standards enables the automated assembly of quantitative systems biology models of metabolic networks based on user-defined criteria. Such data integration processes can be implemented as Taverna workflows to provide a rapid overview of the components and their relationships within a biochemical system.

  11. Label-free in vivo optical imaging of functional microcirculations within meninges and cortex in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal microcirculation within meninges is common in many neurological diseases. There is a need for an imaging method that is capable of monitoring dynamic meningeal microcirculations, preferably decoupled from cortical blood flow. Optical microangiography (OMAG) is a recently developed label-free imaging method capable of producing 3D images of dynamic blood perfusion within micro-circulatory tissue beds at an imaging depth up to ~2 mm, with an unprecedented imaging sensitivity to blood flow at ~4 µm/s. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of OMAG in imaging the detailed blood flow distributions, at a capillary level resolution, within the meninges and cortex in mice with the cranium left intact. Using a thrombotic mouse model, we show that the OMAG can yield longitudinal measurements of meningeal vascular responses to the insult and can decouple these responses from those in the cortex, giving valuable information regarding the localized hemodynamics along with the dynamic formation of thrombotic event. The results indicate that OMAG can be a useful tool to study therapeutic strategies in preclinical animal models in order to mitigate various pathologies that are mainly related to the meningeal circulations. PMID:20933005

  12. Theories linguistiques, modeles informatiques, experimentation psycholinguistique (Linguistic Theories, Information-Processing Models, Psycholinguistic Experimentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Daniele

    1975-01-01

    Delineates and elaborates upon the underlying psychological postulates in linguistic and information-processing models, and shows the interdependence of psycholinguistics and linguistic analysis. (Text is in French.) (DB)

  13. Bacterial Meningitis in Adults After Splenectomy and Hyposplenic States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriani, Kirsten S.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the occurrence, disease course, prognosis, and vaccination status of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis with a history of splenectomy or functional hyposplenia. Patients and Methods: Patients with bacterial meningitis proven by cerebrospinal fluid culture

  14. Hyperglycemia in bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, E.S.; Westendorp, W.F.; de Gans, J.; Kruyt, N.D.; Spanjaard, L.; Reitsma, J.B.; van de Beek, D.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hyperglycemia has been associated with unfavorable outcome in several disorders, but few data are available in bacterial meningitis. We assessed the incidence and significance of hyperglycemia in adults with bacterial meningitis. METHODS: We collected data prospectively between

  15. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Antimicrobial Treatment of Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Tunkel, Allan R.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed as a result of the widespread use of conjugate vaccines and preventive antimicrobial treatment of pregnant women. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with bacterial meningitis, accurate information is necessary regarding the

  16. Cholinesterase modulations in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Ofek, Keren; Qvist, Tavs

    2011-01-01

    The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis.......The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis....

  17. Optimization of Regression Models of Experimental Data Using Confirmation Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2010-01-01

    A new search metric is discussed that may be used to better assess the predictive capability of different math term combinations during the optimization of a regression model of experimental data. The new search metric can be determined for each tested math term combination if the given experimental data set is split into two subsets. The first subset consists of data points that are only used to determine the coefficients of the regression model. The second subset consists of confirmation points that are exclusively used to test the regression model. The new search metric value is assigned after comparing two values that describe the quality of the fit of each subset. The first value is the standard deviation of the PRESS residuals of the data points. The second value is the standard deviation of the response residuals of the confirmation points. The greater of the two values is used as the new search metric value. This choice guarantees that both standard deviations are always less or equal to the value that is used during the optimization. Experimental data from the calibration of a wind tunnel strain-gage balance is used to illustrate the application of the new search metric. The new search metric ultimately generates an optimized regression model that was already tested at regression model independent confirmation points before it is ever used to predict an unknown response from a set of regressors.

  18. Thermal conductivity of microporous layers: Analytical modeling and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andisheh-Tadbir, Mehdi; Kjeang, Erik; Bahrami, Majid

    2015-11-01

    A new compact relationship is developed for the thermal conductivity of the microporous layer (MPL) used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells as a function of pore size distribution, porosity, and compression pressure. The proposed model is successfully validated against experimental data obtained from a transient plane source thermal constants analyzer. The thermal conductivities of carbon paper samples with and without MPL were measured as a function of load (1-6 bars) and the MPL thermal conductivity was found between 0.13 and 0.17 W m-1 K-1. The proposed analytical model predicts the experimental thermal conductivities within 5%. A correlation generated from the analytical model was used in a multi objective genetic algorithm to predict the pore size distribution and porosity for an MPL with optimized thermal conductivity and mass diffusivity. The results suggest that an optimized MPL, in terms of heat and mass transfer coefficients, has an average pore size of 122 nm and 63% porosity.

  19. A systematic review of prion therapeutics in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevitt, Clare R; Collinge, John

    2006-09-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible, invariably fatal, neurodegenerative diseases which include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie in animals. A large number of putative treatments have been studied in experimental models over the past 30 years, with at best modest disease-modifying effects. The arrival of variant CJD in the UK in the 1990s has intensified the search for effective therapeutic agents, using an increasing number of animal, cellular and in vitro models with some recent promising proof of principle studies. Here, for the first time, we present a comprehensive systematic, rather than selective, review of published data on experimental approaches to prion therapeutics to provide a scientific resource for informing future therapeutics research, both in laboratory models and in clinical studies.

  20. Experimental validation of the multiphase extended Leblond's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz-Patrault, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Transformation induced plasticity is a crucial contribution of the simulation of several forming processes involving phase transitions under mechanical loads, resulting in large irreversible strain even though the applied stress is under the yield stress. One of the most elegant and widely used models is based on analytic homogenization procedures and has been proposed by Leblond et al. [1-4]. Very recently, a simple extension of the Leblond's model has been developed by Weisz-Patrault [8]. Several product phases are taken into account and several assumptions are relaxed in order to extend the applicability of the model. The present contribution compares experimental tests with numerical computations, in order to discuss the validity of the developed theory. Thus, experimental results extracted from the existing literature are analyzed. Results show a good agreement between measurements and theoretical computations.

  1. Regression Model Optimization for the Analysis of Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2009-01-01

    A candidate math model search algorithm was developed at Ames Research Center that determines a recommended math model for the multivariate regression analysis of experimental data. The search algorithm is applicable to classical regression analysis problems as well as wind tunnel strain gage balance calibration analysis applications. The algorithm compares the predictive capability of different regression models using the standard deviation of the PRESS residuals of the responses as a search metric. This search metric is minimized during the search. Singular value decomposition is used during the search to reject math models that lead to a singular solution of the regression analysis problem. Two threshold dependent constraints are also applied. The first constraint rejects math models with insignificant terms. The second constraint rejects math models with near-linear dependencies between terms. The math term hierarchy rule may also be applied as an optional constraint during or after the candidate math model search. The final term selection of the recommended math model depends on the regressor and response values of the data set, the user s function class combination choice, the user s constraint selections, and the result of the search metric minimization. A frequently used regression analysis example from the literature is used to illustrate the application of the search algorithm to experimental data.

  2. Dynamic Modeling of Wind Turbine Gearboxes and Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune

    is presented. The model takes into account the effects of load and applied grinding corrections. The results are verified by comparing to simulated and experimental results reported in the existing literature. Using gear data loosely based on a 1 MW wind turbine gearbox, the gear mesh stiffness is expanded...... analysis in relation to gear dynamics. A multibody model of two complete 2.3MWwind turbine gearboxes mounted back-to-back in a test rig is built. The mean values of the proposed gear mesh stiffnesses are included. The model is validated by comparing with calculated and measured eigenfrequencies and mode...

  3. Experimental validation of a Bayesian model of visual acuity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dalimier, Eugénie

    2009-01-01

    Based on standard procedures used in optometry clinics, we compare measurements of visual acuity for 10 subjects (11 eyes tested) in the presence of natural ocular aberrations and different degrees of induced defocus, with the predictions given by a Bayesian model customized with aberrometric data of the eye. The absolute predictions of the model, without any adjustment, show good agreement with the experimental data, in terms of correlation and absolute error. The efficiency of the model is discussed in comparison with image quality metrics and other customized visual process models. An analysis of the importance and customization of each stage of the model is also given; it stresses the potential high predictive power from precise modeling of ocular and neural transfer functions.

  4. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double...... hyperalgesia models (6 studies), 'pain' models (25 studies), summation models (2 studies), nociceptive reflex models (3 studies) and miscellaneous models (2 studies). A consistent reversal of analgesia by a MOR-antagonist was demonstrated in 10 of the 25 ITP-studies, including stress-induced analgesia and r......TMS. In the remaining 14 conditioning modulation studies either absence of effects or ambiguous effects by MOR-antagonists, were observed. In the STP-studies, no effect of the opioid-blockade could be demonstrated in 5 out of 6 secondary hyperalgesia studies. The direction of MOR-antagonist dependent effects upon pain...

  5. Experimental-analytical method of technological processes modeling in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efremov German I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers general modeling techniques used in the study in education at different stages. The classification of different types of models and main stages of the simulation are considered. It is shown that in the course “Process of simulation” for technical areas of the Universities required the category of “Experimental-analytical simulation method”. For example, a new textbook for bachelors “Modeling of chemical-technological processes” shows that the section facilitates the compilation of process models in general; gives the possibility of studying the process at different levels; describes the nonlinear properties of the simulation objects, and to obtain refined adjustment of the model according to the experiment. The use of models of high accuracy can improve the quality of education.

  6. Experimental Evaluation of Equivalent-Fluid Models for Melamine Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Melamine foam is a soft porous material commonly used in noise control applications. Many models exist to represent porous materials at various levels of fidelity. This work focuses on rigid frame equivalent fluid models, which represent the foam as a fluid with a complex speed of sound and density. There are several empirical models available to determine these frequency dependent parameters based on an estimate of the material flow resistivity. Alternatively, these properties can be experimentally educed using an impedance tube setup. Since vibroacoustic models are generally sensitive to these properties, this paper assesses the accuracy of several empirical models relative to impedance tube measurements collected with melamine foam samples. Diffuse field sound absorption measurements collected using large test articles in a laboratory are also compared with absorption predictions determined using model-based and measured foam properties. Melamine foam slabs of various thicknesses are considered.

  7. Epidemiology of neonatal meningitis in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, Mahmoud F; Bessisso, Mohammed S; Janahi, Mohammad A; Habob, Lina H; El-Shafie, Sittana S

    2002-07-01

    Neonatal meningitis is responsible for thousands of neonatal deaths annually all over the world. Our study was conducted to determine the epidemiology, management and best preventive measures for neonatal meningitis in Qatar. A retrospective study reviewed the records of bacterial meningitis patients under the age of one month. The study was carried out at Hamad Medical Hospital, the only hospital that provides health care at Qatar and the study period was between January 1998 to December 2000. Thirteen patients were included. Sixty percent of patients had early onset meningitis. Causative organisms were group B Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas species, Neisseria meningitidis, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Flavibacterium meningococcus septicum. A bacterial resistance to the usual combination of ampicillin and gentamicin were noticed (as initial treatment before culture sensitivity results), which affected negatively on some patients. Complications of cerebral palsy, mental retardation and epilepsy occurred in 3 patients (23%). None of the patients died during the study period. Emphasis is placed on the importance of correct early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic therapy. It is suggested that the identification and appropriate treatment of any maternal bacterial infection is an important measure in preventing neonatal sepsis and meningitis.

  8. Development and plasticity of meningeal lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Salli; Karaman, Sinem; Nurmi, Harri; Airavaara, Mikko; Voutilainen, Merja H; Mathivet, Thomas; Chilov, Dmitri; Li, Zhilin; Koppinen, Tapani; Park, Jun-Hee; Fang, Shentong; Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Saarma, Mart; Eichmann, Anne; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Alitalo, Kari

    2017-11-15

    The recent discovery of meningeal lymphatic vessels (LVs) has raised interest in their possible involvement in neuropathological processes, yet little is known about their development or maintenance. We show here that meningeal LVs develop postnatally, appearing first around the foramina in the basal parts of the skull and spinal canal, sprouting along the blood vessels and cranial and spinal nerves to various parts of the meninges surrounding the central nervous system (CNS). VEGF-C, expressed mainly in vascular smooth muscle cells, and VEGFR3 in lymphatic endothelial cells were essential for their development, whereas VEGF-D deletion had no effect. Surprisingly, in adult mice, the LVs showed regression after VEGF-C or VEGFR3 deletion, administration of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib, or expression of VEGF-C/D trap, which also compromised the lymphatic drainage function. Conversely, an excess of VEGF-C induced meningeal lymphangiogenesis. The plasticity and regenerative potential of meningeal LVs should allow manipulation of cerebrospinal fluid drainage and neuropathological processes in the CNS. © 2017 Antila et al.

  9. Meningitis in children: Analysis of 92 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Abuhandan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to evaluate cases ofmeningitis for epidemiologic, clinical, laboratory findingsand the treatment response.Materials and methods: We evaluated ninety two patientswhose diagnosis were meningitis retrospectivelybetween January 2010 and December 2011, for age, gender,presenting symptoms, physical examination, laboratoryfindings and treatments. The patients who were hospitalizedwith central nervous system infection were diagnosedas meningitis by examination of cerebrospinal fluid(CSF under a microscope and evaluation of biochemical(glucose, protein, chloride results and / or culture.Results: Fifty patients were male and 42 were female,mean age was 4.2 ± 4.1 years. The most common symptomswere fever (91.3%, vomiting (87.0%, headache(68.5%, and convulsion (20.7%. On physical examinationin descending order neck stiffness (60.9%, Brudzinskiphenomenon (50%, Kernig sign (46.7%, alteredconsciousness (16.3% and rash (2.2% were detected.When patients were classified in terms of clinical andlaboratory findings; bacterial meningitis was determined53.4%, aseptic in 38% and tuberculous meningitis in7,6%. CSF and blood culture were positive in 13 of andseven of the cases respectively. The most frequent complicationswere seizures, cranial nerve palsy, hydrocephalusand the syndrome of inappropriate ADH. Mortalityrate was determined as 2.2%.Conclusion: The patients especially with symptoms offever, vomiting, headache and convulsions, meningitisshould be considered primary disease.Key words: Child, meningitis, clinical signs, treatment

  10. Leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Young Hwan [School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    The CNS involvement by leukemia may either be meningeal or parenchymal, although meningeal infiltration of leukemic cells, known as leukemic meningitis is more common. We report a case of leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina in a patient with an acute lymphoblastic crisis which transformed from the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia. An MR image revealed diffuse enlargement and peripheral ring enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina.

  11. Transvaginal ultrasound ovarian diathermy: sheep as an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimentel Anita M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some techniques of transvaginal ovarian drilling have been previously described. Nevertheless a monopolar transvaginal ovarian cauterization, that use the expertise and safety of transvaginal puncture for oocyte captation seems to be an easier and feasible approach. The aim of this study was to develop a minimally invasive ovarian cauterization technique under transvaginal ultrasound control, and to evaluate the safety of the transvaginal ovarian monopolar cauterization, female sheep at reproductive age were used as an experimental model. Findings An experimental study was performed in a university research center. Seventeen female sheep (15 Corriedale e 2 Suffolk in reproductive age were submitted to transvaginal ovarian cauterization with a monopolar Valleylab Force 2 electrocautery. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions were assessed. Ovarian size were 1.31 cm2 ± 0,43 (Corriedale and 3.41 cm2 ± 0,64 (Suffolk. From 30 ovaries from Corriedale sheep punctured, only 3 were cauterized, presenting macroscopic and typical microscopic lesion. In the Suffolk sheep group, only one ovary was cauterized. No lesion could be found in the needle path. Conclusions This is the first experimental animal model described for ovarian cauterization needle guided by transvaginal ultrasound. The sheep does not seem to be the ideal animal model to study this technique. Another animal model, whose ovaries are better identified by transvaginal ultrasound should be sought for this technique, theoretically less invasive, before it could be offered safely to women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

  12. Update on bacterial meningitis: epidemiology, trials and genetic association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasanmoentalib, E. Soemirien; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease that continues to inflict a heavy toll. We reviewed recent advances in vaccination, randomized studies on treatment, and genetic association studies in bacterial meningitis. The incidence of bacterial meningitis has decreased after implementation of

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory markers in patients with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Merel M.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Seron, Mercedes Valls; Houben, Judith; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes meningitis is the third most common cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with high rates of mortality and unfavorable outcome. We analyzed 101 cytokines, chemokines and complement factors in CSF of adult patients with Listeria meningitis included in a prospective

  14. Community-acquired Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M. C.; van de Beek, D.; Heckenberg, S. G. B.; Spanjaard, L.; de Gans, J.

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis in adults. This report describes a prospective evaluation of 16 episodes of community-acquired H. influenzae meningitis in a nationwide study on bacterial meningitis. Predisposing conditions were present in eight (50%) of the 16

  15. Current concept in the management of acute bacterial meningitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though largely considered a disease of the so called dry and hot “African meningitis belt,” meningitis is assuming a global public health problem. Recent emergence of resistant strains of bacteria has resulted in increased morbidity of and mortality attributable to meningitis. This review addresses recent developments in the ...

  16. Olfactory nerve--a novel invasion route of Neisseria meningitidis to reach the meninges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sjölinder

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival.

  17. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Jennifer E.; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R.; Gray, Katherine J.; Kiran, Anmol M.; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Faragher, Brian E.; Everett, Dean B.; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. PMID:26259813

  18. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulohoma, Benard W; Cornick, Jennifer E; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R; Gray, Katherine J; Kiran, Anmol M; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Parkhill, Julian; Faragher, Brian E; Everett, Dean B; Bentley, Stephen D; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. Copyright © 2015 Kulohoma et al.

  19. Olfactory Nerve—A Novel Invasion Route of Neisseria meningitidis to Reach the Meninges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2010-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival. PMID:21124975

  20. Cost-utility analysis of patient care in children with meningeal signs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostenbrink, Rianne; Oostenbrink, Jan B.; Moons, Karel G. M.; Derksen-Lubsen, Gerarda; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Redekop, W. Ken; Moll, Henriëtte A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We designed a model of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions applied in children with meningeal signs. Using this model, we determined in a cost-utility analysis the consequences for society of different diagnostic strategies in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs.

  1. Numerical modeling of experimental human fibrous cap delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiaochang; Davis, Lindsey A; Deng, Xiaomin; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    Fibrous cap delamination is a critical process during the rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, which often leads to severe life-threatening clinical consequences such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this study a finite element modeling and simulation approach is presented that enables the study of fibrous cap delamination experiments for the purpose of understanding the fibrous cap delamination process. A cohesive zone model (CZM) approach is applied to simulate delamination of the fibrous cap from the underlying plaque tissue. A viscoelastic anisotropic (VA) model for the bulk arterial material behavior is extended from existing studies so that the hysteresis phenomenon observed in the fibrous cap delamination experiments can be captured. A finite element model is developed for the fibrous cap delamination experiments, in which arterial layers (including the fibrous cap and the underlying plaque tissue) are represented by solid elements based on the VA model and the fibrous cap-underlying plaque tissue interface is characterized by interfacial CZM elements. In the CZM, the delamination process is governed by an exponential traction-separation law which utilizes critical energy release rates obtained directly from the fibrous cap delamination experiments. A set of VA model parameter values and CZM parameter values is determined based on values suggested in the literature and through matching simulation predictions of the load vs. load-point displacement curve with one set of experimental measurements. Using this set of parameter values, simulation predictions for other sets of experimental measurements are obtained and good agreement between simulation predictions and experimental measurements is observed. Results of this study demonstrate the applicability of the viscoelastic anisotropic model and the CZM approach for the simulation of diseased arterial tissue failure processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Pneumococcal meningitis with accompanying severe hearing loss: 3D-FLAIR imaging of the inner ear and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Naoyuki; Yunoki, Taijun; Kubo, Satoshi; Fujii, Hiroki; Takamatu, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Akio; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of unconsciousness. He was diagnosed with pneumococcal meningitis and treated with a combination of antibiotics (meropenem hydrate), dexamethasone, and intravenous immunoglobulin. Although he gradually regained consciousness, he started showing signs of hearing disturbance. Measurement of auditory brainstem response revealed severe sensorineural hearing loss. The patient then underwent three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed increased signals in the cochlea and the vestibuum, and their enhancement after gadolinium administration. This enhancement was still observed on images of the inner ear acquired on the 52nd hospital day. These findings suggested that the change of content in the lymph and the damage to the blood-labyrinth barrier was caused and aggravated by an immune response. Recent studies have shown that an MyD88-dependent immune response contributes to hearing loss in an experimental mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. The patient was administered steroid pulse and hyperbaric oxygen therapies for improving the hearing deficit, but these therapies were discontinued because of the aggravation of hepatitis B and diabetes mellitus, which he had developed previously.

  3. Bacterial meningitis in children. MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Onuma, Takehide [Sendai City Hospital (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    We analyzed MRI findings for 17 children with bacterial meningitis. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images revealed meningeal enhancement at the basal cistern and/or the convex surface of the brain in 15 cases. Cerebral infarcts were found in the distribution of perforating and/or medullary arteries in four cases. In one neonatal case, venous infarction with hemorrhagic transformation was evident. Communicating hydrocephalus was noted in three cases, subdural effusion in two, subdural empyema in one, and encephalitis in one. In one neonatal case ventriculitis was found. We conclude that MRI is useful for the evaluation of the active inflammatory process of the meninges and the identification of the focal lesions in central nervous system complications. (author)

  4. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  5. Targets for adjunctive therapy in pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichello, Tatiana; Collodel, Allan; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Moreira, Ana Paula; Ceretta, Renan A; Petronilho, Fabrícia; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-15

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a severe infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The inflammatory reaction to the disease contributes to neuronal injury and involves the meninges, the subarachnoid space and the brain parenchymal vessels. Bacterial pathogens may reach the blood-brain barrier and be recognized by antigen-presenting cells through the binding of Toll-like receptors, triggering an inflammatory cascade. This in turn produces cytokines and chemokines, increases adhesion molecule expression and attracts leukocytes from the blood. This cascade leads to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage and blood-brain barrier permeability. In spite of effective antibacterial treatments, approximately one third of survivors suffer from long-term sequelae, such as hearing loss, cerebral palsy, seizures, hydrocephaly or cognitive impairment. This review summarizes the information on targets of adjuvant treatments of acute pneumococcal meningitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Lind, I

    1977-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) would facilitate the rapid, etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis when used in parallel with other routine methods in a medical bacteriological laboratory. Of 3,674 consecutive specimens of cerebros......The aim of the present study was to investigate whether counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) would facilitate the rapid, etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis when used in parallel with other routine methods in a medical bacteriological laboratory. Of 3,674 consecutive specimens....../139) of the culture-negative specimens. CSF specimens from 21 patients with bacterial meningitis caused by other species were all negative in CIE, except four, three of which contained Escherichia coli antigen reacting with antiserum to N. meningitidis group B and one E. coli antigen reacting with antiserum to H...

  7. Target Soil Impact Verification: Experimental Testing and Kayenta Constitutive Modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Scott Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, Gregory Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newell, Pania [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report details experimental testing and constitutive modeling of sandy soil deformation under quasi - static conditions. This is driven by the need to understand constitutive response of soil to target/component behavior upon impact . An experimental and constitutive modeling program was followed to determine elastic - plastic properties and a compressional failure envelope of dry soil . One hydrostatic, one unconfined compressive stress (UCS), nine axisymmetric compression (ACS) , and one uniaxial strain (US) test were conducted at room temperature . Elastic moduli, assuming isotropy, are determined from unload/reload loops and final unloading for all tests pre - failure and increase monotonically with mean stress. Very little modulus degradation was discernable from elastic results even when exposed to mean stresses above 200 MPa . The failure envelope and initial yield surface were determined from peak stresses and observed onset of plastic yielding from all test results. Soil elasto - plastic behavior is described using the Brannon et al. (2009) Kayenta constitutive model. As a validation exercise, the ACS - parameterized Kayenta model is used to predict response of the soil material under uniaxial strain loading. The resulting parameterized and validated Kayenta model is of high quality and suitable for modeling sandy soil deformation under a range of conditions, including that for impact prediction.

  8. Experimental Damage Identification of a Model Reticulated Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage identification of a reticulated shell is a challenging task, facing various difficulties, such as the large number of degrees of freedom (DOFs, the phenomenon of modal localization and transition, and low modeling accuracy. Based on structural vibration responses, the damage identification of a reticulated shell was studied. At first, the auto-regressive (AR time series model was established based on the acceleration responses of the reticulated shell. According to the changes in the coefficients of the AR model between the damaged conditions and the undamaged condition, the damage of the reticulated shell can be detected. In addition, the damage sensitive factors were determined based on the coefficients of the AR model. With the damage sensitive factors as the inputs and the damage positions as the outputs, back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs were then established and were trained using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (L–M algorithm. The locations of the damages can be predicted by the back-propagation neural networks. At last, according to the experimental scheme of single-point excitation and multi-point responses, the impact experiments on a K6 shell model with a scale of 1/10 were conducted. The experimental results verified the efficiency of the proposed damage identification method based on the AR time series model and back-propagation neural networks. The proposed damage identification method can ensure the safety of the practical engineering to some extent.

  9. Association between Toll-like receptor 9 gene polymorphisms and risk of bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X H; Shi, H P; Li, F J

    2016-07-25

    We determined whether two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Toll-like receptor 9 gene (TLR9) (TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836) influenced susceptibility to bacterial meningitis in a Chinese population. The study comprised 126 patients with bacterial meningitis and 252 control subjects, all of whom were recruited from the Tuberculosis Hospital of Shanxi Province. Genotyping of TLR9+2848 rs352140 and TLR9-1237 rs5743836 was performed by polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that individuals with the AA genotype were associated with an increased risk of bacterial meningitis compared with those with the GG genotype (OR = 0.43, 95%CI = 0.19-0.95; P = 0.03). In a recessive model, the AA genotype was correlated with an elevated risk of bacterial meningitis compared with the GG+GA genotype (OR = 0.49, 95%CI = 0.22-0.99; P = 0.04). However, no significant differences were observed in the association between the TLR9-1237 rs5743836 polymorphism and the risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant, dominant, or recessive models. In conclusion, the results of our study suggest an association between the TLR9+2848 polymorphism and a reduced risk of bacterial meningitis in the codominant and recessive models.

  10. Biomechanics of epithelial cell islands analyzed by modeling and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Coburn, Luke; Noppe, Adrian; Caldwell, Benjamin J; Moussa, Elliott; Yap, Chloe; Priya, Rashmi; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Roberts, Anthony P; Yap, Alpha S; Neufeld, Zoltan; Gomez, Guillermo A

    2016-01-01

    We generated a new computational approach to analyze the biomechanics of epithelial cell islands that combines both vertex and contact-inhibition-of-locomotion models to include both cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion. Examination of the distribution of cell protrusions (adhesion to the substrate) in the model predicted high order profiles of cell organization that agree with those previously seen experimentally. Cells acquired an asymmetric distribution of protrusions (and traction forces) that decreased when moving from the edge to the island center. Our in silico analysis also showed that tension on cell-cell junctions (and monolayer stress) is not homogeneous across the island. Instead it is higher at the island center and scales up with island size, which we confirmed experimentally using laser ablation assays and immunofluorescence. Moreover, our approach has the minimal elements necessary to reproduce mechanical crosstalk between both cell-cell and cell substrate adhesion systems. We found that an i...

  11. Numerical modeling of nitrogen oxide emission and experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecowka Lech

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of nitrogen reduction in combustion process with application of primary method are presented in paper. The reduction of NOx emission, by the recirculation of combustion gasses, staging of fuel and of air was investigated, and than the reduction of NOx emission by simultaneous usage of the mentioned above primary method with pulsatory disturbances.The investigations contain numerical modeling of NOx reduction and experimental verification of obtained numerical calculation results.

  12. Epidural blood patch: A study on an experimental model

    OpenAIRE

    S K Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Epidural blood patch has been used to treat spinal headache with varying success. An experimental model was designed to ascertain whether an epidural blood patch can be used to seal the needle puncture sites in dural repair. Materials and Methods: Bovine dura was secured to the lower end of an open-ended calibrated plastic cylinder. Multiple interrupted stitches were applied over a 02 cm length of the dura without any incision. The cylinder was filled with colored saline gradually with t...

  13. Experimental model of heterotopic ossification in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotz, T.G.G. [Escola Politécnica, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Tecnologia em Saúde, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Paula, J.B. de [Médico,Doutor em Engenharia Biomédica, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Moser, A.D.L. [Escola Politécnica, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Tecnologia em Saúde, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues adjacent to large joints, resulting in joint mobility deficit. In order to determine which treatment techniques are more appropriate for such condition, experimental models of induced heterotopic bone formation have been proposed using heterologous demineralized bone matrix implants and bone morphogenetic protein and other tissues. The objective of the present experimental study was to identify a reliable protocol to induce HO in Wistar rats, based on autologous bone marrow (BM) implantation, comparing 3 different BM volumes and based on literature evidence of this HO induction model in larger laboratory animals. Twelve male Wistar albino rats weighing 350/390 g were used. The animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction in order to quantify serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP). HO was induced by BM implantation in both quadriceps muscles of these animals, experimental group (EG). Thirty-five days after the induction, another blood sample was collected for ALP determination. The results showed a weight gain in the EG and no significant difference in ALP levels when comparing the periods before and after induction. Qualitative histological analysis confirmed the occurrence of heterotopic ossification in all 12 EG rats. In conclusion, the HO induction model was effective when 0.35 mL autologous BM was applied to the quadriceps of Wistar rats.

  14. Amplified energy harvester from footsteps: design, modeling, and experimental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Chen, Wusi; Guzman, Plinio; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling and experimental analysis of an amplified footstep energy harvester. With the unique design of amplified piezoelectric stack harvester the kinetic energy generated by footsteps can be effectively captured and converted into usable DC power that could potentially be used to power many electric devices, such as smart phones, sensors, monitoring cameras, etc. This doormat-like energy harvester can be used in crowded places such as train stations, malls, concerts, airport escalator/elevator/stairs entrances, or anywhere large group of people walk. The harvested energy provides an alternative renewable green power to replace power requirement from grids, which run on highly polluting and global-warming-inducing fossil fuels. In this paper, two modeling approaches are compared to calculate power output. The first method is derived from the single degree of freedom (SDOF) constitutive equations, and then a correction factor is applied onto the resulting electromechanically coupled equations of motion. The second approach is to derive the coupled equations of motion with Hamilton's principle and the constitutive equations, and then formulate it with the finite element method (FEM). Experimental testing results are presented to validate modeling approaches. Simulation results from both approaches agree very well with experimental results where percentage errors are 2.09% for FEM and 4.31% for SDOF.

  15. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Rafael Panisi de Campos [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Hochman, Bernardo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia; Helene Junior, Americo; Fraga, Murillo Francisco Pires [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia. Divisao de Cirurgia Plastica; Lellis, Rute [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Divisao de Patologia; Ferreira, Lydia Masako, E-mail: rpcmeirelles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: lydia.dcir@epm.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Divisao de Cirugia Plastica

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: to describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. Methods: on this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. Results: after 30 days, the animals from the control group had all their hair grown. In spite of that, the animals from group 2000 cGy had a 60-day alopecia and from group 3000 cGy, a 90-day alopecia. After the 30th day, the 3000cGy group demonstrated 90-day cutaneous radiation injuries, graded 3 and 4. One of the animals from group 4500 cGy died on the 7th day with visceral necrosis. The other from the same group had total skin necrosis. A progressive reduction of glands and blood vessels count and an increase on collagen deposition was observed. Conclusion: The proposed experimental model is reproducible. This study suggests that the dosage 4500cGy is excessive and the 3000 cGy is the most effective for this experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. (author)

  16. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  17. Listeria Meningitis in an Immunocompetent Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Giovanna; Diana, Maria Cristina; Solari, Nicoletta; Bandettini, Roberto; Sorrentino, Stefania; Loy, Anna; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Renna, Salvatore

    2017-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anerobic, gram-positive bacillus that is isolated from the soil, vegetables, and wild or domestic animals. Listeria infection is usually found in the older adults, immunocompromised patients, pregnant women, and newborns, whereas it is rare in healthy infants and children. Listeria monocytogenes may cause meningitis, meningoencephalitis, brain abscess, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and liver abscess in children. The course of meningoencephalitis by Listeria is often severe and even fatal. Complications such as acute hydrocephalus, brain abscess, and spine abscess can develop, and the mortality associated with listeriosis is significantly high. We present a case of a previously healthy 7-year-old boy who developed Listeria monocytogenes meningitis.

  18. Neurosonographic findings of bacterial meningitis in Infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Chul; Lee, Sung Sik; Lee, Hong Kue; Lee, Soon Il [Sowa Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    44 infants under 1 year were studied retrospectively during these illness and follow up after 1 week intervals. The spectrum of sonographic features of bacterial meningitis in acute stage included normal scan (20 patients), echogenic sulci (10 patients), echogenic lining of epandymas (8 patients), Abnormal parenchymal echogenecity (6 patients). On follow up examination with 1 week intervals, variety of complications was found in 14 patients (32%) of the infants. There were ventriculomegaly in 7 patients, extraaxial fluid collection in 4 patients, brain abscess in 2 patients and poor encephalic cyst in 1 patient. We conclude that ultrasound was an effective method for evaluation of progression and complications of bacterial meningitis.

  19. Anthrax Meningitis - Report Of An Autopsied Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax is a rare cause of hemorrhagic meningitis in man. This report illustrates the characteristic hemorrhagic manifestations in the brain of a patient dying of anthrax meningitis secondary to overwhelming bacteremia. Gross examination of the brain revealed a thick dense subarachnoid hemorrhage with numerous petechial hemorrhages in the cortex. Histologically, meningoencephalitis with vascular necrosis, edema, perivascular cortical hemorrhages and clumps of Gram positive bacilli in the vascular lumen and invading vessel wall were the salient features. The anthrax bacillus was isolated from CSF and brain tissue and further its pathogenecity was confirmed by animal inoculation.

  20. Tuberculous and brucellosis meningitis differential diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, Hakan; Senbayrak, Seniha; Gencer, Serap

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Thwaites and Lancet scoring systems have been used in the rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). However, brucellar meningoencephalitis (BME) has similar characteristics with TBM. The ultimate aim of this study is to infer data to see if BME should be included in the dif......BACKGROUND: The Thwaites and Lancet scoring systems have been used in the rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). However, brucellar meningoencephalitis (BME) has similar characteristics with TBM. The ultimate aim of this study is to infer data to see if BME should be included...

  1. The microbiological diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, H; Ozturk-Engin, D; Elaldi, N

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to provide data on the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in this largest case series ever reported. The Haydarpasa-1 study involved patients with microbiologically confirmed TBM in Albania, Croatia, Denmark, Egypt, France, Hungary, Iraq, Italy, Macedonia, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia......, Syria and Turkey between 2000 and 2012. A positive culture, PCR or Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen staining (EZNs) from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was mandatory for inclusion of meningitis patients. A total of 506 TBM patients were included. The sensitivities of the tests were as follows: interferon-γ release...

  2. Innervation of the human middle meningeal artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Gulbenkian, S; Barroso, C P

    1998-01-01

    The majority of nerve fibers in the middle meningeal artery and branching arterioles are sympathetic, storing norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y (NPY). A sparse supply of fibers contain acetylcholinesterase activity and immunoreactivity toward vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), peptidine histidine...... methionine (PHM), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Only few substance P and neuropeptide K immunoreactive fibers are noted. Electronmicroscopy shows axons and terminals at the adventitial medial border of the human middle meningeal artery, with a fairly large distance to the smooth muscle cells...

  3. CFD modeling of pharmaceutical isolators with experimental verification of airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayan, N; Akay, H U; Walsh, M R; Bell, W V; Troyer, G L; Dukes, R E; Mohan, P

    2007-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been developed to predict the airflow in a transfer isolator using a commercial CFD code. In order to assess the ability of the CFD approach in predicting the flow inside an isolator, hot wire anemometry measurements and a novel experimental flow visualization technique consisting of helium-filled glycerin bubbles were used. The results obtained have been shown to agree well with the experiments and show that CFD can be used to model barrier systems and isolators with practical fidelity. This indicates that CFD can and should be used to support the design, testing, and operation of barrier systems and isolators.

  4. Contact drying: a review of experimental and mechanistic modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Ekneet Kaur; Chaudhuri, Bodhisattwa

    2012-09-15

    Drying is one of the most complex unit operations with simultaneous heat and mass transfer. The contact drying process is also not well understood as several physical phenomena occur concurrently. This paper reviews current experimental and modeling approaches employed towards a better understanding of the contact drying operation. Additionally, an overview of some fundamental aspects relating to contact drying is provided. A brief discussion of some model extensions such as incorporation of noncontact forces, interstitial fluids and attrition rate is also presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pneumatic Adaptive Absorber: Mathematical Modelling with Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Mikułowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of mechanical energy absorbers utilized in engineering structures are hydraulic dampers, since they are simple and highly efficient and have favourable volume to load capacity ratio. However, there exist fields of applications where a threat of toxic contamination with the hydraulic fluid contents must be avoided, for example, food or pharmacy industries. A solution here can be a Pneumatic Adaptive Absorber (PAA, which is characterized by a high dissipation efficiency and an inactive medium. In order to properly analyse the characteristics of a PAA, an adequate mathematical model is required. This paper proposes a concept for mathematical modelling of a PAA with experimental verification. The PAA is considered as a piston-cylinder device with a controllable valve incorporated inside the piston. The objective of this paper is to describe a thermodynamic model of a double chamber cylinder with gas migration between the inner volumes of the device. The specific situation considered here is that the process cannot be defined as polytropic, characterized by constant in time thermodynamic coefficients. Instead, the coefficients of the proposed model are updated during the analysis. The results of the experimental research reveal that the proposed mathematical model is able to accurately reflect the physical behaviour of the fabricated demonstrator of the shock absorber.

  6. Bacterial Invasion of the Inner Ear in Association With Pneumococcal Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the pathways of bacterial invasion and subsequent spreading in the inner ear during pneumococcal meningitis. STUDY DESIGN: A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was used. METHODS: Thirty rats were inoculated intrathecally with S. pneumoniae...... serotype 1, 3 or 9 V and received no additional treatment. The rats were sacrificed when reaching terminal illness or on Day 7 and then prepared for serial sectioning and PAS-Alcian blue staining for light microscopy. RESULTS: During the first few days after inoculation, bacteria invade the inner ear...... spreading were found within the inner ear. Bacterial elimination was evidenced by engulfment by macrophages within the inner ear. CONCLUSION: From the meninges, pneumococci invade the inner ear through the cochlear aqueduct during the first days of infection, whereas hematogenous invasion via the spiral...

  7. Experimental models in vaccine research: malaria and leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Teixeira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have a long history of being useful tools, not only to test and select vaccines, but also to help understand the elaborate details of the immune response that follows infection. Different models have been extensively used to investigate putative immunological correlates of protection against parasitic diseases that are important to reach a successful vaccine. The greatest challenge has been the improvement and adaptation of these models to reflect the reality of human disease and the screening of vaccine candidates capable of overcoming the challenge of natural transmission. This review will discuss the advantages and challenges of using experimental animal models for vaccine development and how the knowledge achieved can be extrapolated to human disease by looking into two important parasitic diseases: malaria and leishmaniasis.

  8. Experimental models in vaccine research: malaria and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, C; Gomes, R

    2013-02-01

    Animal models have a long history of being useful tools, not only to test and select vaccines, but also to help understand the elaborate details of the immune response that follows infection. Different models have been extensively used to investigate putative immunological correlates of protection against parasitic diseases that are important to reach a successful vaccine. The greatest challenge has been the improvement and adaptation of these models to reflect the reality of human disease and the screening of vaccine candidates capable of overcoming the challenge of natural transmission. This review will discuss the advantages and challenges of using experimental animal models for vaccine development and how the knowledge achieved can be extrapolated to human disease by looking into two important parasitic diseases: malaria and leishmaniasis.

  9. Experimental model of cultured keratinocytes Modelo experimental de cultura de queratinócitos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Gragnani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioengineering research is essential in the development of ideal combination of biomaterials and cultured cells to produce the permanent wound coverage. The experimental model of cultured keratinocytes presents all steps of the culture, since the isolation of the keratinocytes, preparation of the human acellular dermis, preparation of the composite skin graft and their elevation to the air-liquid interface. The research in cultured keratinocytes model advances in two main ways: 1. optimization of the methods in vitro to the skin cells culture and proliferation and 2. developing biomaterials that present similar skin properties.A pesquisa em bioengenharia é primordial no desenvolvimento da combinação ideal de biomateriais e células cultivadas para produzir a cobertura definitiva das lesões. O modelo experimental da cultura de queratinócitos apresenta toda as etapas do cultivo, desde o isolamento dos queratinócitos, preparação da derme acelular humana, do enxerto composto e da sua elevação à interface ar-líquido. A pesquisa em modelo de cultura de queratinócitos desenvolve-se em duas vias principais: 1. otimização dos métodos in vitro para cultivo e proliferação de células da pele e 2. desenvolvimento de biomateriais que mimetizem as propriedades da pele.

  10. Meningococcal meningitis: vaccination outbreak response and epidemiological changes in the African meningitis belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod Artal, Francisco Javier

    2015-07-01

    The main approach to controlling epidemics of meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt has been reactive vaccination campaigns with serogroup A polysaccharide vaccine once the outbreak reached an incidence threshold. Early reactive vaccination is effective in reducing morbidity and mortality. A recent paper in International Health has shown that earlier reactive vaccination campaigns may be even more effective than increasing the coverage area of vaccination. Monovalent serogroup A conjugate vaccine programs have recently been launched to prevent transmission in endemic areas in the African meningitis belt. Conjugate vaccines can induce immunological memory and have impact on pharyngeal carriage. However, reactive vaccination still has a role to play taking into account the dynamic changes in the epidemiology of meningitis in this area. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN BACTERIAL MENINGITIS: DOSE IT HELP TO DIFFERENTIATE BACTERIAL FROM VIRAL MENINGITIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR EMAMI NAEINI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Central nervous system infections are among the most serious conditions in of medical practice. C-reactive Protein has recently been evaluated in terms of its ability to diffeccentiate bacterial from nonbacterial central nervous system inflammations.
    Methods. We studied the frequency of positive CRP in 61 patients who had signs of meningitis. All the specimens referred to one laboratory and were examined by Slide method.
    Results. Positive CRP was found in 97.6 percent of those who were finally diagnosed as bacterial meningitis. The frequency of CRP for other types of meningitis was 16.6 percent (P < 0.05.
    Discussion. In the absence of infection, CSF is free of CRP. Positive CRP may help to the differentiate the different types of meningitis.

  12. Myeloid-related protein 14 promotes inflammation and injury in meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wache, Christina; Klein, Matthias; Ostergaard, Christian; Angele, Barbara; Häcker, Hans; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Pruenster, Monika; Sperandio, Markus; Leanderson, Tomas; Roth, Johannes; Vogl, Thomas; Koedel, Uwe

    2015-07-15

    Neutrophilic inflammation often persists for days despite effective antibiotic treatment and contributes to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. We propose here that myeloid-related protein 14 (MRP14), an abundant cytosolic protein in myeloid cells, acts as an endogenous danger signal, driving inflammation and aggravating tissue injury. The release pattern of MRP14 was analyzed in human and murine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as well as in isolated neutrophils. Its functional role was assessed in a mouse meningitis model, using MRP14-deficient mice. We detected large quantities of MRP14 in CSF specimens from patients and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Immunohistochemical analyses and a cell-depletion approach indicated neutrophils as the major source of MRP14. In a meningitis model, MRP14-deficient mice showed a better resolution of inflammation during antibiotic therapy, which was accompanied by reduced disease severity. Intrathecal administration of MRP14 before infection reverted the phenotype of MRP14-deficient mice back to wild type. Moreover, intrathecal injection of MRP14 alone was sufficient to induce meningitis in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-CXCL2-dependent manner. Finally, treatment with the MRP14 antagonist paquinimod reduced inflammation and disease severity significantly, reaching levels comparable to those achieved after genetic depletion of MRP14. The present study implicates MRP14 as an essential propagator of inflammation and potential therapeutic target in pneumococcal meningitis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Functional polymorphisms of macrophage migration inhibitory factor as predictors of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savva, Athina; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Le Roy, Didier; Ferwerda, Bart; van der Ende, Arie; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; van de Beek, Diederik; Calandra, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most frequent and critical type of bacterial meningitis. Because cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis, we examined whether functional polymorphisms of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were associated with morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis. Two functional MIF promoter polymorphisms, a microsatellite (−794 CATT5–8; rs5844572) and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (−173 G/C; rs755622) were genotyped in a prospective, nationwide cohort of 405 patients with pneumococcal meningitis and in 329 controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. Carriages of the CATT7 and −173 C high-expression MIF alleles were associated with unfavorable outcome (P = 0.005 and 0.003) and death (P = 0.03 and 0.01). In a multivariate logistic regression model, shock [odds ratio (OR) 26.0, P = 0.02] and carriage of the CATT7 allele (OR 5.12, P = 0.04) were the main predictors of mortality. MIF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid were associated with systemic complications and death (P = 0.0002). Streptococcus pneumoniae strongly up-regulated MIF production in whole blood and transcription activity of high-expression MIF promoter Luciferase reporter constructs in THP-1 monocytes. Consistent with these findings, treatment with anti-MIF immunoglogulin G (IgG) antibodies reduced bacterial loads and improved survival in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. The present study provides strong evidence that carriage of high-expression MIF alleles is a genetic marker of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis and also suggests a potential role for MIF as a target of immune-modulating adjunctive therapy. PMID:26976591

  14. DMFC anode polarization: Experimental analysis and model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalegno, A.; Marchesi, R. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2008-01-03

    Anode two-phase flow has an important influence on DMFC performance and methanol crossover. In order to elucidate two-phase flow influence on anode performance, in this work, anode polarization is investigated combining experimental and modelling approach. A systematic experimental analysis of operating conditions influence on anode polarization is presented. Hysteresis due to operating condition is observed; experimental results suggest that it arises from methanol accumulation and has to be considered in evaluating DMFC performances and measurements reproducibility. A model of DMFC anode polarization is presented and utilised as tool to investigate anode two-phase flow. The proposed analysis permits one to produce a confident interpretation of the main involved phenomena. In particular, it confirms that methanol electro-oxidation kinetics is weakly dependent on methanol concentration and that methanol transport in gas phase produces an important contribution in anode feeding. Moreover, it emphasises the possibility to optimise anode flow rate in order to improve DMFC performance and reduce methanol crossover. (author)

  15. Of mice and men: modelling post-stroke depression experimentally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, G; Gertz, K; Heinz, A; Endres, M

    2014-01-01

    At least one-third of stroke survivors suffer from depression. The development of comorbid depression after stroke is clinically highly significant because post-stroke depression is associated with increased mortality, slows recovery and leads to worse functional outcomes. Here, we review the evidence that post-stroke depression can be effectively modelled in experimental rodents via a variety of approaches. This opens an exciting new window onto the neurobiology of depression and permits probing potential underlying mechanisms such as disturbed cellular plasticity, neuroendocrine dysregulation, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in a novel context. From the point of view of translational stroke research, extending the scope of experimental investigations beyond the study of short-term end points and, in particular, acute lesion size, may help improve the relevance of preclinical results to human disease. Furthermore, accumulating evidence from both clinical and experimental studies offers the tantalizing prospect of 5-hydroxytryptaminergic antidepressants as the first pharmacological therapy for stroke that would be available during the subacute and chronic phases of recovery. Interdisciplinary neuropsychiatric research will be called on to dissect the mechanisms underpinning the beneficial effects of antidepressants on stroke recovery. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Animal Models in Psychiatry Research. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-20 PMID:24838087

  16. Analytical modeling and experimental characterization of chemotaxis in Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiang; Wei, Guopeng; Wright Carlsen, Rika; Edwards, Matthew R.; Marculescu, Radu; Bogdan, Paul; Sitti, Metin

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a modeling and experimental framework to characterize the chemotaxis of Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) relying on two-dimensional and three-dimensional tracking of individual bacteria. Previous studies mainly characterized bacterial chemotaxis based on population density analysis. Instead, this study focuses on single-cell tracking and measuring the chemotactic drift velocity VC from the biased tumble rate of individual bacteria on exposure to a concentration gradient of l-aspartate. The chemotactic response of S. marcescens is quantified over a range of concentration gradients (10-3 to 5 mM/mm) and average concentrations (0.5×10-3 to 2.5 mM). Through the analysis of a large number of bacterial swimming trajectories, the tumble rate is found to have a significant bias with respect to the swimming direction. We also verify the relative gradient sensing mechanism in the chemotaxis of S. marcescens by measuring the change of VC with the average concentration and the gradient. The applied full pathway model with fitted parameters matches the experimental data. Finally, we show that our measurements based on individual bacteria lead to the determination of the motility coefficient μ (7.25×10-6 cm2/s) of a population. The experimental characterization and simulation results for the chemotaxis of this bacterial species contribute towards using S. marcescens in chemically controlled biohybrid systems.

  17. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi

    2015-04-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  18. Experimental validation of Swy-2 clay standard's PHREEQC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Hegyfalvi, Csaba; Freiler, Ágnes; Udvardi, Beatrix; Kónya, Péter; Székely, Edit; Falus, György

    2017-04-01

    One of the challenges of the present century is to limit the greenhouse gas emissions for the mitigation of climate change which is possible for example by a transitional technology, CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) and, among others, by the increase of nuclear proportion in the energy mix. Clay minerals are considered to be responsible for the low permeability and sealing capacity of caprocks sealing off stored CO2 and they are also the main constituents of bentonite in high level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The understanding of clay behaviour in these deep geological environments is possible through laboratory batch experiments of well-known standards and coupled geochemical models. Such experimentally validated models are scarce even though they allow deriving more precise long-term predictions of mineral reactions and rock and bentonite degradation underground and, therefore, ensuring the safety of the above technologies and increase their public acceptance. This ongoing work aims to create a kinetic geochemical model of Na-montmorillonite standard Swy-2 in the widely used PHREEQC code, supported by solution and mineral composition results from batch experiments. Several four days experiments have been carried out in 1:35 rock:water ratio at atmospheric conditions, and with inert and CO2 supercritical phase at 100 bar and 80 ⁰C relevant for the potential Hungarian CO2 reservoir complex. Solution samples have been taken during and after experiments and their compositions were measured by ICP-OES. The treated solid phase has been analysed by XRD and ATR-FTIR and compared to in-parallel measured references (dried Swy-2). Kinetic geochemical modelling of the experimental conditions has been performed by PHREEQC version 3 using equations and kinetic rate parameters from the USGS report of Palandri and Kharaka (2004). The visualization of experimental and numerous modelling results has been automatized by R. Experiments and models show very fast

  19. Meningococcal Meningitis Surveillance in the African Meningitis Belt, 2004-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingani, Clément; Bergeron-Caron, Cassi; Stuart, James M; Fernandez, Katya; Djingarey, Mamoudou H; Ronveaux, Olivier; Schnitzler, Johannes C; Perea, William A

    2015-11-15

    An enhanced meningitis surveillance network was established across the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa in 2003 to rapidly collect, disseminate, and use district weekly data on meningitis incidence. Following 10 years' experience with enhanced surveillance that included the introduction of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), in 2010, we analyzed the data on meningitis incidence and case fatality from countries reporting to the network. After de-duplication and reconciliation, data were extracted from the surveillance bulletins and the central database held by the World Health Organization Inter-country Support Team in Burkina Faso for countries reporting consistently from 2004 through 2013 (Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Togo). The 10 study countries reported 341 562 suspected and confirmed cases over the 10-year study period, with a marked peak in 2009 due to a large epidemic of group A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA) meningitis. Case fatality was lowest (5.9%) during this year. A mean of 71 and 67 districts annually crossed the alert and epidemic thresholds, respectively. The incidence rate of NmA meningitis fell >10-fold, from 0.27 per 100,000 in 2004-2010 to 0.02 per 100,000 in 2011-2013 (P meningitis surveillance system provides a global overview of the epidemiology of meningitis in the region, despite limitations in data quality and completeness. This study confirms a dramatic fall in NmA incidence after the introduction of PsA-TT. © 2015 World Health Organization; licensee Oxford Journals.

  20. Meningococcal Meningitis Surveillance in the African Meningitis Belt, 2004–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingani, Clément; Bergeron-Caron, Cassi; Stuart, James M.; Fernandez, Katya; Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Ronveaux, Olivier; Schnitzler, Johannes C.; Perea, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An enhanced meningitis surveillance network was established across the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa in 2003 to rapidly collect, disseminate, and use district weekly data on meningitis incidence. Following 10 years’ experience with enhanced surveillance that included the introduction of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), in 2010, we analyzed the data on meningitis incidence and case fatality from countries reporting to the network. Methods. After de-duplication and reconciliation, data were extracted from the surveillance bulletins and the central database held by the World Health Organization Inter-country Support Team in Burkina Faso for countries reporting consistently from 2004 through 2013 (Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Togo). Results. The 10 study countries reported 341 562 suspected and confirmed cases over the 10-year study period, with a marked peak in 2009 due to a large epidemic of group A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA) meningitis. Case fatality was lowest (5.9%) during this year. A mean of 71 and 67 districts annually crossed the alert and epidemic thresholds, respectively. The incidence rate of NmA meningitis fell >10-fold, from 0.27 per 100 000 in 2004–2010 to 0.02 per 100 000 in 2011–2013 (P meningitis surveillance system provides a global overview of the epidemiology of meningitis in the region, despite limitations in data quality and completeness. This study confirms a dramatic fall in NmA incidence after the introduction of PsA-TT. PMID:26553668

  1. Experimental validation of solid rocket motor damping models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riso, Cristina; Fransen, Sebastiaan; Mastroddi, Franco; Coppotelli, Giuliano; Trequattrini, Francesco; De Vivo, Alessio

    2017-12-01

    In design and certification of spacecraft, payload/launcher coupled load analyses are performed to simulate the satellite dynamic environment. To obtain accurate predictions, the system damping properties must be properly taken into account in the finite element model used for coupled load analysis. This is typically done using a structural damping characterization in the frequency domain, which is not applicable in the time domain. Therefore, the structural damping matrix of the system must be converted into an equivalent viscous damping matrix when a transient coupled load analysis is performed. This paper focuses on the validation of equivalent viscous damping methods for dynamically condensed finite element models via correlation with experimental data for a realistic structure representative of a slender launch vehicle with solid rocket motors. A second scope of the paper is to investigate how to conveniently choose a single combination of Young's modulus and structural damping coefficient—complex Young's modulus—to approximate the viscoelastic behavior of a solid propellant material in the frequency band of interest for coupled load analysis. A scaled-down test article inspired to the Z9-ignition Vega launcher configuration is designed, manufactured, and experimentally tested to obtain data for validation of the equivalent viscous damping methods. The Z9-like component of the test article is filled with a viscoelastic material representative of the Z9 solid propellant that is also preliminarily tested to investigate the dependency of the complex Young's modulus on the excitation frequency and provide data for the test article finite element model. Experimental results from seismic and shock tests performed on the test configuration are correlated with numerical results from frequency and time domain analyses carried out on its dynamically condensed finite element model to assess the applicability of different equivalent viscous damping methods to describe

  2. Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production.

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production in the mass range 110-600 GeV. The solid curve reflects the observed experimental limits for the production of a Higgs of each possible mass value (horizontal axis). The region for which the solid curve dips below the horizontal line at the value of 1 is excluded with a 95% confidence level (CL). The dashed curve shows the expected limit in the absence of the Higgs boson, based on simulations. The green and yellow bands correspond (respectively) to 68%, and 95% confidence level regions from the expected limits. Higgs masses in the narrow range 123-130 GeV are the only masses not excluded at 95% CL

  3. Experimentally supported mathematical modeling of continuous baking processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenby Andresen, Mette

    The scope of the PhD project was to increase knowledge on the process-to-product interactions in continuous tunnel ovens. The work has focused on five main objectives. These objectives cover development of new experimental equipment for pilot plant baking experiments, mathematical modeling of heat...... and mass transfer in a butter cookie product, and evaluation of quality assessment methods. The pilot plant oven is a special batch oven designed to emulate continuous convection tunnel oven baking. The design, construction, and validation of the oven has been part of the project and is described...... in this thesis. The oven was successfully validated against a 10 m tunnel oven. Besides the ability to emulate the baking conditions in a tunnel oven, the new batch oven is designed and constructed for experimental research work. In the design options to follow the product continuously (especially weight...

  4. Efeitos da administração subaracnóidea de grandes volumes de lidocaína a 2% e ropivacaína a 1% sobre a medula espinhal e as meninges: estudo experimental em cães Efectos de la administración subaracnóidea de grandes volúmenes de lidocaína a 2% y ropivacaína a 1% sobre la médula espinal y las meninges: estudio experimental en perros Effects of spinal administration of large volumes of 2% lidocaine and 1% ropivacaine on spinal cord and meninges: experimental study in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Marisa Ganem

    2003-06-01

    ón subaracnóidea accidental, en perros. MÉTODO: Veintiún perros fueron distribuidos aleatoriamente en 3 grupos, que recibieron por vía subaracnóidea: G1 - cloreto de sodio a 0,9%; G2 - lidocaína a 2% y G3 - ropivacaína a 1%. La punción subaracnóidea fue realizada en el espacio intervertebral L6-L7. El volumen de anestésico local administrado fue de 1 ml para cada 10 cm de distancia entre la protuberancia occipital y el espacio lomosacral (5 - 6,6 ml. Después de 72 horas de observación clínica los animales fueron sacrificados y fue removida la porción lomosacral de la médula para examen histológico, por microscopia óptica. RESULTADOS: Ningún animal del G1 presentó alteraciones clínicas o histológicas de la médula espinal. Fueron observados dos casos de necrosis del tejido nervioso en G2, más cambios clínicos, en solamente uno de estos perros y en otros dos animales que no presentaron alteraciones histológicas. Fue encontrada necrosis focal del tejido nervioso medular en un animal de G3. Todos los animales de G3 permanecieron clínicamente normales. CONCLUSIONES: Se concluye que grandes volúmenes de lidocaína a 2% determinaron alteraciones clínicas e histológicas más intensas que los de ropivacaína a 1%.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Spinal injection of large local anesthetic volumes after accidental dural puncture is an epidural anesthesia complication. This study aimed at investigating potential clinical and histological changes triggered by large volumes of 2% lidocaine or 1% ropivacaine in a simulated accidental spinal injection in dogs. METHODS: Twenty one dogs were randomly allocated into three experimental groups, which received spinal injections of: G1 - 0.9% sodium chloride, G2 - 2% lidocaine, G3 - 1% ropivacaine. Spinal puncture was performed in L6-L7 interspace. Anesthetic volume was 1 ml per 10 cm-distance between the occipital protuberance and the lumbosacral space (5 - 6.6 ml. After 72 hours of clinical observation animals were

  5. Continuum damage modeling through theoretical and experimental pressure limit formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Majid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we developed a mathematical modeling to represent the damage of thermoplastic pipes. On the one hand, we adapted the theories of the rupture pressure to fit the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE case. Indeed, the theories for calculating the rupture pressure are multiple, designed originally for steels and alloys. For polymer materials, we have found that these theories can be adapted using a coefficient related to the nature of the studied material. The HDPE is characterized by two important values of pressure, deduced from the ductile form of the internal pressures evolution until burst. For this reason, we have designed an alpha coefficient taking into account these two pressures and giving a good approximation of the evolution of the experimental burst pressures through the theoretically corrected ones, using Faupel㒒s pressure formula. Then, we can deduce the evolution of the theoretical damage using the calculated pressures. On the other hand, two other mathematical models were undertaken. The first one has given rise to an adaptive model referring to an expression of the pressure as a function of the life fraction, the characteristic pressures and the critical life fraction. The second model represents a continuum damage model incorporating the pressure equations as a function of the life fraction and based on the burst pressure�s static damage model. These models represent important tools for industrials to assess the failure of thermoplastic pipes and proceed quick checks

  6. Short note: the experimental geopotential model XGM2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, R.; Fecher, T.; Barnes, D.; Factor, J. F.; Holmes, S. A.; Gruber, T.; Zingerle, P.

    2017-10-01

    As a precursor study for the upcoming combined Earth Gravitational Model 2020 (EGM2020), the Experimental Gravity Field Model XGM2016, parameterized as a spherical harmonic series up to degree and order 719, is computed. XGM2016 shares the same combination methodology as its predecessor model GOCO05c (Fecher et al. in Surv Geophys 38(3): 571-590, 2017. doi: 10.1007/s10712-016-9406-y). The main difference between these models is that XGM2016 is supported by an improved terrestrial data set of 15^' × 15^' gravity anomaly area-means provided by the United States National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), resulting in significant upgrades compared to existing combined gravity field models, especially in continental areas such as South America, Africa, parts of Asia, and Antarctica. A combination strategy of relative regional weighting provides for improved performance in near-coastal ocean regions, including regions where the altimetric data are mostly unchanged from previous models. Comparing cumulative height anomalies, from both EGM2008 and XGM2016 at degree/order 719, yields differences of 26 cm in Africa and 40 cm in South America. These differences result from including additional information of satellite data, as well as from the improved ground data in these regions. XGM2016 also yields a smoother Mean Dynamic Topography with significantly reduced artifacts, which indicates an improved modeling of the ocean areas.

  7. Experimental validation of mathematical model for small air compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhovčák Ján

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development process of reciprocating compressors can be simplified by using simulation tools. Modelling of a compressor requires a trade-off between computational effort and accuracy of desired results. This paper presents experimental validation of the simulation tool, which can be used to predict compressor behaviour under different working conditions. The mathematical model provides fast results with very good accuracy, however the model must be calibrated for a certain type of compressor. Small air compressor was used to validate an in-house simulation tool, which is based on mass and energy conservation in a control volume. The simulation tool calculates pressure and temperature history inside the cylinder, valve characteristics, mass flow and heat losses during the cycle of the compressor. A test bench for the compressor consisted of pressure sensors on both discharge and suction side, temperature sensor on discharge side and flow meter with calorimetric principle sensor.

  8. A two-Higgs-doublet model facing experimental hints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crivellin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physics beyond the Standard Model has so far eluded our experimental probes. Nevertheless, a number of interesting anomalies have accumulated that can be taken as hints towards new physics: BaBar, Belle, and LHCb have found deviations of approximately 3:8σ in B → Dτν and B → D*τν; the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon differs by about 3σ from the theoretic prediction; the branching ratio for τ → μνν is about 2σ above the Standard Model expectation; and CMS and ATLAS found hints for a non-zero decay rate of h → μτ at 2.6σ. Here we consider these processes within a lepton-specific two-Higgs doublet model with additional non-standard Yukawa couplings and show how (and which of these excesses can be accommodated.

  9. Comparison of mixed layer models predictions with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggian, P.; Riva, G.M. [CISE Spa, Divisione Ambiente, Segrate (Italy); Brusasca, G. [ENEL Spa, CRAM, Milano (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The temporal evolution of the PBL vertical structure for a North Italian rural site, situated within relatively large agricultural fields and almost flat terrain, has been investigated during the period 22-28 June 1993 by experimental and modellistic point of view. In particular, the results about a sunny day (June 22) and a cloudy day (June 25) are presented in this paper. Three schemes to estimate mixing layer depth have been compared, i.e. Holzworth (1967), Carson (1973) and Gryning-Batchvarova models (1990), which use standard meteorological observations. To estimate their degree of accuracy, model outputs were analyzed considering radio-sounding meteorological profiles and stability atmospheric classification criteria. Besides, the mixed layer depths prediction were compared with the estimated values obtained by a simple box model, whose input requires hourly measures of air concentrations and ground flux of {sup 222}Rn. (LN)

  10. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every parenchymal vessel. Thus, meninges may modulate most of the physiological and pathological events of the CNS throughout the life. Meninges are present since the very early embryonic stages of cortical development and appear to be necessary for normal corticogenesis and brain structures formation. In adulthood meninges contribute to neural tissue homeostasis by secreting several trophic factors including FGF2 and SDF-1. Recently, for the first time, we have identified the presence of a stem cell population with neural differentiation potential in meninges. In addition, we and other groups have further described the presence in meninges of injury responsive neural precursors. In this review we will give a comprehensive view of meninges and their multiple roles in the context of a functional network with the neural tissue. We will highlight the current literature on the developmental feature of meninges and their role in cortical development. Moreover, we will elucidate the anatomical distribution of the meninges and their trophic properties in adult CNS. Finally, we will emphasize recent evidences suggesting the potential role of meninges as stem cell niche harbouring endogenous precursors that can be activated by injury and are able to contribute to CNS parenchymal reaction. PMID:23671802

  11. [Acute care of patients with bacterial meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetefeld, H R; Dohmen, C

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening emergency that is still associated with high mortality and poor outcome. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of clinical presentation, diagnostic procedure, therapy, and prognosis in bacterial meningitis. Prognostic factors which could be influenced positively are identified and a focused procedure in the emergency setting and for the treatment of complications are provided. This work is based on a literature search (PubMed, guidelines) and personal experience (standard operating procedures, SOP). Despite improved health care, bacterial meningitis is still associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome, which has remained largely unaltered during recent decades. Diagnosis and, more importantly, effective therapy of bacterial meningitis are often delayed, having an immediate negative influence on clinical outcome. Neurological and nonneurological complications often necessitate intensive care and may occur rapidly or in the further course of the disease. Immediate initiation of effective therapy is crucial to positively influence mortality and neurological outcome. Antibiotics should be administered within 30 min after admission. To achieve this, a focused and well-organized procedure in the emergency setting is necessary. Because of intra- and extracranial complications, patients need to be treated on intensive care units including neurological expertise and interdisciplinary support.

  12. neonatal bacterial meningitis in Cape Town children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial meningitis is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in South Africa. However, comprehensive regional or national epidemiological data, essential for rational public health interventions, are lacking. The purpose of this 1-year prospective study, from. 1 August 1991 to 31 July 1992, was to define the.

  13. Outcomes of bacterial meningitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, C; Levy, C; Baumie, F; Joao, L; Béchet, S; Carbonnelle, E; Grimprel, E; Cohen, R; Gaudelus, J; de Pontual, L

    2016-06-01

    Pediatricians are well aware of the immediate risks of bacterial meningitis in children. However, the long-term outcome of the disease has not been extensively studied. We aimed: (i) to evaluate the duration and quality of the long-term follow-up of children diagnosed with bacterial meningitis in a general pediatric department, (ii) to estimate the incidence of sequelae at the various stages of follow-up, and (iii) to compare our data with that of other studies. We conducted a retrospective study and included 34 children (3 months-15 years) who had been hospitalized for bacterial meningitis in the pediatric department of a University Hospital between January 1st, 2001 and December 31st, 2013. Overall, 32% of patients presented with sequelae and 15% with seizures. Only one patient presented with hearing loss, but 23.5% of patients did not have any hearing test performed. Seven patients had a neuropsychological assessment performed and no severe neuropsychological sequela was observed in this group. The average follow-up duration increased during the study period (from 23 to 49months). The long-term follow-up modalities observed in other studies were highly variable. Assessing the incidence and severity of sequelae was therefore difficult. A standardized follow-up should be implemented by way of a national surveillance network of children presenting with bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Diagnostic challenges with acellular bacterial meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pleocytosis, hypoglycorrhachia and a raised CSF protein level.[2,8,16]. Despite our patient's reduced CSF glucose and raised protein, the inconsistent polymorph cell count was striking. Based on clinical suspicion, CSF and laboratory determinants, she was treated for acute bacterial meningitis. CSF Gram stains and culture ...

  15. Childhood bacterial meningitis in Mbarara Hospital, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The recommended antibiotic treatment of bacterial meningitis has come under scrutiny following frequent reports of in-vitro resistance by the common causative organisms to penicillin and chloramphenicol. Objective. The study recorded'the causative organisms, antibiotic sensitivity patterns and outcome of ...

  16. Emergency diagnosis and treatment of adult meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitch, Michael T.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2007-01-01

    Despite the existence of antibiotic therapies against acute bacterial meningitis, patients with the disease continue to suffer significant morbidity and mortality in both high and low-income countries. Dilemmas exist for emergency medicine and primary-care providers who need to accurately diagnose

  17. Childhood bacterial meningitis in Mbarara Hospital, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background : The recommended antibiotic treatment of bacterial meningitis has come under scrutiny following frequent reports of in-vitro resistance by the common causative organisms to penicillin and chloramphenicol. Objective : The study recorded the causative organisms, antibiotic sensitivity patterns and outcome of ...

  18. Advances in treatment of bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Thwaites, Guy E.; Tunkel, Allan R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis kills or maims about a fifth of people with the disease. Early antibiotic treatment improves outcomes, but the effectiveness of widely available antibiotics is threatened by global emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. New antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones, could have a

  19. Angiostrongylus cantonensis Meningitis and Myelitis, Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hammoud, Roukaya; Nayes, Stacy L; Murphy, James R; Heresi, Gloria P; Butler, Ian J; Pérez, Norma

    2017-06-01

    Infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis roundworms is endemic in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. A. cantonensis meningitis and myelitis occurred in summer 2013 in a child with no history of travel outside of Texas, USA. Angiostrongyliasis is an emerging neurotropic helminthic disease in Texas and warrants increased awareness among healthcare providers.

  20. Epidemiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has been dynamic in the past 30 years following introduction of conjugated vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type B, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in

  1. Computed Tomography Study Of Complicated Bacterial Meningitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To monitor the structural intracranial complications of bacterial meningitis using computed tomography (CT) scan. Retrospective study of medical and radiological records of patients who underwent CT scan over a 4 year period. AUniversityTeachingHospital in a developing country. Thirty three patients with clinically and ...

  2. October 2012 Multistate Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-17

    This podcast gives an overview of the October 2012 multistate fungal meningitis outbreak, including symptoms to watch for and a website for up-to-date information.  Created: 10/17/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  3. Bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsura T

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Keisho Hirota1,2, Masayuki Akimoto1,3, Toshiaki Katsura21Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Medical Center, National Hospital Organization, 2Internal Medicine, Kyoto Medical Center, 3Clinical Research Center, Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto, JapanPurpose: The report of a case of bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis.Case report: A 47-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaint of persistent high fever and transient loss of consciousness. Although his general condition improved after intravenous acyclovir administration, the patient presented with visual loss in both eyes 4 days after admission. Visual acuity in his right eye was 20/200 and his left eye had light perception alone. Both eyes showed panretinal arteritis diagnosed as acute retinal necrosis. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed for both eyes. Progression of retinal detachment was prevented in both eyes; however, visual acuity of the left eye was totally lost because of neovascular glaucoma. Visual acuity of the right eye recovered to 20/20.Conclusion: Although cases of bilateral acute retinal necrosis have been reported after herpetic encephalitis, this condition is rare after herpetic meningitis. Prophylactic acyclovir therapy and early panretinal photocoagulation may prevent retinal detachment and improve the prognosis. Neurologists and ophthalmologists should be aware that not only herpetic encephalitis but also herpetic meningitis can lead to acute retinal necrosis within a very short interval.Keywords: acute retinal necrosis, herpetic meningitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster virus

  4. Prediction of unfavorable outcomes in cryptococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakyemez, I N; Erdem, H; Beraud, G

    2018-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is mostly seen in immunocompromised patients, particularly human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients, but CM may also occur in apparently immunocompetent individuals. Outcome analyses have been performed in such patients but, due to the high prevalence of HIV...

  5. Streptococcus sanguis meningitis: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotmongkol, Verajit; Panthavasit, Jedsada; Vorachit, Malai

    2002-07-01

    A 35-year-old woman who presented with acute purulent meningitis and hearing loss was reported. No bacteria was seen with Gram' s stain of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF grew Streptococcus viridans, which was subsequently identified to be S. sanguis. The patient improved after treatment, including hearing.

  6. Evaluation of Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model Assumptions Using Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, B.; Ewing, D.; Matovic, D.

    1996-11-01

    The accuracy of Rodi's ASM assumption is examined by evaluating the terms in Reynolds stress transport equation and their modelled counterparts. The basic model assumption: Dτ_ij/Dt + partial T_ijl/partial xl = (τ_ij/k )(Dk/Dt + partial Tl /partial xl ) (Rodi( Rodi W., ZAMM.), 56, pp. 219-221, 1976.), can also be broken into two stronger assumptions: Da_ij/Dt = 0 and (2) partial T_ijl/partial xl = (τ_ij/k )(partial Tl /partial xl ) (e.g. Taulbee( Taulbee D. B., Phys. of Fluids), 4(11), pp. 2555-2561, 1992.). Fu et al( Fu S., Huang P.G., Launder B.E. & Leschziner M.A., J. Fluid Eng.), 110(2), pp. 216-221., 1988 examined the accuracy of Rodi's assumption using the results of RSM calculation of axisymmetric jets. Since the RSM results did not accurately predict the experimental results either, it may be useful to examine the basic ASM model assumptions using experimental data. The database of Hussein, Capp and George( Hussein H., Capp S. & George W., J.F.M.), 258, pp.31-75., 1994. is sufficiently detailed to evaluate the terms of Reynolds stress transport equations individually, thus allowing both Rodi's and the stronger assumptions to be tested. For this flow assumption (1) is well satisfied for all the components (including \\overlineuv); however, assumption (2) does not seem as well satisfied.

  7. Neuroinflammatory targets and treatments for epilepsy validated in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Bauer, Sebastian; Bozzi, Yuri; Caleo, Matteo; Dingledine, Raymond; Gorter, Jan A; Henshall, David C; Kaufer, Daniela; Koh, Sookyong; Löscher, Wolfgang; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Mishto, Michele; Norwood, Braxton A; Palma, Eleonora; Poulter, Michael O; Terrone, Gaetano; Vezzani, Annamaria; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2017-07-01

    A large body of evidence that has accumulated over the past decade strongly supports the role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of human epilepsy. Specific inflammatory molecules and pathways have been identified that influence various pathologic outcomes in different experimental models of epilepsy. Most importantly, the same inflammatory pathways have also been found in surgically resected brain tissue from patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy. New antiseizure therapies may be derived from these novel potential targets. An essential and crucial question is whether targeting these molecules and pathways may result in anti-ictogenesis, antiepileptogenesis, and/or disease-modification effects. Therefore, preclinical testing in models mimicking relevant aspects of epileptogenesis is needed to guide integrated experimental and clinical trial designs. We discuss the most recent preclinical proof-of-concept studies validating a number of therapeutic approaches against inflammatory mechanisms in animal models that could represent novel avenues for drug development in epilepsy. Finally, we suggest future directions to accelerate preclinical to clinical translation of these recent discoveries. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Hepatoprotective activity of Musa paradisiaca on experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, M; Girija, K; Lakshman, K; Divya, T

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the hepatoprotective activity of stem of Musa paradisiaca (M. paradisiaca) in CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity models in rats. Hepatoprotective activity of alcoholic and aqueous extracts of stem of M. paradisiaca was demonstrated by using two experimentally induced hepatotoxicity models. Administration of hepatotoxins (CCl4 and paracetamol) showed significant biochemical and histological deteriorations in the liver of experimental animals. Pretreatment with alcoholic extract (500 mg/kg), more significantly and to a lesser extent the alcoholic extract (250 mg/kg) and aqueous extract (500 mg/kg), reduced the elevated levels of the serum enzymes like serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bilirubin levels and alcoholic and aqueous extracts reversed the hepatic damage towards the normal, which further evidenced the hepatoprotective activity of stem of M. paradisiaca. The alcoholic extract at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o. and aqueous extract at a dose of 500 mg/kg, p.o. of stem of M. paradisiaca have significant effect on the liver of CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity animal models.

  9. A comprehensive experimental and modeling study of 2-methylbutanol combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo

    2015-05-01

    2-Methylbutanol (2-methyl-1-butanol) is one of several next-generation biofuels that can be used as an alternative fuel or blending component for combustion engines. This paper presents new experimental data for 2-methylbutanol, including ignition delay times in a high-pressure shock tube and premixed laminar flame speeds in a constant volume combustion vessel. Shock tube ignition delay times were measured for 2-methylbutanol/air mixtures at three equivalence ratios, temperatures ranging from 750 to 1250. K, and at nominal pressures near 20 and 40. bar. Laminar flame speed data were obtained using the spherically propagating premixed flame configuration at pressures of 1, 2, and 5. bar. A detailed chemical kinetic model for 2-methylbutanol oxidation was developed including high- and low-temperature chemistry based on previous modeling studies on butanol and pentanol isomers. The proposed model was tested against new and existing experimental data at pressures of 1-40. atm, temperatures of 740-1636. K, equivalence ratios of 0.25-2.0. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were conducted for identifying key reactions at various combustion conditions, and to obtain better understanding of the combustion characteristics of larger alcohols.

  10. Predictive factors of bacterial meningitis in the patients seen in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casado, María Isabel; Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Lobato-Casado, Paula; Cámara-Marín, Belén; Pérez-Matos, Julio Alberto; Martínez-Maroto, Tamara

    2017-04-01

    To analyse and compare predictive factors of bacterial meningitis in the patients seen in the Emergency Departments (ED) due to an episode of acute meningitis (AM). A prospective, observational study was carried out in patients aged 15 years and older seen in ED due to AM between August 2009 and November 2015. Thirty-two variables for predicting bacterial meningitis were assessed. They covered epidemiological, comorbidity, clinical and analytical factors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. The study included 154 patients. The diagnosis was bacterial meningitis in 53 (34.4%) patients. Four variables were significantly associated with bacterial aetiology: cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate concentration ≥33mg/dl (odds ratio [OR] 50.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.63-119.47, P<.001), serum procalcitonin (PCT) ≥0.8ng/ml (OR 46.34; 95%CI: 19.71-108.89; P<.001), CSF glucose <60% of blood value (OR 20.82; 95%CI: 8.86-48.96; P=.001), CSF polymorphonuclears greater than 50% (OR 20.19; 95%CI: 8.31-49.09; P=.002]. The area under the curve for the model serum PCT≥0.8ng/ml plus CSF lactate ≥33mg/dl was 0.992 (95%CI: 0.979-1; P<.001), and achieved 99% sensitivity and 98% specificity for predicting bacterial meningitis. Serum PCT with CSF lactate, CSF glucose and CSF polymorphonuclears evaluated in an initial assessment in the ED for patients with AM, achieved an excellent diagnostic usefulness for predicting bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. Definition and characterization of localised meningitis epidemics in Burkina Faso: a longitudinal retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tall Haoua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt is characterised by seasonality, localised epidemics and epidemic waves. To facilitate research and surveillance, we aimed to develop a definition for localised epidemics to be used in real-time surveillance based on weekly case reports at the health centre level. Methods We used national routine surveillance data on suspected meningitis from January 2004 to December 2008 in six health districts in western and central Burkina Faso. We evaluated eight thresholds composed of weekly incidence rates at health centre level for their performance in predicting annual incidences of 0.4%and 0.8% in health centre areas. The eventually chosen definition was used to describe the spatiotemporal epidemiology and size of localised meningitis epidemics during the included district years. Results Among eight weekly thresholds evaluated, a weekly incidence rate of 75 cases per 100,000 inhabitants during at least two consecutive weeks with at least 5 cases per week had 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity for predicting an annual incidence of at least 0.8% in health centres. Using this definition, localised epidemics were identified in all but one years during 2004-2008, concerned less than 10% of the districts' population and often were geographically dispersed. Where sufficient laboratory data were available, localised epidemics were exclusively due to meningococci. Conclusions This definition of localised epidemics a the health centre level will be useful for risk factor and modelling studies to understand the meningitis belt phenomenon and help documenting vaccine impact against epidemic meningitis where no widespread laboratory surveillance exists for quantifying disease reduction after vaccination.

  12. Model reduction for experimental thermal characterization of a holding furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussouarn, Thomas; Maillet, Denis; Remy, Benjamin; Dan, Diane

    2017-09-01

    Vacuum holding induction furnaces are used for the manufacturing of turbine blades by loss wax foundry process. The control of solidification parameters is a key factor for the manufacturing of these parts. The definition of the structure of a reduced heat transfer model with experimental identification through an estimation of its parameters is required here. Internal sensors outputs, together with this model, can be used for assessing the thermal state of the furnace through an inverse approach, for a better control. Here, an axisymmetric furnace and its load have been numerically modelled using FlexPDE, a finite elements code. The internal induction heat source as well as the transient radiative transfer inside the furnace are calculated through this detailed model. A reduced lumped body model has been constructed to represent the numerical furnace. The model reduction and the estimation of the parameters of the lumped body have been made using a Levenberg-Marquardt least squares minimization algorithm, using two synthetic temperature signals with a further validation test.

  13. [Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in children in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzet-Ozenda, L; Haas, H; Bingen, E; Lécuyer, A; Levy, C; Cohen, R

    2008-12-01

    Listeriosis is a serious invasive disease which affects mainly pregnant women, newborns and immunocompromised adults. To analyze specifically the epidemiological and clinical data of the meningitis due to Listeria monocytogenes (Lm), from the French Network of Surveillance of Bacterial Meningitis in childhood. Patients were aged 0 to 18 years. The diagnosis was based on a combination of a feverish meningeal syndrome and a positive culture of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or a positive PCR in the CSF and/or positive blood culture associated with a pleiocytose. Among 2539 cases of bacterial meningitis recorded in 6 years (2001 to 2006), 18 cases were due to Lm (0.7 %) (sex ratio M / F : 0.8). The average of age was 2.5 years (median : 0.5 ; ext : 0-15.1). The serotype of Lm was 4B in half of the cases. Most cases have occured in summer and autumn. Two patients presented an acquired or congenital immunodeficiency. Fifty-six percent (n=10) were younger than 1 year, among them, 7 were newborns. The CSF direct microbiologic investigation was suggestive of Lm (Gram positive bacilli) only in two cases, but the culture of CSF was positive for 16 patients and the blood culture was positive for 2 other patients. Three of 18 patients died between 7 and 13 days after admittance : a premature baby of 25 weeks'gestational age, two full-term newborns of 2 days and 1.5 months old. The mortality rate was 16.7 % before the age of 1 year (no death after this age). Meningitis due to Lm remains a rare disease, including in neonatal period. The recent increase of cases in adults requires to maintain vigilance in children especially since direct examination of CSF can rarely allow the diagnosis.

  14. CFD Modeling and Experimental Validation of a Solar Still

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Tahir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth is the densest planet of the solar system with total area of 510.072 million square Km. Over 71.68% of this area is covered with water leaving a scant area of 28.32% for human to inhabit. The fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of the total volume and the rest is the brackish water. Presently, the world is facing chief problem of lack of potable water. This issue can be addressed by converting brackish water into potable through a solar distillation process and solar still is specially assigned for this purpose. Efficiency of a solar still explicitly depends on its design parameters, such as wall material, chamber depth, width and slope of the zcondensing surface. This study was aimed at investigating the solar still parameters using CFD modeling and experimental validation. The simulation data of ANSYS-FLUENT was compared with actual experimental data. A close agreement among the simulated and experimental results was seen in the presented work. It reveals that ANSYS-FLUENT is a potent tool to analyse the efficiency of the new designs of the solar distillation systems.

  15. Experimental model for creation of carotid artery aneurysms in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Yu, In Kyu; Lee, Sang Hyun; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To describe the detailed technique for producing experimental carotid aneurysms in dogs and the success rate, cause of failure and remedy, based on our experience. Fourteen male dogs weighing 12-15kg were anesthetized with inhalation of 1-2% halothane and 50% nitrous oxide. Each surgical procedure was performed under sterile condition with the aid of an operating microscope. A paramidline incision 7-8cm in length was made parallel to and medial to the external jugular vein in the dog's neck. The external jugular vein was harvested as a 1cm vein pouch by ligation and division of the proximal and distal ends. The ipsilateral common carotid artery was exposed and clamped at both ends by a vascular clamp. A 5-mm long elliptical arteriotomy was made at the mid portion of the artery, and then end to side anastomosis between the artery and vein sac was performed by using interrupted 7-0 monofilament prolene sutures. Carotid arteriography or Doppler sonography was performed 1-6 weeks after aneurysm construction. Twenty experimental aneurysms were constructed, and 17 aneurysms were patent on follow up study, but one dog with two aneurysms died from hemorrhagic pneumonia 17 days after surgery. The overall patency rate was 75%. We demonstrated the feasibility of creating experimental aneurysm models in the dog and expect that the technique presented will help to avoid failure in the construction of aneurysms.

  16. Plasma transferred arc welding—modeling and experimental optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilden, J.; Bergmann, J. P.; Frank, H.

    2006-12-01

    Plasma transferred arc (PTA) welded coatings are used to improve surface properties of mechanical parts. Advantages are the high reliability of the process and the low dilution of substrate and coating material. Processing of surfaces by PTA welding is restricted at the time to flat horizontal position. Furthermore, industry is interested in the development of strategies for coating with PTA in constraint position as complex three-dimensional (3D) parts could be then easily processed as well. Under commercial aspects, the process design can be optimized to increase process efficiency and to reduce heat input during the welding process. Process optimization involves the determination of guidelines for PTA welding in constraint positions as well. Modeling the process gives an alternative to reduce the experimental effort to optimize the welding process. Results of simulation studies of the PTA welding process are given in the present work. It will be shown that coating conditions can be optimized by varying plasma gas flow, heat input and heat flow, process speed, or powder injection with regard to welding in constraint positions. The defined controlling of the PTA welding allows modification of process management with less experimental effort and to develop coating strategies for processing in different positions. In experimental investigations, the developed coating strategies are confirmed by producing PTA coatings in constraint position as well as complex 3D parts.

  17. Genetic Variation in the β2-Adrenocepter Gene Is Associated with Susceptibility to Bacterial Meningitis in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, Kirsten S.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Baas, Frank; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the biased β2-adrenoceptor/β-arrestin pathway was shown to play a pivotal role in crossing of the blood brain barrier by Neisseria meningitidis. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the β2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2) may influence susceptibility to bacterial meningitis. In a prospective genetic association study we genotyped 542 patients with CSF culture proven community acquired bacterial meningitis and 376 matched controls for 2 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2). Furthermore, we analyzed if the use of non-selective beta-blockers, which bind to the β2-adrenoceptor, influenced the risk of bacterial meningitis. We identified a functional polymorphism in ADRB2 (rs1042714) to be associated with an increased risk for bacterial meningitis (Odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.76; p = 0.026). The association remained significant after correction for age and was more prominent in patients with pneumococcal meningitis (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.12–2.07; p = 0.007). For meningococcal meningitis the difference in genotype frequencies between patients and controls was similar to that in pneumococcal meningitis, but this was not statistically significant (OR 1.43, 95% CI 0.60–3.38; p = 0.72). Patients with bacterial meningitis had a lower frequency of non-selective beta-blockers use compared to the age matched population (0.9% vs. 1.8%), although this did not reach statistical significance (OR 1.96 [95% CI 0.88–4.39]; p = 0.09). In conclusion, we identified an association between a genetic variant in the β2-adrenoceptor and increased susceptibility to bacterial meningitis. The potential benefit of pharmacological treatment targeting the β2-adrenoceptor to prevent bacterial meningitis in the general population or patients with bacteraemia should be further studied in both experimental studies and observational cohorts. PMID:22624056

  18. An efficient approach to bioconversion kinetic model generation based on automated microscale experimentation integrated with model driven experimental design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, B. H.; Micheletti, M.; Baganz, F.

    2009-01-01

    design. It incorporates a model driven approach to the experimental design that minimises the number of experiments to be performed, while still generating accurate values of kinetic parameters. The approach has been illustrated with the transketolase mediated asymmetric synthesis of L......Reliable models of enzyme kinetics are required for the effective design of bioconversion processes. Kinetic expressions of the enzyme-catalysed reaction rate however, are frequently complex and establishing accurate values of kinetic parameters normally requires a large number of experiments....... These can be both time consuming and expensive when working with the types of non-natural chiral intermediates important in pharmaceutical syntheses. This paper presents ail automated microscale approach to the rapid and cost effective generation of reliable kinetic models useful for bioconversion process...

  19. A DIDATIC EXPERIENCE IN BIOCHEMISTRY LABWORKS: THEORETICALVERSUS EXPERIMENTAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C Rossi-Rodrigues

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry labworks are fundamental to both the instrumentation and  for  the  establishment of important concepts. The labworks of Basic  Biochemistry  (BB280 for Biology students at UNICAMP have gone through several  improvements. The labworks are  now  structured  from simple  activities to more complex ones, and aimed  to  the student’s  autonomy  development  in the experiments planning and execution  over  the teaching  semester. The first practical activity is on buffer systems, and   it is based  on  the confrontation of a theoretical model with the  lab experiments results.  First of all, the students  simulate  a Titration  in  a computational environment, where students lay a theoretical model from their knowledge. In the theoretical model the buffer parameters are set according to the teacher instructions, and the experiment conditions are also set and tested.  The simulation results are used for planning  the experiment and to compare with the experimental ones.  After having the simulations concluded and having the experiment planned the students  perform  the  in lab  Titration with the parameters established in the simulation. The results obtained by students are presented in a report. We analyzed the reports from 76 BB280’s students in 2007(night class and day class. The students identified as the main causes of the discrepancy between theoretical and experimental data: 1 experimental errors, related to the lack of technical skill 2 limitation of equipment used 3 unexpected behavior of the substances  used. In addition to the theoretical content related to  labwork, the confrontation between the  simulation and experimentation provided the students with ability  to identify the main aspects of which can influence the quality of the data obtained.

  20. Astrocyte regulation of sleep circuits: experimental and modeling perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso eFellin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrated within neural circuits, astrocytes have recently been shown to modulate brain rhythms thought to mediate sleep function. Experimental evidence suggests that local impact of astrocytes on single synapses translates into global modulation of neuronal networks and behavior. We discuss these findings in the context of current conceptual models of sleep generation and function, each of which have historically focused on neural mechanisms. We highlight the implications and the challenges introduced by these results from a conceptual and computational perspective. We further provide modeling directions on how these data might extend our knowledge of astrocytic properties and sleep function. Given our evolving understanding of how local cellular activities during sleep lead to functional outcomes for the brain, further mechanistic and theoretical understanding of astrocytic contribution to these dynamics will undoubtedly be of great basic and translational benefit.

  1. An experimental and modeling study of n-octanol combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the first investigation on the combustion chemistry of n-octanol, a long chain alcohol. Ignition delay times were determined experimentally in a high-pressure shock tube, and stable species concentration profiles were obtained in a jet stirred reactor for a range of initial conditions. A detailed kinetic model was developed to describe the oxidation of n-octanol at both low and high temperatures, and the model shows good agreement with the present dataset. The fuel\\'s combustion characteristics are compared to those of n-alkanes and to short chain alcohols to illustrate the effects of the hydroxyl moiety and the carbon chain length on important combustion properties. Finally, the results are discussed in detail. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  2. Experimental studies and modeling on concentration polarization in forward osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian-Jun; Chen, Sijie; Oo, Maung Htun; Kekre, Kiran A; Cornelissen, Emile R; Ruiken, Chris J

    2010-01-01

    Concentration polarization (CP) is an important issue in forward osmosis (FO) processes and it is believed that the coupled effect of dilutive internal CP (DICP) and concentrative external CP (CECP) limits FO flux. The objective of this study was to distinguish individual contribution of different types of DICP and CECP via modeling and to validate it by pilot studies. The influence of DICP/CECP on FO flux has been investigated in this study. The CP model presented in this work was derived from a previous study and evaluated by bench-scale FO experiments. Experiments were conducted with drinking water as the feed and NaCl/MgSO(4) as draw solutions at different concentrations and velocities. Modeling results indicated that DICP contributed to a flux reduction by 99.9% for 0.5 M NaCl as a draw solution although the flow pattern of both feed and draw solutions was turbulent. DICP could be improved via selection of the draw solution. The modeling results were well fit with the experimental data. It was concluded that the model could be used for selection of the draw solution and prediction of water flux under similar situation. A draw solution with greater diffusion coefficient or a thinner substrate of an asymmetric FO membrane resulted in a higher flux.

  3. Immunology and Homeopathy. 3. Experimental Studies on Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bellavite

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A search of the literature and the experiments carried out by the authors of this review show that there are a number of animal models where the effect of homeopathic dilutions or the principles of homeopathic medicine have been tested. The results relate to the immunostimulation by ultralow doses of antigens, the immunological models of the ‘simile’, the regulation of acute or chronic inflammatory processes and the use of homeopathic medicines in farming. The models utilized by different research groups are extremely etherogeneous and differ as the test medicines, the dilutions and the outcomes are concerned. Some experimental lines, particularly those utilizing mice models of immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory effects of homeopathic complex formulations, give support to a real effect of homeopathic high dilutions in animals, but often these data are of preliminary nature and have not been independently replicated. The evidence emerging from animal models is supporting the traditional ‘simile’ rule, according to which ultralow doses of compounds, that in high doses are pathogenic, may have paradoxically a protective or curative effect. Despite a few encouraging observational studies, the effectiveness of the homeopathic prevention or therapy of infections in veterinary medicine is not sufficiently supported by randomized and controlled trials.

  4. Maternal hypothyroidism: An overview of current experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Mahboubeh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2017-10-15

    Maternal hypothyroidism (MH) is the most common cause of transient congenital hypothyroidism. Different animal models are used for assessing developmental effects of MH in offspring. The severity and status of hypothyroidism in animal models must be a reflection of the actual conditions in humans. To obtain comparable results with different clinical conditions, which lead to MH in humans, several factors have been suggested for researchers to consider before designing the experimental models. Regarding development of fetal body systems during pregnancy, interference at different times provides different results and the appropriate time for induction of hypothyroidism should be selected based on accurate time of development of the system under assessment. Other factors that should be taken into consideration include, physiological and biochemical differences between humans and other species, thyroid hormone-independent effects of anti-thyroid drugs, circadian rhythms in TSH secretion, sex differences, physical and psychological stress. This review addresses essential guidelines for selecting and managing the optimal animal model for MH as well as discussing the pros and cons of currently used models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antioxidant Capacity: Experimental Determination by EPR Spectroscopy and Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Justyna; Bartoszek, Mariola; Chorążewski, Mirosław

    2015-07-22

    A new method of determining antioxidant capacity based on a mathematical model is presented in this paper. The model was fitted to 1000 data points of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements of various food product samples such as tea, wine, juice, and herbs with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values from 20 to 2000 μmol TE/100 mL. The proposed mathematical equation allows for a determination of TEAC of food products based on a single EPR spectroscopy measurement. The model was tested on the basis of 80 EPR spectroscopy measurements of herbs, tea, coffee, and juice samples. The proposed model works for both strong and weak antioxidants (TEAC values from 21 to 2347 μmol TE/100 mL). The determination coefficient between TEAC values obtained experimentally and TEAC values calculated with proposed mathematical equation was found to be R(2) = 0.98. Therefore, the proposed new method of TEAC determination based on a mathematical model is a good alternative to the standard EPR method due to its being fast, accurate, inexpensive, and simple to perform.

  6. An experimental methodology for a fuzzy set preference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turksen, I. B.; Willson, Ian A.

    1992-01-01

    models and vague linguistic preferences has greatly limited the usefulness and predictive validity of existing preference models. A fuzzy set preference model that uses linguistic variables and a fully interactive implementation should be able to simultaneously address these issues and substantially improve the accuracy of demand estimates. The parallel implementation of crisp and fuzzy conjoint models using identical data not only validates the fuzzy set model but also provides an opportunity to assess the impact of fuzzy set definitions and individual attribute choices implemented in the interactive methodology developed in this research. The generalized experimental tools needed for conjoint models can also be applied to many other types of intelligent systems.

  7. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed

  8. Taenia solium: Development of an Experimental Model of Porcine Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Agnès; Trejo, Armando; Cisneros, Humberto; García-Navarrete, Roberto; Villalobos, Nelly; Hernández, Marisela; Villeda Hernández, Juana; Hernández, Beatriz; Rosas, Gabriela; Bobes, Raul J; de Aluja, Aline S; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. NC is a severe disease still affecting the population in developing countries of Latin America, Asia, and Africa. While great improvements have been made on NC diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, the management of patients affected by extraparenchymal parasites remains a challenge. The development of a T. solium NC experimental model in pigs that will allow the evaluation of new therapeutic alternatives is herein presented. Activated oncospheres (either 500 or 1000) were surgically implanted in the cerebral subarachnoid space of piglets. The clinical status and the level of serum antibodies in the animals were evaluated for a 4-month period after implantation. The animals were sacrificed, cysticerci were counted during necropsy, and both the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of cysts were described. Based on the number of established cysticerci, infection efficiency ranged from 3.6% (1000 oncospheres) to 5.4% (500 oncospheres). Most parasites were caseous or calcified (38/63, 60.3%) and were surrounded by an exacerbated inflammatory response with lymphocyte infiltration and increased inflammatory markers. The infection elicited specific antibodies but no neurological signs. This novel experimental model of NC provides a useful tool to evaluate new cysticidal and anti-inflammatory approaches and it should improve the management of severe NC patients, refractory to the current treatments.

  9. Experimental Model of Intervertebral Disk Mediated Postoperative Epidural Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, Sergey N; Sorokovikov, V A; Erdyneyev, K C; Lepekhova, S A; Goldberg, O A

    2016-07-01

    Postoperative epidural fibrosis (EF) after lumbar discectomy is the most common and at the same time controversial issue. The etiology and pathogenesis creates a lot of discussion and selection of methods of treatment and prevention continues. LIV laminectomy with dura mater (DM) exposition was done in 24 rats, and then, 0.3 ml of elements of suspension of autologous intervertebral disk was implicated on DM. As autologous intervertebral disk, we used the intervertebral disk from amputated tail. In all the animals, incisions were closed with 3/0 Vicryl. EF was examined. Fibroblast cell density was calculated in each field at ×40 magnification: Grade 1 - fewer than 100 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 2 - 100-150 fibroblasts in each field; Grade 3 - more than 150 fibroblasts in each field. Based on histological results, we confirmed our model of experiment. On the 30th day of evaluation, there were significant histological evidences of postoperative epidural adhesions in experimental animals, which included the obliteration of epidural space, the presence of adhesions in the dura and nerve roots, the restructuring of the yellow ligament, bone sclerosis, excessive appearance of fibrous tissue around the autologous intervertebral disk tissue that applied on the DM. In our work, we describe a new experimental model, where the elements of autologous intervertebral disk play the role of inflammation trigger, which cause postoperative scar and EF.

  10. Experimental Investigation and Theoretical Modeling of Nanosilica Activity in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental investigations and theoretical modeling of the hydration reaction of nanosilica blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different nanosilica replacement ratios. The developments of chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength of Portland cement control specimens and nanosilica blended specimens were measured at different ages: 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Due to the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica, the contents of calcium hydroxide in nanosilica blended pastes are considerably lower than those in the control specimens. Compared with the control specimens, the extent of compressive strength enhancement in the nanosilica blended specimens is much higher at early ages. Additionally, a blended cement hydration model that considers both the hydration reaction of cement and the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica is proposed. The properties of nanosilica blended concrete during hardening were evaluated using the degree of hydration of cement and the reaction degree of nanosilica. The calculated chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength were generally consistent with the experimental results.

  11. NADPH Oxidase-Related Pathophysiology in Experimental Models of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several experimental studies have indicated that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidases (Nox exert detrimental effects on ischemic brain tissue; Nox-knockout mice generally exhibit resistance to damage due to experimental stroke following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Furthermore, our previous MCAO study indicated that infarct size and blood-brain barrier breakdown are enhanced in mice with pericyte-specific overexpression of Nox4, relative to levels observed in controls. However, it remains unclear whether Nox affects the stroke outcome directly by increasing oxidative stress at the site of ischemia, or indirectly by modifying physiological variables such as blood pressure or cerebral blood flow (CBF. Because of technical problems in the measurement of physiological variables and CBF, it is often difficult to address this issue in mouse models due to their small body size; in our previous study, we examined the effects of Nox activity on focal ischemic injury in a novel congenic rat strain: stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats with loss-of-function in Nox. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of Nox in focal ischemic injury and discuss critical issues that should be considered when investigating Nox-related pathophysiology in animal models of stroke.

  12. Experimental model of distraction osteogenesis in edentulous rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Montserrat Pujadas Bigi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis (DO is a surgical technique producing bone lengthening by distraction of the fracture callus. Although a large number of experimental studies on the events associated with DO of craniofacial skeleton have been reported, the few employing rat mandibular bone DO used complicated designs and produced a small volume of newly formed bone. Thus, this study aims to present an original experimental model of mandibular DO in edentulous rats that produces a sufficient quantity and quality of intramembranous bone. Eight male Wistar rats, weighing 75 g, underwent extraction of lower molars. With rats weighing 350 g, right mandibular osteotomy was performed and the distraction device was placed. The distraction device was custom made using micro-implants, expansion screws, and acrylic resin. Study protocol: latency: 6 days, distraction: ¼ turn (0.175 mm once a day during 6 d, consolidation: 28 d after distraction phase, sacrifice. DO-treated and contralateral hemimandibles were dissected and compared macroscopically and using radiographic studies. Histological sections were obtained and stained with H&E. A distraction gap filled with newly formed and mature bone tissue was obtained. This model of mandibular DO proved useful to obtain adequate quantity and quality of bone to study bone regeneration.

  13. Sparse linear models: Variational approximate inference and Bayesian experimental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Matthias W [Saarland University and Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Campus E1.4, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2009-12-01

    A wide range of problems such as signal reconstruction, denoising, source separation, feature selection, and graphical model search are addressed today by posterior maximization for linear models with sparsity-favouring prior distributions. The Bayesian posterior contains useful information far beyond its mode, which can be used to drive methods for sampling optimization (active learning), feature relevance ranking, or hyperparameter estimation, if only this representation of uncertainty can be approximated in a tractable manner. In this paper, we review recent results for variational sparse inference, and show that they share underlying computational primitives. We discuss how sampling optimization can be implemented as sequential Bayesian experimental design. While there has been tremendous recent activity to develop sparse estimation, little attendance has been given to sparse approximate inference. In this paper, we argue that many problems in practice, such as compressive sensing for real-world image reconstruction, are served much better by proper uncertainty approximations than by ever more aggressive sparse estimation algorithms. Moreover, since some variational inference methods have been given strong convex optimization characterizations recently, theoretical analysis may become possible, promising new insights into nonlinear experimental design.

  14. The Epidemiology, Management, and Outcomes of Bacterial Meningitis in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchenir, Lynda; Renaud, Christian; Khan, Sarah; Bitnun, Ari; Boisvert, Andree-Anne; McDonald, Jane; Bowes, Jennifer; Brophy, Jason; Barton, Michelle; Ting, Joseph; Roberts, Ashley; Hawkes, Michael; Robinson, Joan L

    2017-07-01

    The pathogens that cause bacterial meningitis in infants and their antimicrobial susceptibilities may have changed in this era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, use of conjugated vaccines, and maternal antibiotic prophylaxis for group B Streptococcus (GBS). The objective was to determine the optimal empirical antibiotics for bacterial meningitis in early infancy. This was a cohort study of infants bacterial meningitis at 7 pediatric tertiary care hospitals across Canada in 2013 and 2014. There were 113 patients diagnosed with proven meningitis (n = 63) or suspected meningitis (n = 50) presented at median 19 days of age, with 63 patients (56%) presenting a diagnosis from home. Predominant pathogens were Escherichia coli (n = 37; 33%) and GBS (n = 35; 31%). Two of 15 patients presenting meningitis on day 0 to 6 had isolates resistant to both ampicillin and gentamicin (E coli and Haemophilus influenzae type B). Six of 60 infants presenting a diagnosis of meningitis from home from day 7 to 90 had isolates, for which cefotaxime would be a poor choice (Listeria monocytogenes [n = 3], Enterobacter cloacae, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Pseudomonas stutzeri). Sequelae were documented in 84 infants (74%), including 8 deaths (7%). E coli and GBS remain the most common causes of bacterial meningitis in the first 90 days of life. For empirical therapy of suspected bacterial meningitis, one should consider a third-generation cephalosporin (plus ampicillin for at least the first month), potentially substituting a carbapenem for the cephalosporin if there is evidence for Gram-negative meningitis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Neoplastic Meningitis Due to Lung, Breast, and Melanoma Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2017-01-01

    Neoplastic meningitis, a central nervous system (CNS) complication of cancer metastatic to the meninges and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is relevant to oncologists due to the impact of the disease on patient quality of life and survival rates. A review of the literature of articles published in English was conducted with regard to neoplastic meningitis. The incidence of neoplastic meningitis is increasing because patients with cancer are surviving longer in part because of the use of novel therapies with poor CNS penetration. Up to 5% of patients with solid tumors develop neoplastic meningitis during the disease course (breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma being the predominantly causative cancers). The rate of median survival in patients with untreated neoplastic meningitis is 1 to 2 months, although it can be as long as 5 months in some cases. Therapeutic options for the treatment of neoplastic meningitis include systemic therapy (cancer-specific, CNS-penetrating chemotherapy or targeted therapies), intra-CSF administration of chemotherapy (methotrexate, cytarabine, thiotepa) and CNS site-specific radiotherapy. Determining whom to treat with neoplastic meningitis remains challenging and, in part, relates to the extent of systemic disease, the neurological burden of disease, the available systemic therapies, and estimated rates of survival. The prognosis of neoplastic meningitis remains poor. The increasing use of novel, targeted therapies and immunotherapy in solid tumors and its impact on neoplastic meningitis remains to be determined and is an area of active research. Thus, well conducted trials are needed.

  16. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan R.; Sudhir, Uchil; Javali, Mahendra; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no prior treatment were evaluated. Cortisol levels were compared with 20 patients with aseptic (viral) meningitis and 25 control subjects. Results: Mean CSF cortisol level was 13.85, 3.47, and 1.05 in bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis, and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in bacterial meningitis was significantly higher as compared to controls (P meningitis (P meningitis. This suggests that intrathecalcortisol may serve as a valuable, rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic marker in discriminatingbetween bacterial and aseptic meningitis. This helps in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26019421

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid ferritin in children with viral and bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M; Mamishi, S; Mahmoudi, S; Pourakbari, B; Khotaei, G; Daneshjou, K; Hashemi, N

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that the prognosis of bacterial meningitis has been improved by the influence of antibiotics, this disease is still one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality in children. Rapid differentiation between bacterial and aseptic meningitis, and the need for immediate antibiotic treatment in the former, is crucial in the prognosis of these patients. Ferritin is one of the most sensitive biochemical markers investigated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for the early diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. The present study aims to evaluate the diagnostic capability of CSF ferritin in differentiating bacterial and viral meningitis in the paediatric setting. A cross-sectional study was carried out in the referral Children's Medical Center Hospital, Tehran, during 2008 and 2009. According to the inclusion criteria, CSF samples from 42 patients with suspected meningitis were obtained and divided into two meningitis groups, bacterial (n = 18) and viral (n = 24). Ferritin and other routine determinants (i.e., leucocytes, protein and glucose) were compared between the two groups. Ferritin concentration in the bacterial meningitis group was 106.39 +/- 86.96 ng/dL, which was considerably higher than in the viral meningitis group (10.17 +/- 14.09, P meningitis group and showed a positive correlation with CSF ferritin. In conclusion, this study suggests that CSF ferritin concentration is an accurate test for the early differentiation of bacterial and aseptic meningitis; however, further investigation on a larger cohort of patients is required to confirm this finding.

  18. Aseptic and Bacterial Meningitis: Evaluation, Treatment, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Hillary R; Boyle, Sean D

    2017-09-01

    The etiologies of meningitis range in severity from benign and self-limited to life-threatening with potentially severe morbidity. Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency that requires prompt recognition and treatment. Mortality remains high despite the introduction of vaccinations for common pathogens that have reduced the incidence of meningitis worldwide. Aseptic meningitis is the most common form of meningitis with an annual incidence of 7.6 per 100,000 adults. Most cases of aseptic meningitis are viral and require supportive care. Viral meningitis is generally self-limited with a good prognosis. Examination maneuvers such as Kernig sign or Brudzinski sign may not be useful to differentiate bacterial from aseptic meningitis because of variable sensitivity and specificity. Because clinical findings are also unreliable, the diagnosis relies on the examination of cerebrospinal fluid obtained from lumbar puncture. Delayed initiation of antibiotics can worsen mortality. Treatment should be started promptly in cases where transfer, imaging, or lumbar puncture may slow a definitive diagnosis. Empiric antibiotics should be directed toward the most likely pathogens and should be adjusted by patient age and risk factors. Dexamethasone should be administered to children and adults with suspected bacterial meningitis before or at the time of initiation of antibiotics. Vaccination against the most common pathogens that cause bacterial meningitis is recommended. Chemoprophylaxis of close contacts is helpful in preventing additional infections.

  19. Application of Iterative Robust Model-based Optimal Experimental Design for the Calibration of Biocatalytic Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Daele, Timothy; Gernaey, Krist V.; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer

    2017-01-01

    The aim of model calibration is to estimate unique parameter values from available experimental data, here applied to a biocatalytic process. The traditional approach of first gathering data followed by performing a model calibration is inefficient, since the information gathered during...... experimentation is not actively used to optimise the experimental design. By applying an iterative robust model-based optimal experimental design, the limited amount of data collected is used to design additional informative experiments. The algorithm is used here to calibrate the initial reaction rate of an ω......-transaminase catalysed reaction in a more accurate way. The parameter confidence region estimated from the Fisher Information Matrix is compared with the likelihood confidence region, which is a more accurate, but also a computationally more expensive method. As a result, an important deviation between both approaches...

  20. Integral Reactor Containment Condensation Model and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-05-02

    This NEUP funded project, NEUP 12-3630, is for experimental, numerical and analytical studies on high-pressure steam condensation phenomena in a steel containment vessel connected to a water cooling tank, carried out at Oregon State University (OrSU) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW-Madison). In the three years of investigation duration, following the original proposal, the planned tasks have been completed: (1) Performed a scaling study for the full pressure test facility applicable to the reference design for the condensation heat transfer process during design basis accidents (DBAs), modified the existing test facility to route the steady-state secondary steam flow into the high pressure containment for controllable condensation tests, and extended the operations at negative gage pressure conditions (OrSU). (2) Conducted a series of DBA and quasi-steady experiments using the full pressure test facility to provide a reliable high pressure condensation database (OrSU). (3) Analyzed experimental data and evaluated condensation model for the experimental conditions, and predicted the prototypic containment performance under accidental conditions (UW-Madison). A film flow model was developed for the scaling analysis, and the results suggest that the 1/3 scaled test facility covers large portion of laminar film flow, leading to a lower average heat transfer coefficient comparing to the prototypic value. Although it is conservative in reactor safety analysis, the significant reduction of heat transfer coefficient (50%) could under estimate the prototypic condensation heat transfer rate, resulting in inaccurate prediction of the decay heat removal capability. Further investigation is thus needed to quantify the scaling distortion for safety analysis code validation. Experimental investigations were performed in the existing MASLWR test facility at OrST with minor modifications. A total of 13 containment condensation tests were conducted for pressure

  1. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-09-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  2. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Vasant More

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson’s disease dementia and Alzheimer’s disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  3. Mass spectrometry analysis of hepcidin peptides in experimental mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjalsma, Harold; Laarakkers, Coby M M; van Swelm, Rachel P L; Theurl, Milan; Theurl, Igor; Kemna, Erwin H; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Venselaar, Hanka; Dutilh, Bas E; Russel, Frans G M; Weiss, Günter; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Fleming, Robert E; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2011-03-08

    The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1) and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2) at the peptide level. To this purpose, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF) MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i) 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c) upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii) homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X) mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii) mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics.

  4. Mass spectrometry analysis of hepcidin peptides in experimental mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Tjalsma

    Full Text Available The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1 and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2 at the peptide level. To this purpose, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics.

  5. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Hepcidin Peptides in Experimental Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Swelm, Rachel P. L.; Theurl, Milan; Theurl, Igor; Kemna, Erwin H.; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.; Venselaar, Hanka; Dutilh, Bas E.; Russel, Frans G. M.; Weiss, Günter; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Fleming, Robert E.; Swinkels, Dorine W.

    2011-01-01

    The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1) and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2) at the peptide level. To this purpose, fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF) MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i) 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c) upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii) homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X) mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii) mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics. PMID:21408141

  6. Inflammasome activation mediates inflammation and outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammasomes are multi-protein intracellular signaling complexes that have recently been hypothesized to play a role in the regulation of the inflammation response. We studied associations between inflammasome-associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial meningitis and clinical outcome, and pneumococcal serotype. In a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis we examined the pathophysiological roles of two inflammasome proteins, NLRP3 (Nod-like receptor protein-3) and adaptor protein ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein). Methods In a nationwide prospective cohort study, CSF cytokine levels were measured and related to clinical outcome and pneumococcal serotype. In a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis using Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, we examined bacterial titers, cytokine profiles and brain histology at 6 and 30 hours after inoculation in wild-type (WT), Asc and Nlrp3 deficient mice. Results In patients with bacterial meningitis, CSF levels of inflammasome associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were related to complications, and unfavorable disease outcome. CSF levels of IL-1β were associated with pneumococcal serotype (pmeningitis, which may dependent on the pneumococcal serotype. PMID:23902681

  7. Predicting subsurface uranium transport: Mechanistic modeling constrained by experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottman, Michael; Schenkeveld, Walter D. C.; Kraemer, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) munitions and their widespread use throughout conflict zones around the world pose a persistent health threat to the inhabitants of those areas long after the conclusion of active combat. However, little emphasis has been put on developing a comprehensive, quantitative tool for use in remediation and hazard avoidance planning in a wide range of environments. In this context, we report experimental data on U interaction with soils and sediments. Here, we strive to improve existing risk assessment modeling paradigms by incorporating a variety of experimental data into a mechanistic U transport model for subsurface environments. 20 different soils and sediments from a variety of environments were chosen to represent a range of geochemical parameters that are relevant to U transport. The parameters included pH, organic matter content, CaCO3, Fe content and speciation, and clay content. pH ranged from 3 to 10, organic matter content from 6 to 120 g kg-1, CaCO3 from 0 to 700 g kg-1, amorphous Fe content from 0.3 to 6 g kg-1 and clay content from 4 to 580 g kg-1. Sorption experiments were then performed, and linear isotherms were constructed. Sorption experiment results show that among separate sets of sediments and soils, there is an inverse correlation between both soil pH and CaCO¬3 concentration relative to U sorptive affinity. The geological materials with the highest and lowest sorptive affinities for U differed in CaCO3 and organic matter concentrations, as well as clay content and pH. In a further step, we are testing if transport behavior in saturated porous media can be predicted based on adsorption isotherms and generic geochemical parameters, and comparing these modeling predictions with the results from column experiments. The comparison of these two data sets will examine if U transport can be effectively predicted from reactive transport modeling that incorporates the generic geochemical parameters. This work will serve to show

  8. Evaluation of two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. García-Moreno

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The serious neuropsychological repercussions of hepatic encephalopathy have led to the creation of several experimental models in order to better understand the pathogenesis of the disease. In the present investigation, two possible causes of hepatic encephalopathy, cholestasis and portal hypertension, were chosen to study the behavioral impairments caused by the disease using an object recognition task. This working memory test is based on a paradigm of spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample and was performed 60 days after surgery. Male Wistar rats (225-250 g were divided into three groups: two experimental groups, microsurgical cholestasis (N = 20 and extrahepatic portal hypertension (N = 20, and a control group (N = 20. A mild alteration of the recognition memory occurred in rats with cholestasis compared to control rats and portal hypertensive rats. The latter group showed the poorest performance on the basis of the behavioral indexes tested. In particular, only the control group spent significantly more time exploring novel objects compared to familiar ones (P < 0.001. In addition, the portal hypertension group spent the shortest time exploring both the novel and familiar objects (P < 0.001. These results suggest that the existence of portosystemic collateral circulation per se may be responsible for subclinical encephalopathy.

  9. Tesla Coil Theoretical Model and its Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voitkans Janis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a theoretical model of Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wire form, where the line voltage is measured across electrically neutral space. By applying the principle of equivalence of single-wire and two-wire schemes an equivalent two-wire scheme can be found for a single-wire scheme and the already known long line theory can be applied to the Tesla coil. A new method of multiple reflections is developed to characterize a signal in a long line. Formulas for calculation of voltage in Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance frequencies are proposed. The theoretical calculations are verified experimentally. Resonance frequencies of Tesla coil are measured and voltage standing wave characteristics are obtained for different output capacities in the single-wire mode. Wave resistance and phase coefficient of Tesla coil is obtained. Experimental measurements show good compliance with the proposed theory. The formulas obtained in this paper are also usable for a regular two-wire long line with distributed parameters.

  10. Modelling concentration-analgesia relationships for morphine to evaluate experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Foster, David John Richard; Upton, Richard Neil

    2015-01-01

    -blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 39 healthy volunteers received an oral dose of 30 mg morphine hydrochloride or placebo. Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to describe the plasma concentrations of morphine and metabolites, and the analgesic effect of morphine on experimental pain in skin......The aim of this study was to develop population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models for morphine in experimental pain induced by skin heat and muscle pressure, and to evaluate the experimental pain models with regard to assessment of morphine pharmacodynamics. In a randomized, double...... and muscle. Baseline pain metrics varied between individuals and occasions, and were described with interindividual and interoccasion variability. Placebo-response did not change with time. For both pain metrics, morphine effect was proportional to baseline pain and was described with a linear model...

  11. Clinical Presentation, Diagnosis, and Radiological Findings of Neoplastic Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigakos, Georgios; Liakou, Chrysoula I; Felipe, Naillid; Orkoulas-Razis, Dennis; Razis, Evangelia

    2017-01-01

    Neoplastic meningitis is a complication of solid and hematological malignancies. It consists of the spread of malignant cells to the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space and their dissemination within the cerebrospinal fluid. A literature review was conducted to summarize the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, laboratory values, and imaging findings of neoplastic meningitis. Neoplastic meningitis is an event in the course of cancer with a variable clinical presentation and a wide differential diagnosis. In general, characteristic findings on gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and the presence of malignant cells in the cerebrospinal fluid remain the cornerstones of diagnosis. However, both modalities do not always confirm the diagnosis of neoplastic meningitis despite a typical clinical picture. Clinicians treating patients with cancer should be aware of the possibility of neoplastic meningitis, especially when multilevel neurological symptoms are present. Neoplastic meningitis can be an elusive diagnosis, so clinician awareness is important so that this malignant manifestation is recognized in a timely manner.

  12. Extramedullary spinal teratoma presenting with recurrent aseptic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpayo, Lucy L; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Man; Wang, Kai; Wang, Jiao; Yang, Li

    2014-06-01

    Spinal teratomas are extremely rare; they constitute meningitis. A 7-year-old boy presented with paroxysmal abdominal pain and a history of recurrent aseptic meningitis. Kernig and Brudzinski signs were present. Lumber puncture revealed pleocytosis with no evidence of bacteria growth. Imaging of the spine revealed a cystic lesion in spinal cord at thoracic level 9-11. Endoscopic excision of the cyst was successfully performed. Surgical and histopathological findings confirmed extramedullary matured teratoma. As the symptomatic attacks of spontaneous rupture of spinal teratoma resemble presentations of Mollaret meningitis, spinal teratoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Mollaret meningitis. We describe a rare example of spinal teratoma causing recurrent meningitis. Spine imaging should be considered in individuals with recurrent aseptic meningitis as this promotes earlier diagnosis, more appropriate treatment, and improved neurological outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. HIB-INFECTION: MENINGITIS, CELLULITIS IN THE CHILD OF 6 MONTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Harchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical case of Hib-infection is the clinic purulent meningitis and pannikulita young child. Shows the complexity of the differential diagnosis of meningitis in combination with panniculitis with meningococcal disease (meningitis, meningokokktsemiya.

  14. Epidemiologic and microbiologic characteristics of recurrent bacterial and fungal meningitis in the Netherlands, 1988-2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, Joris J.; Bekker, Vincent; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van der Ende, Arie; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Patients may experience multiple episodes of bacterial meningitis. Information from large studies of recurrent meningitis is limited. We evaluated the incidence of recurrent bacterial meningitis and the distribution of causative organisms in The Netherlands. Methods. Data for patients

  15. A molecular machine biosensor: construction, predictive models and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi-Monfared, Sahar; Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Cornell, Bruce

    2012-04-15

    This paper describes the construction, operation and predictive modeling of a molecular machine, functioning as a high sensitivity biosensor. Embedded gramicidin A (gA) ionchannels in a self-assembled tethered lipid bilayer act as biological switches in response to target molecules and provide a signal amplification mechanism that results in high sensitivity molecular detection. The biosensor can be used as a rapid and sensitive point of care diagnostic device in different media such as human serum, plasma and whole blood without the need for pre and post processing steps required in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The electrical reader of the device provides the added advantage of objective measurement. Novel ideas in the construction of the molecular machine, including fabrication of biochip arrays, and experimental studies of its ability to detect analyte molecules over a wide range of concentrations are presented. Remarkably, despite the complexity of the device, it is shown that the response can be predicted by modeling the analyte fluid flow and surface chemical reactions. The derived predictive models for the sensing dynamics also facilitate determining important variables in the design of a molecular machine such as the ion channel lifetime and diffusion dynamics within the bilayer lipid membrane as well as the bio-molecular interaction rate constants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Kraft, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    New measurements of thermal infrared emission spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7-40 ??m) of experimentally shocked basalt and basaltic andesite (17-56 GPa) exhibit changes in spectral features with increasing pressure consistent with changes in the structure of plagioclase feldspars. Major spectral absorptions in unshocked rocks between 350-700 cm-1 (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations) and between 1000-1250 cm-1 (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) transform at pressures >20-25 GPa to two broad spectral features centered near 950-1050 and 400-450 cm-1. Linear deconvolution models using spectral libraries composed of common mineral and glass spectra replicate the spectra of shocked basalt relatively well up to shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation in plagioclase. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the libraries improves fits for more highly shocked basalt. However, deconvolution models of the basaltic andesite select shocked feldspar end-members even for unshocked samples, likely caused by the higher primary glass content in the basaltic andesite sample.

  17. Experimental Models of Autoimmune Demyelinating Diseases in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimmer, Lev; Fovet, Claire-Maëlle; Serguera, Ché

    2017-01-01

    Human idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases (IIDD) are a heterogeneous group of autoimmune inflammatory and demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). These include multiple sclerosis (MS), the most common chronic IIDD, but also rarer disorders such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Great efforts have been made to understand the pathophysiology of MS, leading to the development of a few effective treatments. Nonetheless, IIDD still require a better understanding of the causes and underlying mechanisms to implement more effective therapies and diagnostic methods. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a commonly used animal model to study the pathophysiology of IIDD. EAE is principally induced through immunization with myelin antigens combined with immune-activating adjuvants. Nonhuman primates (NHP), the phylogenetically closest relatives of humans, challenged by similar microorganisms as other primates may recapitulate comparable immune responses to that of humans. In this review, the authors describe EAE models in 3 NHP species: rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaques ( Macaca fascicularis), and common marmosets ( Callithrix jacchus), evaluating their respective contribution to the understanding of human IIDD. EAE in NHP is a heterogeneous disease, including acute monophasic and chronic polyphasic forms. This diversity makes it a versatile model to use in translational research. This clinical variability also creates an opportunity to explore multiple facets of immune-mediated mechanisms of neuro-inflammation and demyelination as well as intrinsic protective mechanisms. Here, the authors review current insights into the pathogenesis and immunopathological mechanisms implicated in the development of EAE in NHP.

  18. Experimental rat models of chronic allograft nephropathy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrestha B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Badri Shrestha, John HaylorSheffield Kidney Institute, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield, UKAbstract: Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN is the leading cause of late allograft loss after renal transplantation (RT, which continues to remain an unresolved problem. A rat model of CAN was first described in 1969 by White et al. Although the rat model of RT can be technically challenging, it is attractive because the pathogenesis of CAN is similar to that following human RT and the pathological features of CAN develop within months as compared with years in human RT. The rat model of RT is considered as a useful investigational tool in the field of experimental transplantation research. We have reviewed the literature on studies of rat RT reporting the donor and recipient strain combinations that have investigated resultant survival and histological outcomes. Several different combinations of inbred and outbred rat combinations have been reported to investigate the multiple aspects of transplantation, including acute rejection, cellular and humoral rejection mechanisms and their treatments, CAN, and potential targets for its prevention.Keywords: interventions, therapy, late allograft loss, renal transplantation

  19. Standardised Models for Inducing Experimental Peritoneal Adhesions in Female Rats

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    Bernhard Kraemer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models for adhesion induction are heterogeneous and often poorly described. We compare and discuss different models to induce peritoneal adhesions in a randomized, experimental in vivo animal study with 72 female Wistar rats. Six different standardized techniques for peritoneal trauma were used: brushing of peritoneal sidewall and uterine horns (group 1, brushing of parietal peritoneum only (group 2, sharp excision of parietal peritoneum closed with interrupted sutures (group 3, ischemic buttons by grasping the parietal peritoneum and ligating the base with Vicryl suture (group 4, bipolar electrocoagulation of the peritoneum (group 5, and traumatisation by electrocoagulation followed by closure of the resulting peritoneal defect using Vicryl sutures (group 6. Upon second look, there were significant differences in the adhesion incidence between the groups (P<0.01. Analysis of the fraction of adhesions showed that groups 2 (0% and 5 (4% were significantly less than the other groups (P<0.01. Furthermore, group 6 (69% was significantly higher than group 1 (48% (P<0.05 and group 4 (47% (P<0.05. There was no difference between group 3 (60% and group 6 (P=0.2. From a clinical viewpoint, comparison of different electrocoagulation modes and pharmaceutical adhesion barriers is possible with standardised models.

  20. Optimization of Experimental Model Parameter Identification for Energy Storage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Morello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The smart grid approach is envisioned to take advantage of all available modern technologies in transforming the current power system to provide benefits to all stakeholders in the fields of efficient energy utilisation and of wide integration of renewable sources. Energy storage systems could help to solve some issues that stem from renewable energy usage in terms of stabilizing the intermittent energy production, power quality and power peak mitigation. With the integration of energy storage systems into the smart grids, their accurate modeling becomes a necessity, in order to gain robust real-time control on the network, in terms of stability and energy supply forecasting. In this framework, this paper proposes a procedure to identify the values of the battery model parameters in order to best fit experimental data and integrate it, along with models of energy sources and electrical loads, in a complete framework which represents a real time smart grid management system. The proposed method is based on a hybrid optimisation technique, which makes combined use of a stochastic and a deterministic algorithm, with low computational burden and can therefore be repeated over time in order to account for parameter variations due to the battery’s age and usage.

  1. Models of Investor Forecasting Behavior — Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bonetto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forecasting behaviors affect investors’ trading decisions and lead to qualitatively different asset price trajectories. It has been shown in the literature that the weights that investors place on observed asset price changes when forecasting future price changes, and the nature of their confidence when price changes are forecast, determine whether price bubbles, price crashes, and unpredictable price cycles occur. In this paper, we report the results of behavioral experiments involving multiple investors who participated in a market for a virtual asset. Our goal is to study investors’ forecast formation. We conducted three experimental sessions with different participants in each session. We fit different models of forecast formation to the observed data. There is strong evidence that the investors forecast future prices by extrapolating past price changes, even when they know the fundamental value of the asset exactly and the extrapolated forecasts differ significantly from the fundamental value. The rational expectations hypothesis seems inconsistent with the observed forecasts. The forecasting models of all participants that best fit the observed forecasting data were of the type that cause price bubbles and cycles in dynamical systems models, and price bubbles and cycles ended up occurring in all three sessions.

  2. Experimental and numerical investigation of a simplified exhaust model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Vehovszky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A simplified experimental equipment was built to investigate heat radiation and free convection around hot exhaust pipe. Temperatures were measured on the surface of the pipe as like as on heat insulating and -reflecting aluminum shield. Special care was taken to the temperature measuring method: result proved that inappropriate fixing of measuring thermocouples lead to an error of up to 30 % in the temperature-increase values. A detailed 1D numerical model was set up and parametrized so as to the calculation results can be fitted to measured temperature values. In this way thermal properties of the surfaces – as emissivities, absorption coefficients and convective heat transfer coefficients – were determined for temperature sweeps and stationary state cases. The used methods are to be further improved for real automotive parts and higher temperatures.

  3. Modeling the constitutive response of tantalum across experimental platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Nathan; Austin, Ryan; Brown, Justin; Marinak, Marty; Park, Hye-Sook; Prisbrey, Shon

    2017-06-01

    Given the complexities of the mechanics related to strength and the wide range of conditions of interest, it is useful to make comparisons across experimental platforms and across computational methods where possible. Modeling results will be presented from one such cross-platform study; including results from plate impact, ramp compression, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments. Observables from strength experiments at more extreme conditions are influenced by a variety of material response characteristics, not just by the material's resistance to plastic deformation. Results include sensitivities to some of these other aspects, such as equation of state and shear modulus formulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL-ABS-724459).

  4. Experimental human pneumococcal carriage models for vaccine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniela M; Jambo, Kondwani C; Gordon, Stephen B

    2011-09-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have had unprecedented success in controlling vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease. As serotype replacement and the complexity of designing vaccines to multiple capsular polysaccharides ultimately pose a threat to these vaccines, the development of alternative protein vaccines is important. Protein vaccines offer the promise of extended serotype coverage, reduced cost, and improved protection against otitis media and pneumococcal pneumonia. As placebo-controlled trials are not currently ethically justifiable, human pneumococcal challenge models using prevention of carriage as a test endpoint offer an attractive link between preclinical studies and clinical efficacy trials. Experimental human pneumococcal carriage studies offer a means of describing mechanisms of protection against carriage and a clinical tool to choose between vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Practical application of stereological kidney methods in experimental animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Fernández García

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The kidneys are vital organs responsible for excretion, fluid and electrolyte balance and hormone production. The nephrons are the kidney's functional and structural units. The number, size and distribution of the nephron components contain relevant information on renal function. Stereology is a branch of morphometry that applies mathematical principles to obtain three-dimensional information from serial, parallel and equidistant two-dimensional microscopic sections. Because of the complexity of stereological studies and the lack of scientific literature on the subject, the aim of this paper is to clearly explain, through animal models, the basic concepts of stereology and how to calculate the main kidney stereological parameters that can be applied in future experimental studies.

  6. Dietary whey supplementation in experimental models of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velioglu Ogünç, A; Manukyan, M; Cingi, A; Eksioglu-Demiralp, E; Ozdemir Aktan, A; Süha Yalçin, A

    2008-03-01

    Whey is a dairy product containing milk serum proteins with diverse biological effects. In this study, the effect of dietary whey supplementation on wound healing was investigated. Rats were fed a standard or whey-supplemented diet for three weeks. Wound healing parameters, glutathione, and lipid peroxide levels were determined three days after the application of two different models of wound healing, i.e. laparotomy and colonic anastomosis. Dietary whey supplementation significantly increased glutathione levels and suppressed lipid peroxidation after experimental laparotomy and colonic anastomosis. Bursting pressures, hydroxyproline, and cytokine levels were not changed. Our results show that dietary whey supplementation increases glutathione synthesis and cellular antioxidant defense. Long-term effects of whey feeding on wound healing remains to be investigated.

  7. IMMUNE THERAPY OF ENTEROVIRUS MENINGITIS IN CHILDREN

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    Yu. B. Hamanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyzed 254 cases of Enteroviral Meningitis (EVM in children that were treated in the children's department of neuroinfections ofClinicalHospital№40 inClinical andDiagnosticCenter. We compared the conventional method of the treatment of EVM in children above three years with complex therapy that includes various immunotropic preparations. The efficiency of the therapy was estimated according to the results of clinical observations, and the parameters of systemic immunity. Basic therapy included the appointment of rehydration, vasoactive drugs, vitamins of group B. In comparison groups children were given one of the following preparations: Amixin, Anaferon for children, Cycloferon, Viferon in addition to the basic treatment. The study demonstrated the benefits of complex treatment for enteroviral meningitis with immunomodulators before applying basic therapy. Total maximum effect was observed in the group with Anaferon for children.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid lactic acidosis in bacterial meningitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Eross, J; Silink, M; Dorman, D

    1981-01-01

    A rapid, microenzymatic method was used to measure cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels in 205 children with suspected bacterial meningitis. Fifty children with normal CSF containing fewer than 0.005 X 10(9)/l WBC, no segmented neutrophils, glucose 3.4 +/- 0.8 mmol/l (61.2 +/- 14.4 mg/100 ml), and a protein of less than 0.30 g/l had CSF lactate levels below 2.0 mmol/l (18 mg/100 ml) (mean and standard deviation 1.3 +/- 0.3 mmol/l (11.8 +/- 2.7 mg/100 ml)). In 31 cases of proved viral meningitis...

  9. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barocci, Simone; Mancini, Alessio; Canovari, Benedetta; Petrelli, Enzo; Sbriscia-Fioretti, Emanuela; Licci, Alberto; D'Addesa, Simona; Petrini, Giancarlo; Giacomini, Marinella; Renzi, Antonella; Migali, Antonio; Briscolini, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of meningitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a stem cell transplant recipient on immunosuppressive therapy for cutaneous chronic graft-versus host disease. A 59-year-old woman had undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation (from a matched unrelated donor) 13 months previously for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. She was on regular hematologic follow-up. Though her previous malignancy has been in remission, she was immunosuppressed due to the pharmacological treatment. We describe a meningitis caused by a typical food-borne pathogen, dangerous in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Moreover the bacterium had a multidrug resistance, a rare characteristic in clinical listeriosis. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are key factors in these cases. We chose ampicillin and rifampicin that allowed a complete resolution of the clinical manifestations.

  10. Confirmed viral meningitis with normal CSF findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Naghum; Desjobert, Edouard; Lumley, Janine; Webster, Daniel; Jacobs, Michael

    2014-07-17

    An 18-year-old woman presented with a progressively worsening headache, photophobia feverishness and vomiting. Three weeks previously she had returned to the UK from a trip to Peru. At presentation, she had clinical signs of meningism. On admission, blood tests showed a mild lymphopenia, with a normal C reactive protein and white cell count. Chest X-ray and CT of the head were normal. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microscopy was normal. CSF protein and glucose were in the normal range. MRI of the head and cerebral angiography were also normal. Subsequent molecular testing of CSF detected enterovirus RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. The patient's clinical syndrome correlated with her virological diagnosis and no other cause of her symptoms was found. Her symptoms were self-limiting and improved with supportive management. This case illustrates an important example of viral central nervous system infection presenting clinically as meningitis but with normal CSF microscopy. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Bilateral Renal Cortical Necrosis in Meningococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kennedy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is a relatively common infection of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and leptomeninges. The clinical picture evolves rapidly and, if treatment is delayed, can result in a variety of long-term sequelae, including death. Acute kidney injury in the setting of bacterial meningitis usually results from hypotension and volume depletion and resolves with appropriate treatment. Meningococcaemia with profound hypotension, and/or disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC may very rarely lead to bilateral renal cortical necrosis. In this context, renal recovery is extremely unlikely. We present two cases of meningococcaemia complicated by bilateral renal cortical necrosis and, ultimately, end stage kidney disease. We also present a review of the literature on the subject. The cases outline the importance of early aggressive intervention by a multidisciplinary team.

  12. Calcium Intervention Ameliorates Experimental Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Haghmorad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common inflammatory disease of the CNS. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is a widely used model for MS. In the present research, our aim was to test the therapeutic efficacy of Calcium (Ca in an experimental model of MS. Methods: In this study the experiment was done on C57BL/6 mice. EAE was induced using 200 μg of the MOG35-55 peptide emulsified in CFA and injected subcutaneously on day 0 over two flank areas. In addition, 250 ng of pertussis toxin was injected on days 0 and 2. In the treatment group, 30 mg/kg Ca was administered intraperitoneally four times at regular 48 hour intervals. The mice were sacrificed 21 days after EAE induction and blood samples were taken from their hearts. The brains of mice were removed for histological analysis and their isolated splenocytes were cultured. Results: Our results showed that treatment with Ca caused a significant reduction in the severity of the EAE. Histological analysis indicated that there was no plaque in brain sections of Ca treated group of mice whereas 4 ± 1 plaques were detected in brain sections of controls. The density of mononuclear infiltration in the CNS of Ca treated mice was lower than in controls. The serum level of Nitric Oxide in the treatment group was lower than in the control group but was not significant. Moreover, the levels of IFN-γ in cell culture supernatant of splenocytes in treated mice were significantly lower than in the control group. Conclusion: The data indicates that Ca intervention can effectively attenuate EAE progression.

  13. Clinical study on epilepsy secondary to fungal meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu YANG; Min ZHANG; Xi HE

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), imaging and EEG characteristics of 10 patients with epilepsy secondary to fungal meningitis were retrospectively analyzed, so as to improve the diagnosis and treatment of fungal meningitis. The results suggest that patients with fungal meningitis involving the cortex were sensitive to secondary epilepsy; imaging examinations showing frontotemporal lesions and EEG showing moderate-to-severe abnormalities were sensitive to secondary ...

  14. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Anish Mehta; Rohan R Mahale; Uchil Sudhir; Mahendra Javali; Rangasetty Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no pri...

  15. Five Cases of Recurrent Meningitis Associated with Chronic Strongyloidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Shimasaki, Teppei; Chung, Heath; Shiiki, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Although meningitis secondary to chronic strongyloidiasis is a rare complication, it is associated with a high mortality rate. Recurrent meningitis can occur if the underlying parasitic infection is left untreated. We report five cases of recurrent meningitis related to chronic strongyloidiasis that were associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Common causative organisms are Escherichia coli, Streptococcus bovis, and Klebsiella pneumonia. One patient died during t...

  16. Unusual cause of fatal anthrax meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Emine; Parlak, Mehmet; Atli, Seval Bilgiç

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of fatal anthrax meningoencephalitis in the province of Muş located in eastern Anatolia, Turkey. The organism isolated from cerebrospinal fluid was identified as Bacillus anthracis. The patient was treated with crystallized penicillin G (24 MU/day IV) and ciprofloxacin (2 × 400/day IV), but died 5 days after hospitalization. Although it is a rare case, we consider that the patients who have skin, respiratory and neurological systems might also have hemorrhagic meningitis.

  17. Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Martuza. The cell lines were tested for mycoplasma, Hoechst DNA staining, PCR, and culture testing for contaminant bacteria, yeast, and fungi ...potential therapeutic effect of HSV-1 on meningeal metastases. When HSV-1 was injected at the early growth phase (day 12) we observed a significant ...present significant findings and results obtained during the entire funding period. This includes work that has been completed during the 1st and 2nd

  18. The Role of Vancomycin on Meningitis

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    Ahmed I. Shatat and P.I.C.U team

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: After the previous discussion of the results obtained from this study, the researchers concluded that most of the cases diagnosed meningitis was aseptic and there was no need for antibiotics. Also in those who diagnosed as bacterial vancomycin was not essential in all cases, this confirmed by the absence of any differences in the outcome. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 501-511

  19. Throat Culture from Patients with Meningococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    THROAT CULTURE FROM PATIENTS-’WITH MENINGOCOCCAL MENINGITIS BY J.E. Sippel and N.I. Girigs U.S. NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT NO. 3 (CAIRO, ARAB REPUBLIC...lowv albumin eoncen rations, characteristically, have a centra fpit and are throat swabs from teenage or young dults but that it als’q underestimites...8217described would’/cletzrly facilitate recognition read at 590 tim against commensal staphylococci and strep - NP IIRENWALD The procedure is linear t thie

  20. Experimental and modelling evidence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kenneth; Han, June-Chiew; Crampin, Edmund John; Taberner, Andrew James; Loiselle, Denis Scott

    2017-10-01

    Heat associated with muscle shortening has been repeatedly demonstrated in skeletal muscle, but its existence in cardiac muscle remains contentious after five decades of study. By iterating between experiments and computational modelling, we show compelling evidence for the existence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle and reveal, mechanistically, the source of this excess heat. Our results clarify a long-standing uncertainty in the field of cardiac muscle energetics. We provide a revised partitioning of cardiac muscle energy expenditure to include this newly revealed thermal component. When a muscle shortens against an afterload, the heat that it liberates is greater than that produced by the same muscle contracting isometrically at the same level of force. This excess heat is defined as 'shortening heat', and has been repeatedly demonstrated in skeletal muscle but not in cardiac muscle. Given the micro-structural similarities between these two muscle types, and since we imagine that shortening heat is the thermal accompaniment of cross-bridge cycling, we have re-examined this issue. Using our flow-through microcalorimeter, we measured force and heat generated by isolated rat trabeculae undergoing isometric contractions at different muscle lengths and work-loop (shortening) contractions at different afterloads. We simulated these experimental protocols using a thermodynamically constrained model of cross-bridge cycling and probed the mechanisms underpinning shortening heat. Predictions generated by the model were subsequently validated by a further set of experiments. Both our experimental and modelling results show convincing evidence for the existence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle. Its magnitude is inversely related to the afterload or, equivalently, directly related to the extent of shortening. Computational simulations reveal that the heat of shortening arises from the cycling of cross-bridges, and that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is more sensitive to

  1. Experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis in rabbits Modelo experimental de pancreatite aguda grave em coelhos

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    Alberto Goldenberg

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop an experimental model of severe acute pancreatitis in rabbits through a pancreatic ductal injection of sodium taurocholate. METHODS: Twenty-four albino rabbits of the New Zealand lineage were distributed into four groups of six animals (A, B, C and S. The rabbits of three experimental groups (A, B and C were submitted to a laparatomy and received a pancreatic ductal injection of 1ml/kg sodium taurocholate 5%. Also, they were submitted to further laparatomies after 4h, 8h and 12h, respectively. The control group (S was subdivided into two groups of three animals: in subgroup S1 only the pancreatic duct catheterization was performed whereas in subgroup S2 the pancreatic duct catheterization as well as an injection of 1ml/kg physiologic solution 0.9% were carried out. After 12 hours, the rabbits were evaluated. In the re-intervention, blood was collected to determine the amylasemia and a pancreatectomy was carried out to investigate interstitial infiltration, steatonecrosis and necrosis of the organ, using an optical microscope. RESULTS: There was an elevation of amylase in all groups thus proving the existence of acute pancreatitis. The size of the interlobular septum increased progressively with a greater variation between group S1 (0.13 and group C (0. 53 (p=0.035. While all the animals in group A exhibited focal cellular necrosis, it was more intense in the rabbits of group B and culminated with a high proportion of severe pancreatic necrosis in group C animals. The difference in the intensity of cellular necrosis showed statistic significance (p=0.001. CONCLUSION: The proposed experimental model demonstrated its reproducibility and effectiveness in producing severe acute pancreatitis in rabbits.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver modelo experimental de pancreatite aguda grave em coelhos por meio da injeção de taurocolato de sódio no ducto pancreático. MÉTODOS: Vinte e quatro coelhos albinos da linhagem Nova Zelândia foram distribu

  2. Meningitis neonatal por Neisseria meningitidis serogrupo B

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    Manuel Díaz Álvarez

    Full Text Available La meningitis meningocóccica es una infección poco frecuente en el período neonatal internacionalmente, y solo hay una publicación previa en la literatura médica cubana hace 25 años atrás, de recién nacidos con meningitis bacteriana causada por Neisseria meningitidis. Se presenta el caso de un recién nacido febril, con manifestaciones de toxicidad, fontanela abombada, y cuando se realizó punción lumbar, se encontró pleocitosis del líquido cefalorraquídeo y se aisló N. meningitidis serogrupo B, por lo que se diagnostica meningitis meningocóccica neonatal. Tuvo evolución favorable. Se describen algunas características de la infección meningocócica, y se destaca el diagnóstico y tratamiento recomendado para este tipo de infección, así como se hace referencia a reportes de casos publicados en la literatura internacional.

  3. Incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in aplasia cutis congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Katharine; Zedek, Daniel; Sayed, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both rare congenital conditions that most commonly occur on the scalp and may appear clinically and histologically similar. A subtype of aplasia cutis congenita, membranous aplasia cutis congenita, and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both proposed to result from neural tube closure errors. However, neither non-membranous nor membranous aplasia cutis congenita are known to occur together with cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in the same lesion. We report the incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia within a lesion of aplasia cutis congenita. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Sub-meninges Implantation Reduces Immune Response to Neural Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwardt, Neil T.; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability. PMID:23370311

  5. Experimental model for Porphyromonas gingivalis infection in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, P I; Rotimi, V O; Laughon, B E

    1996-03-01

    A virulence model suitable for studying the dynamics of Porphyromonas gingivalis infection, including the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis in experimentally induced infections of multiple organs was developed using mouse and hamster. Virulence of P. gingivalis strains was expressed contrastingly in subcutaneous (sc) infection in the Murine abscess model (MAM) and the Hamsters abscess model (HAM). Subcutaneous infection in the MAM was characterized by a gravity abscess, spreading from the primary site of inoculation downwards, frequently erupting as a secondary lesion. In contract, s.c. P. gingivalis infection in HAM was characterized as a palpable localized abscess at the primary site of inoculation. When the Semi-Solid Agar (SSA) was added to the mono-culture of P. gingivalis, reproducibility of infection in both models was enhanced. P. gingivalis culture supplemented with haemin, or combined with oral Actinomyces viscosus had its virulence overtly enhanced and often fatal in the MAM. Menadione, Eh reducing agents and mixture with the Streptococcus or A. neaslundii did not potentiate virulence in either mode. Transtracheal challenge of the lungs of hamster with P. gingivalis initiated an early pneumonitis and later sequelae of necrosis and abscess formation. Also, abscess was induced by direct inoculation of P. gingivalis in the muscles, liver and testes, but did not induce intra-abdominal abscesses. In conclusion, the HAM applied with the SSA procedure caused a localized P. gingivalis tissue infection with practical advantages for quantitative and qualitative studies of P. gingivalis infections. This study also demonstrates the pathogenic potential of P. gingivalis by reproducing similar infections in multiple anatomical sites.

  6. Microbial dormancy improves development and experimental validation of ecosystem model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gangsheng; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie A; Schadt, Christopher W; Steinweg, J Megan; Gu, Lianhong; Post, Wilfred M

    2015-01-01

    Climate feedbacks from soils can result from environmental change followed by response of plant and microbial communities, and/or associated changes in nutrient cycling. Explicit consideration of microbial life-history traits and functions may be necessary to predict climate feedbacks owing to changes in the physiology and community composition of microbes and their associated effect on carbon cycling. Here we developed the microbial enzyme-mediated decomposition (MEND) model by incorporating microbial dormancy and the ability to track multiple isotopes of carbon. We tested two versions of MEND, that is, MEND with dormancy (MEND) and MEND without dormancy (MEND_wod), against long-term (270 days) carbon decomposition data from laboratory incubations of four soils with isotopically labeled substrates. MEND_wod adequately fitted multiple observations (total C-CO2 and (14)C-CO2 respiration, and dissolved organic carbon), but at the cost of significantly underestimating the total microbial biomass. MEND improved estimates of microbial biomass by 20-71% over MEND_wod. We also quantified uncertainties in parameters and model simulations using the Critical Objective Function Index method, which is based on a global stochastic optimization algorithm, as well as model complexity and observational data availability. Together our model extrapolations of the incubation study show that long-term soil incubations with experimental data for multiple carbon pools are conducive to estimate both decomposition and microbial parameters. These efforts should provide essential support to future field- and global-scale simulations, and enable more confident predictions of feedbacks between environmental change and carbon cycling.

  7. An experimental model of vitreous motion induced by eye rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfiglio, Andrea; Lagazzo, Alberto; Repetto, Rodolfo; Stocchino, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    During eye rotations the vitreous humour moves with respect to the eye globe. This relative motion has been suggested to possibly have an important role in inducing degradation of the gel structure, which might lead to vitreous liquefaction and/or posterior vitreous detachment. Aim of the present work is to study the characteristics of vitreous motion induced by eye rotations. We use an experimental setup, consisting of a Perspex model of the vitreous chamber that, for simplicity, is taken to have a spherical shape. The model is filled with an artificial vitreous humour, prepared as a solution of agar powder and hyaluronic acid sodium salt in deionised water, which has viscoelastic mechanical properties similar to those of the real vitreous. The model rotates about an axis passing through the centre of the sphere and velocity measurements are taken on the equatorial plane orthogonal to the axis of rotation, using an optical technique. The results show that fluid viscoelasticity has a strong influence on flow characteristics. In particular, at certain frequencies of oscillation of the eye model, fluid motion can be resonantly excited. This means that fluid velocity within the domain can be significantly larger than that of the wall. The frequencies for which resonant excitation occurs are within the range of possible eye rotations frequencies. Therefore, the present results suggest that resonant excitation of vitreous motion is likely to occur in practice. This, in turn, implies that eye rotations produce large stresses on the retina and within the vitreous that may contribute to the disruption of the vitreous gel structure. The present results also have implications for the choice of the ideal properties for vitreous substitute fluids.

  8. Interaction of Fibrinogen and Muramidase-released Protein Promotes the Development of Streptococcus suis Meningitis

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    Junping eWang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Muramidase-released protein (MRP is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg; however, the function of this interaction in S.suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3. Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis.

  9. Dexamethasone inhibits brain apoptosis in mice with eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Chin; Lee, Bi-Yao; Yen, Chuan-Min; Wann, Shue-Ren; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Chen, Yao-Shen

    2015-04-02

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, is the major cause of eosinophilic meningitis worldwide. Rats serve as the definitive host of the nematode, but humans can be infected incidentally, leading to eosinophilic meningitis. A previous BALB/c animal study has demonstrated increased apoptotic proteins and decreased anti-apoptotic proteins in mice infected with A. cantonensis. Steroids may be an effective treatment option for eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis, but the involved mechanism is unclear. This study hypothesized that the beneficial effects of steroids on eosinophilic meningitis are mediated by decreased apoptosis. In a BALB/c animal model, mice were orally infected with 50 A. cantonensis L3 via an oro-gastric tube and were sacrificed every week for 3 consecutive weeks after infection or until the end of the study. Dexamethasone was injected intra-peritoneally from the 7(th) day post-infection until the end of the 21-day study. Evans blue method was used to measure changes in the blood brain barrier, while western blotting, immuno-histochemistry, and TUNEL assay were used to analyze brain homogenates expression of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins. There were increased amounts of Evans blue, apoptotic proteins (caspase-3, -8, and -9 and cytochrome C), and decreased anti-apoptotic proteins (bcl-2) after 2-3 weeks of infection. Dexamethasone administration significantly decreased Evans blue extravasations and apoptotic protein expressions. Apoptosis of mice brain homogenates can be repressed by dexamethasone treatment.

  10. A Seroepidemiological Study of Serogroup A Meningococcal Infection in the African Meningitis Belt.

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    Olivier Manigart

    Full Text Available The pattern of epidemic meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt may be influenced by the background level of population immunity but this has been measured infrequently. A standardised enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measuring meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibodies was established at five centres within the meningitis belt. Antibody concentrations were then measured in 3930 individuals stratified by age and residence from six countries. Seroprevalence by age was used in a catalytic model to determine the force of infection. Meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high in each country but showed heterogeneity across the meningitis belt. The geometric mean concentration (GMC was highest in Ghana (9.09 μg/mL [95% CI 8.29, 9.97] and lowest in Ethiopia (1.43 μg/mL [95% CI 1.31, 1.57] on the margins of the belt. The force of infection was lowest in Ethiopia (λ = 0.028. Variables associated with a concentration above the putative protective level of 2 μg/mL were age, urban residence and a history of recent vaccination with a meningococcal vaccine. Prior to vaccination with the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high across the African meningitis belt and yet the region remained susceptible to epidemics.

  11. Meningitis bacteriémica por Pasteurella multocida Pasteurella multocida bacteremic meningitis

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    R. Soloaga

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Las infecciones por Pasteurella multocida en seres humanos habitualmente están relacionadas con mordeduras o arañazos de perros y gatos. Muchas de ellas se acompañan de otros microorganismos de la orofaringe de estos animales. Se presenta un caso de meningitis bacteriémica por P. multocida en una mujer de 86 años que convivía con siete gatos. Si bien no se documentó una infección de piel o de partes blandas, es posible que ésta haya pasado inadvertida inicialmente y que fuera la causa de la bacteriemia con impacto en meninges, o bien que la meningitis se haya producido luego de la colonización nasofaríngea (no demostrada. Los aislamientos de hemocultivos y de líquido cefalorraquídeo fueron identificados como P. multocida por medio de API 20NE, API 20E y Vitek 1. La cepa aislada presentó sensibilidad a penicilina, cefotaxima, levofloxacina y tetraciclinas, en coincidencia con lo descrito en la literatura.Human infections by Pasteurella multocida are usually associated with bites or scratches from dogs and cats. Many of them are accompanied by other oropharyngeal microorganisms of these animals. We herein present a case of bacteremic meningitis by P. multocida in an 86-year-old woman who was living with seven cats. Even though no skin or soft tissue infection was recorded, it is possible that a mild infection had gone undetected and a subsequent bacteremia had impacted on the meninges, or that meningitis could have occurred after nasopharyngeal colonization (not demonstrated. The isolates obtained from blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid were identified as P. multocida by API 20NE, API 20E, and Vitek 1. In agreement with findings in the literature, this strain was susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, levofloxacin and tetracyclines.

  12. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Copper Smelting Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodub, Konstantin; Kuminova, Yaroslava; Dinsdale, Alan; Cheverikin, Vladimir; Filichkina, Vera; Saynazarov, Abdukahhar; Khvan, Alexandra; Kondratiev, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Effective extraction of copper from sulfide ores requires careful operation of a copper smelter, which in turn depends very much on chemistry of the feed and resulted slag and matte. For example, chemical composition of copper smelting slags has to be in a certain range to ensure that their properties are within specific limits. Disobeying these rules may lead to complications in smelting operation, poor quality of the copper products, and premature shutdown of the copper smelter. In the present paper the microstructure and phase composition of slags from the Almalyk copper flash smelter were investigated experimentally and then modeled thermodynamically to evaluate potential ways of improvement and optimization of the copper smelting process and its products. The slag samples were taken at different stages of the copper smelting process: on slag tapping, after slag transportation to a deposition site, and at the site. Experimental investigation included the XRD, XRF, and SEM techniques, which were also confirmed by the traditional wet chemistry analysis. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out using thermochemical software package MTDATA, which enables thermodynamic and physical properties of the matte, slag, and gas phases to be calculated in a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and chemical compositions. In addition, slag viscosities and corresponding matte settling rates were estimated using the modified Urbain and Utigard-Warczok models, and the Hadamard-Rybczynski equation, respectively. It was found that the copper content in the slags may vary significantly depending on the location of slag sampling. Cu was found to be present as sulfide particles, almost no Cu was found to be dissolved in the slag. Analysis of microstructure and phase composition showed that major phase found in the samples is fayalite, while other phases are complex spinels (based on magnetite), different sulfides, and a glass-like phase. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated the

  13. Experimental osteonecrosis: development of a model in rodents administered alendronate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Nicolau; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos; Andrade, Cleverton Roberto de; Esteves, Jônatas Caldeira; Marcantonio, Elcio

    2016-08-22

    The main objective of this study was to cause bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws to develop in a rodent model. Adult male Holtzman rats were assigned to one of two experimental groups to receive alendronate (AL; 1 mg/kg/week; n = 6) or saline solution (CTL; n = 6). After 60 days of drug therapy, all animals were subjected to first lower molar extraction, and 28 days later, animals were euthanized. All rats treated with alendronate developed osteonecrosis, presenting as ulcers and necrotic bone, associated with a significant infection process, especially at the inter-alveolar septum area and crestal regions. The degree of vascularization, the levels of C-telopeptide cross-linked collagen type I and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, as well as the bone volume were significantly reduced in these animals. Furthermore, on radiographic analysis, animals treated with alendronate presented evident sclerosis of the lamina dura of the lower first molar alveolar socket associated with decreased radiographic density in this area. These findings indicate that the protocol developed in the present study opens new perspectives and could be a good starting model for future property design.

  14. Experimental osteonecrosis: development of a model in rodents administered alendronate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolau CONTE NETO

    Full Text Available Abstract The main objective of this study was to cause bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws to develop in a rodent model. Adult male Holtzman rats were assigned to one of two experimental groups to receive alendronate (AL; 1 mg/kg/week; n = 6 or saline solution (CTL; n = 6. After 60 days of drug therapy, all animals were subjected to first lower molar extraction, and 28 days later, animals were euthanized. All rats treated with alendronate developed osteonecrosis, presenting as ulcers and necrotic bone, associated with a significant infection process, especially at the inter-alveolar septum area and crestal regions. The degree of vascularization, the levels of C-telopeptide cross-linked collagen type I and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, as well as the bone volume were significantly reduced in these animals. Furthermore, on radiographic analysis, animals treated with alendronate presented evident sclerosis of the lamina dura of the lower first molar alveolar socket associated with decreased radiographic density in this area. These findings indicate that the protocol developed in the present study opens new perspectives and could be a good starting model for future property design.

  15. [Coronary microvascular disease: from experimental models to clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecoli, Cecilia; Caselli, Chiara; Caruso, Raffaele; Morales, Maria Aurora

    2012-01-01

    Coronary vascular microcirculation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of left ventricular dysfunction as well as in the development of heart failure. Coronary microcirculation includes all the vessels which contribute to provide resistance to coronary flow. It represents the district where coronary circulation blood flow is regulated to ensure that each structural and functional cardiac component receives the proper amount of oxygen and metabolic substrates through the capillary network. Coronary microcirculation is fundamental for myocardial function which largely depends on the ratio between energetic metabolites received from coronary circulation and their utilization by the myocytes. Alterations in coronary microvascular circulation which limit myocardial perfusion can cause repetitive ischemic events leading to left ventricular dysfunction in several ischemic and non ischemic cardiomyopathies as the idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. To date, mechanisms underlying microvascular dysfunction are not completely understood and experimental animal models are employed to study alterations which may cause microcirculation impairment. These animals models are unique tools to identify new therapeutic targets, to test new drug therapies for the treatment of left ventricular dysfunction as well as its progression towards overt heart failure.

  16. Experimental studies on power transformer model winding provided with MOVs

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    G.H. Kusumadevi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Surge voltage distribution across a HV transformer winding due to appearance of very fast rise time (rise time of order 1 μs transient voltages is highly non-uniform along the length of the winding for initial time instant of occurrence of surge. In order to achieve nearly uniform initial time instant voltage distribution along the length of the HV winding, investigations have been carried out on transformer model winding. By connecting similar type of metal oxide varistors across sections of HV transformer model winding, it is possible to improve initial time instant surge voltage distribution across length of the HV transformer winding. Transformer windings with α values 5.3, 9.5 and 19 have been analyzed. The experimental studies have been carried out using high speed oscilloscope of good accuracy. The initial time instant voltage distribution across sections of winding with MOV remains nearly uniform along length of the winding. Also results of fault diagnostics carried out with and without connection of MOVs across sections of winding are reported.

  17. Development of Experimental Tissue Models for Blast Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Benjamin; Bo, Chiara; Williams, Alun; Jardine, Andy; Brown, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    There is a pressing need to better understand the relationship between the intensity of a blast wave and the clinical consequences for victims of an explosion. In order to quantitatively study how these factors correlate with one another, blast injury tissue models are being developed. Sections of larynx, trachea and pulmonary tissue were excised from a recently sacrificed pig and maintained on ice prior to testing. The samples were subjected to strain rates of between 0.001 s-1 and 1000 s-1 in the laboratory by using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar and quasi-static testing apparatus. During high strain rate testing, samples were housed in a polycarbonate chamber which permitted experimentation on tissue held in fluid. Data were analysed using 1, 2 and 3 wave analysis software in Matlab to yield information about the material properties of both undamaged and damaged tissues. In addition, macroscopic changes in tissue organization were also visualized using histopathological techniques. This work is being extended to cellular and animal models to derive more detailed information about the underlying molecular changes relating to blast-induced damage and repair. The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies.

  18. Effectiveness and safety of iodopovidone in an experimental pleurodesis model

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    Lisete R. Teixeira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Chemical pleurodesis is an important therapeutic tool to control recurrent malignant pleural effusion. Among the various sclerosing agents, iodopovidone is considered effective and safe. However, in a recent study, ocular changes were described after iodopovidone was used in recurrent pneumothorax. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and morbidity of iodopovidone pleurodesis in an experimental model. METHODS: New Zealand rabbits were submitted to intrapleural injection of iodopovidone at concentrations of 2%, 4% and 10%. Biochemical (lactic dehydrogenase, proteins, triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, urea and creatinine and immunological (Interleukin-8 [IL-8], VEGF and TGFβ parameters were measured in the pleural fluid and blood. After 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days, groups of animals were euthanized, and macro- (pleura and microscopic (pleura and retina analyses were performed. RESULTS: An early pleural inflammatory response with low systemic repercussion was observed without corresponding changes in thyroid or renal function. The higher concentrations (4% and 10% correlated with greater initial exudation, and maximum pleural thickening was observed after 28 days. No changes were observed in the retinal pigment epithelium of the rabbits. CONCLUSION: Iodopovidone is considered to be an effective and safe sclerosing agent in this animal model. However, its efficacy, tolerance and safety in humans should be further evaluated.

  19. From Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa to the Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, M Teresa; Jodar, Luis; Granoff, Dan; Rabinovich, Regina; Ceccarini, Costante; Perkin, Gordon W

    2015-11-15

    Polysaccharide vaccines had been used to control African meningitis epidemics for >30 years but with little or modest success, largely because of logistical problems in the implementation of reactive vaccination campaigns that are begun after epidemics are under way. After the major group A meningococcal meningitis epidemics in 1996-1997 (250,000 cases and 25,000 deaths), African ministers of health declared the prevention of meningitis a high priority and asked the World Health Organization (WHO) for help in developing better immunization strategies to eliminate meningitis epidemics in Africa. WHO accepted the challenge and created a project called Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa (EVA) that served as an organizational framework for external consultants, PATH, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Consultations were initiated with major vaccine manufacturers. EVA commissioned a costing study/business plan for the development of new group A or A/C conjugate vaccines and explored the feasibility of developing these products as a public-private partnership. Representatives from African countries were consulted. They confirmed that the development of conjugate vaccines was a priority and provided information on preferred product characteristics. In parallel, a strategy for successful introduction was also anticipated and discussed. The expert consultations recommended that a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine be developed and introduced into the African meningitis belt. The results of the costing study indicated that the "cost of goods" to develop a group A - containing conjugate vaccine in the United States would be in the range of US$0.35-$1.35 per dose, depending on composition (A vs A/C), number of doses/vials, and presentation. Following an invitation from BMGF, a proposal was submitted in the spring of 2001. In June 2001, BMGF awarded a grant of US$70 million to create the Meningitis

  20. A Statistical Classifier to Support Diagnose Meningitis in Less Developed Areas of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lélis, Viviane-Maria; Guzmán, Eduardo; Belmonte, María-Victoria

    2017-08-11

    This paper describes the development of statistical classifiers to help diagnose meningococcal meningitis, i.e. the most sever, infectious and deadliest type of this disease. The goal is to find a mechanism able to determine whether a patient has this type of meningitis from a set of symptoms that can be directly observed in the earliest stages of this pathology. Currently, in Brazil, a country that is heavily affected by meningitis, all suspected cases require immediate hospitalization and the beginning of a treatment with invasive tests and medicines. This procedure, therefore, entails expensive treatments unaffordable in less developed regions. For this purpose, we have gathered together a dataset of 22,602 records of suspected meningitis cases from the Brazilian state of Bahia. Seven classification techniques have been applied from input data of nine symptoms and other information about the patient such as age, sex and the area they live in, and a 10 cross-fold validation has been performed. Results show that the techniques applied are suitable for diagnosing the meningococcal meningitis. Several indexes, such as precision, recall or ROC area, have been computed to show the accuracy of the models. All of them provide good results, but the best corresponds to the J48 classifier with a precision of 0.942 and a ROC area over 0.95. These results indicate that our model can indeed help lead to a non-invasive and early diagnosis of this pathology. This is especially useful in less developed areas, where the epidemiologic risk is usually high and medical expenses, sometimes, unaffordable.