WorldWideScience

Sample records for experimental medicine part

  1. Experimental medicine 1000 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Halim, Rabie E

    2011-05-01

    Little is known about the state of experimentation in the field of medicine during the Medieval Islamic era. With few exceptions, most of the contemporary sources on history of medicine propagate the idea that the roots of experimental medicine in its modern form, including clinical trials and drug-potency studies, first started during the European Renaissance in the 16(th) to the 18(th) centuries. This study is part of an ongoing multidisciplinary primary-source investigation of the original Arabic works of 11 Islamic medical scholars who lived and practiced between the 9(th) and the 13(th) centuries. The study critically evaluated and documented their contributions to the development of the scientific method and experimental medicine during that medieval Islamic era in several areas including critical appraisal of previous knowledge, clinical observations and case reports, clinical therapeutic trials, drug potency trials, experimentation on animals, dissection and dissection experiments as well as postmortem examinations. In each of the above-mentioned areas, significant contributions were made during the Medieval Islamic era from as early as the ninth century AD.

  2. Herbal Medicines: from Traditional Medicine to Modern Experimental Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Rasoulian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Academic writings indicate that the medicinal use of plants dates back to 4000 - 5000 B.C. (1. Utilization of medicinal herbs has indeed a long history not only in human's life, but also in animals and there are some interesting evidences about the animals' self-medication, in both the prevention and treatment of diseases (2-5. The World Health Organization (WHO has recognized the importance of traditional medicines and created strategies, guidelines and standards for botanical medicines (6, 7. A significant part of those traditional text dealing with medicine, which were appreciated by ancient scientific communities worldwide, such as The Canon of Medicine by Persian physician–philosopher Ibn Sina (or Avicenna, 980 to 1032 AD, is allocated to herbal medicines. The Canon explores nearly 500 medicinal plants and herbal drugs. It should be noted that this book was used as a medical textbook in Europe until the 17th century AD (8, 9. Although there are important evidences about using some kinds of experimental approaches in traditional medicine (8, the efficacy of such approaches is in doubt because it is generally agreed that they might have been part of physicians' personal experiences. Not only the demand for herbal drugs is growing in developing countries, but also there are some evidences that consumers in developed countries are becoming disillusioned with modern healthcare; hence, the demand for traditional alternatives including herbal medicines is increasing in developing countries (10. On the one hand, the increased interest in herbal medicines throughout the world (10, 11, on the other hand, the need for direct empirical evidence about the effectiveness of herbal medicines in the proper statistical society with the appropriate number and method, denote the significance of new studies about medicinal plants and publishing their results. Herbal Medicines Journal (eISSN: 2538-2144 reports valuable research results for researchers all

  3. The Hunterian Laboratory of Experimental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Kevin; Cameron, John L; Yeh, Michael W

    2011-05-01

    The Hunterian Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, established at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1905, played a central role in the early history of American surgery. Created primarily by William Halsted with the help of Harvey Cushing, the Laboratory was a cornerstone of experimental surgical research as well as surgical education. This article examines the conception and early years of the Laboratory.

  4. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study: An experimental medicine platform for evaluating new drugs for relapse prevention in addiction. Part A: Study description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Louise M; Flechais, Remy S A; Murphy, Anna; Reed, Laurence J; Abbott, Sanja; Boyapati, Venkataramana; Elliott, Rebecca; Erritzoe, David; Ersche, Karen D; Faluyi, Yetunde; Faravelli, Luca; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Kalk, Nicola J; Kuchibatla, Shankar S; McGonigle, John; Metastasio, Antonio; Mick, Inge; Nestor, Liam; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Smith, Dana G; Suckling, John; Tait, Roger; Taylor, Eleanor M; Waldman, Adam D; Robbins, Trevor W; Deakin, J F William; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2015-09-01

    Drug and alcohol dependence are global problems with substantial societal costs. There are few treatments for relapse prevention and therefore a pressing need for further study of brain mechanisms underpinning relapse circuitry. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study is an experimental medicine approach to this problem: using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques and selective pharmacological tools, it aims to explore the neuropharmacology of putative relapse pathways in cocaine, alcohol, opiate dependent, and healthy individuals to inform future drug development. Addiction studies typically involve small samples because of recruitment difficulties and attrition. We established the platform in three centres to assess the feasibility of a multisite approach to address these issues. Pharmacological modulation of reward, impulsivity and emotional reactivity were investigated in a monetary incentive delay task, an inhibitory control task, and an evocative images task, using selective antagonists for µ-opioid, dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) and neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors (naltrexone, GSK598809, vofopitant/aprepitant), in a placebo-controlled, randomised, crossover design. In two years, 609 scans were performed, with 155 individuals scanned at baseline. Attrition was low and the majority of individuals were sufficiently motivated to complete all five sessions (n=87). We describe herein the study design, main aims, recruitment numbers, sample characteristics, and explain the test hypotheses and anticipated study outputs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. [Medicine in ancient Mesopotamia--part 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins E Silva, J

    2009-01-01

    The present work summarizes the more elucidating aspects on the foundations and the practice of the medicine in Antique Mesopotamia, since the invention of the writing, more than 5000 thousand years ago, and the beginning of our era. The first part of the article includes a brief perspective about the political and social evolution that characterized those archaic civilizations, as well as the inventions and knowledge further used by the following Humanity's generations. Most of what is known on the subject, as well as the history and political-social events that occurred in the region during that remote epoch, resulted of the laborious decoding of about half a million small clay plates or fragments with text engravings in cuneiform characters that were discovered since the middle of the XIX century in the ruins of the main cities of the Babylonian and Assyrian empires. The second part embraces exclusively the main characteristics of the medicine in Ancient Mesopotamia, in its main facets: concept of disease, healers and practice. The disease was considered a divine punishment or resultant from a malign influence. In that base, the medicine began by being preventive, by the use of appropriate amulets, or by offerings or sacrifices intending to pacify those malign forces. The treatment of the generality of the diseases privileged the expulsion of those spirits and malign influences from the patient body, purifying it, which was done by the specific intervention of an ãshipu (clergyman-exorcist); not having results, the treatment was continued by the asû (practical healer) that appealed to a group of physical manipulations, limited surgical acts and the administration or application of prescriptions, resultants of the mixture of organic and inorganic substances. In case of failing, the patients (as well as individuals or rein leaders) could fall back upon a priest diviner (bârû) who, by examination of the organs of an animal especially sacrificed for the effect

  6. [Medicine in ancient Mesopotamia - part 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins E Silva, J

    2010-01-01

    The second part embraces exclusively the main characteristics of the medicine in Ancient Mesopotamia, in its main facets: concept of disease, healers and practice. The disease was considered a divine punishment or resultant from a malign influence. Insofar, the medicine began by being preventive, by the use of appropriate amulets or by offerings or sacrifices intending to pacify those malign forces. The treatment of the generality of the diseases privileged the expulsion of those spirits and malign influences from the patient body, purifying it, which was done by the specific intervention of a approximately shipu (clergymanexorcist); not having results, the treatment was continued by the asû (practical healer) that appealed to a group of physical manipulations, limited surgical acts and the administration or application of prescriptions, resultants of the mixture of organic and inorganic substances. In case of failing, the patients (as well as common healthy individuals or rule leaders) could fall back upon a priest diviner (bârû) that, by examination of the organs of an animal especially sacrificed for, would give a final decision about the disease or the future. Besides this more occult facet, nourished in religious faiths and in the magic, the medicine of Ancient Mesopotamia included rational knowledge, certainly as the result of systematic patients observation and semiotic interpretation. From those observations and knowledge referred to the Sumerian period, carefully logged, refined and transmitted to the following generations, it was built a valuable group of texts with the description of symptoms, signs, diagnosis and prognostic of the most common diseases, still identifiable in the present.

  7. Curriculum Redesign in Veterinary Medicine: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macik, Maria L; Chaney, Kristin P; Turner, Jacqueline S; Rogers, Kenita S; Scallan, Elizabeth M; Korich, Jodi A; Fowler, Debra; Keefe, Lisa M

    Curricular review is considered a necessary component for growth and enhancement of academic programs and requires time, energy, creativity, and persistence from both faculty and administration. On a larger scale, a comprehensive redesign effort involves forming a dedicated faculty redesign team, developing program learning outcomes, mapping the existing curriculum, and reviewing the curriculum in light of collected stakeholder data. The faculty of the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (TAMU) recently embarked on a comprehensive curriculum redesign effort through partnership with the university's Center for Teaching Excellence. Using a previously developed evidence-based model of program redesign, TAMU created a process for use in veterinary medical education, which is described in detail in the first part of this article series. An additional component of the redesign process that is understated, yet vital for success, is faculty buy-in and support. Without faculty engagement, implementation of data-driven curricular changes stemming from program evaluation may be challenging. This second part of the article series describes the methodology for encouraging faculty engagement through the final steps of the redesign initiative and the lessons learned by TAMU through the redesign process.

  8. Curriculum Redesign in Veterinary Medicine: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Kristin P; Macik, Maria L; Turner, Jacqueline S; Korich, Jodi A; Rogers, Kenita S; Fowler, Debra; Scallan, Elizabeth M; Keefe, Lisa M

    Curricular review is considered a necessary component for growth and enhancement of academic programs and requires time, energy, creativity, and persistence from both faculty and administration. At Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (TAMU), the faculty and administration partnered with the university's Center for Teaching Excellence to create a faculty-driven, data-enhanced curricular redesign process. The 8-step process begins with the formation of a dedicated faculty curriculum design team to drive the redesign process and to support the college curriculum committee. The next steps include defining graduate outcomes and mapping the current curriculum to identify gaps and redundancies across the curriculum. Data are collected from internal and external stakeholders including veterinary students, faculty, alumni, and employers of graduates. Data collected through curriculum mapping and stakeholder engagement substantiate the curriculum redesign. The guidelines, supporting documents, and 8-step process developed at TAMU are provided to assist other veterinary schools in successful curricular redesign. This is the first of a two-part report that provides the background, context, and description of the process for charting the course for curricular change. The process involves defining expected learning outcomes for new graduates, conducting a curriculum mapping exercise, and collecting stakeholder data for curricular evaluation (steps 1-4). The second part of the report describes the development of rubrics that were applied to the graduate learning outcomes (steps 5-8) and engagement of faculty during the implementation phases of data-driven curriculum change.

  9. [Medicine in notafilia--Part III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Rade R; Babić, Gordana Stanković

    2013-01-01

    Notafilia is the study of paper money. Only a few countries in the world have issued banknotes with portraits of well-known scientists who brought international fame to their own people and medicine. PORTRAITS OF SCIENTISTS ON THE BANKNOTES OF YUGOSLAVIA, SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO AND SERBIA. Nikola Tesla and Mihailo Pupin Idvorski were the ingenious inventors and scientists of our time who made special contributions to radiology. Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) pioneered the use of X-rays for medical purposes, thus effectively laying the foundations of radiology and radiography, and revealed the existence of harmful effects of X-rays on the human body. Mihailo Pupin Idvorski (1854-1935) was worldwide famous for applying physics in practice, as well as in the basis of telephone and telegraph transmissions. He also studied the nature of X-rays and contributed to establishing of radiology. PORTRAITS OF SCIENTISTS ON THE BANKNOTES OF THE WORLD: Maria Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) was the first woman to gain the academic title of the Academy of Medicine, Paris. Together with her husband Pierre Curie (1859-1906) she gave an outstanding contribution to science and medicine. The discovery of the radioactive elements introduced the concept of "radioactivity" into physics and "radiotherapy" as a new discipline in medicine, thus creating the conditions for the development of nuclear medicine, oncology, and mobile diagnostic radiology. This paper presents the banknotes featuring the portraits of Nikola Tesla, Mihailo Pupin Idvorski, Maria Sklodowska Curie and Pierre Curie, the world renowned scientists, who made enormous contributions to medicine and laid the foundation for radiology.

  10. Primary Care Sports Medicine: A Part-Timer's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Warren B.

    1988-01-01

    A family practice physician describes his part-time sports medicine experience, including the multiple roles he plays as team physician, the way sports medicine is integrated into his family practice, and how it affects his professional life and peer relationships. (Author/MT)

  11. [Textual research on change of medicinal parts and herbal medicine of Prunella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhang; Guo, Qiaosheng; Wang, Chengya

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the herbal medicine of Prunella vulgaris by textual researches, and provide a theoretical basis for clinical medication, exploitation and protection of wild P. vulgaris resources. Textual research on medicinal works of past dynasties and field work were adopted. The natural distributions of P. vulgaris were concentrated distribution in Sichuan province, Huaihe river basin, and Middle-Lower Yangtze river valley in Chinese history. The indications of P. vulgaris in ancient and modern times were basically identical. While there were difference between the medicinal parts, harvest period and processing methods existed difference between ancient and modern. Three periods that whole grass of P. vulgaris as medicinal parts (from late Ming dynasty to late Qing dynasty and early stage of Republic of China), both whole grass and spicas as medicinal parts (from mid-term Republic of China to 1963), and the semi-maturity or maturity of spicas as medicinal parts (from 1963 to today) existed. The processing method for medicinal parts of P. vulgaris adopted sun drying and shady drying in ancient China, but only the sun drying was only used in modern times.

  12. Patient reactions to personalized medicine vignettes: an experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrick, Morgan; Roter, Debra; Kaphingst, Kimberly; Erby, Lori H; Haywood, Carlton; Beach, Mary Catherine; Levy, Howard P

    2011-05-01

    Translational investigation on personalized medicine is in its infancy. Exploratory studies reveal attitudinal barriers to "race-based medicine" and cautious optimism regarding genetically personalized medicine. This study describes patient responses to hypothetical conventional, race-based, or genetically personalized medicine prescriptions. Three hundred eighty-seven participants (mean age = 47 years; 46% white) recruited from a Baltimore outpatient center were randomized to this vignette-based experimental study. They were asked to imagine a doctor diagnosing a condition and prescribing them one of three medications. The outcomes are emotional response to vignette, belief in vignette medication efficacy, experience of respect, trust in the vignette physician, and adherence intention. Race-based medicine vignettes were appraised more negatively than conventional vignettes across the board (Cohen's d = -0.51-0.57-0.64, P medicine (-0.14-0.15-0.17, P = 0.47), with the exception of reduced adherence intention to genetically personalized medicine (Cohen's d = -0.38-0.41-0.44, P = 0.009). This relative reluctance to take genetically personalized medicine was pronounced for racial minorities (Cohen's d = -0.38-0.31-0.25, P = 0.02) and was related to trust in the vignette physician (change in R = 0.23, P medicine technology, especially among racial minorities, and highlights enhancement of adherence through improved doctor- patient relationships.

  13. Performing arts medicine - instrumentalist musicians: part III - case histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommerholt, Jan

    2010-04-01

    In parts I and II of this article series, the basic principles of examining musicians in a healthcare setting were reviewed [Dommerholt, J. Performing arts medicine - instrumentalist musicians: part I: general considerations. J. Bodyw. Mov. Ther., in press-a; Dommerholt, J. Performing arts medicine - instrumentalist musicians: part II: the examination. J. Bodyw. Mov. Ther., in press-b]. Part III describes three case reports of musicians with hand pain, interfering with their ability to play their instruments. The musicians consulted with a performing arts physiotherapist. Neither musician had a correct medical diagnosis if at all, when they first contacted the physiotherapist. Each musician required an individualized approach not only to establish the correct diagnosis, but also to develop a specific treatment program. The treatment programs included ergonomic interventions, manual therapy, trigger point therapy, and patient education. All musicians returned to playing their instruments without any residual pain or dysfunction. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Performing arts medicine--instrumentalist musicians, Part II--examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommerholt, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Part I of this article's series included background information on performing arts medicine with a special focus on musicians. It covered in detail what questions need to be included in the history, when healthcare providers first examine musicians. In part II of the series, the emphasis is on the physical examination, including posture, range of motion and hypermobility, ergonomics, and instrument-specific examination procedures. The final article in the series will describe three case histories of musicians with hand pain.

  15. Evidence-based medicine - searching the medical literature. Part 1.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Burgess

    Evidence-based medicine - searching the medical literature. Part 1. ... psychological literature, but these are only available on payment of a subscription. Most of ... 2. Component terms (keywords/phrases) children drug resistant malaria treatment. 3. Alternative terms (synonyms) child drug-resistant resistance multidrug.

  16. [Ttextual research of Cannabis sativa varieties and medicinal part].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingfang; Wang, Huadong; Guo, Shanshan; Yan, Jie; Long, Fei

    2010-07-01

    To determine the medicinal part and varieties of Cannabis Sativa through herbal textual research to Provide bibliographic reference for clinical application. Herbal textual research of C. Sativa from ancient herbal works and modern data analysis. Through the herbal textual research, the plant of the C. sativa, for Fructus Cannabis used now is identical with that described in ancient herbal literatures. People did not make a sharp distinction on medicinal part of C. sativa in the early stage literatures, female inflorescence and unripe fruit, fruit and kernel of seed were all used. Since Taohongjing realized the toxicity ofpericarp, all the herbal and prescription works indicate that the pericarp shall be removed before usage and only the kernel can be used. However, in modem literatures, both fruit and kernel can be used as medicinal part. The plants for Fructus Cannabis described in modern and ancient literatures are identical. The base of the original plant is the same either in ancient or modern. And the toxicity of the fruit is more than that of the kernel. The kernel is the exact medicinal part of C. Sativa.

  17. Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

  18. Recent applications of nuclear medicine in diagnostics: II part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Treglia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Positron-emission tomography (PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT are effective diagnostic imaging tools in several clinical settings. The aim of this article (the second of a 2-part series is to examine some of the more recent applications of nuclear medicine imaging techniques, particularly in the fields of neurology, cardiology, and infection/inflammation. Discussion: A review of the literature reveals that in the field of neurology nuclear medicine techniques are most widely used to investigate cognitive deficits and dementia (particularly those associated with Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, and movement disorders. In cardiology, SPECT and PET also play important roles in the work-up of patients with coronary artery disease, providing accurate information on the state of the myocardium (perfusion, metabolism, and innervation. White blood cell scintigraphy and FDG-PET are widely used to investigate many infectious/inflammatory processes. In each of these areas, the review discusses the use of recently developed radiopharmaceuticals, the growth of tomographic nuclear medicine techniques, and the ways in which these advances are improving molecular imaging of biologic processes at the cellular level.

  19. Acupuncture in clinical and experimental reproductive medicine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franconi, G; Manni, L; Aloe, L; Mazzilli, F; Giambalvo Dal Ben, G; Lenzi, A; Fabbri, A

    2011-04-01

    Acupuncture has been used as treatment for infertility for hundreds of years, and recently it has been studied in male and female infertility and in assisted reproductive technologies, although its role in reproductive medicine is still debated. To review studies on acupuncture in reproductive medicine, in experimental and clinical settings. Papers were retrieved on PubMed and Google Scholar and were included in the review if at least the abstract was in English. There is evidence of benefit mainly when acupuncture is performed on the day of embryo transfer (ET) in the live birth rate. Benefit is also evident when acupuncture is performed for female infertility due to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There is some evidence of sperm quality improvement when acupuncture is performed on males affected by idiopathic infertility. Experimental studies suggest that acupuncture effects are mediated by changes in activity of the autonomic nervous system and stimulation of neuropeptides/neurotransmitters which may be involved in the pathogenesis of infertility. Acupuncture seems to have beneficial effects on live birth rate when performed on the day of ET, and to be useful also in PCOS as well as in male idiopathic infertility, with very low incidence of side effects. However, further studies are necessary to confirm the clinical results and to expand our knowledge of the mechanisms involved.

  20. Validation of experimental medicine methods in psychiatry: the P1vital approach and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Gerard R; Craig, Kevin J; Dourish, Colin T

    2011-06-15

    In the pharmaceutical industry deciding whether to progress a compound to the next stage of development or choosing between compounds in a development portfolio is laden with risk. This is particularly true of compounds developed to treat CNS disorders. The use of pre-clinical models in CNS drug development is well established but these models often lack predictive validity and many compounds fail when they reach the target patient group. Bridging the gap between pre-clinical CNS models and patient studies, P1vital's objective is to develop human volunteer models that will enable rapid, accurate and reliable decision making about which compounds to progress into patient trials. The research strategy of P1vital and its academic research network is to focus on science that progresses the development of clinical efficacy models. As part of this strategy P1vital established a CNS Experimental Medicine Consortium with members from both academic research and the pharmaceutical industry. This consortium is unique in that experimental medicine models initially developed through academic research are selected for further validation in a process that is managed by the Pharma members of the P1vital CNS Experimental Medicine Consortium steering (PEM) committee. The P1vital consortium is very much a work in progress. However, since its inception in 2007 the consortium has successfully delivered results from five clinical studies in four therapeutic areas namely, anxiety, cognitive disorders, schizophrenia and depression. 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A micromachined capacitive incremental position sensor: part 2. experimental assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, A.A.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2006-01-01

    Part 2 of this two-part paper presents the experimental assessment of a micromachined capacitive incremental position sensor for nanopositioning of microactuator systems with a displacement range of 100 μm or more. Incremental sensing in combination with quadrature detection reduces the requirements

  2. VALIDATION AND THERAPEUTIC USE OF SUCCULENT PLANT PARTS - OPENING OF A NEW HORIZON OF ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibabrata Pattanayak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The history of use of plants for medicinal purposes is very old. In the ancient civilizations, the crude plant parts were mostly used in such purposes. In the ongoing research, solvent extracted parts of the plants are validated for their reported efficacy with an intention to identify the active principles for production of those at a large scale to use them commercially as medicines. This contemporary method may be added with validation of reported medicinal plants at their fresh, succulent form with all the available principles within them. The validated medicinal plants may be used in many purposes after performing studies related with toxicity, dose etc. Organic animal farms may be created by using fresh inputs of the added medicinal plant garden, replacing the inorganic medicines. Commercialization of succulent medicinal plant part extracts may be performed by export oriented agro-medicine business with the assistance of different cooling systems.

  3. Placebo and Nocebo Effects in Sexual Medicine: An Experimental Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Tillmann H C; Grob, Carolin; de Boer, Claas; Peschel, Thomas; Hartmann, Uwe; Tenbergen, Gilian; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2016-11-16

    Few studies have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in a human sexuality context. Studying placebo and nocebo responses in this context may provide insight into their potential to modulate sexual drive and function. To examine such effects in sexual medicine, 48 healthy, male heterosexual participants were divided into four groups. Each group received instruction to expect stimulating effects, no effect, or an inhibitory effect on sexual functions. Only one group received the dopamine agonist cabergoline; all other groups received placebo or nocebo. Modulations in sexual experience were examined through an established experimental paradigm of sexual arousal and masturbation-induced orgasm during erotic film sequences with instruction to induce placebo or nocebo effects. Endocrine data, appetitive, consummatory, and refractory sexual behavior parameters were assessed using the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Acute Sexual Experience Scale (ASES). Results showed increased levels of sexual function after administration of cabergoline with significant effects for several parameters. Placebo effects were induced only to a small degree. No negative effects on sexual parameters in the nocebo condition were noted. This paradigm could induce only small placebo and nocebo effects. This supports the view that healthy male sexual function seems relatively resistant to negative external influences.

  4. Recent highlights of experimental research for inhibiting tumor growth by using Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xi-ran; Han, Shu-yan; Li, Ping-ping

    2015-10-01

    To give an overview of contemporary experimental research using Chinese medicine (CM) for the treatment of cancer. As an integral part of mainstream medicine in the People's Republic of China, CM emphasizes improvements in holistic physical condition instead of merely killing tumor cells, which is consistent with the current medical model that advocates patient-oriented treatment. Great progress has been made in experimental research, and the principle aspects include anti-tumor angiogenesis, inducing apoptosis and differentiation, reversing multidrug resistance, and improving immune function. As a current hot topic in cancer research, tumor microenvironment (TME) highlights the mutual and interdependent interaction between tumor cells and their surrounding tissues, and the CM treatment concept bears a striking resemblance to it. To date, primary points of TME include extracellular matrix remodeling, inflammation, hypoxia, and angiogenesis, but trials using CM with a focus on TME are rare. Despite considerable recent development, experimental research on CM for solving cancer issues appears insufficient. Greater efforts in this field are urgently needed.

  5. Terror medicine as part of the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Leonard A; Wagner, Katherine; Scott, Sandra; Connell, Nancy D; Cooper, Arthur; Kennedy, Cheryl Ann; Natal, Brenda; Lamba, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training.

  6. Terror Medicine As Part of the Medical School Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard A Cole

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training.

  7. European Law – Medicinal products and essential similarity: the preliminary ruling in R v Medicines Control Agency ex parte Generics

    OpenAIRE

    Wooldridge, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The author explains how the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruling in the case of R v Medicines Control Agency ex parte Generics (Case C-368/96) elucidated the controversial meaning of the concept of essential similarity involved in the authorisation of medicinal products under EC legislation. Article by Dr Frank Wooldridge (University of Notre Dame, London) published in Amicus Curiae - Journal of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and its Society for Advanced Legal Studies. The Journal ...

  8. Wardround in statistics part 1 | Dahiru | Annals of Nigerian Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. Annals of Nigerian Medicine Vol. 1(2) 2005: 19-21. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  9. Recent applications of nuclear medicine in diagnostics (I part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Treglia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aim of this review is to describe the recent applications of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnostics, particularly in oncology. Materials and methods: We reviewed scientific literature data searching for the current role of tomographic nuclear medicine techniques (SPECTand PET in oncology and summarized the main applications of these techniques. Results: Nuclear medicine techniques have a key role in oncology allowing early diagnosis of many tumours, an accurate staging of disease and evalutation of treatment response. Hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT imaging systems now provide metabolic and functional information from SPECTor PETcombined with the high spatial resolution and anatomic information of CT. The most frequent applications of SPECT/CT in oncology concern thyroid tumours, neuroendocrine tumours, bone metastases and lymph node mapping. Furthermore the evaluation of many tumours may benefit from PET/CT imaging. Discussion: The recent development of new radiopharmaceuticals and the growth of hybrid tomographic devices, such as SPECT/CT and PET/CT, now permits molecular imaging of biologic processes at the cellular level to improve both the diagnosis and treatment of many tumours.

  10. Delayed luminescence: an experimental protocol for Chinese herbal medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, M.; Wijk, R. van; Wijk, E. van; Wang, M.; Wietmarschen, H. van; Hankemeier, T.; Greef, J. van der

    2016-01-01

    In Chinese medicine, raw herbal materials are used in processed and unprocessed forms aiming to meet the different requirements of clinical practice. To assure the chemical quality and therapeutic properties of the herbs, fast and integrated systematic assays are required. So far, such assays have

  11. [Mind-body medicine as a part of German integrative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, G; Altner, N; Lange, S; Musial, F; Langhorst, J; Michalsen, A; Paul, A

    2006-08-01

    Mind-body medicine (MBM) as a holistic approach to health and healing has been shaped by research into stress physiology and stress psychology, by psychoneuro(endocrino)immunology and by Antonovsky's salutogenetic paradigm. MBM seeks to acknowledge physical, psychological as well as social and spiritual aspects of human beings. MBM constitutes one of the traditions, which the emerging field of integrative medicine in Germany draws upon, others being mainstream medicine, traditional European naturopathy and non-European methods like traditional Chinese medicine. The article outlines historical aspects of MBM, gives a brief review of research evidence, and introduces clinical MBM institutes in Germany. Especially the Clinic and Chair of Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach Foundation at the University Duisburg-Essen has been integrating MBM into the concept of integrative medicine. Considering that a growing number of health issues arises due to maladaptive lifestyles, MBM is being identified as a development that supports a shift from increasingly expensive treatments to more cost-effective preventive approaches.

  12. 50 years ago: the Nuremberg Doctors' Tribunal. Part 4: Nazi medicine's relevance today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E

    1997-01-01

    The final part of this series attempts to evaluate the relevance of Nazi medicine for doctors today. Euthanasia, informed consent, the conflict of interests of the individual versus those of society and racism were as prominent themes of Nazi medicine as they are today. It would be foolish not to learn from experiences of the past. Nazi medicine can therefore never be an irrelevant subject of the days gone by.

  13. Sustainable Practices in Medicinal Chemistry Part 2: Green by Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliagas, Ignacio; Berger, Raphaëlle; Goldberg, Kristin; Nishimura, Rachel T; Reilly, John; Richardson, Paul; Richter, Daniel; Sherer, Edward C; Sparling, Brian A; Bryan, Marian C

    2017-07-27

    With the development of ever-expanding synthetic methodologies, a medicinal chemist's toolkit continues to swell. However, with finite time and resources as well as a growing understanding of our field's environment impact, it is critical to refine what can be made to what should be made. This review seeks to highlight multiple cheminformatic approaches in drug discovery that can influence and triage design and execution impacting the likelihood of rapidly generating high-value molecules in a more sustainable manner. This strategy gives chemists the tools to design and refine vast libraries, stress "druglikeness", and rapidly identify SAR trends. Project success, i.e., identification of a clinical candidate, is then reached faster with fewer molecules with the farther-reaching ramification of using fewer resources and generating less waste, thereby helping "green" our field.

  14. Mitogenic activities in African traditional herbal medicines (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Y; Kato, A; Nishiyama, Y; Ikemi, M; Ohoka, K; Kawanishi, K; Juma, F D; Ngángá, J N; Mathenge, S G

    1996-03-01

    Mitogenic activities in African traditional herbal medicines were examined on human peripheral blood lymphocytes and mouse spleen cells using protein fractions obtained from their extracts by precipitation with ammonium sulfate. Target specificity for these mitogens was investigated by using isolated T cells and lymphocytes from athymic nude mice. Among 20 plants investigated, potent mitogenic activities for both human and mouse lymphocytes were found in 7 plants: Monanthotaxis sp. (Annonaceae), Uvaria lucida (Annonaceae), Maytenus buchananii (Celastraceae), Lonchocarpus bussei (Leguminosae), Phytolacca dodecandra (Phytolaccaceae), Phytolacca octandra (Phytolaccaceae), and Toddalia asiatica (Rutaceae). The U. lucida stem demonstrated the highest activity among all and induced mitogenesis both in human and mouse isolated T cells, but not in lymphocytes from athymic nude mice. Copyright © 1996 Gustav Fischer Verlag · Struttgart · Jena · New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  15. [Precision medicine from experimental to clinical applications in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normanno, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms of cancer development and progression has improved with the application of novel techniques that allow a comprehensive molecular tumour profiling. The application of discoveries and technologies from translational research to the clinical setting has facilitated the identification of novel drug targets and treatment strategies. The term "precision medicine" refers to the application of patient-specific genetic information (germline and somatic) to select the optimal treatment for individual patients with the goal of improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced toxicity. It involves the use of biomarkers that provide unique patient- and tumour-specific molecular information. There has been a growing interest in cancer diagnostics using circulating tumour DNA as a source for tumour biomarkers. Liquid biopsy is less invasive than tumour biopsy, offering the potential to mirror the genetic diversity within a tumour, also enabling longitudinal measurements to monitor genetic changes in a tumour over time, avoiding re-biopsies. The use and improvement of these technologies will continue to advance the field of precision medicine by putting their application into standard clinical practice.

  16. [Management of chronic kidney disease guided by the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine: an experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ji; Xie, Xi-Sheng; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Mao, Nan; Zhang, Cheng-Long; Xie, Lin-Shen; Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Zi-Yuan; Fan, Jun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of Traditional Chinese Medicine on patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 225 CKD patients in an outpatient department were recruited for this study, among whom 170 received regular Western and Chinese medicine treatments (control group) and 55 received treatments guided by the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine (experimental group). The effectiveness of the treatments was determined through a pre-post comparison. Significant pre-intervention differences in age (P experimental group had a greater level of decrease in blood urea nitrogen (P experimental group compared with the control (P Medicine can improve renal function through influencing glomerular filtration rate. The effect is more prominent than the regular treatment regime.

  17. Students’ letters to patients as a part of education in family medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Mrduljaš-Đujić

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Family medicine fosters holistic approach to patient-centered practice. Current medical curriculum in Croatia does not have well-structured courses or tools to prepare medicals students for successful communication with the patient and for building lasting and beneficial doctor-patient relationship. We explored the value of students’ practice in writing letters to patients about their illness as a way of building personal and compassionate relationship with patients. Sixth year students at the School of Medicine in Split wrote letters to the patients from consultations under the supervision of the supervisor in a family medicine practice. Structured teaching of communication with the patient brings family medicine back to what has actually always been its main part – communication and doctor-patient relationship. Our future aim is to develop students’ letters to patients as a new tool in the family medicine course examination. Moreover, we will investigate how they can be used in everyday practice of family medicine.

  18. Performing arts medicine - instrumentalist musicians part I - general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommerholt, Jan

    2009-10-01

    Performing arts medicine is a relatively new specialty addressing the medical needs of dancers, musicians, ice skaters, and gymnasts. This paper focuses on the role of healthcare providers in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of instrumentalist musicians. Musicians are at high risk for developing painful musculoskeletal problems, including pain and overuse injuries, entrapment and peripheral neuropathies, and focal dystonias. Musicians' careers are threatened, when they are no longer able to play their instrument because of pain and dysfunction. To appreciate music-related injuries, it is important that clinicians are familiar with the context of musicians' injuries and disorders. This is the first paper in a series of three. This paper discusses the importance of taking an extended history. The typical history procedures need to be broadened when interviewing musicians, and should include instrument-specific questions, and questions regarding practice habits, education, repertoire, and employment. The second article addresses the physical examination, while the third article provides three case reports of musicians with hand problems, which serve to illustrate the points made in the first two articles. The articles are illustrated with several tables and photographs of musicians to assist the reader in assessing instrumentalist musicians and determining the most appropriate course of action.

  19. Herbal Medicines: challenges in the modern world. Part 5. status and current directions of complementary and alternative herbal medicine worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enioutina, Elena Yu; Salis, Emma R; Job, Kathleen M; Gubarev, Michael I; Krepkova, Lubov V; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2017-03-01

    Herbal medicine (HM) use is growing worldwide. Single herb preparations, ethnic and modern HM formulations are widely used as adjunct therapies or to improve consumer wellbeing. Areas covered: This final part in the publication series summarizes common tendencies in HM use as adjunct or alternative medicine, education of healthcare professionals and consumers, current and proposed guidelines regulating of production. We discuss potential HM-HM and HM-drug interactions that could lead to severe adverse events in situations where HMs are taken without proper medical professional oversight. Expert commentary: A number of serious problems have arisen with the steady global increase in HM use. HM interaction with conventional drugs (CD) may result in inadequate dosing of CD or adverse reactions; HM-HM interaction within herbal supplements could lead to toxicity of formulations. Inadequate education of clinicians and patients regarding medicinal properties of HMs must be addressed regionally and globally to ensure consumer safety.

  20. Experimental Medicine in Psychiatry New Approaches in Schizophrenia, Depression and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Gerard R

    The use of experimental medicine studies to bridge the gap between Phase 1 and 2 drug trials and so to enhance translation of basic neuroscience studies using experimental animals to the clinic is proposed. Illustrative examples are provided for affective disorders and schizophrenia in relation also to cognitive dysfunction.

  1. Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time: a comparison between 1996 and 2004.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtenberg, M.; Heiligers, P.J.M.; Jong, J.D. de; Hingstman, L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although medical specialists traditionally hold negative views towards working parttime, the practice of medicine has evolved. Given the trend towards more part-time work and that there is no evidence that it compromises the quality of care, attitudes towards part-time work may have

  2. Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time: a comparison between 1996 and 2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Heiligers, P.J.M.; Jong, Judith de; Hingstman, Lammert

    2006-01-01

    Although medical specialists traditionally hold negative views towards working parttime, the practice of medicine has evolved. Given the trend towards more part-time work and that there is no evidence that it compromises the quality of care, attitudes towards part-time work may have changed as

  3. European responses to the Ebola crisis- Part I: Initiatives at the European Medicines Agency (EMA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2014-01-01

    While it is evident that the current Ebola crisis requires both immediate responses and more sustainable changes in health care policy, research and regulation, medicines regulators are collaborating internationally to find innovative solutions for enhancing the evaluation of and access...... to potential new medicines to counter Ebola outbreaks. In a statement announced by the International Coalition of Medicines Regulatory Authorities (ICMRA) in September 2014, regulators around the world led by the FDA and the EMA have vowed to collaborate in supporting accelerated evaluation of experimental new...

  4. Correlation of the emergency medicine resident in-service examination with the American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David; Dvorkin, Ronald; Schwartz, Adam; Zimmerman, Steven; Li, Feiming

    2014-02-01

    Eligible residents during their fourth postgraduate year (PGY-4) of emergency medicine (EM) residency training who seek specialty board certification in emergency medicine may take the American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine (AOBEM) Part 1 Board Certifying Examination (AOBEM Part 1). All residents enrolled in an osteopathic EM residency training program are required to take the EM Resident In-service Examination (RISE) annually. Our aim was to correlate resident performance on the RISE with performance on the AOBEM Part 1. The study group consisted of osteopathic EM residents in their PGY-4 year of training who took both examinations during that same year. We examined data from 2009 to 2012 from the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME). The NBOME grades and performs statistical analyses on both the RISE and the AOBEM Part 1. We used the RISE exam scores, as reported by percentile rank, and compared them to both the score on the AOBEM Part 1 and the dichotomous outcome of passing or failing. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was generated to depict the relationship. We studied a total of 409 residents over the 4-year period. The RISE percentile score correlated strongly with the AOBEM Part 1 score for residents who took both exams in the same year (r=0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54 to 0.66). Pass percentage on the AOBEM Part 1 increased by resident percent decile on the RISE from 0% in the bottom decile to 100% in the top decile. ROC analysis also showed that the best cutoff for determining pass or fail on the AOBEM Part 1 was a 65(th) percentile score on the RISE. We have shown there is a strong correlation between a resident's percentile score on the RISE during their PGY-4 year of residency training and first-time success on the AOBEM Part 1 taken during the same year. This information may be useful for osteopathic EM residents as an indicator as to how well prepared they are for the AOBEM Part 1 Board Certifying

  5. Correlation of the Emergency Medicine Resident In-service Examination with the American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Levy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eligible residents during their fourth postgraduate year (PGY-4 of emergency medicine (EM residency training who seek specialty board certification in emergency medicine may take the American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine (AOBEM Part 1 Board Certifying Examination (AOBEM Part 1. All residents enrolled in an osteopathic EM residency training program are required to take the EM Resident In-service Examination (RISE annually. Our aim was to correlate resident performance on the RISE with performance on the AOBEM Part 1. The study group consisted of osteopathic EM residents in their PGY-4 year of training who took both examinations during that same year. Methods: We examined data from 2009 to 2012 from the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME. The NBOME grades and performs statistical analyses on both the RISE and the AOBEM Part 1. We used the RISE exam scores, as reported by percentile rank, and compared them to both the score on the AOBEM Part 1 and the dichotomous outcome of passing or failing. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was generated to depict the relationship. Results: We studied a total of 409 residents over the 4-year period. The RISE percentile score correlated strongly with the AOBEM Part 1 score for residents who took both exams in the same year (r¼0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54 to 0.66. Pass percentage on the AOBEM Part 1 increased by resident percent decile on the RISE from 0% in the bottom decile to 100% in the top decile. ROC analysis also showed that the best cutoff for determining pass or fail on the AOBEM Part 1 was a 65th percentile score on the RISE. Conclusion: We have shown there is a strong correlation between a resident’s percentile score on the RISE during their PGY-4 year of residency training and first-time success on the AOBEM Part 1 taken during the same year. This information may be useful for osteopathic EM residents as an indicator as to how well

  6. 42 CFR Appendix F to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Medicine Technologists, and Radiation Therapy Technologists F Appendix F to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC..., and Radiation Therapy Technologists The following section describes basic elements to be incorporated... licensed as Radiographers, Nuclear Medicine Technologists, or Radiation Therapy Technologists. 2. Licenses...

  7. Experimental design strategy a part of an innovative construction industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarten Gjaltema; Rogier Laterveer; Dr Ruben Vrijhoef

    2013-01-01

    From the article: Abstract. This exploratory and conceptual article sets out to research what arguments and possibilities for experimentation in construction exists and if experimentation can contribute towards more innovative construction as a whole. Traditional, -western- construction is very

  8. Experimental Design Strategy As Part of an Innovative Construction Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogier Laterveer

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory and conceptual article sets out to research what arguments and possibilities for experimentation in construction exists and if experimentation can contribute towards more innovative construction as a whole. Traditional, -western- construction is very conservative and regional, often

  9. Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time: a comparison between 1996 and 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Heiligers, Phil J M; de Jong, Judith D; Hingstman, Lammert

    2006-10-06

    Although medical specialists traditionally hold negative views towards working part-time, the practice of medicine has evolved. Given the trend towards more part-time work and that there is no evidence that it compromises the quality of care, attitudes towards part-time work may have changed as well in recent years. The aim of this paper was to examine the possible changes in attitudes towards part-time work among specialists in internal medicine between 1996 and 2004. Moreover, we wanted to determine whether these attitudes were associated with individual characteristics (age, gender, investments in work) and whether attitudes of specialists within a partnership showed more resemblance than specialists' attitudes from different partnerships. Two samples were used in this study: data of a survey conducted in 1996 and in 2004. After selecting internal medicine specialists working in general hospitals in The Netherlands, the sample consisted of 219 specialists in 1996 and 363 specialists in 2004. They were sent a questionnaire, including topics on the attitudes towards part-time work. Internal medicine specialists' attitudes towards working part-time became slightly more positive between 1996 and 2004. Full-time working specialists in 2004 still expressed concerns regarding the investments of part-timers in overhead tasks, the flexibility of task division, efficiency, communication and continuity of care. In 1996 gender was the only predictor of the attitude, in 2004 being a full- or a part-timer, age and the time invested in work were associated with this attitude. Furthermore, specialists' attitudes were not found to cluster much within partnerships. In spite of the increasing number of specialists working or preferring to work part-time, part-time practice among internal medicine specialists seems not to be fully accepted. The results indicate that the attitudes are no longer gender based, but are associated with age and work aspects such as the number of hours

  10. Claude Bernard and an introduction to the study of experimental medicine: "physical vitalism," dialectic, and epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normandin, Sebastian

    2007-10-01

    This article explores the profound impact of the thought of Claude Bernard (1813-78) and his philosophy of experimentalism elaborated in his masterwork An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine. I argue that Bernard's far-ranging theoretical impact on medicine and biology marks the end of conventional vitalism and the elusive notion of a "vital force" as a legitimate scientific concept. His understanding of medicine is as epistemologically significant in its time as Newton's contribution was to the physical sciences in the seventeenth century. This essay treats Bernard's philosophical ambitions seriously, exploring his important, even central, role in the mental world of nineteenth-century France. This includes his influence on Henri Bergson (1859-1941) and other late-nineteenth century thinkers. The subtext of Bernard's experimental epistemology is also contrasted with a key idealist philosopher of the period, the German Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860), and placed in the context of the larger European philosophical sphere. In contrast to much of mid-nineteenth-century philosophy, Bernard, in creating the framework for experimental medicine, argued for an experimental approach in which a priori assumptions were to be strictly constrained. Bernard's thoughts on the nature of experiment put an end to "systems" in medicine, ironically by replacing all previous medical philosophies with the all-embracing "system" of experiment. And yet, while "vital forces" fade after Bernard, a form of vitalism still flourishes. Even in Bernard's own work, in the struggle with concepts like determinism, complexity, and causality, there is a realization of the unique character of living function in a kind of "physical vitalism."

  11. Commentary: Missing the elephant in my office: recommendations for part-time careers in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, Deborah

    2009-10-01

    Several recent articles in this journal, including the article by Linzer and colleagues in this issue, discuss and promote the concept of part-time careers in academic medicine as a solution to the need to achieve a work-life balance and to address the changing demographics of academic medicine. The article by Linzer and colleagues presents the consensus of a task force that attempted to address practical considerations for part-time work in academic internal medicine. Missing from these discussions, however, are a consensus on the definition of part-time work, consideration of how such strategies would be available to single parents, how time or resources will be allocated to part-time faculty to participate in professional associations, develop professional networks, and maintain currency in their field, and how part-time work can allow for the development of expertise in research and scholarly activity. Most important, the discussions about the part-time solution do not address the root cause of dissatisfaction and attrition: the ever-increasing and unsustainable workload of full-time faculty. The realization that an academic full-time career requires a commitment of 80 hours per week begs the question of whether part-time faculty would agree to work 40 hours a week for part-time pay. The historical underpinnings of the current situation, the implications of part-time solutions for the academy, and the consequences of choosing part-time work as the primary solution are discussed. Alternative strategies for addressing some of the problems facing full-time faculty are proposed.

  12. Students letters to patients as a part of education in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrduljaš-Đjujic, Nataša; Pavličević, Ivančica; Marušic, Ana; Marušic, Matko

    2012-01-01

    Family medicine fosters holistic approach to patient-centered practice. Current medical curriculum in Croatia does not have well-structured courses or tools to prepare medicals students for successful communication with the patient and for building lasting and beneficial doctor- patient relationship. We explored the value of students practice in writing letters to patients about their illness as a way of building personal and compassionate relationship with patients. Sixth year students at the School of Medicine in Split wrote letters to the patients from consultations under the supervision of the supervisor in a family medicine practice. Structured teaching of communication with the patient brings family medicine back to what has actually always been its main part- communication and doctor-patient relationship. Our future aim is to develop students letters to patients as a new tool in the family medicine course examination. Moreover, we will investigate how they can be used in everyday practice of family medicine. Copyright 2012 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  13. All lesions great and small, part 2. Diagnostic cytology in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Leslie C; Seelig, Davis M; Overmann, Jed

    2014-06-01

    This is the second in a two-part review of diagnostic cytopathology in veterinary medicine. As in human medicine, cytopathology is a minimally invasive, rapid, and cost-effective diagnostic modality with broad utilization. In this second part, the diagnostic applications of cytology in respiratory, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, endocrine, ocular, and central nervous system tissues are discussed with a section describing fluid analysis in veterinary medicine. As noted in the previous manuscript, which characterized the cytology of the skin/subcutis, musculoskeletal, and lymphoid tissues, the interpretation of veterinary cytology samples must be undertaken with extensive knowledge of the breadth of animal species, including familiarity with the frequency and clinical progression of diseases, both of which can be influenced by species, breed, and husbandry conditions. Similar to part one, this review focuses on the most common domestic companion animal species (dog, cat, and horse) and highlights lesions that are either unique to veterinary species or have relevant correlates in people. The cytologic features and biological behavior of similar lesions are compared, and selected mechanisms of disease and ancillary diagnostics are reviewed when appropriate. Supporting figures illustrate a subset of lesions. While not an exhaustive archive of veterinary cytology, the goal is to give cytopathologists working in human medicine a general impression of correlates and unique entities in veterinary practice. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. On Gelsemium and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in Anxiety and Experimental Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore

    2015-06-01

    A recent discussion expanded the debate about the experimental research on Gelsemium in anxiety. Herbal medicine is widely used in anxiety and mood disorders, often with contradictory evidence, although some authors are yet prompted to promote their full introduction in pharmacology as a promising therapy. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in anxiety is particularly appreciated by individual healthcare, but deserves further investigation, as many critical issues have been recently raised. Comments about the ability of negligible doses of Gelsemium hydroalcoholic extracts to affect gene expression were recently reported.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Charpy Impact Tests on Metallic SLM parts

    OpenAIRE

    Yasa, Evren; Deckers, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Rombouts, Marleen; Luyten, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a layer-additive manufacturing technology making it possible to create fully functional parts directly from standard metal powders without using any intermediate binders or any additional post-processing steps. During the process, a laser source selectively scans a powder bed according to the CAD data of the part to be produced and powder particles are completely molten by a high intensity laser beam. SLM is capable of producing near full density metallic part...

  16. Animal experimentation-Part II: In periodontal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T K Pal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Animals contribute to the development of medical and dental sciences by being sacrificed in the hands of scientists. The experimental design demands a specific type of animal to be used for experimentation. Each animal needs proper handling, care, and diet. Alongside specific advantages and disadvantages pertaining to each type of animal need to be understood well depending on the type of study/experiment. It is important for the researcher to know the disease susceptibility of each animal. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the salient factors that need to be considered for animal experimentations.

  17. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology (part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M; Brunett, Patrick H; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together-traditionalists, baby boomers, generation Xers (Gen Xers), and millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  18. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: structure, function, and culture (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Larrabee, Hollynn; Dyne, Pamela L; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    Strategies for approaching generational issues that affect teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology in emergency medicine (EM) have been reported. Tactics to address generational influences involving the structure and function of the academic emergency department (ED), organizational culture, and EM schedule have not been published. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic EM. Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can address some common issues encountered in academic EM. By understanding the differences and strengths of each of the cohorts in academic EM departments and considering simple mitigating strategies, faculty leaders can maximize their cooperative effectiveness and face the challenges of a new millennium. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...... with the simulation prediction, showing the validity of the algorithm....

  20. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS FOR MODELLING THE THERMAL FATIGUE PHENOMENON IN MACHINES PARTS OF AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camelia Pinca-Bretotean; Lucia Vîlceanu

    2013-01-01

      The purpose of this paper is to present some experimental investigations for validate an experimental plant designed and built for study the thermal fatigue phenomenon that occurs in machines parts...

  1. Experimental design in analytical chemistry--part I: theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Najafabadi, Heshmatollah; Leardi, Riccardo; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the main concepts of experimental design applicable to the optimization of analytical chemistry techniques. The critical steps and tools for screening, including Plackett-Burman, factorial and fractional factorial designs, and response surface methodology such as central composite, Box-Behnken, and Doehlert designs, are discussed. Some useful routines are also presented for performing the procedures.

  2. Creation of Three-Dimensional Liver Tissue Models from Experimental Images for Systems Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehme, Stefan; Friebel, Adrian; Hammad, Seddik; Drasdo, Dirk; Hengstler, Jan G

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we illustrate how three-dimensional liver tissue models can be created from experimental image modalities by utilizing a well-established processing chain of experiments, microscopic imaging, image processing, image analysis and model construction. We describe how key features of liver tissue architecture are quantified and translated into model parameterizations, and show how a systematic iteration of experiments and model simulations often leads to a better understanding of biological phenomena in systems biology and systems medicine.

  3. An ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants in western part of central Taurus Mountains: Aladaglar (Nigde - Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Ebru; Alpınar, Kerim

    2015-05-26

    With this study, we aimed to document traditional uses of medicinal plants in the western part of Aladaglar/Nigde. This study was conducted between 2003 and 2005. The research area was in the western part of the Aladaglar mountains. The settlements in Aladaglar (5 towns and 10 villages) were visited during the field work. The plants collected by the help of medicinal plant users. The plants were identified and voucher specimens prepared. These voucher specimens were kept at the Herbarium of Istanbul University Faculty of Pharmacy (ISTE). We collected the information by means of semi-structured interviews with 170 informants (90 men and 80 women). In addition, the relative importance value of the species was determined and the informant consensus factor (FIC) was calculated for the medicinal plants researched in the study. According to the results of the identification, among 126 plants were used by the inhabitants and 110 species belonging to 40 families were used for medicinal purposes. Most of the medicinal plants used in Aladaglar/Nigde belong to the families Lamiaceae (25 species), Asteraceae (16 species), Apiaceae (7 species), Fabaceae (6 species) and Brassicaceae (5 species). The most commonly used plant species were Hypericum perforatumThymus sipyleus var. sipyleus, Rosa canina, Urtica dioica, Malva neglecta, Thymus leucotrichus, Salix alba, Mentha longifolia, Berberis crataegina, Juniperus oxycedrus, Viscum album subsp. abietis, Allium rotundum and Taraxacum stevenii. The most common preparations were infusion and decoction. The traditional medicinal plants have been mostly used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases (86%), hemorrhoids (79%), urinary diseases (69%), diabetes (68%) and respiratory diseases (61%). The use of traditional medicine was still widespread among the inhabitants of Aladaglar mountains/Nigde region. Due to the lack of medical facilities in the villages of Aladaglar mountains, local people prefer herbal treatment rather than

  4. All lesions great and small, part 1: diagnostic cytology in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Leslie C; Seelig, Davis M; Overmann, Jed

    2014-06-01

    Cytopathology is a minimally invasive, rapid, and cost-effective diagnostic modality with broad utilization in veterinary medicine. Primary care clinicians often screen common cutaneous and subcutaneous aspirates, with other samples most frequently evaluated by board certified veterinary clinical pathologists in reference laboratories. Wright-Giemsa stains are frequently utilized with the application of ancillary diagnostics such as cytochemistry, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and molecular diagnostic techniques complicated by the need to develop and validate species specific reagents and protocols. The interpretation of veterinary cytology samples must be undertaken with extensive knowledge of the breadth of animal species, which includes familiarity with the frequency and biological behavior of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic lesions that are influenced by species, breed, and husbandry conditions. This review is the first of two parts that focus on the most common domestic companion animal species (dog, cat, and horse), taking an organ system approach to survey important lesions that may be unique to veterinary species or have interesting correlates in human medicine. The first of the two-part series covers skin and subcutaneous tissue, the musculoskeletal system, and lymphoid organs. The cytologic features and biological behavior of similar lesions are compared, and selected molecular mechanisms of disease and ancillary diagnostics are reviewed when characterized. Supporting figures illustrate a subset of lesions. While not a comprehensive catalog of veterinary cytology, the goal is to give cytopathologists working in human medicine a general impression of correlates in veterinary practice. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nuestra Comunidad: Primaria para Adultos. Segunda Parte. Edicion Experimental (Our Community: Primer for Adults. Part Two. Experimental Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This textbook is part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. It is designed to teach people with developing literacy skills to participate in a meaningful way in the life of their community. Topics…

  6. Nuestra Familia: Primaria para Adultos. Segunda Parte. Edicion Experimental (Our Family: Primer for Adults. Part Two. Experimental Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This textbook is part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. It is designed to orient people with little education or developing literacy skills to a sense of responsibility toward their families.…

  7. Nuestro Trabajo: Primaria para Adultos. Segunda Parte. Edicion Experimental (Our Work: Primer for Adults. Part Two. Experimental Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    This workbook is part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. This workbook is designed to orient people who are only recently literate to the world of work and business. Topics covered include worker…

  8. Role of Feedback during Evaluation in Improving Emergency Medicine Residents' Skills; an Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, Ali; Heidari, Kamran; Hosseini, Mohammad-Ali; Alavi-Moghaddam, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of students' learning in clinical education system is one of the most important and challenging issues that facilities in this field have been facing. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of feedback during evaluation in increasing emergency medicine residents' clinical skills. The present experimental study was performed on all second year emergency medicine residents of two educational hospitals, Tehran, Iran, with switching replications design and before-after method. They were randomly allocated to two groups (with or without feedback) and evaluated three times regarding chest ultrasonography for trauma patients, using direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS) and valid and reliable checklist. Data were analyzed using SPSS 20. 30 emergency medicine residents with the mean age of 36.63 ± 30.30 years were allocated to two equal groups (56.7% male). Studied groups were similar regarding the baseline characteristics. In both groups, obtained scores showed a significant increase from the first to the third evaluation (p medicine residents regarding chest ultrasonography for trauma patients, led to a significant improvement in their scores in future evaluations and consequently their skill.

  9. Standardization of Administered Activities in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine: A Report of the First Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative Project, Part 2-Current Standards and the Path Toward Global Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Bom, Henry Hee-Seung; Chiti, Arturo; Choi, Yun Young; Huang, Gang; Lassmann, Michael; Laurin, Norman; Mut, Fernando; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; O'Keeffe, Darin; Pradhan, Prasanta; Scott, Andrew M; Song, Shaoli; Soni, Nischal; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Vargas, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative (NMGI) was formed in 2012 and consists of 13 international organizations with direct involvement in nuclear medicine. The underlying objectives of the NMGI are to promote human health by advancing the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, encourage global collaboration in education, and harmonize procedure guidelines and other policies that ultimately lead to improvements in quality and safety in the field throughout the world. For its first project, the NMGI decided to consider the issues involved in the standardization of administered activities in pediatric nuclear medicine. It was decided to divide the final report of this project into 2 parts. Part 1 was published in this journal in the spring of 2015. This article presents part 2 of the final report. It discusses current standards for administered activities in children and adolescents that have been developed by various professional organizations. It also presents an evaluation of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine specifically with regard to administered activities as determined by an international survey of 313 nuclear medicine clinics and centers from 29 countries. Lastly, it provides recommendations for a path toward global standardization of the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  10. Generational Influences in Academic Emergency Medicine: Teaching and Learning, Mentoring, and Technology (Part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M.; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M.; Brunett, Patrick H.; Promes, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together – Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another. PMID:21314779

  11. Multi-Target Strategy and Experimental Studies of Traditional Chinese Medicine for Alzheimer's Disease Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Lan; Yang, Cui-cui

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial complex disease. The pathogenesis of AD is very complicated, and involves the β-amyloid (Aβ) cascade, tau hyperphosphorylation, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced levels of neurotrophic factors, and damage and loss of synapses as well as cholinergic neurons. The multi-target characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) may be advantageous over single-target drugs in the treatment of complex diseases. These drugs have therefore attracted more attention in the research and development of AD therapies. This review describes advances made in experimental studies of TCM for AD treatment. It discusses research, from our group and other laboratories, on TCM compound drugs (Shenwu capsule) and approximately 10 Chinese medicinal herb extracts (tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside, epimedium flavonoid, icariin, cornel iridoid glycoside, ginsenoside, puerarin, clausenamide, huperzine A, and timosaponins).

  12. Charge Transport in LDPE Nanocomposites Part I—Experimental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh T. Hoang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents results of bulk conductivity and surface potential decay measurements on low-density polyethylene and its nanocomposites filled with uncoated MgO and Al2O3, with the aim to highlight the effect of the nanofillers on charge transport processes. Material samples at various filler contents, up to 9 wt %, were prepared in the form of thin films. The performed measurements show a significant impact of the nanofillers on reduction of material’s direct current (dc conductivity. The investigations thus focused on the nanocomposites having the lowest dc conductivity. Various mechanisms of charge generation and transport in solids, including space charge limited current, Poole-Frenkel effect and Schottky injection, were utilized for examining the experimental results. The mobilities of charge carriers were deduced from the measured surface potential decay characteristics and were found to be at least two times lower for the nanocomposites. The temperature dependencies of the mobilities were compared for different materials.

  13. Dynamic spreading of nanofluids on solids. Part I: experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondiparty, Kirtiprakash; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh; Liu, Kuan-Liang

    2012-10-16

    Nanofluids have enhanced thermophysical properties compared to fluids without nanoparticles. Recent experiments have clearly shown that the presence of nanoparticles enhances the spreading of nanofluids. We report here the results of our experiments on the spreading of nanofluids comprising 5, 10, and 20 vol % silica suspensions of 19 nm particles displacing a sessile drop placed on a glass surface. The contact line position is observed from both the top and side views simultaneously using an advanced optical technique. It is found that the nanofluid spreads, forming a thin nanofluid film between the oil drop and the solid surface, which is seen as a bright inner contact line distinct from the conventional three-phase outer contact line. For the first time, the rate of the nanofluidic film spreading is experimentally observed as a function of the nanoparticle concentration and the oil drop volume. The speed of the inner contact line is seen to increase with an increase in the nanoparticle concentration and decrease with a decrease in the drop volume, that is, with an increase in the capillary pressure. Interestingly, the formation of the inner contact line is not seen in fluids without nanoparticles.

  14. O debate em torno da medicina experimental no segundo reinado The debate on experimental medicine under the second reign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Coelho Edler

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available A presença de uma forte tradição clínica na medicina oitocentista não constitui uma barreira estrutural ao ingresso das novidades produzidas no terreno da experimentação em laboratório, como afirmam alguns historiadores. O amplo debate em torno das regras do 'método experimental' revela uma dimensão da luta travada entre adeptos de teorias médicas rivais, num contexto em que a dissensão entre os esculápios ameaçava sua autoridade científica, frente a outras categorias de curadores.Although Brazil's twentieth century medicine was strong in the clinical tradition, this was no structural barrier to innovations from the realm of laboratory experiments, contrary to what some historians have argued. The broad debate over the rules of 'experimental methods' reveals a dimension of the struggle waged between proponents of rival medical theories, within a context where dissension among physicians threatened their scientific authority vis-à-vis that of other types of healers.

  15. Microwave radiometry and its potential applications in biology and medicine: experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigu-del-Blanco, J; Romero-Sierra, C; Watts, D G

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data on : (1) the natural emission of microwave radiation by biological systems, and (2) the effect of drugs as well as microwave radiation on specimen microwave emission. Experiments were conducted on guinea pigs, mice, rabbits, and human subjects. The results were obtained with two different radiometers, one of the correlation type and one of the Dicke type, operating in the X-band at about 9 GHz with a sensitivity of approximately 0.1 degrees K. The results demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and suggestions are made for its use in bilogy, medicine, and in the field of biocommunications.

  16. What is the purpose of launching the World Journal of Experimental Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Atsushi

    2011-12-20

    The first issue of the World Journal of Experimental Medicine (WJEM), whose preparatory work was initiated on May 26, 2011, will be published on December 20, 2011. The WJEM Editorial Board has now been established and consists of 104 distinguished experts from 30 countries. Our purpose of launching the WJEM is to publish peer-reviewed, high-quality articles via an open-access online publishing model, thereby acting as a platform for communication between peers and the wider public, and maximizing the benefits to editorial board members, authors and readers.

  17. [Improving methodical approaches to experimental studies in the field of occupational medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukavishnikov, V S; Sosedova, L M

    2013-01-01

    The features of the methodical approaches in performing the experimental studies dealing with studying the working condition and the health state in the employees are presented in this paper. The results of our experiments performed in the Institute based on modeling the occupational toxic encephalopathy, studying the combined factor activity of the biological and chemical nature developing the methodical approaches to the assessment of the biological activity effects of the nanomaterials are indicated. The purposefulness of performing the experiments in the occupational medicine using the non-breedy and line-breedy animals is considered.

  18. Herbal medicines: challenges in the modern world. Part 3. China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Lida; Zu, Qiang; Li, Gangzhou; Yu, Tian; Job, Kathleen M; Yang, Xiaoyan; Di, Liuqing; Sherwin, Catherine Mt; Enioutina, Elena Y

    2016-09-01

    Medicinal plants, and formulations prepared from them, have been used in China and Japan for thousands of years. Nowadays, ancient formulations of Traditional Chinese and Kampo (Japanese) Medicines coexist with Western herbal medicines (HMs) and complement each other. HMs are used for the treatment of mild and chronic diseases, as an adjunct therapy, to improve wellbeing and delay aging, or as healthy (functional) foods. This article, a third part in a series of reviews, is focusing on history, use and regulation of the traditional and modern HMs in Japan and China. Materials available from legislative and governmental websites, PubMed and news media were used. Expert commentary: HMs are heavily regulated in both countries, often in a similar manner as conventional pharmaceutical drugs. The majority of herbal formulations are sold as over-the-counter medications supplied with leaflets describing indications and appropriate dosages for patients of different ages. Medical practitioners prescribe herbal formulations that are tailored to the needs of particular patients. Both countries had problems with adverse drug reactions and toxicity of single herbs and herbal formulations that have been investigated by authorities, and some drugs have been removed from the market.

  19. Traditional Chinese medicine Yisui Tongjing relieved neural severity in experimental autoimmune neuritis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Erli; Li, Mingquan; Zhao, Jianjun; Dong, Yuxiang; Yang, Xueqin; Huang, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    To study the effect of Yisui Tongjing (YSTJ) prescription on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and microstructure of the sciatic nerve in experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) rats, the Guillain-Barré syndrome classic animal models. In this study, we established an EAN model in Lewis rats by immunization. We evaluated the potential clinical application of a traditional Chinese medicine YSTJ by intragastric administration and compared its effect with immunoglobulin. The sciatic MNCV was measured by electrophysiology experiment. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and transmission electron microscope analysis were used to determine the pathologically morphological changes before and after YSTJ application. We found that application of YSTJ could significantly alleviate the clinical signs in EAN rats. The treatment also increased MNCV in the sciatic nerve compared to that in the untreated nerve. Demyelination in the sciatic nerve in EAN rats was significantly ameliorated, and newly generated myelinated nerve fibers were observed with treatment of high dose of YSTJ. This study showed that the traditional Chinese medicine YSTJ was likely to serve as a therapeutic medicine in autoimmune neuropathies, providing an effective and economic means to the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  20. [Hyperbaric therapy and diving medicine - hyperbaric therapy part 2: adjuvant therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Kay; Jüttner, Björn

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), i. e. breathing pure oxygen at elevated ambient pressure, remains the gold standard of care in treating air or gas embolism and decompression illness. Guidelines are less clear on the value of HBOT in acute management of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning or clostridial necrosis. To evaluate the evidence of clinical efficacy of HBOT we performed a systematic literature review. Part 1 assesses acute indications such as air or gas embolism, decompression sickness, CO-poisoning, clostridialmyonecrosis, necrotizing problem wounds, acute traumatic wounds and arterial retinal occlusion. Part 2 discusses further uses of HBOT as adjuvant treatment and highlights problems in assessing the value of HBOT using evidence-based medicine criteria. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  1. [Hyperbaric therapy and diving medicine - hyperbaric therapy part 1: evidence-based emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jüttner, Björn; Tetzlaff, Kay

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), i. e. breathing pure oxygen at elevated ambient pressure, remains the gold standard of care in treating air or gas embolism and decompression illness. Guidelines are less clear on the value of HBOT in acute management of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning or clostridial necrosis. To evaluate the evidence of clinical efficacy of HBOT we performed a systematic literature review. Part 1 assesses acute indications such as air or gas embolism, decompression sickness, CO-poisoning, clostridialmyonecrosis, necrotizing problem wounds, acute traumatic wounds and arterial retinal occlusion. Part 2 discusses further uses of HBOT as adjuvant treatment and highlights problems in assessing the value of HBOT using evidence-based medicine criteria. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Exploring Cancer Therapeutics with Natural Products from African Medicinal Plants, Part II: Alkaloids, Terpenoids and Flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwodo, Justina N; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Simoben, Conrad V; Ntie-Kang, Fidele

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stands as second most common cause of disease-related deaths in humans. Resistance of cancer to chemotherapy remains challenging to both scientists and physicians. Medicinal plants are known to contribute significantly to a large population of Africa, which is to a very large extent linked to folkloric claims which is part of their livelihood. In this review paper, the potential of naturally occurring anti-cancer agents from African flora has been explored, with suggested modes of action, where such data is available. Literature search revealed plant-derived compounds from African flora showing anti-cancer and/or cytotoxic activities, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo. This corresponds to 400 compounds (from mildly active to very active) covering various compound classes. However, in this part II, we only discussed the three major compound classes which are: flavonoids, alkaloids and terpenoids.

  3. Family Medicine in a Consumer Age — Part 4: Preventive Medicine, Professional Satisfaction, and the Rise of Consumerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Morton M.

    1977-01-01

    In an attempt to find out if the physician perceives the same strengths and weaknesses in today's practice of family medicine as does the consumer, the Lay Advisory Committee of the College's B.C. Chapter initiated a survey of physicians' and consumers' attitudes. This article, the fourth and last in a series, presents some of the results of the survey as they relate to preventive-medicine, professional satisfaction and the rise of consumerism.

  4. Part-time careers in academic internal medicine: a report from the association of specialty professors part-time careers task force on behalf of the alliance for academic internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzer, Mark; Warde, Carole; Alexander, R Wayne; Demarco, Deborah M; Haupt, Allison; Hicks, Leroi; Kutner, Jean; Mangione, Carol M; Mechaber, Hilit; Rentz, Meridith; Riley, Joanne; Schuster, Barbara; Solomon, Glen D; Volberding, Paul; Ibrahim, Tod

    2009-10-01

    To establish guidelines for more effectively incorporating part-time faculty into departments of internal medicine, a task force was convened in early 2007 by the Association of Specialty Professors. The task force used informal surveys, current literature, and consensus building among members of the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine to produce a consensus statement and a series of recommendations. The task force agreed that part-time faculty could enrich a department of medicine, enhance workforce flexibility, and provide high-quality research, patient care, and education in a cost-effective manner. The task force provided a series of detailed steps for operationalizing part-time practice; to do so, key issues were addressed, such as fixed costs, malpractice insurance, space, cross-coverage, mentoring, career development, productivity targets, and flexible scheduling. Recommendations included (1) increasing respect for work-family balance, (2) allowing flexible time as well as part-time employment, (3) directly addressing negative perceptions about part-time faculty, (4) developing policies to allow flexibility in academic advancement, (5) considering part-time faculty as candidates for leadership positions, (6) encouraging granting agencies, including the National Institutes of Health and Veterans Administration, to consider part-time faculty as eligible for research career development awards, and (7) supporting future research in "best practices" for incorporating part-time faculty into academic departments of medicine.

  5. [Rationalization in 20th-century czechoslovak pharmacy practice - commission for rationalization and standardization in medicine, veterinary medicine and pharmacy - part 2*].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babica, Jan; Rusek, Václav

    2014-08-01

    In interwar Czechoslovakia health care, an increased attention paid to the new ideas of scientific management (Taylorism), work rationalization and standardization led to the establishment of the Commission for Rationalization and Standardization in Medicine, Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy (RANOK) within the Department of Natural Science and Medicine of the Masaryk Academy of Work. Within RANOK, the group for pharmacy worked between 1928 and 1932. The first part of the paper described the scientific management and standardization movement in interwar Czechoslovakia, the establishment of Masaryk Academy of Work and RANOK, and work objectives of RANOK and its group for pharmacy. The second part deals with the work results, relative failure and importance of the group for pharmacy.

  6. Education scholarship in emergency medicine part 2: supporting and developing scholars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandiera, Glen; Leblanc, Constance; Regehr, Glenn; Snell, Linda; Frank, Jason R; Sherbino, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) is defined, in part, by clinical excellence across an immense breadth of content and the provision of exemplary bedside teaching to a wide variety of learners. The specialty is also well-suited to a number of emerging areas of education scholarship, particularly in relation to team-based learning, clinical reasoning, acute care response, and simulation-based teaching. The success of EM education scholarship will be predicated on systematic, collective attention to providing the infrastructure for this to occur. Specifically, as a new generation of emergency physicians prepares for education careers, academic organizations need to develop means not only to identify potential scholars but also to mentor, support, and encourage their careers. This paper summarizes the supporting literature and presents related recommendations from a 2013 consensus conference on EM education scholarship led by the Academic Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians.

  7. Nigella sativa – a Plant with Personality in Biochemistry and Experimental Medicine Researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Last decades often presented references to traditional medicine, or culinary use of natural resources for a better health status, prevention or treatment of different diseases. One of the natural plants came lately in the researches as a miracle salve: Nigella sativa. Also commonly known as black cumin, the most use of this plant are the seeds, such as, as powder, as oil extract, or as hydro or alcoholic extracts. Culinary usage of N. sativa is referring to the seeds used as spice. Medical usage of this plantis mostly used as oil or extracts administrated orally or intraperitoneal. The best demonstrated bioactive component is thymoquinone, an alkaloid, monotherpenoid compound, that seems to be the key of medical benefits of N. sativa. Experimental medicine proved that seeds of black cumin have health enhancement and pharmaceutical effects, being used in various disseases (cardiac, digestive and respiratory diseases; hepatic and renal tonic; inflammations; reproductive and neural disorders, analgesic; appetite stimulant; cancer prevention and treatment; spasmolytic and diabetes. Seeds (as powder, oil or hydro, alcoholic extracts have been demonstrated that have antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antitumoral, antidiabetic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory action. N. sativa is easy to cultivate, storing, and offering diver potential of use as seed, seed oil, different type of seed extracts.

  8. Experimental Clinical Medicine and Drug Action in Mid-Seventeenth-Century Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, Evan R

    2017-01-01

    Leiden University boasted one of the most popular and influential medical schools of the mid-seventeenth century, drawing hundreds of students from across Europe. These students participated in the revival of frequent clinical instruction, anatomical and chymical experiments, and even tests of supposed disease-causing substances and remedies on living animals and humans. Comparing records of cases from the hospital clinic with the professors' treatises and student-authored disputations shows that old and new theories of disease and drug action were hotly contested and often tested, including the claims of the leading professors at the school. Though notable exemplars of their work received sharp criticism and rejection from contemporaries and subsequent generations, Leiden students and professors united chymistry, postmortem autopsy, anatomical experiments, and clinical tests, often aiming at discovery. They enacted one, perhaps ephemeral, instance of experimental, clinical medicine well before its putative modern birth.

  9. Development and experimental medicine applications of PET in oncology: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Terry; Price, Pat

    2012-03-01

    Nearly 90 years of scientific research have led to the use of PET and the ability to forge advances in the field of oncology. In this Historial Review we outline the key developments made with this imaging technique, including the evolution of cyclotrons and scanners, together with the associated advances made in image reconstruction, presentation, analysis of data, and radiochemistry. The applications of PET to experimental medicine are summarised, and we cover how these are related to the use and development of PET, especially in the assessment of tumour biology and pharmacology. The use of PET in clinical oncology and for tissue pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies as a means of supporting drug development is detailed. The current limitations of the technology are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [30 years heart transplantation program in Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine in Prague].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošková, Lenka; Málek, Ivan; Melenovský, Vojtěch; Podzimková, Marianna; Hegarová, Markéta; Dorazilová, Zora; Kautzner, Josef; Netuka, Ivan; Pirk, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Heart transplantation has become in recent decades an established method for the treatment of advanced heart failure. Precisely, it was in January 2014 when 30 years have passed since the start of clinical heart transplantation program at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine. 936 heart transplants were performed by the end of 2013. The transplant program has reached considerable development since its beginnings. The knowledge of whole issue has deepened, indication criteria have been extended, new immunosuppressives are available and many of them are still in research. Life expectancy of patients has been prolonged and quality of life has improved. Nevertheless, the care of transplant patient is very complicated task for medical professionals and brings a lot of problems to solve.

  11. [Rationalization in 20th-century Czechoslovak pharmacy practice - commission for rationalization and standardization in medicine, veterinary medicine and pharmacy - part 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babica, Jan; Rusek, Václav

    2014-06-01

    In the 1920s Czechoslovakia, an increased attention was paid to the new ideas of scientific management (Taylorism), work rationalization and standardization. This was reflected in the foundation of the Masaryk Academy of Work in 1920. An effort to implement the new principles into health care led to the establishment of the Commission for Rationalization and Standardization in Medicine, Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy (RANOK) within the Department of Natural Science and Medicine of the Academy. Within RANOK, the group for pharmacy worked between 1928-1932. The first part of the paper describes the scientific management and standardization movement in interwar Czechoslovakia, and the establishment of Masaryk Academy of Work and RANOK, including the group for pharmacy. The paper discusses the work objectives of the commission and presents concise biographies of the group for pharmacy members, too. The second part will be focused on the work results, relative failure and role of the group. Masaryk Academy of Work Comission for Rationalization and Standardization in Medicine Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy (RANOK) work rationalization standardization pharmacy practice.

  12. Pharmacotherapy in Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Novel Experimental Medicine Models and Emerging Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, David S; Hou, Ruihua; Gordon, Robert; Huneke, Nathan T M; Garner, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Many pharmacological and psychological approaches have been found efficacious in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), but many treatment-seeking patients will not respond and others will relapse despite continuing with interventions that initially had beneficial effects. Other patients will respond but then stop treatment early because of untoward effects such as sexual dysfunction, drowsiness, and weight gain. There is much scope for the development of novel approaches that could have greater overall effectiveness or acceptability than currently available interventions or that have particular effectiveness in specific clinical subgroups. 'Experimental medicine' studies in healthy volunteers model disease states and represent a proof-of-concept approach for the development of novel therapeutic interventions: they determine whether to proceed to pivotal efficacy studies and so can reduce delays in translating innovations into clinical practice. Investigations in healthy volunteers challenged with the inhalation of air 'enriched' with 7.5% carbon dioxide (CO2) indicate this technique provides a validated and robust experimental medicine model, mirroring the subjective, autonomic, and cognitive features of GAD. The anxiety response during CO2 challenge probably involves both central noradrenergic neurotransmission and effects on acid-base sensitive receptors and so may stimulate development of novel agents targeted at central chemosensors. Increasing awareness of the potential role of altered cytokine balance in anxiety and the interplay of cytokines with monoaminergic mechanisms may also encourage the investigation of novel agents with modulating effects on immunological profiles. Although seemingly disparate, these two approaches to treatment development may pivot on a shared mechanism in exerting anxiolytic-like effects through pharmacological effects on acid-sensing ion channels.

  13. Systematic reviews of complementary therapies - an annotated bibliography. Part 2: herbal medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, K.; ter Riet, G.; Hondras, M.; Vickers, A.; Saller, R.; Melchart, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies are widespread but controversial. We aim to provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials in three major complementary therapies (acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy). This article is dealing with herbal medicine.

  14. USE OF FRESH PARTS OF MEDICINAL PLANTS FOR HEALTH AND PRODUCTION IN LIVESTOCK – A NEW CONCEPT OF FARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibabrata Pattanayak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Farm animals are reared for production to meet up the demand for animal protein in human. Various modern medicines are extensively used for production as well as treatment and prevention of diseases of animals, which can ultimately reach us through food chain. Herbs are now considered as an important source of alternative medicines. The Ayurvedic medicines prepared by manufacturers contain processed plant parts and added with preservative and other chemicals in many cases. The present way of research on herbal medicine follows the path of identification of active principles from the extracts of preserved parts of medicinal plants after testing of their efficacy in laboratory. This concept of research have the limitation of loss of many aromatic and other phytochemicals present in the living plant, which may have very important role when used together. Animals maintained in modern farm may be given relief from modern medicines in minor and moderate ailments, cure of problems related with their production with the validated fresh plant medicine available from the plants cultivated adjacent to the farm area. Consulting the reports of ethno-botanical study, a preliminary list of medicinal plant is prepared which are having antipyretic, analgesic, wound healing, immunostimulant, hepato-protective, fertility enhancing, pregnancy assisting, lactation assisting, anthelmintic, astringent, expectorant, purgative and anti-flatulent, nutriceutical, antiseptic, anti-dermatitis, anti-dysenteric and anti-enteric, hematenic, stomachic, diuretic and kidney stone removing effects and insecticidal or insect repelling effects. This list may be enriched further and plants may be selected for a farm from these groups according to the agro-climatic condition of the area, disease prevalence, problems encountered during farming practice and other requirements of the farm. Validation of reported effects of the plants is to be performed in fresh condition, so that parts

  15. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of some Libyan medicinal plants in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahar Lutfun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ballota pseudodictamnus (L. Benth. (Lamiaceae, Salvia fruticosa Mill. (Lamiaceae and Thapsia garganica L. (Apiaceae are three well-known medicinal plants from the Libyan flora, which have long been used for the treatment of inflammations. The aim of the present study was to investigate, for the first time, the anti-inflammatory property of the methanol (MeOH extracts of the aerial parts of these plants. Shade-dried and ground aerial parts of B. pseudodictamnus, S. fruticosa and T. garganica were Soxhlet-extracted with MeOH. The extracts were concentrated by evaporation under reduced pressure at 40°C. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts was evaluated using the carrageenan-induced mice paw edema model. The administration of the extracts at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight produced statistically significant inhibition (p < 0.05 of edema within 3 h of carrageenan administration. The results demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory properties of the test extracts. Among the extracts, the S. fruticosa extract exhibited the most significant inhibition of inflammation after 3 h (62.1%. Thus, S. fruticosa could be a potential source for the discovery and development of newer anti-inflammatory ‘leads’ for drug development. The anti-inflammatory activity of B. pseudodictamnus and S. fruticosa could be assumed to be related to high levels of phenolic compounds, e.g., flavonoids, present in these plants.

  16. Nikola Tesla and medicine: 160th anniversary of the birth of the genius who gave light to the world - Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Vučević, Danijela; Đorđević, Drago; Radosavljević, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Nikola Tesla (1856 - 1943) was a genius inventor and scientist, whose contribution to medicine is remarkable. Part I of this article reviewed special contributions of the world renowned scientist to the establishment of radiology as a new discipline in medicine. This paper deals with the use of Tesla currents in medicine. Tesla Currents in Medicine. Tesla's greatest impact on medicine is his invention of a transformer (Tesla coil) for producing high frequency and high voltage cu...

  17. MS14, a Marine Herbal Medicine, an Immunosuppressive Drug in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi Kalan, Abbas; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Kafami, Laya; Mohamadnezhad, Daryoush; Khaki, Amir Afshin; Mohammadi Roushandeh, Amaneh

    2014-07-01

    Cytokines are secreted signaling proteins which play essential roles in immune responses during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a demyelinating model that mimics many features of multiple sclerosis (MS). Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine produced by different cells, mediating inflammatory reactions and immune-mediated processes. Several studies have described immunosuppressive potentials of several herbal medicines. MS14 as an Iranian marine herbal medicine has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The present study investigated the immunosuppressive potential of MS14 as an herbal drug as well as the IL-6 level in EAE model. We hope it will be a new approach for neurologic diseases and autoimmune originated diseases therapy. The present experimental study was a collaboration between Department of Anatomical Sciences of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences and Shefa Neuroscience Research Center of Tehran. We used 30 C57BL/6 mice. The animals were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) to induce EAE and treated with MS14-containing (30%) diets. Subjects were selected by simple random sampling and then they were randomly allocated to two groups. EAE symptoms were assessed using the standard 10-point EAE scoring system from the seventh to the 35th day after immunization. Afterwards, the spleen was removed and its cells were cultured with or without MOG 35-55; then, the IL-6 level was analyzed by ELISA. In addition, histopathological studies were carried out for demyelination lesion evaluation in the spinal cord. MS14 significantly improved clinical symptoms of EAE compared with the control (P < 0.05). It also suppressed proliferative responses of T cells and decreased IL-6 expression (16.93 ± 2.7 vs. 21.4 ± 3.33) (P < 0.05). Our results strongly suggested that IL-6 as a potential molecule could have a role in neuroimmunology and neuroinflammation, which is in congruent with previous studies. Therefore

  18. An Iranian herbal-marine medicine, MS14, ameliorates experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafreshi, Azita Parvaneh; Ahmadi, Amrollah; Ghaffarpur, Majid; Mostafavi, Hossein; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Minaie, Bagher; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Naseri, Mohsen

    2008-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system which mainly affects young adults. To overcome wide spectrum troublesome symptoms of multiple sclerosis which affects the quality of life both in patients and their families, new drugs and remedies have been examined and offered. The preclinical beneficial effects of different medicines have mostly been examined in an animal model of multiple sclerosis called experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this study we have tested a traditionally used natural (herbal-marine) product called MS(14) in EAE mice. EAE mice were fed with MS(14) containing diet (30%) on the immunization day and monitored for 20 days. The results show that while clinical scores and therefore severity of the disease was progressive in normal-fed EAE mice, the disease was slowed down in MS(14)-fed EAE mice. Moreover, while there were moderate to severe neuropathological changes in normal fed mice, milder changes were seen in MS(14) fed mice.

  19. Antibacterial efficacy of Withania somnifera (ashwagandha) an indigenous medicinal plant against experimental murine salmonellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owais, M; Sharad, K S; Shehbaz, A; Saleemuddin, M

    2005-03-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the antibacterial activity of ashwagandha [Withania somnifera L. Dunal (Solanaceae; root and leaves)], an Indian traditional medicinal plant against pathogenic bacteria. Both aqueous as well as alcoholic extracts of the plant (root as well as leaves) were found to possess strong antibacterial activity against a range of bacteria, as revealed by in vitro Agar Well Diffusion Method. The methanolic extract was further subfractionated using various solvents and the butanolic sub-fraction was found to possess maximum inhibitory activity against a spectrum of bacteria including Salmonella typhimurium. Moreover, in contrast to the synthetic antibiotic (viz. chloramphenicol), these extracts did not induce lysis on incubation with human erythrocytes, advocating their safety to the living cells. Finally, the antibacterial efficacy of the extracts isolated from plant (both root and leaves) was determined against experimental salmonellosis in Balb/C mice. Oral administration of the aqueous extracts successfully obliterated salmonella infection in Balb/C mice as revealed by increased survival rate as well as less bacterial load in various vital organs of the treated animals.

  20. Creep investigation of GFRP RC Beams - Part A : Literature review and experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    masmoudi abdelmonem

    2014-11-01

    This paper (Part A presents a literature review and the loading history of six experimental beams reinforced with GFRP and steel bars. The results of this study revealed that Beams reinforced with GFRP are less marked with creep phenomenon.  This investigation should guide the civil engineer/designer for a better understanding creep phenomenon in GFRP reinforced concrete members.

  1. Part seven: The role of narrative in the everyday practice of medicine developing narrative competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, Jerry; Schleifer, Ronald; Crow, Sheila

    2009-10-01

    It has been the thesis of this symposium that medicine is a narrative enterprise. We have presented our case that the work in is largely narrative. If that is true, then one of the goals of medical education should be to create methods of improving the narrative competencies in learners and practitioners of medicine. This final paper will explore the field of Narrative Medicine and briefly discuss methods currently in use in American Medical Education and conclude with the experience at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine over the past ten years.

  2. Experimental Validation of Antidiabetic Potential of Cayratia trifolia (L.) Domin: An Indigenous Medicinal Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Shahid Iqbal; Salunkhe, Narendra Subhash; Vishwakarma, Kishor Sukhlal; Maheshwari, Vijay Laxminarayan

    2017-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of Cayratia trifolia root extract against streptozotocin induced diabetes in experimental rats to scientifically validate its use against diabetes in some parts of India. Ethanolic extract, showing the highest activity in in vitro experiments, was prepared in saline and administered orally to streptozotocin induced albino Wistar diabetic rats for 21 days. Biochemical parameters liver and muscles glycogen and in vivo antioxidant activity in normal, diabetic control, standard (metformin) and treated animals were determined and compared. Attempt was made to isolate, purify and characterize one of the major secondary metabolites in extract by range of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. Treatment of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats with ethanolic root extract (500 mg/kg) caused significant (P compliments the antidiabetic effect.

  3. Piper umbellatum L.: A medicinal plant with gastric-ulcer protective and ulcer healing effects in experimental rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Junior, Iberê Ferreira; Balogun, Sikiru Olaitan; de Oliveira, Ruberlei Godinho; Damazo, Amílcar Sabino; Martins, Domingos Tabajara de Oliveira

    2016-11-04

    Piper umbellatum L. (Piperaceae) is a shrub found in the Amazon, Savannah and Atlantic Forest region of Brazil. It is widely used in folk medicine in many countries primarily for the treatment of gastric disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastroprotective and anti-ulcer effects of hydroethanolic extract of P. umbellatum (HEPu) leaves in experimental rodents. In addition, the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of the extract was assessed. The leaves of P. umbellatum were macerated in 75% (1:3w/v) hydroethanolic solution to obtain HEPu. The gastroprotective and ulcer healing activities of HEPu were evaluated using acidified ethanol (acute) and acetic acid (chronic) gastric ulcer models in rodents. The anti-H. pylori activity was evaluated by in vitro broth microdilution assay using H. pylori cagA+ and vacA+ strain. The probable mechanism of action of HEPu was evaluated by determining gastric secretory parameters, antioxidant enzyme (catalase), non-protein sulfhydryl (glutathione) and malondialdehyde levels in gastric tissue, including pro-inflammatory (IL-1β, TNF-a, IL -17, RANTES, IFN-γ and MIP-2) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines. HEPu demonstrated potent gastroprotection against acute ulcer induced by acidified ethanol and excellent healing effect of the chronic ulcer induced by acetic acid. The gastroprotective activity in acidified ethanol is partly attributed to the antioxidant mechanisms, while anti-secretory, anti-inflammatory and regeneration of the gastric mucosa are evoked as part of its antiulcer mechanism of action. The gastric ulcer healing of HEPu also involves restoration of the altered cytokines levels to near normal. However, it has no in vitro anti-H. pylori activity. The results of this study showed that HEPu possesses preventive and curative effects in experimental models of gastric ulcers in animals. These effects are partially dependent on antioxidant, antisecretory, anti-inflammatory and mucosa regeneration. It is

  4. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-04-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms 'anxiety' OR 'anxiety disorder' OR 'generalized anxiety disorder' OR 'social phobia' OR 'post-traumatic stress disorder' OR 'panic disorder' OR 'agoraphobia' OR 'obsessive compulsive disorder' in combination with the search terms 'Herb*' OR 'Medicinal Plants' OR 'Botanical Medicine' OR 'Chinese herb*', in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium

  5. An experimental study on four kinds of Chinese herbal medicines containing alkaloids using fluorescence microscope and microspectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Z; Chen, H; Zhao, Z

    2009-01-01

    In order to find a useful method for uniting the identification and quality evaluation of Chinese herbal medicine, the techniques of fluorescence microscopy and microspectrometer were firstly applied to authenticate four kinds of herbal medicines, Caulis Sinomenii, Rhizoma Coptidis, Radix Sophorae Tonkinensis and Rhizoma Menispermi, as well as to measure the distribution of alkaloids in their cross-sections. The results showed that the fluorescence microscopic characteristics and the fluorescence emission spectra of the same tissues from the four kinds of Chinese herbal medicine were different, for example, the cortex of Radix Sophorae Tonkinensis emitted blue fluorescence instead of the yellow of Rhizoma Coptidis observed with emission filter of long-pass 397 nm, which could be effective to identify them. Furthermore, alkaloids, as active components of the above herbal medicines, were distributed in each part of herbal tissue but their fluorescence intensities in different parts of tissue were different. The results indicated that fluorescence microscope combined with microspectrometer could be a helpful method for identification and quality evaluation of Chinese herbal medicine.

  6. The Jewish contribution to medicine Part 11. The 19th and 20th ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This brilliant period of Jewish medicine in Germany included the renowned immunologists Ehrlich and Wassermann and neurologists Romberg and Freud. Eminent workers from France were Metchnikoff, who discovered phagocytosis, Haffkine for his plague vaccine and Widal, who discovered bacterial. agglutination.

  7. Advances in Unsteady Boundary Layer Transition Research, Part II: Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Schobeiri

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This two-part article presents recent advances in boundary layer research into the unsteady boundary layer transition modeling and its validation. This, Part II, deals with the results of an inductive approach based on comprehensive experimental and theoretical studies of unsteady wake flow and unsteady boundary layer flow. The experiments were performed on a curved plate at a zero streamwise pressure gradient under periodic unsteady wake flow, in which the frequency of the periodic unsteady flow was varied. To validate the model, systematic experimental investigations were performed on the suction and pressure surfaces of turbine blades integrated into a high-subsonic cascade test facility, which was designed for unsteady boundary layer investigations. The analysis of the experiment's results and comparison with the model's prediction confirm the validity of the model and its ability to predict accurately the unsteady boundary layer transition.

  8. Chemometrics in analytical chemistry-part I: history, experimental design and data analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Richard G; Jansen, Jeroen; Lopes, João; Marini, Federico; Pomerantsev, Alexey; Rodionova, Oxana; Roger, Jean Michel; Walczak, Beata; Tauler, Romà

    2017-10-01

    Chemometrics has achieved major recognition and progress in the analytical chemistry field. In the first part of this tutorial, major achievements and contributions of chemometrics to some of the more important stages of the analytical process, like experimental design, sampling, and data analysis (including data pretreatment and fusion), are summarised. The tutorial is intended to give a general updated overview of the chemometrics field to further contribute to its dissemination and promotion in analytical chemistry.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Investigations in Single Point Incremental Sheet Forming For Micro parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejardin, S.; Thibaud, S.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-04-01

    Incremental Sheet Forming processes have been demonstrated in recent studies as a very promising technology to manufacture sheet metal parts by the CNC controlled movement of a simple generative tool. In glance with its various advantages, such process has been introduced as an alternative to reduce costs resulting from stamping technology when small batches or prototypes have to be manufactured. In this paper, an application is carried out accounting flexibility of the process linked to the fact that the punches or dies are avoided. Although the process still needs a further optimization, preliminary results have been obtained through experimental tests to manufacture micro parts. At the same time, a FEM analysis has been carried out in order to get the characteristics of the formed parts.

  10. Antiviral and Cytotoxic Activities of Extracts from the Cell Cultures and Respective Parts of Some Turkish Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    SÖKMEN, ATALAY

    2001-01-01

    Extracts from respective parts and cell cultures of some Turkish medicinal plants have been assessed for their antiviral and cytotoxic properties. None of the extracts tested showed notable activity against herpes simplex viruses (HSV-I and II), but a slight antiretroviral activity against HIV-I was determined in an extract from Hypericum capitatum cell cultures. On the other hand, according to cytotoxic activity test results against brine shrimp (Artemia salina), an activity level of LD50 a...

  11. Offer and use of complementary and alternative medicine in hospitals of the French-speaking part of Switzerland.

    OpenAIRE

    Carruzzo, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2004, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was offered by physicians in one third of Swiss hospitals. Since then, CAM health policy has considerably changed. This study aims at describing the present supply and use of CAM in hospitals of the French-speaking part of Switzerland, and qualitatively explores the characteristics of this supply. Methods: Between June 2011 and March 2012, a short questionnaire was sent to the medical directors of hospitals (N=46), asking th...

  12. Offer and use of complementary and alternative medicine in hospitals of the French-speaking part of Switzerland.

    OpenAIRE

    Carruzzo, P.; Graz, B.; Rodondi, P.Y.; Michaud, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2004, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was offered by physicians in one-third of Swiss hospitals. Since then, CAM health policy has changed considerably. This study aimed to describe the present supply and use of CAM in hospitals in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, and to explore qualitatively the characteristics of this offer. METHODS: Between June 2011 and March 2012, a short questionnaire was sent to the medical directors of hospitals (n = 46), asking ...

  13. Dispersing the Mists: An Experimental History of Medicine Study into the Quality of Volatile Inhalations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnane, Barry; Gallagher, Cathal T; Snell, Noel; Sanders, Mark; Moshksar, Ramin; Murnane, Darragh

    2017-06-01

    Dr. Nelson's Improved Inhaler was first marketed with an advertisement in The Lancet in 1865. Revolutionary at the time for its ease of use and patient-friendliness, the inhaler is still in use for self-treatment by many all over the world. On the occasion of its 150th anniversary, this study reports an experimental historical medicine approach to identify evidence for the quality of vapor inhalers. Through accessing reviews of the device's use by the contemporary medical establishment, it was established that Dr. Nelson's Inhaler enjoyed a reputation of quality and efficacy among reputable physicians generating empirical evidence of clinical performance. There was a general absence of product performance tests during this period. Therefore, modern inhalation performance testing was applied to test the aerosol delivery performance for Friars' Balsam, and its key chemical constituent, benzoic acid (BA). A respirable dose of 59.9 ± 9.0 μg of BA was aerosolized in a 10 minutes period from a dose of 3.3 mL Friars' Balsam (equivalent to 35.1 ± 0.2 mg of BA) in 375 mL of steaming water using the glass twin stage impinger at a flow rate of 60 L·min-1. The respirable dose from a standardized aqueous BA inhalation formulation increased from 115.9 ± 10.6 to 200.2 ± 19.9 μg by increasing the simulated inhalation period from 5 to 10 minutes. When tested with a simulated inhalation maneuver (500 mL tidal volume, 13 minutes-1 respiration rate, 1:2 inspiratory:expiratory ratio) a respirable dose of 112.8 ± 40.3 μg was produced. This work has highlighted the potential for aerosol drug delivery using steam inhalers that are popular with patients. Physicians should therefore be aware of the potential for lung dosing with irritants when patients self-medicate using the Nelson Inhaler with vaporizing formulations such as Friars' Balsam.

  14. Effects of Japanese herbal medicine Sairei-to on murine experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaburaki, Toshikatsu; Zhang, Qi; Jin, Xiangyuan; Uchiyama, Masateru; Fujino, Yujiro; Nakahara, Hisae; Takamoto, Mitsuko; Otomo, Kazuyoshi; Niimi, Masanori

    2013-12-01

    It has been suggested thatSairei-to (TJ114), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, has immunomodulatory activities. To evaluate the effects of TJ114 on uveitis, we examined the effectiveness of oral administration in a murine model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Murine EAU was induced by subcutaneous injection of human inter-photoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) peptide mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant. In the TJ114-treated group, 2 g/kg was administrated orally from 0 to 20 days after immunization. Clinical scoring, histopathological scoring of EAU, cell proliferation, cytokine assessment, and adoptive transfer experiment of splenic T cells into naïve mice were performed. EAU development occurred in 32 of 38 mice (86 %) in the untreated group and 12 of 33 (36 %) in the TJ114-treated group. The clinical scores for EAU in the vehicle-treated and TJ114-treated groups were 1.56 ± 1.65 and 0.59 ± 0.63 respectively, at 14 days after immunization (p < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test), and 2.26 ± 1.56 and 0.75 ± 1.31 respectively at 21 days (p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test), while the histopathological scores at 21 days were 1.47 ± 1.42 and 0.54 ± 0.84 respectively (p < 0.01, Mann-Whitney U-test). Interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production by cervical lymph node cells obtained from the TJ114-treated group were significantly reduced as compared with those from the vehicle-treated group (p < 0.01, Student's unpaired t-test). Moreover, the levels of C-C motif chemokine 2 (CCL2) and IFN-γ were significantly reduced in splenocytes of TJ114-treated mice as compared with the vehicle-treated group (p < 0.01, Student's unpaired t-test). Mice that received adoptive transfer of splenic T cells from TJ114-treated EAU mice caused significantly lower severity of EAU compared to those that received from vehicle-treated EAU mice. Oral administration of TJ114 has an inhibitory effect on a murine model of EAU, possibly via reduction in

  15. Advanced computational tools for PEM fuel cell design. Part 2. Detailed experimental validation and parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, P. C.; Kumar, S.; Djilali, N.

    This paper reports on the systematic experimental validation of a comprehensive 3D CFD-based computational model presented and documented in Part 1. Simulations for unit cells with straight channels, similar to the Ballard Mk902 hardware, are performed and analyzed in conjunction with detailed current mapping measurements and water mass distributions in the membrane-electrode assembly. The experiments were designed to display sensitivity of the cell over a range of operating parameters including current density, humidification, and coolant temperature, making the data particularly well suited for systematic validation. Based on the validation and analysis of the predictions, values of model parameters, including the electro-osmotic drag coefficient, capillary diffusion coefficient, and catalyst specific surface area are determined adjusted to fit experimental data of current density and MEA water content. The predicted net water flux out of the anode (normalized by the total water generated) increases as anode humidification water flow rate is increased, in agreement with experimental results. A modification of the constitutive equation for the capillary diffusivity of water in the porous electrodes that attempts to incorporate the experimentally observed immobile (or irreducible) saturation yields a better fit of the predicted MEA water mass with experimental data. The specific surface area parameter used in the catalyst layer model is found to be effective in tuning the simulations to predict the correct cell voltage over a range of stoichiometries.

  16. Evidence-based medicine in otolaryngology, part 2: the current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer J; Rauch, Steven D; Wasserman, Jared; Coblens, Orly; Randolph, Gregory W

    2011-03-01

    What is the current state of evidence-based medicine in otolaryngology? This question inquires about the state of our literature, our attitudes and capabilities, and our patients' desires. Thus, this installment of "Evidence-Based Medicine in Otolaryngology" focuses on these 3 topics. First, the authors consider the literature relative to benchmarks for study design. Second, the data regarding otolaryngologists' and other surgical specialists' attitudes and understanding of clinical data are discussed. Third, patient-based efforts to promote and participate in evidence-based practice are explored. In addition, a discussion of the relevant supportive efforts made by our professional organizations is included.

  17. Herbal medicines: challenges in the modern world. Part 2. European Union and Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Helen M; Gubarev, Michael I; Krepkova, Lubov V; Bortnikova, Valentina V; Corrick, Fenella; Job, Kathleen M; Sherwin, Catherine Mt; Enioutina, Elena Y

    2016-08-01

    Herbal medicines (HMs) have been well known to people of the European Union (EU) and Russia for centuries. Currently, Western HMs can be classified into two categories, plant-derived conventional medicines and dietary supplements. Interest to HMs has grown rapidly in all countries during the past two decades. The main goal of this review article is to present the history of HMs in the EU and Russia, forms of modern HMs, including Oriental Medicines that are popular among consumers of both countries. Additional discussion points comprise safety and adulteration issues associated with HMs, including regulatory changes and new legislative measures undertaken by the authorities. Materials available from legislative and governmental websites, PubMed and news media were used. Expert commentary: Due to cultural diversities in the EU and Russia, traditional HMs of other regions, particularly Chinese Traditional and Ayurvedic medicines, are also popular. Recently, dietary supplements containing multiple herbal and other natural products have flooded the EU and Russian markets. Pharmacovigilance in these markets is challenging in terms of establishing quality and safety of ingredients, determining efficacy, and defining risks of herb-herb and herb-drug interactions. Both the EU and Russia have introduced new legislation aimed to overcome these deficiencies.

  18. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE AS AN UPDATED MODEL OF NATIONAL HEALTH-CARE SYSTEM.PART 1. STRATEGIC ASPECTS OF INFRASTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Suchkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the key problems of the transition of the national health-care system to a new platform of personalized medicine and, in particular, pediatrics. The first part, published in this issue, analyzes the most important of the necessary aspects of the infrastructure of the new model. Evidence is given of the extreme urgency of introducing a new model of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM. The result of implementation should be breakthrough success in solving many epidemiological, diagnostic, curative, preventive, social and economic problems. It is emphasized that neonatology and pediatrics are the most important link in this paradigm. When considering the potential architectonics of the model, important characteristics of its main segments are revealed. Diagnostic principles (genotyping, targeting, and dynamic screening of biomarkers and arsenal (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, mathematical modeling tools, etc. of personalized medicine are presented. Attention is focused on the need to create information (global, regional and target-specific banks that are necessary for monitoring individual health. The need to create a new social decision-making mechanism for selecting a preventive protocol that minimizes the risks of the disease or prevents its development is discussed. Four categories of basic programs of medical and social support of persons from the risk category are considered. The necessary conditions for translating these programs into practice are presented. The main tasks and problems of developing the principles for the preparation of preventive-prophylactic and protocols of medical rehabilitation for personalized medicine were discussed. 

  19. [Study on balance group in steady-state extraction process of Chinese medicine and experimental verification to Houttuynia cordata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenlong; Zhang, Xili; He, Fuyuan; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Haiqin; Wu, Dezhi; Chen, Zuohong

    2011-11-01

    To establish and experimental verification the mathematical model of the balance groups that is the steady-state of traditional Chinese medicine in extraction. Using the entropy and genetic principles of statistics, and taking the coefficient of variation of GC fingerprint which is the naphtha of the Houttuynia cordata between strains in the same GAP place as a pivot to establish and verify the mathematical model was established of the balance groups that is the steady-state of traditional Chinese medicine in extraction. A mathematical model that is suitable for the balance groups of the steady-state of traditional Chinese medicine and preparation in extraction, and the balance groups which is 29 683 strains (approximately 118.7 kg) were gained with the same origin of H. cordata as the model drug. Under the GAP of quality control model, controlling the stability of the quality through further using the Hardy-Weinberg balance groups of the H. cordata between strains, the new theory and experiment foundation is established for the steady-state of traditional Chinese medicine in extraction and quality control.

  20. [Our medicinal preparations in the mid-19th century. Part I--Introduction and chemical preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drábek, Pavel

    2012-08-01

    The paper deals with the development of the first editions of the Austrian Pharmacopoeia, Pharmacopoea Austriaca, since its origin in the year 1812. It demonstrates its gradual retardation in the period when nearly all medicinal substances had to be prepared only in pharmacies. The conception was changed as late as 1855 in the Fifth Edition, when it was allowed to buy many medicinal substances from producers or wholesalers. At the same time, requirements for organoleptic properties and chemical purity began to be introduced. The present communication also deals with the chemical drugs used in the mid-19th century and is based on a comparison of the pharmacopoeias of 1836 and 1855. It presents some typical examples, such as alkaloids and metal compounds.

  1. Students’ letters to patients as a part of education in family medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Nataša Mrduljaš-Đujić; Ivančica Pavličević; Ana Marušić; Matko Marušić

    2012-01-01

    Family medicine fosters holistic approach to patient-centered practice. Current medical curriculum in Croatia does not have well-structured courses or tools to prepare medicals students for successful communication with the patient and for building lasting and beneficial doctor-patient relationship. We explored the value of students’ practice in writing letters to patients about their illness as a way of building personal and compassionate relationship with patients. Sixth year students at th...

  2. Education scholarship in emergency medicine part 1: innovating and improving teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbino, Jonathan; Van Melle, Elaine; Bandiera, Glen; McEwen, Jill; Leblanc, Constance; Bhanji, Farhan; Frank, Jason R; Regehr, Glenn; Snell, Linda

    2014-05-01

    As emergency medicine (EM) education evolves, a more advanced understanding of education scholarship is required. This article is the first in a series of three articles that reports the recommendations of the 2013 education scholarship consensus conference of the Academic Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians. Adopting the Canadian Association for Medical Education's definition, education scholarship (including both research and innovation) is defined. A rationale for why education scholarship should be a priority for EM is discussed.

  3. Education scholarship in emergency medicine part 3: a "how-to" guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, Farhan; Cheng, Adam; Frank, Jason R; Snell, Linda; Sherbino, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Successful emergency medicine (EM) education scholarship requires a systematic approach that includes searching the (grey) literature, mobilizing resources, adopting frameworks to focus the innovation, integrating a component of program evaluation, and disseminating the innovation via traditional and emerging avenues. This paper provides direction for EM teachers and educators looking to transform their education innovation into scholarship. Recommendations on producing EM education scholarship from the 2013 consensus conference of the Academic Section of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians are presented.

  4. MEDICINAL PLANTS AND HERBS OF NEWFOUNDLAND. PART 1. CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF THE AERIAL PART OF PINEAPPLE WEED (Matricaria matricarioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIMOTHY F. LOOMIS

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aerial part of Pineapple weed (Matricaria matricarioides, an adulterant of Chamomile, was investigated for its chemical constituents. Nine compounds were isolated and identified as two spiroethers [cis - en - yn - dicycloether 1 and trans - en - yn - dicycloether 2], three coumarins [7 - methoxycoumarin (Herniarin 3, umbelliferone 4 and 7 - methoxy - 3, 4 -dihydrocoumarin 5], phytol 6, luteolin - 7 - glucoside 7, (Z - 2 - β - D - Glucopyranosyloxyl - 4 - methoxycinnamic acid 8, and (E - 2 - β -D-Glucopyranosyloxyl - 4 -methoxycinnamic acid 9. By GC-MS analysis, the major components of the steam distilled volatile oil were identified as trans-en-yn-dicycloether and cis-en- yn-dicycloether, with the trans-form being more abundant than the cis-form. The results indicated some similarities between the constituents of Pineapple weed and those of German Chamomile. All these nine compounds are reported for the first time from Pineapple weed growing in Newfoundland. Compound 5 is reported from this plant genus for the first time.

  5. [Stem cells and regenerative medicine in urology, part 1: General concepts, kidney, testis and urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor-Navarro, T; Moratalla-Charcos, L M; Bermell-Marco, L; Beamud-Cortés, M; Osca-García, J M; Gil-Salom, M

    2010-06-01

    Progress in stem cell study and tissue engineering reached during the last times proves that this may be one of the most promising research fields in the future. Most urological diseases could profit from the development of disciplines such as regenerative medicine as, up to now, there have been encouraging results in this subject. We performed an electronic research through the Pubmed database, of both original and review publications, with the following search criteria: stem cells urology, kidney stem cells, testis stem cells, urinary sphincter, cell therapy urology, tissue engineering urology y regenerative medicine urology. We reviewed 33 articles published up to January 2010, trying to summarize the most relevant findings within the last years, the clinical applications and the point we have come to this day. Cell therapy and regenerative medicine are showing themselves to be one of the most promising fields within urological basic investigation in the last years. However, there is much work to be done yet, to make the advances reached in basic research be applicable to the clinic.

  6. Potential role for psychological skills training in emergency medicine: Part 1 - Introduction and background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauria, Michael J; Rush, Stephen; Weingart, Scott D; Brooks, Jason; Gallo, Isabelle A

    2016-10-01

    Psychological skills training (PST) is the systematic acquisition and practice of different psychological techniques to improve cognitive and technical performance. This training consists of three phases: education, skills acquisition and practice. Some of the psychological skills developed in this training include relaxation techniques, focusing and concentration skills, positive 'self-suggestion' and visualisation exercises. Since the middle of the 20th century, PST has been successfully applied by athletes, performing artists, business executives, military personnel and other professionals in high-risk occupations. Research in these areas has demonstrated the breadth and depth of the training's effectiveness. Despite the benefits realised in other professions, medicine has only recently begun to explore certain elements of PST. The present paper reviews the history and evidence behind the concept of PST. In addition, it presents some aspects of PST that have already been incorporated into medical training as well as implications for developing more comprehensive programmes to improve delivery of emergency medical care. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. [What Must the (Abdominal) Surgeon Know about Experimental Medicine (?) - Translational Research in General (Abdominal) Surgery(Viszeral-)Chirurg & experimentelle Medizin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, T; Kuester, D; Meyer, F

    2015-08-01

    Experimental medicine has evolved tremendously in the last few years. In particular, the introduction of novel techniques, in-vitro models, knock-out/transgenic animals and high-through put analytical methodologies have resulted in a deeper understanding of cellular pathophysiology and diseases. The daily clinical management has benefited by the introduction of biomarkers and targeted therapies. This development has been accompanied by increasing specialisation across all fields of research and medicine. Therefore, clinical-translational research requires a team of competent partners nowadays. The visceral surgeon can contribute significantly to these projects. The present review highlights several aspects of translational research and put chances and potential pitfalls into perspective in context with the work of the visceral surgeon. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. On understanding the very different science premises meaningful to CAM versus orthodox medicine: part I--the fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, William A

    2010-03-01

    In previous articles by this author and his colleagues in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, it has been shown that physical reality consists of two uniquely different categories of substance, one being electric charge-based while the other appears to be magnetic charge-based. Normally, only the electric atom/molecule type of substance is accessible by our traditional measurement instruments. We label this condition as the uncoupled state of physical reality that is our long-studied, electric atom/molecule level of nature. The second level of physical reality is invisible to traditional measurement instruments when the system is in the uncoupled state but is accessible to these same instruments when the system is in the coupled state of physical reality. The coupling of these two unique levels has been shown to occur via the application of a sufficient intensity of human consciousness in the form of specific intentions. Part II of this article (in a forthcoming issue) explores the thermodynamics of complementary and 328 alternative medicine (CAM) through five different space-time applications involving coupled state physics to show their relevance to today's medicine: (1) homeopathy; (2) the placebo effect; (3) long-range, room temperature, macroscopic-size-scale, information entanglement; (4) explanation for dark matter/energy plus possible human levitation; and (5) electrodermal diagnostic devices. The purpose is to clearly differentiate the use and limitations of uncoupled state physics in nature and today's traditional medicine from coupled state physics in tomorrow's CAM. Existing orthodox science provides the technical underpinnings and mindset for today's orthodox medicine. Psycho-energetic science will provide the technical underpinnings and mindset for CAM.

  9. Effect of publicly reporting performance data of medicine use on injection use: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Tang, Yuqing; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Xi; Du, Xin; Zhang, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate use of prescribing pharmaceuticals, particularly injections, not only affects the quality of medical care, but also leads to an increase in medical expenses. Publicly reporting performance data of medical care is becoming a common health policy tool adopted to supervise medical quality. To our knowledge, few studies about public reporting applied to medicine use have been reported. This study intended to introduce public reporting in the field of medicine use, and evaluate the effect of publicly reporting performance data of medicine use on the use of injections. The research sites were 20 primary healthcare institutions in Q City, Hubei. By matching, the institutions were divided into the intervention group and control group. A quasi-experimental design was applied in this study. In the intervention group, the performance data of medicine use were publicly reported. The injection prescribing rates of the two groups before and after intervention were measured and compared. Difference-in-difference method and logistic regression were employed to estimate the effect of public reporting on injection use. Public reporting led to a reduction of approximately 4% in the injection prescribing rate four months after intervention (OR = 0.96; 95%CI: 0.94, 0.97). The intervention effect was inconsistent in each month after intervention, and it was most positive in the second month after intervention (OR = 0.90; 95%CI: 0.89, 0.92). In general, publicly reporting performance data of medicine use may have positive effects on injection use to some extent. Further research is needed to investigate the mechanism by which public reporting influences injection use. Comprehensive measures are also necessary to promote the rational use of injections.

  10. Effect of publicly reporting performance data of medicine use on injection use: a quasi-experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inappropriate use of prescribing pharmaceuticals, particularly injections, not only affects the quality of medical care, but also leads to an increase in medical expenses. Publicly reporting performance data of medical care is becoming a common health policy tool adopted to supervise medical quality. To our knowledge, few studies about public reporting applied to medicine use have been reported. This study intended to introduce public reporting in the field of medicine use, and evaluate the effect of publicly reporting performance data of medicine use on the use of injections. METHODS: The research sites were 20 primary healthcare institutions in Q City, Hubei. By matching, the institutions were divided into the intervention group and control group. A quasi-experimental design was applied in this study. In the intervention group, the performance data of medicine use were publicly reported. The injection prescribing rates of the two groups before and after intervention were measured and compared. Difference-in-difference method and logistic regression were employed to estimate the effect of public reporting on injection use. RESULTS: Public reporting led to a reduction of approximately 4% in the injection prescribing rate four months after intervention (OR = 0.96; 95%CI: 0.94, 0.97. The intervention effect was inconsistent in each month after intervention, and it was most positive in the second month after intervention (OR = 0.90; 95%CI: 0.89, 0.92. CONCLUSIONS: In general, publicly reporting performance data of medicine use may have positive effects on injection use to some extent. Further research is needed to investigate the mechanism by which public reporting influences injection use. Comprehensive measures are also necessary to promote the rational use of injections.

  11. Experimental and computational investigation of an electromagnetic pump used for manufacturing aluminium parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinigo, D.; Rodrigues, M. A.; Rivas, A.; Duque, O.; Vazquez, V.; Maroto, J. A.; Cuesta, R.

    2007-03-01

    An experimental and computational investigation was carried out on an electromagnetic pump for molten aluminum. The electromagnetic pump is a MHD device to drive molten metals by means of electromagnetic fields and without mechanical parts in contact with the metal at high temperature. An exact computer simulation of the electromagnetic pump would require the simultaneous solution of electromagnetic and fluid dynamics problems. However, in this study we divide the simulation into two independent stages. First, the electromagnetic system is simulated by ANSYS considering the secondary of the pump as a solid. This simulation is experimentally validated in a test bed with a solid secondary replacing the molten metal. Secondly, a 3D field of electromagnetic forces provided by the ANSYS simulation is imported into the FLUENT CFD code to simulate the fluid dynamic problem, considering now the secondary of the pump as a liquid. This second simulation is also experimentally validated by measuring the static head provided by the pump. This simulation process is valid only if the electromagnetic system and the fluid dynamic problem are uncoupled, which has been verified by calculating the magnetic Reynolds number and the interaction parameter. Tables 4, Figs 14, Refs 15.

  12. Effects of acute memantine administration on MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery performance in psychosis: Testing an experimental medicine strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Savita G; Chou, Hsun-Hua; Rana, Brinda; Talledo, Jo A; Balvaneda, Bryan; Gaddis, Laura; Light, Gregory A; Swerdlow, Neal R

    2016-06-01

    Pro-cognitive agents for chronic psychotic disorders (CPDs) might be detected via experimental medicine models, in which neural targets engaged by the drug predict sensitivity to the drug's pro-cognitive effects. This study aims to use an experimental medicine model to test the hypothesis that "target engagement" predicts pro-cognitive effects of the NMDA antagonist, memantine (MEM), in CPDs. MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) performance was assessed in CPD (n = 41) and healthy subjects (HS; n = 41) in a double-blind, randomized cross-over design of acute (single dose) MEM (placebo vs. 10 or 20 mg p.o.). Measures of prepulse inhibition (PPI) and mismatch negativity previously reported from this cohort substantiated target engagement. Biomarkers predicting MEM neurocognitive sensitivity were assessed. Testing confirmed MCCB deficits associated with CPD diagnosis, age, and anticholinergic exposure. MEM (20 mg p.o.) reduced MCCB performance in HS. To control for significant test order effects, an "order-corrected MEM effect" (OCME) was calculated. In CPD subjects, greater age, positive MEM effects on PPI, and SNP rs1337697 (within the ionotropic NMDA receptor gene, GRIN3A) predicted greater positive OCME with 20 mg MEM. An experimental medicine model to assess acute pro-cognitive drug effects in CPD subjects is feasible but not without challenges. A single MEM 20 mg dose had a negative impact on neurocognition among HS. In CPD patients, age, MEM effects on PPI, and rs1337697 predicted sensitivity to the neurocognitive effects of MEM. Any potential clinical utility of these predictive markers for pro-cognitive effects of MEM in subgroups of CPD patients cannot be inferred without a validating clinical trial.

  13. An experimental data set for benchmarking 1-D, transient heat and moisture transfer models of hygroscopic building materials. Part II: Experimental, numerical and analytical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, Prabal [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Osanyintola, Olalekan F. [XXL Engineering Ltd., 101-807 Manning Road NE, Calgary, AB (Canada); Olutimayin, Stephen O.; Simonson, Carey J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the experimental results on spruce plywood and cellulose insulation using the transient moisture transfer (TMT) facility presented in Part I [P. Talukdar, S.O. Olutmayin, O.F. Osanyintola, C.J. Simonson, An experimental data set for benchmarking 1-D, transient heat and moisture transfer models of hygroscopic building materials-Part-I: experimental facility and property data, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, in press, doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2007.03.026] of this paper. The temperature, relative humidity and moisture accumulation distributions within both materials are presented following different and repeated step changes in air humidity and different airflow Reynolds numbers above the materials. The experimental data are compared with numerical data, numerical sensitivity studies and analytical solutions to increase the confidence in the experimental data set. (author)

  14. Medicinal herbs as part of the development of sustainable tourism in Nature park 'Stara Planina'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratknić Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of the concept of sustainable exploitation of medicinal plant resources facilitates the development of tourism offering and the related activities that would enhance the development of rural areas in this region. When managed in a sustainable manner, tourism can bring many advantages to protected areas, tourism industry and a local community. By using high-resolution satellite images and application of GIS technology, a method is developed for monitoring periodic changes in eco-systems. The collected data enable design of models that incorporate in themselves dynamics of changes taking place in natural ecosystems. By means of periodic imaging of characteristic areas, the spatial representation of eco-systems will be monitored, along with the changes in their composition and structure, which may seriously endanger the development of tourism potential in the region. The integral approach to the management of medicinal herb resources in the region of Mt. Stara Planina, based on the results of this study, necessitates the integration of these results with the results of the studies investigating views and needs of the local population, whose quality of life depends on sustainability of the process of collection and valorization of this resource.

  15. Hospital Medicine (Part 1): what is wrong with acute hospital care?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2009-09-01

    Modern hospitals are facing several challenges and, over the last decade in particular, many of these institutions have become dysfunctional. Paradoxically as medicine has become more successful the demand for acute hospital care has increased, yet there is no consensus on what conditions or complaints require hospital admission and there is wide variation in the mortality rates, length of stay and possibly standards of care between different units. Most acutely ill patients are elderly and instead of one straightforward diagnosis are more likely to have a complex combination of multiple co-morbid conditions. Any elderly patient admitted to hospital is at considerable risk which must be balanced against the possible benefits. Although most of the patients in hospital die from only approximately ten diagnoses, obvious life saving treatment is often delayed by a junior doctor in-training first performing an exhaustive complete history and physical, and then ordering a number of investigations before consulting a senior colleague. Following this traditional hierarchy delays care with several "futile cycles" of clinical activity thoughtlessly directed at the patient without any benefit being delivered. If acute hospital medicine is to be improved changes in traditional assumptions, attitudes, beliefs and practices are needed.

  16. Ethnomedicine of the Kagera Region, north western Tanzania. Part 3: plants used in traditional medicine in Kikuku village, Muleba District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshi Mainen J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kagera region of north western Tanzania has a rich culture of traditional medicine use and practice. Traditional medicines are the mainstay of healthcare in this region and are known to support the management of many illnesses such as malaria, bacterial infections, epilepsy, gynecological problems and others. However, most of the plants being used have either not been documented or evaluated for safety and efficacy or both. This study, the sixth of an ongoing series, reports on the medicinal plants that are used at Kikuku village, Muleba District. Methodology A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect information on the common/local names of the plants, parts of the plants used, diseases treated, methods of preparing the herbal remedies, dosage of the remedies administered, frequency and duration of treatment and toxicity of the medicines. A literature review was carried out for information on the ethnomedical uses of the reported plants. Results A total of 49 plant species belonging to 47 genera and 24 plant families were documented. The family Euphorbiaceae and Asteraceae had the highest representation. The plants are used for the treatment of skin conditions (10 plants; 20%, bacterial infections and wounds (14 plants; 28.6%, malaria (14 plants; 28.6%, gastrointestinal disorders (11 plants; 22.4%, gynecological problems including infertility (8 plants; 16.3%, hypertension (5 plants; 10.2%, viral infections (7 plants; 14.3%, chest problems (5 plants; 10.2%, diabetes (3 plants; 6.1%, cancer (2 plants; 4.1%, inflammatory conditions (arthritis, rheumatism, HIV and AIDS, and hernia each treated by 1 plant (3 plants in total; 6.1%. Information obtained from the literature indicate that 25 (51.0% of the therapeutic claims are supported by laboratory results or have similar claims of ethnomedical use from other countries. Conclusion Herbal remedies comprise an important and effective component of the healthcare system

  17. Ethnomedicine of the Kagera Region, north western Tanzania. Part 2: The medicinal plants used in Katoro Ward, Bukoba District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbabazi Pamela K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Kagera region of north western Tanzania has a rich culture of traditional medicine use and practices. The dynamic inter-ethnic interactions of different people from the surrounding countries constitute a rich reservoir of herbal based healing practices. This study, the second on an ongoing series, reports on the medicinal plant species used in Katoro ward, Bukoba District, and tries to use the literature to establish proof of the therapeutic claims. Methodology Ethnomedical information was collected using Semi-structured interviews in Kyamlaile and Kashaba villages of Katoro, and in roadside bushes on the way from Katoro to Bukoba through Kyaka. Data collected included the common/local names of the plants, parts used, the diseases treated, methods of preparation, dosage, frequency and duration of treatments. Information on toxicity and antidote were also collected. Literature was consulted to get corroborative information on similar ethnomedical claims and proven biological activities of the plants. Results Thirty three (33 plant species for treatement of 13 different disease categories were documented. The most frequently treated diseases were those categorized as specific diseases/conditions (23.8% of all remedies while eye diseases were the least treated using medicinal plants (1.5% of all remedies. Literature reports support 47% of the claims including proven anti-malarial, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activity or similar ethnomedical uses. Leaves were the most frequently used plant part (20 species followed by roots (13 species while making of decoctions, pounding, squeezing, making infusions, burning and grinding to powder were the most common methods used to prepare a majority of the therapies. Conclusion Therapeutic claims made on plants used in traditional medicine in Katoro ward of Bukoba district are well supported by literature, with 47% of the claims having already been reported. This study further

  18. Antioxidant property of aerial parts and root of Phyllanthus fraternus Webster, an important medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Richa; Chaurasia, Jitendra Kumar; Tiwari, Kavindra Nath; Singh, Karuna

    2014-01-01

    In present study free radical scavenging potential of aerial parts and root of Phyllanthus fraternus was investigated. Extraction was done in water and ethanol. Total antioxidant capacity was measured by DPPH free radical scavenging method; ethanolic extract of aerial part was most potent in activity with 50% inhibition at 258 μg/mL concentration. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) was measured in terms of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) by using egg-yolk homogenates as lipid-rich media with EC₅₀ of aerial part (ethanolic) 1522 μg/mL which was found to be most active. Superoxide (SO) radical scavenging activity was measured using riboflavin-light-nitroblue tetrazolium assay. Ethanolic and aqueous extract of both aerial part and root was almost similar in superoxide radical scavenging activity. Reducing power was determined on the basis of Fe³⁺-Fe⁺ transformation in the presence of extract. Total phenolic and flavonoid contents were also measured by spectroscopic method. Results showed that the ethanolic fraction of aerial part is most active towards antioxidant potential and this activity is related to its polyphenolic content and reducing potential. Thus, P. fraternus extract can be used as potent natural antioxidant.

  19. [Surgical therapy and critical care medicine in severely burned patients - Part 1: the first 24 ours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, Rolf; Kauczok, Jens; Deisz, Robert; Pallua, Norbert; Marx, Gernot

    2012-09-01

    Critical care medicine in severely burned patients should be adapted to the different pathophysiological phases. Accordingly, surgical and non-surgical therapy must be coordinated adequately. Initial wound care comprises topical treatment of less severely injured skin and surgical debridement of severely burned areas. The first 24 hours of intensive care are focused on calculated fluid delivery to provide stable hemodynamics and avoid progression of local edema formation. In the further course wound treatment with split-thickness skin grafts is the major aim of surgical therapy. Critical care is focused on the avoidance of complications like infections and ventilator associated lung injury. Therefore, lung-protective ventilation strategies, weaning and sedation protocols, and early enteral nutrition are important cornerstones of the treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Evolution of Quality Assurance for Clinical Immunohistochemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine - Part 2: Immunohistochemistry Test Performance Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlakovic, Emina E; Cheung, Carol C; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Dietel, Manfred; Francis, Glenn D; Gilks, C Blake; Hall, Jacqueline A; Hornick, Jason L; Ibrahim, Merdol; Marchetti, Antonio; Miller, Keith; van Krieken, J Han; Nielsen, Soren; Swanson, Paul E; Vyberg, Mogens; Zhou, Xiaoge; Taylor, Clive R

    2017-02-01

    All laboratory tests have test performance characteristics (TPCs), whether or not they are explicitly known to the laboratorian or the pathologist. TPCs are thus also an integral characteristic of immunohistochemistry (IHC) tests and other in situ, cell-based molecular assays such as DNA or RNA in situ hybridization or aptamer-based testing. Because of their descriptive, in situ, cell-based nature, IHC tests have a limited repertoire of appropriate TPCs. Although only a few TPCs are relevant to IHC, proper selection of informative TPCs is nonetheless essential for the development of and adherence to appropriate quality assurance measures in the IHC laboratory. This paper describes the TPCs that are relevant to IHC testing and emphasizes the role of TPCs in the validation of IHC tests. This is part 2 of the 4-part series "Evolution of Quality Assurance for Clinical Immunohistochemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine."

  1. Numerical-experimental investigation of PE/EVA foam injection molded parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Roberto

    The main objective of the presented work is to propose a robust framework to test foaming injection molded parts, with the aim of establishing a standard testing cycle for the evaluation of a new foam material based on numerical and experimental results. The research purpose is to assess parameters influencing several aspects, such as foam morphology and compression behavior, using useful suggestions from finite element analysis. The investigated polymeric blend consisted of a mixture of low density polyethylenes (LDPEs), a high-density polyethylene (HDPE), an ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and an azodicarbonamide (ADC). The thermal, rheological and compression properties of the blend are fully described, as well as the numerical models and the parameters of the injection molding process.

  2. Thermomechanical Effects during Direct Chill and Electromagnetic Casting of Aluminum Alloys Part I : Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drezet, J.-M.; Plata, M.

    The deformation and the temperature field evolution within direct chill (DC) and electromagnetic (EM) cast aluminum ingots have been measured in-situ using a simple experimental set-up. The deformation of the cross section of the cold ingots has also been characterized as a function of the casting speed, alloy composition and inoculation condition. The pull-in of the lateral rolling faces has been found to occur in two sequences for DC cast ingots whereas that associated with EMC was continuous. The pull-in was maximum at the center of these faces (about 7-9 %) and strongly depended upon the casting speed. The present results constitute a basis for the validation of the model presented in part II.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND DYNAMIC SIMULATION FOR SINGULARIZING UNIT IN PART FEEDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SURESH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the automotive sector, the act of feeding and orienting the asymmetric components in desired orientation was considered as major problem. Brake pad was considered in this work and a singularizing unit (hopper was developed for separating them. The objective of this work was to identify the suitable parameters for feeding the irregular part one by one in the specified orientations. Experiments were conducted for various frequency levels at various levels of inclination of the hopper using base plates. The experimental outcome provides the suitable parameters of base plate thickness and frequency of vibration. The hopper model was developed and the vibration analysis was carried out using dynamic simulation software. The results of the physical experiments and simulated design experiment were compared. The comparison shows an appreciable relationship to each other.

  4. The connotation of the Quantum Traditional Chinese Medicine and the exploration of its experimental technology system for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X L; Han, J X

    2013-12-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) developed based on ancient Chinese philosophy. Its characteristics include abstract theories, fuzzy concepts, subjective diagnostic methods and it lacks clarity, and rigor as well as vindication from modern sciences, which makes development of TCM remain stagnant. Thus, how to free the theory of TCM from heavy philosophy to achieve separation of medicine and philosophy, and to use the contemporary cutting-edge science and technology to transform the theory of TCM and then to achieve its scientific paradigm shift, is a way for TCM to get out of the woods. This article, focusing on the problems existing in the development of the modernization of TCM, introduces the concept, the connotation as well as the important role of Quantum TCM in the modernization of TCM. Additionally, based on the view that the body's electromagnetic radiation can characterize the human "Qi" in TCM, we discuss several experimental technology systems for the diagnosis of Quantum TCM in detail. By analyzing and comparing these technology systems, we come to the conclusion that the biophoton analytical technology (BPAT) is more worthy of further study in building the experimental technology system for the diagnosis of Quantum TCM.

  5. Astrocyte-neuron interactions: from experimental research-based models to translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linne, Marja-Leena; Jalonen, Tuula O

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the principal astrocyte functions and the interactions between neurons and astrocytes. We then address how the experimentally observed functions have been verified in computational models and review recent experimental literature on astrocyte-neuron interactions. Benefits of computational neuroscience work are highlighted through selected studies with neurons and astrocytes by analyzing the existing models qualitatively and assessing the relevance of these models to experimental data. Common strategies to mathematical modeling and computer simulation in neuroscience are summarized for the nontechnical reader. The astrocyte-neuron interactions are then further illustrated by examples of some neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, where the miscommunication between glia and neurons is found to be increasingly important. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Stability Formula for Plastic-Tipped Bullets Part 2: Experimental Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Part 1 of this paper describes a modification of the original Miller twist rule for computing gyroscopic bullet stability that is better suited to plastic-tipped bullets. The original Miller twist rule assumes a bullet of constant density, but it also works well for conventional copper (or gilding metal) jacketed lead bullets because the density of copper and lead are sufficiently close. However, the original Miller twist rule significantly underestimates the gyroscopic stability of plastic-tipped bullets, because the density of plastic is much lower than the density of copper and lead. Here, a new amended formula is developed for the gyroscopic stability of plastic-tipped bullets by substituting the length of just the metal portion for the total length in the (1 + L2) term of the original Miller twist rule. Part 2 describes experimental testing of this new formula on three plastic-tipped bullets. The new formula is relatively accurate for plastic-tipped bullets whose metal portion has nearly uniform density,...

  7. A novel embeddable spherical smart aggregate for structural health monitoring: part II. Numerical and experimental verifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingzhao; Fan, Shuli; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing

    2017-09-01

    The newly developed spherical smart aggregate (SSA) based on a radially polarized spherical piezoceramic shell element has unique omnidirectional actuating and sensing capabilities that can greatly improve the detection aperture and provide additional functionalities in health monitoring applications in concrete structures. Detailed fabrication procedures and electrical characterization of the SSA have been previously studied (Part I). In this second paper (Part II), the functionalities of the SSA used in both active sensing and passive sensing approaches were investigated in experiments and numerical simulations. One SSA sample was embedded in a 1 ft3 concrete specimen. In the active sensing approach, the SSA was first utilized as an actuator to generate stress waves and six conventional smart aggregates (SA) mounted on the six faces of the concrete cube were utilized as sensors to detect the wave response. Conversely, the embedded SSA was then utilized as a sensor to successively detect the wave response from each SA. The experimentally obtained behavior of the SSA was then compared with the numerical simulation results. Further, a series of impact tests were conducted to verify the performance of the SSA in the detection of the impact events from different directions. Comparison with the wave response associated with different faces of the cube verified the omnidirectional actuating and sensing capabilities of the SSA.

  8. The writer's guide to education scholarship in emergency medicine: Education innovations (part 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrew K; Hagel, Carly; Chan, Teresa M; Thoma, Brent; Murnaghan, Aleisha; Bhanji, Farhan

    2017-06-20

    The scholarly dissemination of innovative medical education practices helps broaden the reach of this type of work, allowing scholarship to have an impact beyond a single institution. There is little guidance in the literature for those seeking to publish program evaluation studies and innovation papers. This study aims to derive a set of evidence-based features of high-quality reports on innovations in emergency medicine (EM) education. We conducted a scoping review and thematic analysis to determine quality markers for medical education innovation reports, with a focus on EM. A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, ERIC, and Google Scholar was augmented by a hand search of relevant publication guidelines, guidelines for authors, and website submission portals from medical education and EM journals. Study investigators reviewed the selected articles, and a thematic analysis was conducted. Our search strategy identified 14 relevant articles from which 34 quality markers were extracted. These markers were grouped into seven important themes: goals and need for innovation, preparation, innovation development, innovation implementation, evaluation of innovation, evidence of reflective practice, and reporting and dissemination. In addition, multiple outlets for the publication of EM education innovations were identified and compiled. The publication and dissemination of innovations are critical for the EM education community and the training of health professionals. We anticipate that our list of innovation report quality markers will be used by EM education innovators to support the dissemination of novel educational practices.

  9. Agrimonia – biological activity and perspectives for medicinal application. Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Saluk-Juszczak1,2

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The menopause-related alteration in a woman’s body may include a variety of disorders, such as obesity,metabolic syndrome, changes in immune response or haemostatic parameters, and oxidative stress. Some plantderivedsubstances have been used for many years as an alternative for oestrogen therapy in the treatment ofvarious menopausal symptoms. Among these compounds, the best known are isoflavones. However, also otherbiologically active compounds, that are present in herbs, should be taken into account as potential therapeuticagents. The growing number of reports has confirmed favourable effects of plants belonging to the Agrimoniagenus. Three species of them occur in Poland: Agrimonia eupatoria L., Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb., and Agrimoniaprocera Wallr. In the present review, the available data and recent findings on the potential use of differentplants from Agrimonia genus in prevention and therapy of various disturbances of the inflammatory systemand cardiovascular disorders are described. One of the most important aspects of the medicinal application ofAgrimonia plants is their possible role in the protection of the cardiovascular system against changes associatedwith menopause.

  10. The Miniature Swine as a Model in Experimental and Translational Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker-Krongrad, Alain; Shoemake, Catherine R; Bouchard, Guy F

    2016-06-01

    The use of the miniature swine as a nonrodent species in research has continued to expand for over a decade, and they are becoming routinely used both in experimental pharmacology and as a therapeutic model for human diseases. Miniature swine models are regularly used for studies designed to assess efficacy and safety of new therapeutic compounds given through different routes of exposure and are used as an alternative model to rodents, canines, or nonhuman primates. Translational preclinical swine study data presented here support the current understanding that miniature swine are the animal model of choice for the assessment of drugs targeting endocrine, dermal, and ocular disorders. Because research investigators need to be familiar with some of the important features of the models developed in the miniature swine in order to place clinical and experimental findings in their proper perspective, relevant references and data from these models will be presented, compared, and partially illustrated. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. A Systematic Review of Rhubarb (a Traditional Chinese Medicine) Used for the Treatment of Experimental Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Xie, Dong-Ping; Mai, Shu-Tao; Weng, Yan-Na; Du, Jiong-Dong; Wu, Guang-Ping; Zheng, Jing-Xia; Han, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a global major health problem in great need for more effective therapy. For thousands of years, Rhubarb had been used for various diseases including severe infection. Pharmacological studies and trials reported that Rhubarb may be effective in treating sepsis, but the efficacy and the quality of evidence remain unclear since there is no systematic review on Rhubarb for sepsis. The present study is the first systematic review of Rhubarb used for the treatment of experimental sepsis in both English and Chinese literatures by identifying 27 studies from 7 databases. It showed that Rhubarb might be effective in reducing injuries in gastrointestinal tract, lung, and liver induced by sepsis, and its potential mechanisms might include reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, ameliorating microcirculatory disturbance, and maintaining immune balance. Yet the positive findings should be interpreted with caution due to poor methodological quality. In a word, Rhubarb might be a promising candidate that is worth further clinical and experimental trials for sepsis therapy.

  12. Evidence of effectiveness of herbal medicinal products in the treatment of arthritis. Part I: Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Melainie; Gagnier, Joel J; Little, Christine V; Parsons, Tessa J; Blümle, Anette; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2009-11-01

    Herbal medicinal products (HMPs) are used in a variety of oral and topical forms for the treatment of osteoarthritis. The aim of this study was to update a previous systematic review published in 2000. We searched electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CISCOM, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane registers) to June 2007, unrestricted by date or language, and included randomized controlled trials that compared HMPs with inert (placebo) or active controls in patients with osteoarthritis. Five reviewers contributed to data extraction. Disagreements were discussed and resolved by consensus with reference to Cochrane guidelines and advice from the Cochrane Collaboration.Thirty-five studies (30 studies identified for this review update, and 5 studies included in the original review) evaluating the effectiveness of 22 HMPs were included. However, due to differing HMPs, interventions, comparators, and outcome measures, meta-analysis was restricted to data from studies of three HMPs: topical capsaicin, avocado-soybean unsaponifiables, and the Chinese herbal mixture SKI306X showed benefit in the alleviation of osteoarthritic pain.Several studies investigating products from devil's claw, and a powder from rose hip and seed, reported favorable effects on osteoarthritic pain, whereas two studies of a willow bark extract returned disparate results. Three studies of Phytodolor N(R) were of limited use because doses and measures were inconsistent among trials. The remaining single studies for each HMP provided moderate evidence of effectiveness. No serious side effects were reported with any herbal intervention.Despite some evidence, the effectiveness of none of the HMPs is proven beyond doubt. The obvious potential benefits of HMPs in the treatment of osteoarthritis are reduced reliance on synthetic medications with the associated risks of harmful adverse events, but further clinical trials are necessary before HMPs can be adopted in osteoarthritis treatment guidelines.

  13. Bioelectrical impedance techniques in medicine. Part I: Bioimpedance measurement. Second section: impedance spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, B; Morucci, J P; Chauveau, N

    1996-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectrometry is an important application field of bioimpedance measurements. After introducing the electrical properties of biological tissues, this part presents instrumental aspects and applications of electrical impedance spectrometry. The main instrumental constraints encountered in spectrometric electrical impedance measurements are reviewed, focusing on low-frequency applications. Examples of impedance cells and probes are presented and several instrumental setups operating in the frequency and time domain are described. Some examples of applications are presented, including in vitro characterization and modeling of normal tissues, in vitro and in vivo characterization of cancerous tissues, and assessment of tissue perfusion/ischemia levels.

  14. [Education in our time: competency or aptitude? The case for medicine. Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viniegra-Velázquez, Leonardo

    Part II is focused on participatory education (PE), a distinctive way to understand and practice education in contrast to passive education. The core of PE is to develop everyone's own cognitive potentialities frequently mutilated, neglected or ignored. Epistemological and experiential basis of PE are defined: the concept of incisive and creative criticism, the idea of knowledge as each person's own construct and life experience as the main focus of reflection and cognition. The PE aims towards individuals with unprecedented cognitive and creative faculties, capable of approaching a more inclusive and hospitable world. The last part criticizes the fact that medical education has remained among the passive education paradigm. The key role of cognitive aptitudes, both methodological and practical (clinical aptitude), in the progress of medical education and practice is emphasized. As a conclusion, the knowhow of education is discussed, aiming towards a better world away from human and planetary degradation. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD): comparison of Chinese and western culture (Part A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, V C N

    2009-03-01

    A cross-sectional survey of the use of CAM by children was undertaken in the Duchess of Kent Children's Hospital in Hong Kong (March-December 2006). A questionnaire survey concerning the use of CAM was administered to chief caretakers (only the mothers) who accompanied children with neurodevelopmental disabilities followed up in our Neurodevelopmental paediatrics clinics. Four hundred and thirty agreed for interview of which 98 (22.8%) had Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). CAM was used in 40.8% for ASD and 21.4% of non-ASD (p ASD in this part A paper. The three most common type of CAM use was Acupuncture (47.5%), Sensory Integration (42.5%), and Chinese Medicine (30%). About 76.9% of interviewees expected CAM to augment conventional treatment. Although 47.5% used both conventional western medicine and CAM, only 22.4% disclosed the use of CAM to Doctors. The following factors were significantly related to CAM use: father's job and mother's religion. Our frequency of CAM used in children with ASD was lower in Canada (52%) and USA (74%, 92%). The main CAM use in western culture was biological-based therapy whereas acupuncture was the most common CAM used in our locality.

  16. Abdominal wall regenerative medicine for a large defect using tissue engineering: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuhigashi, Masaya; Kaji, Tatsuru; Nakame, Kazuhiko; Mukai, Motoi; Yamada, Waka; Onishi, Shun; Yamada, Koji; Kawano, Takafumi; Takamatsu, Hideo; Ieiri, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Treatment for a large abdominal wall defect remains challenging. The aim of this study was to optimize tissue engineering therapy of muscle constructs using a rat model. Experimental abdominal wall defects were created in Wister rats. The animal model was divided into three groups: collagen sponge (CS), hybrid scaffold (HS) and hybrid scaffold containing bone marrow liquid (HSBM). Hybrid scaffolds comprised collagen sponge and poly L-lactide (PLLA) sheets. Abdominal wall defects were covered by three kinds of sheets. Thereafter, the bone marrow liquid was spread onto the sheets. Rats were killed at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Pathological examinations were performed using hematoxylin-eosin and desmin antibody staining. The CS group showed abdominal hernia, whereas the HS and HSBM groups did not. Vascular formation was confirmed in all groups. Muscle tissue was recognized at the marginal area of the sheet only in the HSBM group. The HS and HSBM groups show a greater intensity than the CS group. Muscle tissue regeneration is solely recognized in the HSBM group. Our experimental data suggest that the triad of scaffold, cell, and growth factor is fundamental for ideal biomaterials. The HSBM may be useful for reconstruction of abdominal wall defects.

  17. X-ray imaging physics for nuclear medicine technologists. Part 1: Basic principles of x-ray production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-09-01

    The purpose is to review in a 4-part series: (i) the basic principles of x-ray production, (ii) x-ray interactions and data capture/conversion, (iii) acquisition/creation of the CT image, and (iv) operational details of a modern multislice CT scanner integrated with a PET scanner. Advances in PET technology have lead to widespread applications in diagnostic imaging and oncologic staging of disease. Combined PET/CT scanners provide the high-resolution anatomic imaging capability of CT with the metabolic and physiologic information by PET, to offer a significant increase in information content useful for the diagnostician and radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, or other physician needing both anatomic detail and knowledge of disease extent. Nuclear medicine technologists at the forefront of PET should therefore have a good understanding of x-ray imaging physics and basic CT scanner operation, as covered by this 4-part series. After reading the first article on x-ray production, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with (a) the physical characteristics of x-rays relative to other electromagnetic radiations, including gamma-rays in terms of energy, wavelength, and frequency; (b) methods of x-ray production and the characteristics of the output x-ray spectrum; (c) components necessary to produce x-rays, including the x-ray tube/x-ray generator and the parameters that control x-ray quality (energy) and quantity; (d) x-ray production limitations caused by heating and the impact on image acquisition and clinical throughput; and (e) a glossary of terms to assist in the understanding of this information.

  18. Alveolar bone regeneration potential of a traditional Chinese medicine, Bu-Shen-Gu-Chi-Wan, in experimental periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Wen, Q; Xue, J; Ding, Y

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a traditional Chinese medicine, Bu-Shen-Gu-Chi-Wan, on experimental periodontitis and bone regeneration in rat. Sixty female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided equally into three groups: a healthy control group (Group N); a periodontitis group (Group P); and the Bu-Shen-Gu-Chi-Wan treatment group (Group T). A 0.2-mm wire was placed around the maxillary first molar and Porphyromonas gingivalis was injected into the gingival sulcus. Rats in different groups were administered 0.9% normal saline or Bu-Shen-Gu-Chi-Wan solution (4 g/kg of body weight, for three alternate days), and the animals were killed after 4 wk. Morphological analysis of alveolar bone rebuilding was performed using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and stereomicroscopy, and the variation of inflammation in the periodontium was determined histologically. The serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and of the bone-turnover biomarkers pyridinoline cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and osteocalcin (OC) were determined using radioimmunoassays. After treatment with Bu-Shen-Gu-Chi-Wan, there were significant decreases in the levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, ICTP and OC and decreased inflammatory infiltration in the periodontal tissues of Group T. significant changes in alveolar bone volume and density were detected by micro-CT, but stereomicroscopy did not detect a significant improvement of alveolar bone height. The data of the present study suggest that the traditional Chinese medicine, Bu-Shen-Gu-Chi-Wan, has anti-inflammatory function in experimental periodontitis and may simultaneously improve alveolar bone remodeling. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. An ethical analysis of crisis in chronic pain care: facts, issues and problems in pain medicine; Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, James; Schatman, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    We posit that in order to realistically, fully, and most positively affect the capability of implementing a more comprehensive paradigm of pain care it is necessary to: 1) recognize the complexity of chronic pain; 2) account for economic factors imposed upon the healthcare system, and 3) enable articulation of any paradigmatic revision within the contemporary medico-legal environment. Three primary ethical problems arise from the interaction(s) of these contingencies--namely 1) the under-treatment of pain, 2) the inappropriate over-utilization of pharmacologic agents and techniques, and 3) tensions and conflicts that develop within the relationships of pain medicine. All can lead to a failure of technically apt and ethically sound pain care. This essay--the first in a 3-part series--employs the method of ethical analysis to approach the circumstances, issues, questions, and problems of contemporary practice of pain medicine, to allow insight(s) to the facts, define the agents involved, appreciate how problems are generated, and develop more thorough evaluation and articulation of potential resolutions. We contend that resolution of these problems must offer practical responses to the circumstances and issues. Such practicality entails affording "good" in ways that are grounded to the facts and realities of situations, and are not merely theoretical or conceptual. Determining the "good" is the work of ethics--as systems and analyses of the moral decisional process. Ethics establishes norms and articulates their use in practice, and we opine that the distinction between the normative and applied is more of a continuum that is dependent upon case and circumstance(s). Given the variety of circumstances in the practice of pain medicine, no single ethical system would be totally adequate, and we believe a discursive approach to be most effective. Subsequent papers in this series will describe the systems, structure, and function of a putative ethical infrastructure of

  20. [Education in our time: competency or aptitude? The case for medicine. Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viniegra-Velázquez, Leonardo

    This paper begins with a statement: It is necessary to characterize the respective society to be able to understand the education's core. Distinctive features of the present-day world lead us to define it as the ruin of a civilization based on limitless financial gain, where education has a passive quality, responsible of maintaining the status quo as well as preserving the degrading attributes of actual societies: individualism, passivity, competitiveness, consumerism and high vulnerability to control and manipulation. About the dilemma: competency or aptitude, these are not synonyms but concepts pertaining radically different approaches to the practice and understanding of education. Competency represents the actual tendencies of passive education, where knowledge is just about acquiring information. Aptitude refers to participatory education, described in the second part of this essay. The passive education is present in the professional competencies model, specified in terms of curricula, profiles, levels, school activities, evaluation, concept of progress and social consequences. This paradigm does not foster real progress-defined as the primacy of values sustaining spiritual, intellectual and moral development but as an "accomplice" of the civilization's collapse. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - part 1: Achillea millefolium-Curcuma longa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calapai, Gioacchino; Miroddi, Marco; Minciullo, Paola L; Caputi, Achille P; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Schmidt, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph has been produced. Part 1: Achillea millefolium L.-Curcuma longa L. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Current and Future Magnetic Resonance Technologies for Assessing Liver Disease in Clinical and Experimental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawden, Stephen J; Scott, R A; Aithal, Guruprasad P

    2017-01-01

    In the past decades, a number of non-invasive methods have emerged for detecting and estimating liver fibrosis; these include both serum-based panels and imaging-based technology. Some of these methods are now being incorporated in clinical practice. However, the limitations of the current techniques include lack of organ specificity, sampling errors and limited ability to reflect the efficacy of interventions. Key Messages: Novel magnetic resonance (MR)-based techniques provide an opportunity to bring about further changes in the investigations and management of patients with liver diseases. Multimodal quantitative MR techniques enable the estimation of fat, iron accumulation, degree of liver injury/inflammation and fibrosis within the whole liver without the need for administering contrast agents. Architectural changes within the liver can be evaluated concurrently with portal haemodynamic changes allowing non-invasive assessment of portal hypertension and effects of interventions. A combination ultra-high field (7T) provides greater sensitivity with a potential to distinguish inflammation from fibrosis on imaging and determine specific types of fats (saturated vs. unsaturated) present within the liver using MR spectroscopy. 13C MR spectroscopy can estimate glutathione flux and rate of beta oxidation in-vivo providing novel tools for experimental studies that evaluate the efficacy of interventions as well as underlying mechanisms. Translational research should focus on converting the potentials of these innovative methodologies into clinical applications for the benefit of patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. A shift from cell cultures to creatures: in vivo imaging of small animals in experimental regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studwell, Anna J; Kotton, Darrell N

    2011-11-01

    Although the use of small animals for in vivo experimentation has been widespread, only recently has there been easy availability of techniques that allow noninvasive in vivo imaging of small animals. Because these techniques allow the same individual subject to be followed longitudinally throughout the duration of an experiment, their use is rapidly changing the way small animals are employed in the laboratory. In this review, we focus on six imaging modalities that are increasingly employed for small animal in vivo imaging: optical imaging (OI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), ultrasound (US), and positron-emission tomography (PET). Each modality allows for the noninvasive tracking of cells and cell products in vivo. In addition, multimodality imaging, combining two or more of these techniques, has also been increasingly employed to overcome the limitations of each independent technique. After reviewing these available imaging modalities, we detail their experimental application, exemplified by the emerging field of regenerative medicine, referring to publications whose conclusions would otherwise be difficult to support without the availability of in vivo imaging.

  4. Effect of provenance, plant part and processing on extract profiles from cultivated European Rhodiola rosea L. for medicinal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Wieland; Prieto, José M; Karkour, Caroline; Williamson, Elizabeth M

    2013-02-01

    The demand for plant material of Rhodiola rosea L. (Crassulaceae) for medicinal use has increased recently, amid concerns about its quality and sustainability. We have analysed the content of phenylpropanoids (total rosavins) and salidroside in liquid extracts from 3-year old cultivated plants of European origin, and mapped the influence of plant part (rhizome versus root), genotype, drying, cutting, and extraction solvent to chemical composition. Rhizomes contained 1.5-4 times more salidroside (0.3-0.4% dry wt) and total rosavins (1.2-3.0%) than roots. The qualitative decisive phenylpropanoid content in the extracts was most influenced by plant part, solvent, and genotype, while drying temperature and cutting conditions were of less importance. We have shown that R. rosea from different boreal European provenances can be grown under temperate conditions and identified factors to obtain consistent high quality extracts provided that authentic germplasm is used and distinguished between rhizome, roots and their mixtures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process.

  6. Interview with Mikhail Gulyukin - Director of All-Russian research Institute of experimental Veterinary Medicine named after Y. R. Kovalenko, academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    GULYUKIN M.I.

    2016-01-01

    Interview with Mikhail Gulyukin director of All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Veterinary Medicine named after Y.R. Kovalenko, Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Interview taken on August 18, 2016 by Editor-in-Chief of RJOAS.

  7. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM) Program. Part 1: the QUANUM Program and Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    An effective management system that integrates quality management is essential for a modern nuclear medicine practice. The Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the mission of supporting nuclear medicine practice in low- and middle-income countries and of helping them introduce it in their health-care system, when not yet present. The experience gathered over several years has shown diversified levels of development and varying degrees of quality of practice, among others because of limited professional networking and limited or no opportunities for exchange of experiences. Those findings triggered the development of a program named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), aimed at improving the standards of NM practice in low- and middle-income countries to internationally accepted standards through the introduction of a culture of quality management and systematic auditing programs. QUANUM takes into account the diversity of nuclear medicine services around the world and multidisciplinary contributions to the practice. Those contributions include clinical, technical, radiopharmaceutical, and medical physics procedures. Aspects of radiation safety and patient protection are also integral to the process. Such an approach ensures consistency in providing safe services of superior quality to patients. The level of conformance is assessed using standards based on publications of the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and guidelines from scientific societies such as Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) and European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). Following QUANUM guidelines and by means of a specific assessment tool developed by the IAEA, auditors, both internal and external, will be able to evaluate the level of conformance. Nonconformances will then be prioritized and recommendations will be provided during an exit briefing. The

  8. Offer and use of complementary and alternative medicine in hospitals of the French-speaking part of Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruzzo, Philippe; Graz, Bertrand; Rodondi, Pierre-Yves; Michaud, Pierre-André

    2013-09-06

    In 2004, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was offered by physicians in one-third of Swiss hospitals. Since then, CAM health policy has changed considerably. This study aimed to describe the present supply and use of CAM in hospitals in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, and to explore qualitatively the characteristics of this offer. Between June 2011 and March 2012, a short questionnaire was sent to the medical directors of hospitals (n = 46), asking them whether CAM was offered, where and by whom. Then, a semi-directive interview was conducted with ten CAM therapists. Among 37 responses (return rate 80%), 19 medical directors indicated that their hospital offered at least one CAM and 18 reported that they did not. Acupuncture was the most frequently available CAM, followed by manual therapies, osteopathy and aromatherapy. The disciplines that offered CAM most frequently were rehabilitation, gynaecology and obstetrics, palliative care, psychiatry, and anaesthetics. In eight out of ten interviews, it appeared that the procedures for introducing a CAM in the hospital were not tightly supervised by the hospital and were mainly based on the goodwill of the therapists, rather than clinical/scientific evidence. The number of hospitals offering CAM in the French-speaking part of Switzerland seemed to have risen since 2004. The selection of a CAM to be offered in a hospital should be based on the same procedure of evaluation and validation as conventional therapy, and if the safety and efficiency of the CAM is evidence-based, it should receive the same resources as a conventional therapy.

  9. Experimental Ejection Forces of Thermoplastic Parts From Rapid Tooled Injection Mold Inserts (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kinsella, Mary E; Lilly, Blaine

    2007-01-01

    .... Ejection forces for cylindrical parts molded with high density polyethylene and high impact polystyrene were measured directly and compared with values calculated from an ejection force differently...

  10. Evidence-based medicine, systematic reviews, and guidelines in interventional pain management: Part 2: Randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Smith, Howard S

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a shift in medical paradigms and about solving clinical problems, acknowledging that intuition, unsystematic clinical experience, and pathophysiologic rationale are insufficient grounds for clinical decision-making. The importance of randomized trials has been created by the concept of the hierarchy of evidence in guiding therapy. Even though the concept of hierarchy of evidence is not absolute, in modern medicine, most researchers synthesizing the evidence may or may not follow the principles of EBM, which requires that a formal set of rules must complement medical training and common sense for clinicians to interpret the results of clinical research. N of 1 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been positioned as the top of the hierarchy followed by systematic reviews of randomized trials, single randomized trial, systematic review of observational studies, single observational study, physiologic studies, and unsystematic clinical observations. However, some have criticized that the hierarchy of evidence has done nothing more than glorify the results of imperfect experimental designs on unrepresentative populations in controlled research environments above all other sources of evidence that may be equally valid or far more applicable in given clinical circumstances. Design, implementation, and reporting of randomized trials is crucial. The biased interpretation of results from randomized trials, either in favor of or opposed to a treatment, and lack of proper understanding of randomized trials, leads to a poor appraisal of the quality. Multiple types of controlled trials include placebo-controlled and pragmatic trials. Placebo controlled RCTs have multiple shortcomings such as cost and length, which limit the availability for studying certain outcomes, and may suffer from problems of faulty implementation or poor generalizability, despite the study design which ultimately may not be the prime consideration when weighing evidence

  11. Therapeutic Efficacy of Topically Applied Antioxidant Medicinal Plant Extracts in a Mouse Model of Experimental Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Bum; Li, Ying; Choi, Ji Suk; Lee, Hyo Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the therapeutic effects of topical administration of antioxidant medicinal plant extracts in a mouse model of experimental dry eye (EDE). Methods. Eye drops containing balanced salt solution (BSS) or 0.001%, 0.01%, and 0.1% extracts were applied for the treatment of EDE. Tear volume, tear film break-up time (BUT), and corneal fluorescein staining scores were measured 10 days after desiccating stress. In addition, we evaluated the levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, IL-6, interferon- (IFN-) γ, and IFN-γ associated chemokines, percentage of CD4+C-X-C chemokine receptor type 3 positive (CXCR3+) T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) positive cells, and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Results. Compared to the EDE and BSS control groups, the mice treated with topical application of the 0.1% extract showed significant improvements in all clinical parameters, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels, percentage of CD4+CXCR3+ T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-HNE-positive cells, and extracellular ROS production (P extracts improved clinical signs, decreased inflammation, and ameliorated oxidative stress marker and ROS production on the ocular surface of the EDE model mice. PMID:27313829

  12. What is the position of Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine in its scholarly journal network based on journal metrics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sun

    2014-12-01

    Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine (CERM) converted its language to English only beginning with the first issue of 2011. From that point in time, one of the goals of the journal has been to become a truly international journal. This paper aims to identify the position of CERM in its scholarly journal network based on the journal's metrics. The journal's metrics, including citations, countries of author affiliation, and countries of citing authors, Hirsch index, and proportion of funded articles, were gathered from Web of Science and analyzed. The two-year impact factor of 2013 was calculated at 0.971 excluding self-citation, which corresponds to a Journal Citation Reports ranking of 85.9% in the category of obstetrics and gynecology. In 2012, 2013, and 2014, the total citations were 17, 68, and 85, respectively. Authors from nine countries contributed to CERM. Researchers from 25 countries cited CERM in their articles. The Hirsch index was six. Out of 88 original articles, 35 studies received funds (39.8%). Based on the journal metrics, changing the journal language to English was found to be successful in promoting CERM to international journal status.

  13. Medicine Sellers for Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections: Effect of a Quasi-Experimental Training Intervention in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Nazmul; Alam, Anadil; Fournier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This study used a quasi-experimental pre-post design to test whether short training can improve medicine sellers' (MSs) practices and skills for prevention and control of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Bangladesh. The training included lectures, printed materials, and identification of referral sites. Difference-in-differences estimation was used to determine the effects of intervention on key primary and secondary outcomes. Advice given by the MSs in intervention group for partner treatment and condoms use increased significantly by 11% and 9%, respectively, after adjusting for baseline differences in education, religion, age, duration of training, and study site. Referral of clients to qualified service providers increased by 5% in the intervention group compared to the comparison group, but this change was not found to be statistically significant. Significantly higher proportion of MSs in the intervention group recognized the recommended medications as per the national syndromic management guidelines in Bangladesh for treatment of urethral discharge and genital ulcer symptoms. Short training intervention was found to be effective in improving MSs' practice of promoting condom use and partner treatment to the clients. We anticipate the need for broad based training programs of MSs to improve their skills for the prevention and control of STI/HIV in Bangladesh.

  14. Oriental Medicine Samhwangsasim-tang Alleviates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Suppressing Th1 Cell Responses and Upregulating Treg Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min J; Choi, Jong H; Lee, Sung J; Cho, Ik-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Oriental medicine Samhwangsasim-tang (SHSST) has traditionally been used in East Asia to treat hypertension and its complications. However, little is known about its potential value regarding the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we investigated whether SHSST has a beneficial effect in treating myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Onset-treatment with SHSST was found to alleviate neurological symptoms as well as demyelination and glial activation in the spinal cords from the EAE mice. The SHSST also attenuated the mRNA or protein expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta and tumor necrotic factor-alpha); chemokines (RANTES, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha); inducible nitric oxide synthase; and cyclooxygenase-2 in correspondence with the down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappa B and mitogen-activated protein kinases signal pathways in the spinal cords from EAE mice. Interestingly, the protective effect of the SHSST was related to a decreased number of Th1 cells and an increased number of Treg cells in spinal cords from EAE mice. Taken together, our finding firstly suggested that SHSST could delay or mitigate EAE with a wide therapeutic time-window by suppressing Th1 cell responses and upregulating Treg cell responses. Also, our findings are strong enough to warrant further investigation of SHSST as a treatment for chronic autoimmune diseases including MS.

  15. To repent or to rationalize: three physicians exchange letters on the ethics of experimentation in postwar medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wispelwey, Bram P; Jotkowitz, Alan B

    2013-01-01

    In the late 1990s, three prominent figures of 20th-century medicine-Paul Beeson, Howard Burchell, and Shimon Glick-exchanged private letters on the ethics of experimentation in the years following World War II. What began as a brief published back-and-forth blossomed into a long correspondence filled with humor and wisdom even in the face of continued disagreement. The history of postwar investigation unfolds memorably in their letters, starting with the whistleblowing of Beecher and Pappworth and moving into the 21st century. The heart of the discussion focuses on the ethics of consent and legitimate risk in clinical investigation, and on the prevalence of violations of patients' rights. Glick openly discusses his views about the widespread practice of their subjection to experiments without benefit or unrelated to their conditions. In opposition, Burchell claims that accusations of ethical misconduct during this period were exaggerated, and that most of these studies would pass review boards today. Just when things seem to reach an immutable impasse, Beeson weighs in with keen insight and personal experience. The debate provides not only an intimate perspective on some of the most influential physician investigators of the last half-century, but also a context for productively approaching ethical questions of today.

  16. The Feasibility of Administering a Practical Clinical Examination in Podiatry at a College of Podiatric Medicine: Results of a Field Trial Under Simulated Part III Test Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Valletta, Michael

    1978-01-01

    The results of a practical clinical examination in podiatric medicine administered to fourth-year students are presented. The examination could become the prototype of a Part III practical clinical examination under the auspices of the National Board of Podiatry Examiners. Its feasibility is established and problems and issues are discussed.…

  17. [Achievements of the Cracow School of Forensic Medicine--on the 200 the anniversary of the Chair of Forensic Medicine--Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Zdzisław

    2006-01-01

    The Chair of Forensic Medicine was established at the Jagiellonian University in 1804. Initially, the Cracow academic institution developed along the similar lines as other Chairs of those times. Considerable progress was made thanks to Professor W. Hechel, who headed the Chair since 1834 and initiated intensive research and didactic activities. His successors, mostly Professors Antoni Bryk and Stanisław Janikowski, extended the Chair, strengthening its importance at the University and in the judicial system. The golden age commenced in 1882, when Professor Leon Blumenstock became Head of the Chair. Other founders of the Cracow School of Forensic Medicine include Professors Leon Wachholz and Jan Olbrycht (1895-1962). It was these two eminent scientists that wrote important textbooks, discovered new methods and helped the Cracow institution to become a significant research center of forensic medicine. Their important achievements include the test for COHb determination in blood of victims of carbon monoxide poisoning (the Wachholz-Sieradzki test), the explanation of death mechanisms involved in violent death by drawning, the development of protocols for opinionating and event reconstruction in cases of violent death by poisoning and mechanical injuries, and the widely accepted theory and medicolegal assessment of medical errors. Other outstanding achievements focused on investigations of biological trace evidence, serohematology in determinations of fatherhood, and--what may be the most important--identification of responsibilities and role of an expert in legal proceedings, and many others. The work of several generations of Cracow forensic medicine specialist has culminated in training a cadre of specialists who became heads of the majority of Chairs of Forensic Medicine in Poland, writing numerous textbooks for students, monographs, hundreds of research papers and an enormous number of medico-legal opinions, the participation in almost all major court

  18. Influence of Prescribed Herbal and Western Medicine on Patients with Abnormal Liver Function Tests: A Retrospective Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah-Ram; Yim, Je-Min; Kim, Won-Il

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and the efficacy of Korean herbal, western and combination medicine use in patients with abnormal liver function tests. Methods: We investigated nerve disease patients with abnormal liver function tests who were treated with Korean herbal, western and combination medicine at Dong-Eui University Oriental Hospital from January 2011 to August 2011. We compared aspartic aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total bilirubin (T-bil) levels before and after taking medicine and excluded patients who had liver-related disease when admitted. Results: AST and ALT were decreased significantly in patients who had taken herbal, western medicine. AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. Compare to herbal medicine, AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken western medicine, and ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. There were no significant differences between western and combination medicine. Conclusions: This study suggests that prescribed Korean herbal medicine, at least, does not injure liver function for patients’, moreover, it was shown to be effective in patients with abnormal liver function tests. PMID:25780634

  19. Influence of prescribed herbal and Western medicine on patients with abnormal liver function tests: a retrospective quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah-Ram; Yim, Je-Min; Kim, Won-Il

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and the efficacy of Korean herbal, western and combination medicine use in patients with abnormal liver function tests. We investigated nerve disease patients with abnormal liver function tests who were treated with Korean herbal, western and combination medicine at Dong-Eui University Oriental Hospital from January 2011 to August 2011. We compared aspartic aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total bilirubin (T-bil) levels before and after taking medicine and excluded patients who had liver-related disease when admitted. AST and ALT were decreased significantly in patients who had taken herbal, western medicine. AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. Compare to herbal medicine, AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken western medicine, and ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. There were no significant differences between western and combination medicine. This study suggests that prescribed Korean herbal medicine, at least, does not injure liver function for patients', moreover, it was shown to be effective in patients with abnormal liver function tests.

  20. Influence of Prescribed Herbal and Western Medicine on Patients with Abnormal Liver Function Tests: A Retrospective Quasi-Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ah-Ram

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and the efficacy of Korean herbal, western and combination medicine use in patients with abnormal liver function tests. Methods: We investigated nerve disease patients with abnor-mal liver function tests who were treated with Korean herbal, western and combination medicine at Dong-Eui University Oriental Hospital from January 2011 to August 2011. We co-mpared aspartic aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotran-sferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and total bilirubin (T-bil levels before and after taking medicine and excluded patients who had liver-related disease when admitted. Results: AST and ALT were decreased significantly in patients who had taken herbal, western medicine. AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken comb-ination medicine. Compare to herbal medicine, AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken western medicine, and ALT and ALP were decreased signifi-cantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. There were no significant differences between western and combin-ation medicine. Conclusions: This study suggests that prescribed Korean herbal medicine, at least, does not injure liver function for patients’, moreover, it was shown to be effective in patients with abnormal liver function tests.

  1. The business of palliative medicine--part 4: Potential impact of an acute-care palliative medicine inpatient unit in a tertiary care cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Declan

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a hematology/oncology computerized discharge database was qualitatively and quantitatively reviewed using an empirical methodology. The goal was to identify potential patients for admission to a planned acute-care, palliative medicine inpatient unit. Patients were identified by the International Classifications of Disease (ICD-9) codes. A large heterogenous population, comprising up to 40 percent of annual discharges from the Hematology/Oncology service, was identified. If management decided to add an acute-care, palliative medicine unit to the hospital, these are the patients who would benefit. The study predicted a significant change in patient profile, acuity, complexity, and resource utilization in current palliative care services. This study technique predicted the actual clinical load of the acute-care unit when it opened and was very helpful in program development. Our model predicted that 695 patients would be admitted to the acute-care palliative medicine unit in the first year of operation; 655 patients were actually admitted during this time.

  2. A thermoelectric power generating heat exchanger: Part I – Experimental realization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Sarhadi, Ali; Pryds, Nini

    2016-01-01

    An experimental realization of a heat exchanger with commercial thermoelectric generators (TEGs) is presented. The power producing capabilities as a function of flow rate and temperature span are characterized for two different commercial heat transfer fluids and for three different thermal...

  3. A Transverse Oscillation Approach for Estimation of Three-Dimensional Velocity Vectors, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2014-01-01

    The 3-D transverse oscillation method is investigated by estimating 3-D velocities in an experimental flowrigsystem. Measurements of the synthesized transverse oscillatingfields are presented as well. The method employs a 2-D transducer; decouples the velocity estimation; and estimates the axial,...

  4. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - part 4: Solidago virgaurea-Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciullo, Paola L; Calapai, Gioacchino; Miroddi, Marco; Mannucci, Carmen; Chinou, Ioanna; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Schmidt, Richard J

    2017-08-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph - now (since 2014) called a 'European Union herbal monograph' - has been produced. The present part 4 addresses species from Solidago virgaurea L. to Vitis vinifera L. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - Part 3: Mentha × piperita - Solanum dulcamara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calapai, Gioacchino; Minciullo, Paola L; Miroddi, Marco; Chinou, Ioanna; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Schmidt, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph - now (since 2015)(†) called a European Union herbal monograph - has been produced. Part 3: Mentha × piperita L.-Solanum dulcamara L. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. XingNaoJing, prescription of traditional Chinese medicine, prevents autophagy in experimental stroke by repressing p53-DRAM pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gang; Huang, YueChun; Li, Fei; Zeng, FeiJian; Li, YiWei; Deng, RuDong; Lai, YingTao; Zhou, JianHong; Huang, GuiHua; Chen, DongFeng

    2015-10-19

    Xingnaojing (XNJ), a well known prescription in traditional Chinese medicine, has been used for treatment of stroke in China. However, the effects and mechanisms of XNJ on autophagy are not clear. Here, we used the cell models of autophagy induced by serum-free condition and ischemia stroke in rats to further investigate whether the p53-DRAM pathway is involved in the effects of XNJ on autophagy. We used the cell model of autophagy induced by serum-free condition and the rat model of ischemia caused by a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The effects of XNJ on p53 transcriptional activity of PC12 cells were evaluated by the luciferase activity assay. The mRNA levels and the expression of p53 and its target autophagy gene DRAM (damage-regulated autophagy modulator) were analyzed respectively by Quantitative-RTPCR and Western blot assay. The activation of autophagy was detected by the levels of autophagy markers, microtubule associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) and p62 by Immunofluorescence and Western blot. p53 inhibitor was used to determine whether p53 is responsible for the effects of XNJ on preventing autophagy. The assay for luciferase activity of p53 promoter indicated that XNJ inhibited p53 transcriptional activity. XNJ reduced the expression of p53 and its target autophagy gene DRAM (damage-regulated autophagy modulator) in serum-free condition PC12 cells and the cortex in MCAO rats. XNJ reduced autophagy of PC12 cells induced by serum-free condition and the cortex in MCAO rats. Furthermore, suppression of p53 by p53 inhibitor significantly reduced the effects of XNJ on the autophagy of PC12 cells in serum-free condition. XNJ prevents autophagy in experimental stroke by repressing p53/DRAM pathway. Our findings are therefore of considerable therapeutic significance and provide the novel and potential application of XNJ for the treatment of brain diseases.

  7. An NMR metabolomics investigation of perturbations after treatment with Chinese herbal medicine formula in an experimental model of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunzhi; Liu, Hongbin; Wu, Xianzhong; Li, Donghua; Huang, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. OMICS and systems pharmacology approaches offer the promise of new therapeutic candidates for the treatment of patients with sepsis. Qin-Re-Jie-Du (QRJD) and Liang-Xue-Huo-Xue (LXHX) are two traditional Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) formulas with putative effects in sepsis treatment. The present study aimed to assess their efficacy in an experimental model of sepsis in rats (cecal ligation and punctures) and investigate their mechanism of action using a 1H-NMR metabolomics approach. Rats were randomly divided into four groups (i.e., model group, sham control group, and two CHM treatment groups). Water extracts of QRJD and LXHX were orally administered to the two CHM treatment groups at a dose of 24 g/kg of body weight, once daily for 3 consecutive days. The same volume of 0.9% saline solution was orally administered to the model and sham surgery groups. Plasma samples were collected and measured using 600 MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy. As a result, 18 potential metabolite biomarkers involved in multiple metabolic pathways, including increased energy metabolism, fat mobilization, and disrupted amino acid metabolism, were identified in septic rats. The principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant (PLS-DA) plots of the metabolic state correlated well with the mortality and clinical biochemistry results. An analysis of potential biomarkers verified the holistic effects of the two CHM formulas. The Cori cycle was positively regulated in the QRJD-treated formulas treatment group but also inhibited in the LXHX-treated group, which demonstrates the different efficacies of these solutions in septic rats.

  8. Ethno-diversity within current ethno-pharmacology as part of Israeli traditional medicine – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Efraim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Holy Land has absorbed millions of immigrants in recent centuries: Jews from East and West, Druze, Circassians, Muslim and Christian Arabs. The land is unique and diverse in geographical location and ethnic groups, and also in its cultural characteristics, including traditional medicine and use of materia medica. However, these traditions have waned over the years. The young state of Israel adopted a "melting pot" approach to fashion Jews from all over the world into Israelis. The traditional medicine and materia medica of different ethnic groups (Yemenite, Iranian, and Iraqi Jews are reviewed in this paper, as well as the ethno-botanical survey (first conducted in the 1980s, covering Bedouins, Druze, Circassians, and Muslim and Christian Arabs, and the matching ethno-pharmacological survey (conducted in the late 1990s covering the medicines sold in stores. Present-day healers are usually not young and are believed to be the end of the chain of traditional medical knowledge. The ethno-diversity of Israel is becoming blurred; modernity prevails, and ethnic characteristics are fading. The characteristic lines of traditional medicine and materia medica have hardly lasted three generations. A salient former dividing line between ethnic groups, namely their use of different medicinal substances, paradoxically becomes a bridge for conservative users of all groups and religions. Shops selling these substances have become centers for "nostalgia" and preserving the oriental heritage, traditional medicine, and medicinal substances!

  9. The Mallory body: morphological, clinical and experimental studies (Part 1 of a literature survey)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Gluud, C

    1994-01-01

    suggest a hit-and-run effect of alcohol, whereas other chronic liver diseases show evidence of gradual increase in prevalence of Mallory bodies with severity of hepatic pathology. Mallory bodies in cirrhosis do not imply alcoholic pathogenesis. Obesity, however, is associated with alcoholism and diabetes......, and Mallory bodies are only present in diabetic patients if alcoholism or obesity complicates the condition. In addition, case studies on diseases in which Mallory bodies have been identified, along with pharmacological side effects and experimental induction of Mallory bodies by various antimitotic......To aid understanding of markers of disease and predictors of outcome in alcohol-exposed systems, we undertook a literature survey of more than 700 articles to view the morphological characteristics and the clinical and experimental epidemiology of the Mallory body. Mallory bodies are filaments...

  10. Experimental Investigation into Suitable Process Conditions for Plastic Injection Molding of Thin-Sheet Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyi-Cheng Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study performs an experimental investigation into the effects of the process parameters on the surface quality of injection molded thin-sheet thermoplastic components. The investigations focus specifically on the shape, number and position of the mold gates, the injection pressure and the injection rate. It can be seen that the gravity force entering point improved filling of the cavity for the same forming time and injection pressure. Moreover, it shows the same injection pressure and packing time, the taper-shape gate yields a better surface appearance than the sheet-shape gate. The experimental results provide a useful source of reference in suitable the process conditions for the injection molding of thin-sheet plastic components.

  11. Combustion Behaviour of Pulverised Wood - Numerical and Experimental Studies. Part 1 Numerical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfasakhany, A.; Xue-Song Bai [Lund Inst. of Tech. (Sweden). Dept. of Heat and Power Engineering

    2002-12-01

    This report describes a theoretical/numerical investigation of the particle motion and the particle drying, pyrolysis, oxidation of volatile and char in a pulverised biofuel (wood) flame. This work, along with the experimental measurement of a pulverised wood flame in a vertical furnace at TPS, is supported by the Swedish Energy Agency, STEM. The fundamental combustion process of a pulverised wood flame with determined size distribution and anisotropy character is studied. Comprehensive submodels are studied and some models not available in the literature are developed. The submodels are integrated to a CFD code, previously developed at LTH. The numerical code is used to simulate the experimental flame carried out at TPS (as sub-task 2 within the project). The sub-models describe the drying, devolatilization, char formation of wood particles, and the oxidation reaction of char and the gas phase volatile. At the present stage, the attention is focused on the understanding and modelling of non-spherical particle dynamics and the drying, pyrolysis, and oxidation of volatile and char. Validation of the sub-models against the experimental data is presented and discussed in this study. The influence of different factors on the pulverised wood flame in the TPS vertical furnace is investigated. This includes shape of the particles, the effect of volatile release, as well as the orientation of the particles on the motion of the particles. The effect of particle size on the flame structure (distribution of species and temperature along the axis of the furnace) is also studied. The numerical simulation is in close agreement with the TPS experimental data in the concentrations of species O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} as well as temperature. Some discrepancy between the model simulations and measurements is observed, which suggests that further improvement in our understanding and modeling the pulverised wood flame is needed.

  12. Stress state dependence of in-reactor creep and swelling. Part 2: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M. M., Jr.; Flinn, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation creep constitutive equations, which were developed in Part I, are used here to analyze in-reactor creep and swelling data obtained ca. 1977-1979 as part of the US breeder reactor program. The equations were developed according to the principles of incremental continuum plasticity for the purpose of analyzing data obtained from a novel irradiation experiment that was conducted, in part, using Type 304 stainless steel that had been previously irradiated to significant levels of void swelling. Analyses of these data support an earlier observation that all stress states, whether tensile, compressive, shear or mixed, can affect both void swelling and interactions between irradiation creep and swelling. The data were obtained using a set of five unique multiaxial creep-test specimens that were designed and used for the first time in this study. The data analyses demonstrate that the constitutive equations derived in Part I provide an excellent phenomenological representation of the interactive creep and swelling phenomena. These equations provide nuclear power reactor designers and analysts with a first-of-its-kind structural analysis tool for evaluating irradiation damage-dependent distortion of complex structural components having gradients in neutron damage rate, temperature and stress state.

  13. Experimenter's Pantomimes Influence Children's Use of Body Part as Object and Imaginary Object Pantomimes: A Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert W.; Clark, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Young children asked to pretend to use a series of absent objects typically pantomime by using a body part as the object (BPO) rather than by acting as if using an imaginary object (IO). This replication of Lyons's work (1983, 1986) examines whether different pretend contexts when requesting pantomimes influence children's use of IO and BPO…

  14. MATLAB-based Applications for Image Processing and Image Quality Assessment – Part II: Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Krasula

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an overview of some possible usage of the software described in the Part I. It contains the real examples of image quality improvement, distortion simulations, objective and subjective quality assessment and other ways of image processing that can be obtained by the individual applications.

  15. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  16. Safety aspects of Chinese herbal medicine in pregnancy-re-evaluation of experimental data of two animal studies and the clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebrecht, Axel; Gaus, Wilhelm; Becker, Simon; Hummelsberger, Josef; Kuhlmann, Kirsten

    2014-10-01

    Chinese herbal medicine is an increasingly popular worldwide medical therapy which also has an impact in pregnancy. However, the question of its drug safety during pregnancy remains unresolved. Potential problems include teratogenicity, abortion, perinatal toxicity, pre- and postnatal developmental abnormalities, and eventually an increased risk for carcinomas in the offspring. Standard Materia Medica textbooks contain unreliable information when it comes to risks during pregnancy. Wang and co-workers conducted an experimental study (WS) on mice in which they investigated the effects of 17 Chinese medicinals regarding embryotoxicity and fetotoxicity. All these drugs seemed to exhibit multiple significant toxic effects. Another study by Li and co-workers (LS) investigated the reproductive toxicity of Atractylodis macrocephalae Rhizoma in mice, rats and rabbits. They described an increased pre- and postnatal mortality and, at high doses, congenital malformations. In an attempt to identify the risks of the tested medicinals during pregnancy, we analysed these two experimental studies and compared their results with possible safety data for humans from two reviews of clinical studies on threatened miscarriage (AR and CR). We re-evaluated WS and LS in relation to accordance with internationally accepted rules, equivalence to human dose, biometric accuracy, plausibility, and coherence. Eligible studies of the two reviews on threatened miscarriage were evaluated for specific pregnancy risks concerning the 17 medicinals tested in WS and LS. We found that WS does not conform to international ICH guidelines and includes many inconsistencies, implausibilities and several severe biometrical flaws. It reported a total of 364 significant events out of which 145 false significant results are expected. The data-handling pointed to irregularities. Analysis of LS exhibited also many inconsistencies. The results regarding congenital malformations were statistically insignificant and

  17. Experimental Study of Residual Stresses in Metal Parts Obtained by Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasov, C. E.; Safronov, V. A.; Kotoban, D. V.; Gusarov, A. V.

    High local temperature gradients occur at additive manufacturing by selective laser melting of powder. This gives rise to undesirable residual stresses, deformations, and cracks. To understand how to control the formation of the residual stresses, a reliable method is necessary for measuring their distribution in the fabricated part. It is proposed to cut the part into thin plates and to reconstruct the residual stresses from the measured deformation of the plates. This method is tested on beams with square cross-section built from stainless steel. The beams were cut by electrical discharge machining and chemically etched. The obtained stress profile in vertical transversal direction slightly increases from the top to the bottom of the beam. This dependency is confirmed by numerical modeling. The measured stress profile agrees with the known results by other authors.

  18. The two-stroke poppet valve engine. Part 1: Intake and exhaust ports flow experimental assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamili Zahidi, M.; Razali Hanipah, M.; Ramasamy, D.; Noor, M. M.; Kadirgama, K.; Rahman, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    A two-stroke poppet valve engine is developed to overcome the common problems in conventional two-stroke engine designs. However, replacing piston control port with poppet valve will resulted different flow behaviour. This paper is looking at experimental assessment on a two-stroke poppet valve engine configuration to investigate the port flow performance. The aims are to evaluate the intake and exhaust coefficient of discharge and assess the twostroke capability of the cylinder head. The results has shown comparable coefficient of discharge values as production engine for the intake while the exhaust has higher values which is favourable for the two-stroke cycle operation.

  19. Texture evolution of experimental silicon steel grades. Part I: Hot rolling

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval Robles, J. A.; Salas Zamarripa, A.; Martha P. Guerrero Mata; Cabrera Marrero, José M.

    2017-01-01

    The metallurgical understanding of the deformation processes during the fabrication of non-oriented electrical steels plays a key role in improving their final properties. Texture control and optimization is critical in these steels for the enhancement of their magnetic properties. The aim of the present work is to study the texture evolution of six non-oriented experimental silicon steel grades during hot rolling. These steels were low carbon steel with a silicon content from 0.5 to 3.0 wt%....

  20. Odontology and the history of medicine at the Royal Society of Medicine 1907-1960 and the contributions of Lilian Lindsay--Part One. The early years of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Section of Odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papworth, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the foundation of the Royal Society of Medicine and the Sections of Odontology. It considers the remarkable achievements of Lilian Lindsay which were made at a time when the medical world was almost entirely dominated by men.

  1. Projects in medical education: "Social Justice in Medicine" a rationale for an elective program as part of the medical education curriculum at John A. Burns School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Teresa; Rieth, Katherine

    2012-04-01

    Research has shown that cultural competence training improves the attitudes, knowledge, and skills of clinicians related to caring for diverse populations. Social Justice in medicine is the idea that healthcare workers promote fair treatment in healthcare so that disparities are eliminated. Providing students with the opportunity to explore social issues in health is the first step toward decreasing discrimination. This concept is required for institutional accreditation and widely publicized as improving health care delivery in our society. A literature review was performed searching for social justice training in medical curricula in North America. Twenty-six articles were discovered addressing the topic or related to the concept of social justice or cultural humility. The concepts are in accordance with objectives supported by the Future of Medical Education in Canada Report (2010), the Carnegie Foundation Report (2010), and the LCME guidelines. The authors have introduced into the elective curriculum of the John A. Burns School of Medicine a series of activities within a time span of four years to encourage medical students to further their knowledge and skills in social awareness and cultural competence as it relates to their future practice as physicians. At the completion of this adjunct curriculum, participants will earn the Dean's Certificate of Distinction in Social Justice, a novel program at the medical school. It is the hope of these efforts that medical students go beyond cultural competence and become fluent in the critical consciousness that will enable them to understand different health beliefs and practices, engage in meaningful discourse, perform collaborative problem-solving, conduct continuous self-reflection, and, as a result, deliver socially responsible, compassionate care to all members of society.

  2. Scaling Factor Estimation Using Optimized Mass Change Strategy, Part 2: Experimental Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, Pelayo Fernández; Aenlle, Manuel López; Garcia, Luis M. Villa

    2007-01-01

    of the structure. On the other hand, the aforementioned objectives are difficult to achieve for all modes simultaneously. Thus, a study of the number, magnitude and location of the masses must be performed previously to the modal tests. In this paper, the mass change method was applied to estimate the scaling......The mass change method is used to estimate the scaling factors, the uncertainty is reduced when, for each mode, the frequency shift is maximized and the changes in the mode shapes are minimized, which in turn, depends on the mass change strategy chosen to modify the dynamic behavior...... factors of a steel cantilever beam. The effect of the mass change strategy was experimentally studied by performing several modal tests in which the magnitude, the location and the number of the attached masses were changed....

  3. Variable Modal Parameter Identification for Non-Linear Mdof Systems. Part II: Experimental Validation and Advanced Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.H. Chong

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of Part II is to provide an experimental validation of the methodology presented in Part I and to consider a representative engineering case, the study of which requires a relatively large numerical model. A beam system with cubic stiffness type non-linearity was used in the experimental study. The non-linear response was measured at three locations and the underlying linear system was obtained via linear modal analysis of low-excitation response data. The non-linear parameter variations were obtained as a function of the modal amplitude and the response of the system was generated for other force levels. The results were found to agree very well with the corresponding measurements, indicating the success of the non-linear modal analysis methodology, even in the presence of true experimental noise. An advanced numerical case study that included both inherent structural damping and non-linear friction damping, was considered next. The linear finite element model of a high-pressure turbine blade was used in conjunction with three local non-linear friction damper elements. It was shown that the response of the system could be predicted at any force level, provided that that non-linear modal parameters were available at some reference force level. The predicted response levels were compared against those obtained from reference simulations and very good agreement was achieved in all cases.

  4. TRADITIONAL CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZHU, YP; WOERDENBAG, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Herbal medicine, acupuncture and moxibustion, and massage and the three major constituent parts of traditional Chinese medicine. Although acupuncture is well known in many Western countries, Chinese herbal medicine, the mos important part of traditional Chinese medicine, is less well known in the

  5. Experimental Studies on Assemblies 1 and 2 of the Fast Reactor FR-0. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrand, E.; Andersson, T.L.; Brunfelter, B.; Kockum, J.; Londen, S.O.; Tiren, L.I.

    1965-12-15

    In a first part of this report, published as AE-195, an account was given of critical mass determinations and measurements of flux distribution and reaction ratios in the first assemblies of the fast zero power reactor FR0. This second part of the report deals with various investigations involving the measurement of reactivity. Control rod calibrations have been made using the positive period, the inverse multiplication, the rod drop and the pulsed source techniques, and show satisfactory agreement between the various methods. The reactivity worths of samples of different materials and different sizes have been measured at the core centre. Comparisons with perturbation calculations show that the regular and adjoint fluxes are well predicted in the central region of the core. The variation in the prompt neutron life-time with reactivity has been studied by means of the pulsed source and the Rossi-{alpha} techniques. Comparison with one region calculations reveals large discrepancies, indicating that this simple model is inadequate. Some investigations of streaming effects in an empty channel in the reactor and of interaction effects between channels have been made and are compared with theoretical estimates. Measurements of the reactivity worth of an air gap between the reactor halves and of the temperature coefficient are also described in the report. The work has been performed as a joint effort by AB Atomenergi and the Research Institute of National Defence.

  6. Texture evolution of experimental silicon steel grades. Part I: Hot rolling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval Robles, J.A., E-mail: jsandoval.uanl@yahoo.com [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Ave. Universidad S/N, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66450 (Mexico); Salas Zamarripa, A.; Guerrero Mata, M.P. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Ave. Universidad S/N, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66450 (Mexico); Cabrera, J. [Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Departament de Ciència dels Materials I Enginyeria Metal-lúrgica, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    The metallurgical understanding of the deformation processes during the fabrication of non-oriented electrical steels plays a key role in improving their final properties. Texture control and optimization is critical in these steels for the enhancement of their magnetic properties. The aim of the present work is to study the texture evolution of six non-oriented experimental silicon steel grades during hot rolling. These steels were low carbon steel with a silicon content from 0.5 to 3.0 wt%. The first rolling schedule was performed in the austenitic (γ-Fe) region for the steel with a 0.5 wt% of silicon content, while the 1.0 wt% silicon steel was rolled in the two-phase (α+γ) region. Steels with higher silicon content were rolled in the ferritic (α-Fe) region. The second rolling schedule was performed in the α-Fe region. Samples of each stage were analyzed by means of Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). Findings showed that the texture was random and heterogeneous in all samples after 60% of rolling reduction, which is due to the low deformation applied during rolling. After the second rolling program, localized deformation and substructured grains near to surface were observed in all samples. The Goss {110}<001>texture-component was found in the 0.5 and 1.0 wt.-%silicon steels. This is due to the thermomechanical conditions and the corresponding hot band microstructure obtained after the first program. Moreover, the α<110>//RD and the γ <111>//ND fiber components of the texture presented a considerable increment as the silicon content increases. Future research to be published soon will be related to the texture evolution during the cold-work rolling process. - Highlights: • We analyze six silicon steel experimental grades alloys trough the rolling process. • Material was subjected to a hot deformation process in the α-γ region. • No recrystalization was observed during-after the rolling schedules. • Rise of the magnetic texture components

  7. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Program. Part 2: Analysis of Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Ordonez, Felix Barajas; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has developed a program, named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), to help its Member States to check the status of their nuclear medicine practices and their adherence to international reference standards, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine, including quality assurance/quality control of instrumentation, radiopharmacy (further subdivided into levels 1, 2, and 3, according to complexity of work), radiation safety, clinical applications, as well as managerial aspects. The QUANUM program is based on both internal and external audits and, with specifically developed Excel spreadsheets, it helps assess the level of conformance (LoC) to those previously defined quality standards. According to their level of implementation, the level of conformance to requested standards; 0 (absent) up to 4 (full conformance). Items scored 0, 1, and 2 are considered non-conformance; items scored 3 and 4 are considered conformance. To assess results of the audit missions performed worldwide over the last 8 years, a retrospective analysis has been run on reports from a total of 42 audit missions in 39 centers, three of which had been re-audited. The analysis of all audit reports has shown an overall LoC of 73.9 ± 8.3% (mean ± standard deviation), ranging between 56.6% and 87.9%. The highest LoC has been found in the area of clinical services (83.7% for imaging and 87.9% for therapy), whereas the lowest levels have been found for Radiopharmacy Level 2 (56.6%); Computer Systems and Data Handling (66.6%); and Evaluation of the Quality Management System (67.6%). Prioritization of non-conformances produced a total of 1687 recommendations in the final audit report. Depending on the impact on safety and daily clinical activities, they were further classified as critical (requiring immediate action; n = 276; 16% of the total); major (requiring action in relatively short time, typically from 3 to 6 months; n = 604

  8. More accurate macro-models of solid oxide fuel cells through electrochemical and microstructural parameter estimation - Part I: Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boigues Muñoz, Carlos; Pumiglia, Davide; McPhail, Stephen J.; Montinaro, Dario; Comodi, Gabriele; Santori, Giulio; Carlini, Maurizio; Polonara, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    The distributed relaxation times (DRT) method has been employed in order to deconvolute the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements carried out on a Ni-YSZ|YSZ|Pr2NiO4+δ - GDC solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This has enabled to shed light on the diverse physicochemical processes occurring within the aforementioned cell by individuating the characteristic relaxation times of these by means of a specifically designed experimental campaign where temperature and gas compositions in anode and cathode were varied one at a time. A comprehensive equivalent circuit model (ECM) has thus been generated based on the processes observed in the DRT spectra. This ECM has proved to be instrumental for the obtainment of parameters which describe the microstructural and electrochemical properties of the SOFC when used contemporaneously with experimental results and modelling theory (described in Part II of this work).

  9. Frequency-Dependent Streaming Potential of Porous Media—Part 1: Experimental Approaches and Apparatus Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. J. Glover

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrokinetic phenomena link fluid flow and electrical flow in porous and fractured media such that a hydraulic flow will generate an electrical current and vice versa. Such a link is likely to be extremely useful, especially in the development of the electroseismic method. However, surprisingly few experimental measurements have been carried out, particularly as a function of frequency because of their difficulty. Here we have considered six different approaches to make laboratory determinations of the frequency-dependent streaming potential coefficient. In each case, we have analyzed the mechanical, electrical, and other technical difficulties involved in each method. We conclude that the electromagnetic drive is currently the only approach that is practicable, while the piezoelectric drive may be useful for low permeability samples and at specified high frequencies. We have used the electro-magnetic drive approach to design, build, and test an apparatus for measuring the streaming potential coefficient of unconsolidated and disaggregated samples such as sands, gravels, and soils with a diameter of 25.4 mm and lengths between 50 mm and 300 mm.

  10. An experimental and modeling study of propene oxidation. Part 2: Ignition delay time and flame speed measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Burke, Sinéad M.

    2015-02-01

    Experimental data obtained in this study (Part II) complement the speciation data presented in Part I, but also offer a basis for extensive facility cross-comparisons for both experimental ignition delay time (IDT) and laminar flame speed (LFS) observables. To improve our understanding of the ignition characteristics of propene, a series of IDT experiments were performed in six different shock tubes and two rapid compression machines (RCMs) under conditions not previously studied. This work is the first of its kind to directly compare ignition in several different shock tubes over a wide range of conditions. For common nominal reaction conditions among these facilities, cross-comparison of shock tube IDTs suggests 20-30% reproducibility (2σ) for the IDT observable. The combination of shock tube and RCM data greatly expands the data available for validation of propene oxidation models to higher pressures (2-40. atm) and lower temperatures (750-1750. K).Propene flames were studied at pressures from 1 to 20. atm and unburned gas temperatures of 295-398. K for a range of equivalence ratios and dilutions in different facilities. The present propene-air LFS results at 1. atm were also compared to LFS measurements from the literature. With respect to initial reaction conditions, the present experimental LFS cross-comparison is not as comprehensive as the IDT comparison; however, it still suggests reproducibility limits for the LFS observable. For the LFS results, there was agreement between certain data sets and for certain equivalence ratios (mostly in the lean region), but the remaining discrepancies highlight the need to reduce uncertainties in laminar flame speed experiments amongst different groups and different methods. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the burning rate characteristics of propene at elevated pressures (>5. atm).IDT and LFS measurements are compared to predictions of the chemical kinetic mechanism presented in Part I and good

  11. Investigation of sol-gel transition by rheological methods. Part I. Experimental methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUDRYAVTSEV Pavel Gennadievich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work rheological studies of the gelling process were carried out. We have developed a measuring system for studying the rheology of the gelation process. It consisted of several measuring cells of the Weiler-Rebinder type, system for automatic regulation of the composition of the medium and hermostabilization system. This complex is designed to measure the dependence of the value of the ultimate shear stress as a function of time, from the start of the sol-gel transition to the complete conversion of the sol to the gel. The developed device has a wide range of measured values of critical shear stresses τ0 = (0,05÷50000 Dyne/cm2. Using the developed instrument, it was possible to establish the shape of the initial section of the curve τ0 = f(t and develop a methodology for more accurate determination of gelation time. The developed method proved that the classical method for determining the start time of the sol-gel transition using the point of intersection of the tangent to the linear part of the rheological curve τ0 = f(t,gives significantly distorted results. A new phenomenon has been discovered: the kinetic curves in the coordinates of the Avrami-Erofeev-Bogolyubov equation have an inflection point which separates the kinetic curve into two parts, the initial and the final. It was found that the constant k in the Avrami–Erofeev–Bogolyubov quation does not depend on the temperature and is the same for both the initial and final parts of the kinetic curve. It depends only on the chemical nature of the reacting system. It was found that for the initial section of the kinetic curves, the value of the parameter n in the Avrami-Erofeev-Bogolyubov equation was n = 23,4±2,8 and, unlike the final section of the rheological curve, does not depend on temperature. A large value of this parameter can be interpreted as the average number of directions of growth of a fractal aggregate during its growth. The value of this parameter depends

  12. Quality of equine veterinary care. Part 2: Client satisfaction in equine top sports medicine in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, J.B.A.; Waaijer, P.G.; Maree, J.T.M.; Weeren, van P.R.; Barneveld, A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate systematically the quality of equine veterinary top sports medicine in The Netherlands and the degree to which the expectations in the field are met. Focus was on structure, process and outcome of care. The structure of care is generally satisfactory but there

  13. 42 CFR Appendix D to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Nuclear Medicine Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... courses in the following areas: (1) Human anatomy and physiology; (2) Physics; (3) Mathematics; (4..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING STANDARDS FOR THE ACCREDITATION OF...; (i) Departmental organization and function; (j) Radiation biology; (k) Nuclear medicine in vivo and...

  14. A transverse oscillation approach for estimation of three-dimensional velocity vectors, part II: experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    The 3-D transverse oscillation method is investigated by estimating 3-D velocities in an experimental flow-rig system. Measurements of the synthesized transverse oscillating fields are presented as well. The method employs a 2-D transducer; decouples the velocity estimation; and estimates the axial, transverse, and elevation velocity components simultaneously. Data are acquired using a research ultrasound scanner. The velocity measurements are conducted with steady flow in sixteen different directions. For a specific flow direction with [α, ß] = [45, 15]°, the mean estimated velocity vector at the center of the vessel is (v(x), v(y), v(z)) = (33.8, 34.5, 15.2) ± (4.6, 5.0, 0.6) cm/s where the expected velocity is (34.2, 34.2, 13.0) cm/s. The velocity magnitude is 50.6 ± 5.2 cm/s with a bias of 0.7 cm/s. The flow angles α and ß are estimated as 45.6 ± 4.9° and 17.6 ± 1.0°. Subsequently, the precision and accuracy are calculated over the entire velocity profiles. On average for all direction, the relative mean bias of the velocity magnitude is -0.08%. For α and ß, the mean bias is -0.2° and -1.5°. The relative standard deviations of the velocity magnitude ranges from 8 to 16%. For the flow angles, the ranges of the mean angular deviations are 5° to 16° and 0.7° and 8°.

  15. Sensory perception in cetaceans: Part II – Promising experimental approaches to study chemoreception in dolphins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee eKremers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemosensory perception in cetaceans remains an intriguing issue as morphological, neuroanatomical and genetic studies draw unclear conclusions, while behavioral data suggest that dolphins may use it for food selection or socio-sexual interactions. Experimental approaches have been scarce due to the practical difficulties of testing chemoreception in wild dolphins. Go/no-go tasks are one elegant way to investigate discrimination abilities; however, they require to train the animals, thus preventing spontaneous responses and hence the expression of preferences. Here, we aimed at testing potential spontaneous responses to chemical stimuli and developed novel procedures. First, we conducted a study to test whether captive dolphins respond to a biologically relevant smell. Therefore, we placed dead fish within an opaque barrel at the border of the pool and counted the number of respirations at proximity as an indicator of investigation. The same dead fishes were presented several times during experiments lasting three consecutive days. From the second day on (i.e. when the odor composition changed, dolphins breathed more often close to the fish-smelling barrel than close to the visually identical but empty control barrel. Second, we conducted a study to test whether dolphins are able to discriminate food flavors. Captive dolphins are commonly provided with ice cubes as a source of enrichment. We took this opportunity to provide ice cubes with different flavors and to compare the reaction to these different flavors as a measure of discrimination. Hence, we used the latency of return to the ice cube begging spot as a measure of discrimination from the previous ice cube flavor. Thus, our method used a non-invasive and easily replicable technique based on the spontaneous begging responses of dolphins toward more or less attractive items bearing biological relevance. The procedures used enabled us to show that dolphins may discriminate odors and flavors

  16. A Novel Camera Calibration Algorithm as Part of an HCI System: Experimental Procedure and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauer Kristal

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Camera calibration is an initial step employed in many computer vision applications for the estimation of camera parameters. Along with images of an arbitrary scene, these parameters allow for inference of the scene's metric information. This is a primary reason for camera calibration's significance to computer vision. In this paper, we present a novel approach to solving the camera calibration problem. The method was developed as part of a Human Computer Interaction (HCI System for the NASA Virtual GloveBox (VGX Project. Our algorithm is based on the geometric properties of perspective projections and provides a closed form solution for the camera parameters. Its accuracy is evaluated in the context of the NASA VGX, and the results indicate that our algorithm achieves accuracy similar to other calibration methods which are characterized by greater complexity and computational cost. Because of its reliability and wide variety of potential applications, we are confident that our calibration algorithm will be of interest to many.

  17. Curation of Laboratory Experimental Data as Part of the Overall Data Lifecycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Frey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The explosion in the production of scientific data in recent years is placing strains upon conventional systems supporting integration, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of data and thus constraining the whole scientific process. Support for handling large quantities of diverse information can be provided by e-Science methodologies and the cyber-infrastructure that enables collaborative handling of such data. Regard needs to be taken of the whole process involved in scientific discovery. This includes the consideration of the requirements of the users and consumers further down the information chain and what they might ideally prefer to impose on the generators of those data. As the degree of digital capture in the laboratory increases, it is possible to improve the automatic acquisition of the ‘context of the data’ as well as the data themselves. This process provides an opportunity for the data creators to ensure that many of the problems they often encounter in later stages are avoided. We wish to elevate curation to an operation to be considered by the laboratory scientist as part of good laboratory practice, not a procedure of concern merely to the few specialising in archival processes. Designing curation into experiments is an effective solution to the provision of high-quality metadata that leads to better, more re-usable data and to better science.

  18. Exit blade geometry and part-load performance of small axial flow propeller turbines: An experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute for Water and River Basin Management (IWG), University of Karlsruhe, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    A detailed experimental investigation of the effects of exit blade geometry on the part-load performance of low-head, axial flow propeller turbines is presented. Even as these turbines find important applications in small-scale energy generation using micro-hydro, the relationship between the layout of blade profile, geometry and turbine performance continues to be poorly characterized. The experimental results presented here help understand the relationship between exit tip angle, discharge through the turbine, shaft power, and efficiency. The modification was implemented on two different propeller runners and it was found that the power and efficiency gains from decreasing the exit tip angle could be explained by a theoretical model presented here based on classical theory of turbomachines. In particular, the focus is on the behaviour of internal parameters like the runner loss coefficient, relative flow angle at exit, mean axial flow velocity and net tangential flow velocity. The study concluded that the effects of exit tip modification were significant. The introspective discussion on the theoretical model's limitation and test facility suggests wider and continued experimentation pertaining to the internal parameters like inlet vortex profile and exit swirl profile. It also recommends thorough validation of the model and its improvement so that it can be made capable for accurate characterization of blade geometric effects. (author)

  19. [Aviation and high-altitude medicine for anaesthetists. Part 4: human performance limitations and crew resource management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerth, Martin; Pump, Stefan; Graf, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    For pilots and doctors, as well as a variety of other professions the knowledge of human performance limitations is essential, especially in critical situations. Crew resource management was developed in the 1980s in the aviation industry in order to ensure systematic training and support in such instances. Just recently, the value is recognized not only in other high reliability organizations but also in medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Effects of stimulant drugs on actual and simulated driving: perspectives from four experimental studies conducted as part of the DRUID research consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, J.G.; Kuypers, K.P.C.; Bosker, W.M.; Brookhuis, K.A.; Veldstra, J.A.; Simons, R.; Martens, Marieke Hendrikje

    2012-01-01

    The Integrated Project DRUID (Driving under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol and Medicines) involved researchers from more than 20 European countries. It aimed to gain new insights to the degree of impairment caused by psychoactive drugs and their actual impact on road safety. Part of this large

  1. Probabilistic evidential assessment of gunshot residue particle evidence (Part II): Bayesian parameter estimation for experimental count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, A; Bozza, S; Taroni, F

    2011-03-20

    Part I of this series of articles focused on the construction of graphical probabilistic inference procedures, at various levels of detail, for assessing the evidential value of gunshot residue (GSR) particle evidence. The proposed models--in the form of Bayesian networks--address the issues of background presence of GSR particles, analytical performance (i.e., the efficiency of evidence searching and analysis procedures) and contamination. The use and practical implementation of Bayesian networks for case pre-assessment is also discussed. This paper, Part II, concentrates on Bayesian parameter estimation. This topic complements Part I in that it offers means for producing estimates usable for the numerical specification of the proposed probabilistic graphical models. Bayesian estimation procedures are given a primary focus of attention because they allow the scientist to combine (his/her) prior knowledge about the problem of interest with newly acquired experimental data. The present paper also considers further topics such as the sensitivity of the likelihood ratio due to uncertainty in parameters and the study of likelihood ratio values obtained for members of particular populations (e.g., individuals with or without exposure to GSR). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Medicinal cannabis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meersch, H; Verschuere, A P; Bottriaux, F

    2006-01-01

    Pharmaceutical grade cannabis is available to Dutch patients from public pharmacies in the Netherlands. The first part of this paper reviews the pharmaceutical and pharmacological properties of medicinal cannabis. Detailed information about its composition and quality, potential applications, methods of administration, adverse reactions, drug interactions and safety during pregnancy or breastfeeding are given. The second part deals with the legal aspects of dispensing medicinal cannabis through pharmacies in view of the Belgian and Dutch legislation. The last part discusses the present Belgian regulation about the possession of cannabis.

  3. The relevance of the Hippocratic Oath to the ethical and moral values of contemporary medicine. Part I: The Hippocratic Oath from antiquity to modern times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askitopoulou, Helen; Vgontzas, Antoniοs N

    2017-10-27

    The present paper discusses the relevance and significance of the Hippocratic Oath to contemporary medical ethical and moral values. It attempts to answer the questions about some controversial issues related to the Oath. The text is divided in two parts. Part I discusses the general attributes and ethical values of the Oath, while Part II presents a detailed analysis of each passage of the Oath with regard to perennial ethical principles and moral values. Part I starts with the contribution of Hippocrates and his School of Cos to medicine. It continues by examining the moral dilemmas concerning physicians and patients in the Classical Times and in the Modern World. It also investigates how the Hippocratic Oath stands nowadays, with regard to the remarkable and often revolutionary advancements in medical practice and the significant evolution in medical ethics. Further, it presents the debate and the criticism about the relevance of the general attributes and ethical values of the Oath to those of modern societies. Finally, it discusses the endurance of the ethical values of the Hippocratic Oath over the centuries until today with respect to the physicians' commitment to the practice of patient-oriented medicine. Part I concludes with the Oath's historic input in the Judgment delivered at the close of the Nuremberg "Doctors' Trial"; this Judgement has become legally binding for the discipline in the Western World and was the basis of the Nuremberg Code. The ethical code of the Oath turned out to be a fundamental part of western law not only on medical ethics but also on patients' rights regarding research.

  4. An individually tailored behavioral medicine treatment in physical therapy for tension-type headache - two experimental case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Anne; Lagerlöf, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate the effect of an individually tailored behavioral medicine treatment in physical therapy, based on a functional behavioral analysis (FBA), for tension-type headache (TTH). Two case studies with A1-A2-B-A3 design of two patients with TTH was conducted. Outcome variables were headache frequency, headache index (mean intensity), consumption of analgesics, self-efficacy in headache management (Headache Management Self-efficacy Scale [HMSE]), disability, and perceived loss of happiness for activities with family and friends. The results showed that headache frequency and headache index decreased for one of the patients. Self-efficacy in headache management increased markedly for both patients. A behavioral medicine treatment in physical therapy based on an FBA can be a way for physical therapists to handle patients with TTH. Future investigations should focus on large group studies with longer observation periods.

  5. Contribution of Arabic Medicine and Pharmacy to the Development of Health Care Protection in Bosnia and Herzegovina - the Second Part.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2017-12-01

    After the collapse of the Arab rule, the Arab territorial expanses and cultural heritage were taken over by the Turks. Although scientific progress in the Turkish period slowed down due to numerous unfavorable political-economic and other circumstances. Thanks to the Turks, Arabic culture and useful Islamic principles expanded to the territory of our homeland of Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H). Significant role in the transfer of Arabic pharmaceutical knowledge was also attributed to the Sephardic Jews who, with their arrival, continued to perform their attar activities, which were largely based on Arab achievements. However, insufficiently elaborated, rich funds of oriental medical and pharmaceutical handwriting testify that Oriental science has nurtured in these areas as well, and that the Arabic component in a specific way was intertwined with other cultures and traditions of B&H. The Franciscan monasteries in Bosnia and Herzegovina have museums which contain important exhibits and libraries rich in books, among which many from the field of medicine and pharmacy. Muslim mosques, also, had small libraries with Arabic books used for spreading medical knowledge. The second category was folk doctors and practitioners who were on disposition to the people of any religion. Some of them listened to lectures in medicine during the studies of theology and philosophy. However, most did not have any medical education, but by reading books and teaching experience they made their own recipe collection. Special books, called "Ljekaruše" (Books of recipes) were also born during the study when they came into contact with an even larger number of health books. However, it should not be neglected that a lot of them contained folk medicines that were used in some environments depending on the habits and available herbs. Although it has been proven that many recipes from Ljekaruše are pharmacologically and medically justified, one should not ignore the knowledge and skill behind

  6. Embryonic stem cells in science and medicine, part II: law, ethics, and the continuing need for dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Louis M; Brockman-Lee, Sandra A

    2008-03-01

    Just as our first article, "Embryonic Stem Cells in Science and Medicine: An Invitation for Dialogue," in the December 2007 issue of Gender Medicine went to press, two groups of researchers had just announced that adult human somatic cells had been reprogrammed to behave like pluripotent stem cells, and that the reprogrammed cells were able to differentiate into cell types of the 3 germ layers in vitro and in a mouse model. A third group has since done so. Because the reprogrammed cells were not embryonic in origin, the announcements were heralded as "stunning" and "leaps forward," because, it was argued, the ability to generate stem cells, without destroying embryos in the process, would avoid the difficult ethical questions raised by human embryonic stem (hES) cell research. This article addresses the most recent announcements and briefly retraces the relevant history so that we may consider whether the moral, ethical, and social issues do in fact disappear as a result of these new advancements. We conclude that, despite the hoopla, little has changed. If indeed there were ethical issues surrounding hES cell research, they remain-and remain as urgent to address and resolve as they had been previously. Lastly, we argue that the medical and scientific communities continue to do themselves a disservice by failing to create a cohesive governing body to address and make concrete recommendations concerning the moral, ethical, and related social issues affecting their communities.

  7. Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Order Granting in part and Denying in part Petitions for Objection to Permits in Response to Remand

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Petition Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-petition-database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Oxidation of hazardous waste in supercritical water: Part 1, A comparison of modeling and experimental results for methanol destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, P.B. [Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States); Bergan, N.E.; Bramlette, T.T. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Recent experiments at Sandia National Laboratories conducted in conjunction with MODEC Corporation have demonstrated successful clean-up of contaminated water in a supercritical water reactor. These experiments targeted wastes of interest to Department of Energy (DOE) production facilities. In this paper we present modeling and experimental results for a surrogate waste containing 98% water, 2% methanol, and parts per million of chlorinated hydrocarbons and laser dyes. Our initial modeling results consider only methanol and water. Experimental data are available for inlet and outlet conditions (composition, flow rate, and temperature), and axial temperature profiles along the outside reactor wall. The purpose of our model is to study the chemical and physical processes inside the reactor. We are particularly interested in the parameters that control the location of the reaction zone. The laboratory-scale reactor operates at 25 MPa., between 300 K and 900 K; it is modeled as a plug-flow reactor with a specified temperature profile. We use Chemkin Real-Gas to calculate mixture density, with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The elementary reaction set for methanol oxidation and reactions of other C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} hydrocarbons is based on previous models for gas-phase kinetics. Results from our calculations show that the methanol is 99.99% destroyed at 1/3 the total reactor length. Although we were not able to measure composition of the fluid inside the experimental reactor, this prediction occurs near the location of the high reactor temperature. This indicates that the chemical reaction is triggered by thermal effects, not kinetic rates. Results from ideal-gas calculations show nearly identical chemical profiles inside the reactor in dimensionless distance. However, reactor residence times are overpredicted by nearly 150% using an ideal-gas assumption.

  9. Feasibility Study of a Novel Membrane Reactor for Syngas Production. Part 1: Experimental Study of O2 Permeation through Perovskite Membranes under Reducing and Non-Reducing Atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang Wenxing, Z.W.; Zhang, Wenxing; Smit, J.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this contribution, the feasibility of a novel membrane reactor for energy efficient syngas production is investigated by means of an experimental and a simulation study. In Part 1, a detailed experimental study is performed on the O2 permeation through a perovskite membrane with composition

  10. Pharmacognostical evaluation of aerial parts of Graptophyllum pictum (L.) Griff. (Syn: Justicia picta Linn.): A well-known folklore medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pradeep; Khosa, Ratan L; Mishra, Garima; Jha, Keshri K

    2015-01-01

    Graptophyllum pictum (L.) Griff. (Family-Acanthaceae) occupies a key role in traditional system of medicine. Since an extensive literature survey did not provide any information about studies on its standardization. Therefore, we designed the current study to establish the quality control parameters of G. pictum aerial parts. The investigation included determination of various standardization parameters such as macroscopic and microscopic studies, physicochemical parameters as well as phytochemical analysis of the crude drug. The microscopy study of aerial parts revealed that stem shows typical dicotyledonous characters with prismatic crystals of calcium oxalate in the cortical region and dorsiventral leaf. Physicochemical constants such as moisture content, ash values, fluorescence analysis, and extractive values were established. Preliminary phytochemical analysis confirmed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, etc. The present study suggests establishing the parameters for pharmacopoeial standardization of G. pictum.

  11. Evolution of Quality Assurance for Clinical Immunohistochemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine. Part 3: Technical Validation of Immunohistochemistry (IHC) Assays in Clinical IHC Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlakovic, Emina E; Cheung, Carol C; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Dietel, Manfred; Francis, Glenn D; Gilks, C Blake; Hall, Jacqueline A; Hornick, Jason L; Ibrahim, Merdol; Marchetti, Antonio; Miller, Keith; van Krieken, J Han; Nielsen, Soren; Swanson, Paul E; Vyberg, Mogens; Zhou, Xiaoge; Taylor, Clive R

    2017-03-01

    Validation of immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays is a subject that is of great importance to clinical practice as well as basic research and clinical trials. When applied to clinical practice and focused on patient safety, validation of IHC assays creates objective evidence that IHC assays used for patient care are "fit-for-purpose." Validation of IHC assays needs to be properly informed by and modeled to assess the purpose of the IHC assay, which will further determine what sphere of validation is required, as well as the scope, type, and tier of technical validation. These concepts will be defined in this review, part 3 of the 4-part series "Evolution of Quality Assurance for Clinical Immunohistochemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine."

  12. American Academy of Pain Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 7. GET STARTED AAPM... the Voice of Pain Medicine Become part of the distinguished multimodal, interdisciplinary community of pain medicine clinicians. Join Today! Welcome The American Academy of ...

  13. Impact of pharmacy worker training and deployment on access to essential medicines and health outcomes in Malawi: protocol for a cluster quasi-experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinga, Solomon J; Jenny, Alisa M; Larsen-Cooper, Erin; Crawford, Jessica; Matemba, Charles; Stergachis, Andy; Babigumira, Joseph B

    2014-10-11

    Access to essential medicines is core to saving lives and improving health outcomes of people worldwide, particularly in the low- and middle-income countries. Having a trained pharmacy workforce to manage the supply chain and safely dispense medicines is critical to ensuring timely access to quality pharmaceuticals and improving child health outcomes. This study measures the impact of an innovative pharmacy assistant training program in the low-income country of Malawi on access to medicines and health outcomes. We employ a cluster quasi-experimental design with pre-and post-samples and decision analytic modeling to examine access to and the use of medicines for malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhea for children less than 5 years of age. Two intervention districts, with newly trained and deployed pharmacy assistants, and two usual care comparison districts, matched on socio-economic, geographic, and health-care utilization indicators, were selected for the study. A baseline household survey was conducted in March 2014, prior to the deployment of pharmacy assistants to the intervention district health centers. Follow-up surveys are planned at 12- and 24-months post-deployment. In addition, interviews are planned with caregivers, and time-motion studies will be conducted with health-care providers at the health centers to estimate costs and resources use. This impact evaluation is designed to provide data on the effects of a novel pharmacy assistant program on pharmaceutical systems performance, and morbidity and mortality for the most common causes of death for children under five. The results of this study should contribute to policy decisions about whether and how to scale up the health systems strengthening workforce development program to have the greatest impact on the supply chain and health outcomes in Malawi.

  14. Application of propensity scores to explore the effect of public reporting of medicine use information on rational drug use in China: a quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Xinping

    2014-11-11

    Transparency has become a hottest topic and a growing movement in the health care system worldwide. This study used a quasi-experimental design method to explore whether public reporting of medicine use information can improve rational drug use. 20 township hospitals and 274 doctors of City Y in Hubei Province, China were divided into the intervention and control groups on the basis of their characteristics. In the intervention group, the values and rankings of the average expenditure per prescription, percentage of prescriptions requiring antibiotics and percentage of prescriptions requiring injections of each hospital and doctor were publicly released to patients and doctors in an appropriate format monthly. Data were gathered both four months before and after the intervention. Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to minimize the observed covariate (gender, age, experience, education level, title, and monthly income) differences in the doctors' characteristics. 108 pairs of doctors were obtained after PSM. Chi-square test and t-test were employed to explore the effect of public reporting of medicine use information on rational drug use. The study was approved by the Committee of Tongji Medical College, Hua Zhong University of Science and Technology (IORG No: IORG0003571). In baseline, the average expenditure per prescription of the 274 doctors was 42.82 RMB yuan (USD 6.97), the percentage of prescriptions requiring antibiotics was 63.00%, and the percentage of prescriptions requiring injections was 70.79%, all higher than the average of Hubei Province and the standard recommended by WHO. Before the intervention all the three indicators were all comparable (p > 0.05), whereas after the intervention, a significant difference (p medicine use information could decrease the percentage of prescriptions requiring injections in township hospitals in China, but this effect was not observed on prescription costs and antibiotics use. Analyses of the mechanism and long

  15. [Scientific and research experimentation center of aviation and space medicine and human engineeing celebrates 80th anniversary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanko, I M; Vorona, A A; Lapa, V V; Khomenko, M N

    2015-03-01

    The article is devoted to the history of the Research Test Center Aviation and Space Medicine and military ergonomics, now included in the Central Research Institute of the Air Force Defense Ministry. The center throughout 80 years history is a leding research organization in the country for the integrated study of the human factor in aviation and problems connected with it. The world-famous scientific schools in aviation physiology, hygiene and radiolorgy, emergency medicine, aviation psychology and ergonomics have been grounded on the basis of this center. With a high qualified scientific staff and laboratory-and-bench-scale base including unique seminatural airplanes and helicopters complexes, posters and installation simulating the impact of flight factors (centrifuge, hyperbaric chambers, shakenr vestibulyar-WIDE stands, etc.) the center has. successfully slved tasks concerning an improvement of flight crews protection from occupational hazards, ergonomic demands to capabilities of aircraft, professional and psycho-physiological training. Automatic systems of medical decision-making on assessment of the health status in the medical-flight expertise and dynamic medical supervision, planning, treatment and preventive and remedial actions aircrew training are currently 'being developed

  16. Experimental Adjustment on Drug Interactions through Intestinal CYP3A Activity in Rat: Impacts of Kampo Medicines Repeat Administered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsumi Kinoshita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To provide the information that is necessary for making the proper use of kampo medicines, we have proposed the adequate methodology focused on the following issues: (i kampo medicines emphasize the effects produced by the combination of herbal drugs rather than the individual effect of any single herb and (ii Intestinal CYP3A has become a key factor for the bioavailability of orally administrated drugs. In the present study, we investigated both the in vivo and in vitro effects of Saireito and Hochuekkito (kampo formulas on CYP3A activities. From our study, oral pre-treatment with Saireito or Hochuekkito did not affect the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine after intravenous administration to rats. When nifedipine was administered to rat intrajejunum, a significant decrease of AUC was showed by pre-treatment with both kampo formulas. Saireito pre-treatment led to 80% decrease in max of nifedipine. Saireito caused significant increases in both protein expression and metabolic activity of CYP3A in intestinal microsome, whereas it had no effect on CYP3A in hepatic microsome. Our result also showed that this affect of Saireito can be gone by wash-out with 1 week. These findings demonstrated that Saireito may induce CYP3A activity of intestine but not of liver in rats. When resources for research are limited, well-designed scientific studies except clinical trials also have many advantages.

  17. Heavy metals translocation and accumulation from the rhizosphere soils to the edible parts of the medicinal plant Fengdan (Paeonia ostii) grown on a metal mining area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhang Jun; Xu, De Cong; Chen, Yan Song; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-09-01

    Fengdan (Paeonia ostii) is one of Chinese 34 famous medicinal materials. This study investigated the concentrations of Arsenic (As), Chromium (Cr), Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), Lead (Pb), Iron (Fe), Manganese (Mn), and Zinc (Zn) in rhizosphere soils, cortex mouton and seeds of Fengdan planted in a metal mining area, China. The mean concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, and Zn in the rhizosphere soils were above the limits set by the Chinese Soil Environmental Quality Standard (GB 15618-1995). The contamination factor (CF) of Cd was >5, while it was >2for As, Cu, Pb, and Zn in all the soils. The integrated pollution index for all the soils was >3 and ˂ 5. Metal concentrations in the edible parts of Fengdan were in the following decreasing order: Mn>Fe>Zn>Cu>Pb>As>Cr≥Cd. The transfer factor mean values for As, Cu, Cd and Fe in the cortex moutan of old Fengdan (over 6 years) were significantly higher than in young Fengdan. Available metal concentrations, pH and soil organic matter content influenced the metal concentrations of the cortex moutan. The results indicated that mining and smelting operations have led to heavy metals contamination of soils and medicinal parts of Fengdan. The major metal pollutants were elemental Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Heavy metals mainly accumulated in the cortex moutan of Fengdan. The mean concentrations of Cd, Cu, and Pb in the old cortex moutan (over 6 years) were above those of the Chinese Green Trade Standards for Medicinal Plants and Preparations in Foreign Trade (WM/T2-2004). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. A review of experimental studies of hydrogen as a new therapeutic agent in emergency and critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Meihua; Zhang, Hongying; Yu, Congjun; Wang, Fan; Sun, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant chemical element in the Universe, but is seldom regarded as a therapeutic agent. Recent evidence has shown that hydrogen is a potent antioxidative, antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory agent and so may have potential medical applications in cells, tissues and organs. There are several methods to administer hydrogen, such as inhalation of hydrogen gas, aerosol inhalation of a hydrogen-rich solution, drinking hydrogen dissolved in water, injecting hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) and taking a hydrogen bath. Drinking hydrogen solution (saline/pure water/other solutions saturated with hydrogen) may be more practical in daily life and more suitable for daily consumption. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies on the use of hydrogen in emergency and critical care medicine using different disease models.

  19. THE APPROACH OF CANCER RELATED FATIGUE IN RHEABILITATION MEDICINE: PART I – MECHANISMS, SYMPTOMS, CLINICAL EVALUATION AND SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SALCA Amalia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer related fatigue (CRF is the most disabling and distressing symptom in cancer, throughout the whole history of the illness, including successfully treated cases. Rehabilitation medicine could have a positive impact on these patients’ outcomes, if well targeted. With these purpose, the rehabilitation clinician needs to correctly assess fatigue using standard, reliable scales. This review of articles and trials synthesizes the epidemiology, mechanics (including causes and effects, clinical presentation and means of assessment in CRF. CRF causes and mechanisms are not well known. Understanding them would provide specific targets to fatigue management. Clinical presentation is very variable, a wide range of features being found in literature. Poorly medical reports in assessing fatigue offer variable percentages of prevalence, inconsistent with patients’ daily burden due to CRF. There are many tools used to assess fatigue in clinical research and on them depends the percentages reported as fatigue prevalence. The hereby gathered information are useful in the approach of a patient that addresses to a rehabilitation clinician for CRF management.

  20. Analysis of the ecotoxicity data submitted within the framework of the REACH Regulation. Part 3. Experimental sediment toxicity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesnaitis, Romanas; Sobanska, Marta A; Versonnen, Bram; Sobanski, Tomasz; Bonnomet, Vincent; Tarazona, Jose V; De Coen, Wim

    2014-03-15

    For the first REACH registration deadline, companies have submitted registrations with relevant hazard and exposure information for substances at the highest tonnage level (above 1000 tonnes per year). At this tonnage level, information on the long-term toxicity of a substance to sediment organisms is required. There are a number of available test guidelines developed and accepted by various national/international organisations, which can be used to investigate long-term toxicity to sediment organisms. However instead of testing, registrants may also use other options to address toxicity to sediment organisms, e.g. weight of evidence approach, grouping of substances and read-across approaches, as well as substance-tailored exposure-driven testing. The current analysis of the data provided in ECHA database focuses on the test methods applied and the test organisms used in the experimental studies to assess long-term toxicity to sediment organisms. The main guidelines used for the testing of substances registered under REACH are the OECD guidelines and OSPAR Protocols on Methods for the Testing of Chemicals used in the Offshore Oil Industry: "Part A: A Sediment Bioassay using an Amphipod Corophium sp." explaining why one of the mostly used test organisms is the marine amphipod Corophium sp. In total, testing results with at least 40 species from seven phyla are provided in the database. However, it can be concluded that the ECHA database does not contain a high enough number of available experimental data on toxicity to sediment organisms for it to be used extensively by the scientific community (e.g. for development of non-testing methods to predict hazards to sediment organisms). © 2013.

  1. Amniotic membrane as part of a skin substitute for full-thickness wounds: an experimental evaluation in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffelbein, Denys J; Baumann, Claudia; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Hasler, Rafael; Mücke, Thomas; Steinsträßer, Lars; Drecoll, Enken; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kesting, Marco R

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the use of human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a graft material for the treatment of iatrogenic full-thickness (FT) skin wounds in a porcine model with a view to reducing donor site morbidity in free flap transfer. Forty experimental FT-wounds were covered with an autologous split-thickness skin graft (STSG) alone or in combination with a mono- or multilayer HAM or Integra(®). Untreated wounds served as controls. Clinical evaluation and biopsy-sampling for histological and immunohistochemical staining with von-Willebrand-factor (vWF) antibody, laminin antibody, Ki-67 antibody, and smooth muscle actin (αSMA) antibody were performed on days 5, 7, 10, 20, 40, and 60 after surgical intervention. Considerable disparities in the estimated criteria were observed between the various treatment groups of the FT-wounds. The use of HAM was found to have an accelerating impact on re-epithelialization. The multilayered amnion membrane showed better results than the Integra(®) and monolayer technique in terms of contraction rate, inflammation, and scarring and seemed useful as a dermal substitute in FT-wounds giving comparable results to STSG coverage alone. This study demonstrates the successful application of HAM as part of a skin substitute in FT-wounds in minipigs. The results offer promise as a simple and effective technique for the application of multilayer HAM in iatrogenic human skin defects and the acceleration of wound healing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Computational screen and experimental validation of anti-influenza effects of quercetin and chlorogenic acid from traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zekun; Zhao, Junpeng; Li, Weichen; Shen, Li; Huang, Shengbo; Tang, Jingjing; Duan, Jie; Fang, Fang; Huang, Yuelong; Chang, Haiyan; Chen, Ze; Zhang, Ran

    2016-01-12

    The Influenza A virus is a great threat for human health, while various subtypes of the virus made it difficult to develop drugs. With the development of state-of-art computational chemistry, computational molecular docking could serve as a virtual screen of potential leading compound. In this study, we performed molecular docking for influenza A H1N1 (A/PR/8/34) with small molecules such as quercetin and chlorogenic acid, which were derived from traditional Chinese medicine. The results showed that these small molecules have strong binding abilities with neuraminidase from H1N1 (A/PR/8/34). Further details showed that the structural features of the molecules might be helpful for further drug design and development. The experiments in vitro, in vivo have validated the anti-influenza effect of quercetin and chlorogenic acid, which indicating comparable protection effects as zanamivir. Taken together, it was proposed that chlorogenic acid and quercetin could be employed as the effective lead compounds for anti-influenza A H1N1.

  3. Computational screen and experimental validation of anti-influenza effects of quercetin and chlorogenic acid from traditional Chinese medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zekun; Zhao, Junpeng; Li, Weichen; Shen, Li; Huang, Shengbo; Tang, Jingjing; Duan, Jie; Fang, Fang; Huang, Yuelong; Chang, Haiyan; Chen, Ze; Zhang, Ran

    2016-01-01

    The Influenza A virus is a great threat for human health, while various subtypes of the virus made it difficult to develop drugs. With the development of state-of-art computational chemistry, computational molecular docking could serve as a virtual screen of potential leading compound. In this study, we performed molecular docking for influenza A H1N1 (A/PR/8/34) with small molecules such as quercetin and chlorogenic acid, which were derived from traditional Chinese medicine. The results showed that these small molecules have strong binding abilities with neuraminidase from H1N1 (A/PR/8/34). Further details showed that the structural features of the molecules might be helpful for further drug design and development. The experiments in vitro, in vivo have validated the anti-influenza effect of quercetin and chlorogenic acid, which indicating comparable protection effects as zanamivir. Taken together, it was proposed that chlorogenic acid and quercetin could be employed as the effective lead compounds for anti-influenza A H1N1.

  4. Investigations of residue of veterinary medicines and environmental contaminants during production cycle of Petrovska klobasa as part of compulsory parameters for food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant factor in the protection of consumer health is the systematic and constant implementation of control for the presence of residue of biologically active substances and their metabolites in raw materials and in primary products of animal origin. As regards meat, an essential aspect of security is definitely the control of possible residue of veterinary medicines and environmental contaminants. In that respect, the objective of the national project entitled „Development of technology for drying and fermentation of the sausage petrovačka kobasica (Petrovská klobása - registered geographic origin under controlled conditions“, Number TR - 20037, was to protect the product petrovačka kobasica (Petrovská klobása with the appropriate appellation. A part of the compulsory investigations also included the establishing of the presence of residue of veterinary medicines and environmental contaminants in raw materials and in the finished product, which was also the aim of this work. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-20037: Petrovská klobása - oznaka geografskog porekla u kontrolisanim uslovima

  5. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders: part I, basic principles, shift work and jet lag disorders. An American Academy of Sleep Medicine review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Robert L; Auckley, Dennis; Auger, R Robert; Carskadon, Mary A; Wright, Kenneth P; Vitiello, Michael V; Zhdanova, Irina V

    2007-11-01

    This the first of two articles reviewing the scientific literature on the evaluation and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs), employing the methodology of evidence-based medicine. In this first part of this paper, the general principles of circadian biology that underlie clinical evaluation and treatment are reviewed. We then report on the accumulated evidence regarding the evaluation and treatment of shift work disorder (SWD) and jet lag disorder (JLD). A set of specific questions relevant to clinical practice were formulated, a systematic literature search was performed, and relevant articles were abstracted and graded. A substantial body of literature has accumulated that provides a rational basis the evaluation and treatment of SWD and JLD. Physiological assessment has involved determination of circadian phase using core body temperature and the timing of melatonin secretion. Behavioral assessment has involved sleep logs, actigraphy and the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ). Treatment interventions fall into three broad categories: 1) prescribed sleep scheduling, 2) circadian phase shifting ("resetting the clock"), and 3) symptomatic treatment using hypnotic and stimulant medications. Circadian rhythm science has also pointed the way to rational interventions for the SWD and JLD, and these treatments have been introduced into the practice of sleep medicine with varying degrees of success. More translational research is needed using subjects who meet current diagnostic criteria.

  6. Evolution of Quality Assurance for Clinical Immunohistochemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine: Part 1: Fit-for-Purpose Approach to Classification of Clinical Immunohistochemistry Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Carol C; D'Arrigo, Corrado; Dietel, Manfred; Francis, Glenn D; Gilks, C Blake; Hall, Jacqueline A; Hornick, Jason L; Ibrahim, Merdol; Marchetti, Antonio; Miller, Keith; van Krieken, J Han; Nielsen, Soren; Swanson, Paul E; Taylor, Clive R; Vyberg, Mogens; Zhou, Xiaoge; Torlakovic, Emina E

    2017-01-01

    Technical progress in immunohistochemistry (IHC) as well as the increased utility of IHC for biomarker testing in precision medicine avails us of the opportunity to reassess clinical IHC as a laboratory test and its proper characterization as a special type of immunoassay. IHC, as used in current clinical applications, is a descriptive, qualitative, cell-based, usually nonlinear, in situ protein immunoassay, for which the readout of the results is principally performed by pathologists rather than by the instruments on which the immunoassay is performed. This modus operandi is in contrast to other assays where the instrument also performs the readout of the test result (eg, nephelometry readers, mass spectrometry readers, etc.). The readouts (results) of IHC tests are used either by pathologists for diagnostic purposes or by treating physicians (eg, oncologists) for patient management decisions, the need for further testing, or follow-up. This paper highlights the distinction between the original purpose for which an IHC test is developed and its subsequent clinical uses, as well as the role of pathologists in the analytical and postanalytical phases of IHC testing. This paper is the first of a 4-part series, under the general title of "Evolution of Quality Assurance for Clinical Immunohistochemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine."

  7. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  8. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  9. Essential Experimental Methods for Identifying Bonghan Systems as a Basis for Korean Medicine: Focusing on Visual Materials from Original Papers and Modern Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoon-Gi; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Lee, Ki-Bog

    2015-01-01

    In the 1960s, through studies on Korean Medicine, Bonghan Kim proposed the Bonghan systems (BS) as the anatomical reality of the acupuncture meridians based on various experimental data. Since 2002, several groups, mainly led by a team at Seoul National University, who renamed the BS as the primo vascular system (PVS), have published around 70 papers showing biological structures corresponding to the BS. However, it is still difficult for other researchers to find them, especially under the skin, which Bonghan Kim first reported as acupuncture points, due to similar-looking biological tissues, for example, the lymphatic vessels, and such artifacts as blood clots or fascia debris. To solve these drawbacks, we examined the main methods for identifying the BS by comparing the original papers with the modern outcomes in terms of the common physical/chemical characteristics of the BS. In addition, effective methods of staining and microscopic observations discovered by modern teams are synthetically explained using visual materials such as diagrams and photos. Through the essentially organized methods in this review paper, we suggest that one can find the BS under the skin as putative acupuncture points by tracing the intraexternal BS, from which a new Korean Medicine will be born.

  10. Experimental investigation of an indirect solar dryer integrated with phase change material for drying valeriana jatamansi (medicinal herb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Bhardwaj

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experimental investigation of an indirect solar dryer integrated with phase change material has been carried out for drying Valeriana Jatamansi. The experimentation has been performed under the climatic conditions of Himalayan region, Solan (latitude − 30.91°N, longitude − 77.09°E, Himachal Pradesh (India in the month of October-November 2016. Paraffin RT-42 has been used as a phase change material in the dryer. Using this system, the moisture content of rhizomes reduced from 89% to 9% in 5 days as compared to heat pump drying and shade drying, which took 8 days and 14 days, respectively. Results of present study infer that the drying time using phase change material in this setup has reduced by 37.50% and 64.29% when compared to heat pump drying and shade drying, respectively. The dried rhizomes obtained are of superior quality in terms of colour, texture, aroma and bio-medical constituents. Analyses show that by using present setup, total valepotriates obtained were 3.47% as compared to traditional shade drying which yield 3.31%.

  11. Therapeutic efficacy of Neuro AiD™ (MLC 601), a traditional Chinese medicine, in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Che; Chang, Ching-Ping; Peng, Syue-Wei; Jhuang, Kai-Sheng; Fang, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Tsao, Thomas Chang-Yao

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes increased release of several mediators from injured and dead cells and elicits microglial activation. Activated microglia change their morphology, migrate to injury sites, and release tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and others. In this study we used a controlled fluid percussion injury model of TBI in the rat to determine whether early (4 h post-injury) or late (4 days post-injury) treatment with MLC 601, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, would affect microglial activation and improve recovery. MLC 601 was chosen for this study because its herbal component MLC 901 was beneficial in treating TBI in rats. Herein, rats with induced TBI were treated with MLC 601 (0.2-0.8 mg/kg) 1 h (early treatment) or 4 day post-injury (late treatment) and then injected once daily for consecutive 2 days. Acute neurological and motor deficits were assessed in all rats the day before and 4 days after early MLC 601 treatment. An immunofluorescence microscopy method was used to count the numbers of the cells colocalized with neuron- and apoptosis-specific markers, and the cells colocalized with microglia- and TNF-α-specific markers, in the contused brain regions 4 days post-injury. An immunohistochemistry method was used to evaluate both the number and the morphological transformation of microglia in the injured areas. It was found that early treatment with MLC 601 had better effects in reducing TBI-induced cerebral contusion than did the late therapy with MLC 601. Cerebral contusion caused by TBI was associated with neurological motor deficits, brain apoptosis, and activated microglia (e.g., microgliosis, amoeboid microglia, and microglial overexpression of TNF-α), which all were significantly attenuated by MLC 601 therapy. Our data suggest that MLC 601 is a promising agent for treatment of TBI in rats.

  12. Leaf anatomy of medicinal shrubs and trees from Misiones forest of the Paranaense Province (Argentina: Part 2 Anatomía foliar de arbustos y árboles medicinales de la Selva Misionera de la provincia Paranaense (Argentina: Parte 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Arambarri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper contains the study of the second part of medicinal shrubs and trees from Paranaense province. Forty five species of shrubs and trees belonging to 29 families inhabiting Misiones forest of the Paranaense biogeographic province (Argentina have been cited with medicinal properties. The work provides illustrations of diagnostic characters and conclusions of the main botanical differential traits, such as the presence of crystaliferous epidermis (e.g. Trixis divaricata subsp. divaricata; stomata and trichomes types (e. g. ciclocytic stomata in Pilocarpus pennatifolius and scale peltate trichomes in Tabebuia heptaphylla; midvein transection outlines (e.g. midvein convex and keel-shaped on the adaxial side in Schinus weinmanniifolia; presence and types of crystals (e.g. crystal sand in Cordia ecalyculata, raphides in Psychotria carthagenensis. This paper also gives an ecological interpretation of the species studied which shows predominantly a combination of mesomorphic (e.g. hypostomatic leaves, dorsiventral mesophyll and xeromorphic leaf traits (e.g. thick cuticle, abundant sclerenchyma, multilayered epidermis, mesophyll formed exclusively by palisade parenchyma, multilayered hypodermis, presence of sclereids. Only two species (Ilex paraguariensis and Manihot grahamii have mesomorphic (e.g. hypostomatic leaves, dorsiventral mesophyll and hygromorphic leaf characters (e.g. epidermis glabrous. Finally, the work provides a key to distinguish 107 medicinal shrubs and trees from the Paranaense biogeographic province (Part 1: Gallery forests and Part 2: Misiones forest that permit identified species using anatomy leaf characteristics.El presente trabajo corresponde a la segunda entrega del estudio de arbustos y árboles medicinales de la provincia biogeografica Paranaense. En esta parte, se analizaron 45 especies contenidas en 29 familias que habitan la Selva Misionera y han sido citadas con propiedades medicinales. El trabajo se acompa

  13. Pharmacognostical study and establishment of quality parameters of aerial parts of Costus speciosus-a well known tropical folklore medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pradeep; Khosa, Ratan Lal; Srivastava, Shruti; Mishra, Garima; Jha, Keshri Kishor; Srivastava, Sourabh; Sangeeta; Verma, Ramesh Kumar; Tahseen, Mohd Adil

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic pharmacognostical characters of Costus speciosus (aerial parts) along with their physico-chemical parameters and fluorosence analysis. The pharmacognostical characters were determined in terms of macroscopy, microscopy, powder microscopy, leaf constant, fluorescence analysis and preliminary phytochemical investigation. The findings of macroscopy revealed that leaves elliptic to oblong or oblong-lancoelate, thick, spirally arranged, with stem clasping sheaths up to 4 cm, flowers large, white, cone-like terminal spikes, with bright red bracts. Transverse section of leaflet showed the presence of cuticularised epidermis with polygonal cells on adaxial surface and bluntly angled cells on abaxial surface of lamina, mesophyll cells differentiated in to single layered palisade cells on each surface and 2-3 layered spongy parenchyma, unicellular and uniseriate multicellular covering trichomes, paracytic stomata and vascular bundles surrounded by sclerenchymatous multicellular sheath. Preliminary phytochemical screening exhibited the presence of various phytochemical groups like alkaloids, glycosides, steroids, phenolic constituents. Further, the leaf constants, powder microscopy and fluorescence characteristics indicated outstanding results from this investigation. Various pharmacognostical and physico-chemical parameters have pivotal roles in identification, authentication and establishment of quality parameters of the species.

  14. New approach for the determination of aerosol refractive indices - Part II: Experimental set-up and application to amorphous silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, P.; Herbin, H.; Visez, N.; Pujol, O.; Petitprez, D.

    2017-10-01

    This article is the Part II of a work aimed at proposing a new method for determining the optical constants of aerosols. The Part I detailed the theoretical and numerical basis of an algorithm devoted to retrieve the imaginary and the real part of complex refractive indices from extinction spectra of aerosols. This algorithm associates the Mie theory, the single subtractive Kramers-Kronig relation, and an optimal estimation method in an iterative process. This Part II presents the experimental set-up developed to record simultaneously high spectral resolution extinction spectra and size distributions of airborne silica particles. Extinction spectra are measured with a high spectral resolution on a broad spectral range, including both infrared (650 - 2 , 500cm-1) and UV-visible (9 , 000 - 32 , 500cm-1) spectral regions. Experimental data were used to retrieve the complex refractive indices of aerosol particles. By associating the numerical procedure presented in the first paper and this experimental set-up, complex refractive indices of silica spherical aerosol particles have been determined under controlled experimental conditions. Additional comparison between experimental and simulated extinction spectra from retrieved complex refractive indices shows that this new methodology provides optical properties representative of the material.

  15. Mountain medicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Bjørn; Hjuler, Kasper Fjellhaugen

    2016-01-01

    Travelling to high altitudes is an increasingly popular form of recreational holiday. Individual medical advice may be essential for certain groups of individuals such as patients with chronic disorders, pregnant women or children. This is the second part in a series of two articles on mountain...... medicine. The first part covered high-altitude physiology and medical aspects of objective alpine dangers and the increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This part covers altitude sickness, fluid balance, nutrition, and precautions for patients with pre-existing medical conditions, pregnant women...

  16. Evidence-based review of oral traditional Chinese medicine compound recipe administration for treating weight drop-induced experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Zhe; Sheng, Chenxia; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Jing; Xiong, Xin-gui; Peng, Weijun

    2016-03-09

    Recently, a number of studies conducted and published in China have suggested that traditional Chinese medicine compound recipe (TCMCR) may be beneficial in the treatment of experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy of TCMCR in TBI model with weight drop method to provide robust evidence on the effects of TCMCR and to determine whether TCMCR can be recommended for routine treatment or considered as a standard treatment for TBI. We identified eligible studies by searching five electronic databases on April 1, 2014, and pooled the data using the random-effects model. Results were reported in terms of standardized mean difference (SMD). We also calculated statistical heterogeneity, evaluated the studies' methodological quality and investigated the presence of publication bias. Totally, 187 relevant publications were searched from databases, 25 of which met our inclusion criteria. The overall methodological quality of the most studies was poor, and there was evidence of statistical heterogeneity among studies along with small-study effects. Meta-analysis showed statistically significant effects indicating that TCMCR has a beneficial effect on TBI. Despite the limitations, we concluded that TCMCR may reduce brain water content, improve BBB permeability, and decrease TNF-α/NO expression after experimental TBI in terms of overall efficacy. However, our review also indicates that more well-designed and well-reported animal studies are needed.

  17. An ethnopharmacological survey and in vitro confirmation of the ethnopharmacological use of medicinal plants as anthelmintic remedies in the Ashanti region, in the central part of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Christian; Spiegler, Verena; Sarkodie, Herbert; Asase, Alex; Liebau, Eva; Hensel, Andreas

    2014-12-02

    Infections with helminths are still a big problem in many parts of the world. The majority of the people in West Africa treat such infections with medicinal plants related to the local traditional medicine. The present study aims at identifying medicinal plants traditionally used for worm infections in the Ashanti region, Ghana. In vitro screening of selected extracts from plants on which scientific knowledge is limited was to be performed. Validated questionnaires were administered to 50 traditional healers in the Ashanti region, Ghana. Interviews and structured conversations were used to obtain relevant information. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation was performed additionally to structured cross-referencing of the data using SciFinder(®) data base. Selected plant species were used for in vitro testing on anthelmintic activity against the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. 35 plant species were recorded for the use in humans and 6 for the use in animals. Plant material most frequently used were the seeds from Carica papaya, mentioned by nearly all healers. The plausibility of most plants used for treatment of infections with helminths was given in most cases by documentation of potential anthelmintic activity in recent scientific literature. 9 species from plants not or scarcely described in literature for this indication were investigated on in vitro activity. A hydroethanolic (1:1) extract of Combretum mucronatum was most active with a survival rate of nematodes of 89% at 0.1mg/mL and 58% at 1mg/mL respectively (levamisole 16%). Extracts of Paullinia pinnata and Phyllanthus urinaria were also assessed to exhibit a minor (85% and 89% respectively at 1mg/mL), but still significant activity. Traditional use of anthelmintic plants from Ghana can be well rationalized by cross-referencing with published literature and phytochemical/pharmacological plausibility.The in vitro investigations of extracts from Combretum mucronatum, Paullinia pinnata

  18. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  19. In silico modeling on ADME properties of natural products: Classification models for blood-brain barrier permeability, its application to traditional Chinese medicine and in vitro experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiuqing; Liu, Ting; Fan, Xiaohui; Ai, Ni

    2017-08-01

    In silico modeling of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability plays an important role in early discovery of central nervous system (CNS) drugs due to its high-throughput and cost-effectiveness. Natural products (NP) have demonstrated considerable therapeutic efficacy against several CNS diseases. However, BBB permeation property of NP is scarcely evaluated both experimentally and computationally. It is well accepted that significant difference in chemical spaces exists between NP and synthetic drugs, which calls into doubt on suitability of available synthetic chemical based BBB permeability models for the evaluation of NP. Herein poor discriminative performance on BBB permeability of NP are first confirmed using internal constructed and previously published drug-derived computational models, which warrants the need for NP-oriented modeling. Then a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) study on a NP dataset was carried out using four different machine learning methods including support vector machine, random forest, Naïve Bayes and probabilistic neural network with 67 selected features. The final consensus model was obtained with approximate 90% overall accuracy for the cross-validation study, which is further taken to predict passive BBB permeability of a large dataset consisting of over 10,000 compounds from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). For 32 selected TCM molecules, their predicted BBB permeability were evaluated by in vitro parallel artificial membrane permeability assay and overall accuracy for in vitro experimental validation is around 81%. Interestingly, our in silico model successfully predicted different BBB permeation potentials of parent molecules and their known in vivo metabolites. Finally, we found that the lipophilicity, the number of hydrogen bonds and molecular polarity were important molecular determinants for BBB permeability of NP. Our results suggest that the consensus model proposed in current work is a reliable tool for

  20. Odontology and the history of medicine at the Royal Society of Medicine 1907-1960 and the contributions of Lilian Lindsay. Part Two--Lillian Lindsay and the RSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papworth, Julie

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the foundation and early development of the Royal Society of Medicine and looks in further detail at the Section of Odontology and the Section of the History of Medicine. It then considers the remarkable contributions and achievements of Lilian Lindsay.

  1. The impact of funding through the RF President's grants for young scientists (the field--medicine) on research productivity: a quasi-experimental study and a brief systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygitov, Ruslan T

    2014-01-01

    The impact of grants on research productivity has been investigated by a number of retrospective studies. The results of these studies vary considerably. The objective of my study was to investigate the impact of funding through the RF President's grants for young scientists on the research productivity of awarded applicants. The study compared the number of total articles and citations for awarded and rejected applicants who in 2007 took part in competitions for young candidates of science (CoS's) and doctors of science (DoS's) in the scientific field of medicine. The bibliometric analysis was conducted for the period from 2003 to 2012 (five years before and after the competition). The source of bibliometric data is the eLIBRARY.RU database. The impact of grants on the research productivity of Russian young scientists was assessed using the meta-analytical approach based on data from quasi-experimental studies conducted in other countries. The competition featured 149 CoS's and 41 DoS's, out of which 24 (16%) and 22 (54%) applicants, respectively, obtained funding. No difference in the number of total articles and citations at baseline, as well as in 2008-2012, for awarded and rejected applicants was found. The combination of data from the Russian study and other quasi-experimental studies (6 studies, 10 competitions) revealed a small treatment effect--an increase in the total number of publications over a 4-5-year period after the competition by 1.23 (95% CI 0.48-1.97). However, the relationship between the number of total publications published by applicants before and after the competition revealed that this treatment effect is an effect of the "maturation" of scientists with a high baseline publication activity--not of grant funding.

  2. The impact of funding through the RF President's grants for young scientists (the field--medicine on research productivity: a quasi-experimental study and a brief systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan T Saygitov

    Full Text Available The impact of grants on research productivity has been investigated by a number of retrospective studies. The results of these studies vary considerably. The objective of my study was to investigate the impact of funding through the RF President's grants for young scientists on the research productivity of awarded applicants. The study compared the number of total articles and citations for awarded and rejected applicants who in 2007 took part in competitions for young candidates of science (CoS's and doctors of science (DoS's in the scientific field of medicine. The bibliometric analysis was conducted for the period from 2003 to 2012 (five years before and after the competition. The source of bibliometric data is the eLIBRARY.RU database. The impact of grants on the research productivity of Russian young scientists was assessed using the meta-analytical approach based on data from quasi-experimental studies conducted in other countries. The competition featured 149 CoS's and 41 DoS's, out of which 24 (16% and 22 (54% applicants, respectively, obtained funding. No difference in the number of total articles and citations at baseline, as well as in 2008-2012, for awarded and rejected applicants was found. The combination of data from the Russian study and other quasi-experimental studies (6 studies, 10 competitions revealed a small treatment effect--an increase in the total number of publications over a 4-5-year period after the competition by 1.23 (95% CI 0.48-1.97. However, the relationship between the number of total publications published by applicants before and after the competition revealed that this treatment effect is an effect of the "maturation" of scientists with a high baseline publication activity--not of grant funding.

  3. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradin, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Muci, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Hassan, Yassin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Dominguez, A. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tokuhiro, Akira [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Hamman, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2014-10-15

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  4. Condiciones térmicas de un dispositivo electrónico en caso de incendio Primera parte: estudio experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Chine

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presentan los resultados de un estudio experimental para determinar las condiciones térmicas a la cual un sistema electrónico, usado para radiocomunicaciones en túneles, podría estar sujeto en caso de incendio. El sistema se compone de un dispositivo electrónico contenido en una caja metálica de acero inoxidable 316, un cable coaxial interno y un cable coaxial externo de cobre. Sobre el sistema, que se alberga en una cámara de polímero concreto, ha sido realizada una prueba al fuego con registro experimental de los valores de temperatura en diferentes puntos del sistema mismo. El trabajo experimental ha permitido analizar eficazmente la respuesta del dispositivo electrónico y de los distintos materiales que lo componen a las severas condiciones térmicas de prueba.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Indoor Air Distribution in High-Performance Residential Buildings: Part I. General Descriptions and Qualification Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalalzadeh, A. A.; Hancock, E.; Powell, D.

    2007-12-01

    The main objective of this project is to experimentally characterize an air distribution system in heating mode during a period of recovery from setback. The specific air distribution system under evaluation incorporates a high sidewall supply-air register/diffuser and a near-floor wall return air grille directly below. With this arrangement, the highest temperature difference between the supply air and the room can occur during the recovery period and create a favorable condition for stratification. The experimental approach will provide realistic input data and results for verification of computational fluid dynamics modeling.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigations of internal heat transfer in an innovative trailing edge blade cooling system: stationary and rotation effects, part 1—experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniaiche, Ahmed; Ghenaiet, Adel; Facchini, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    The aero-thermal behavior of the flow field inside 30:1 scaled model reproducing an innovative smooth trailing edge of shaped wedge discharge duct with one row of enlarged pedestals have been investigated in order to determine the effect of rotation, inlet velocity and blowing conditions effects, for Re = 20,000 and 40,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. Two configurations are presented: with and without open tip configurations. Thermo-chromic liquid crystals technique is used to ensure a local measurement of the heat transfer coefficient on the blade suction side under stationary and rotation conditions. Results are reported in terms of detailed 2D HTC maps on the suction side surface as well as the averaged Nusselt number inside the pedestal ducts. Two correlations are proposed, for both closed and open tip configurations, based on the Re, Pr, Ro and a new non-dimensional parameter based on the position along the radial distance, to assess a reliable estimation of the averaged Nusselt number at the inter-pedestal region. A good agreement is found between prediction and experimental data with about ±10 to ±12 % of uncertainty, for the simple form correlation, and about ±16 % using a complex form. The obtained results help to predict the flow field visualization and the evaluation of the aero-thermal performance of the studied blade cooling system during the design step.

  7. Nuestras cuentas diarias: Matematicas. Primaria para adultos, Segunda parte, Volumens 1 y 2. Edicion Experimental (Our Daily Accounting: Mathematics. Primer for Adults, Part Two, Volumes 1 and 2. Experimental Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    These workbooks are part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. The workbooks are designed to teach skills needed to manage ordinary financial transactions and daily tasks requiring a knowledge of…

  8. Nuestras cuentas diarias: Matematicas. Primaria para adultos, Primera parte, Volumens 1 y 2. Edicion Experimental (Our Daily Accounting: Mathematics. Primer for Adults, Part One, Volumes 1 and 2. Experimental Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    These workbooks are part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. The workbooks, divided in two volumes, are designed to teach skills required in managing ordinary financial transactions and daily tasks…

  9. La Palabra es Nuestra: Primaria para Adultos. Segunda Parte, Volumen 1-2. Edicion Experimental (The Language Is Ours: Primer for Adults. Part Two, Volumes 1-2. Experimental Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    These workbooks are part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. They provide readings and exercises for developing literacy skills. Pictures and fill-in-the blank exercises appear frequently. Volume 1…

  10. La Palabra es Nuestra: Primaria para Adultos. Primera Parte, Volumen 1-2. Edicion Experimental. (The Language Is Ours: Primer for Adults. Part One, Volumes 1-2. Experimental Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    These workbooks are part of a Mexican series of instructional materials designed for Spanish speaking adults who are in the process of becoming literate or have recently become literate in their native language. These workbooks, designed to continue developing literacy skills, include pictures, dialogues, crossword puzzles, and fill-in-the blank…

  11. Methods for resolving fan/motor vibration problems in air-conditioning units. Part 3: Experimental procedures for investigating torsional vibration in air-conditioning units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, C. [Carrier Corp., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Reynolds, D.D. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-10-01

    Vibration modes associated with a fan impeller, motor, and motor mounting assembly in small air-conditioning units can be excited by motor torque pulsations in single-phase motors. Experimental procedures were developed that can be used to measure the torsional resonance frequencies of the stationary parts (motor stator and motor mounting assembly) and the rotating parts (fan impeller and motor rotor and shaft assembly) of a propeller fan assembly. Impact test procedures, test procedures in which the fan motor is set up to act as a torsional shaker, and procedures that employ the use of a microphone in an anechoic room are presented in this paper.

  12. Antifertility activity of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Daniyal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of medicinal plants used as antifertility agents in females throughout the world by various tribes and ethnic groups. We undertook an extensive bibliographic review by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, and further consulting well accepted worldwide scientific databases. We performed CENTRAL, Embase, and PubMed searches using terms such as “antifertility”, “anti-implantation”, “antiovulation”, and “antispermatogenic” activity of plants. Plants, including their parts and extracts, that have traditionally been used to facilitate antifertility have been considered as antifertility agents. In this paper, various medicinal plants have been reviewed for thorough studies such as Polygonum hydropiper Linn, Citrus limonum, Piper nigrum Linn, Juniperis communis, Achyanthes aspera, Azadirachta indica, Tinospora cordifolia, and Barleria prionitis. Many of these medicinal plants appear to act through an antizygotic mechanism. This review clearly demonstrates that it is time to expand upon experimental studies to source new potential chemical constituents from medicinal plants; plant extracts and their active constituents should be further investigated for their mechanisms. This review creates a solid foundation upon which to further study the efficacy of plants that are both currently used by women as traditional antifertility medicines, but also could be efficacious as an antifertility agent with additional research and study.

  13. Antifertility activity of medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Akram, Muhammad

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive summary of medicinal plants used as antifertility agents in females throughout the world by various tribes and ethnic groups. We undertook an extensive bibliographic review by analyzing classical text books and peer reviewed papers, and further consulting well accepted worldwide scientific databases. We performed CENTRAL, Embase, and PubMed searches using terms such as "antifertility", "anti-implantation", "antiovulation", and "antispermatogenic" activity of plants. Plants, including their parts and extracts, that have traditionally been used to facilitate antifertility have been considered as antifertility agents. In this paper, various medicinal plants have been reviewed for thorough studies such as Polygonum hydropiper Linn, Citrus limonum, Piper nigrum Linn, Juniperis communis, Achyanthes aspera, Azadirachta indica, Tinospora cordifolia, and Barleria prionitis. Many of these medicinal plants appear to act through an antizygotic mechanism. This review clearly demonstrates that it is time to expand upon experimental studies to source new potential chemical constituents from medicinal plants; plant extracts and their active constituents should be further investigated for their mechanisms. This review creates a solid foundation upon which to further study the efficacy of plants that are both currently used by women as traditional antifertility medicines, but also could be efficacious as an antifertility agent with additional research and study. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. Estudio experimental de la aglomeración de partículas en un lecho fluidizado

    OpenAIRE

    Prada Díaz, Ángel de

    2014-01-01

    Muchos han sido los estudios y aplicaciones realizadas acerca del fenómeno de la fluidización de partículas sólidas desde el primer cuarto del siglo pasado. Para establecer una primera toma de contacto con el fenómeno, podemos definir éste en términos de un simple experimento en el que un lecho de partículas sólidas es mantenido en suspensión por una corriente de gas o líquido que pasa a través de ellas. El comportamiento de dichas partículas guarda ciertas similitudes con el comportamiento d...

  15. Medicines optimisation: priorities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gerri

    2016-03-23

    Medicines optimisation is promoted in a guideline published in 2015 by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Four guiding principles underpin medicines optimisation: aim to understand the patient's experience; ensure evidence-based choice of medicines; ensure medicines use is as safe as possible; and make medicines optimisation part of routine practice. Understanding the patient experience is important to improve adherence to medication regimens. This involves communication, shared decision making and respect for patient preferences. Evidence-based choice of medicines is important for clinical and cost effectiveness. Systems and processes for the reporting of medicines-related safety incidents have to be improved if medicines use is to be as safe as possible. Ensuring safe practice in medicines use when patients are transferred between organisations, and managing the complexities of polypharmacy are imperative. A medicines use review can help to ensure that medicines optimisation forms part of routine practice.

  16. Refining the experimental analysis of academic skills deficits: Part I. An investigation of variables that affect generalized oral reading performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Edward J; Bonfiglio, Christine M; Mattson, Tara; Persampieri, Michael; Foreman-Yates, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    Experimental analyses for improving reading fluency deficits have rarely targeted generalized increases in academic responding. As a consequence, the variables that may help students to generalize newly learned forms of academic responding like reading are not well understood. Furthermore, experimental analyses of reading fluency interventions have not systematically examined difficulty level as a variable that may affect instructional outcomes. The experiment reported in this paper expands (a) the measurement of the dependent variables to include generalized increases across tasks (reading passages) and (b) the combination of independent variables used to produce measurable generalized increases. The results demonstrate the importance of combining reward and instructional variables (including difficulty level) to produce generalized increases and how those variables can be meaningfully investigated prior to making treatment recommendations.

  17. French investigations of high burnup effect on LOCA thermomechanical behavior: Part 1. Experimental programmes in support of LOCA design methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waeckel, N. [EDF/SEPTEN Villeurbanne (France); GrandJean, C. [IPSN, Cadarache (France); Cauvin, R.; Lebuffe, C. [EDF/SCMI, Chinon (France)

    1997-01-01

    Within the framework of Burn-Up extension request, EDF, FRAMATOME, CEA and IPSN have carried out experimental programmes in order to provide the design of fuel rods under LOCA conditions with relevant data. The design methods used in France for LOCA are based on standard Appendix K methodology updated to take into account some penalties related to the actual conditions of the Nuclear Power Plant. Best-Estimate assessments are used as well. Experimental programmes concern plastic deformation and burst behavior of advanced claddings (EDGAR) and thermal shock quenching behavior of highly irradiated claddings (TAGCIR). The former reveals the important role played by the {alpha}/{beta} transformation kinetics related to advanced alloys (Niobium alloys) and the latter the significative impact of hydrogen charged during in-reactor corrosion on oxidation kinetics and failure behavior in terms of cooling rates.

  18. The flow field inside a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube part I: Experimental analysis using planar filtered Rayleigh scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Doll, Ulrich; Burow, Eike; Beversdorff, Manfred; Stockhausen, Guido; Willert, Christian; Morsbach, Christian; Schlüß, Daniel; Franke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The flow field of a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is characterized experimentally. Firstly conventional probe based technology is used in order to measure inlet and outlet temperatures as well as to acquire temporally resolved wall pressure data over a wide range of operating conditions. Secondly the filtered Rayleigh scattering technique is employed in order to gather detailed temporally averaged planar information on the vortex tube’s flow topology. These measurements form the basis of a detail...

  19. Autothermal reforming of methane with integrated CO2 capture in a novel fluidized bed membrane reactor. Part 1: experimental demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, F.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Two fluidized bed membrane reactor concepts for hydrogen production via autothermal reforming of methane with integrated CO2 capture are proposed. Ultra-pure hydrogen is obtained via hydrogen perm-selective Pd-based membranes, while the required reaction energy is supplied by oxidizing part of the

  20. An Oriental Medicine, Hyungbangpaedok-San Attenuates Motor Paralysis in an Experimental Model of Multiple Sclerosis by Regulating the T Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Hee; Lee, Min Jung; Jang, Minhee; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Shim, Insop; Kim, Hak-Jae; Lee, Sanghyun; Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Young Ock; Cho, Ik-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The preventive and therapeutic mechanisms in multiple sclerosis are not clearly understood. We investigated whether Hyungbangpaedok-san (HBPDS), a traditional herbal medicine, has a beneficial effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide (MOG 35-55). Onset-treatment with 4 types of HBPDS (extracted using distilled water and 30%/70%/100% ethanol as the solvent) alleviated neurological signs, and HBPDS extracted within 30% ethanol (henceforth called HBPDS) was more effective. Onset-treatment with HBPDS reduced demyelination and the recruitment/infiltration and activation of microglia/macrophages in the spinal cord of EAE mice, which corresponded to the reduced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β), iNOS, and chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-1α, and RANTES) in the spinal cord. Onset-treatment with HBPDS inhibited changes in the components of the blood-brain barrier such as astrocytes, adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1), and junctional molecules (claudin-3, claudin-5, and zona occludens-1) in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Onset-treatment with HBPDS reduced the elevated population of CD4+, CD4+/IFN-γ+, and CD4+/IL-17+ T cells in the spinal cord of EAE mice but it further increased the elevated population of CD4+/CD25+/Foxp3+ and CD4+/Foxp3+/Helios+ T cells. Pre-, onset-, post-, but not peak-treatment, with HBPDS had a beneficial effect on behavioral impairment in EAE mice. Taken together, HBPDS could alleviate the development/progression of EAE by regulating the recruitment/infiltration and activation of microglia and peripheral immune cells (macrophages, Th1, Th17, and Treg cells) in the spinal cord. These findings could help to develop protective strategies using HBPDS in the treatment of autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis.

  1. Implementation of WHO multimodal strategy for improvement of hand hygiene: a quasi-experimental study in a Traditional Chinese Medicine hospital in Xi'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Wang, Xiaoqing; An, Junming; An, Jialu; Zhou, Ning; Sun, Lu; Chen, Hong; Feng, Lin; Han, Jing; Liu, Xiaorong

    2017-01-01

    Hand hygiene (HH) is an essential component for preventing and controlling of healthcare-associated infection (HAI), whereas compliance with HH among health care workers (HCWs) is frequently poor. This study aimed to assess compliance and correctness with HH before and after the implementation of a multimodal HH improvement strategy launched by the World Health Organization (WHO). A quasi-experimental study design including questionnaire survey generalizing possible factors affecting HH behaviors of HCWs and direct observation method was used to evaluate the effectiveness of WHO multimodal HH strategy in a hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Multimodal HH improvement strategy was drawn up according to the results of questionnaire survey. Compliance and correctness with HH among HCWs were compared before and after intervention. Also HH practices for different indications based on WHO "My Five Moments for Hand Hygiene" were recorded. In total, 553 HCWs participated in the questionnaire survey and multimodal HH improvement strategy was developed based on individual, environment and management levels. A total of 5044 observations in 23 wards were recorded in this investigation. The rate of compliance and correctness with HH improved from 66.27% and 47.75% at baseline to 80.53% and 88.35% after intervention. Doctors seemed to have better compliance with HH after intervention (84.04%) than nurses and other HCWs (81.07% and 69.42%, respectively). When stratified by indication, compliance with HH improved for all indications after intervention ( P  strategy can significantly improve HH compliance and correctness among HCWs.

  2. Towards the synthesis of an experimental bioactive dental ceramic. Part I: Crystallinity characterization and bioactive behavior evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudouri, O.-M. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kontonasaki, E. [School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papadopoulou, L.; Kantiranis, N. [Department of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Lazaridis, N.K. [Chemistry Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Chrissafis, K.; Chatzistavrou, X. [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Koidis, P. [School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Paraskevopoulos, K.M., E-mail: kpar@auth.gr [Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-05-01

    An attachment between the dental ceramic and the surrounding marginal tissues in fixed prosthetic restorations could eliminate secondary carries prevalence. The development of dental ceramics with apatite forming ability could provide the biological surface required for selective spread and attachment of specific cell types able to promote tissue attachment. Dental ceramics/bioactive glass composites synthesized by the sol gel method have been previously reported to develop carbonated hydroxyapatite (HCAp) in biomimetic solutions, requiring though a high amount of bioactive glass, which resulted in the compromise of their mechanical integrity. Thus, the aim of the present work was the synthesis and characterization of an experimental sol–gel derived dental ceramic with low amount of bioactive glass and the evaluation of its in vitro bioactivity. Differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (TG–DTA), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to evaluate the crystal structure and the in vitro apatite forming ability of the synthesized material. The results of this study indicated the successful sol–gel synthesis of an experimental dental ceramic containing low amount of bioactive glass that presented similar structural and morphological characteristics with a commercial feldspathic dental ceramic, while exhibiting in vitro bioactivity. The apatite forming ability of the experimental sol–gel derived feldspathic dental ceramic may trigger the appropriate cellular mechanisms towards the establishment of attachment with the surrounding connective tissue. This attachment could provide a barrier to oral bacteria penetration, prolonging the life expectation of the restorations. - Highlights: • Synthesis of a bioactive sol–gel dental ceramic for fixed prosthetic restorations. • The sol–gel technique promoted the crystallization of

  3. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  4. Experimental human-like model to assess the part of viable Legionella reaching the thoracic region after nebulization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Pourchez

    Full Text Available The incidence of Legionnaires' disease (LD in European countries and the USA has been constantly increasing since 1998. Infection of humans occurs through aerosol inhalation. To bridge the existing gap between the concentration of Legionella in a water network and the deposition of bacteria within the thoracic region (assessment of the number of viable Legionella, we validated a model mimicking realistic exposure through the use of (i recent technology for aerosol generation and (ii a 3D replicate of the human upper respiratory tract. The model's sensitivity was determined by monitoring the deposition of (i aerosolized water and Tc99m radio-aerosol as controls, and (ii bioaerosols generated from both Escherichia coli and Legionella pneumophila sg 1 suspensions. The numbers of viable Legionella prior to and after nebulization were provided by culture, flow cytometry and qPCR. This study was designed to obtain more realistic data on aerosol inhalation (vs. animal experimentation and deposition at the thoracic region in the context of LD. Upon nebulization, 40% and 48% of the initial Legionella inoculum was made of cultivable and non-cultivable cells, respectively; 0.7% of both populations reached the filter holder mimicking the thoracic region in this setup. These results are in agreement with experimental data based on quantitative microbial risk assessment methods and bring new methods that may be useful for preventing LD.

  5. Gas tonometry for evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion: experimental models of trauma, shock and complex surgical maneuvers - Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo Luiz Francisco Poli de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Substantial clinical and animal evidences indicate that the mesenteric circulatory bed, particularly the gut mucosa, is highly vulnerable to reductions in oxygen supply and prone to early injury in the course of hemodynamic changes induced by trauma, shock, sepsis and several complex surgical maneuvers. Gut hypoxia or ischemia is one possible contributing factor to gastrointestinal tract barrier dysfunction that may be associated with the development of systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, a common cause of death after trauma, sepsis or major surgeries. Monitoring gut perfusion during experiments may provide valuable insights over new interventions and therapies highly needed to reduce trauma and sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. We present our experience with gas tonometry as a monitor of the adequacy of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion in clinical and experimental models of trauma, shock and surgical maneuvers associated with abrupt hemodynamic changes, such as aortic occlusion and hepatic vascular exclusion. Next issue we will be presenting our experience with gas tonometry in experimental and clinical sepsis.

  6. Adaptation of the Rapid Estimate of Adult Litera cy in Medicine Revised (REALM -R to the South African context: Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Mavis Maja

    2010-03-01

    was om primêre sorg pasiênte wat moontlik lae geletterdheidsvaardigheid het, te kansif. ‘n Aangepasde Delphi-tegniek is gebruik om die oordeel van ‘n groep kundiges in te win. Agt kundiges in verpleegwetenskappe is doelgerig gekies ten einde ‘n betroubare ooreenkoms te verkry.Data is deur middel van self-raportering ingewin deurdat die deelnemers op vrae, gestel deur die navorser, geantwoord het. Beskrywende statistiek is gebruik om die data te ontleed. Die REALM-R is aangepas vir die Suid-Afrikaanse konteks ten einde ‘n geskikte instrument beskikbaar te stel om die geletterdheidsvaardigheid van primêre sorg pasiente vinnig en akkuraat te kan meet.

    How to cite this article: Wasserman, Z., Wright, S. & Maja, T.M., 2010, ‘Adaptation of the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine Revised (REALM-R to the South African context: Part 1’, Health SA Gesondheid 15(1, Art. #468, 5 pages. DOI: 10.4102/hsag.v15i1.468

  7. The Connective Tissue Components of Optic Nerve Head Cupping in Monkey Experimental Glaucoma Part 1: Global Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Ren, Ruojin; Lockwood, Howard; Williams, Galen; Libertiaux, Vincent; Downs, Crawford; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To characterize optic nerve head (ONH) connective tissue change within 21 monkey experimental glaucoma (EG) eyes, so as to identify its principal components. Methods Animals were imaged three to five times at baseline then every 2 weeks following chronic unilateral IOP elevation, and euthanized early through end-stage confocal scanning laser tomographic change. Optic nerve heads were serial-sectioned, three-dimensionally (3D) reconstructed, delineated, and quantified. Overall EG versus control eye differences were assessed by general estimating equations (GEE). Significant, animal-specific, EG eye change was required to exceed the maximum physiologic intereye differences in six healthy animals. Results Overall EG eye change was significant (P cupping” in monkey EG which serve as targets for longitudinally staging and phenotyping ONH connective tissue alteration within all forms of monkey and human optic neuropathy. PMID:26641545

  8. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 2. Effects of sintering and deposit microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study that examines the influence of sintering and microstructure on ash deposit thermal conductivity. The measurements are made using a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. The technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. The initial stages of sintering and densification are accompanied by an increase in deposit thermal conductivity. Subsequent sintering continues to densify the deposit, but has little effect on deposit thermal conductivity. SEM analyses indicates that sintering creates a layered deposit structure with a relatively unsintered innermost layer. They hypothesize that this unsintered layer largely determines the overall deposit thermal conductivity. A theoretical model that treats a deposit as a two-layered material predicts the observed trends in thermal conductivity.

  9. The role of chemometrics in single and sequential extraction assays: a review. Part II. Cluster analysis, multiple linear regression, mixture resolution, experimental design and other techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomino, Agnese; Abollino, Ornella; Malandrino, Mery; Mentasti, Edoardo

    2011-03-04

    Single and sequential extraction procedures are used for studying element mobility and availability in solid matrices, like soils, sediments, sludge, and airborne particulate matter. In the first part of this review we reported an overview on these procedures and described the applications of chemometric uni- and bivariate techniques and of multivariate pattern recognition techniques based on variable reduction to the experimental results obtained. The second part of the review deals with the use of chemometrics not only for the visualization and interpretation of data, but also for the investigation of the effects of experimental conditions on the response, the optimization of their values and the calculation of element fractionation. We will describe the principles of the multivariate chemometric techniques considered, the aims for which they were applied and the key findings obtained. The following topics will be critically addressed: pattern recognition by cluster analysis (CA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and other less common techniques; modelling by multiple linear regression (MLR); investigation of spatial distribution of variables by geostatistics; calculation of fractionation patterns by a mixture resolution method (Chemometric Identification of Substrates and Element Distributions, CISED); optimization and characterization of extraction procedures by experimental design; other multivariate techniques less commonly applied. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical prediction of fiber orientation in injection-molded short-fiber/thermoplastic composite parts with experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thi, Thanh Binh Nguyen; Morioka, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Atsushi [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Hamanaka, Senji; Yamashita, Katsuhisa; Nonomura, Chisato [Research Center, Toyobo Co., LTD, 2-1-1 Katata, Otsu, Shiga 520-0292 (Japan)

    2015-05-22

    Numerical prediction of the fiber orientation in the short-glass fiber (GF) reinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) composites with the fiber weight concentration of 30%, 50%, and 70% manufactured by the injection molding process is presented. And the fiber orientation was also directly observed and measured through X-ray computed tomography. During the injection molding process of the short-fiber/thermoplastic composite, the fiber orientation is produced by the flow states and the fiber-fiber interaction. Folgar and Tucker equation is the well known for modeling the fiber orientation in a concentrated suspension. They included into Jeffrey’s equation a diffusive type of term by introducing a phenomenological coefficient to account for the fiber-fiber interaction. Our developed model for the fiber-fiber interaction was proposed by modifying the rotary diffusion term of the Folgar-Tucker equation. This model was presented in a conference paper of the 29{sup th} International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society published by AIP conference proceeding. For modeling fiber interaction, the fiber dynamic simulation was introduced in order to obtain a global fiber interaction coefficient, which is sum function of the fiber concentration, aspect ratio, and angular velocity. The fiber orientation is predicted by using the proposed fiber interaction model incorporated into a computer aided engineering simulation package C-Mold. An experimental program has been carried out in which the fiber orientation distribution has been measured in 100 x 100 x 2 mm injection-molded plate and 100 x 80 x 2 mm injection-molded weld by analyzed with a high resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography system XVA-160α, and calculated by X-ray computed tomography imaging. The numerical prediction shows a good agreement with experimental validation. And the complex fiber orientation in the injection-molded weld was investigated.

  11. The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

  12. Mengele medicus: medicine's Nazi heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidelman, W E

    1988-01-01

    Nazi medicine is commonly considered to be an aberration that began and ended with the horrors of the Hitler regime. But its beginnings were more gradual and its legacy is more pernicious. Data derived from research conducted on unknowing and unwilling subjects in death camps continue to be cited in authoritative contemporary medical literature. Nazi medicine has become a part of the professional genotype of modern medicine. This continuing influence of Nazi medicine raises profound questions for the epistemology and morality of medicine.

  13. Experimental evidence of inter-blade cavitation vortex development in Francis turbines at deep part load condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Müller, A.; Favrel, A.; Avellan, F.

    2017-10-01

    Francis turbines are subject to various types of cavitation flow depending on the operating condition. To enable a smooth integration of the renewable energy sources, hydraulic machines are now increasingly required to extend their operating range, especially down to extremely low discharge conditions called deep part load operation. The inter-blade cavitation vortex is a typical cavitation phenomenon observed at deep part load operation. However, its dynamic characteristics are insufficiently understood today. In an objective of revealing its characteristics, the present study introduces a novel visualization technique with instrumented guide vanes embedding the visualization devices, providing unprecedented views on the inter-blade cavitation vortex. The binary image processing technique enables the successful evaluation of the inter-blade cavitation vortex in the images. As a result, it is shown that the probability of the inter-blade cavitation development is significantly high close to the runner hub. Furthermore, the mean vortex line is calculated and the vortex region is estimated in the three-dimensional domain for the comparison with numerical simulation results. In addition, the on-board pressure measurements on a runner blade is conducted, and the influence of the inter-blade vortex on the pressure field is investigated. The analysis suggests that the presence of the inter-blade vortex can magnify the amplitude of pressure fluctuations especially on the blade suction side. Furthermore, the wall pressure difference between pressure and suction sides of the blade features partially low or negative values near the hub at the discharge region where the inter-blade vortex develops. This negative pressure difference on the blade wall suggests the development of a backflow region caused by the flow separation near the hub, which is closely related to the development of the inter-blade vortex. The development of the backflow region is confirmed by the numerical

  14. Experimental Determination of the Dynamic Hydraulic Transfer Function for the J-2X Oxidizer Turbopump. Part One; Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Tom; Patel, Sandeep; Lee, Erik; Karon, Dave

    2011-01-01

    An advanced methodology for extracting the hydraulic dynamic pump transfer matrix (Yp) for a cavitating liquid rocket engine turbopump inducer+impeller has been developed. The transfer function is required for integrated vehicle pogo stability analysis as well as optimization of local inducer pumping stability. Laboratory pulsed subscale waterflow test of the J-2X oxygen turbo pump is introduced and our new extraction method applied to the data collected. From accurate measures of pump inlet and discharge perturbational mass flows and pressures, and one-dimensional flow models that represents complete waterflow loop physics, we are able to derive Yp and hence extract the characteristic pump parameters: compliance, pump gain, impedance, mass flow gain. Detailed modeling is necessary to accurately translate instrument plane measurements to the pump inlet and discharge and extract Yp. We present the MSFC Dynamic Lump Parameter Fluid Model Framework and describe critical dynamic component details. We report on fit minimization techniques, cost (fitness) function derivation, and resulting model fits to our experimental data are presented. Comparisons are made to alternate techniques for spatially translating measurement stations to actual pump inlet and discharge.

  15. Modelling transient pipe flow with cavitation and frequency dependent friction. Part II. Friction and numerical-experimental validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Urbanowicz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of time-depended hydraulic friction is not an easy issue. As numerous studies have shown, wall shear stress in the pipe can be determined as a sum of the quasi-steady and time-dependent expressions. Time-depended expression is an convolution integral of the local acceleration of the liquid and a weighting function. The weighting function, in general, makes allowance for relation of historic velocity changes and unsteady component of wall shear stress. The original weighting function has usually a very complicated structure, and what is more it makes impossible to do an efficient simulation of dynamical runs. In this paper, in order to enable efficient calculation of unsteady component wall shear stress, new weighting functions are presented as a sum of exponential components. To aim this goal in case of turbulent flow, the scaling procedure proposed by Vitkovsky et al. is used. This method makes very easy the estimation of any new turbulent weighting function. Presented approximated weighting functions are compared with the original counterparts, known from literature in case of laminar and turbulent flows. Using the previously discussed models of cavitation flow CSM, CSMG, CSMA, and the BCM with implemented effective weighting function a series of simulation studies has been made, which showed that the introduced changes in models of unsteady flow with cavitation greatly improve the degree of simulation fit in comparison with experimental results.[b]Keywords[/b]: numerical fluid mechanics, transient flow, cavitation, frequency-dependent friction losses, pipeline, waterhammer

  16. Infrared characteristic radiation of water condensation and freezing in connection with atmospheric phenomena; Part 3: Experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatartchenko, V.; Liu, Yifan; Chen, Wenyuan; Smirnov, P.

    2012-09-01

    This paper is the third one from the series of papers with the same titles published in this journal. The papers consider the infrared characteristic radiation (IRCR) during the first order phase transitions of water: crystallization, water vapor condensation, and water vapor deposition. Experimental results are analyzed in terms of their correspondence to the theoretical model. This model is based on the assertion that the particle's (atom, molecule, or cluster) transition from the higher energetic level in a metastable phase (vapor or liquid) to a lower level in a stable phase (liquid or crystal) produces an emission of one or more photons. The energy of these photons depends on the latent energy of the phase transition and the character of bonds formed by the particle in the new phase. For all investigated substances, this energy falls in the infrared range. Recorded in the atmosphere, numerous sources of the infrared radiation seem to be a result of crystallization, condensation and deposition of water during fog and cloud formation. The effect under investigation must play a very important role in atmospheric phenomena: it is one of the sources of Earth's cooling; formation of hailstorm clouds is accompanied by intensive IRCR that could be detected for process characterization and meteorological warnings. IRCR seems to be used for atmospheric energy accumulation and together with the wind, falling water, solar and geothermal energies makes available the fifth source of ecologically pure energy.

  17. Axial mercury segregation in direct current operated low-pressure argon mercury gas discharges: Part I. Experimental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, John W. A. M.; de Groot, Simon; van der Mullen, Joost J. A. M.

    2004-07-01

    Due to cataphoresis, axial segregation of mercury will occur when the gas discharge of a fluorescent lamp is operated by means of a direct current. A consequence of this is a non-uniform axial luminance distribution along the lamp. To determine the degree of axial mercury segregation experimentally, axial luminance distributions have been measured which are converted into axial mercury vapour pressure distributions by an appropriate calibration method. The mercury segregation has been investigated for variations in lamp tube radius (3.6-4.8 mm), argon buffer gas pressure (200-600 Pa) and lamp current (100-250 mA) at mercury vapour pressures set at the anode in the range from 0.2 to 9.0 Pa. From the experiments it has been concluded that the mercury vapour pressure gradient at any axial position for a certain lamp tube diameter, argon pressure and lamp current depends on the local mercury vapour pressure. This observation is in contrast to assumptions made in earlier modelling publications in which one mercury vapour pressure gradient is used for all axial positions. By applying a full factorial design, an empirical relation of the mercury segregation is found for any set of parameters inside the investigated parameter ranges.

  18. A Class of Methods for the Analysis of Blade Tip Timing Data from Bladed Assemblies Undergoing Simultaneous Resonances—Part II: Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gallego-Garrido

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Blade tip timing is a technique for the measurement of vibrations in rotating bladed assemblies. In Part I of this work a class of methods for the analysis of blade tip timing data from bladed assemblies undergoing two simultaneous synchronous resonances was developed. The approaches were demonstrated using data from a mathematical simulation of tip timing data. In Part II the methods are validated on an experimental test rig. First, the construction and characteristics of the rig will be discussed. Then, the performance of the analysis techniques when applied to data from the rig will be compared and analysed. It is shown that accurate frequency estimates are obtained by all the methods for both single and double resonances. Furthermore, the recovered frequencies are used to calculate the amplitudes of the blade tip responses. The presence of mistuning in the bladed assembly does not affect the performance of the new techniques.

  19. Part of the functional imagery in the development of new medicines. Press conference 30 september 1999; Role de l'imagerie fonctionnelle dans le developpement de nouveaux medicaments. Conference de presse 30 septembre 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    today the functional imagery plays an increasing part in the discovery and the development of new medicines. This paper is a presentation of the aims of the colloquium and the subjects proposed. It takes stock on the functional imagery methods: positron emission tomography, monophonic emission tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance (imaging and spectroscopy). The research programs of the CEA in this domain and in particular the activities of the Frederic Joliot hospital center are presented. (A.L.B.)

  20. Alexander von Humboldt: galvanism, animal electricity, and self-experimentation part 2: the electric eel, animal electricity, and later years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Stanley; Piccolino, Marco; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    After extensive experimentation during the 1790s, Alexander von Humboldt remained skeptical about "animal electricity" (and metallic electricity), writing instead about an ill-defined galvanic force. With his worldview and wishing to learn more, he studied electric eels in South America just as the new century began, again using his body as a scientific instrument in many of his experiments. As had been the case in the past and for many of the same reasons, some of his findings with the electric eel (and soon after, Italian torpedoes) seemed to argue against biological electricity. But he no longer used galvanic terminology when describing his electric fish experiments. The fact that he now wrote about animal electricity rather than a different "galvanic" force owed much to Alessandro Volta, who had come forth with his "pile" (battery) for multipling the physical and perceptable effects of otherwise weak electricity in 1800, while Humboldt was deep in South America. Humboldt probably read about and saw voltaic batteries in the United States in 1804, but the time he spent with Volta in 1805 was probably more significant in his conversion from a galvanic to an electrical framework for understanding nerve and muscle physiology. Although he did not continue his animal electricity research program after this time, Humboldt retained his worldview of a unified nature and continued to believe in intrinsic animal electricity. He also served as a patron to some of the most important figures in the new field of electrophysiology (e.g., Hermann Helmholtz and Emil du Bois-Reymond), helping to take the research that he had participated in to the next level.

  1. Alexander von Humboldt: galvanism, animal electricity, and self-experimentation part 1: formative years, naturphilosophie, and galvanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Stanley; Piccolino, Marco; Stahnisch, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    During the 1790s, Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), who showed an early interest in many facets of natural philosophy and natural history, delved into the controversial subject of galvanism and animal electricity, hoping to shed light on the basic nature of the nerve force. He was motivated by his broad worldview, the experiments of Luigi Galvani, who favored animal electricity in more than a few specialized fishes, and the thinking of Alessandro Volta, who accepted specialized fish electricity but was not willing to generalize to other animals, thinking Galvani's frog experiments flawed by his use of metals. Differing from many German Naturphilosophen, who shunned "violent" experiments, the newest instruments, and detailed measurement, Humboldt conducted thousands of galvanic experiments on animals and animal parts, as well as many on his own body, some of which caused him great pain. He interpreted his results as supporting some but not all of the claims made by both Galvani and Volta. Notably, because of certain negative findings and phenomenological differences, he remained skeptical about the intrinsic animal force being qualitatively identical to true electricity. Hence, he referred to a "galvanic force," not animal electricity, in his letters and publications, a theoretical position he would abandon with Volta's help early in the new century.

  2. Medicinal Plants with Antiplatelet Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haouari, Mohammed; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-07-01

    Blood platelets play an essential role in the hemostasis and wound-healing processes. However, platelet hyperactivity is associated to the development and the complications of several cardiovascular diseases. In this sense, the search for potent and safer antiplatelet agents is of great interest. This article provides an overview of experimental studies performed on medicinal plants with antiplatelet activity available through literature with particular emphasis on the bioactive constituents, the parts used, and the various platelet signaling pathways modulated by medicinal plants. From this review, it was suggested that medicinal plants with antiplatelet activity mainly belong to the family of Asteraceae, Rutaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Zygophyllaceae, Rhamnaceae, Liliaceae, and Zingiberaceae. The antiplatelet effect is attributed to the presence of bioactive compounds such as polyphenols, flavonoids, coumarins, terpenoids, and other substances which correct platelet abnormalities by interfering with different platelet signalization pathways including inhibition of the ADP pathway, suppression of TXA2 formation, reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, and phosphoinositide breakdown, among others. The identification and/or structure modification of the plant constituents and the understanding of their action mechanisms will be helpful in the development of new antiplatelet agents based on medicinal plants which could contribute to the prevention of thromboembolic-related disorders by inhibiting platelet aggregation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Machine Learning in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Rahul C

    2015-11-17

    Spurred by advances in processing power, memory, storage, and an unprecedented wealth of data, computers are being asked to tackle increasingly complex learning tasks, often with astonishing success. Computers have now mastered a popular variant of poker, learned the laws of physics from experimental data, and become experts in video games - tasks that would have been deemed impossible not too long ago. In parallel, the number of companies centered on applying complex data analysis to varying industries has exploded, and it is thus unsurprising that some analytic companies are turning attention to problems in health care. The purpose of this review is to explore what problems in medicine might benefit from such learning approaches and use examples from the literature to introduce basic concepts in machine learning. It is important to note that seemingly large enough medical data sets and adequate learning algorithms have been available for many decades, and yet, although there are thousands of papers applying machine learning algorithms to medical data, very few have contributed meaningfully to clinical care. This lack of impact stands in stark contrast to the enormous relevance of machine learning to many other industries. Thus, part of my effort will be to identify what obstacles there may be to changing the practice of medicine through statistical learning approaches, and discuss how these might be overcome. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Granular metal–carbon nanocomposites as piezoresistive sensor films – Part 1: Experimental results and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Schultes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We have produced granular films based on carbon and different transition metals by means of plasma deposition processes. Some of the films possess an increased strain sensitivity compared to metallic films. They respond to strain almost linearly with gauge factors of up to 30 if strained longitudinally, while in the transverse direction about half of the effect is still measured. In addition, the film's thermal coefficient of resistance is adjustable by the metal concentration. The influence of metal concentration was investigated for the elements Ni, Pd, Fe, Pt, W, and Cr, while the elements Co, Au, Ag, Al, Ti, and Cu were studied briefly. Only Ni and Pd have a pronounced strain sensitivity at 55 ± 5 at. % (atomic percent of metal, among which Ni–C is far more stable. Two phases are identified by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction: metal-containing nanocolumns densely packed in a surrounding carbon phase. We differentiate three groups of metals, due to their respective affinity to carbon. It turns out that only nickel has the capability to bond and form a stable and closed encapsulation of GLC around each nanoparticle. In this structure, the electron transport is in part accomplished by tunneling processes across the basal planes of the graphitic encapsulation. Hence, we hold these tunneling processes responsible for the increased gauge factors of Ni–C composites. The other elements are unable to form graphitic encapsulations and thus do not exhibit elevated gauge factors.

  5. The medicine from behind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel, Van Tinde; Onselen, Van Sabine; Myren, Britt; Towns, Alexandra; Quiroz, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Purgative enemas form an integral part of African traditional medicine. Besides possible benefits, serious health risks of rectal herbal therapy have been described in literature. To design appropriate health education programs, it is essential to understand

  6. An experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system over the Yellow River basin - Part 1: Understanding the role of initial hydrological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xing; Ma, Feng; Wang, Linying; Zheng, Ziyan; Ma, Zhuguo; Ye, Aizhong; Peng, Shaoming

    2016-06-01

    The hydrological cycle over the Yellow River has been altered by the climate change and human interventions greatly during past decades, with a decadal drying trend mixed with a large variation of seasonal hydrological extremes. To provide support for the adaptation to a changing environment, an experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system is established over the Yellow River basin. The system draws from a legacy of a global hydrological forecasting system that is able to make use of real-time seasonal climate predictions from North American Multimodel Ensemble (NMME) climate models through a statistical downscaling approach but with a higher resolution and a spatially disaggregated calibration procedure that is based on a newly compiled hydrological observation dataset with 5 decades of naturalized streamflow at 12 mainstream gauges and a newly released meteorological observation dataset including 324 meteorological stations over the Yellow River basin. While the evaluation of the NMME-based seasonal hydrological forecasting will be presented in a companion paper to explore the added values from climate forecast models, this paper investigates the role of initial hydrological conditions (ICs) by carrying out 6-month Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) and reverse ESP-type simulations for each calendar month during 1982-2010 with the hydrological models in the forecasting system, i.e., a large-scale land surface hydrological model and a global routing model that is regionalized over the Yellow River. In terms of streamflow predictability, the ICs outweigh the meteorological forcings up to 2-5 months during the cold and dry seasons, but the latter prevails over the former in the predictability after the first month during the warm and wet seasons. For the streamflow forecasts initialized at the end of the rainy season, the influence of ICs for lower reaches of the Yellow River can be 5 months longer than that for the upper reaches, while such a difference

  7. Aerospace Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  8. Temporomandibular joint reconstruction with a 2-part chrome-cobalt prosthesis, chondro-osseous graft, and silastic: clinical and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummoona, Raja

    2009-11-01

    Seventy-six patients including 27 females and 49 males, with ages ranging between 4 and 35 years (mean, 19.5 y), all experienced loss of weight, stiff temporomandibular joints and inability to chew food, and facial deformities. These patients were treated in the Maxillofacial Unit, Surgical Specialties Hospital, Medical City, Baghdad, Iraq, using 4 different techniques according to the requirement of each case and the facilities available. These patients were divided into 4 groups: the first group consists of 16 children (21.06%) treated with a chondro-osseous graft; the second group, 10 children (13.16%) treated with a 2-part chrome-cobalt prosthesis; the third group, 32 children (42.11%) treated with a Sialastic rubber silicone implant (Koken Co, Tokyo, Japan); and the fourth group, 18 children (23.69%) treated with interposition arthroplasty with a temporalis muscle flap. The follow-up period of the cases ranged between 3 and 15 years. Experimental studies were done on using rabbits to assess the viability of the chondro-osseous graft and on monkeys to demonstrate the biological acceptability of the 2-part chrome-cobalt prosthesis. The aim of this clinical and experimental study was to show our experience in managing difficult tasks that craniofacial or maxillofacial surgeons may face and to share these experiences with other colleagues all over the world.

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell short stack performance testing - Part A: Experimental analysis and μ-combined heat and power unit comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropasqua, L.; Campanari, S.; Brouwer, J.

    2017-12-01

    The need to experimentally understand the detailed performance of SOFC stacks under operating conditions typical of commercial SOFC systems has prompted this two-part study. The steady state performance of a 6-cell short stack of yttria (Y2O3) stabilised zirconia (YSZ) with Ni/YSZ anodes and composite Sr-doped lanthanum manganite (LaMnO3, LSM)/YSZ cathodes is experimentally evaluated. In Part A, the stack characterisation is carried out by means of sensitivity analyses on the fuel utilisation factor and the steam-to-carbon ratio. Electrical and environmental performances are assessed and the results are compared with a commercial full-scale micro-CHP system, which comprises the same cells. The results show that the measured temperature dynamics of the short stack in a test stand environment are on the order of many minutes; therefore, one cannot neglect temperature dynamics for a precise measurement of the steady state polarisation behaviour. The overall polarisation performance is comparable to that of the full stack employed in the micro-CHP system, confirming the good representation that short-stack analyses can give of the entire SOFC module. The environmental performance is measured verifying the negligible values of NO emissions (<10 ppb) across the whole polarisation curve.

  10. Evolution of Quality Assurance for Clinical Immunohistochemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine: Part 1: Fit-for-Purpose Approach to Classification of Clinical Immunohistochemistry Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, C.C.; D'Arrigo, C.; Dietel, M.; Francis, G.D.; Gilks, C.B.; Hall, J.A.; Hornick, J.L.; IBRAHIM, M.; Marchetti, A.; Miller, K.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Nielsen, S.; Swanson, P.E.; Taylor, C.R.; Vyberg, M.; Zhou, X.; Torlakovic, E.E.

    2017-01-01

    Technical progress in immunohistochemistry (IHC) as well as the increased utility of IHC for biomarker testing in precision medicine avails us of the opportunity to reassess clinical IHC as a laboratory test and its proper characterization as a special type of immunoassay. IHC, as used in current

  11. Environmental risk assessment for veterinary medicinal products. Part 2. The phase 1 assessment for immunological products. Report on the workshop 23-9-1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montforts MHMM; CSR

    2000-01-01

    This report contains a proposal for a simplified Phase 1 assessment for immunological veterinary medicinal products. This scheme was constructed as it was felt that the existing guidance as given by the EMEA was too complex and laborous to reach quick decisions on the acceptability of low-risk

  12. Report on Health Manpower and Programs in Ohio: Part Two. Allied Health, Area Health Education Centers, Dentistry, Emergency Medical Services, Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Information on health occupations educational programs in Ohio and current and projected employment needs for health professionals are presented. The following health fields are examined: allied health, dentistry, emergency medical service, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Issues and trends affecting each field are…

  13. Extended family medicine training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  14. The Relationship between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jingcheng

    2013-01-01

    The essence of the traditional Chinese medicine has always been the most advanced and experienced therapeutic approach in the world. It has knowledge that can impact the direction of future modern medical development; still, it is easy to find simple knowledge with mark of times and special cultures. The basic structure of traditional Chinese medicine is composed of three parts: one consistent with modern medicine, one involuntarily beyond modern medicine, and one that needs to be further evaluated. The part that is consistent with modern medicine includes consensus on several theories and concepts of traditional Chinese medicine, and usage of several treatments and prescriptions of traditional Chinese medicine including commonly used Chinese herbs. The part that is involuntarily beyond modern medicine contains several advanced theories and important concepts of traditional Chinese medicine, relatively advanced treatments, formula and modern prescriptions, leading herbs, acupuncture treatment and acupuncture anesthesia of traditional Chinese medicine that affect modern medicine and incorporates massage treatment that has been gradually acknowledged by modern therapy. The part that needs to be further evaluated consists not only the knowledge of pulse diagnosis, prescription, and herbs, but also many other aspects of traditional Chinese medicine.

  15. The Relationship between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingcheng Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The essence of the traditional Chinese medicine has always been the most advanced and experienced therapeutic approach in the world. It has knowledge that can impact the direction of future modern medical development; still, it is easy to find simple knowledge with mark of times and special cultures. The basic structure of traditional Chinese medicine is composed of three parts: one consistent with modern medicine, one involuntarily beyond modern medicine, and one that needs to be further evaluated. The part that is consistent with modern medicine includes consensus on several theories and concepts of traditional Chinese medicine, and usage of several treatments and prescriptions of traditional Chinese medicine including commonly used Chinese herbs. The part that is involuntarily beyond modern medicine contains several advanced theories and important concepts of traditional Chinese medicine, relatively advanced treatments, formula and modern prescriptions, leading herbs, acupuncture treatment and acupuncture anesthesia of traditional Chinese medicine that affect modern medicine and incorporates massage treatment that has been gradually acknowledged by modern therapy. The part that needs to be further evaluated consists not only the knowledge of pulse diagnosis, prescription, and herbs, but also many other aspects of traditional Chinese medicine.

  16. The ICCAM platform study: An experimental medicine platform for evaluating new drugs for relapse prevention in addiction. Part B: fMRI description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, John; Murphy, Anna; Paterson, Louise M; Reed, Laurence J; Nestor, Liam; Nash, Jonathan; Elliott, Rebecca; Ersche, Karen D; Flechais, Remy Sa; Newbould, Rexford; Orban, Csaba; Smith, Dana G; Taylor, Eleanor M; Waldman, Adam D; Robbins, Trevor W; Deakin, Jf William; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Suckling, John

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to set up a robust multi-centre clinical fMRI and neuropsychological platform to investigate the neuropharmacology of brain processes relevant to addiction - reward, impulsivity and emotional reactivity. Here we provide an overview of the fMRI battery, carried out across three centres, characterizing neuronal response to the tasks, along with exploring inter-centre differences in healthy participants. Three fMRI tasks were used: monetary incentive delay to probe reward sensitivity, go/no-go to probe impulsivity and an evocative images task to probe emotional reactivity. A coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis was carried out for the reward and impulsivity tasks to help establish region of interest (ROI) placement. A group of healthy participants was recruited from across three centres (total n=43) to investigate inter-centre differences. Principle observations: The pattern of response observed for each of the three tasks was consistent with previous studies using similar paradigms. At the whole brain level, significant differences were not observed between centres for any task. In developing this platform we successfully integrated neuroimaging data from three centres, adapted validated tasks and applied whole brain and ROI approaches to explore and demonstrate their consistency across centres.

  17. Ethics in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Warren R; George, Michael S; Churchill, Larry; Spindler, Kurt P

    2007-05-01

    Physicians have struggled with the medical ramifications of athletic competition since ancient Greece, where rational medicine and organized athletics originated. Historically, the relationship between sport and medicine was adversarial because of conflicts between health and sport. However, modern sports medicine has emerged with the goal of improving performance and preventing injury, and the concept of the "team physician" has become an integral part of athletic culture. With this distinction come unique ethical challenges because the customary ethical norms for most forms of clinical practice, such as confidentiality and patient autonomy, cannot be translated easily into sports medicine. The particular areas of medical ethics that present unique challenges in sports medicine are informed consent, third parties, advertising, confidentiality, drug use, and innovative technology. Unfortunately, there is no widely accepted code of sports medicine ethics that adequately addresses these issues.

  18. Methodologies and experimental platforms for generating and analysing microarray and mass spectrometry-based omics data to support P4 medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzi, Pietro H; Agapito, Giuseppe; Milano, Marianna; Cannataro, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) medicine is an emerging medical model that is based on the customization of all medical aspects (i.e. practices, drugs, decisions) of the individual patient. P4 medicine presupposes the elucidation of the so-called omic world, under the assumption that this knowledge may explain differences of patients with respect to disease prevention, diagnosis and therapies. Here, we elucidate the role of some selected omics sciences for different aspects of disease management, such as early diagnosis of diseases, prevention of diseases, selection of personalized appropriate and optimal therapies based on molecular profiling of patients. After introducing basic concepts of P4 medicine and omics sciences, we review some computational tools and approaches for analysing selected omics data, with a special focus on microarray and mass spectrometry data, which may be used to support P4 medicine. Some applications of biomarker discovery and pharmacogenomics and some experiences on the study of drug reactions are also described. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The Jewish contribution to medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    History of Medicine. The Jewish contribution to medicine. Part I. Biblical and Talmudic times to the end of the 18th century. H.DUBOVSKY. Summary. Jewish interest in medicine has a religious motivation with the preservation of health and life as religious commandments in the Holy Scriptures. Despite a basic belief that God ...

  20. A quantitative approach to benefit-risk assessment of medicines - part 1: the development of a new model using multi-criteria decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussen, Filip; Salek, Sam; Walker, Stuart

    2007-07-01

    One of the most important uses of benefit-risk assessment pertains to approval of new medicines by regulatory authorities and the subsequent review of these products during their life-cycle when new safety and/or efficacy data becomes available. At present, there exist no validated, well-accepted models for benefit-risk assessment that have the appropriate degree of sophistication, and as a consequence no models are widely used by regulatory authorities or industry. The aim of the study was therefore to develop a new model for benefit-risk assessment of medicines using multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). The MCDA methodology was used for a systematic approach to assess the benefit risk ratio of medicines. The reasons for adopting this approach were (1) taking multiple benefit and risk criteria into account, (2) making a judgement on the evidence and potential uncertainty because of the incompleteness of evidence, and (3) making trade-offs of the benefits against risks. It was demonstrated through a seven-step approach how MCDA is used to construct the model. Ten benefit and ten risk criteria were identified to form a value tree. Then fixed scales were established for all criteria and options on the criteria were scored. Weights were assigned for each criteria using swing-weighting. Finally sensitivity analysis was carried. This novel approach based on MCDA has the potential for being applied as a new tool for judging and deciding on the benefits and risks, thereby helping regulators and industry in the development and approval of new medicines and their adequate use.

  1. Mathematical modeling and simulation in animal health - Part II: principles, methods, applications, and value of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in veterinary medicine and food safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z; Gehring, R; Mochel, J P; Lavé, T; Riviere, J E

    2016-10-01

    This review provides a tutorial for individuals interested in quantitative veterinary pharmacology and toxicology and offers a basis for establishing guidelines for physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development and application in veterinary medicine. This is important as the application of PBPK modeling in veterinary medicine has evolved over the past two decades. PBPK models can be used to predict drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals, to estimate chemical concentrations at the site of action and target organ toxicity to aid risk assessment of environmental contaminants and/or drugs in both domestic animals and wildlife, as well as to help design therapeutic regimens for veterinary drugs. This review provides a comprehensive summary of PBPK modeling principles, model development methodology, and the current applications in veterinary medicine, with a focus on predictions of drug tissue residues and withdrawal times in food-producing animals. The advantages and disadvantages of PBPK modeling compared to other pharmacokinetic modeling approaches (i.e., classical compartmental/noncompartmental modeling, nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, and interspecies allometric scaling) are further presented. The review finally discusses contemporary challenges and our perspectives on model documentation, evaluation criteria, quality improvement, and offers solutions to increase model acceptance and applications in veterinary pharmacology and toxicology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Systems Analysis of Technologies for Energy Recovery from Waste. Part I. Gasification followed by Catalytic Combustion, PEM Fuel Cells and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Stationary Applications in Comparison with Incineration. Part - II. Catalytic combustion - Experimental part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assefa, Getachew; Frostell, Bjoern [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Industrial Ecology; Jaeraas, Sven; Kusar, Henrik [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Chemical Technology

    2005-02-01

    This project is entitled 'Systems Analysis: Energy Recovery from waste, catalytic combustion in comparison with fuel cells and incineration'. Some of the technologies that are currently developed by researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology include catalytic combustion and fuel cells as downstream units in a gasification system. The aim of this project is to assess the energy turnover as well as the potential environmental impacts of biomass/waste-to-energy technologies. In second part of this project economic analyses of the technologies in general and catalytic combustion and fuel cell technologies in particular will be carried out. Four technology scenarios are studied: (1) Gasification followed by Low temperature fuel cells (Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells) (2) Gasification followed by high temperature fuel cells (Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) (3) Gasification followed by catalytic combustion and (4) Incineration with energy recovery. The waste used as feedstock is an industrial waste containing parts of household waste, paper waste, wood residues and poly ethene. In the study compensatory district heating is produced by combustion of biofuel. The power used for running the processes in the scenarios will be supplied by the waste-to-energy technologies themselves while compensatory power is assumed to be produced from natural gas. The emissions from the system studied are classified and characterised using methodology from Life Cycle Assessment in to the following environmental impact categories: Global Warming Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential and finally Formation of Photochemical Oxidants. Looking at the result of the four technology chains in terms of the four impact categories with impact per GWh electricity produced as a unit of comparison and from the perspective of the rank each scenario has in all the four impact categories, SOFC appears to be the winner technology followed by PEM and CC as second

  3. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS TAKING PART-TIME JOBS: A STUDY AMONGST FIRST YEAR CLINICAL STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF IBADAN

    OpenAIRE

    Kanmodi, K.K.; Akinloye, A.G.; Aladelusi, T.O.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Student part-time jobs are employments taken up by students while in school. Students in tertiary institutions do engage in part-time jobs because of the associated benefits. Some of these benefits include work experience, independence, financial support, and job satisfaction. Different studies have reported different attitudes towards taking part-time jobs among university students. Objective: To determine the attitudes of medical students in their first clinical year of study at...

  4. Second-order coupling of numerical and physical wave tanks for 2D irregular waves. Part II: Experimental validation in two-dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiwen; Liu, Shuxue; Bingham, Harry B.

    2014-01-01

    performance is achieved by using the second-order correction. When controlling with a second-order coupling signal, two key points are notable: (i) The higher harmonics underlying the numerical waves are accurately captured and transferred into the physical model. (ii) The second-order behavior leads...... to an unwanted spurious freely propagating second harmonic that is substantially reduced when compared to an identical wave paddle operating with a first-order coupling signal. Using nonlinear regular (monochromatic), bichromatic and irregular wave cases as well as varying coupled wave tank bathymetries, both......This paper provides an experimental validation of the second-order coupling theory outlined by Yang et al. (Z. Yang, S. Liu, H.B. Bingham and J. Li., 2013. Second-order coupling of numerical and physical wave tanks for 2D irregular waves. Part I: Formulation, implementation and numerical properties...

  5. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  6. Determination of the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) of Photocatalytic Oxidation (PCO) Purifiers for Indoor Air Pollutants Using a Closed-Loop Reactor. Part II: Experimental Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héquet, Valérie; Batault, Frédéric; Raillard, Cécile; Thévenet, Frédéric; Le Coq, Laurence; Dumont, Éric

    2017-03-06

    The performances of a laboratory PhotoCatalytic Oxidation (PCO) device were determined using a recirculation closed-loop pilot reactor. The closed-loop system was modeled by associating equations related to two ideal reactors: a perfectly mixed reservoir with a volume of VR = 0.42 m³ and a plug flow system corresponding to the PCO device with a volume of VP = 5.6 × 10-3 m³. The PCO device was composed of a pleated photocatalytic filter (1100 cm²) and two 18-W UVA fluorescent tubes. The Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) of the apparatus was measured under different operating conditions. The influence of three operating parameters was investigated: (i) light irradiance I from 0.10 to 2.0 mW·cm-2; (ii) air velocity v from 0.2 to 1.9 m·s-1; and (iii) initial toluene concentration C₀ (200, 600, 1000 and 4700 ppbv). The results showed that the conditions needed to apply a first-order decay model to the experimental data (described in Part I) were fulfilled. The CADR values, ranging from 0.35 to 3.95 m³·h-1, were mainly dependent on the light irradiance intensity. A square root influence of the light irradiance was observed. Although the CADR of the PCO device inserted in the closed-loop reactor did not theoretically depend on the flow rate (see Part I), the experimental results did not enable the confirmation of this prediction. The initial concentration was also a parameter influencing the CADR, as well as the toluene degradation rate. The maximum degradation rate rmax ranged from 342 to 4894 ppbv/h. Finally, this study evidenced that a recirculation closed-loop pilot could be used to develop a reliable standard test method to assess the effectiveness of PCO devices.

  7. Determination of the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR of Photocatalytic Oxidation (PCO Purifiers for Indoor Air Pollutants Using a Closed-Loop Reactor. Part II: Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Héquet

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The performances of a laboratory PhotoCatalytic Oxidation (PCO device were determined using a recirculation closed-loop pilot reactor. The closed-loop system was modeled by associating equations related to two ideal reactors: a perfectly mixed reservoir with a volume of VR = 0.42 m3 and a plug flow system corresponding to the PCO device with a volume of VP = 5.6 × 10−3 m3. The PCO device was composed of a pleated photocatalytic filter (1100 cm2 and two 18-W UVA fluorescent tubes. The Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR of the apparatus was measured under different operating conditions. The influence of three operating parameters was investigated: (i light irradiance I from 0.10 to 2.0 mW·cm−2; (ii air velocity v from 0.2 to 1.9 m·s−1; and (iii initial toluene concentration C0 (200, 600, 1000 and 4700 ppbv. The results showed that the conditions needed to apply a first-order decay model to the experimental data (described in Part I were fulfilled. The CADR values, ranging from 0.35 to 3.95 m3·h−1, were mainly dependent on the light irradiance intensity. A square root influence of the light irradiance was observed. Although the CADR of the PCO device inserted in the closed-loop reactor did not theoretically depend on the flow rate (see Part I, the experimental results did not enable the confirmation of this prediction. The initial concentration was also a parameter influencing the CADR, as well as the toluene degradation rate. The maximum degradation rate rmax ranged from 342 to 4894 ppbv/h. Finally, this study evidenced that a recirculation closed-loop pilot could be used to develop a reliable standard test method to assess the effectiveness of PCO devices.

  8. Axisymmetric flow in a cylindrical tank over a rotating bottom. Part II. Deformation of the water surface and experimental verification of the theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Keita; Yokota, Sho; Watanabe, Shunichi; Ikeda, Takashi; Niino, Hiroshi; Misawa, Nobuhiko

    2017-12-01

    The theory of axisymmetric flow in a cylindrical container with a rotating bottom, as described in Part I, is validated against the results of previous and our own laboratory experiments. First, deformation of the water surface is derived using the velocity distribution of the axisymmetric flow obtained by the theory. The form of the water surface is classified into three regimes, and the rotation rates of the transitions between these regimes are determined. The parameters predicted from this theory are compared with the results measured in laboratory experiments and also with data from previous experimental studies. The theory predicts the experimental data well, but a slight difference was found in the narrow region close to the side wall. Corrections estimated by considering the fluid behavior around the side wall boundary layer successfully explain most of the discrepancies. This theory appears to predict the results of the laboratory experiments very well, much better than a theory using an assumption of quadratic drag as a model of turbulent boundary layers.

  9. Determination of lamb wave dispersion data in lossy anisotropic plates using time domain finite element analysis. Part I: theory and experimental verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Gordon; Hyslop, Jamie

    2006-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental approach for extraction of guided wave dispersion data in plate structures is described. Finite element modeling is used to calculate the surface displacement data (in-plane and out-of-plane) when the plate is subject to either symmetrical or antisymmetrical impulsive force stimulation at one or both of the parallel faces. Fourier transformation of the resultant space-time displacement histories is then employed to obtain phase velocity as a function of frequency. Experimental verification in the case of antisymmetrical stimulation is provided by means of a high-power Q-switched laser source that is used to excite guided waves in the plate. The subsequent out-of-plane displacement data were then obtained by means of a scanning laser vibrometer, and good agreement between theory and experiment is demonstrated. Examples of dispersion data are provided for aluminum, and excellent correlation between the data sets and conventional Rayleigh-Lamb theory for plate structures was obtained. This was then extended to lossy polymeric plates, in addition to both unpolarized and polarized piezoelectric ceramic plates, again with good agreement between the finite element modeling and optical experiments. The last set of results prepares the way for a detailed investigation of the nonhomogeneous piezoelectric composite waveguides described in a companion paper (Part II).

  10. Plants and Medicinal Chemistry--2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, D.

    1977-01-01

    Second of a two part article on the influence of plants on medicinal chemistry. This part considers how drugs work, the attempts to develop anaesthetics safer than cocaine, and useful poisons. (Author/SL)

  11. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 2. Results: Primary care management and community orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    At the WONCA Europe conference 2009 the recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' was presented. It is a background paper and reference manual, providing advocacy of general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) in Europe. The Research Agenda summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the WONCA Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In this second article, the results for the core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' are presented. Though there is a large body of research on various aspects of 'primary care management', it represents a very scattered rather than a meta view. Many studies focus on care for specific diseases, the primary/secondary care interface, or the implications of electronic patient records. Cost efficiency or process indicators of quality are current outcomes. Current literature on community orientation is mainly descriptive, and focuses on either care for specific diseases, or specific patient populations, or on the uptake of preventive services. Most papers correspond poorly to the WONCA concept. For both core competencies, there is a lack of research with a longitudinal perspective and/or relevant health or quality of life outcomes as well as research on patients' preferences and education for organizational aspects of GP/FM.

  12. [Kant and medicine of enlightenment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model, A

    1990-01-01

    Immanuel Kants "Critique of Judgment" (1970) reflects the medicine of the second part of the eighteenth century. Both parts of the "Critique of Judgment" (as well the "Critique of Aesthetic Judgment" as the "Critique of Teleological Judgment") refer to problems of medicine.

  13. Ethnoveterinary Medicine: The prospects of integrating medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, the use of medicinal plant products would be a rational alternative to synthetic drugs. Ethnobotanical surveys carried out in many parts of Kenya have revealed a lot of plants being used in animal disease management. Specific plant extracts have been identified and screened by many researchers for their ...

  14. Astronomy, Astrology, and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Dorian Gieseler

    Astronomy and astrology were combined with medicine for thousands of years. Beginning in Mesopotamia in the second millennium BCE and continuing into the eighteenth century, medical practitioners used astronomy/astrology as an important part of diagnosis and prescription. Throughout this time frame, scientists cited the similarities between medicine and astrology, in addition to combining the two in practice. Hippocrates and Galen based medical theories on the relationship between heavenly bodies and human bodies. In an enduring cultural phenomenon, parts of the body as well as diseases were linked to zodiac signs and planets. In Renaissance universities, astronomy and astrology were studied by students of medicine. History records a long tradition of astrologer-physicians. This chapter covers the topic of astronomy, astrology, and medicine from the Old Babylonian period to the Enlightenment.

  15. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are one type of dietary supplement. They are ... and fresh or dried plants. People use herbal medicines to try to maintain or improve their health. ...

  16. Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  17. [Cross-sectional analysis of heart failure among patients in the Internal Medicine Service at a third-level hospital. Part I: epidemiologic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinza Sanjurjo, S; Cabarcos Ortiz de Barrón, A; Enrique Nieto Pol, E; Torre Carballada, J A

    2007-06-01

    To observe the epidemiologic characteristics of the patients intake during five years in a internal medicine department, with heart failure. A cross-sectional study of the intake patients in the Internal Medicine Service in the Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela between 1999 to 2003. The variables analized were: sex, age, days of hospital stay, number of intake by failure cardiac, reason for admission (guide symptom), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiac disease, fibrillation atrium, previous treatment with beta-blockers, blood pressure in the admission moment, to make echocardiography, disfunction systolic, etiology, deceased, treatment at the end. The statistical analysis was performed with qualitative and quantitative measures, chi-cuadrado and t-student, and multivariant analyses. 248 patients were accepted for the study. We observed more women than men (55.2%) and bigger median age (79 years old vs. 73 years old in men, p failure most frequent were ischemic cardiopathy (27.2%) and hypertension (24.2%). The most frequent symptom was the dyspnea (68.9%). It made echocardiography in 20.9% of patients and 45.1% showed systolic disfunction. The only factor related with this small percentage of echocardiographies was the incoming time. The most frequent etiology was respiratory infections (39.5%). The 8.6% of patients was deceased. The pharmacologic treatment more prescribed were the diuretics (86.9%) and transcutaneous nitrates (49.5%). It was indicated ECAI or AAR-II in the 86.9% of patients and beta-blockers in 0.9%. The number of echocardiograms practiced to the patients is smaller that the number advised by international associations and smaller to the cardiologist registers. The beta-blockers and ECAI use is smaller too.

  18. Ethics seminars: physician complicity in the Holocaust: historical review and reflections on emergency medicine in the 21st century, part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiderman, Joel Martin

    2002-03-01

    Part I of this seminar in ethics reviewed the participation of German physicians and the German medical establishment in carrying out Nazi policies and listed eight moral failures that could be attributed to doctors during the dark period of history known as the Holocaust. The collective acts that occurred during this period have, arguably, become a benchmark for abject ethical collapse on the part of mankind. Part II contemplates a variety of contemporary issues through the prism of the Holocaust. This article reviews and categorizes ethical pitfalls encountered by physicians during the Nazi era and examines them in relationship to several current issues. It also focuses on ethical concerns and challenges that confront contemporary emergency practitioners, some of which have parallels, though certainly not direct comparators, in the Nazi era.

  19. Indicative properties on snow cover based on the results of experimental studies in the winter 2011/12 in the central part of the East European Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kitaev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Local and regional differences in the snow formation were studied in different landscapes of the central part of the East European Plain – within reserves in the Moscow and Tver’ regions (south-north direction; the study period is the winter 2011/12. The observed increase of snow storage in 1.3–1.5 times in the direction south-north is connected, apparently. The difference in the five-day appearance of snow cover maximum is related to differences in regional winter air temperature. Throughout the snow depth and snow storage in spruce are smaller than in deciduous forest – in the ratio of 0.81 in south area and 0.93 in north area; in spruce the large part of solid precipitation is intercepted by the crowns pine trees. Snow stratigraphy at south areas has four layers, six layers at the north area are more variable in snow density and snow storage. Perhaps, gravitational conversion is more noticeable due to larger snow depth. Snow density and snow storage at the open areas are more heterogeneous than in the forest. This is due to sharp fluctuations in air temperature, wind transport and compaction of snow, evaporation from the snow surface. The stratigraphy of snow also reflects the history of winter changes of air temperature and snow accumulation. Common feature for reserves at south and north is the availability of layers with maximum snow storage in the middle of the snow thickness, which were formed during the air temperature drops to the lowest seasonal values in period with increase of snow depth to maximum. Formation of depth hoar in snow thickness are touched everywhere the bottom and middle layers, respectively, it was formed both before and during the period with minimal air temperature. Thus, the results of experimental studies confirm the significance of the differences of individual components of the landscape setting. Analytical conclusions are largely qualitative in nature due to the lack to date of initial information, and

  20. Practical nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Gemmell, Howard G; Sharp, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in patient care, and this book is an essential guide for all practitioners to the many techniques that inform clinical management. The first part covers the scientific basis of nuclear medicine, the rest of the book deals with clinical applications. Diagnostic imaging has an increasingly important role in patient management and, despite advances in other modalities (functional MRI and spiral CT), nuclear medicine continues to make its unique contribution by its ability to demonstrate physiological function. This book is also expanded by covering areas of d

  1. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS TAKING PART-TIME JOBS: A STUDY AMONGST FIRST YEAR CLINICAL STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF IBADAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanmodi, K K; Akinloye, A G; Aladelusi, T O

    2017-06-01

    Student part-time jobs are employments taken up by students while in school. Students in tertiary institutions do engage in part-time jobs because of the associated benefits. Some of these benefits include work experience, independence, financial support, and job satisfaction. Different studies have reported different attitudes towards taking part-time jobs among university students. To determine the attitudes of medical students in their first clinical year of study at the University of Ibadan medical school towards taking up parttime medical jobs within the university hospital. This study was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among medical students in their first clinical year of study. Eighty one first clinical - year medical students were recruited to participate in this study. All participants were interviewed using a self-administered questionnaire to obtain information on bio-data, scholarship benefit status, level of satisfaction with monthly income, choices of part-time jobs, and the factors that might informed choice of a part-time job. No questionnaire was discarded because all were correctly filled. Data collected was coded, entered, and analysed using the SPSS version 16 software. Analyses of all variables were done using descriptive statistics. The mean age of the 81 respondents was 20.8 (±1.6) years and 51.9% were males. A higher proportion of the male respondents were studying on scholarship (57.1%), compared to that of the females (31.6%). Respondents studying on scholarship had a higher level of financial satisfaction. Over 90% of the participants supported the idea of part-time medical job creation for medical students. The majority of the respondents (64.2%) prefer to take up the job position of research assistantships. The amount of wages to be earned was the most predominant factor considered among the male respondents in their decision for taking up a part-time medical job, while opportunity to learn new skills was the most

  2. A crisis in chronic pain care: an ethical analysis. Part three: Toward an integrative, multi-disciplinary pain medicine built around the needs of the patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, James; Schatman, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    A number of variables have contributed to the current crisis in chronic pain care and are affected by, and affect, the philosophies and politics that influence the socio-economic climate of the American healthcare system. Thus, we posit that managing the crisis in chronic pain care in the United States is contingent upon the development of a multi-focal healthcare paradigm that more thoroughly enables and fortifies research, its translation (in education and practice), and the implementation of, and support for, both the curative and healing approaches in medicine in general, and pain care specifically. These steps necessitate re-examination, if not revision of the health care system and its economics. The ethical imperative to consider and prudently employ cutting-edge diagnostic and therapeutic technologies in pain medicine is obligatory. However, "supply side prudence" is of little value if "demand side accessibility" is lacking. Revisions to health insurance plans advocated by the in-coming administration seek to create uniformity in basic health care services based upon re-assessment of the clinical effectiveness (versus merely cost) of treatments, including those that are "high tech." These plans attempt to allow every patient a more complete ability to deliberatively work with physicians to access those services and resources that maximize health functioning and goals. But even given these revisions, authentic pain care must take into account the interactive contexts of the painient individual. The biopsychosocial model of chronic pain management may have significant practical and ethical worth in this regard. A system of pain treatment operating from a biopsychosocial perspective necessitates integrative multi-disciplinarity. We propose a tiered, multi-disciplinary paradigm based upon the differing needs of each specific patient. But establishing such a system does not guarantee access, and distribution of these services and resources requires economic

  3. Optimizing clinical operations as part of a global emergency medicine initiative in Kumasi, Ghana: application of Lean manufacturing principals to low-resource health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Patrick M; Desmond, Jeffery S; Akanbobnaab, Christopher; Oteng, Rockefeller A; Rominski, Sarah D; Barsan, William G; Cunningham, Rebecca M

    2012-03-01

    Although many global health programs focus on providing clinical care or medical education, improving clinical operations can have a significant effect on patient care delivery, especially in developing health systems without high-level operations management. Lean manufacturing techniques have been effective in decreasing emergency department (ED) length of stay, patient waiting times, numbers of patients leaving without being seen, and door-to-balloon times for ST-elevation myocardial infarction in developed health systems, but use of Lean in low to middle income countries with developing emergency medicine (EM) systems has not been well characterized. To describe the application of Lean manufacturing techniques to improve clinical operations at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Ghana and to identify key lessons learned to aid future global EM initiatives. A 3-week Lean improvement program focused on the hospital admissions process at KATH was completed by a 14-person team in six stages: problem definition, scope of project planning, value stream mapping, root cause analysis, future state planning, and implementation planning. The authors identified eight lessons learned during our use of Lean to optimize the operations of an ED in a global health setting: 1) the Lean process aided in building a partnership with Ghanaian colleagues; 2) obtaining and maintaining senior institutional support is necessary and challenging; 3) addressing power differences among the team to obtain feedback from all team members is critical to successful Lean analysis; 4) choosing a manageable initial project is critical to influence long-term Lean use in a new environment; 5) data intensive Lean tools can be adapted and are effective in a less resourced health system; 6) several Lean tools focused on team problem-solving techniques worked well in a low-resource system without modification; 7) using Lean highlighted that important changes do not require an influx of resources; and

  4. [The Hannover School of Veterinary Medicine in the Third Reich. Part 1: early history, assumption of power and consolidation of the Nazi regime].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimanski, M; Schäffer, J

    2001-09-01

    During the time of the Weimar republic the professors and students at the School of Veterinary Medicine Hannover had a national-conservative political attitude with a clearly anti-republican tendency. Before 1933 the National Socialism did not play a role at the school. After the assumption of power by Hitler the 'Gleichschaltung'--which also took place at the universities--ran mostly smoothly at the veterinary school. 75% of the teaching staff and 50% of the students had joined the NSDAP (nazi party) respectively the NSDStB (nazi student organisation) at the end of the summer semester 1933. The following development of the school until World War II is closely connected with the foundation of the Military Veterinary Academy in Hannover in 1935. During the years 1935-1939 offerings were made in a traditional way and without political considerations playing a major role. With the beginning of World War II the school developed into the centre of veterinary studies in Germany. In order to meet the demand of veterinary officers and civil veterinarians the studies were shortened, trimesters were temporarily introduced und standards of examinations were lowered. At the end of the war around 45% of the school was destroyed. In the beginning the denazification meant a significant turning point but it developed into a mere episode of the history of the school by the reappointment of all the seven professors who had been dismissed in 1945/46.

  5. European medicinal and edible plants associated with subacute and chronic toxicity part I: Plants with carcinogenic, teratogenic and endocrine-disrupting effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanc, Luka; Kreft, Samo

    2016-06-01

    In recent decades, the use of herbal medicines and food products has been widely embraced in many developed countries. These products are generally highly accepted by consumers who often believe that "natural" equals "safe". This is, however, an oversimplification because several botanicals have been found to contain toxic compounds in concentrations harmful to human health. Acutely toxic plants are in most cases already recognised as dangerous as a result of their traditional use, but plants with subacute and chronic toxicity are difficult or even impossible to detect by traditional use or by clinical research studies. In this review, we systematically address major issues including the carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and endocrine-disrupting effects associated with the use of herbal preparations with a strong focus on plant species that either grow natively or are cultivated in Europe. The basic information regarding the molecular mechanisms of the individual subtypes of plant-induced non-acute toxicity is given, which is followed by a discussion of the pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. We describe the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of alkenylbenzenes, pyrrolizidine alkaloids and bracken fern ptaquiloside, the teratogenicity issues regarding anthraquinone glycosides and specific alkaloids, and discuss the human health concerns regarding the phytoestrogens and licorice consumption in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 3. Results: person centred care, comprehensive and holistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-06-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In a second article, the results for the two core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' were presented. This article reflects on the three core competencies, which deal with person related aspects of GP/FM, i.e. 'person centred care', 'comprehensive approach' and 'holistic approach'. Though there is an important body of opinion papers and (non-systematic) reviews, all person related aspects remain poorly defined and researched. Validated instruments to measure these competencies are lacking. Concerning patient-centredness, most research examined patient and doctor preferences and experiences. Studies on comprehensiveness mostly focus on prevention/care of specific diseases. For all domains, there has been limited research conducted on its implications or outcomes.

  7. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 5: Needs and implications for future research and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-12-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and highlights related needs and implications for future research and policy. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In three subsequent, articles the results for the six core competencies of the European Definition of GP/FM were presented. This article formulates the common aims for further research and appropriate research methodologies, based on the missing evidence and research gaps identified form the comprehensive literature review. In addition, implications of this research agenda for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers, research organizations, patients and policy makers are presented. The concept of six core competencies should be abandoned in favour of a model with four dimensions, including clinical, person related, community oriented and management aspects. Future research and policy should consider more the involvement and rights of patients; more attention should be given to how new treatments or technologies are effectively translated into routine patient care, in particular primary care. There is a need for a European ethics board. The promotion of GP/FM research demands a good infrastructure in each country, including access to literature and databases, appropriate funding and training possibilities.

  8. Cryotherapy in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, C; Swärd, L; Karlsson, J

    1996-08-01

    The use of cryotherapy, i.e. the application of cold for the treatment of injury or disease, is widespread in sports medicine today. It is an established method when treating acute soft tissue injuries, but there is a discrepancy between the scientific basis for cryotherapy and clinical studies. Various methods such as ice packs, ice towels, ice massage, gel packs, refrigerant gases and inflatable splints can be used. Cold is also used to reduce the recovery time as part of the rehabilitation programme both after acute injuries and in the treatment of chronic injuries. Cryotherapy has also been shown to reduce pain effectively in the post-operative period after reconstructive surgery of the joints. Both superficial and deep temperature changes depend on the method of application, initial temperature and application time. The physiological and biological effects are due to the reduction in temperature in the various tissues, together with the neuromuscular action and relaxation of the muscles produced by the application of cold. Cold increases the pain threshold, the viscosity and the plastic deformation of the tissues but decreases the motor performance. The application of cold has also been found to decrease the inflammatory reaction in an experimental situation. Cold appears to be effective and harmless and few complications or side-effects after the use of cold therapy are reported. Prolonged application at very low temperatures should, however, be avoided as this may cause serious side-effects, such as frost-bite and nerve injuries. Practical applications, indications and contraindications are discussed.

  9. [Cross-sectional study of heart failure of patients intaked in an Internal Medicine Service in the third level hospital in mixed area. Part III: mortality analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinza Sanjurjo, S; Cabarcos Ortiz de Barrón, A; Nieto Pol, E; Torre Carballada, J A

    2007-08-01

    To establish the characteristics of the deceased in intaked patients by heart failure. A cross-sectional study of the intaked patients in the Internal Medicine Service in the Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela between 1999 to 2003. The variables analized were: sex, age, days of hospital stay, number of intaked by failure cardiac, reason for admission (guide symptom), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cardiac disease, fibrillation atrium, previous treatment with beta-blockers, blood pressure in the admission moment, to make echocardiography, disfunction systolic, etiology, deceased, treatment at the end. The statistical analysis was performed with cualitative and cuantitative measures, chi-cuadrado and t-student. 248 patients were accepted for the study, with the mortality rate rising 8.6% (21 patients). We did not observed differences between sexes, but the median age in death patients was greater than other patients. The median income was 5 days, letter than study population. The hypertension prevalence (30 vs. 42.6%, p = 0.27) and ischemic cardiopathy (30 vs. 27.7%, p = 0.82) did not showed differences with the population. The hypertension prevalence in women (16.7 vs. 35.7%, p = 0.21) and the ischemic cardiopathy prevalence in men (50 vs. 21.4%, p = 0.20) did not showed differences. It made echocardiography in 21.0% of death patients, p = 0.76. The systolic disfunction prevalence was bigger in death patients (80 vs. 41.3%), this difference was not significant statistically. The older patients showed letter survival. We did not observe any influence of sex or left ventricular systolic function on mortality in patients with heart failure.

  10. Applying 'Evidence-Based Medicine' Theory to Interventional Radiology.Part 2: A Spreadsheet for Swift Assessment of Procedural Benefit and Harm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacEneaney, Peter M.; Malone, Dermot E

    2000-12-01

    AIM: To design a spreadsheet program to analyse interventional radiology (IR) data rapidly produced in local research or reported in the literature using 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM) parameters of treatment benefit and harm. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Microsoft Excel{sup TM}was used. The spreadsheet consists of three worksheets. The first shows the 'Levels of Evidence and Grades of Recommendations' that can be assigned to therapeutic studies as defined by the Oxford Centre for EBM. The second and third worksheets facilitate the EBM assessment of therapeutic benefit and harm. Validity criteria are described. These include the assessment of the adequacy of sample size in the detection of possible procedural complications. A contingency (2 x 2) table for raw data on comparative outcomes in treated patients and controls has been incorporated. Formulae for EBM calculations are related to these numerators and denominators in the spreadsheet. The parameters calculated are benefit -- relative risk reduction, absolute risk reduction, number needed to treat (NNT). Harm -- relative risk, relative odds, number needed to harm (NNH). Ninety-five per cent confidence intervals are calculated for all these indices. The results change automatically when the data in the therapeutic outcome cells are changed. A final section allows the user to correct the NNT or NNH in their application to individual patients. RESULTS: This spreadsheet can be used on desktop and palmtop computers. The MS Excel{sup TM}version can be downloaded via the Internet from the URL ftp://radiography.com/pub/TxHarm00.xls. CONCLUSION: A spreadsheet is useful for the rapid analysis of the clinical benefit and harm from IR procedures. MacEneaney, P.M. and Malone, D.E.

  11. Research enrichment: evaluation of structured research in the curriculum for dental medicine students as part of the vertical and horizontal integration of biomedical training and discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Karl; O'Malley, Susan; Stewart, Tanis; Howard, Katherine M

    2008-02-19

    Research programs within medical and dental schools are important vehicles for biomedical and clinical discovery, serving as effective teaching and learning tools by providing situations in which predoctoral students develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Although research programs at many medical and dental schools are well-established, they may not be well integrated into the predoctoral curriculum to effectively support the learning objectives for their students. A series of structured seminars, incorporating faculty research, was designed for first-year dental students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine to reinforce and support the concepts and skills taught in concurrent courses. A structured research enrichment period was also created to facilitate student engagement in active research using faculty and student curricular release time. Course evaluations and surveys were administered to gauge student perceptions of the curricular integration of research, the impact of these seminars on recruitment to the research program, and overall levels of student satisfaction with research enrichment. The analysis of course surveys revealed that students perceived the research-containing seminars effectively illustrated concepts, were logically sequenced, and were well-integrated into their curriculum. In addition, analysis of surveys revealed that the Integration Seminar courses motivated students to engage in research enrichment. Finally, this analysis provided evidence that students were very satisfied with their overall learning experience during research enrichment. Curricular integration is one method of improving the teaching and learning of complicated and inter-related concepts, providing an opportunity to incorporate research training and objectives into traditionally separate didactic courses. Despite the benefits of curricular integration, finding the most appropriate points of integration, obtaining release time

  12. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 4. Results: specific problem solving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-09-01

    The 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. The previous articles presented background, objectives, and methodology, as well results on 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' and the person-related core competencies of GP/FM. This article reflects on the general practitioner's 'specific problem solving skills'. These include decision making on diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, accounting for the properties of primary care, but also research questions related to quality management and resource use, shared decision making, or professional education and development. Clinical research covers most specific diseases, but often lacks pragmatism and primary care relevance. Quality management is a stronghold of GP/FM research. Educational interventions can be effective when well designed for a specific setting and situation. However, their message that 'usual care' by general practitioners is insufficient may be problematic. GP and their patients need more research into diagnostic reasoning with a step-wise approach to increase predictive values in a setting characterized by uncertainty and low prevalence of specific diseases. Pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies of new and established drugs or non-pharmaceutical therapy are needed. Multi-morbidity and complexity should be addressed. Studies on therapy, communication strategies and educational interventions should consider impact on health and sustainability of effects.

  13. Research enrichment: evaluation of structured research in the curriculum for dental medicine students as part of the vertical and horizontal integration of biomedical training and discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Tanis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research programs within medical and dental schools are important vehicles for biomedical and clinical discovery, serving as effective teaching and learning tools by providing situations in which predoctoral students develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Although research programs at many medical and dental schools are well-established, they may not be well integrated into the predoctoral curriculum to effectively support the learning objectives for their students. Methods A series of structured seminars, incorporating faculty research, was designed for first-year dental students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine to reinforce and support the concepts and skills taught in concurrent courses. A structured research enrichment period was also created to facilitate student engagement in active research using faculty and student curricular release time. Course evaluations and surveys were administered to gauge student perceptions of the curricular integration of research, the impact of these seminars on recruitment to the research program, and overall levels of student satisfaction with research enrichment. Results The analysis of course surveys revealed that students perceived the research-containing seminars effectively illustrated concepts, were logically sequenced, and were well-integrated into their curriculum. In addition, analysis of surveys revealed that the Integration Seminar courses motivated students to engage in research enrichment. Finally, this analysis provided evidence that students were very satisfied with their overall learning experience during research enrichment. Conclusion Curricular integration is one method of improving the teaching and learning of complicated and inter-related concepts, providing an opportunity to incorporate research training and objectives into traditionally separate didactic courses. Despite the benefits of curricular integration, finding

  14. Concise review: ex vivo expansion of cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells: basic principles, experimental approaches, and impact in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Guzmán, Patricia; Fernández-Sánchez, Verónica; Mayani, Hector

    2013-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) play key roles in the production of mature blood cells and in the biology and clinical outcomes of hematopoietic transplants. The numbers of these cells, however, are extremely low, particularly in umbilical cord blood (UCB); thus, ex vivo expansion of human UCB-derived HSCs and HPCs has become a priority in the biomedical field. Expansion of progenitor cells can be achieved by culturing such cells in the presence of different combinations of recombinant stimulatory cytokines; in contrast, expansion of actual HSCs has proved to be more difficult because, in addition to needing recombinant cytokines, HSCs seem to deeply depend on the presence of stromal cells and/or elements that promote the activation of particular self-renewal signaling pathways. Hence, there is still controversy regarding the optimal culture conditions that should be used to achieve this. To date, UCB transplants using ex vivo-expanded cells have already been performed for the treatment of different hematological disorders, and although results are still far from being optimal, the advances are encouraging. Recent studies suggest that HSCs may also give rise to nonhematopoietic cells, such as neural, cardiac, mesenchymal, and muscle cells. Such plasticity and the possibility of producing nonhematopoietic cells at the clinical scale could bring new alternatives for the treatment of neural, metabolic, orthopedic, cardiac, and neoplastic disorders. Once standardized, ex vivo expansion of human HSCs/HPCs will surely have a positive impact in regenerative medicine.

  15. Protective and Therapeutic Effects of Chinese Medicine Formula Jiajian Yunvjian on Experimental Cardiac Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction Induced by Coronary Artery Ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jun; Gu, Wei-Liang; Chen, Chang-Xun; Wang, Ying; Lv, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study was designed to explore the effect and mechanism of a classic Chinese medicine formula Jiajian Yunvjian (JJYNJ) on cardiac remodeling. Cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) model was achieved by coronary artery ligation (CAL). Methodology. When dosed orally once daily, the effects of JJYNJ on hemodynamics, left ventricular weight index (LVWI), heart weight index (HWI), concentration, and gene expression of neuroendocrine factors as well as the histomorphological observation were determined. Results. After 4 weeks, mild cardiac remodeling in CAL group was characterized compared with sham group, but after 4 weeks of treatment of JJYNJ, hemodynamics improved, HWI reduced, and circulating angiotensin II (Ang II), endothelin-1 (ET-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and hydroxyproline (Hyp) concentrations as well as Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1R) mRNA, transforming growth factor β 1 (TGF-β 1) mRNA, and TNF-α mRNA levels in myocardium were lower than in CAL group. Decreased plasma aldosterone (ALD) concentration, cross-sectional area of cardiomyocyte, collagen volume fraction (CVF), collagen types I and III, perivascular collagen area (PVCA), and upregulated nitric oxide (NO) levels were observed at the same time. Conclusions. These findings suggest that JJYNJ may have a protective and therapeutic function on cardiac remodeling related to MI.

  16. Antitumor effect of blister beetles: an ethno-medicinal practice in Karbi community and its experimental evaluation against a murine malignant tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akalesh Kumar; Prasad, Surya Bali

    2013-07-30

    The blister beetles Epicauta hirticornis and Mylabris cichorii are used as a folk medicine by the Karbi tribe in Karbi Anglong district of Assam, India for the treatment of different human ailments, including cancer cases. It includes field survey related to zoo-therapeutic aspects of two blister beetles in Karbi community, isolation of bio-active compound and evaluation of its antitumor potential with possible mode of action against murine Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC). The main bio-active compound of blister beetles was isolated from ethyl acetate extract and the structure was confirmed as cantharidin using NMR, IR, Mass and X-ray diffractometer. The effect of cantharidin on apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and the apoptosis related signaling pathways were determined using different bioassays, including cell cycle analysis, mitochondrial membrane potential, western blot analysis of cytochrome c, caspases 9, 3/7 assays, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Cantharidin induced apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy cell death in EAC cells. The decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential was observed, which may help to release cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. Cantharidin treatment caused up-regulation of caspases 9 and -3/7 and a decrease in LDH activity in EAC cells. The major bioactive compound of these blister beetles is cantharidin which induces severe apoptosis in EAC cells involving mitochondrial intrinsic pathway. Cantharidin-mediated inhibition of LDH activity may lead to short supply of NAD(+) and cut off energy and anabolic supply to cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A review of radiation countermeasures focusing on injury-specific medicinals and regulatory approval status: part III. Countermeasures under early stages of development along with 'standard of care' medicinal and procedures not requiring regulatory approval for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay K; Hanlon, Briana K; Santiago, Paola T; Seed, Thomas M

    2017-09-01

    Terrorist attacks, with their intent to maximize psychological and economic damage as well as inflicting sickness and death on given targeted populations, are an ever-growing worldwide concern in government and public sectors as they become more frequent, violent, and sensational. If given the chance, it is likely that terrorists will use radiological or nuclear weapons. To thwart these sinister efforts, both physical and medical countermeasures against these weapons are currently being researched and developed so that they can be utilized by the first responders, military, and medical providers alike. This is the third article of a three-part series in which we have reviewed additional radiation countermeasures that are currently under early preclinical phases of development using largely animal models and have listed and discussed clinical support measures, including agents used for radiation-induced emesis, as well as countermeasures not requiring Food and Drug Administration approval. Despite the significant progress that has been made in this area during the last several years, additional effort is needed in order to push promising new agents, currently under development, through the regulatory pipeline. This pipeline for new promising drugs appears to be unreasonably slow and cumbersome; possible reasons for this inefficiency are briefly discussed. Significant and continued effort needs to be afforded to this research and development area, as to date, there is no approved radioprotector that can be administered prior to high dose radiation exposure. This represents a very significant, unmet medical need and a significant security issue. A large number of agents with potential to interact with different biological targets are under development. In the next few years, several additional radiation countermeasures will likely receive Food and Drug Administration approval, increasing treatment options for victims exposed to unwanted ionizing irradiation.

  18. Optimizing Clinical Operations as part of a Global Emergency Medicine Initiative in Kumasi, Ghana: Application of Lean Manufacturing Principals to Low Resource Health Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Patrick M.; Desmond, Jeffery S.; Akanbobnaab, Christopher; Oteng, Rockefeller A.; Rominski, Sarah; Barsan, William G.; Cunningham, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background Although many global health programs focus on providing clinical care or medical education, improving clinical operations can have a significant effect on patient care delivery, especially in developing health systems without high-level operations management. Lean manufacturing techniques have been effective in decreasing emergency department (ED) length of stay, patient waiting times, numbers of patients leaving without being seen, and door-to-balloon times for ST-elevation myocardial infarction in developed health systems; but use of Lean in low to middle income countries with developing emergency medicine systems has not been well characterized. Objectives To describe the application of Lean manufacturing techniques to improve clinical operations at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana and to identify key lessons learned to aid future global EM initiatives. Methods A three-week Lean improvement program focused on the hospital admissions process at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital was completed by a 14-person team in six stages: problem definition, scope of project planning, value stream mapping, root cause analysis, future state planning, and implementation planning. Results The authors identified eight lessons learned during our use of Lean to optimize the operations of an ED in a global health setting: 1) the Lean process aided in building a partnership with Ghanaian colleagues; 2) obtaining and maintaining senior institutional support is necessary and challenging; 3) addressing power differences among the team to obtain feedback from all team members is critical to successful Lean analysis; 4) choosing a manageable initial project is critical to influence long-term Lean use in a new environment; 5) data intensive Lean tools can be adapted and are effective in a less resourced health system; 6) several Lean tools focused on team problem solving techniques worked well in a low resource system without modification; 7) using Lean highlighted that

  19. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM as Part of the Oncological Treatment: Survey about Patients' Attitude towards CAM in a University-Based Oncology Center in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin A Kessel

    Full Text Available To understand if and which patients would be open-minded to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use parallel to their oncological treatment. Moreover, we sought to determine which methods are most accepted and which are the primary motivators to use CAM.We developed and anonymously conducted a questionnaire for patients in the oncology center (TU Munich. Questions focus on different CAM methods, previous experiences, and willingness to apply or use CAM when offered in a university-based setting.A total of 171 of 376 patients (37.4% women, 62.0% men, 0.6% unknown participated. This corresponds to a return rate of 45%. Median age was 64 years (17-87 years. Of all participants, 15.2% used CAM during their oncological therapy; 32.7% have used it in the past. The majority (81.9% was not using CAM during therapy; 55.5% have not used CAM in the past respectively. The analysis revealed a significant correlation between education and CAM use during therapy (r = 0.18; p = 0.02, and CAM use in the past (r = 0.17; p = 0.04. Of all patients using CAM during therapy, favored methods were food supplements (42.3%, vitamins/minerals (42.3%, massage (34.6%. Motivations are especially the reduction of side effect and stress, the positive effect of certain CAM-treatments on the immune system and tumor therapy. Results showed no difference between women and men. Most patients not having had any experience with CAM complain about the deficiency of information by their treating oncologist (31.4% as well as missing treatment possibilities (54.3%.Since many patients believe in study results demonstrating the efficacy of CAM, it stresses our task to develop innovative study protocols to investigate the outcomes of certain CAM on symptom reduction or other endpoints. Thus, prospective trials and innovative evidence-based treatment concepts to include CAM into high-end oncology is what patients demand and what a modern oncology center should offer.

  20. [Expedition medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlagić, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Expedition and wildeness medicine is a term that combines rescue medicine, sport medicine as well as more specific branches as polar or high altitude medicine. It is being intensively studied both at the reaserch institutes and on expeditions. Ophtalmologists are concentrated on the reaserch of HARH (High Altitude Retinal Hemorrhage), neurologists on HACE reaserch (High Altitude Cerebral Edema), psychologists are developing tests to decsribe cognitive functions and many physicians are being trained to work in extreme enviroment. The result of all this effort are numerous new findings in pathophysiology and therapy of altitude illness, increased security on expedition and further development of expeditionism.

  1. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Diseases and Conditions Tests and Procedures Recipes Nutrition Information Prevention Guidelines ... Prostate Cancer: Herbal Supplements Topic Index - Complementary and Alternative Medicine ...

  2. Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold; Kothari, Shanu N; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John M; Nguyen, Ninh T; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 78 FR 69991 - Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee; Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 14 Advisory Committee; Veterinary Medicine... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the termination of the Veterinary Medicine Advisory... [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Veterinary Medicine Committee was...

  4. HUMAN SPARE PARTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas K. Grose

    2015-01-01

    ... for the fast-growing field of cell-based and personalized therapies, or regenerative medicine, that use cells, either as immunizations or as part of patches and implants, to cure a range of ailments...

  5. Vulnerable Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  6. Cannabis; extracting the medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazekamp, Arno

    2007-01-01

    The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) has a long history as a recreational drug, but also as part of traditional medicine in many cultures. Nowadays, it is used by a large number of patients worldwide, to ameliorate the symptoms of diseases varying from cancer and AIDS to multiple sclerosis and

  7. Antibiotics in laboratory medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lorian, Victor

    2005-01-01

    ... in critical articles and reviews. Materials appearing in this book prepared by individuals as part of their official duties as U.S. government employees are not covered by the above-mentioned copyright. Printed in the USA Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Antibiotics in laboratory medicine / [edited by] Victor Lorian. - 5th ed...

  8. [Evolutionary medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wjst, M

    2013-12-01

    Evolutionary medicine allows new insights into long standing medical problems. Are we "really stoneagers on the fast lane"? This insight might have enormous consequences and will allow new answers that could never been provided by traditional anthropology. Only now this is made possible using data from molecular medicine and systems biology. Thereby evolutionary medicine takes a leap from a merely theoretical discipline to practical fields - reproductive, nutritional and preventive medicine, as well as microbiology, immunology and psychiatry. Evolutionary medicine is not another "just so story" but a serious candidate for the medical curriculum providing a universal understanding of health and disease based on our biological origin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Evaluation of antioxidant potential, total phenolic content and phytochemical screening of aerial parts of a folkloric medicine, Haplophyllum tuberculatum (Forssk A. Juss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziza Salim Al-Brashdi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify total phenols, flavonoids and to investigate the in vitro antioxidant power of Haplophyllum tuberculatum (H. tuberculatum leaves extracts of varying polarities. Methods: The authenticated sample of H. tuberculatum (50 g leaves was dried under shade, powdered and extracted exhaustively with ethanol by cold percolation method. The alcoholic extract was further partitioned into petroleum ether, acetone, chloroform and methanol to obtain the fractions of varying polarities which were subjected to qualitative phytochemical testing. Total phenolics and flavonoids content in the acetone, chloroform and methanol extracts were quantified by using standard colorimetric methods. Petroleum ether extract was omitted because it did not show the presence of either tannins or flavonoids. In vitro antioxidant activity and total antioxidant capacity were determined by using 1,1 diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and phosphomolybdenum reagent. Ascorbic acid was used as a reference antioxidant for comparison purpose. Results: Qualitative phytochemical results of leaves extracts confirmed the presence of major secondary plant metabolites. The extraction of phenolic compounds varied considerably according to the polarity of solvent. The most polar fractions i.e. methanol were observed to have the highest phenolic content (561.22 mg/g of gallic acid equivalent and flavonoids (165.54 mg/g of quercetin equivalent. Although the free radical scavenging activity of leaves fractions was noted to be slightly lower than the reference compound, a direct relationship was observed between phenolic content and in vitro antioxidant activity. On the other hand, leaves fractions exhibited significant total antioxidant capacity as ascorbic acid equivalent. Conclusions: The aerial part of H. tuberculatum is rich in phenolic compounds which might play a vital role in the discovery of natural antioxidants.

  10. Relationship among Translational Medicine, Evidence-Based Medicine and Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-en HUANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Translational medicine is a new concept in international medical field. It integrates experimental research results and clinical guidance into the optimal implementation criteria for promoting the prediction, prevention and treatment of diseases. Based on people’s higher demand for medicine and health, appearance of translational medicine changes the mode of medical research.Evidence-based medicine (EBM refers to cautious and accurate application of the current best research evidence and combination of the clinician’s professional skills and abundant clinical experience to consider the patients willing and value, consequently making the best diagnostic regimens for patients. Recently, some scholars have begun to question why the patients with the same diagnosis, course of disease and pathological condition have different efficacies and prognosis after treatment with the same drug. So far, an accurate answer cannot be given based on the research data of EBM to implement translational medicine. The concept of precision medicine is accepted gradually with the development of disease management model. In this study, practice and enlightenment of translational medicine, effect of EBM on translational medicine, EBM limitations as well as emergence and development trend of precision medicine were all reviewed in order to investigate the relationship among translational medicine, EBM and precision medicine.

  11. Herbal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Diseases and Conditions Acupuncture Art, Dance, and Music Ayurveda Biofeedback Body Movement Chinese Medicine Electromagnetic Therapy ... American word for "rough" (referring to its root structure). It is generally used for menopausal conditions, painful ...

  12. Medicinal cannabis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murnion, Bridin

    2015-01-01

    .... The Regulator of Medicinal Cannabis Bill 2014 is under consideration in Australia to address this. Nabiximols is the only cannabinoid on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods at present, although cannabidiol has been recommended for inclusion in Schedule 4.

  13. Maytenus heterophylla and Maytenus senegalensis, two traditional herbal medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, G.; Serrano, R.; Silva, O.

    2011-01-01

    Maytenus heterophylla (Eckl. and Zeyh.) N.K.B. Robson and Maytenus senegalensis (Lam.) Exell are two African shrubs or trees that go under the common name of spike thorn, which belong to the Celastraceae family. Different plant parts of this species are largely used in traditional medicine for infectious and inflammatory diseases treatment. Several studies have been reported for both these species, but there are no recent review articles focusing microscopic, phytochemistry and pharmacological studies. The aim of this review is to summarize the information about these two African traditional medicines. Such kind of data can be applied in future experimental work and may guide future studies, namely in the field of validation of traditional medicine. PMID:22470236

  14. Essentials of periodontal medicine in preventive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkle Gulati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of systemic disorders on periodontal diseases is well established. However, of growing interest is the effect of periodontal diseases on numerous systemic diseases or conditions like cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, diabetes, pre-term low birth weight babies, preeclampsia, respiratory infections and others including osteoporosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, Alzheimer′s disease, gastrointestinal disease, prostatitis, renal diseases, which has also been scientifically validated. This side of the oral-systemic link has been termed Periodontal Medicine and is potentially of great public health significance, as periodontal disease is largely preventable and in many instances readily treatable, hence, providing many new opportunities for preventing and improving prognosis of several systemic pathologic conditions. This review article highlights the importance of prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases as an essential part of preventive medicine to circumvent its deleterious effects on general health.

  15. Laser In Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Carlton; Jaggar, David H.

    1982-12-01

    Lasers have been used for some time now on animals for experimental purposes prior to their use in human medical and surgical fields. However the use of lasers in veterinary medicine and surgery per se is a recent development. We describe the application of high and low intensity laser technology in a general overview of the current uses, some limitations to its use and future needs for future inquiry and development.

  16. Fatigue Life Prediction of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Room and Elevated Temperatures. Part I: Experimental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an experimental analysis on the fatigue behavior in C/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) with different fiber preforms, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply and 2.5D woven, at room and elevated temperatures in air atmosphere. The experimental fatigue life S - N curves of C/SiC composites corresponding to different stress levels and test conditions have been obtained. The damage evolution processes under fatigue loading have been analyzed using fatigue hysteresis modulus and fatigue hysteresis loss energy. By comparing the experimental fatigue hysteresis loss energy with theoretical computational values, the interface shear stress corresponding to different peak stress, fiber preforms and test conditions have been estimated. It was found that the degradation of interface shear stress and fibres strength caused by oxidation markedly decreases the fatigue life of C/SiC composites at elevated temperature.

  17. Micromachined Parts Advance Medicine, Astrophysics, and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the mid-1990s, Marshall Space Flight Center awarded two SBIR contracts to Potomac Photonics, now based in Baltimore, for the development of computerized workstations capable of mass-producing tiny, intricate, diffractive optical elements. While the company has since discontinued the workstations, those contracts set the stage for Potomac Photonics to be a leader in the micromachining industry, where NASA remains one of its clients.

  18. Travel medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  19. Drinking waters interlaboratory ring test. Part 1. Scope, procedure and criteria of experimental data treatment; Circuito Interlaboratorio sulle acque potabili Unichim. Parte 1. Obiettivi, modalita' di svolgimento e criteri di elaborazione dei dati sperimentali

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaterra, E.; Divo, C.; Bottazzini, N. [Unichim Milan, Milan (Italy); Alava, F. [Ambiente e Servizi, Bergamo (Italy); Bettinelli, M. [Electric Power Production Company, Piacenza (Italy); Bonfiglioli, F. [Azienda Mediterranea Gas e Aqua, Genoa (Italy)

    2001-04-01

    In this first paper the aims of the project, the procedures of an interlaboratory ring test and the criteria of statistical treatment of data obtained from analytical determinations of some chemical parameters relevant to the assessment of potability of drinking waters are reported. Experimental results of specific parameters relevant to the assessment of potability of drinking waters are reported. Experimental results of specific parameters and precision and accuracy of pertinent analytical methods obtained in a number of cycles of interlaboratory ring test will be reported in subsequent papers. [Italian] In questo primo lavoro vengono riportati gli obiettivi e descritte le modalita' di svolgimento di un circuito interlaboratorio e i criteri di elaborazione statistica dei dati ottenuti in relazione alla determinazione analitica di specifiche caratteristiche di acque destinate al consumo umano ai fini dell'accertamento della loro potabilita'. I risultati e le esperienze conseguite nei vari cicli del circuito interlaboratorio saranno oggetto di successive specifiche pubblicazioni.

  20. [The regulatory framework for complementary and alternative medicines in Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöss, Werner; Stolte, F; Reh, K

    2008-07-01

    Medicinal products from complementary and alternative medicine are in Germany a regular part of the health care system. Herbal, homeopathic, anthroposophic and traditional medicinal products are highly accepted by the population. The German Medicines Act obliged the competent authorities to consider the particular characteristics of complementary and alternative medicines. The European regulatory framework defined the status of herbal medicinal products, traditional herbal medicinal products and homeopathic medicinal products within the directive 2001/83/EC. The committee for herbal medicinal products (HMPC) was established at the European Medicines Agency in London (EMEA); for homeopathic medicinal products there is a specific working group established by the Heads of Medicines Agencies. Harmonisation of medicinal products from complementary and alternative and traditional medicine in Europe was enforced by implementation of directive 2001/83/EC in national legislations of member states. The provisions of this directive will substantially influence the development of the European market during the forthcoming years.

  1. Assessment of the Contour Method for 2-D Cross Sectional Residual Stress Measurements of Friction Stir Welded Parts of AA2024-T3—Numerical and Experimental Comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Carlone, Pierpaolo; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2017-01-01

    The contour method is one of the newest techniques for obtaining residual stress fields from friction stir welded (FSW) parts, experimentally. This method has many advantages; however, edge effects coming from the process itself might introduce artifacts in the obtained results, and this was slig......The contour method is one of the newest techniques for obtaining residual stress fields from friction stir welded (FSW) parts, experimentally. This method has many advantages; however, edge effects coming from the process itself might introduce artifacts in the obtained results......, and consequently this should not be interpreted as a misleading result of the contour method. Edge effects from the cutting process involved in the contour method should, however, be taken into consideration, most likely resulting in the residual stresses observed near the surfaces of the cross section being less...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  5. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  8. Stem cells in veterinary medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Fortier, Lisa A; Travis, Alexander J

    2011-01-01

    The stem cell field in veterinary medicine continues to evolve rapidly both experimentally and clinically. Stem cells are most commonly used in clinical veterinary medicine in therapeutic applications for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries in horses and dogs. New technologies of assisted reproduction are being developed to apply the properties of spermatogonial stem cells to preserve endangered animal species. The same methods can be used to generate transgenic animals for production o...

  9. Experimental Study of Wave Field Around the Outer Part of a Rubble Mound Roundhead Solution for the new Port of La Coruña at Punto Langosteira

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Pedersen, Thomas Schmidt

    The wave agitation in the port and at the entrance to the port depends on the length of the outer part of the breakwater (west of the spur breakwater) and on the type of structure, e.g. caissons or rubble mound. In the present study is investigated the wave field around a rubble mound head armoured...

  10. Cannabis; extracting the medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Hazekamp, Arno

    2007-01-01

    The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) has a long history as a recreational drug, but also as part of traditional medicine in many cultures. Nowadays, it is used by a large number of patients worldwide, to ameliorate the symptoms of diseases varying from cancer and AIDS to multiple sclerosis and migraine. The discovery of cannabinoid-receptors and the endocannabinoid system have opened up a new and exciting field of research. But despite the pharmaceutical potential of cannabis, its classifi...

  11. Medicinal Mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindequist, U.; Won Kim, H.; Tiralongo, E.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Since beginning of mankind nature is the most important source of medicines. Bioactive compounds produced by living organisms can be used directly as drugs or as lead compounds for drug development. Besides, the natural material can be used as crude drug for preparation of powder or extracts. Plants

  12. Oral medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correspondence to: P Botha (p.mbotha@mweb. co.za). Clinical setting. The causes of oral signs and symptoms could include medicine side-effects, trauma, autoimmune disease, nutritional deficiency, fungal infection (Fig. 1), premalignant disease (Fig. 2), oral carcinoma (Fig. 3), or sequelae of cancer treatment. What is.

  13. Travel Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Daniel T; LaRocque, Regina C; Ryan, Edward T

    2018-01-02

    International travel can result in new illness or exacerbate existing conditions, and primary care clinicians have the opportunity to provide both pre- and posttravel health care. Providers should be familiar with destination-specific disease risks, be knowledgeable about travel and routine vaccines, be prepared to prescribe chemoprophylaxis and self-treatment regimens, and be aware of travel medicine resources.

  14. Personalized medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety...

  15. Ayurvedic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lead poisoning in pregnant women who used Ayurvedic medications from India—New York City, 2011-2012. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2012; 61(33):641–646. Chopra A, Doiphode VV. Ayurvedic medicine. Core concept, therapeutic principles, and current relevance. . Medical Clinics of ...

  16. Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, J. David

    1997-01-01

    Highlights the demand for medicinal plants as pharmaceuticals and the demand for health care treatments worldwide and the issues that arise from this. Discusses new drugs from plants, anticancer drugs, antiviral drugs, antimalarial drugs, herbal remedies, quality, safety, efficacy, and conservation of plants. Contains 30 references. (JRH)

  17. [Penitentiary medicine and the Rights of Man].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisier, S

    1993-06-01

    Penitentiary medicine combines preventive medicine and treatment which are for the most part carried out in renovated structures. Other than the usual illnesses, these services and their personal are confronted with specific pathologies due to stress, tobacco consumption, insomnia, inactivity, distress, but also hunger strikes and self-mutilation. One particular concern is AIDS and its formidable complications, notably tuberculosis. The important role played by psychiatry and psychotherapeutic support in penitentiary medicine cannot be emphasized enough. Not only are many of the inmates alcoholics or drugs users, many of them are also starved for communication. The Ahens statement (1987), a true codicil of Human Rights, developed by the International Council of Penitentiary Medical Services, formally prohibits doctors to practice any form of torture or experimental medical operations on inmates, and puts medical priority above and beyond any administrative or judiciary considerations. This message is applicable to all prisons, regardless of countries: Europe, the Americas, Africa, Pacific or other. As President of the Council, we have distributed this message throughout the world, to all the various United Nations Agencies, thus teaching Human Rights, including prisoners' rights, in a concrete fashion.

  18. Influence of turbulence on the drop growth in warm clouds, Part I: comparison of numerically and experimentally determined collision kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Siewert

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the comparison of numerically and experimentally determined collision kernels of water drops in air turbulence. The numerical and experimental setups are matched as closely as possible. However, due to the individual numerical and experimental restrictions, it could not be avoided that the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate of the measurement and the simulations differ. Direct numerical simulations (DNS are performed resulting in a very large database concerning geometric collision kernels with 1470 individual entries. Based on this database a fit function for the turbulent enhancement of the collision kernel is developed. In the experiments, the collision rates of large drops (radius >7.5μm$> 7.5\\,\\text{\\textmu{}m}$ are measured. These collision rates are compared with the developed fit, evaluated at the measurement conditions. Since the total collision rates match well for all occurring dissipation rates the distribution information of the fit could be used to enhance the statistical reliability and for the first time an experimental collision kernel could be constructed. In addition to the collision rates, the drop size distributions at three consecutive streamwise positions are measured. The drop size distributions contain mainly small drops (radius <7.5μm$< 7.5\\,\\text{\\textmu{}m}$. The measured evolution of the drop size distribution is confronted with model calculations based on the newly derived fit of the collision kernel. It turns out that the observed fast evolution of the drop size distribution can only be modeled if the collision kernel for small drops is drastically increased. A physical argument for this amplification is missing since for such small drops, neither DNSs nor experiments have been performed. For large drops, for which a good agreement of the collision rates was found in the DNS and the experiment, the time for the evolution of the spectrum in the wind tunnel is too short to draw

  19. Experimental and numerical investigations of internal heat transfer in an innovative trailing edge blade cooling system: stationary and rotation effects, part 2: numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniaiche, Ahmed; Ghenaiet, Adel; Carcasci, Carlo; Facchini, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a numerical validation of the aero-thermal study of a 30:1 scaled model reproducing an innovative trailing edge with one row of enlarged pedestals under stationary and rotating conditions. A CFD analysis was performed by means of commercial ANSYS-Fluent modeling the isothermal air flow and using k- ω SST turbulence model and an isothermal air flow for both static and rotating conditions (Ro up to 0.23). The used numerical model is validated first by comparing the numerical velocity profiles distribution results to those obtained experimentally by means of PIV technique for Re = 20,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. The second validation is based on the comparison of the numerical results of the 2D HTC maps over the heated plate to those of TLC experimental data, for a smooth surface for a Reynolds number = 20,000 and 40,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. Two-tip conditions were considered: open tip and closed tip conditions. Results of the average Nusselt number inside the pedestal ducts region are presented too. The obtained results help to predict the flow field visualization and the evaluation of the aero-thermal performance of the studied blade cooling system during the design step.

  20. The fast-spectrum transmutation experimental facility FASTEF: Main design achievements (Part 1: Core and primary system) within the FP7-CDT collaborative project of the European Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bruyn, D.; Fernandez, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mansani, L. [ANSALDO, Corso Perrone 25, 16152 Genova (Italy); Woaye-Hune, A. [AREVA-NP, rue Juliette Recamier 10, 69456 Lyon Cedex 06 (France); Sarotto, M. [ENEA, Via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Bubelis, E. [KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator-driven system (ADS) in development at SCK CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. SCK CEN in association with 17 European partners from industry, research centres and academia, responded to the FP7 (Seventh Framework Programme) call from the European Commission to establish a Central Design Team (CDT) for the design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) able to demonstrate efficient transmutation and associated technology through a system working in subcritical and/or critical mode. The project has started on April 01, 2009 for a period of three years. In this paper, we present the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system. The FASTEF facility has evolved quite a lot since the intermediate reporting done at the ICAPP'10 and ICAPP'11 conferences 1 2. If it remains a small-scale facility, the core power amounts now up to 100 MWth in critical mode. In a companion paper 3, we present the concept of the reactor building and the plant layout. (authors)

  1. Aspects of Experimental Hepatocarcinogenesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-06

    Apr 6, 1974 ... The remaining articles in this series are: Part Il-Hyperplastic nodules; Part Ill-Iron overload and hepatocarcinogenesis; Part IV-Changes in the liver fol- lowing cessation of carcinogen administration; Part V-. The ultrastructural morphology of early hepatocellular carcinomas. EXPERIMENTAL METHOD.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Forming and Springback Behavior and the Resulting Effects on Industrial Application on a Structural Part in Mass Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prexl, A.; Golle, M.; Hoffmann, H.; Kudraß, S.; Wahl, M.

    2011-01-01

    Springback prediction and compensation is nowadays a widely recommended discipline in finite element modeling. Many researches have shown an improvement of the accuracy in prediction of springback using advanced modeling techniques, e.g. by including the Bauschinger effect. In this work different models were investigated in the commercial simulation program AutoForm for a large series production part, manufactured from the dual phase steel HC340XD. The work shows the differences between numerical drawbead models and geometrically modeled drawbeads. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was made for a reduced kinematic hardening model, implemented in the finite element program AutoForm.

  3. Use of medicinal fauna in Mexican traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad

    2014-02-27

    Mexico has great biodiversity of fauna. The use of fauna with medicinal properties is a common practice since pre-Hispanic times. In the last decade, there has been an interest in ethnozoological studies in Mexico. Therefore, more studies are needed in order to gather information regarding the use of fauna with medicinal properties in México. Ethnozoological studies are necessary in order to discover new medications for human health. This review presents current information in terms of ethnozoological, conservation status, trade, toxicological and pharmacological effects of fauna used for medicinal purposes in Mexican traditional medicine (MTM), based on scientific literature. Future prospects for research with medicinal fauna are discussed. Bibliographic investigation was carried out by analyzing recognized books and peer-reviewed papers, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases from the last five decades. Reports included in this review complied with the three criteria cited as follows: (i) used in Mexican traditional medicine for medicinal and/or magical-religious purposes, (ii) with experimental studies regarding the toxicological or medicinal effects and/or with studies exploring mechanisms of medicinal effects, and (iii) with information obtained from a clear source. A total of 163 animal species, belonging to 79 families and 4 taxonomic categories, used for medicinal purposes are reported in this review. Medicinal fauna used in MTM come from birds (48), fishes (3), insects (22), mammals (49) and reptiles (41). The most versatile species which had the greatest number of medicinal properties were Mephitis macroura (21 uses), Crotalus atrox (17 uses), Dasypus novemcinctus (13 uses) and Didelphis virginiana (13 uses). However, 14 of the 161 species listed in this review are classified as endangered. Animal species are mainly used for the treatment of inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases. Furthermore, insects and reptiles are the

  4. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  5. Transfusion medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  6. Young women's use of medicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dana Lee; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2009-01-01

    , a unifying concept involving growing autonomy in medicine use emerged. This concept consisted of three parts: the great influence of family norms when autonomy was limited, growing autonomy under changing influences and assertion of autonomy and positioning of own behaviour relative to the norm. This study......'s findings indicate that despite increases in autonomy in medicine use, normative perceptions continued to serve as important reference points for informants' own medicine taking behaviour. Practitioners involved in the health care and promotion of youth may benefit from an increased awareness...

  7. Haptic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Cindy; Mason, Earl

    2009-01-01

    The paper introduces haptic medicine--healthcare based on loving touch for healing and preventing disease. We describe the effects of loving touch (a square inch of our skin has over 1000 nerves) on the body, brain and mind. We describe two web-based health education and media projects. The first, HYPERLINK "http://www.21stcenturymed.org" www.21stcenturymed.org is a place for health practitioners to start learning about touch and resources. The second project, Humans Without Borders, is a multi-lingual self help education website for everyday people. Teaching materials for these projects are based on our previous work with a form of haptic medicine known as psychophysiophilosophy with patients at Stanford Hospital, Kaiser Permanente and Lucille Packard Children's Hospital. We describe psychophysiophilosophy, relate motherly love to recent discoveries in neurosciences and give hints on ways to increase motherly love in each of us. We present a plan for moving into the future by re-introducing haptic medicine into our daily lives through self-help and as an adjunct for current physician practice. There is an exercise in self-help for the reader and an appendix of recent clinical research with profound benefits on the use of human touch for over 40 conditions.

  8. Sports and performing arts medicine. 1. General considerations for sports and performing arts medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Scott F; Chou, Larry H; Toledo, Santiago D; Akuthota, Venu; Drake, David F

    2004-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights general considerations in sports and performing arts medicine. It is part of the study guide on sports and performing arts medicine in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. To discuss similarities and differences of injuries sustained in sports and performing arts using case vignettes.

  9. Before-After analysis of the trophic network of an experimental dumping site in the eastern part of the Bay of Seine (English Channel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezy, Jean-Philippe; Raoux, Aurore; Marmin, Stella; Balay, Pierre; Niquil, Nathalie; Dauvin, Jean-Claude

    2017-05-15

    An experimental study was conducted to assess the physical and biological impacts of muddy fine sand dredged material dumped on a medium sand site Machu offshore the Seine Estuary. Complementary trophic web modelling tools were applied to the Machu ecosystem to analyse the effects of dumping operations. Results show that, after the dumping operations, the biomass of fish increased while invertebrate biomass remained relatively stable through time. Nevertheless, the biomasses of benthic invertebrates, omnivores/scavengers and predators showed some increases, while non-selective deposit feeders and filter feeders decreased. At the ecosystem level, results show that the total ecosystem activity, the ascendency and the overall omnivorous character of the food-web structure increased after dumping operations, whereas recycling subsequently decreased. Finally, the fine and medium sand habitat offshore from the Seine estuary, which undergoes regular natural physical perturbations, shows a high resilience after a short dumping phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Phronesis: Medicine's indispensable virtue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Facing those who defend that Medicine is not but an applied science, Pellegrino argues that the ultimate goal of Medicine is facing to a human being in his illness condition. Thus, it is not sufficient to have scientific knowledge but proximity to man kindness. Cure is not the only goal -achievable in only a few cases- but healing, caring with a person as an ill person and as a person. For this reason, professional competence is not enough; the physician needs to have the necessary dispositions to be a good person, a good professional. To get the goals of Medicine, the physician has to achieve those qualities who allow him to do the good he is intended to, that is, he needs to be virtuous. Prudence -phronesis- is the virtue that allows him to apply a general rule to a particular case and, furthermore, addresses his actions to be not only technically correct, but excellent. Prudence is, then, the link between intellectual virtues and moral virtues. Pellegrino's main objective has been to elaborate a Philosophy of Medicine, different from the Philosophy of Science, useful for clinical practice and used by clinical practitioners. By nurturing prudence, a small bit of the final goal is reached: the healing, the goodness for the sick. This should be possible if we are embedded in a moral community, and for Pellegrino, sharing knowledge and ethical values is the way of being part of a moral community.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Parents - or Other Adults Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is ...

  13. Medicines by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Medicines By Design Medicines By Design Spotlight Nature's Medicine Cabinet A Medicine's Life Inside ... Free Booklet | Feedback | More Publications | Search Publications Social Media Links Bookmark & Share Free Subscriptions Twitter Facebook Instagram ...

  14. Aspidosperma (Apocynaceae plant cytotoxicity and activity towards malaria parasites. Part II: experimental studies withAspidosperma ramiflorum in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna CC Aguiar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Several species of Aspidospermaplants are used to treat diseases in the tropics, including Aspidosperma ramiflorum, which acts against leishmaniasis, an activity that is experimentally confirmed. The species, known as guatambu-yellow, yellowperoba, coffee-peroba andmatiambu, grows in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil in the South to the Southeast regions. Through a guided biofractionation of A. ramiflorumextracts, the plant activity against Plasmodium falciparumwas evaluated in vitro for toxicity towards human hepatoma G2 cells, normal monkey kidney cells and nonimmortalised human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. Six of the seven extracts tested were active at low doses (half-maximal drug inhibitory concentration < 3.8 µg/mL; the aqueous extract was inactive. Overall, the plant extracts and the purified compounds displayed low toxicity in vitro. A nonsoluble extract fraction and one purified alkaloid isositsirikine (compound 5 displayed high selectivity indexes (SI (= 56 and 113, respectively, whereas compounds 2 and 3 were toxic (SI < 10. The structure, activity and low toxicity of isositsirikine in vitro are described here for the first time in A. ramiflorum, but only the neutral and precipitate plant fractions were tested for activity, which caused up to 53% parasitaemia inhibition of Plasmodium bergheiin mice with blood-induced malaria. This plant species is likely to be useful in the further development of an antimalarial drug, but its pharmacological evaluation is still required.

  15. Aspidosperma (Apocynaceae) plant cytotoxicity and activity towards malaria parasites. Part II: experimental studies withAspidosperma ramiflorum in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Anna C C; Cunha, Ananda C; Ceravolo, Isabela Penna; Gonçalves, Regina A Correia; Oliveira, Arildo J B; Krettli, Antoniana Ursine

    2015-11-01

    Several species of Aspidosperma plants are used to treat diseases in the tropics, including Aspidosperma ramiflorum, which acts against leishmaniasis, an activity that is experimentally confirmed. The species, known as guatambu-yellow, yellow peroba, coffee-peroba and matiambu, grows in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil in the South to the Southeast regions. Through a guided biofractionation of A. ramiflorum extracts, the plant activity against Plasmodium falciparum was evaluated in vitro for toxicity towards human hepatoma G2 cells, normal monkey kidney cells and nonimmortalised human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. Six of the seven extracts tested were active at low doses (half-maximal drug inhibitory concentration < 3.8 µg/mL); the aqueous extract was inactive. Overall, the plant extracts and the purified compounds displayed low toxicity in vitro. A nonsoluble extract fraction and one purified alkaloid isositsirikine (compound 5) displayed high selectivity indexes (SI) (= 56 and 113, respectively), whereas compounds 2 and 3 were toxic (SI < 10). The structure, activity and low toxicity of isositsirikine in vitro are described here for the first time in A. ramiflorum, but only the neutral and precipitate plant fractions were tested for activity, which caused up to 53% parasitaemia inhibition of Plasmodium berghei in mice with blood-induced malaria. This plant species is likely to be useful in the further development of an antimalarial drug, but its pharmacological evaluation is still required.

  16. Archaeogenetics in evolutionary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Abigail; Rühli, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Archaeogenetics is the study of exploration of ancient DNA (aDNA) of more than 70 years old. It is an important part of the wider studies of many different areas of our past, including animal, plant and pathogen evolution and domestication events. Hereby, we address specifically the impact of research in archaeogenetics in the broader field of evolutionary medicine. Studies on ancient hominid genomes help to understand even modern health patterns. Human genetic microevolution, e.g. related to abilities of post-weaning milk consumption, and specifically genetic adaptation in disease susceptibility, e.g. towards malaria and other infectious diseases, are of the upmost importance in contributions of archeogenetics on the evolutionary understanding of human health and disease. With the increase in both the understanding of modern medical genetics and the ability to deep sequence ancient genetic information, the field of archaeogenetic evolutionary medicine is blossoming.

  17. Teleophthalmology in preventive medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Michelson, Georg

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical applications, methods, and technologies of teleophthalmology within the field of preventive medicine. The ability of novel methods to detect the initial signs of neurodegenerative diseases on the basis of alterations in the retina is reviewed, and detailed attention is paid to the role of teleophthalmology in screening for vision-threatening diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. A major part of the book is devoted to novel imaging methods and the latest information technologies, including advanced mobile communication and Web 2.0 applications in teleophthalmology. In addition, the initial projects of an interdisciplinary cooperation in preventive medicine are described. All of the authors are experienced in the scientific and practical aspects of teleophthalmology, including e-learning, and have produced a book that will meet the needs of all medical care providers interested in using teleophthalmology.

  18. The PMIP4 contribution to CMIP6 - Part 3: The last millennium, scientific objective, and experimental design for the PMIP4 past1000 simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungclaus, Johann H.; Bard, Edouard; Baroni, Mélanie; Braconnot, Pascale; Cao, Jian; Chini, Louise P.; Egorova, Tania; Evans, Michael; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Goosse, Hugues; Hurtt, George C.; Joos, Fortunat; Kaplan, Jed O.; Khodri, Myriam; Klein Goldewijk, Kees; Krivova, Natalie; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Lorenz, Stephan J.; Luterbacher, Jürg; Man, Wenmin; Maycock, Amanda C.; Meinshausen, Malte; Moberg, Anders; Muscheler, Raimund; Nehrbass-Ahles, Christoph; Otto-Bliesner, Bette I.; Phipps, Steven J.; Pongratz, Julia; Rozanov, Eugene; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Schmidt, Hauke; Schmutz, Werner; Schurer, Andrew; Shapiro, Alexander I.; Sigl, Michael; Smerdon, Jason E.; Solanki, Sami K.; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Usoskin, Ilya G.; Wagner, Sebastian; Wu, Chi-Ju; Leng Yeo, Kok; Zanchettin, Davide; Zhang, Qiong; Zorita, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    The pre-industrial millennium is among the periods selected by the Paleoclimate Model Intercomparison Project (PMIP) for experiments contributing to the sixth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6) and the fourth phase of the PMIP (PMIP4). The past1000 transient simulations serve to investigate the response to (mainly) natural forcing under background conditions not too different from today, and to discriminate between forced and internally generated variability on interannual to centennial timescales. This paper describes the motivation and the experimental set-ups for the PMIP4-CMIP6 past1000 simulations, and discusses the forcing agents orbital, solar, volcanic, and land use/land cover changes, and variations in greenhouse gas concentrations. The past1000 simulations covering the pre-industrial millennium from 850 Common Era (CE) to 1849 CE have to be complemented by historical simulations (1850 to 2014 CE) following the CMIP6 protocol. The external forcings for the past1000 experiments have been adapted to provide a seamless transition across these time periods. Protocols for the past1000 simulations have been divided into three tiers. A default forcing data set has been defined for the Tier 1 (the CMIP6 past1000) experiment. However, the PMIP community has maintained the flexibility to conduct coordinated sensitivity experiments to explore uncertainty in forcing reconstructions as well as parameter uncertainty in dedicated Tier 2 simulations. Additional experiments (Tier 3) are defined to foster collaborative model experiments focusing on the early instrumental period and to extend the temporal range and the scope of the simulations. This paper outlines current and future research foci and common analyses for collaborative work between the PMIP and the observational communities (reconstructions, instrumental data).

  19. Development of methods for evaluation of electricity saving and load levelling measures. Part 3: Experimental assessment of the effect of a power conservation campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalborg Nielsen, H.; Madsen, H. [Danmarks Tekniske Univ., Dept. of Mathematical Modelling (Denmark)

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to develop and to investigate methods for estimating effects of power conservation campaigns, and to estimate the effect of a particular campaign. The statistical approach of experimental design, followed by analysis of measurements is applied. Using a method known as cluster analysis prior to the initiation of the campaign, a number of substations for which measurements equipment was installed were combined into groups of highest possible similarity with respect to a number of features. It was decided to perform a campaign on a total of two substations. For this purpose the two groups of highest similarity were selected and one substation was chosen from each group to receive the campaign (the active substations). Since each of the two groups contained two substations this procedure left two substations for comparisons (the control substations). The overall results indicate a 10-12% reduction of the power consumption when carrying out a campaign. However, some difference is observed for the two pairs of active and control substations. Consequently, the extrapolation to other substations of similar kind will be difficult. When measuring the diurnal profile as the relative deviation from the daily level during the cycle, practically no effect of the campaign can be detected. However, the amplitude of the profile measured in units of power consumption depends strongly on the daily level. It is demonstrated that non-parametric and semi non-parametric methods, combined with traditional time series analysis and bootstrapping, are well suited as statistical tools for the analysis of data from these kinds of experiments. (au) EFP-95. 22 refs.

  20. The PMIP4 contribution to CMIP6 - Part 2: Two interglacials, scientific objective and experimental design for Holocene and Last Interglacial simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Braconnot, Pascale; Harrison, Sandy P.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Albani, Samuel; Bartlein, Patrick J.; Capron, Emilie; Carlson, Anders E.; Dutton, Andrea; Fischer, Hubertus; Goelzer, Heiko; Govin, Aline; Haywood, Alan; Joos, Fortunat; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Lipscomb, William H.; Lohmann, Gerrit; Mahowald, Natalie; Nehrbass-Ahles, Christoph; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Peterschmitt, Jean-Yves; Phipps, Steven J.; Renssen, Hans; Zhang, Qiong

    2017-11-01

    Two interglacial epochs are included in the suite of Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP4) simulations in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6). The experimental protocols for simulations of the mid-Holocene (midHolocene, 6000 years before present) and the Last Interglacial (lig127k, 127 000 years before present) are described here. These equilibrium simulations are designed to examine the impact of changes in orbital forcing at times when atmospheric greenhouse gas levels were similar to those of the preindustrial period and the continental configurations were almost identical to modern ones. These simulations test our understanding of the interplay between radiative forcing and atmospheric circulation, and the connections among large-scale and regional climate changes giving rise to phenomena such as land-sea contrast and high-latitude amplification in temperature changes, and responses of the monsoons, as compared to today. They also provide an opportunity, through carefully designed additional sensitivity experiments, to quantify the strength of atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, and land-surface feedbacks. Sensitivity experiments are proposed to investigate the role of freshwater forcing in triggering abrupt climate changes within interglacial epochs. These feedback experiments naturally lead to a focus on climate evolution during interglacial periods, which will be examined through transient experiments. Analyses of the sensitivity simulations will also focus on interactions between extratropical and tropical circulation, and the relationship between changes in mean climate state and climate variability on annual to multi-decadal timescales. The comparative abundance of paleoenvironmental data and of quantitative climate reconstructions for the Holocene and Last Interglacial make these two epochs ideal candidates for systematic evaluation of model performance, and such comparisons will shed new light on the importance of external

  1. The PMIP4 contribution to CMIP6 – Part 2: Two interglacials, scientific objective and experimental design for Holocene and Last Interglacial simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Otto-Bliesner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Two interglacial epochs are included in the suite of Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project (PMIP4 simulations in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6. The experimental protocols for simulations of the mid-Holocene (midHolocene, 6000 years before present and the Last Interglacial (lig127k, 127 000 years before present are described here. These equilibrium simulations are designed to examine the impact of changes in orbital forcing at times when atmospheric greenhouse gas levels were similar to those of the preindustrial period and the continental configurations were almost identical to modern ones. These simulations test our understanding of the interplay between radiative forcing and atmospheric circulation, and the connections among large-scale and regional climate changes giving rise to phenomena such as land–sea contrast and high-latitude amplification in temperature changes, and responses of the monsoons, as compared to today. They also provide an opportunity, through carefully designed additional sensitivity experiments, to quantify the strength of atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, and land-surface feedbacks. Sensitivity experiments are proposed to investigate the role of freshwater forcing in triggering abrupt climate changes within interglacial epochs. These feedback experiments naturally lead to a focus on climate evolution during interglacial periods, which will be examined through transient experiments. Analyses of the sensitivity simulations will also focus on interactions between extratropical and tropical circulation, and the relationship between changes in mean climate state and climate variability on annual to multi-decadal timescales. The comparative abundance of paleoenvironmental data and of quantitative climate reconstructions for the Holocene and Last Interglacial make these two epochs ideal candidates for systematic evaluation of model performance, and such comparisons will shed new light on the

  2. Spatial Variation of Pressure in the Lyophilization Product Chamber Part 2: Experimental Measurements and Implications for Scale-up and Batch Uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Pooja; Varma, Nikhil; Ganguly, Arnab; Pikal, Michael; Alexeenko, Alina; Bogner, Robin H

    2017-02-01

    Product temperature during the primary drying step of freeze-drying is controlled by a set point chamber pressure and shelf temperature. However, recent computational modeling suggests a possible variation in local chamber pressure. The current work presents an experimental verification of the local chamber pressure gradients in a lab-scale freeze-dryer. Pressure differences between the center and the edges of a lab-scale freeze-dryer shelf were measured as a function of sublimation flux and clearance between the sublimation front and the shelf above. A modest 3-mTorr difference in pressure was observed as the sublimation flux was doubled from 0.5 to 1.0 kg·h-1·m-2 at a clearance of 2.6 cm. Further, at a constant sublimation flux of 1.0 kg·h-1·m-2, an 8-fold increase in the pressure drop was observed across the shelf as the clearance was decreased from 4 to 1.6 cm. Scale-up of the pressure variation from lab- to a manufacturing-scale freeze-dryer predicted an increased uniformity in drying rates across the batch for two frequently used pharmaceutical excipients (mannitol and sucrose at 5% w/w). However, at an atypical condition of shelf temperature of +10°C and chamber pressure of 50 mTorr, the product temperature in the center vials was calculated to be a degree higher than the edge vial for a low resistance product, thus reversing the typical edge and center vial behavior. Thus, the effect of local pressure variation is more significant at the manufacturing-scale than at a lab-scale and accounting for the contribution of variations in the local chamber pressures can improve success in scale-up.

  3. Modeling Short-Term Maximum Individual Exposure from Airborne Hazardous Releases in Urban Environments. Part I: Validation of a Deterministic Model with Field Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. Efthimiou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The release of airborne hazardous substances in the atmosphere has a direct effect on human health as, during the inhalation, an amount of concentration is inserted through the respiratory system into the human body, which can cause serious or even irreparable damage in health. One of the key problems in such cases is the prediction of the maximum individual exposure. Current state of the art methods, which are based on the concentration cumulative distribution function and require the knowledge of the concentration variance and the intermittency factor, have limitations. Recently, authors proposed a deterministic approach relating maximum individual exposure to parameters such as the fluctuation intensity and the concentration integral time scale. The purpose of the first part of this study is to validate the deterministic approach with the extensive dataset of the MUST (Mock Urban Setting Test field experiment. This dataset includes 81 trials, which practically cover various atmospheric conditions and stability classes and contains in total 4004 non-zero concentration sensor data with time resolutions of 0.01–0.02 s. The results strengthen the usefulness of the deterministic model in predicting short-term maximum individual exposure. Another important output is the estimation of the methodology uncertainty involved.

  4. The conformational musings of a medicinal chemist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Harry

    2014-03-01

    Structure-based drug design strategies based on X-ray crystallographic data of ligands bound to biological targets or computationally derived pharmacophore models have been introduced over the past 25 years or so. These have now matured and are deeply embedded in the drug discovery process in most pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies where they continue to play a major part in the discovery of new medicines and drug candidates. Newly developed NMR methods can now provide a full description of the conformations in which ligands exist in free solution, crucially allowing those that are dominant to be identified. Integrating experimentally determined conformational information on active and inactive molecules in drug discovery programmes, alongside the existing techniques, should have a major impact on the success of drug discovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Empirical analysis of BMD metrics in genetic toxicology part II: in vivo potency comparisons to promote reductions in the use of experimental animals for genetic toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, John W; Long, Alexandra S; Johnson, George E; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Dertinger, Stephen D; Slob, Wout; White, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    doses of dibenz[a,h]anthracene). Collectively, the presented examples illustrate how innovative use of the BMD approach can permit refinement of the use of in vivo data; improving the efficacy of experimental animal use in genetic toxicology without sacrificing PoD precision. © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2016. Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of Health.

  6. Nuclear medicine therapy principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aktolun, Cumali

    2012-01-01

    This book reviews nuclear medicine techniques and technology for therapy of malignant and benign diseases, covering scientific principles and clinical applications, and trials of experimental agents for treating tumors involving virtually every organ system.

  7. The Evaluation of a Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) Under Vertical Loading Conditions: Part 1 - Experimental Setup and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D.; Annett, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    A series of 16 vertical tests were conducted on a Test Device for Human Occupant Restraint (THOR) - NT 50th percentile Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The purpose of the tests conducted at NASA LaRC was threefold. The first was to add vertical response data to the growing test database for THOR-NT development and validation. Second, the THOR-NT analytical computational models currently in development must be validated for the vertical loading environment. The computational models have been calibrated for frontal crash environments with concentration on accurately replicating head/neck, thoracic, and lower extremity responses. Finally, familiarity with the THOR ATD is necessary because NASA is interested in evaluating advanced ATDs for use in future flight and research projects. The THOR was subjected to vertical loading conditions ranging between 5 and 16 g in magnitude and 40 to 120 milliseconds (msec) in duration. It was also tested under conditions identical to previous tests conducted on the Hybrid II and III ATDs to allow comparisons to be made. Variations in the test setup were also introduced, such as the addition of a footrest in an attempt to offload some of the impact load into the legs. A full data set of the THOR-NT ATD will be presented and discussed. Results from the tests show that the THOR was largely insensitive to differences in the loading conditions, perhaps due in part to their small magnitudes. THOR responses, when compared to the Hybrid II and III in the lumbar region, demonstrated that the THOR more closely resembled the straight spine Hybrid setup. In the neck region, the THOR behaved more like the Hybrid III. However in both cases, the responses were not identical, indicating that the THOR would show differences in response than the Hybrid II and III ATDs when subjected to identical impact conditions. The addition of a footrest did not significantly affect the THOR response due to the nature of how

  8. Atmospheric dust modeling from meso to global scales with the online NMMB/BSC-Dust model – Part 2: Experimental campaigns in Northern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Haustein

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Pérez et al., 2011 develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6–0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1 in 2006 and the Bodélé Dust Experiment (BoDEx in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are

  9. Atmospheric Dust Modeling from Meso to Global Scales with the Online NMMB/BSC-Dust Model Part 2: Experimental Campaigns in Northern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, K.; Perez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.; Jorba, O.; Basart, S.; Miller, R. L.; Janjic, Z.; Black, T.; Nickovic, S.; Todd, M. C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The new NMMB/BSC-Dust model is intended to provide short to medium-range weather and dust forecasts from regional to global scales. It is an online model in which the dust aerosol dynamics and physics are solved at each model time step. The companion paper (Perez et al., 2011) develops the dust model parameterizations and provides daily to annual evaluations of the model for its global and regional configurations. Modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) was evaluated against AERONET Sun photometers over Northern Africa, Middle East and Europe with correlations around 0.6-0.7 on average without dust data assimilation. In this paper we analyze in detail the behavior of the model using data from the Saharan Mineral dUst experiment (SAMUM-1) in 2006 and the Bodele Dust Experiment (BoDEx) in 2005. AOD from satellites and Sun photometers, vertically resolved extinction coefficients from lidars and particle size distributions at the ground and in the troposphere are used, complemented by wind profile data and surface meteorological measurements. All simulations were performed at the regional scale for the Northern African domain at the expected operational horizontal resolution of 25 km. Model results for SAMUM-1 generally show good agreement with satellite data over the most active Saharan dust sources. The model reproduces the AOD from Sun photometers close to sources and after long-range transport, and the dust size spectra at different height levels. At this resolution, the model is not able to reproduce a large haboob that occurred during the campaign. Some deficiencies are found concerning the vertical dust distribution related to the representation of the mixing height in the atmospheric part of the model. For the BoDEx episode, we found the diurnal temperature cycle to be strongly dependant on the soil moisture, which is underestimated in the NCEP analysis used for model initialization. The low level jet (LLJ) and the dust AOD over the Bodélé are well reproduced

  10. Recent Advances in Antiepileptic Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchishi, Stephen M

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders worldwide, with about 80 percent of cases thought to be in developing nations where it is mostly linked to superstition. The limited supply, high cost as well as low efficacy and adverse side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a matter of major concern. Herbal medicine has always been traditionally part of treatment of epilepsy. Herbal medicines are generally well tolerated, with fewer side effects. To highlight some herbal extracts that have been studied for their anticonvulsant activity in animal models, literature search from PubMed and Science Direct, was performed. The keywords for the search consisted of combinations of the following terms: Herbal antiepileptic and/or anticonvulsant, botanicals + epilepsy. Literature published in the last five years was considered. Eighteen (18) anticonvulsant herbal agents are reported and discussed. Experiments mostly consisted of phenotypic screens in rodents, with little diversity in screening methods. In most experiments, the tested extracts prolonged the time to onset of seizures and decreased their duration. Most experimenters implicate potentiation of GABAergic activity as the mode of action of the extracts, even though some experimenters did not fully characterise the bioactive chemical composition of their extracts. Potential herbal remedies have shown positive results in animal models. It remains unclear how many make it into clinical trials and eventually making part of the AED list. More rigorous research, applying strict research methodology with uniform herbal combinations, as well as clinical studies are urgently needed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. African palm ethno-medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruca, Marta; Blach-Overgaard, Anne; Balslev, Henrik

    2015-05-13

    This study is the first to demonstrate the breadth and patterns of the medicinal applications of African palms. It sheds light on species with the potential to provide new therapeutic agents for use in biomedicine; and links the gap between traditional use of palms and pharmacological evaluation for the beneficial effects of palm products on human health. Last but not least, the study provides recommendations for the areas that should be targeted in future ethno-botanical surveys. The primary objective of this survey was to assemble all available ethno-medicinal data on African palms, and investigate patterns of palm uses in traditional medicine; and highlight possible under-investigated areas. References were found through bibliographic searches using several sources including PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar and search engines of the State and University Libraries of Aarhus, National Library of Denmark and Copenhagen University Libraries, Harvard University Libraries, and the Mertz Library. Information about ethno-medicinal uses of palms was extracted and digitized in a database. Additionally, we used an African palm distribution database to compute the proportion of palm species that have been used for medicinal purposes in each country. We found 782 medicinal uses mentioned in 156 references. At least 23 different palm species (some remained unidentified) were used medicinally in 35 out of Africa's 48 countries. The most commonly used species were Elaeis guineensis, Phoenix dactylifera, Cocos nucifera, and Borassus aethiopum. Medicinal uses were in 25 different use categories of which the most common ones were Infections/Infestations and Digestive System Disorders. Twenty-four different parts of the palms were used in traditional medicine, with most of the uses related to fruit (and palm oil), root, seed and leaf. Palms were used in traditional medicine mostly without being mixed with other plants, and less commonly in mixtures, sometimes in mixture with

  12. Medicinal cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnion, Bridin

    2015-12-01

    A number of therapeutic uses of cannabis and its derivatives have been postulated from preclinical investigations. Possible clinical indications include spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis, cancer-associated nausea and vomiting, cancer pain and HIV neuropathy. However, evidence is limited, may reflect subjective rather than objective outcomes, and is not conclusive. Controversies lie in how to produce, supply and administer cannabinoid products. Introduction of cannabinoids therapeutically should be supported by a regulatory and educational framework that minimises the risk of harm to patients and the community. The Regulator of Medicinal Cannabis Bill 2014 is under consideration in Australia to address this. Nabiximols is the only cannabinoid on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods at present, although cannabidiol has been recommended for inclusion in Schedule 4.

  13. Some medicinal plants used in Yemeni herbal medicine to treat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This pilot study examined the extent and the type of medicinal plants used for treating malaria. 492 informants were interviewed in 13 villages located on the coastal plain of four provinces. Nineteen plants belonging to fourteen families were recorded each with local names, methods of preparation and parts used.

  14. Medicine and religion: spiritual dimension of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinohara, S

    2001-01-01

    The author probes into the origin of medicine and illuminates how religion took an essential part in the birth of ancient medicine in both East and West. In the modern age, medicine as science continues to attain a high level of progress. Yet simultaneously, medicine interacts with the spiritual and religious realm of the human mind. The hospice movement, started by Cecily Saunders in 1967, strongly encouraged this tendency, and now spiritual care is acquiring much importance in global medicine.

  15. Insurance Coverage Policies for Personalized Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Hresko; Haga, Susanne B.

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of personalized medicine in practice has been slow, in part due to the lack of evidence of clinical benefit provided by these technologies. Coverage by insurers is a critical step in achieving widespread adoption of personalized medicine. Insurers consider a variety of factors when formulating medical coverage policies for personalized medicine, including the overall strength of evidence for a test, availability of clinical guidelines and health technology assessments by independent ...

  16. Dietary advice in family medicine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the conceptual basis of dietary advice in family medicine. Given the large number of illnesses and diseases encountered in family practice for which diet and nutrition are relevant interventions, food-related advice is an important part of daily practice. To enhance the

  17. Taking Bioinformatics to Systems Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, Antoine H C; Moerland, Perry D

    2016-01-01

    Systems medicine promotes a range of approaches and strategies to study human health and disease at a systems level with the aim of improving the overall well-being of (healthy) individuals, and preventing, diagnosing, or curing disease. In this chapter we discuss how bioinformatics critically contributes to systems medicine. First, we explain the role of bioinformatics in the management and analysis of data. In particular we show the importance of publicly available biological and clinical repositories to support systems medicine studies. Second, we discuss how the integration and analysis of multiple types of omics data through integrative bioinformatics may facilitate the determination of more predictive and robust disease signatures, lead to a better understanding of (patho)physiological molecular mechanisms, and facilitate personalized medicine. Third, we focus on network analysis and discuss how gene networks can be constructed from omics data and how these networks can be decomposed into smaller modules. We discuss how the resulting modules can be used to generate experimentally testable hypotheses, provide insight into disease mechanisms, and lead to predictive models. Throughout, we provide several examples demonstrating how bioinformatics contributes to systems medicine and discuss future challenges in bioinformatics that need to be addressed to enable the advancement of systems medicine.

  18. Pharmacological Investigation of Selected Medicinal Plants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To pharmacologically investigate the methanol and petroleum ether extracts of the plant leaves of ... medicinal properties in local floristic resources. ..... 2nd edition ed. 2003: Asiatic. Society of Bangladesh; p 138. 2. Mohiddin YBH, Chin W, Worth DH. Traditional Medicinal. Plants of Brunei Darussalam Part III.

  19. The folklore medicinal orchids of Sikkim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Panda

    2013-01-01

    Results and Conclusion: We found that 36 species of orchids are used as medicines for different purposes of health. The botanical and ayurvedic name, phenology, parts used and medicinal uses of 36 orchids are presented in this paper along with its local distribution.

  20. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Analysis of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Zhao, Bin-xing; Xiao, Hong-tao; Tong, Rong-sheng; Gao, Chun-ming

    2013-09-01

    Chinese medicine is a historic cultural legacy of China. It has made a significant contribution to medicine and healthcare for generations. The development of Chinese herbal medicine analysis is emphasized by the Chinese pharmaceutical industry. This study has carried out the experimental analysis of ten kinds of Chinese herbal powder including Fritillaria powder, etc., based on the photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) method. First, a photoacoustic spectroscopy system was designed and constructed, especially a highly sensitive solid photoacoustic cell was established. Second, the experimental setup was verified through the characteristic emission spectrum of the light source, obtained by using carbon as a sample in the photoacoustic cell. Finally, as the photoacoustic spectroscopy analysis of Fritillaria, etc., was completed, the specificity of the Chinese herb medicine analysis was verified. This study shows that the PAS can provide a valid, highly sensitive analytical method for the specificity of Chinese herb medicine without preparing and damaging samples.

  1. Medicinal Herbs Affecting Gray Hair in Iranian Traditional Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshk, Maryam; Khandani, Shahram Kalantari; Raeiszadeh, Mahboobeh

    2016-05-01

    The presence of hair plays an important role in people's overall physical appearance and self-perception. As a result of increased life expectancy, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever.The use of medicinal plants is as old as mankind and the market will face many new products containing natural oils and herbs in coming years. In traditional Iranian medicine, many plants and herbal formulations are reported for hair growth as well as the improvement in hair quality. The aim of this article is to introduce effective medicinal plants in traditional Iranian medicine to prevent gray hair and advocate them as the new products. The present investigation is an overview study and has been codified by library search in the main sources of traditional Iranian medicine. In traditional Iranian medicine, three types of formulations are proposed to prevent gray hair, namely (i) treatment compounds, (ii) preventive compounds, and (iii) hair dyes to color gray hairs. Our search showed that the main parts of a plant that is used in the treatment and preventive compounds are seeds and fruits. These are primarily in the form of topical oil or oral compound (electuary). The majority of plant parts used in hair dyes is from the fruit and/or leaves. Natural products are highly popular and the use of plant extracts in formulations is on the rise. This is because synthetic based product may cause health hazards with several side effects. Considering the increased popularity of herbal drugs in hair care, it is worthwhile to conduct systemic investigation on the production and efficacy of these drugs. We trust that our investigation would encourage the use of traditional Iranian medicine in future hair care products.

  2. [Forensic medicine and criminalistics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerd, W

    1989-01-01

    The supplementary designation "criminalistics" in the title of certain forensic medical institutes in the first half of this century is to be regarded as a reaction to faulty developments in our specialty, which almost led to the elimination of forensic medicine as an independent scientific discipline in the 1960s. The ability to think in terms of criminalistics and the corresponding working procedures has always been a crucial precondition for the forensic physician, since forensic medicine is the application of medical knowledge for juridical purposes. Forensic medicine originated with the appraisal of cases of violent death by doctors, i.e., reconstruction of the facts in the case. To use the term "criminalistics" in the form of a supplementary designation is thus not required. An attempt is nevertheless made to define "medical criminalistics" as a small but important component of criminalistics. They are subdivided into two phases: the first part begins at the scene of the crime or the place of discovery (local evidence). Here, the trained eye of the forensic physician is indispensable to the criminal investigation department and the prosecutor. Medical criminalistic thinking and working procedures continue at the autopsy. Here, forensic autopsy differs from that practiced by the pathologist. Without knowledge of the situation at the discovery location, the forensic physician runs the risk of not recognizing facts that are important for reconstruction and thus becoming a "destroyer of clues". The second part of medical criminalistics is the actual detection of medical clues, i.e., the investigation of medical clues with special methods, including histological and toxicological investigations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Diseño e implementación de una práctica de metacognición en la asignatura de Fisiología Humana (Facultad de Medicina Designing and implementing a practical on metacognition as part of the subject of Human Physiology (Faculty of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F. Escanero-Marcen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Presentar el diseño y los resultados obtenidos en una práctica sobre metacognición en Fisiología Humana (Facultad de Medicina. Sujetos y métodos. Ciento diecinueve estudiantes (95 mujeres y 24 varones asistieron a una práctica sobre metacognición en la asignatura de Fisiología Humana (Facultad de Medicina. La práctica se dividió en dos partes: en la primera, los estudiantes se determinaron el estilo de aprendizaje (test de Kolb para poner de manifiesto que no todos aprenden de la misma manera, y se les hizo reflexionar sobre las características esenciales de cada estilo encontrado; en la segunda, escribieron las recomendaciones que harían a su mejor amigo/a sobre cómo estudiar fisiología y, posteriormente, las expusieron ante el resto. Resultados y conclusiones. Los resultados respecto a los modos de aprender mostraron dos hechos: uno, que la mayor puntuación se obtuvo en la conceptualización abstracta, tanto para varones como para mujeres, y, otro, referente a la segunda opción, que las mujeres señalaron la experimentación activa (significativamente mayor que en los varones, mientras que para éstos fue la observación reflexiva. Los estilos de aprendizaje de los estudiantes fueron convergentes y asimiladores, con escasa diferencia entre ambos. Por sexos, se observó que en los varones predominó el estilo asimilador (13 frente a 8, mientras que en las mujeres fue más frecuente el convergente (44 frente a 36. En la segunda parte de la práctica (metacognición ambos grupos manifestaron utilizar las mismas estrategias, con independencia del estilo al que pertenecían. Determinadas estrategias fueron utilizadas por los estudiantes con niveles de sofisticación diferentes.Aim. To present the design and results found in a practical lecture on metacognition in the subject of Human Physiology (School of Medicine. Subjects and methods. The practical lecture was attended by 119 students (95 women and 24 men. This one was

  4. Animal experimentations: Part I: General considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T K Pal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All materials, in the form of drugs or devices, which are intended for human use are required to be tested first in suitable animals. Many biological understandings are established on various modes of cruelties on animals. This observational notes guide us to accept or modify or even reject materials for ultimate human use. The science of experiments on animals gives us the remedial solutions to many of our human sufferings. This unique and important discipline is in need of proper understanding for selection of suitable number of animals and its proper care in captivity, and further refinements of code of conducts and ethical issues.

  5. Medicines in Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... developing 85 medicines for Alzheimer's. Report Medicines in Development for Arthritis 2014 Report America’s biopharmaceutical research companies are developing 92 innovative new medicines to help the millions of Americans affected ...

  6. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Your Parents - or Other Adults Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... resfriado Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  7. Depression - stopping your medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000570.htm Depression - stopping your medicines To use the sharing features ... prescription medicines you may take to help with depression, anxiety, or pain. Like any medicine, there are ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is ... this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's ( ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... previous nuclear medicine exam. top of page What are the limitations of Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine procedures can be time consuming. It can take several hours to days ...

  10. Radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Soeren [Lund Univ., Skane Univ. Hospital Malmoe (Sweden). Medical Radiation Physics; Hoeschen, Christoph (eds.) [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Addresses all aspects of radiation protection in nuclear medicine. Covers current technologies and principles. An ideal textbook for students and a ready source of information for nuclear medicine specialists and medical physics experts. One of a series of three books on the fundamentals of modern nuclear medicine (physics, safety, and imaging). This book explains clearly and in detail all aspects of radiation protection in nuclear medicine. After an introductory chapter on the general role of radiation protection, measurement quantities and units are discussed, and detectors and dosimeters, described. Radiation biology and radiation dosimetry are then addressed, with the inclusion of a chapter specifically devoted to biology and dosimetry for the lens of the eye. Discussion of radiation doses to patients and to embryos, fetuses, and children forms a central part of the book. Phantom models, biokinetic models, calculations, and software solutions are all considered, and a further chapter focuses on quality assurance and reference levels. Occupational exposure also receives detailed attention. Exposure resulting from the production, labeling, and injection of radiopharmaceuticals and from contact with patients is discussed and shielding calculations are explained. The book closes by considering exposure of the public and summarizing the ''rules of thumb'' for radiation protection in nuclear medicine. This is an ideal textbook for students and a ready source of useful information for nuclear medicine specialists and medical physics experts.

  11. Obstetric medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Balbi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Obstetric assistance made major advances in the last 20 years: improved surgical technique allows quicker caesarean sections, anaesthesiology procedures such as peripheral anaesthesia and epidural analgesia made safer operative assistance, remarkably reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, neonatology greatly improved the results of assistance to low birth weight newborns. A new branch of medicine called “obstetric medicine” gained interest and experience after the lessons of distinguished physicians like Michael De Swiet in England. All together these advances are making successful pregnancies that 20 years ago would have been discouraged or even interrupted: that’s what we call high risk pregnancy. High risk of what? Either complications of pregnancy on pre-existing disease or complications of pre-existing disease on pregnancy. Nowadays, mortality in pregnancy has a medical cause in 80% of cases in Western countries (Confidential Enquiry on Maternal Deaths, UK, 2004. DISCUSSION The background is always changing and we have to take in account of: increase of maternal age; widespread use of assisted fertilization techniques for treatment of infertility; social feelings about maternity desire with increasing expectations from medical assistance; immigration of medically “naive” patients who don’t know to have a chronic disease, but apt and ready to conceive; limited knowledge of feasibility of drug use in pregnancy which may induce both patients and doctors to stopping appropriate drug therapy in condition of severe disease. Preconception counseling, planning the pregnancy, wise use of drugs, regular follow-up throughout the pregnancy and, in selected cases, preterm elective termination of pregnancy may result in excellent outcome both for mother and foetus. CONCLUSIONS Highly committed and specifically trained physicians are required to counsel these patients and to plan their treatment before and during pregnancy.

  12. Utilização do planejamento experimental no estudo do efeito da composição de misturas de bentonitas na reologia de fluidos de perfuração. Parte II: composições ternárias Experimental design applied to the study of composition effect of bentonite on the rheology of drilling fluids. Part II: ternary compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. A. Campos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi utilizar o planejamento experimental para avaliar o efeito da composição de misturas ternárias de bentonitas na reologia de fluidos de perfuração de poços de petróleo. Por meio do planejamento foram determinadas as proporções dos componentes nas misturas ternárias das argilas e então ajustados modelos de regressão relacionando viscosidade aparente, viscosidade plástica e volume de filtrado com a proporção de cada argila. A aplicação da modelagem de misturas, incluindo composições ternárias, aliada a metodologia de superfícies de resposta e otimização matemática e gráfica permitiu delimitar uma gama de composições de argilas que favorece a melhoria das propriedades reológicas e de filtração dos fluidos estudados.The purpose of this work was to study of composition effect of ternary bentonite mixtures on the rheology of drilling fluids. Through the experimental design were defined the components proportions in the ternary clays mixtures and then adjusted regression models relating apparent and plastic viscosities and water loss, with the proportion of each clay. The application of mixture experimental design, include ternary composition, response surface methodology, graphic and mathematical optimization allowed to delimit a strip of compositions that favors the improvement of the rheological properties of the drilling fluids.

  13. Gas tonometry for evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion: experimental and clinical sepsis¹. part 2 Tonometria a gás para a avaliação da perfusão da mucosa gastrointestinal: sepse clínica e experimental. Parte 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer Silva

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Substantial clinical and animal evidences indicate that the mesenteric circulatory bed, particularly the gut mucosa, is highly vulnerable to reductions in oxygen supply and prone to early injury in the course of hemodynamic changes induced by sepsis and septic shock. Gut hypoxia or ischemia is one possible contributing factor to gastrointestinal tract barrier dysfunction that may be associated with the development of systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, the principal cause of death after sepsis. Monitoring gut perfusion during experimental and clinical sepsis may provide valuable insights over new interventions and therapies highly needed to reduce multiple organ dysfunction and sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. We present our experience with gas tonometry as a monitor of the adequacy of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion in experimental models sepsis and with the use of vasoactive agents for hemodynamic management in patients with septic shock.Evidências clínicas e experimentais substanciais indicam que o território circulatório mesentérico, principalmente na mucosa intestinal, é altamente vulnerável a redução na oferta de oxigênio e predisposto a lesão precoce na presença de alterações hemodinâmicas induzidas pela sepse e choque séptico. A hipóxia ou isquemia intestinal é um dos possíveis mecanismos contribuintes para a disfunção da barreira gastrointestinal que pode estar associada com o desenvolvimento da resposta inflamatória sistêmica e com a síndrome da disfunção de múltiplos órgãos, a principal causa comum de morte na sepse. Monitorar a perfusão intestinal na sepse experimental e clínica pode fornecer dados valiosos quanto a novas intervenções e tratamentos altamente necessários para reduzir disfunção de múltiplos órgãos e mortalidade extremamente elevadas na sepse. Apresentamos nossa experiência com a tonometria a gás como monitor da adequação da perfus

  14. Development of emergency medicine in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Bahati Kabeza

    2013-09-01

    The Rwandan government, partnering with international organizations, has launched a campaign to improve human resources for health, and as a part of that effort the creation of training programs in emergency medicine is now underway. The Rwandan Human Resources for Health program can serve as a guide to the development of similar programs within other African countries. The emergency medicine component of this program includes two tracks: a 2-year postgraduate diploma course, followed by a 3-year Masters of Medicine in Emergency Medicine. The program is slated to graduate its first cohort of trained Emergency Physicians in 2017.

  15. Alternative medicine studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2011-01-01

    A peer-reviewed, open-access journal about alternative medicine systems including acupuncture, anthroposophic medicine, ayurveda, chiropractic, herbalism and natural products, homeopathy, naturopathy...

  16. Medicines for sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzodiazepines; Sedatives; Hypnotics; Sleeping pills; Insomnia - medicines; Sleep disorder - medicines ... are commonly used to treat allergies. While these sleep aids are not addictive, your body becomes used ...

  17. Medicines for osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... when: A bone density test shows you have osteoporosis, even if you have not had a fracture ...

  18. (Re)introducing medicinal cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Laurence E; Rauwendaal, Evert R; Moxham-Hall, Vivienne L; Wodak, Alex D

    2013-12-16

    • After considering extensive scientific and medical evidence, a New South Wales Legislative Council multiparty committee recommended that medicinal cannabis should lawfully be made available for selected-use pharmacotherapy. • The evidence indicates that cannabis has genuine medicinal utility in patients with certain neuropathic conditions, with acceptable levels of risk from mostly mild side effects. • The potential medical benefits of cannabis pharmacotherapy have largely been overlooked, with research and society's attention, in most parts of the world, being directed towards the hazards of its recreational use. • The NSW Government has since dismissed the unanimous and compassionate recommendations of their committee.

  19. Historic images in nuclear medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    In 1976, 2 major molecular imaging events coincidentally took place: Clinical Nuclear Medicine was first published in June, and in August researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania created the first images in humans with F-FDG. FDG was initially developed as part of an evolution...... set in motion by fundamental research studies with positron-emitting tracers in the 1950s by Michel Ter-Pegossian and coworkers at the Washington University. Today, Clinical Nuclear Medicine is a valued scientific contributor to the molecular imaging community, and FDG PET is considered the backbone...

  20. History of the World Federation of Societies for Laser Medicine and Surgery (WFSLMS) and its Non-Profit Organization (NPO-WFSLMS): Part 1: Origins to Inaugural Meeting, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    The first society formed to represent the "new" field of laser applications in medicine and surgery was the late Professor Kaplan's International Society for Laser Surgery and Medicine, held in Israel in 1975. Following the ISLSM lead, a large number of national and international societies were very swiftly formed. As the number grew, it became obvious that some sort of linking forum would help all these separate societies to pool the knowledge of their members for the good of the clinicians and their patients. The World Federation of Societies for Laser Medicine and Surgery was formed to attempt to fill this role. The History: At the 1996 meeting of the Greek Medical Laser Association, the first international forum of representatives from 17 international and national laser societies was convened by Professor Nick Nicolopoulos, and the seed of an idea for a centralized forum to help separate laser societies coordinate efforts and knowledge was planted. This seed was nurtured by the ISLSM as the first medical laser society, and forums were called together at each meeting of the ISLSM and the other related societies from 1997 to 2003. At the 2004 Chinese Medical Laser Society meeting, the idea of worldwide federation of laser societies crystallized into a more tangible form The Inaugural WFSLMS Congress: The convening of the first WFSLMS congress took place in Tokyo in 2005, under the leadership of Professor Kazuhiko Atsumi. At this meeting, Professor Kaplan proposed that a Medical Laser Foundation should be established and donated the first seed money for its formation. Because of the Japanese legal requirements, a foundation was impossible and so a Non-profit Organization (NPO-WFSLMS) was started, based in Japan, to oversee the work and fund the tasks of promoting laser surgery and medicine worldwide, for the good of mankind: the financing, running and holding WFSLMS congresses became one of the tasks of NPO-WFSLMS. Both the WFSLMS and NPO-WFSLMS were therefore on

  1. Do preventive medicine physicians practice medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Paul; Lushniak, Boris D

    2018-02-14

    As some preventive medicine physicians have been denied medical licenses for not engaging in direct patient care, this paper attempts to answer the question, "Do preventive medicine physicians practice medicine?" by exploring the requirements of licensure, the definition of "practice" in the context of modern medicine, and by comparing the specialty of preventive medicine to other specialties which should invite similar scrutiny. The authors could find no explicit licensure requirement for either a certain amount of time in patient care or a number of patients seen. No physicians board certified in Public Health and General Preventive Medicine sit on any state medical boards. The authors propose that state medical boards accept a broad standard of medical practice, which includes the practice of preventive medicine specialists, for licensing purposes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The subthalamic nucleus, Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A.J.F.; Usunoff, Kamen G.

    2008-01-01

    Part I. Development, cytology, topography and connections. This monograph on the subthalamic nucleus accentuates in Part I the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology

  3. Animal-based medicines: biological prospection and the sustainable use of zootherapeutic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Neto, Eraldo M

    2005-03-01

    Animals have been used as medicinal resources for the treatment and relieve of a myriad of illnesses and diseases in practically every human culture. Although considered by many as superstition, the pertinence of traditional medicine based on animals cannot be denied since they have been methodically tested by pharmaceutical companies as sources of drugs to the modern medical science. The phenomenon of zootherapy represents a strong evidence of the medicinal use of animal resources. Indeed, drug companies and agribusiness firms have been evaluating animals for decades without paying anything to the countries from where these genetic resources are found. The use of animals' body parts as folk medicines is relevant because it implies additional pressure over critical wild populations. It is argued that many animal species have been overexploited as sources of medicines for the traditional trade. Additionally, animal populations have become depleted or endangered as a result of their use as experimental subjects or animal models. Research on zootherapy should be compatible with the welfare of the medicinal animals, and the use of their by-products should be done in a sustainable way. It is discussed that sustainability is now required as the guiding principle for biological conservation.

  4. Natural medicines used in the traditional Chinese medical system for therapy of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W L; Zheng, H C; Bukuru, J; De Kimpe, N

    2004-05-01

    The rapidly increasing diabetes mellitus is becoming a serious threat to mankind health in all parts of the world. The control and treatment of diabetes and its complications mainly depend on the chemical or biochemical agents, but the fact is that it has never been reported that someone had recovered totally from diabetes. With the distinctive traditional medical opinions and natural medicines mainly originated in herbs, the traditional Chinese medicine performed a good clinical practice and is showing a bright future in the therapy of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Based on a large number of chemical and pharmacological research work, numerous bioactive compounds have been found in Chinese medicinal plants for diabetes. The present paper reviews 86 natural medicines with regards to their origin, anti-diabetic active principles and/or pharmacological test results, which are commonly used in the traditional Chinese medical system and have demonstrated experimental or/and clinical anti-diabetic effectiveness. Among these natural medicines, 82 originate from plants and 4 from animals or insects, which covers 45 families. It is strongly significant to pay close attention to traditional Chinese medical therapeutics and natural medicines for treatment of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Medicina por Imágenes: la visión globalizada. Parte IV: La visión de la gestión, administración de recursos, ciencia y tecnología Image Based Medicine: the global vision. Part IV: Management, science and technology aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Carestia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La visión globalizada del diagnóstico por imágenes es una puesta al día, creemos que necesaria, de los caracteres más relevantes de esta bellísima disciplina. Está dirigida a quienes todavía no han decidido su camino y están finalizando sus carreras de grado -médica o técnica-, pero también a aquellos que ya han comenzado la residencia; y quizá también para quienes habiendo recorrido ya un largo trayecto, conservan un espíritu crítico y una mirada joven. A la luz del nuevo milenio, y cuando se han cumplido veinticinco años de su reconocimiento como especialidad por parte de la comunidad médica de nuestro país, los autores examinamos esta visión que no se conforma con la mirada unilateral del radiólogo sino que busca también la proveniente de otros saberes y ciencias. Por ello, se incluye una aproximación desde el derecho -sobre un tema puntual-, se tratan los aspectos educacionales y se incorpora la mirada desde el área técnica, la perspectiva de la filosofía y la bioética y las visiones desde la psicología, desde la gestión de los recursos humanos y los aspectos de ciencia y tecnología, entre otras.The global vision of diagnostic imaging is a necessary update, we think, of the most relevant characters of this beautiful discipline. It is directed to those advanced students of Medicine and Radiology Technique career who have not yet decided their future activity but also to the already graduated who are just beginning their residence training programs; and maybe to those who keep a critical spirit and a young glance, in spite of the chronological age. At daybreak of the millennium and when we are assisting to the twenty five anniversary of its origin and recognition as a new speciality inside the medical community in our country, we the authors, have selected not only the unique vision of the radiologist but also the vision of other fields of knowledge and sciences. So because of this we develop the legal view on one

  6. Theory-laden experimentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    The thesis of theory-ladenness of observations, in its various guises, is widely considered as either ill-conceived or harmless to the rationality of science. The latter view rests partly on the work of the proponents of New Experimentalism who have argued, among other things, that experimental p...

  7. [Effective Components of three kinds of shen-supplementing Chinese medicine on self-renewal and neuron-like differentiation of NSCs in AD mouse embryos: an experimental research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-lian; Zhang, Lin-lin; Song, Wan-shan; Han, Wen-wen; Huang, Jian-hua; Zhou, Zhen

    2014-10-01

    To observe the regulatory effects of psoralen, oleanolic acid, and stilbene glucoside, three active components of psoralea fruit, glossy privet fruit and tuber fleeceflower root respectively, on Aβ25-35induced self-renewal and neuron-like differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs). Embryonic NSCs werein vitro isolated and cultured from Kunming mice of 14-day pregnancy, and randomly divided into the control group, the Aβ25-35 group, the Aβ25-35 +psoralen group, the Aβ25-35 +oleanolic acid group, and the Aβ25-35 + stilbene glucoside group. The intervention concentration of Aβ25-35 was 25 µmol/L, and the intervention concentration of three active components of Chinese medicine was 10(-7)mol/L. The effect of three active components of Chinese medicine on the proliferation of NSCs was observed by counting method. The protein expression of Tubulin was observed by Western blot and immunofluorescence. The ratio of Tubulin+/DAPI was caculated. Results Compared with the control group, the sperical morphology of NSCs was destroyed in the Aβ25-35 group, the counting of NSCs, the expression of Tubulin protein, and the ratio of Tubulin /DAPI all decreased (P medicine treated groups (P <0. 01, P <0. 05). 25 µmol/L Aβ25-35 could inhibit self-renewal and neuron-like differentiating of NSCs. But psoralen, oleanolic acid, and stilbene glucoside could promote self-renewal of NSCs and neuron-like differentiation.

  8. Marketing Approval of Ethical Kampo Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakamatsuka, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Kampo medicine is an original traditional medicine in Japan. Currently, 148 ethical Kampo formulations (Kampo prescription drugs) are registered in the National Health Insurance Price List. Kampo medicines can be prescribed under the national insurance system, which shows that they are part of conventional medicine in Japan. Japan has a unified drug approval system that does not distinguish between Western and Kampo medicines, and both are subject to the same regulations. The application for the market approval of ethical Kampo medicines is based on the general notification for drugs, i.e., "Handling of Ethical Combination Drugs" in "Precautions Necessary When Applying for Drug Marketing Approval" (Yakushokushinsa Notification No. 1121-12 of November 21, 2014). Furthermore, applications for the market approval of ethical Kampo medicines should follow the Kampo-specific notification of "Handling of Ethical Kampo Medicines" (Yakushin Notification No. 804 of June 25, 1980). Data from comparative studies with standard decoctions must be submitted with approval applications according to Yakushin 2 Notification No. 120 of May 31, 1985. The safety, efficacy, and quality of Kampo medicines are comprehensively assured by the Japanese Pharmacopoeia, Good Manufacturing Practice, Good Agricultural and Collection Practices, marketing approval certificate, approval standard, and pharmacovigilance. I believe that the basic framework for the market approval of ethical Kampo medicines has been established as described above. The key factors for the practical application of superior manufacturing technology and research achievements and the promotion of drug development are the specific guidelines for the approval of drugs of herbal origin.

  9. Roles of acupuncture in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H T

    1982-01-01

    The medical thinking of traditional Chinese medicine is considered to stem mainly from the theory formulated for acupuncture, as evidenced by the preponderant discussions of acupuncture in "Nei Ching", a classic of Chinese Medicine. Acupuncture cannot do much to those diseases which involve irreversible organic damage. It is essentially a technique for correcting the reversible physiological malfunction of various parts of the body by physiological means. It is believed possible that the acupuncture-initiated impulses may activate the autonomic centers and the hypophysical system in the brain so as to improve the efficiency of homeostatic and self-defence mechanisms of the body. Recent studies in acupuncture analgesia have contributed much to the understanding of the neural mechanism of pain and its control. Modern medicine should accept acupuncture as an alternative in medical practice as advocated by William Osler whose viewpoint about the value of acupuncture is cited.

  10. Basic sciences of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Magdy M. (ed.) [Imperial College London (United Kingdom). Biological Imaging Centre

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear medicine has become an ever-changing and expanding diagnostic and therapeutic medical profession. The day-to-day innovations seen in the field are, in great part, due to the integration of many scientific bases with complex technologic advances. The aim of this reference book, Basic Sciences of Nuclear Medicine, is to provide the reader with a comprehensive and detailed discussion of the scientific bases of nuclear medicine, covering the different topics and concepts that underlie many of the investigations and procedures performed in the field. Topics include radiation and nuclear physics, Tc-99m chemistry, single-photon radiopharmaceuticals and PET chemistry, radiobiology and radiation dosimetry, image processing, image reconstruction, quantitative SPECT imaging, quantitative cardiac SPECT, small animal imaging (including multimodality hybrid imaging, e.g., PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and PET/MRI), compartmental modeling, and tracer kinetics. (orig.)

  11. La innovación y la transferencia de tecnologías en la Estación Experimental "Indio Hatuey": 50 años propiciando el desarrollo del sector rural cubano (Parte II Innovation and technology transference at the Experimental Station "Indio Hatuey": 50 years propitiating the development of the Cuban rural sector (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taymer Miranda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Los cambios acontecidos en la agricultura cubana a finales del siglo XX provocaron la ruptura del paradigma basado en la dependencia de importaciones, por lo que se precisó comenzar a construir un nuevo modelo técnico-económico sobre la base del desarrollo endógeno, asociado al fomento de capacidades innovadoras y de tecnologías sostenibles; ello exigió que los centros de desarrollo de conocimiento se centraran en la aplicación de innovaciones, mediante adecuados procesos de extensión rural. En este sentido, la Estació n Experimental "Indio Hatuey" concentró los esfuerzos en el fomento de los procesos de innovación en la ganadería cubana, que fueron potenciados a inicios de la primera década del actual milenio cuando se dio un giro en el sistema convencional de transferencia tecnológica para fomentar la innovación y el desarrollo local rural. Ejemplos destacados de la aplicación de este enfoque son: el Programa de Desarrollo Agropecuario en el municipio Martí, el fortalecimiento de los procesos de innovación agropecuaria local y de fomento de sistemas locales de innovación en el sector cooperativo y campesino de la provincia de Matanzas, así como la producción integrada de alimentos y energía sobre bases agroecológicas en cinco provincias cubanas.The changes occurred in Cuban agriculture at the end of the 20th century caused the rupture of the paradigm based on import dependence, for which it became necessary to begin building a new technical-economic model based on endogenous development, associated to the promotion of innovative capacities and sustainable technologies; this demanded that knowledge-development centers focused on the application of innovations, through adequate rural extension processes. In this sense, the Experimental Station "Indio Hatuey" focused the efforts on the promotion of innovation processes in Cuban livestock production, which were enhanced at the beginning of the first decade of this millennium

  12. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Asim A.; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2016-01-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS’s Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine’s dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site’s competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees’ work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine

  13. Traditional medicine policy and regulation in Nigeria: an index of herbal medicine safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awodele, Olufunsho; Amagon, Kennedy I; Wannang, Noel N; Aguiyi, John C

    2014-03-01

    The requirements and methods for research and evaluation of the safety and efficacy of herbal medicines are more complex than those for conventional pharmaceuticals. In addition to the aforementioned and contrary to the general belief that herbal medicines are safe and despite the profound therapeutic advantages possessed by medicinal plants, some of their constituents have been shown to be potentially toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. Thus, traditional medicine policy and regulation have been made an integral part of the WHO proposed critical determinants of herbal medicine safety. Therefore, this study is designed to assess the policy and regulation guiding herbal medicine in Nigeria as this information may form a safety index of herbal medicine use in Nigeria. Structured questionnaire adopted from WHO was used to obtain the opinions of relevant stakeholders in the field of herbal medicine on the policy and regulation of herbal medicine in Nigeria. The results show that 68.8% of respondents agreed that there is a national policy on TM with 31.2% disagreeing on this issue. 75% of respondents agreed that implementation of the manufacturing requirements of herbal medicines is ensured by control mechanisms while 25% disagreed. Only 25% said herbal medicines are sold by licensed practitioners, with 75% believing that herbal medicines are sold by non-licensed practitioners. 87.5% said support from the WHO is needed and should be in the form of workshops on national capacity building on safety monitoring of herbal medicines. There is need for the Federal Ministry of Health to harmonize the varying opinions on traditional medicine and policy as documented in this study through collaboration and workshops on traditional medicine. These proposed approaches may guarantee the safety and regulation of herbal medicine use in Nigeria.

  14. Applying 'Technology Assessment' and 'Evidence Based Medicine' theory to interventional radiology. Part 1: Suggestions for the phased evaluation of new procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Dermot E.; Maceneaney, Peter M

    2000-12-01

    AIM: To compare and contrast interventional radiology (IR) clinical and research practices with the technology assessment and evidence-based medicine (EBM) paradigms and make suggestions for the phased evaluation of new IR procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Course literature of the Association of University Radiologists' 'Basic Technology Assessment for Radiologists' course and the McMaster University Health Information Research Unit's 'How to Teach Evidence-Based Medicine 1999' course were used to identify major publications in each discipline. A computer search was performed to seek other relevant literature. A model of traditional development of IR procedures was developed. Suggestions for the phased evaluation of IR procedures were derived. RESULTS: As in diagnostic radiology, several levels of progressively stronger IR study design can be described and related to EBM 'levels of evidence'. These range from case reports and case series through case-control and cohort studies to randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The major weakness in the existing IR literature is the predominance of small, uncontrolled, case series. Randomized controlled trials are likely to provide the best possible evidence of effectiveness. They are expensive and randomization is sometimes unethical or impractical. Case-control and cohort studies have been under-utilized. Evidence-based medicine indices of benefit and harm have not yet been applied in IR and may have clinical advantages over traditional statistical methods. A literature search (10 years) using MeSH terms 'radiology, interventional' and 'efficacy' yielded 30 papers. Combining 'radiology, interventional' and 'evidence-based medicine' yielded no papers. Comparative searches substituting the term 'diagnostic imaging' for 'radiology, interventional' yielded 4883 and 62 papers, respectively. CONCLUSION: Principles of technology

  15. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.

    2015-01-01

    Developments in "omics" are creating a paradigm shift in Laboratory Medicine leading to Personalised Medicine. This allows the increasing in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether Laboratory Medicine is able to implement new...... diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... for the era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware...

  16. Sleep Medicine Textbook

    OpenAIRE

    Bassetti, Claudio; Dogas, Zoran; Peigneux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The Sleep Medicine Textbook provides comprehensive, all-in-one educational material (550 pages) structured around the Catalogue of knowledge and skills for sleep medicine (Penzel et al. 2014, Journal of Sleep Research). Written by experts in the field and published by the ESRS, it provides an European approach to sleep medicine education, and represents the knowledge-base for the ESRS-endorsed sleep medicine examinations.The book is available at http://www.esrs.eu/esrs/sleep-medicine-textbook...

  17. Antibacterial activities of medicinal plants used in Mexican traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Flores-Vallejo, Rosario Del Carmen; Cardoso-Taketa, Alexandre; Villarreal, María Luisa

    2017-08-17

    We provide an extensive summary of the in vitro antibacterial properties of medicinal plants popularly used in Mexico to treat infections, and we discuss the ethnomedical information that has been published for these species. We carried out a bibliographic investigation by analyzing local and international peer-reviewed papers selected by consulting internationally accepted scientific databases from 1995 to 2014. We provide specific information about the evaluated plant parts, the type of extracts, the tested bacterial strains, and the inhibitory concentrations for each one of the species. We recorded the ethnomedical information for the active species, as well as their popular names and local distribution. Information about the plant compounds that has been identified is included in the manuscript. This review also incorporates an extensive summary of the available toxicological reports on the recorded species, as well as the worldwide registries of plant patents used for treating bacterial infections. In addition, we provide a list with the top plant species with antibacterial activities in this review RESULTS: We documented the in vitro antibacterial activities of 343 plant species pertaining to 92 botanical families against 72 bacterial species, focusing particularly on Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The plant families Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae and Euphorbiaceae included the largest number of active species. Information related to popular uses reveals that the majority of the plants, in addition to treating infections, are used to treat other conditions. The distribution of Mexican plants extended from those that were reported to grow in just one state to those that grow in all 32 Mexican states. From 75 plant species, 225 compounds were identified. Out of the total plant species, only 140 (40.57%) had at least one report about their toxic effects. From 1994 to July 2014 a total of 11

  18. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders: part II, advanced sleep phase disorder, delayed sleep phase disorder, free-running disorder, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm. An American Academy of Sleep Medicine review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Robert L; Auckley, Dennis; Auger, R Robert; Carskadon, Mary A; Wright, Kenneth P; Vitiello, Michael V; Zhdanova, Irina V

    2007-11-01

    This the second of two articles reviewing the scientific literature on the evaluation and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs), employing the methodology of evidence-based medicine. We herein report on the accumulated evidence regarding the evaluation and treatment of Advamced Sleep Phase Disorder (ASPD), Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder (DSPD), Free-Running Disorder (FRD) and Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm ISWR). A set of specific questions relevant to clinical practice were formulated, a systematic literature search was performed, and relevant articles were abstracted and graded. A substantial body of literature has accumulated that provides a rational basis the evaluation and treatment of CRSDs. Physiological assessment has involved determination of circadian phase using core body temperature and the timing of melatonin secretion. Behavioral assessment has involved sleep logs, actigraphy and the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ). Treatment interventions fall into three broad categories: 1) prescribed sleep scheduling, 2) circadian phase shifting ("resetting the clock"), and 3) symptomatic treatment using hypnotic and stimulant medications. Circadian rhythm science has also pointed the way to rational interventions for CRSDs and these treatments have been introduced into the practice of sleep medicine with varying degrees of success. More translational research is needed using subjects who meet current diagnostic criteria.

  19. Generic - equivalent drugs use in internal and general medicine patients: distrust, confusion, lack of certainties or of knowledge? Part 2. Misconceptions, doubts and critical aspects when using generic drugs in the real world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Nardi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A lot of issues have been raised to argue that equivalent drugs may not work as well or at least the same as what the drug industry likes to call innovator products. Many doubts and biases are also reported in connection with the use of generic drugs. Doctors are mostly concerned about their efficacy, their tolerability, the quality and amount of active ingredients, their formulation or excipients, their packaging, their pharmaceutical form and their palatability. We describe the differences between prescribability (equivalence when prescribing a drug to a patient for the first time and switchability (interchangeability of drugs for a patient already in treatment considering the notions of average bioequivalence, population bioequivalence and individual bioequivalence as well as the usefulness of the U.S. Orange Book in the assessment of bioequivalence. Other key issues deserve attention, such as: duplicate applications for medicinal products, different salt forms, formulations used in the development of each medicinal product and excipients, product quality. Clinicians in collaboration with pharmacists and research pharmacologists have to find solutions for unanswered questions and unsolved doubts, by developing targeted studies, communication tools and shared guidelines.

  20. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Integrative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riya R. Kanherkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since time immemorial humans have utilized natural products and therapies for their healing properties. Even now, in the age of genomics and on the cusp of regenerative medicine, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM approaches represents a popular branch of health care. Furthermore, there is a trend towards a unified medical philosophy referred to as Integrative Medicine (IM that represents the convergence of CAM and conventional medicine. The IM model not only considers the holistic perspective of the physiological components of the individual, but also includes psychological and mind-body aspects. Justification for and validation of such a whole-systems approach is in part dependent upon identification of the functional pathways governing healing, and new data is revealing relationships between therapies and biochemical effects that have long defied explanation. We review this data and propose a unifying theme: IM’s ability to affect healing is due at least in part to epigenetic mechanisms. This hypothesis is based on a mounting body of evidence that demonstrates a correlation between the physical and mental effects of IM and modulation of gene expression and epigenetic state. Emphasis on mapping, deciphering, and optimizing these effects will facilitate therapeutic delivery and create further benefits.

  1. Medical humanities' challenge to medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnaughton, Jane

    2011-10-01

    Medicine is predicated on a view of human nature that is highly positivist and atomistic. This is apparent in the way in which its students are taught, clinical consultations are structured and medical evidence is generated. The field of medical humanities originally emerged as a challenge to this overly narrow view, but it has rarely progressed beyond tinkering around the edges of medical education. This is partly because its practitioners have largely been working from within a pervasive medical culture from which it is difficult to break free, and partly because the field has been insufficiently armed with scholarly thinking from the humanities. This is beginning to change and there is a sign that research in medical humanities has the potential to mount a persuasive challenge to medicine's ways of teaching, working and finding out. This article problematizes medicine's narrow viewpoint, grounding its critique in philosophical ideas from phenomenology and pragmatism. I will reflect upon the historical context within which medical humanities has emerged and briefly examine specific examples of how its interdisciplinary approach, involving humanities scholars with clinicians and medical scientists, may develop new research directions in medicine. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanherkar, Riya R.; Stair, Susan E.; Bhatia-Dey, Naina; Mills, Paul J.; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Since time immemorial humans have utilized natural products and therapies for their healing properties. Even now, in the age of genomics and on the cusp of regenerative medicine, the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches represents a popular branch of health care. Furthermore, there is a trend towards a unified medical philosophy referred to as Integrative Medicine (IM) that represents the convergence of CAM and conventional medicine. The IM model not only considers the holistic perspective of the physiological components of the individual, but also includes psychological and mind-body aspects. Justification for and validation of such a whole-systems approach is in part dependent upon identification of the functional pathways governing healing, and new data is revealing relationships between therapies and biochemical effects that have long defied explanation. We review this data and propose a unifying theme: IM's ability to affect healing is due at least in part to epigenetic mechanisms. This hypothesis is based on a mounting body of evidence that demonstrates a correlation between the physical and mental effects of IM and modulation of gene expression and epigenetic state. Emphasis on mapping, deciphering, and optimizing these effects will facilitate therapeutic delivery and create further benefits. PMID:28316635

  3. Rational use of medicines - Indian perspective!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, G P; Manna, P K

    2015-01-01

    India, the largest democracy in the world, is with a federal structure of 29 states and 7 union territories. With a population of more than 1.2 billion, resource is always a constraint and so is in the health system too. In the federal structure, providing healthcare is largely the responsibility of state governments. Medicines are important component of health care delivery system and quality care is dependent on the availability and proper use of quality medicines. In spite of being known as pharmacy of the third world, poor access to medicines in the country is always a serious concern. Realizing the need of quality use of medicines, several initiatives have been initiated. As early as 1994, seeds of rational use of medicines were sown in the country with two initiatives: establishment of a civil society, Delhi Society for Promoting Rational Use of Drugs (DSPURD) and establishment of government agency in Tamil Nadu, a southern state, called Tamil Medical Services Corporation Limited (TNMSCL). DSPUD was in official association with World Health Organization Country Office for implementing essential medicine programme in the country for two biennia. In addition to organizing sensitising and training programme for healthcare professionals throughout the country, it looked after the procurement and appropriate use of medicines in Delhi government health facilities. TNMSCL has made innovations in medicine management including procurement directly from manufacturers as a part of pooled procurement, establishing warehouses with modern storage facilities and Information Technology enabled management of whole process. TNMSCL Model is now replicated in almost the entire country and even in some small other countries as it is successful in improving access to medicines.The National Government and the State Governments have developed strategies to promote rational use of medicines as a part of improving access and quality care in public health facilities. National

  4. [Ecological protection of medicinal woody plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiufeng

    2003-09-01

    technology (cell culture and gene technology). Aimed at medicinal woody plants in Chinese forest resources, to develop the fundamental researches on resources protection and rational utilization will create many profound scientific significances. Firstly, medicinal woody plants are the important components of Chinese natural forest resources, so the problem for their protection and utilization, especially for that of tall trees, is quite remarkable and special. To reveal the internal contradictory between plant resources protection and its reasonable exploitation and exploit a practicable access to solve it will promote and accelerate the fulfillment of "natural forest protection project" in China. Secondly, traditional Chinese medicine is a main part of Chinese excellent ancestral culture, and the traditional utilizing models have been carried on for thousands of years. Accompanying with the development of human society, many unavoidable troubles such as the shortage of natural resources and the pollution of natural environment are more and more severely, which make the old models of the traditional Chinese medicine become more and more harmful and inaccessible to mankind. New substitutive approach to the utilization of traditional Chinese medicine, especially to that of Chinese medicinal woody plants will be one of the key methods to improve the present situation. Thirdly, traditional Chinese medicine, the cherish treasure of Chinese ancestral culture, need not only be preserved but also be developed. One of the main problems to restrict the extensive spread of the traditional Chinese medicine is its unstable quality, so to reach the stable quality and good quality is tightly linked to the improvement of traditional Chinese medicine. Hence the environmental regulation to the cultivation of medicinal plants, which can prove and guarantee the stable and high quality, will fit the demand on the production of medicinal plant material, and correspond to the goal of great

  5. [The methods of Western medicine in on ancient medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Deokjin

    2010-06-30

    The treatise On Ancient Medicine attests that questions of method were being debated both in medicine and in philosophy and is important evidence of cross-discipline methodological controversy. The treatise On Ancient Medicine is the first attempt in the history of Greek thought to provide a detailed account of the development of a science from a starting point in observation and experience. The author of it criticizes philosophical physicians who attempt to systematized medicine by reducing it to the interaction of one or more of the opposites hot, cold, wet, and dry, factors. He regards the theory of his opponents as hypothesis(hypothesis). Medicine has long been in possession of both an archē and a hodos, a principle and a method, which have enabled it to make discoveries over a long period of time. As far as method is concerned, the traditional science of medicine attained the knowledge of the visible by starting from observation and experience, but it recommended the use of reasoning and analogies with familiar objects as a means of learning about the invisible. It also utilized inference from the visible to the visible(epilogismos) and inference from the visible to the invisible(analogismos). The use of analogy as a means of learning about the obscure was also part of the common heritage of early philosophy and medicine. But the author's use of the analogical method distinguishes it from Empedocles' well-known analogy comparisons of the eye to a lantern and the process of respiration to the operations of a clepsydra. According to the author, traditional science of medicine used functional analogy like wine example and cheese example to know the function of humors within the body and utilized structured analogy like a tube example and a cupping instrument example to acknowledge an organ or structure within the body. But the author didn't distinguish between the claim that medicine has a systematic method of making discoveries and very different claim that it

  6. Projects in Medical Education: “Social Justice In Medicine” A Rationale for an Elective Program as Part of the Medical Education Curriculum at John A. Burns School of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Background Research has shown that cultural competence training improves the attitudes, knowledge, and skills of clinicians related to caring for diverse populations. Social Justice in medicine is the idea that healthcare workers promote fair treatment in healthcare so that disparities are eliminated. Providing students with the opportunity to explore social issues in health is the first step toward decreasing discrimination. This concept is required for institutional accreditation and widely publicized as improving health care delivery in our society. Methods A literature review was performed searching for social justice training in medical curricula in North America. Results Twenty-six articles were discovered addressing the topic or related to the concept of social justice or cultural humility. The concepts are in accordance with objectives supported by the Future of Medical Education in Canada Report (2010), the Carnegie Foundation Report (2010), and the LCME guidelines. Discussion The authors have introduced into the elective curriculum of the John A. Burns School of Medicine a series of activities within a time span of four years to encourage medical students to further their knowledge and skills in social awareness and cultural competence as it relates to their future practice as physicians. At the completion of this adjunct curriculum, participants will earn the Dean's Certificate of Distinction in Social Justice, a novel program at the medical school. It is the hope of these efforts that medical students go beyond cultural competence and become fluent in the critical consciousness that will enable them to understand different health beliefs and practices, engage in meaningful discourse, perform collaborative problem-solving, conduct continuous self-reflection, and, as a result, deliver socially responsible, compassionate care to all members of society. PMID:22737646

  7. Herbal medicinal oils in traditional Persian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Azadeh; Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Sohrabpour, Maryam; Zargaran, Arman

    2013-09-01

    In Iran, conventional production methods of herbal oils are widely used by local practitioners. Administration of oils is rooted in traditional knowledge with a history of more than 3000 years. Scientific evaluation of these historical documents can be valuable for finding new potential use in current medicine. The current study (i) compiled an inventory of herbal oils used in ancient and medieval Persia and (ii) compared the preparation methods and therapeutic applications of ancient times to current findings of medicinal properties in the same plant species. Information on oils, preparation methods and related clinical administration was obtained from ancient Persian documents and selected manuscripts describing traditional Persian medicine. Moreover, we investigated the efficacy of medicinal plant species used for herbal oils through a search of the PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar databases. In Iran, the application of medicinal oils date back to ancient times. In medieval Persian documents, 51 medicinal oils produced from 31 plant species, along with specific preparation methods, were identified. Flowers, fruits and leaves were most often used. Herbal oils have been traditionally administered via oral, topical and nasal routes for gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neural diseases, respectively. According to current investigations, most of the cited medicinal plant species were used for their anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Medicinal oils are currently available in Iranian medicinal plant markets and are prepared using traditional procedures for desirable clinical outcomes. Other than historical clarification, the present study provides data on clinical applications of the oils that should lead to future opportunities to investigate their potential medicinal use.

  8. Chinese materia medica used in medicinal diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fang; Chen, Yalin; Tan, Xiaolei; Ma, Yunyun; Peng, Yong

    2017-07-12

    Medicinal diets have a history of more than 2000 years. Locally referred to as yaoshan (Chinese: ), a medicinal diet is understood in China as a dietary product that combines herbs and food with the purpose of preventing and treating diseases or improving health under the guidance of traditional Chinese medicine theory. Medicinal diets are used in Chinese people's daily life and in specialized restaurants. Hundreds of Chinese materia medica (CMM) are used in medicinal diets; however, a comprehensive evaluation of medicinal diets is lacking. This is an exploratory study that aims to identify the CMM that are most frequently used in medicinal diets and to provide an updated view of the current situation of medicinal diets in China. A field study of 1221 people in 32 Chinese provinces was conducted over a period of approximately 6 months and included various types of interviews as well as a written questionnaire. Two approaches were used to analyse the data collected in the survey: (1) estimating the frequency of CMM consumed in daily diets; and (2) collecting CMM used in medicinal diet restaurants. Complementary information on the selected CMM was obtained from relevant databases, including PubMed, Google Scholar, Baidu Scholar, CNKI, and Web of Science. Ten CMM were reported as commonly used by more than 50% of the participants. Among these 10 species, most medicinally used parts were seeds and fruits. Pharmacological data from the literature revealed that these species are associated with a wide spectrum of biological properties, including antitumour (80%), antioxidant (50%), anti-diabetic (40%), antilipemic (40%), anti-aging (40%), antimicrobial (40%) and cardioprotective (40%) activities. Our survey shows that most medicinal diet restaurants are located in the eastern part of China, with the greatest numbers being found in Beijing and Guangzhou. Only Dioscoreae Rhizoma, Lycii Fructus, Chrysanthemi Flos and Longan Arillus were frequently consumed both in daily

  9. Integrating biomedical and herbal medicine in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boateng, Millicent Addai; Danso-Appiah, Anthony; Turkson, Bernard Kofi

    2016-01-01

    to be parallel than integrated, health personnel providing herbal medicine perceived the system as integrated. Most patients were not aware of the herbal clinic in the hospital but those who had utilized services of the herbal clinic viewed the clinic as part of the hospital. Conclusions: The lack......Background: Over the past decade there has been growing interest in the use of herbal medicine both in developed and developing countries. Given the high proportion of patients using herbal medicine in Ghana, some health facilities have initiated implementation of herbal medicine as a component...... of their healthcare delivery. However, the extent to which herbal medicine has been integrated in Ghanaian health facilities, how integration is implemented and perceived by different stakeholders has not been documented. The study sought to explore these critical issues at the Kumasi South Hospital (KSH) and outline...

  10. Sleep Medicine Training Across the Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    There is now a new pathway and examination for sleep medicine, sponsored by the American Board of Internal Medicine, and a number of accredited sleep medicine fellowship programs through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. This review takes an historical approach to discuss the process of education for sleep physiology and disorders not only in the postgraduate period but also at all levels of instruction. In reality, there is a continuum of knowledge that needs to be reinforced up and down the educational system, of which Sleep Medicine subspecialty training is just one part. Although progress has been made at all educational levels up to this point, the future of training and education will depend on a sustained effort at several levels from undergraduate to postgraduate continuing medical education and will be facilitated by professional societies and other specialties who will collectively promote the value of and outcomes for clinical sleep medicine. PMID:21540220

  11. Medicinal properties of neem leaves: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subapriya, R; Nagini, S

    2005-03-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has attracted worldwide prominence in recent years, owing to its wide range of medicinal properties. Neem has been extensively used in Ayurveda, Unani and Homoeopathic medicine and has become a cynosure of modern medicine. Neem elaborates a vast array of biologically active compounds that are chemically diverse and structurally complex. More than 140 compounds have been isolated from different parts of neem. All parts of the neem tree- leaves, flowers, seeds, fruits, roots and bark have been used traditionally for the treatment of inflammation, infections, fever, skin diseases and dental disorders. The medicinal utilities have been described especially for neem leaf. Neem leaf and its constituents have been demonstrated to exhibit immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycaemic, antiulcer, antimalarial, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties. This review summarises the wide range of pharmacological activities of neem leaf.

  12. Herbal Medicine - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Herbal Medicine URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Herbal Medicine - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child is taking as well as vitamins and herbal supplements and if he or she has any ... What are the limitations of Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine procedures can be time consuming. It ...

  14. Alternative and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for e-updates Please leave this field empty Alternative & Integrative Medicine SHARE Home > Treatment and Care > Treatments Listen Alternative medicine is a term used to define therapies other ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to evaluate organ systems, including ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine procedures are able to pinpoint molecular activity within the body, they offer the potential to ... otherwise, your child may resume his/her normal activities after the nuclear medicine scan. If the child ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used to ... A radiologist or other physician who has specialized training in nuclear medicine will interpret the images and ...

  18. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-20

    . 1Department of Internal Medicine, General Hospital of Larissa, Larissa, Greece. &Corresponding author: Theocharis Koufakis, Department of Internal Medicine, General Hospital of Larissa, Larissa, Greece. Key words: Still´s ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... function of the thyroid gland. top of page How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary ... area of your child's body. top of page How is the procedure performed? Nuclear medicine imaging is ...

  20. Sports Medicine Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Allan J.

    1978-01-01

    Includes a general discussion of sports medicine including exercise and conditioning techniques, prevention of illness and injury, treatment of and rehabilitation after sports injury, and the future of sports medicine. (BB)