WorldWideScience

Sample records for experimental laboratory record

  1. 21 CFR 211.194 - Laboratory records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory records. 211.194 Section 211.194 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Records and Reports § 211.194...

  2. The Hunterian Laboratory of Experimental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Kevin; Cameron, John L; Yeh, Michael W

    2011-05-01

    The Hunterian Laboratory of Experimental Medicine, established at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1905, played a central role in the early history of American surgery. Created primarily by William Halsted with the help of Harvey Cushing, the Laboratory was a cornerstone of experimental surgical research as well as surgical education. This article examines the conception and early years of the Laboratory.

  3. Epistemological Dizziness in the Psychology Laboratory: Lively Subjects, Anxious Experimenters, and Experimental Relations, 1950-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Jill

    2015-09-01

    Since the demise of introspective techniques in the early twentieth century, experimental psychology has largely assumed an administrative arrangement between experimenters and subjects wherein subjects respond to experimenters' instructions and experimenters meticulously constrain that relationship through experimental controls. During the postwar era this standard arrangement came to be questioned, initiating reflections that resonated with Cold War anxieties about the nature of the subjects and the experimenters alike. Albeit relatively short lived, these interrogations of laboratory relationships gave rise to unconventional testimonies and critiques of experimental method and epistemology. Researchers voiced serious concerns about the honesty and normality of subjects, the politics of the laboratory, and their own experimental conduct. Their reflective commentaries record the intimacy of subject and experimenter relations and the plentiful cultural materials that constituted the experimental situation, revealing the permeable boundaries between laboratory and everyday life.

  4. Experimental Results in DIS from Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian Kuhn

    2009-10-01

    We are summarizing the experimental program of Jefferson Lab (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA) in deep inelastic electron scattering. We show recent results and discuss future plans for both the present 6 GeV era and the 12 GeV energy-upgraded facility.

  5. Experimental framework for laboratory scale microgrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alex Restrepo-Zambrano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta una propuesta de un banco de pruebas de microrredes para uso en laboratorio. El objetivo es proporcionar alta flexibilidad utilizando un enfoque modular con un hardware común para la mayoría de las tareas. El marco experimental propuesto para microrredes a escala de laboratorio proporciona los requisitos para enseñanza e investigación. Esto se logra con una etapa de electrónica de potencia reconfigurable, para pruebas y diseños de nuevas topologías. Permite probar algoritmos en los distintos niveles de la estructura jerárquica de la microrred. Da acceso a la emulación y simulación de elementos encontrados comúnmente en una microrred y a la programación de bajo nivel de los protocolos de comunicación para estudiar el canal de comunicación. La unidad de procesamiento en cada módulo, llamado controlador local, utiliza un procesador digital de señales de alto rendimiento (DSP. Esta unidad de procesamiento permite la reconfiguración de cada módulo para asumir cualquier tarea en la microrred; es decir, como cargas controlables, almacenamiento de energía, generación eólica, generación fotovoltaica, etc. El hardware propuesto se probó operando como emulador de los diferentes subsistemas. Las comunicaciones con un controlador central microrred (MCC se realizan mediante procesadores integrados estándar, capaces de implementar los protocolos de comunicación adecuados para ambientes de microrred.

  6. Construction of Virtual Psychology Laboratory Describing Exploratory Experimental Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaike, Ryuichi; Miwa, Kazuhisa

    In the present study, we show a simulated experiment environment, VPL(Virtual Psychology Laboratory), for visualizing user's exploratory experimental behavior, and present two main modules of the environment: (1) a cognitive simulator and (2) a system for automatically describing experimenter's behavior based on EBS (Exploratory Behavior Schema) proposed by the author. Users use this environment as an experimental psychologist who investigates human collaborative discovery. They experience many trials of conducting experiments using the simulated environment, and analyze by themselves their experimental processes based on the description of their behavior by EBS. It is expected that learners can notice their errors of experimental planning and refine various types of knowledge related to the experimental skills by repeating the experimental activities in this environment.

  7. 7 CFR 91.12 - Record of filing time and laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Record of filing time and laboratory tests. 91.12... filing time and laboratory tests. A record showing the date of receipt for each application for a... laboratory analyses shall be recorded at the time of sample receipt. ...

  8. [The 1, 2, 3 of laboratory animal experimentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Batista-Castro, Zenia; De Lucca, Marisel; Ruano, Ana; García-Barceló, María; Rivera-Cervantes, Marta; García-Rodríguez, Julio; Sánchez-Mateos, Soledad

    2016-06-01

    The slow scientific development in Latin America in recent decades has delayed the incorporation of laboratory animal experimentation; however, this situation has started to change. Today, extraordinary scientific progress is evident, which has promoted the introduction and increased use of laboratory animals as an important tool for the advancement of biomedical sciences. In the aftermath of this boom, the need to provide the scientific community with training and guidance in all aspects related to animal experimentation has arisen. It is the responsibility of each country to regulate this practice, for both bioethical and legal reasons, to ensure consideration of the animals' rights and welfare. The following manuscript is the result of papers presented at the International Workshop on Laboratory Animal Testing held at the Technical University of Ambato, Ecuador; it contains information regarding the current state of affairs in laboratory animal testing and emphasizes critical aspects such as main species used, ethical and legal principles, and experimental and alternative designs for animal use. These works aim to ensure good practices that should define scientific work. This document will be relevant to both researchers who aim to newly incorporate animal testing into their research and those who seek to update their knowledge.

  9. 78 FR 60245 - Privacy Act Systems of Records; LabWare Laboratory Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary Privacy Act Systems of Records; LabWare Laboratory Information Management System... is the LabWare Laboratory Information Management System, USDA-APHIS-19. This notice is necessary to... (USDA) is proposing to add a new system of records, entitled LabWare Laboratory Information Management...

  10. Recording 360 Degree Holograms in the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirn, Bradley A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment for recording holograms using a minimum of costly apparatus. Includes a description of apparatus and materials, the procedure for recording the hologram, the processing of the hologram, and the reconstruction of the image. (GS)

  11. A programmable closed-loop recording and stimulating wireless system for behaving small laboratory animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Boi, Fabio; Zordan, Stefano; Bonfanti, Andrea; Vato, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    A portable 16-channels microcontroller-based wireless system for a bi-directional interaction with the central nervous system is presented in this work. The device is designed to be used with freely behaving small laboratory animals and allows recording of spontaneous and evoked neural activity wirelessly transmitted and stored on a personal computer. Biphasic current stimuli with programmable duration, frequency and amplitude may be triggered in real-time on the basis of the recorded neural activity as well as by the animal behavior within a specifically designed experimental setup. An intuitive graphical user interface was developed to configure and to monitor the whole system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo measurements on behaving rats chronically implanted with multi-channels microwire arrays.

  12. Final safety analysis report for the IFR Experimental Fuels Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batte, G. L.; Wilkes, C. W.

    1986-05-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program requires irradiation of a number of U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy elements, to obtain experimental information prior to large scale production of this fuel. The IFR Experimental Fuels Laboratory (EFL) will be established for the fabrication of a limited number uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloy fuel elements, as well as the development of process concepts and parameters needed to make the fuel. The EFL will be located in the Analytical Laboratory, which is a low-hazard facility as determined by its Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The U-Pu-Zr fuel will be prototypical of the fuel that will be used in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program. Approximately 150 U-Pu-Zr alloy pins will be fabricated within the facility. The pins will be processed, inspected, and finally placed into element jackets that have been preloaded with sodium in another facility. After settling, the elements will be transferred to the Fuels and Subassembly Storage Building (FASB) for closure welding and process completion. The purpose of this document is to evaluate the effects to the public and/or working personnel of any incident in the EFL, which would release radioactive contamination to the environment. Several types of probable incidents that could occur within the EFL will be addressed along with actions that will be taken to prevent their occurrence. The document will conclude with an analysis of the most probable design basis accident (DBA), its radiological impact, and also a short discussion of a proposed maximum hypothetical accident. (MHA).

  13. Triggering the mechanical (slip) instability in laboratory experimental model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devidze, M.; Chelidze, T.; Varamashvili, N.

    2008-05-01

    Recent laboratory experiments testify possibility of significant influence of elastic and electromagnetic (EM) fields to affect (hamper or initiate) slip. This work focuses on experimental test of possibility of triggering the mechanical instability of system, which is close to the critical state, by electromagnetic pulses. The mechanical system consisted of two pieces of rock (basalt).This system is driven close to the critical state, namely by placing the rock plate on the inclined supporting sample at the slope angle less than, but close to the critical slip angle. In this state the triggering of mechanical instability by some weak impact such as electrical pulse became more probable. It has been found that when the EM field is nearly parallel to the slip plane the EM impact initiates the slip with the probability at the voltage and with the probability at . On the other hand, if the EM field is normal to the slip surface, application of EM pulse hampers the slip. The slope of support in experiment is analogue of tectonic stress in natural conditions. We conclude that our laboratory experiments give a sound principal basis for the interpretation of the field data on the control of seismic regime by relatively weak natural or artificial perturbations; of course, in the earth crust the detailed physical mechanisms of coupling between tectonic forces and superimposed perturbations may be different.

  14. Role, Challenges, and Opportunities in Multi-scale Laboratory Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekare, Tissa

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental to the distribution of water and effects on its quality are the processes of energy, mass, and momentum transfer in hydrologic systems. I will introduce a class of problems that offers special challenges when these processes occur either across physical interfaces or through transition zones with embedded interfaces. Some of the challenges are a result of hard to define interface topologies, abrupt transition of phase properties, contrasting phase flow and energy dynamics, difficult to characterize simultaneously occurring but different types of transfer processes, and modeling complexities. The data to study these processes cannot always be obtained from controlled field experiments where many factors contribute to the uncertainty of measurements and parameter estimates. The primary thesis of this talk is that laboratory experimentation at multiple test scales will continue to play an important and a useful role in hydrology and will provide new opportunities to improve fundamental process understanding. This knowledge will lead to increased accuracy of predictions and improved upscaling methods. However, performing such experiments pose many challenges such as acquisition of data at different observational scales and close to interfaces, capturing critical features of geologic heterogeneity, mimicking field specific pressure and temperature dependent phase interaction parameters under ambient laboratory conditions, and simulating climate drivers, among others. Through examples in multiphase systems and land/atmospheric interactions, I will show how to address some of these challenges through the design and implementation of theory-driven experiments.

  15. The European Network of Analytical and Experimental Laboratories for Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, Carmela; Funiciello, Francesca; Meredith, Phil; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Troll, Valentin R.; Willingshofer, Ernst

    2013-04-01

    Integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS).The integration of European analytical, experimental, and analogue laboratories plays a key role in this context and is the task of the EPOS Working Group 6 (WG6). Despite the presence in Europe of high performance infrastructures dedicated to geosciences, there is still limited collaboration in sharing facilities and best practices. The EPOS WG6 aims to overcome this limitation by pushing towards national and trans-national coordination, efficient use of current laboratory infrastructures, and future aggregation of facilities not yet included. This will be attained through the creation of common access and interoperability policies to foster and simplify personnel mobility. The EPOS ambition is to orchestrate European laboratory infrastructures with diverse, complementary tasks and competences into a single, but geographically distributed, infrastructure for rock physics, palaeomagnetism, analytical and experimental petrology and volcanology, and tectonic modeling. The WG6 is presently organizing its thematic core services within the EPOS distributed research infrastructure with the goal of joining the other EPOS communities (geologists, seismologists, volcanologists, etc...) and stakeholders (engineers, risk managers and other geosciences investigators) to: 1) develop tools and services to enhance visitor programs that will mutually benefit visitors and hosts (transnational access); 2) improve support and training activities to make facilities equally accessible to students, young researchers, and experienced users (training and dissemination); 3) collaborate in sharing technological and scientific know-how (transfer of knowledge); 4) optimize interoperability of distributed instrumentation by standardizing data collection, archive, and quality control standards (data preservation and interoperability); 5) implement a unified e-Infrastructure for data

  16. Recording the PHILAE Touchdown using CASSE: Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapmeyer, Martin; Faber, Claudia; Tune, Jean-Baptiste; Arnold, Walter; Witte, Lars; Schröder, Silvio; Roll, Reinhard; Chares, Bernd; Fischer, Hans-Herbert; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Seidensticker, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    The landing of Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is scheduled for November 11, 2014. Its landing feet house the triaxial acceleration sensors of CASSE (Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment) which will thus be the first sensors to be in mechanical contact with the cometary surface. It is planned that CASSE will be in listening mode to record the deceleration of the lander by the collision with the comet. The analysis of this data will not only support an engineering analysis of the landing process itself but also yield information about the mechanical properties of the comet's surface. Here, we describe a series of controlled landings of a lander model. The tests were conducted in the Landing & Mobility Test Facility (LAMA) of the DLR Institute of Space Systems in Bremen, Germany, where an industrial robot can be programmed to move landers or rovers along predefined paths and under simulated low gravity. The qualification model of the Philae landing gear was used in the tests. It consists of three legs manufactured of carbon fiber and metal joints. Attached to each leg is a foot with two soles and a mechanically driven ice screw to secure the lander on the comet. The right one of these soles, if viewed from the outside towards the lander body, houses a Brüel & Kjaer DeltaTron 4506 triaxial piezoelectric accelerometer as used on the spacecraft. Orientation of the three axes was such that the X-axis of the accelerometer points downwards while the Y and Z axes are horizontal. This somewhat uncommon orientation was necessary due to the position of the electric connector on the 4506. Data was recorded at a sampling rate of 8.2 kHz for a duration of 2 s. Touchdown measurements were conducted on three types of ground with different landing velocities. Landings with low velocities were carried out on the concrete floor of the LAMA to determine the stiffness of the landing gear based on the deceleration data measured with the accelerometer. Landings on fine

  17. LabTrove: a lightweight, web based, laboratory "blog" as a route towards a marked up record of work in a bioscience research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsted, Andrew J; Hale, Jennifer R; Frey, Jeremy G; Neylon, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    The electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) has the potential to replace the paper notebook with a marked-up digital record that can be searched and shared. However, it is a challenge to achieve these benefits without losing the usability and flexibility of traditional paper notebooks. We investigate a blog-based platform that addresses the issues associated with the development of a flexible system for recording scientific research. We chose a blog-based approach with the journal characteristics of traditional notebooks in mind, recognizing the potential for linking together procedures, materials, samples, observations, data, and analysis reports. We implemented the LabTrove blog system as a server process written in PHP, using a MySQL database to persist posts and other research objects. We incorporated a metadata framework that is both extensible and flexible while promoting consistency and structure where appropriate. Our experience thus far is that LabTrove is capable of providing a successful electronic laboratory recording system. LabTrove implements a one-item one-post system, which enables us to uniquely identify each element of the research record, such as data, samples, and protocols. This unique association between a post and a research element affords advantages for monitoring the use of materials and samples and for inspecting research processes. The combination of the one-item one-post system, consistent metadata, and full-text search provides us with a much more effective record than a paper notebook. The LabTrove approach provides a route towards reconciling the tensions and challenges that lie ahead in working towards the long-term goals for ELNs. LabTrove, an electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) system from the Smart Research Framework, based on a blog-type framework with full access control, facilitates the scientific experimental recording requirements for reproducibility, reuse, repurposing, and redeployment.

  18. LabTrove: a lightweight, web based, laboratory "blog" as a route towards a marked up record of work in a bioscience research laboratory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Milsted

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The electronic laboratory notebook (ELN has the potential to replace the paper notebook with a marked-up digital record that can be searched and shared. However, it is a challenge to achieve these benefits without losing the usability and flexibility of traditional paper notebooks. We investigate a blog-based platform that addresses the issues associated with the development of a flexible system for recording scientific research. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We chose a blog-based approach with the journal characteristics of traditional notebooks in mind, recognizing the potential for linking together procedures, materials, samples, observations, data, and analysis reports. We implemented the LabTrove blog system as a server process written in PHP, using a MySQL database to persist posts and other research objects. We incorporated a metadata framework that is both extensible and flexible while promoting consistency and structure where appropriate. Our experience thus far is that LabTrove is capable of providing a successful electronic laboratory recording system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LabTrove implements a one-item one-post system, which enables us to uniquely identify each element of the research record, such as data, samples, and protocols. This unique association between a post and a research element affords advantages for monitoring the use of materials and samples and for inspecting research processes. The combination of the one-item one-post system, consistent metadata, and full-text search provides us with a much more effective record than a paper notebook. The LabTrove approach provides a route towards reconciling the tensions and challenges that lie ahead in working towards the long-term goals for ELNs. LabTrove, an electronic laboratory notebook (ELN system from the Smart Research Framework, based on a blog-type framework with full access control, facilitates the scientific experimental recording requirements for

  19. LabTrove: A Lightweight, Web Based, Laboratory “Blog” as a Route towards a Marked Up Record of Work in a Bioscience Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milsted, Andrew J.; Hale, Jennifer R.; Frey, Jeremy G.; Neylon, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Background The electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) has the potential to replace the paper notebook with a marked-up digital record that can be searched and shared. However, it is a challenge to achieve these benefits without losing the usability and flexibility of traditional paper notebooks. We investigate a blog-based platform that addresses the issues associated with the development of a flexible system for recording scientific research. Methodology/Principal Findings We chose a blog-based approach with the journal characteristics of traditional notebooks in mind, recognizing the potential for linking together procedures, materials, samples, observations, data, and analysis reports. We implemented the LabTrove blog system as a server process written in PHP, using a MySQL database to persist posts and other research objects. We incorporated a metadata framework that is both extensible and flexible while promoting consistency and structure where appropriate. Our experience thus far is that LabTrove is capable of providing a successful electronic laboratory recording system. Conclusions/Significance LabTrove implements a one-item one-post system, which enables us to uniquely identify each element of the research record, such as data, samples, and protocols. This unique association between a post and a research element affords advantages for monitoring the use of materials and samples and for inspecting research processes. The combination of the one-item one-post system, consistent metadata, and full-text search provides us with a much more effective record than a paper notebook. The LabTrove approach provides a route towards reconciling the tensions and challenges that lie ahead in working towards the long-term goals for ELNs. LabTrove, an electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) system from the Smart Research Framework, based on a blog-type framework with full access control, facilitates the scientific experimental recording requirements for reproducibility, reuse

  20. Comparison of Laboratory Experimental Data to XBeach Numerical Model Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Ebru; Baykal, Cuneyt; Guler, Isikhan; Sogut, Erdinc

    2016-04-01

    generating data sets for testing and validation of sediment transport relationships for sand transport in the presence of waves and currents. In these series, there is no structure in the basin. The second and third series of experiments were designed to generate data sets for development of tombolos in the lee of detached 4m-long rubble mound breakwater that is 4 m from the initial shoreline. The fourth series of experiments are conducted to investigate tombolo development in the lee of a 4m-long T-head groin with the head section in the same location of the second and the third tests. The fifth series of experiments are used to investigate tombolo development in the lee of a 3-m-long rubble-mound breakwater positioned 1.5 m offshore of the initial shoreline. In this study, the data collected from the above mentioned five experiments are used to compare the results of the experimental data with XBeach numerical model results, both for the "no-structure" and "with-structure" cases regarding to sediment transport relationships in the presence of only waves and currents as well as the shoreline changes together with the detached breakwater and the T-groin. The main purpose is to investigate the similarities and differences between the laboratory experimental data behavior with XBeach numerical model outputs for these five cases. References: Baykal, C., Sogut, E., Ergin, A., Guler, I., Ozyurt, G.T., Guler, G., and Dogan, G.G. (2015). Modelling Long Term Morphological Changes with XBeach: Case Study of Kızılırmak River Mouth, Turkey, European Geosciences Union, General Assembly 2015, Vienna, Austria, 12-17 April 2015. Gravens, M.B. and Wang, P. (2007). "Data report: Laboratory testing of longshore sand transport by waves and currents; morphology change behind headland structures." Technical Report, ERDC/CHL TR-07-8, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS. Roelvink, D., Reniers, A., van Dongeren, A., van Thiel de

  1. A laboratory experimental setup for photo-absorption studies using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shastri, A; Saraswati, P; Sunanda, K

    2002-01-01

    The photophysics beamline, which is being installed at the 450 MeV Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), Indus-l, is a medium resolution beamline useful for a variety of experiments in the VUV region viz. 500-2000 A. One of the major applications of this beamline is gas-phase photo-absorption studies. An experimental set up to be used for these experiments was designed, developed and tested in our laboratory. The setup consists of a high vacuum absorption cell, 1/4 m monochromator and detection system. For the purpose of testing, xenon and tungsten continuum sources were used and absorption spectra were recorded in the UV region. This setup was used to record the absorption spectrum of a few molecules like acetone, ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in order to evaluate the performance of the experimental system which will subsequently be used with the photophysics beamline. Details of the design, fabrication and testing of the absorption cell and experimental procedures are presented in this repor...

  2. Magnetic characterisation of recording materials: design, instrumentation and experimental methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samwel, E.O.

    1995-01-01

    The progress being made in the field of magnetic recording is extremely fast. The need to keep this progress going, leads to new types of recording materials which require advanced measurement systems and measurement procedures. Furthermore, the existing measurement methods need to be reviewed as

  3. Accuracy of Laboratory Data Communication on ICU Daily Rounds Using an Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artis, Kathryn A; Dyer, Edward; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A

    2017-02-01

    Accurately communicating patient data during daily ICU rounds is critically important since data provide the basis for clinical decision making. Despite its importance, high fidelity data communication during interprofessional ICU rounds is assumed, yet unproven. We created a robust but simple methodology to measure the prevalence of inaccurately communicated (misrepresented) data and to characterize data communication failures by type. We also assessed how commonly the rounding team detected data misrepresentation and whether data communication was impacted by environmental, human, and workflow factors. Direct observation of verbalized laboratory data during daily ICU rounds compared with data within the electronic health record and on presenters' paper prerounding notes. Twenty-six-bed academic medical ICU with a well-established electronic health record. ICU rounds presenter (medical student or resident physician), interprofessional rounding team. None. During 301 observed patient presentations including 4,945 audited laboratory results, presenters used a paper prerounding tool for 94.3% of presentations but tools contained only 78% of available electronic health record laboratory data. Ninty-six percent of patient presentations included at least one laboratory misrepresentation (mean, 6.3 per patient) and 38.9% of all audited laboratory data were inaccurately communicated. Most misrepresentation events were omissions. Only 7.8% of all laboratory misrepresentations were detected. Despite a structured interprofessional rounding script and a well-established electronic health record, clinician laboratory data retrieval and communication during ICU rounds at our institution was poor, prone to omissions and inaccuracies, yet largely unrecognized by the rounding team. This highlights an important patient safety issue that is likely widely prevalent, yet underrecognized.

  4. Experimental econophysics properties and mechanisms of laboratory markets

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Ji-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Experimental Econophysics describes the method of controlled human experiments, which is developed by physicists to study some problems in economics or finance, namely, stylized facts, fluctuation phenomena, herd behavior, contrarian behavior, hedge behavior, cooperation, business cycles, partial information, risk management, and stock prediction. Experimental econophysics together with empirical econophysics are two branches of the field of econophysics. The latter one has been extensively discussed in the existing books, while the former one has been seldom touched. In this book, the author will focus on the branch of experimental econophysics. Empirical econophysics is based on the analysis of data in real markets by using some statistical tools borrowed from traditional statistical physics. Differently, inspired by the role of controlled experiments and system modelling (for computer simulations and/or analytical theory) in developing modern physics, experimental econophysics specially relies on controlle...

  5. Requirements for Real-Time Laboratory Experimentation over the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, C.; Latchman, H. A.; Gillet, D.; Crisalle, O. D.

    A prototype system based on an inverted pendulum is used to study the Quality of Service and discuss requirements of remote-experimentation systems utilized for carrying out control engineering experiments over the Internet. This class of applications involves the transmission over the network of a variety of data types with their own peculiar…

  6. An experimental study of tether reel system: A laboratory model

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Shoichi; Okamoto, Osamu; 吉村 庄市; 岡本 修

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory prototype model of a reel system has been made as the first step of an in-house hardware study of the tether system in space. The model is consisted of two main parts, i. e., a Reel Drum Driving (RDD) unit (25 kg weight) and a Power Supply/Signal Processing (PSSP) unit (32 kg weight). The tether (0.8 mm in diameter and 300 m long) consists of a Kevlar fiber core and a nylon fiber jacket. Following the preliminary functional test, a computer-controlled functional test has been car...

  7. Hypothesis Testing of Edge Organizations: Laboratory Experimentation Using the ELICIT Multiplayer Intelligence Game

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leweling, Tara A; Nissen, Mark E

    2007-01-01

    .... Building upon prior command and control (C2) research, we report the preliminary results of our extension of our campaign of computational experimentation to series of laboratory experiments using the ELICIT multiplayer intelligence game...

  8. An easy-to-build remote laboratory with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, František; Lustig, František; Dvořák, Jiří; Ožvoldová, Miroslava

    2008-07-01

    The present state of information communication technology makes it possible to devise and run computer-based e-laboratories accessible to any user with a connection to the Internet, equipped with very simple technical means and making full use of web services. Thus, the way is open for a new strategy of physics education with strongly global features, based on experiment and experimentation. We name this strategy integrated e-learning, and remote experiments across the Internet are the foundation for this strategy. We present both pedagogical and technical reasoning for the remote experiments and outline a simple system based on a server-client approach, and on web services and Java applets. We give here an outline of the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System (ISES) as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, using a paste and copy approach with typical prebuilt blocks such as a camera view, controls, graphs, displays, etc. We have set up and operate at present seven experiments, running round the clock, with more than 12 000 connections since 2005. The experiments are widely used in practical teaching of both university and secondary level physics. The recording of the detailed steps the experimentor takes during the measurement enables detailed study of the psychological aspects of running the experiments. The system is ready for a network of universities to start covering the basic set of physics experiments. In conclusion we summarize the results achieved and experiences of using remote experiments built on the ISES hardware system.

  9. An easy-to-build remote laboratory with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, Frantisek; Ozvoldova, Miroslava [Trnava University, Faculty of Pedagogy, Department of Physics, Trnava (Slovakia); Lustig, Frantisek; Dvorak, JirI [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Didactics of Physics, Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: fschauer@ft.utb.cz

    2008-07-15

    The present state of information communication technology makes it possible to devise and run computer-based e-laboratories accessible to any user with a connection to the Internet, equipped with very simple technical means and making full use of web services. Thus, the way is open for a new strategy of physics education with strongly global features, based on experiment and experimentation. We name this strategy integrated e-learning, and remote experiments across the Internet are the foundation for this strategy. We present both pedagogical and technical reasoning for the remote experiments and outline a simple system based on a server-client approach, and on web services and Java applets. We give here an outline of the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System (ISES) as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, using a paste and copy approach with typical prebuilt blocks such as a camera view, controls, graphs, displays, etc. We have set up and operate at present seven experiments, running round the clock, with more than 12 000 connections since 2005. The experiments are widely used in practical teaching of both university and secondary level physics. The recording of the detailed steps the experimentor takes during the measurement enables detailed study of the psychological aspects of running the experiments. The system is ready for a network of universities to start covering the basic set of physics experiments. In conclusion we summarize the results achieved and experiences of using remote experiments built on the ISES hardware system.

  10. Guided Inquiry in a Biochemistry Laboratory Course Improves Experimental Design Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodey, Nina M.; Talgar, Cigdem P.

    2016-01-01

    Many biochemistry laboratory courses expose students to laboratory techniques through pre-determined experiments in which students follow stepwise protocols provided by the instructor. This approach fails to provide students with sufficient opportunities to practice experimental design and critical thinking. Ten inquiry modules were created for a…

  11. Laboratory experimental investigation of heat transport in fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Claudia; Pastore, Nicola; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta Maria

    2017-01-01

    Low enthalpy geothermal energy is a renewable resource that is still underexploited nowadays in relation to its potential for development in society worldwide. Most of its applications have already been investigated, such as heating and cooling of private and public buildings, road defrosting, cooling of industrial processes, food drying systems or desalination. Geothermal power development is a long, risky and expensive process. It basically consists of successive development stages aimed at locating the resources (exploration), confirming the power generating capacity of the reservoir (confirmation) and building the power plant and associated structures (site development). Different factors intervene in influencing the length, difficulty and materials required for these phases, thereby affecting their cost. One of the major limitations related to the installation of low enthalpy geothermal power plants regards the initial development steps that are risky and the upfront capital costs that are huge. Most of the total cost of geothermal power is related to the reimbursement of invested capital and associated returns. In order to increase the optimal efficiency of installations which use groundwater as a geothermal resource, flow and heat transport dynamics in aquifers need to be well characterized. Especially in fractured rock aquifers these processes represent critical elements that are not well known. Therefore there is a tendency to oversize geothermal plants. In the literature there are very few studies on heat transport, especially on fractured media. This study is aimed at deepening the understanding of this topic through heat transport experiments in fractured networks and their interpretation. Heat transfer tests have been carried out on the experimental apparatus previously employed to perform flow and tracer transport experiments, which has been modified in order to analyze heat transport dynamics in a network of fractures. In order to model the obtained

  12. Experimental demonstration of lossy recording of information into DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Maria E.; Vasievich, Elizabeth A.; Protz, Jonathan M.

    2010-04-01

    Non-coding DNA comprises the majority of an organism's DNA and has the potential to store massive amounts of information. We hypothesize that information can be stored into non-coding DNA using a noisy mechanism comprised of thermally sensitive liposomes as sensors and measuring transport state variable information through DNA release and binding in response to stimuli. To test our hypothesis, we performed experiments that demonstrated the in situ, de novo synthesis of information-encoding DNA using natural biomaterials. Our results were compared to a lumped-parameter model designed to simulate the experiments. We found promising correlation between the DNA sequences generated by the simulations and those generated experimentally, suggesting that the in situ, de novo synthesized DNA does store recoverable information by the mechanism proposed.

  13. Digital recording as a teaching and learning method in the skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Ingebjørg; Gulbrandsen, Lise; Slettebø, Åshild; Nåden, Dagfinn

    2017-09-01

    To obtain information on how nursing students react to, think about and learn from digital recording as a learning and teaching method over time. Based on the teaching and learning philosophy of the university college, we used digital recording as a tool in our daily sessions in skills laboratory. However, most of the studies referred to in the background review had a duration of from only a few hours to a number of days. We found it valuable to design a study with a duration of two academic semesters. A descriptive and interpretative design was used. First-year bachelor-level students at the department of nursing participated in the study. Data collection was carried out by employing an 'online questionnaire'. The students answered five written, open-ended questions after each of three practical skill sessions. Kvale and Brinkmann's three levels of understanding were employed in the analysis. The students reported that digital recording affected factors such as feeling safe, secure and confident and that video recording was essential in learning and training practical skills. The use of cameras proved to be useful, as an expressive tool for peer learning because video recording enhances self-assessment, reflection, sensing, psychomotor performance and discovery learning. Digital recording enhances the student's awareness when acquiring new knowledge because it activates cognitive and emotional learning. The connection between tutoring, feedback and technology was clear. The digital recorder gives students direct and immediate feedback on their performance from the various practical procedures, and may aid in the transition from theory to practice. Students experienced more self-confidence and a feeling of safety in their performances. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. First record of Megaselia scalaris (Loew (Diptera: Phoridae infesting laboratory stocks of mantids (Parastagmatoptera tessellata, Saussure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mongiardino Koch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the first record of Megaselia scalaris (Loew infesting laboratory stocks of the praying mantis (Parastagmatoptera tessellata, Saussure. M. scalaris, the scuttle fly, is a cosmopolitan species with a broad niche as it performs as detritivore, facultative parasite, and parasitoid. M. scalaris larvae were found feeding inside adult mantids and, when development was completed, pupae were found inside the abdominal cavity and around the body. We discuss the presence of colonies of crickets bred as prey for the mantids as a facilitator of M. scalaris infestation.

  15. Application of Lean-Six Sigma Approach in a Laboratory Experimental Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashim Raza Rizvi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments are a conventional activity performed at academic institutions, government and private organizations. These experimental studies provide the basis for new inventions in the field of science and engineering. Laboratory experiments are conducted on the basis of provided guidelines, already established by different standard organizations like ASTM, AASHTO etc. This article is based on a case study in which the process of an experiment is examined on the basis of Value Stream Maps (VSM and potential improvement possibilities have been identified. After determining the potential waste, appropriate Lean tools are selected to implement and observe the improvements. The process is examined after application of the Lean tools and a comparison is performed. University laboratory environment can be improved considerably by applying Lean Tools. MUDA application reduced the total work time from 90.75 hours and 10-CD to 63.75 hours and 7-CD hence saving, 27 hours and 3-CD for one experiment. This is remarkable achievement of this application. Heijunka application provided the students equal workload and they performed explicitly better than they used to. 5-S tool provided the students the opportunity to manage the laboratory in an effective and clean way. Safety of the students is a very major concern at university laboratory environment. 5-S not only upgraded the laboratory overall performance, but it significantly raised the safety standards of the laboratory. More application of the Lean Tools should be exercised explored to have more effective and efficient university laboratory experimental environment.

  16. Laboratory Experimental System for Examination of Acoustic Emission Generated by Partial Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Salom

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the major causes of transformer failures is dielectric breakdown. Partial discharges cause gradual insulation degradation thus partial discharge activity monitoring provides transformer state insight. This paper gives an overview of common methods for partial discharges detection and source location in transformers, with a special reference to the acoustic method as an noninvasive and interference resistant method suitable for application. For laboratory testing a laboratory experimental system for partial discharge diagnostics using acoustic emission measurement was developed.

  17. The Plymouth Laboratory and the institutionalization of experimental zoology in Britain in the 1920s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlingsson, Steindór J

    2009-01-01

    The Plymouth Laboratory of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom (1884) was founded in 1888. In addition to conducting morphological and other biological research, the founders of the laboratory aimed at promoting research in experimental zoology which will be used in this paper as a synonym for e.g. experimental embryology, comparative physiology or general physiology. This dream was not fully realized until 1920. The Great War and its immediate aftermath had a positive impact on the development of the Plymouth Laboratory. The war greatly upset the operation of the Zoological Station in Naples and the ensuing crisis in its operations was closely related to the establishment of the physiological department in Plymouth in 1920. Two other key factors in the Plymouth story were the establishment of the Development Fund in 1909, which began contributing funds to the Plymouth Laboratory in 1912, and the patronage of the Cambridge zoologist George P. Bidder (1863-1954). This paper will focus on the combined influence of the Development Fund and Bidder on the development of the Plymouth Laboratory from around 1902 through the early 1920s, and the important role the laboratory played in promoting experimental zoology in Britain in the 1920s.

  18. Experimental Investigations on the Surface-Driven Capillary Flow of Aqueous Microparticle Suspensions in the Microfluidic Laboratory-On Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhadeep

    In this work, total 1592 individual leakage-free polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) microfluidic devices as laboratory-on-a-chip systems are fabricated by maskless lithography, hot embossing lithography, and direct bonding technique. Total 1094 individual Audio Video Interleave Files as experimental outputs related to the surface-driven capillary flow have been recorded and analyzed. The influence of effective viscosity, effect of surface wettability, effect of channel aspect ratio, and effect of centrifugal force on the surface-driven microfluidic flow of aqueous microparticle suspensions have been successfully and individually investigated in these laboratory-on-a-chip systems. Also, 5 micron polystyrene particles have been separated from the aqueous microparticle suspensions in the microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems of modified design with 98% separation efficiency, and 10 micron polystyrene particles have been separated with 100% separation efficiency. About the novelty of this work, the experimental investigations have been performed on the surface-driven microfluidic flow of aqueous microparticle suspensions with the investigations on the separation time in particle-size based separation mechanism to control these suspensions in the microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems. This research work contains a total of 10,112 individual experimental outputs obtained using total 30 individual instruments by author’s own hands-on completely during more than three years continuously. Author has performed the experimental investigations on both the fluid statics and fluid dynamics to develop an automated fluid machine.

  19. "They Sweat for Science": The Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Self-Experimentation in American Exercise Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andi

    2015-08-01

    In many scientific fields, the practice of self-experimentation waned over the course of the twentieth century. For exercise physiologists working today, however, the practice of self-experimentation is alive and well. This paper considers the role of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and its scientific director, D. Bruce Dill, in legitimizing the practice of self-experimentation in exercise physiology. Descriptions of self-experimentation are drawn from papers published by members of the Harvard Fatigue Lab. Attention is paid to the ethical and practical justifications for self-experimentation in both the lab and the field. Born out of the practical, immediate demands of fatigue protocols, self-experimentation performed the long-term, epistemological function of uniting physiological data across time and space, enabling researchers to contribute to a general human biology program.

  20. General Science, Ninth Grade: Theme I and Theme II. Student Laboratory Manual. Experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This ninth grade student manual was developed to be used in conjunction with some of the experimental science activities described in the teacher's guide. It contains laboratory worksheets for: (1) measurement; (2) basic energy concepts; (3) heat energy; (4) light; (5) sound; (6) electricity; and (7) present and future energy resources. Additional…

  1. Archive and laboratory embedded in the landscape: Future of the Santa Rita Experimental Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Sheridan

    2003-01-01

    The Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) is both an archive of past ecological research and a laboratory for continuing research embedded in the southern Arizona landscape. The scientific questions being asked there have changed over the last 100 years, but SRER with its monitoring stations and its legacy of repeat photography still offers a unique opportunity to study...

  2. Experimental Study of Drag Resistance using a Laboratory Scale Rotary Set-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus; Olsen, Kenneth N.; Christoffersen, Martin W.

    2003-01-01

    This work covers an experimental study of the drag resistance of different painted surfaces and simulated large-scale irregularities, viz. dry spraying, weld seams, barnacle fouling and paint remains. A laboratory scale rotary set-up was used to determine the drag resistance, and the surface...

  3. EPR (Electronic Patient Record Laboratory - Simulated Environment to Learn about a Hospital EPR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Yamamoto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The “Electronic Patient Record (EPR Laboratory” is a computer based self-learning system developed for students to acquire practical skills and knowledge required to deal with EPRs. The system is designed to supplement conventional lectures on health information systems given as part of our undergraduate curriculum. Using the Laboratory, the students may learn not only operations of EPR systems but also the subjects connected with patient information handling, including privacy, security and health information ethics. The EPR Laboratory is composed of an eLearing system and an EPR system. The learning materials are arranged in units in the eLearning system, and in each unit, the student learns the materials and the EPR operations through practice. Tests are given at each end of unit, and if a student failed a test, the system shows which questions were answered incorrectly and indicates which parts of the unit he/she should review. For this purpose, we introduced a structure to the learning materials based on an information model. In this paper, the overview of the system, the simulated environment to learn patient flow, information flow and hospital workflow, fundamental EPR operations, and structured learning materials for the test and review cycle are described.

  4. Sleep continuity is positively correlated with sleep duration in laboratory nighttime sleep recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Bender, Amy M.; Palombini, Luciana O.; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio; Ayappa, Indu; Rapoport, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Sleep duration varies widely across individuals and appears to be trait-like. Differences in the stability of underlying sleep processes may underlie this phenomenon. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we examined the relationship between sleep duration and sleep continuity in baseline polysomnography (PSG) recordings from three independently collected datasets: 1) 134 healthy controls (ages 37 ± 13 years) from the São Paulo Epidemiologic Sleep Study, who spent one night in a sleep laboratory, 2) 21 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients who were treated with continuous positive airway pressure for at least 2 months (45 ± 12 years, respiratory disturbance index <15), who spent one night in a sleep laboratory with previous experience of multiple PSG studies, and 3) 62 healthy controls (28 ± 6 years) who, as part of larger experiments, spent 2 consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. For each dataset, we used total sleep time (TST) to separate subjects into those with shorter sleep (S-TST) and those with longer sleep (L-TST). In all three datasets, survival curves of continuous sleep segments showed greater sleep continuity in L-TST than in S-TST. Correlation analyses with TST as a continuous variable corroborated the results; and the results also held true after controlling for age. There were no significant differences in baseline waking performance and sleepiness between S-TST and L-TST. In conclusion, in both healthy controls and treated OSA patients, sleep continuity was positively correlated with sleep duration. These findings suggest that S-TST may differ from L-TST in processes underlying sleep continuity, shedding new light on mechanisms underlying individual differences in sleep duration. PMID:28394943

  5. Effect of recording/playback technique and experimental method on assessments of noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celik, Emine; Persson-Waye, Kerstin; Møller, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The study investigated possible effects of recording/playback technique and experimental method on assessments of annoyance, loudness and unpleasantness. A possible effect of exposure duration was also studied. Sounds were recorded with two different techniques: monophonic and binaural (dummy...... of experiments and interpretation of results. The results also show that long-term annoyance and unpleasantness are poorly predicted by short-duration methods....

  6. 75 FR 50987 - Privacy Act System of Records; National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... Coordinator, National Veterinary Services Laboratories, Veterinary Services, APHIS, 1800 Dayton Avenue, Ames..., position, telephone number, and e-mail address; emergency contact information; and proficiency test results... laboratory submissions, purpose and reason for laboratory submissions, test methods, test equipment, test...

  7. Advanced Laboratory at Texas State University: Error Analysis, Experimental Design, and Research Experience for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrice, Carl

    2009-04-01

    Physics is an experimental science. In other words, all physical laws are based on experimentally observable phenomena. Therefore, it is important that all physics students have an understanding of the limitations of certain experimental techniques and the associated errors associated with a particular measurement. The students in the Advanced Laboratory class at Texas State perform three detailed laboratory experiments during the semester and give an oral presentation at the end of the semester on a scientific topic of their choosing. The laboratory reports are written in the format of a ``Physical Review'' journal article. The experiments are chosen to give the students a detailed background in error analysis and experimental design. For instance, the first experiment performed in the spring 2009 semester is entitled Measurement of the local acceleration due to gravity in the RFM Technology and Physics Building. The goal of this experiment is to design and construct an instrument that is to be used to measure the local gravitational field in the Physics Building to an accuracy of ±0.005 m/s^2. In addition, at least one of the experiments chosen each semester involves the use of the research facilities within the physics department (e.g., microfabrication clean room, surface science lab, thin films lab, etc.), which gives the students experience working in a research environment.

  8. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance. Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Harmon, Anna C. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-09

    This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. These data currently span the period from November 10, 2012 through May 31, 2014 and are anticipated to be extended through November 2014. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  9. Hypothesis Testing of Edge Organizations: Laboratory Experimentation using the ELICIT Multiplayer Intelligence Game

    OpenAIRE

    Leweling, Tara A.; Nissen, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    12th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium (ICCRTS), June 19-21, 2007 at the Naval War College, Newport, RI. The Edge is a relative newcomer to organizational design--one that appears especially appropriate for contemporary military operations, but also raises issues regarding comparative performance of the Edge to alternate organizational designs, including more traditional hierarchical configurations. These issues suggest that laboratory experimentation, wi...

  10. Records of the Office of the Director of Navy Laboratories: Historical Files, 1960-1980, Records Collection 3-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Deputy Chief of Naval Material for Laboratory Management, temporarily assumed the title from December 1980 through June 1982. Mr. Robert M. Hillyer ...1 CNR 2 NOSC 3 NAVHISTCEN 1 R. Hillyer 2 D. Allard i Code 13, (. Pollack 1 Library 2 NCSC 2 USMA 1 C. Dilworth 1 Department of History 1 Code 10OP, K

  11. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line...

  12. Optimizing laboratory animal stress paradigms: The H-H* experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Major advances in behavioral neuroscience have been facilitated by the development of consistent and highly reproducible experimental paradigms that have been widely adopted. In contrast, many different experimental approaches have been employed to expose laboratory mice and rats to acute versus chronic intermittent stress. An argument is advanced in this review that more consistent approaches to the design of chronic intermittent stress experiments would provide greater reproducibility of results across laboratories and greater reliability relating to various neural, endocrine, immune, genetic, and behavioral adaptations. As an example, the H-H* experimental design incorporates control, homotypic (H), and heterotypic (H*) groups and allows for comparisons across groups, where each animal is exposed to the same stressor, but that stressor has vastly different biological and behavioral effects depending upon each animal's prior stress history. Implementation of the H-H* experimental paradigm makes possible a delineation of transcriptional changes and neural, endocrine, and immune pathways that are activated in precisely defined stressor contexts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Laboratory experiment to record rate of movement of cultured benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.; Nigam, R.

    and in culture under laboratory condition, needs to be well studied. Accordingly, recently a laboratory culturing of benthic foraminifera has been initiated. As a continuation of this program, an experiment on cultured foraminifera to study the speed of movement...

  14. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Evaluation of scaling records for TASA access tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ittner, Henrik (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-07-01

    This report presents the result of a project accomplished during the summer 2009. It introduces a method to estimate the magnitude, mass distribution and cause of scaled blocks by tunnel mapping and evaluation of scaling data records. These issues are important for understanding the impact of the excavation method on the surrounding rock mass during excavation of the planned underground repository for spent nuclear fuel. The project includes mapping of the 3120 m drill and blast excavated part of the TASA access tunnel in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). In addition it includes development of a method for evaluation of the collected material together with scaling data records from the Site Characterization Database (SICADA). An interview has also been held with Erik Gabrielsson, who has been in charge of tunnel maintenance at Aespoe for many years. The mapping focused on to identify size and cause of areas with significant overbreaks in the tunnel roof. By distributing documented scaled volume in a tunnel section on several mapped overbreak areas in the same section it is possible to reconstruct the size of scaled blocks. The observed overbreak areas have been categorized in five different area types, depending on the cause of scaling: two geologically induced, one blast induced, one induced from a combination of geology and blasting and one unable to place in any category. For the calculated mass distribution the number of observations is declining with increasing block mass. 11% of the total blocks exceeding 400 Kg and 75% of the scaled blocks weights under 200 Kg. Most of the blocks are however lighter with 34% weighting 50 Kg or less. There is a relation between the mapped area type and the size distribution among the mapped overbreak areas. For example the areas caused by the end of blasting rounds are more frequently appearing then the other types but most of them are small in relation to the others The impression achieved from the tunnel mapping is

  15. Validating the Technology Acceptance Model in the Context of the Laboratory Information System-Electronic Health Record Interface System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Cesar A.

    2014-01-01

    This study represents a research validating the efficacy of Davis' Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) by pairing it with the Organizational Change Readiness Theory (OCRT) to develop another extension to the TAM, using the medical Laboratory Information Systems (LIS)--Electronic Health Records (EHR) interface as the medium. The TAM posits that it is…

  16. Experimental observation of electron-acoustic wave propagation in laboratory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Satyajit; Biswas, Subir; Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Pal, Rabindranath

    2017-06-01

    In the field of fundamental plasma waves, the direct observation of electron-acoustic wave (EAW) propagation in laboratory plasmas remains a challenging problem, mainly because of heavy damping. In the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device, the wave is observed and seen to propagate with the phase velocity ˜ 1.8 times the electron thermal velocity. A small amount of cold, drifting electrons, with the moderate bulk to cold temperature ratio ( ≈ 2 - 3), is present in the device. It plays a crucial role in reducing the damping. Our calculation reveals that the drift relaxes the stringent condition on the temperature ratio for wave destabilization. Growth rate becomes positive above a certain drift velocity even if the temperature ratio is moderate. The observed phase velocity agrees well with the theoretical estimate. Experimental realization of the mode may open up a new avenue in the EAW research.

  17. Experimental simulation of hydrodynamic flow noises in an autonomous marine laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudashev, E. B.; Kolyshnitsyn, V. A.; Marshov, V. P.; Tkachenko, V. M.; Tsvetkov, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    The spectral characteristics of turbulent pressure pulsations arising from the flow around an autonomous marine laboratory have been measured. The autonomous marine laboratory is an upgraded Dolphin buoyant device, equipped with modern digital facilities for autonomous recording, which extends the frequency range of the signals under study up to 50-60 kHz. The power spectra and cross spectra of turbulent pressure pulsations have been measured at different points of the measuring section by point pressure transducers 1.3 or 20 mm in diameter at a speed of the autonomous marine laboratory of 8-22 m/s. The measurements have revealed unexpected behavioral features of the spectra (their inflection points) at high frequencies. An analysis is performed to explain these features. In particular, it is shown that the correction function based on the more complex cross spectrum model (in comparison with the Corcos cross spectrum model) developed by Smol'yakov in 2006 predicts a monotonic (without inflection points) decrease in the spectral levels at high frequencies for reconstructed (corrected) spectra.

  18. Developing a new experimental system for an undergraduate laboratory exercise to teach theories of visuomotor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Shoko; Ushiba, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a flexible motor ability to adapt their movements to changes in the internal/external environment. For example, using arm-reaching tasks, a number of studies experimentally showed that participants adapt to a novel visuomotor environment. These results helped develop computational models of motor learning implemented in the central nervous system. Despite the importance of such experimental paradigms for exploring the mechanisms of motor learning, because of the cost and preparation time, most students are unable to participate in such experiments. Therefore, in the current study, to help students better understand motor learning theories, we developed a simple finger-reaching experimental system using commonly used laptop PC components with an open-source programming language (Processing Motor Learning Toolkit: PMLT). We found that compared to a commercially available robotic arm-reaching device, our PMLT accomplished similar learning goals (difference in the error reduction between the devices, P = 0.10). In addition, consistent with previous reports from visuomotor learning studies, the participants showed after-effects indicating an adaptation of the motor learning system. The results suggest that PMLT can serve as a new experimental system for an undergraduate laboratory exercise of motor learning theories with minimal time and cost for instructors.

  19. EPOS Multi-Scale Laboratory platform: a long-term reference tool for experimental Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Tesei, Telemaco; Funiciello, Francesca; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Rosenau, Matthias; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Lange, Otto; Calignano, Elisa; Spiers, Chris; Drury, Martin; Willingshofer, Ernst; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    will link the growing number of datasets to a centralized EPOS hub. Acknowledging the fact that we are dealing with a variety in levels of maturity regarding available data infrastructures within the different labs, we have set up an architecture that provides different scenarios for participation. Thus, research groups which do not have access to localized repositories and catalogues for sustainable storage of data and metadata can rely on shared services within the Multi-scale Laboratories community. As an example of the usage of data retrieved through the community, an experimentalist willing to decide which material is suitable for his experimental setup can get "virtual lab access" to retrieve information about material parameters with a minimum effort and then may decide to move in a specific laboratory equipped with the instruments needed. The currently participating and collaborating laboratories (Utrecht University, GFZ, Roma Tre University, INGV, NERC, CSIC-ICTJA, CNRS, LMU, UBI, ETH, CNR) warmly welcome everyone who is interested in participating at the development of this project.

  20. Scientific publications laboratory of remote experimentation - RExLab: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine De Lavechia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Information and Communication Technologies TICs are allowing day by day the improvement in all levels of the institutions, providing in a general context a greater communication, and enabling the creation of new knowledge. And with the emergence of the Remote Experimentation Laboratory - RExLab, which allows the student to perform experiments, makes possible the construction of new knowledge. Objective: Identify and present the NICT (New Information and Communication Technologies studied in the laboratory and explained in the publications of the members linked RExLab. Methodology: In this article a systematic research was done on the articles published in RExLab, and located at the Federal University of Santa Catarina, Araranguá. And the articles with the highest citations, the NICT used in each research were presented. Result: It was possible to identify that a great majority of articles published was related to questions of remote experimentation through the usage of mobile devices, and today it allows almost all the students to have a great access to it. Conclusion: It was possible to analyze that the greatest objective of published research is the achievement of democratization and the dissemination of knowledge through their experiments. These are projects that can be applied at all levels of education and also in public and private schools.With this, there are many ICTs that are inserted in the projects and that they have as purpose the aid to the education.

  1. Cold Climate Foundation Retrofit Experimental Hygrothermal Performance: Cloquet Residential Research Facility Laboratory Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Harmon, Anna C. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Thermal and moisture problems in existing basements create a unique challenge because the exterior face of the wall is not easily or inexpensively accessible. This approach addresses thermal and moisture management from the interior face of the wall without disturbing the exterior soil and landscaping. the interior and exterior environments. This approach has the potential for improving durability, comfort, and indoor air quality. This project was funded jointly by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL focused on developing a full basement wall system experimental database to enable others to validate hygrothermal simulation codes. NREL focused on testing the moisture durability of practical basement wall interior insulation retrofit solutions for cold climates. The project has produced a physically credible and reliable long-term hygrothermal performance database for retrofit foundation wall insulation systems in zone 6 and 7 climates that are fully compliant with the performance criteria in the 2009 Minnesota Energy Code. The experimental data were configured into a standard format that can be published online and that is compatible with standard commercially available spreadsheet and database software.

  2. Randomized block experimental designs can increase the power and reproducibility of laboratory animal experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festing, Michael F W

    2014-01-01

    Randomized block experimental designs have been widely used in agricultural and industrial research for many decades. Usually they are more powerful, have higher external validity, are less subject to bias, and produce more reproducible results than the completely randomized designs typically used in research involving laboratory animals. Reproducibility can be further increased by using time as a blocking factor. These benefits can be achieved at no extra cost. A small experiment investigating the effect of an antioxidant on the activity of a liver enzyme in four inbred mouse strains, which had two replications (blocks) separated by a period of two months, illustrates this approach. The widespread failure to use these designs more widely in research involving laboratory animals has probably led to a substantial waste of animals, money, and scientific resources and slowed down the development of new treatments for human and animal diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field Scoring Record Number 673 (Naval Research Laboratories)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overbay, Larry; Robitaille, George

    2005-01-01

    ...) utilizing the APG standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Open Field. Scoring Records have been coordinate by Larry Overbay and the Standardized UXO Technology Demonstration Site Scoring Committee...

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  5. Guide for Keeping Laboratory Records: Do's & Don't | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    it is important that the scientist captures his/her ideas/conception of an invention in written format. Laboratory notebooks, if used properly, can serve as the basis of conception for proving inventorship.

  6. An Experimental Study of Laboratory Hybrid Power System with the Hydrogen Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Minarik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents very small laboratory hybrid photovoltaic-hydrogen power system. The system was primarily assembled to verify the operability of the control algorithms and practical deployment of available commercial hydrogen technologies that are directly usable for storage of electricity produced from renewable energy sources in a small island system. This energetic system was installed and tested in Laboratory of fuel cells that is located in the university campus of VSB-Technical University of Ostrava. The energetic system consists of several basic components: a photovoltaic field, accumulators bank, water commercial electrolyzer and compact fuel cell system. The weather conditions recorded in two different weeks as model weather and solar conditions are used as case studies to test the energetic system and the results for two different cases are compared each other. The results show and illustrate selected behaviour curves of the power system and also average energy storage efficiency for accumulation subsystem based on hydrogen technologies or at the energetic system embedded components. On the basis of real measurement and its evaluation the ideal parameters of the photovoltaic field were calculated as well as the hydrogen technologies for supposed purpose and the power requirements.

  7. Presentation of clinical laboratory results: an experimental comparison of four visualization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torsvik, Torbjørn; Lillebo, Børge; Mikkelsen, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate how clinical chemistry test results were assessed by volunteers when presented with four different visualization techniques. A total of 20 medical students reviewed quantitative test results from 4 patients using 4 different visualization techniques in a balanced, crossover experiment. The laboratory data represented relevant patient categories, including simple, emergency, chronic and complex patients. Participants answered questions about trend, overall levels and covariation of test results. Answers and assessment times were recorded and participants were interviewed on their preference of visualization technique. Assessment of results and the time used varied between visualization techniques. With sparklines and relative multigraphs participants made faster assessments. With relative multigraphs participants identified more covarying test results. With absolute multigraphs participants found more trends. With sparklines participants more often assessed laboratory results to be within reference ranges. Different visualization techniques were preferred for the four different patient categories. No participant preferred absolute multigraphs for any patient. Assessments of clinical chemistry test results were influenced by how they were presented. Importantly though, this association depended on the complexity of the result sets, and none of the visualization techniques appeared to be ideal in all settings. Sparklines and relative multigraphs seem to be favorable techniques for presenting complex long-term clinical chemistry test results, while tables seem to suffice for simpler result sets.

  8. Performance of the Opalinus Clay under thermal loading: experimental results from Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gens, A. [Universitat Politència de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) GmbH, Braunschweig (Germany); Gaus, I. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); and others

    2017-04-15

    The paper presents an overview of the behaviour of Opalinus Clay under thermal loading as observed in three in situ heating tests performed in the Mont Terri rock laboratory: HE-B, HE-D and HE-E. The three tests are summarily described; they encompass a broad range of test layouts and experimental conditions. Afterwards, the following topics are examined: determination of thermal conductivity, thermally-induced pore pressure generation and thermally-induced mechanical effects. The mechanisms underlying pore pressure generation and dissipation are discussed in detail and the relationship between rock damage and thermal loading is examined using an additional in situ test: SE-H. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the various thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) interactions identified in the heating tests. (authors)

  9. A State-of-the-Art Experimental Laboratory for Cloud and Cloud-Aerosol Interaction Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremaux, Charles M.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2011-01-01

    The state of the art for predicting climate changes due to increasing greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere with high accuracy is problematic. Confidence intervals on current long-term predictions (on the order of 100 years) are so large that the ability to make informed decisions with regard to optimum strategies for mitigating both the causes of climate change and its effects is in doubt. There is ample evidence in the literature that large sources of uncertainty in current climate models are various aerosol effects. One approach to furthering discovery as well as modeling, and verification and validation (V&V) for cloud-aerosol interactions is use of a large "cloud chamber" in a complimentary role to in-situ and remote sensing measurement approaches. Reproducing all of the complex interactions is not feasible, but it is suggested that the physics of certain key processes can be established in a laboratory setting so that relevant fluid-dynamic and cloud-aerosol phenomena can be experimentally simulated and studied in a controlled environment. This report presents a high-level argument for significantly improved laboratory capability, and is meant to serve as a starting point for stimulating discussion within the climate science and other interested communities.

  10. Laboratory model of the cardiovascular system for experimental demonstration of pulse wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Nestorović, Zorica; Djurić, Biljana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Žikić, Dejan

    2017-03-01

    The velocity by which a disturbance moves through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is among the key parameters in hemodynamics. Investigation of wave propagation through the fluid-filled elastic tube has a great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through the cardiovascular system. Here, we present a laboratory model of the cardiovascular system. We have designed an experimental setup which can help medical and nursing students to properly learn and understand basic fluid hemodynamic principles, pulse wave and the phenomenon of wave propagation in blood vessels. Demonstration of wave propagation allowed a real time observation of the formation of compression and expansion waves by students, thus enabling them to better understand the difference between the two waves, and also to measure the pulse wave velocity for different fluid viscosities. The laboratory model of the cardiovascular system could be useful as an active learning methodology and a complementary tool for understanding basic principles of hemodynamics.

  11. Laboratory core flooding experimental systems for CO2 geosequestration: An updated review over the past decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankun Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 geosequestration in deep saline aquifers has been currently deemed as a preferable and practicable mitigation means for reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs emissions to the atmosphere, as deep saline aquifers can offer the greatest potential from a capacity point of view. Hence, research on core-scale CO2/brine multiphase migration processes is of great significance for precisely estimating storage efficiency, ensuring storage security, and predicting the long-term effects of the sequestered CO2 in subsurface saline aquifers. This review article initially presents a brief description of the essential aspects of CO2 subsurface transport and geological trapping mechanisms, and then outlines the state-of-the-art laboratory core flooding experimental apparatus that has been adopted for simulating CO2 injection and migration processes in the literature over the past decade. Finally, a summary of the characteristics, components and applications of publicly reported core flooding equipment as well as major research gaps and areas in need of further study are given in relevance to laboratory-scale core flooding experiments in CO2 geosequestration under reservoir conditions.

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, Ruben P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, Wendy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-04

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  13. Comparison of electronic laboratory reports, administrative claims, and electronic health record data for acute viral hepatitis surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Dicker, Joshua; Klompas, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Public health surveillance systems for acute hepatitis are limited: clinician reporting is insensitive and electronic laboratory reporting is nonspecific. Insurance claims and electronic health records are potential alternative sources. To compare the utility of laboratory data, diagnosis codes, and electronic health record combination data (current and prior viral hepatitis studies, liver function tests, and diagnosis codes) for acute hepatitis A and B surveillance. Retrospective chart review. Massachusetts ambulatory practice serving 350 000 patients per year. All patients seen between 1990 and 2008. Sensitivity and positive predictive value of immunoglobulin M (IgM), International Classification of Disease-Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis codes, and combination electronic health record data for acute hepatitis A and B. During the study period, there were 111 patients with positive hepatitis A IgMs, 154 with acute hepatitis A ICD-9 codes, and 77 with positive IgM and elevated liver function tests. On review, 79 cases were confirmed. Sensitivity and positive predictive value were 100% and 71% (95% confidence interval, 62%-79%) for IgM, 94% (92%-100%) and 48% (40%-56%) for ICD-9 codes and 97% (92%-100%) and 100% (96%-100%) for combination electronic health record data. There were 14 patients with positive hepatitis B core IgMs, 2564 with acute hepatitis B ICD-9 codes, and 125 with suggestive combinations of electronic health record data. Acute hepatitis B was confirmed in 122 patients. Sensitivity and positive predictive value were 9.4% (5.2%-16%) and 86% (60%-98%) for hepatitis B core IgM, 73% (65%-80%) and 3.6% (2.9%-4.4%) for ICD-9 codes, and 96% (91%-99%) and 98% (94%-99%) for electronic health record data. Laboratory surveillance using IgM tests overestimates the burden of acute hepatitis A and underestimates the burden of acute hepatitis B. Claims data are subject to many false positives. Electronic health record data are both sensitive and predictive

  14. Environmental epidemiology applied to urban atmospheric pollution: a contribution from the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory (LPAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Paulo Afonso de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic investigation on the effects of human exposure to environmental pollution using scientific methodology only began in the 20th century as a consequence of several environmental accidents followed by an unexpected mortality increase above expected mortality and as a result of observational epidemiological and toxicological studies conducted on animals in developed countries. This article reports the experience of the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory at the School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, concerning the respiratory system and pathophysiological mechanisms involved in responses to exposure to pollution using toxicological and experimental procedures, complemented by observational epidemiological studies conducted in the city of São Paulo. It also describes these epidemiological studies, pointing out that air pollution is harmful to public health, not only among susceptible groups but also in the general population, even when the concentration of pollutants is below the limits set by environmental legislation. The study provides valuable information to support the political and economic decision-making processes aimed at preserving the environment and enhancing quality of life.

  15. Development of Laboratory Experimental System to Clarify Solar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism with TES Microcalorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Akamatsu, H.; Ezoe, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Kanda, T.; Ishida, T.; Tanuma, H.; Ohashi, H.; Shinozaki, K.; Mitsuda, K.

    2012-06-01

    Significant fraction of the cosmic diffuse soft X-ray emission (0.1-1 keV) is caused by the Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) process between the solar wind ion (C q+, N q+, O q+ etc.) and the interplanetary neutral matter. It is difficult to identify spectral features of SWCX with the spectral resolution of existing X-ray astronomy satellites. We are developing a laboratory experimental system with transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeters, in order to clarify the SWCX mechanism. This experiment is designed to measure Charge eXchange (CX) X-rays using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) that generates multi-charged ions. Emission lines (OVIII: 2p→1s; 654 eV) by CX between O8+ and neutral He atom is aimed to be measured with energy resolution better than 10 eV. The TES microcalorimeter is cooled by a double-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (DADR), however, our TES microcalorimeter are not working potentially due to magnetic field contamination. This paper reports our experimental system, present results, and future prospects.

  16. A Flexible Experimental Laboratory for Distributed Generation Networks Based on Power Inverters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Miret

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the recently deregulated electricity market, distributed generation based on renewable sources is becoming more and more relevant. In this area, two main distributed scenarios are focusing the attention of recent research: grid-connected mode, where the generation sources are connected to a grid mainly supplied by big power plants, and islanded mode, where the distributed sources, energy storage devices, and loads compose an autonomous entity that in its general form can be named a microgrid. To conduct a successful research in these two scenarios, it is essential to have a flexible experimental setup. This work deals with the description of a real laboratory setup composed of four nodes that can emulate both scenarios of a distributed generation network. A comprehensive description of the hardware and software setup will be done, focusing especially in the dual-core DSP used for control purposes, which is next to the industry standards and able to emulate real complexities. A complete experimental section will show the main features of the system.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle Aeroheating in AEDC Hypervelocity Tunnel 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Collier, Arnold S.

    2017-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the aeroheating environment of the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle was conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Complex Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9. Testing was performed on a 6-in. (0.1524 m) diameter model in the tunnel's Mach 8 and Mach 10 nozzles at free stream Reynolds numbers from 4.1×10*exp 6)/ft to 49×10(exp 6)/ft and from 1.2×10(exp 6)/ft to 19×10(exp 6)/ft, respectively, using pure nitrogen test gas. These conditions spanned the boundary layer flow regimes from completely laminar to fully turbulent flow over the entire forebody. A computational fluid dynamics study was conducted in support of the wind tunnel testing. Laminar and turbulent solutions were generated for all wind tunnel test conditions and comparisons of predicted heating distributions were performed with the data. These comparisons showed agreement for most cases to within the estimated +/-12% experimental uncertainty margin for fully-laminar or fully-turbulent conditions, while transitional heating data were bounded by laminar and turbulent predictions. These results helped to define uncertainty margins on the use of computational tools for vehicle design.

  18. Idaho National Laboratory PCB Annual Document Log and Annual Records Report for Calendar Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    no name on report

    2014-06-01

    The requirements for the reporting of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-related activities are found in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 761 Subpart J, "General Records and Reports." The PCB Annual Document Log is a detailed record of the PCB waste handling activities at the facility. The facility must prepare it each year by July 1 and maintain it at the facility for at least 3 years after the facility ceases using or storing PCBs and PCB items. While submittal of the PCB Annual Document Log to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is not required by regulation, EPA has verbally requested in telephone conversations that this report be submitted to them on an annual basis. The Annual Document Log section of this report meets the requirements of 40 CFR 761.180(a)(2), as applicable, while the Annual Records section meets the requirement of 40 CFR 761.180(a)(1).

  19. Preferred Names, Preferred Pronouns, and Gender Identity in the Electronic Medical Record and Laboratory Information System: Is Pathology Ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imborek, Katherine L; Nisly, Nicole L; Hesseltine, Michael J; Grienke, Jana; Zikmund, Todd A; Dreyer, Nicholas R; Blau, John L; Hightower, Maia; Humble, Robert M; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2017-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) and laboratory information systems (LISs) commonly utilize patient identifiers such as legal name, sex, medical record number, and date of birth. There have been recommendations from some EMR working groups (e.g., the World Professional Association for Transgender Health) to include preferred name, pronoun preference, assigned sex at birth, and gender identity in the EMR. These practices are currently uncommon in the United States. There has been little published on the potential impact of these changes on pathology and LISs. We review the available literature and guidelines on the use of preferred name and gender identity on pathology, including data on changes in laboratory testing following gender transition treatments. We also describe pathology and clinical laboratory challenges in the implementation of preferred name at our institution. Preferred name, pronoun preference, and gender identity have the most immediate impact on the areas of pathology with direct patient contact such as phlebotomy and transfusion medicine, both in terms of interaction with patients and policies for patient identification. Gender identity affects the regulation and policies within transfusion medicine including blood donor risk assessment and eligibility. There are limited studies on the impact of gender transition treatments on laboratory tests, but multiple studies have demonstrated complex changes in chemistry and hematology tests. A broader challenge is that, even as EMRs add functionality, pathology computer systems (e.g., LIS, middleware, reference laboratory, and outreach interfaces) may not have functionality to store or display preferred name and gender identity. Implementation of preferred name, pronoun preference, and gender identity presents multiple challenges and opportunities for pathology.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory PCB Annual Document Log and Annual Records Report for calendar year 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, Deborah L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The requirements for the reporting of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-related activities are found in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 761 Subpart J, "General Records and Reports." The PCB Annual Document Log is a detailed record of the PCB waste handling activities at the facility. The facility must prepare it each year by July 1 and maintain it at the facility for at least 3 years after the facility ceases using or storing PCBs and PCB items. While submittal of the PCB Annual Document Log to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is not required by regulation, EPA has verbally requested in telephone conversations that this report be submitted to them on an annual basis. The Annual Records are not required to be submitted to EPA and are not considered to be part of the Annual Document Log, but are included to provide the complete disposition history or status of all PCB activities during the year. The Annual Document Log section of this report (Section 2.0) meets the requirements of 40 CFR 761.180(a)(2), as applicable, while the Annual Records section (Section 3.0) meets the requirement of 40 CFR 761.180(a)(1).

  1. Evaluation of the correctness of a 3D recording device for mandibular functional movement in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian; Sui, Huaxin; Yang, Huifang; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: To quantitatively evaluate the correctness of a computer binocular vision mandibular 3D trajectory recording device. Methods: A specialized target shooting paper was neatly pasted on a high-precision three-axis electronic translation stage. A linear one-way movement was set at a speed of 1 mm/s along the X, Y, and Z directions for a distance of 10 mm each. The coordinates of 3 pre-set target points were recorded at the start and end by a computer binocular vision system with a frequency of 10 FPS and stored in TXT format. The TXT files were imported to Imageware 13.0, and the straight-line lengths between the start and end were measured. The mean difference between each length and 10 mm were calculated to evaluate the correctness of the distance measurement. The linear movement and recording procedure was repeated 3 times, but the speed was changed to 5 mm/s to simulate the human mandibular movement speed. The trajectories of the 3 target points were fitted and the vertical dimensions from each track point to the fitted lines were measured. The mean difference was calculated between the vertical dimensions and 0 mm to evaluate the correctness of recording trajectories using this device. Results: The correctness of distance measurements of the points 1, 2, and 3 were 0.06 mm, 0.16 mm, and 0.08 mm, respectively. The correctness of the trajectories of the points 1, 2, and 3 were 0.11 mm, 0.11 mm, and 0.10 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Using this computer binocular vision device, the correctness of the recorded linear trajectories in the range of 10 mm was better than 0.20 mm.

  2. Amphibole reaction rims as a record of pre-eruptive magmatic heating: An experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, S. H.; Larsen, J.; Coombs, Michelle L.; Dunn, A.; Hayden, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    Magmatic minerals record the pre-eruptive timescales of magma ascent and mixing in crustal reservoirs and conduits. Investigations of the mineral records of magmatic processes are fundamental to our understanding of what controls eruption style, as ascent rates and magma mixing processes are well known to control and/or trigger potentially hazardous explosive eruptions. Thus, amphibole reaction rims are often used to infer pre-eruptive magma dynamics, and in particular to estimate magma ascent rates. However, while several experimental studies have investigated amphibole destabilization during decompression, only two investigated thermal destabilization relevant to magma mixing processes. This study examines amphibole decomposition experimentally through isobaric heating of magnesio-hornblende phenocrysts within a natural high-silica andesite glass. The experiments first equilibrated for 24 h at 870 °C and 140 MPa at H2O-saturated conditions and ƒO2 ∼ Re–ReO prior to rapid heating to 880, 900, or 920 °C and hold times of 3–48 h. At 920 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 17 μm after 3 h, to 55 μm after 12 h, and became pseudomorphs after longer durations. At 900 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 7 μm after 3 h, to 80 μm after 24 h, to pseudomorphs after longer durations. At 880 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 7 μm after 3 h, to 18 μm after 36 h, to pseudomorphs after 48 h. Reaction rim microlites vary from 5–16 μm in size, with no systematic relationship between crystal size and the duration or magnitude of heating. Time-averaged rim microlite growth rates decrease steadily with increasing experimental duration (from  to 3.1 to ). Time-averaged microlite nucleation rates also decrease with increasing experimental duration (from  to 5.3 mm−3 s−1). There is no systematic relationship between time-averaged growth or nucleation rates and the magnitude of the heating step. Ortho- and clinopyroxene together constitute 57–90

  3. Studying Exchange with Less-mobile Porosity at the Laboratory Scale: Experimentation and Multiphysics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    MahmoodPoorDehkordy, F.; House, B.; Briggs, M. A.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Lane, J. W., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Exchange between mobile and less-mobile porosity zones in heterogeneous porous media can impact redox zonation and contaminant transport in the hyporheic zone and near-stream aquifer. Field and laboratory-scale experiments have shown that pairing geoeletrical methods with fluid sampling enables the quantification of paired more- and less-mobile porosity, including less-mobile zones dominated by advection or diffusion. Specifically, geoelectrical methods are sensitive to solute tracer dynamics throughout the total porosity of the porous medium whereas fluid sampling is more sensitive to the more-mobile domain. Simultaneous measurements of the combination of bulk and fluid conductivity improves quantification of less-mobile solute dynamics compared to traditional fluid-only sampling approaches that rely on fluid conductivity alone. Upon injection of a tracer into the porous medium, exchange of solute between more- and less-mobile zones causes a lag (hysteresis) between the change in the bulk conductivity of the sample and fluid conductivity in the more-mobile zone. In this study, we used controlled laboratory column experiments, combined with numerical modeling, to explore the hysteretic relationship between bulk conductivity and fluid conductivity in sandy sediments with embedded cobbles. These column results inform the design and interpretation of field experiments in glacial kettle ponds with similar bed material. A plastic disk placed within the sand column normal to flow direction was used to represent the effect of embedded cobbles. A hydraulic shadow, or dead zone, formed downgradient of the plastic disk and causing previously well-connected sand pores to function as less-mobile porosity within the column. Experiments were run at varied pressure gradients to assess the response of natural fluid flux perturbations on less-mobile dead zones dominated by advective exchange. The experimental configuration was also modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics to simulate coupled

  4. Teaching Fraunhofer diffraction via experimental and simulated images in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, Alba; Vidal, Josep; Escalera, Juan Carlos; Lizana, Angel; Campos, Juan; Yzuel, Maria

    2012-10-01

    Diffraction is an important phenomenon introduced to Physics university students in a subject of Fundamentals of Optics. In addition, in the Physics Degree syllabus of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, there is an elective subject in Applied Optics. In this subject, diverse diffraction concepts are discussed in-depth from different points of view: theory, experiments in the laboratory and computing exercises. In this work, we have focused on the process of teaching Fraunhofer diffraction through laboratory training. Our approach involves students working in small groups. They visualize and acquire some important diffraction patterns with a CCD camera, such as those produced by a slit, a circular aperture or a grating. First, each group calibrates the CCD camera, that is to say, they obtain the relation between the distances in the diffraction plane in millimeters and in the computer screen in pixels. Afterwards, they measure the significant distances in the diffraction patterns and using the appropriate diffraction formalism, they calculate the size of the analyzed apertures. Concomitantly, students grasp the convolution theorem in the Fourier domain by analyzing the diffraction of 2-D gratings of elemental apertures. Finally, the learners use a specific software to simulate diffraction patterns of different apertures. They can control several parameters: shape, size and number of apertures, 1-D or 2-D gratings, wavelength, focal lens or pixel size.Therefore, the program allows them to reproduce the images obtained experimentally, and generate others by changingcertain parameters. This software has been created in our research group, and it is freely distributed to the students in order to help their learning of diffraction. We have observed that these hands on experiments help students to consolidate their theoretical knowledge of diffraction in a pedagogical and stimulating learning process.

  5. Evolutionary experimentation through hybridization under laboratory condition in Drosophila: Evidence for Recombinational Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Nallur B

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila nasuta nasuta (2n = 8 and Drosophila nasuta albomicans (2n = 6 are a pair of sibling allopatric chromosomal cross-fertile races of the nasuta subgroup of immigrans species group of Drosophila. Interracial hybridization between these two races has given rise to new karyotypic strains called Cytorace 1 and Cytorace 2 (first phase. Further hybridization between Thailand strain of D. n. albomicans and D. n. nasuta of Coorg strain has resulted in the evolution of two more Cytoraces, namely Cytorace 3 and Cytorace 4 (second phase. The third phase Cytoraces (Cytorace 5 to Cytorace 16 have evolved through interracial hybridization among first, second phase Cytoraces along with parental races. Each of these Cytoraces is composed of recombined genomes of the parental races. Here, we have made an attempt to systematically assess the impact of hybridization on karyotypes, morphometric and life history traits in all 16 Cytoraces. Results The results reveal that in most cases, the newly evolved Cytoraces, with different chromosome constitutions, exhibit decreased body size, better fitness and live longer than their parents. Particularly, Cytorace 5, 6 and 8 have evolved with very much higher range values of quantitative traits than the parents and other Cytoraces, which suggests the role of transgressive segregation in the evolution of these Cytoraces. Conclusion Thus, the rapid divergence recorded in the chromosomes, karyotypes, body size and fitness traits of Cytoraces exhibit the early event of recombinational raciation / speciation in the evolution of the Cytoraces under laboratory conditions.

  6. Deep-focus earthquake analogs recorded at high pressure and temperature in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubnel, Alexandre; Brunet, Fabrice; Hilairet, Nadège; Gasc, Julien; Wang, Yanbin; Green, Harry W

    2013-09-20

    Phase transformations of metastable olivine might trigger deep-focus earthquakes (400 to 700 kilometers) in cold subducting lithosphere. To explore the feasibility of this mechanism, we performed laboratory deformation experiments on germanium olivine (Mg2GeO4) under differential stress at high pressure (P = 2 to 5 gigapascals) and within a narrow temperature range (T = 1000 to 1250 kelvin). We found that fractures nucleate at the onset of the olivine-to-spinel transition. These fractures propagate dynamically (at a nonnegligible fraction of the shear wave velocity) so that intense acoustic emissions are generated. Similar to deep-focus earthquakes, these acoustic emissions arise from pure shear sources and obey the Gutenberg-Richter law without following Omori's law. Microstructural observations prove that dynamic weakening likely involves superplasticity of the nanocrystalline spinel reaction product at seismic strain rates.

  7. Standard-based comprehensive detection of adverse drug reaction signals from nursing statements and laboratory results in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suehyun; Choi, Jiyeob; Kim, Hun-Sung; Kim, Grace Juyun; Lee, Kye Hwa; Park, Chan Hee; Han, Jongsoo; Yoon, Dukyong; Park, Man Young; Park, Rae Woong; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Ju Han

    2017-07-01

    We propose 2 Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities-enabled pharmacovigilance algorithms, MetaLAB and MetaNurse, powered by a per-year meta-analysis technique and improved subject sampling strategy. This study developed 2 novel algorithms, MetaLAB for laboratory abnormalities and MetaNurse for standard nursing statements, as significantly improved versions of our previous electronic health record (EHR)-based pharmacovigilance method, called CLEAR. Adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from 117 laboratory abnormalities and 1357 standard nursing statements for all precautionary drugs ( n   = 101) were comprehensively detected and validated against SIDER (Side Effect Resource) by MetaLAB and MetaNurse against 11 817 and 76 457 drug-ADR pairs, respectively. We demonstrate that MetaLAB (area under the curve, AUC = 0.61 ± 0.18) outperformed CLEAR (AUC = 0.55 ± 0.06) when we applied the same 470 drug-event pairs as the gold standard, as in our previous research. Receiver operating characteristic curves for 101 precautionary terms in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms were obtained for MetaLAB and MetaNurse (0.69 ± 0.11; 0.62 ± 0.07), which complemented each other in terms of ADR signal coverage. Novel ADR signals discovered by MetaLAB and MetaNurse were successfully validated against spontaneous reports in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database. The present study demonstrates the symbiosis of laboratory test results and nursing statements for ADR signal detection in terms of their system organ class coverage and performance profiles. Systematic discovery and evaluation of the wide spectrum of ADR signals using standard-based observational electronic health record data across many institutions will affect drug development and use, as well as postmarketing surveillance and regulation.

  8. Experimental forests, ranges, and watersheds in the Northern Rocky Mountains: A compendium of outdoor laboratories in Utah, Idaho, and Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman C. Schmidt; Judy L. Friede

    1996-01-01

    This is a compendium of experimental forests, ranges, watersheds, and other outdoor laboratories, formally established by the Forest Service and Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the universities in Utah, Idaho, and Montana. The purposes, histories, natural resource bases, data bases, past and current studies, locations, and who...

  9. Experimental Manpower Laboratory for Corrections Phase III. Final Report for the Period September, 1971 to February, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehabilitation Research Foundation, Elmore, AL.

    This report covers the objectives, procedures, and findings of four major projects directed by the Experimental Manpower Laboratory for Correction (EMLC): (1) Token Economy (Ecology) Project, (2) Correctional Officer Training Project, (3) Longitudinal Follow-Up Studies, and (4) Information Dissemination and Utilization Project. EMLC grew out of an…

  10. Development of an Interdisciplinary Experimental Series for the Laboratory Courses of Cell and Molecular Biology and Advance Inorganic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Montserrat Rabago; McAllister, Robert; Newkirk, Kiera; Basing, Alexander; Wang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    An interdisciplinary approach to education has become more important in the development of science and technology, which requires universities to have graduates with broad knowledge and skills and to apply these skills in solving real-world problems. An interdisciplinary experimental series has been developed for the laboratories in cell and…

  11. Establishment of macrocyclic lactone resistant Dirofilaria immitis isolates in experimentally infected laboratory dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulaski, Cassan N; Malone, John B; Bourguinat, Catherine; Prichard, Roger; Geary, Timothy; Ward, Danielle; Klei, Thomas R; Guidry, Tal; Smith, George 'Bud'; Delcambre, Brooke; Bova, Jonathan; Pepping, Jenny; Carmichael, James; Schenker, Rudolf; Pariaut, Romain

    2014-11-07

    Strains of Dirofilaria immitis suspected of lack of efficacy (LOE) to macrocyclic lactone (ML) preventive drugs have been increasingly reported in dogs by practicing veterinarians since 2005 in the Lower Mississippi Delta region. If proven, and not controlled in the early stages, the emergence of ML drug resistance threatens to become a widespread problem in the US that may limit the effectiveness of current preventive drug treatment methods. To validate practice reports, a statewide survey of Louisiana veterinarians was done to define the extent of the problem and identify focal 'hotspots' of reported ML LOEs using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) methods. The present study then utilized microfilariae (Mf) from two canine field cases from different state locations that fit criteria for a high index of suspicion of LOE against heartworms by ML drugs. Blood containing Mf from the canine field cases was used to infect and produce L3 in Aedes aegypti for experimental infection of two groups of dogs, each of which contained two laboratory dogs, one treated with prophylactic ivermectin (12 μg/kg) monthly for 6 months at twice the label dose (6 μg/kg), and one untreated control. Both treated and untreated dogs from Group I and Group II developed patent D. immitis infections by 218 DPI and 189 DPI, respectively, as evidenced by a positive occult heartworm antigen test and microfilaremia by the Knott's test. Mf counts gradually increased post-patency in test and control dogs. Infective larvae raised from microfilariae from the treated Group I dog were used to successfully establish a second generation isolate, confirming heritability of resistance in the face of a monthly ivermectin challenge dose of 24 μg/kg, given monthly for 3 months. These experimental infection studies provide in vivo evidence of the existence of ML drug resistance in dogs infected by D. immitis L3 from suspect field LOE cases in the Lower Mississippi Delta. Results encourage further work on

  12. An experimental approach for science laboratories in the contest of science of primary education degree course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Bozzo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available International literature in science education has shown the importance of introducing scientific studies in primary school, in order to give pupils competences and skills necessary for their life. Consequently, prospective primary teachers need to improve their scientific knowledge and to plan new experimental activities for primary school students. In this context, we have planned an educational learning path for prospective primary teachers, focused on specific conceptual knows of kinematics. The proposed activities are based on an empirical approach, avoiding in the first step any formal introduction of the observed phenomena, which could be difficult to understand, especially for students of science of primary education degree course. In this context, the educational technologies have given a fundamental support, since they have offered to prospective teachers the possibility to focus their attention only on the involved physics concepts and principles.Un approccio sperimentale per i laboratori scientifici nei corsi di laurea in Scienze della Formazione PrimariaStudi recenti hanno evidenziato la necessità di introdurre le discipline scientifiche sin dalla scuola primaria, per consentire alle future generazioni di vivere in modo critico e consapevole nel mondo reale. I futuri insegnanti hanno, quindi, la necessità di approfondire le loro conoscenze in ambito scientifico e di progettare valide attività laboratoriali per gli alunni di scuola primaria. In questo contesto si inserisce la nostra azione formativa rivolta agli studenti di Scienze della Formazione Primaria (SFP, mirata ad affrontare alcune difficoltà nell’apprendimento della Fisica, ben note in letteratura. L’attività didattica proposta è basata sull’osservazione diretta dei fenomeni fisici, evitando, nella fase iniziale, ogni genere di introduzione formale che possa risultare di difficile comprensione per gli studenti di SFP. Il supporto delle tecnologie didattiche ha

  13. Inter-laboratory evaluation of instrument platforms and experimental workflows for quantitative accuracy and reproducibility assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Percy, Andrew J.; Tamura-Wells, Jessica; Albar, Juan Pablo; Aloria, Kerman; Amirkhani, Ardeshir; Araujo, Gabriel D T; Arizmendi, Jesus M.; Blanco, Francisco J.; Canals, Francesc; Cho, Jin Young; Colomé-Calls, Núria; Corrales, Fernando J.; Domont, Gilberto; Espadas, Guadalupe; Fernandez-Puente, Patricia; Gil, Concha; Haynes, Paul A.; Hernáez, Maria Luisa; Kim, Jin Young; Kopylov, Arthur; Marcilla, Miguel; McKay, Mathew J.; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Molloy, Mark P.; Ohlund, Leanne B.; Paik, Young Ki; Paradela, Alberto; Raftery, Mark; Sabidó, Eduard; Sleno, Lekha; Wilffert, Daniel; Wolters, Justina C.; Yoo, Jong Shin; Zgoda, Victor; Parker, Carol E.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2015-01-01

    The reproducibility of plasma protein quantitation between laboratories and between instrument types was examined in a large-scale international study involving 16 laboratories and 19 LC-MS/MS platforms, using two kits designed to evaluate instrument performance and one kit designed to evaluate the

  14. Students' Assessment of Interactive Distance Experimentation in Nuclear Reactor Physics Laboratory Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkawi, Salaheddin; Al-Araidah, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments develop students' skills in dealing with laboratory instruments and physical processes with the objective of reinforcing the understanding of the investigated subject. In nuclear engineering, where research reactors play a vital role in the practical education of students, the high cost and long construction time of research…

  15. Standardisation of environmental enrichment for laboratory mice and rats: Utilisation, practicality and variation in experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumans, V.; Loo, P.L.P. van; Pham, T.M.

    2010-01-01

    Rats and mice are the most commonly used species as laboratory animal models of diseases in biomedical research. Environmental factors such as cage size, number of cage mates and cage structure such as environmental enrichment can affect the physiology and behavioural development of laboratory

  16. Inorganic nitrogen retention by watersheds at Fernow Experimental Forest and Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Beth Adams; Jennifer D. Knoepp; Jackson R. Webster

    2014-01-01

    Because elevated N loading can impair both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, understanding the abiotic and biotic controls over retention and export of dissolved inorganic N (DIN) is crucial. Long-term research has been conducted on experimental watersheds at two U.S. Forest Service experimental forests in the Appalachian region: Fernow Experimental Forest (FEF) in...

  17. Choice of experimental venue matters in ecotoxicology studies: Comparison of a laboratory-based and an outdoor mesocosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Imrei, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2015-10-01

    The heavy application of pesticides and its potential effects on natural communities has attracted increasing attention to inadvertent impacts of these chemicals. Toxicologists conventionally use laboratory-based tests to assess lethal concentrations of pesticides. However, these tests often do not take into account indirect, interactive and long-term effects, and tend to ignore different rates of disintegration in the laboratory and under natural conditions. Our aim was to investigate the importance of the experimental venue for ecotoxicology tests. We reared tadpoles of the agile frog (Rana dalmatina) in the laboratory and in outdoor mesocosms and exposed them to three initial concentrations of a glyphosate-based herbicide (0, 2 and 6.5 mg a.e./L glyphosate), and to the presence or absence of caged predators (dragonfly larvae). The type of experimental venue had a large effect on the outcome: The herbicide was less lethal to tadpoles reared in outdoor mesocosms than in the laboratory. Further, while the herbicide had a negative effect on development time and on body mass in the laboratory, tadpoles exposed to the herbicide in mesocosms were larger at metamorphosis and developed faster in comparison to those reared in the absence of the herbicide. The effect of the herbicide on morphological traits of tadpoles also differed between the two venues. Finally, in the presence of the herbicide, tadpoles tended to be more active and to stay closer to the bottom of laboratory containers, while tadpole behaviour shifted in the opposite direction in outdoor mesocosms. Our results demonstrate major discrepancies between results of a classic laboratory-based ecotoxicity test and outcomes of an experiment performed in outdoor mesocosms. Consequently, the use of standard laboratory tests may have to be reconsidered and their benefits carefully weighed against the difficulties of performing experiments under more natural conditions. Tests validating experimentally estimated

  18. Laboratory And Lysimeter Experimentation And Transport Modeling Of Neptunium And Strontium In Savannah River Site Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Powell, B. A.; Miller, Todd J.

    2012-09-24

    existing data sets. The first data set used laboratory generated Np sorption data as a function of concentration (three orders of magnitude) and as a function of pH (four orders of magnitude of proton concentration). In this modeling exercise, a very simple solution was identified by assuming that all sorption occurred only to the iron oxides in the sediment and that all the added NpO{sub 4}{sup -} remained in the oxidized state and was not reduced to the Np(IV) state (as occurs rapidly with Pu(V)). With rather limited input data, very good agreement between experimental and modeling results was observed. This modeling approach would be easy to add to the PA with little additional data requirements. This model would be useful in a system where pH is expected to change greatly, such as directly beneath a grout or concrete structure. The second model discussed in the report was to derive strontium K{sub d} values from data collected in an 11-year-old field transport study. In this controlled lysimeter study, a sensitivity analysis was conducted of hydrological and chemical processes that influence contaminant transport, including diffusion coefficients, seepage velocity, and K{sub d} value. The best overall K{sub d} derived from the model fit to the data was 32 L kg{sup -1}, which was the same value that was previously measured in traditional laboratory batch sorption studies. This was an unexpected result given the differences in experimental conditions between the batch test and the lysimeter flow through test, in particular the differences between strontium adsorption and desorption processes occurring in the latter test and not in the former. There were some trends in the lysimeter strontium data that were not predicted by the K{sub d} model, which suggest that other geochemical processes are likely also controlling strontium transport. Strontium release and cation exchange are being evaluated. These results suggest that future modeling efforts (e.g., PAs) could be

  19. An externally head-mounted wireless neural recording device for laboratory animal research and possible human clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ming; Li, Hao; Bull, Christopher; Borton, David A; Aceros, Juan; Larson, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new type of head-mounted wireless neural recording device in a highly compact package, dedicated for untethered laboratory animal research and designed for future mobile human clinical use. The device, which takes its input from an array of intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEA) has ninety-seven broadband parallel neural recording channels and was integrated on to two custom designed printed circuit boards. These house several low power, custom integrated circuits, including a preamplifier ASIC, a controller ASIC, plus two SAR ADCs, a 3-axis accelerometer, a 48MHz clock source, and a Manchester encoder. Another ultralow power RF chip supports an OOK transmitter with the center frequency tunable from 3GHz to 4GHz, mounted on a separate low loss dielectric board together with a 3V LDO, with output fed to a UWB chip antenna. The IC boards were interconnected and packaged in a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) enclosure which is compatible with both animal and human use (e.g. sterilizable). The entire system consumes 17mA from a 1.2Ahr 3.6V Li-SOCl2 1/2AA battery, which operates the device for more than 2 days. The overall system includes a custom RF receiver electronics which are designed to directly interface with any number of commercial (or custom) neural signal processors for multi-channel broadband neural recording. Bench-top measurements and in vivo testing of the device in rhesus macaques are presented to demonstrate the performance of the wireless neural interface.

  20. LABEXNET: un Laboratorio de Economía Experimental en Internet. [LABEXNET: Internet-based laboratory for experimental Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galán Ordax, José Manuel

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental Economists have designed over the years a wide range of scientific experiments that can be usefully employed nowadays as teaching aids. The interactive and participatory nature of such experiments serves as a motivation to students, stimulates their own thinking, and enhances their insights into the forces that drive economic markets: the aggregate interactions of economic agents within a market institution. Economic classroom games have been recognised as useful teaching tools for decades, and they have often produced surprising results and better understanding of market dynamics and institutions. Nowadays the new information technologies can be brought into play to conduct and analyse experimental games in unprecedented ways: using Internet-based tools, the design, execution and analysis of classroom games can be made considerably easier than traditionally. In this paper we introduce LABEXNET, a program designed to conduct Internet-based economic classroom games. LABEXNET is freely available to the academic community.. La Economía Experimental ha desarrollado diferentes experimentos que pueden ser aprovechados como una actividad docente en la enseñanza de la Economía. Su naturaleza activa y participativa motiva a los alumnos y estimula la reflexión y la mejor comprensión de algunos fenómenos económicos como el funcionamiento de los mercados, donde los resultados individuales dependen del conjunto de las decisiones de los agentes y de sus interacciones. Los experimentos económicos tienen ya una larga tradición, y han proporcionado resultados espectaculares y conclusiones ampliamente admitidas sobre la dinámica de mercados y el efecto de las instituciones económicas. Las nuevas tecnologías facilitan la realización y el análisis de estos experimentos. En este artículo presentamos LABEXNET, un programa informático para la realización de experimentos económicos por Internet puesto a libre disposición de la comunidad

  1. Privacy-preserving data cube for electronic medical records: An experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohyung; Lee, Hyukki; Chung, Yon Dohn

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of privacy-preserving data cubes of electronic medical records (EMRs). An EMR data cube is a complex of EMR statistics that are summarized or aggregated by all possible combinations of attributes. Data cubes are widely utilized for efficient big data analysis and also have great potential for EMR analysis. For safe data analysis without privacy breaches, we must consider the privacy preservation characteristics of the EMR data cube. In this paper, we introduce a design for a privacy-preserving EMR data cube and the anonymization methods needed to achieve data privacy. We further focus on changes in efficiency and effectiveness that are caused by the anonymization process for privacy preservation. Thus, we experimentally evaluate various types of privacy-preserving EMR data cubes using several practical metrics and discuss the applicability of each anonymization method with consideration for the EMR analysis environment. We construct privacy-preserving EMR data cubes from anonymized EMR datasets. A real EMR dataset and demographic dataset are used for the evaluation. There are a large number of anonymization methods to preserve EMR privacy, and the methods are classified into three categories (i.e., global generalization, local generalization, and bucketization) by anonymization rules. According to this classification, three types of privacy-preserving EMR data cubes were constructed for the evaluation. We perform a comparative analysis by measuring the data size, cell overlap, and information loss of the EMR data cubes. Global generalization considerably reduced the size of the EMR data cube and did not cause the data cube cells to overlap, but incurred a large amount of information loss. Local generalization maintained the data size and generated only moderate information loss, but there were cell overlaps that could decrease the search performance. Bucketization did not cause cells to overlap

  2. Olfactory ensheathing cells: part I—current concepts and experimental laboratory models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladwin, Karen; Choi, David

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to assess the results of current laboratory studies of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation for the treatment of central nervous system repair. This study used a literature search and topic review. There are numerous successful reports of regeneration and functional improvements in animals after OEC transplantation, but a few negative studies raise questions. Although the exact mechanisms of action of OECs are not fully understood, it is clear that OECs have beneficial regenerative properties in laboratory studies, and the ease with which OECs can be harvested and cultured in animal models make clinical application a very reasonable prospect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental innovations in surface science a guide to practical laboratory methods and instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, John T

    2015-01-01

    This book is a new edition of a classic text on experimental methods and instruments in surface science. It offers practical insight useful to chemists, physicists, and materials scientists working in experimental surface science. This enlarged second edition contains almost 300 descriptions of experimental methods. The more than 50 active areas with individual scientific and measurement concepts and activities relevant to each area are presented in this book. The key areas covered are: Vacuum System Technology, Mechanical Fabrication Techniques, Measurement Methods, Thermal Control, Delivery of Adsorbates to Surfaces, UHV Windows, Surface Preparation Methods, High Area Solids, Safety. The book is written for researchers and graduate students.

  4. Experimental Bleaching of a Reef-Building Coral Using a Simplified Recirculating Laboratory Exposure System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining stressor-response relationships in reef building corals is a critical need for researchers because of global declines in coral reef ecosystems. A simplified recirculating coral exposure system for laboratory testing of a diversity of species and morphologies of reef b...

  5. Experimental Population Genetics in the Introductory Genetics Laboratory Using "Drosophila" as a Model Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald; Kennon, Tillman

    2009-01-01

    Hypotheses of population genetics are derived and tested by students in the introductory genetics laboratory classroom as they explore the effects of biotic variables (physical traits of fruit flies) and abiotic variables (island size and distance) on fruit fly populations. In addition to this hypothesis-driven experiment, the development of…

  6. An Easy-to-Build Remote Laboratory with Data Transfer Using the Internet School Experimental System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Frantisek; Lustig, Frantisek; Dvorak, Jiri; Ozvoldova, Miroslava

    2008-01-01

    The present state of information communication technology makes it possible to devise and run computer-based e-laboratories accessible to any user with a connection to the Internet, equipped with very simple technical means and making full use of web services. Thus, the way is open for a new strategy of physics education with strongly global…

  7. Laboratory transport experiments with antibiotic sulfadiazine: Experimental results and parameter uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, S.; Vrugt, J. A.; Kasteel, R.; Groeneweg, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    Persistent antibiotics in the soil potentially contaminate the groundwater and affect the quality of drinking water. To improve our understanding of antibiotic transport in soils, we performed laboratory transport experiments in soil columns under constant irrigation conditions with repeated applications of chloride and radio-labeled SDZ. The tracers were incorporated in the first centimeter, either with pig manure or with solution. Breakthrough curves and concentration profiles of the parent compound and the main transformation products were measured. The goal is to describe the observed nonlinear and kinetic transport behavior of SDZ. Our analysis starts with synthetic transport data for the given laboratory flow conditions for tracers which exhibit increasingly complex interactions with the solid phase. This first step is necessary to benchmark our inverse modeling approach for ideal situations. Then we analyze the transport behavior using the column experiments in the laboratory. Our analysis uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler (Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis algorithm, DREAM) to efficiently search the parameter space of an advective-dispersion model. Sorption of the antibiotics to the soil was described using a model regarding reversible as well as irreversible sorption. This presentation will discuss our initial findings. We will present the data of our laboratory experiments along with an analysis of parameter uncertainty.

  8. Assessment of post-laparotomy pain in laboratory mice by telemetric recording of heart rate and heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasermann Hans P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain of mild to moderate grade is difficult to detect in laboratory mice because mice are prey animals that attempt to elude predators or man by hiding signs of weakness, injury or pain. In this study, we investigated the use of telemetry to identify indicators of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain. Results Adult mice were subjected to laparotomy, either combined with pain treatment (carprofen or flunixin, 5 mg/kg s/c bid, for 1 day or without pain relief. Controls received anesthesia and analgesics or vehicle only. Telemetrically measured locomotor activity was undisturbed in all animals, thus confirming that any pain experienced was of the intended mild level. No symptoms of pain were registered in any of the groups by scoring the animals' outer appearance or spontaneous and provoked behavior. In contrast, the group receiving no analgesic treatment after laparotomy demonstrated significant changes in telemetry electrocardiogram recordings: increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability parameters pointed to sympathetic activation and pain lasting for 24 hours. In addition, core body temperature was elevated. Body weight and food intake were reduced for 3 and 2 days, respectively. Moreover, unstructured cage territory and destroyed nests appeared for 1–2 days in an increased number of animals in this group only. In controls these parameters were not affected. Conclusion In conclusion, real-time telemetric recordings of heart rate and heart rate variability were indicative of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain and could define its duration in our mouse model. This level of pain cannot easily be detected by direct observation.

  9. Assessment of post-laparotomy pain in laboratory mice by telemetric recording of heart rate and heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arras, Margarete; Rettich, Andreas; Cinelli, Paolo; Kasermann, Hans P; Burki, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    Background Pain of mild to moderate grade is difficult to detect in laboratory mice because mice are prey animals that attempt to elude predators or man by hiding signs of weakness, injury or pain. In this study, we investigated the use of telemetry to identify indicators of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain. Results Adult mice were subjected to laparotomy, either combined with pain treatment (carprofen or flunixin, 5 mg/kg s/c bid, for 1 day) or without pain relief. Controls received anesthesia and analgesics or vehicle only. Telemetrically measured locomotor activity was undisturbed in all animals, thus confirming that any pain experienced was of the intended mild level. No symptoms of pain were registered in any of the groups by scoring the animals' outer appearance or spontaneous and provoked behavior. In contrast, the group receiving no analgesic treatment after laparotomy demonstrated significant changes in telemetry electrocardiogram recordings: increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability parameters pointed to sympathetic activation and pain lasting for 24 hours. In addition, core body temperature was elevated. Body weight and food intake were reduced for 3 and 2 days, respectively. Moreover, unstructured cage territory and destroyed nests appeared for 1–2 days in an increased number of animals in this group only. In controls these parameters were not affected. Conclusion In conclusion, real-time telemetric recordings of heart rate and heart rate variability were indicative of mild-to-moderate post-laparotomy pain and could define its duration in our mouse model. This level of pain cannot easily be detected by direct observation. PMID:17683523

  10. Clinical and Laboratory Responses of Cross-Country Skiing for a 24-H World Record: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Niemelä, Jukka Juvonen, Päivikki Kangastupa, Onni Niemelä, Tatu Juvonen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological consequences of ultra-endurance cross-country skiing in cold conditions are poorly known. We report here clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory findings from a 41-y old male elite skier in a world record trial for 24-h skiing. The athlete completed a total of 406.8 km outdoors with the temperature ranging between -24°C and –5°C during the 24-h period. Post exercise, notable increases from baseline values were observed in myoglobin (50-fold, creatinine kinase (30-fold and proBNP (6-fold, whereas troponin T or troponin I levels remained unchanged. At baseline, echocardiographic findings showed cardiac hypertrophy and after skiing, a 5% reduction of left-ventricular end-diastolic dimension. Increases in markers of kidney (creatinine and liver function (alanine aminotransferase, serum uric acid, C-reactive protein and white blood cell counts were also noted. In addition, electrolyte disturbances including hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia and hypocalcaemia were noted during the follow-up. The data indicates that a prolonged period of high-intensity skiing leads to muscle, heart and kidney affection and activation of inflammation even in an experienced elite skier. The observed health effects underscore the need for strict medical surveillance of participants in extreme sports with long duration.

  11. Slit-lamp management in contact lenses laboratory classes: learning upgrade with monitor visualization of webcam video recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arines, Justo; Gargallo, Ana

    2014-07-01

    The training in the use of the slit lamp has always been difficult for students of the degree in Optics and Optometry. Instruments with associated cameras helps a lot in this task, they allow teachers to observe and control if the students evaluate the eye health appropriately, correct use errors and show them how to do it with a visual demonstration. However, these devices are more expensive than those that do not have an integrated camera connected to a display unit. With the aim to improve students' skills in the management of slit lamp, we have adapted USB HD webcams (Microsoft Lifecam HD-5000) to the objectives of the slit lamps available in our contact lenses laboratory room. The webcams are connected to a PC running Linux Ubuntu 11.0; therefore that is a low-cost device. Our experience shows that single method has several advantages. It allows us to take pictures with a good quality of different conditions of the eye health; we can record videos of eye evaluation and make demonstrations of the instrument. Besides it increases the interactions between students because they could see what their colleagues are doing and take conscious of the mistakes, helping and correcting each others. It is a useful tool in the practical exam too. We think that the method supports the training in optometry practice and increase the students' confidence without a huge outlay.

  12. Inter-laboratory evaluation of instrument platforms and experimental workflows for quantitative accuracy and reproducibility assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Percy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reproducibility of plasma protein quantitation between laboratories and between instrument types was examined in a large-scale international study involving 16 laboratories and 19 LC–MS/MS platforms, using two kits designed to evaluate instrument performance and one kit designed to evaluate the entire bottom-up workflow. There was little effect of instrument type on the quality of the results, demonstrating the robustness of LC/MRM-MS with isotopically labeled standards. Technician skill was a factor, as errors in sample preparation and sub-optimal LC–MS performance were evident. This highlights the importance of proper training and routine quality control before quantitation is done on patient samples.

  13. Presentation of clinical laboratory results: an experimental comparison of four visualization techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Torsvik, Torbjørn; Lillebo, Børge; Mikkelsen, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate how clinical chemistry test results were assessed by volunteers when presented with four different visualization techniques. Materials and methods A total of 20 medical students reviewed quantitative test results from 4 patients using 4 different visualization techniques in a balanced, crossover experiment. The laboratory data represented relevant patient categories, including simple, emergency, chronic and complex patients. Participants answered questions about trend, o...

  14. Curation of Laboratory Experimental Data as Part of the Overall Data Lifecycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Frey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The explosion in the production of scientific data in recent years is placing strains upon conventional systems supporting integration, analysis, interpretation and dissemination of data and thus constraining the whole scientific process. Support for handling large quantities of diverse information can be provided by e-Science methodologies and the cyber-infrastructure that enables collaborative handling of such data. Regard needs to be taken of the whole process involved in scientific discovery. This includes the consideration of the requirements of the users and consumers further down the information chain and what they might ideally prefer to impose on the generators of those data. As the degree of digital capture in the laboratory increases, it is possible to improve the automatic acquisition of the ‘context of the data’ as well as the data themselves. This process provides an opportunity for the data creators to ensure that many of the problems they often encounter in later stages are avoided. We wish to elevate curation to an operation to be considered by the laboratory scientist as part of good laboratory practice, not a procedure of concern merely to the few specialising in archival processes. Designing curation into experiments is an effective solution to the provision of high-quality metadata that leads to better, more re-usable data and to better science.

  15. Circuit models and experimental noise measurements of micropipette amplifiers for extracellular neural recordings from live animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang Hao; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Vai, Mang I; Klug, Achim; Lei, Tim C

    2014-01-01

    Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  16. Circuit Models and Experimental Noise Measurements of Micropipette Amplifiers for Extracellular Neural Recordings from Live Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  17. A Hardware-and-Software System for Experimental Studies of the Acoustic Startle Response in Laboratory Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevtsov, E F; Storozheva, Z I; Proshin, A T; Pevtsova, E I

    2016-02-01

    We developed and tested a novel hardware-and-software system for recording the amplitude of the acoustic startle response in rodents. In our experiments, the baseline indexes of acoustic startle response in laboratory rats and pre-stimulation inhibition under the standard delivery of acoustic stimulation were similar to those evaluated by other investigators on foreign devices. The proposed system is relatively cheap and provides the possibility of performing experiments on freely moving specimens. It should be emphasized that the results of studies can be processed with free-access software.

  18. Recording of unexpectedly high frequency vibrations of blood vessel walls in experimental arteriovenous fistulae of rabbits using a laser vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehbens, W E; Liepsch, D W; Poll, A; Erhardt, W

    1995-01-01

    Because arteriovenous fistulae are associated with a palpable thrill and an audible murmur, the vibrational activity of the blood vessel walls about experimental arteriovenous fistulae in rabbits was investigated using, for the first time, a high-resolution laser vibrometer. Frequencies of mural vibrations up to 2200 Hz were recorded at different sites about the fistulae. The relationship of this vibratory activity of blood vessel walls to physiological and pathological conditions warrants further investigation.

  19. Experimental Measures of Bus Comfort Levels Using Kinematic Parameters Recorded by Smartphone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquila, S. dell' ; Eboli, L.; Futia, G.; Mazzulla, G.; Pungillo, G.

    2016-07-01

    Comfort on board plays an essential role in the levels of satisfaction of a bus service perceived by passengers. The aim of this paper is to propose a measure of comfort based on two kinds of data: perceptions of passengers (subjective data) and accelerations of bus (objective data). For the collection of subjective data a questionnaire was addressed to a sample of university students, while a smartphone, equipped with GPS device and 3-axis accelerometer, was used to record the accelerations. Based on the recorded parameters, we determined the thresholds of the acceleration values beyond which the level of comfort cannot be considered as good.. (Author)

  20. Media effects of experimental presentation of the ideal physique on eating disorder symptoms: a meta-analysis of laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausenblas, Heather A; Campbell, Anna; Menzel, Jessie E; Doughty, Jessica; Levine, Michael; Thompson, J Kevin

    2013-02-01

    Older meta-analyses of the effects of the media's portrayal of the ideal physique have found small effects revealing that exposure to the ideal physique increases body image concerns. These meta-analyses also included correlational, quasi-experimental, and experimental studies, with limited examination of moderators and other relevant outcomes besides body image. We conducted a systematic literature search and identified 33 experimental (i.e., pre and post data for both experimental and control groups) laboratory studies examining the effects of acute exposure to the media's portrayal of the ideal physique on eating disorder symptoms (i.e., body image, positive affect, negative affect, self-esteem, anger, anxiety and depression) and the mechanisms that moderate this effect. Fourteen separate meta-analyses revealed a range of small to moderate effect sizes for change in outcomes from pre to post for both experimental and control groups. Exposure to images of the ideal physique resulted in small effect sizes for increased depression and anger and decreased self-esteem and positive affect. Moderator analyses revealed moderate effect sizes for increased depression and body dissatisfaction among high-risk participants. This meta-analysis makes it clear that media exposure of the ideal physique results in small changes in eating disorder symptoms, particularly with participants at high risk for developing an eating disorder. Further research is needed to examine the longitudinal effects of media exposure of eating disorder symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative Cognitive Task Analyses of Experimental Science and Instructional Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate instructional labs in physics generate intense opinions. Their advocates are passionate as to their importance for teaching physics as an experimental activity and providing "hands-on" learning experiences, while their detractors (often but not entirely students) offer harsh criticisms that they are pointless, confusing and…

  2. "Golden Oldies" in a Laboratory Course in the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuriff, G. E.

    2005-01-01

    A common problem in teaching undergraduate courses in the experimental analysis of behavior (EAB) is that the contemporary research literature is largely not comprehensible to most undergraduates. A suggested solution is the use of research articles from the early days of EAB. These are not only easy to understand but provide additional…

  3. Solving an Ethical Issue Involved in Experimentation with Animals in a Brazilian Teaching Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Natalia I. V.; Viana, Henrique V.; Rodrigues, Carlos R.; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Silva, Thais D. N.; Cardoso, Fernanda Serpa; Santos, Dilvani Oliveira; Castro, Helena C.

    2004-01-01

    Changes are occurring within Brazilian institutes of higher education; currently several universities are reviewing their course offerings and teaching approaches to determine if they meet the needs of today's undergraduate students. When changes are made to the curriculum of experimental courses, there should be an understood guarantee that all…

  4. Initial experimental results from the Laboratory Biosphere closed ecological system facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alling, A.; Allen, J.; Dempster, W.; Nelson, M.; Silverstone, S.; van Thillo, M.

    Results from the closure and initial closed ecological system research in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility in Santa Fe, New Mexico (USA) will be presented. The facility was initially sealed in April 2002; and the first crop experiments with soybeans commenced in May 2002. The Laboratory Biosphere was created by the team which invented, built and operated Biosphere 2 during its years of closed ecological system functioning (1991-94) and is a testbed to build upon the lessons learned. It is an opportunity to continue experiments with a sustainable soil based agriculture system unlike most bioregenerative systems which use hydroponic systems dependent on a supply of nutrient solution. Because of the small volume of the system (34-45 m3), developing mechanisms to keep parameters like carbon dioxide within acceptable limits will be critical. Recycle of nutrients within the system to maintain soil fertility; and the ability of the inherent complex ecology of soils and a soil bed reactor to handle trace gas buildups are primary research goals. Other research goals are determination of short and long-term exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere, especially for carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, NOX, and methane, impact of cultivation (tillage) on soil/atmospheric exchanges., investigation and development of strategies to return nutrients to the soil to maintain fertility, e.g. shredding biomass vs. composting, impact on soil chemistry of returning leachate water to the soil as irrigation water. The microbiological status of soils prior to experiments and over time will allow measurement of changes in microbial diversity and the determination of the role of soil microbes in biogeochemical cycles. Integration of automated sensor and control in the system with real-time modeling has importance for operation, research and educational outreach programs. The Laboratory Biosphere is intended to test and develop a "cybersphere" (network of shared intelligence) that may be

  5. A new record from China of epiphytic marine algae, Acrochaete leptochaete (Chaetophoraceae, Chlorophyta) with its primary experimental biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yunyan; Tang, Xiaorong; Ding, Lanping; Lian, Shaoxing

    2011-03-01

    Acrochaete leptochaete, a species in Chaetophoraceae (Chlorophyta), was observed during our recent laboratory culture of the macroalgae Chaetomorpha that was originally collected from an intertidal pool in Rongcheng, Shandong Province, China. This is the first record of this species in China. Its morphology, taxonomy, and distribution were introduced and discussed in detail. Isolated culture experiments at different temperatures (9-29°C) and light intensities (36-108 μmol/m2·s) were also carried out. The culture-based observations have extended our knowledge of growth morphology and general biology of the species.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl M. Stoots; James E. O' Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2008-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

  7. SOME RESULTS OF EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH ON ARTIFICIAL BALL LIGHTNING LOW-ENERGY PLASMOIDS IN A HIGH-VOLTAGE LABORATORY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available First results of experimental laboratory-scale reproduction of spheroidal low-energy plasmoids of an artificial ball lightning are given. The data obtained indicate a possibility in principle of reliable generation of such plasmoids in the air atmosphere via the discharge circuit of a high-voltage installation comprising a curved arc discharge channel between a graphite electrode and technical water surface. The artificial 0.3m-diameter ball lightning plasmoid lifetime was less than 0.6 s in the experiments conducted.

  8. Effect of temperature on coke properties and CO2 reactivity under laboratory conditions and in an experimental blast furnace

    OpenAIRE

    Hilding, Tobias; Kazuberns, Kelli; Gupta, Sushil; Sahajwalla, Veena; Sakurovs, Richard; Björkman, Bo; Wikström, Jan-Olov

    2005-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of coke samples excavated from LKAB's Experimental Blast Furnace (EBF) at MEFOS in Lulea, Sweden were characterized. A thermal annealing study the raw coke used in the EBF was also conducted in a horizontal furnace in a neutral environment at a range of temperatures up to 1650DGC. Carbon crystallite height of the EBF coke and of the cokes treated in the laboratory furnace were measured by XRD while mineral phases were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The CO2 re...

  9. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  10. RNA Isolation from Plant Tissues: A Hands-on Laboratory Experimental Experience for Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nianhui; Yu, Dong; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2017-12-29

    The practice of RNA isolation in undergraduate experimental courses is rare because of the existence of robust, ubiquitous and stable ribonucleases. We reported here modifications to our original protocol for RNA isolation from plant tissues, including the recovery of nucleic acids by ethanol precipitation at 0 °C for 10 min and the assessment of RNA quality by visualizing the banding profile of the separated RNAs on a standard nondenaturing agarose gel to shorten the duration of the whole procedure and simplify the operation. As a result, the modified procedure, including RNA isolation and quality control analysis could be finished in 4 hr and divided into two sessions. Because endogenous ribonucleases released upon disruption of the organelles and vacuoles were effectively and quickly inactivated, measures were taken to protect RNA integrity throughout the whole procedure so that total RNA with high purity and integrity as well as an appropriate yield could be obtained by students. The RNA isolation protocol described here was simple, efficient, flexible, and low cost. Therefore, it is an ideal approach for undergraduates to learn about RNA techniques. The pedagogical approach of the correlation of experimental work with the rationale for the whole protocol described in this report is an effective way for undergraduates to improve their learning of the techniques of RNA isolation and analysis and the theories behind them, as well as experimental design and data analysis. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  12. Experimental study of subcritical laboratory magnetized collisionless shocks using a laser-driven magnetic piston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, D. B., E-mail: dschaeffer@physics.ucla.edu; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Winske, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Recent experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles have successfully generated subcritical magnetized collisionless shocks, allowing new laboratory studies of shock formation relevant to space shocks. The characteristics of these shocks are compared with new data in which no shock or a pre-shock formed. The results are consistent with theory and 2D hybrid simulations and indicate that the observed shock or shock-like structures can be organized into distinct regimes by coupling strength. With additional experiments on the early time parameters of the laser plasma utilizing Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, and fast-gate filtered imaging, these regimes are found to be in good agreement with theoretical shock formation criteria.

  13. Experimental study of subcritical laboratory magnetized collisionless shocks using a laser-driven magnetic piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Winske, D.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles have successfully generated subcritical magnetized collisionless shocks, allowing new laboratory studies of shock formation relevant to space shocks. The characteristics of these shocks are compared with new data in which no shock or a pre-shock formed. The results are consistent with theory and 2D hybrid simulations and indicate that the observed shock or shock-like structures can be organized into distinct regimes by coupling strength. With additional experiments on the early time parameters of the laser plasma utilizing Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, and fast-gate filtered imaging, these regimes are found to be in good agreement with theoretical shock formation criteria.

  14. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Holman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind.

  15. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Luke; Head, Megan L; Lanfear, Robert; Jennions, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind.

  16. The Experimental Demonstration of the Optimized Electrical Probe Memory for Ultra-High Density Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Gong, Sidi; Yang, Cihui; Wen, Jing

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical model has been previously proposed to optimize the structure of the electrical probe memory system, whereby the optimal thickness and resistivity of DLC capping layer and TiN under layer are predicted to be 2 nm, 0.01 Ωm, and 40 nm, 2×10-7 Ωm,respectively However, there is no experimental evidence to show that such a media stack can be fabricated in reality by the time of writing and few patents regarding this intriguing topic have been reviewed and cited. In order to realize this optimized design experimentally, the thickness dependent resistivity for both DLC and TiN film are assessed, from which it is not possible to obtain a media stack with exactly the same properties as the optimized design. Therefore, the previously proposed architecture is re-optimized using the measured properties values, and the capability of using the modified memory architecture to provide ultra-high density, high data rate, and low energy consumption is demonstrated. The results show that it is difficult to experimentally attain an electrical probe memory with exactly the same properties values as the optimized counterpart. An optimized electrical probe memory structure that includes a DLC capping layer and TiN under layer was previously proposed according to a parametric approach, while the practicality of realizing such a media stack experimentally has not bee investigated. In order to assess its practical feasibility, we first measured the electrical resistivities of DLC and TiN films for different thicknesses. In this case, for the purpose of optimizing the memory system with appropriate, but more physically realistic properties values, we re-designed the architecture using the measured properties, and the modified system is able to provide ultra-high density, large data rate, and low energy consumption. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. An Experimental Framework for Generating Evolvable Chemical Systems in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, David A.; Vetsigian, Kalin

    2017-12-01

    Most experimental work on the origin of life has focused on either characterizing the chemical synthesis of particular biochemicals and their precursors or on designing simple chemical systems that manifest life-like properties such as self-propagation or adaptive evolution. Here we propose a new class of experiments, analogous to artificial ecosystem selection, where we select for spontaneously forming self-propagating chemical assemblages in the lab and then seek evidence of a response to that selection as a key indicator that life-like chemical systems have arisen. Since surfaces and surface metabolism likely played an important role in the origin of life, a key experimental challenge is to find conditions that foster nucleation and spread of chemical consortia on surfaces. We propose high-throughput screening of a diverse set of conditions in order to identify combinations of "food," energy sources, and mineral surfaces that foster the emergence of surface-associated chemical consortia that are capable of adaptive evolution. Identification of such systems would greatly advance our understanding of the emergence of self-propagating entities and the onset of adaptive evolution during the origin of life.

  18. Experimental results from a laboratory-scale molten salt thermocline storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seubert, Bernhard; Müller, Ralf; Willert, Daniel; Fluri, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Single-tank storage presents a valid option for cost reduction in thermal energy storage systems. For low-temperature systems with water as storage medium this concept is widely implemented and tested. For high-temperature systems very limited experimental data are publicly available. To improve this situation a molten salt loop for experimental testing of a single-tank storage prototype was designed and built at Fraunhofer ISE. The storage tank has a volume of 0.4 m3 or a maximum capacity of 72 kWhth. The maximum charging and discharging power is 60 kW, however, a bypass flow control system enables to operate the system also at a very low power. The prototype was designed to withstand temperatures up to 550 °C. A cascaded insulation with embedded heating cables can be used to reduce the effect of heat loss on the storage which is susceptible to edge effects due to its small size. During the first tests the operating temperatures were adapted to the conditions in systems with thermal oil as heat transfer fluid and a smaller temperature difference. A good separation between cold and hot fluid was achieved with temperature gradients of 95 K within 16 cm.

  19. SegWay: A simple framework for unsupervised sleep segmentation in experimental EEG recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghouby, Farid; Sunderam, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Sleep analysis in animal models typically involves recording an electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) and scoring vigilance state in brief epochs of data as Wake, REM (rapid eye movement sleep) or NREM (non-REM) either manually or using a computer algorithm. Computerized methods usually estimate features from each epoch like the spectral power associated with distinctive cortical rhythms and dissect the feature space into regions associated with different states by applying thresholds, or by using supervised/unsupervised statistical classifiers; but there are some factors to consider when using them:•Most classifiers require scored sample data, elaborate heuristics or computational steps not easily reproduced by the average sleep researcher, who is the targeted end user.•Even when prediction is reasonably accurate, small errors can lead to large discrepancies in estimates of important sleep metrics such as the number of bouts or their duration.•As we show here, besides partitioning the feature space by vigilance state, modeling transitions between the states can give more accurate scores and metrics. An unsupervised sleep segmentation framework, "SegWay", is demonstrated by applying the algorithm step-by-step to unlabeled EEG recordings in mice. The accuracy of sleep scoring and estimation of sleep metrics is validated against manual scores.

  20. Experimental investigation on gaseous emissions from the combustion of date palm residues in laboratory scale furnace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El may, Yassine; Jeguirim, Mejdi; Dorge, Sophie; Trouvé, Gwenaelle; Said, Rachid

    2013-03-01

    Emissions characteristics from the combustion of five date palm residues, DPR, (Date Palm Leaflets, Date Palm Rachis, Date Palm Trunk, Date Stones and fruitstalk prunings) in a laboratory scale furnace were investigated. Release of gaseous products such as CO2, CO, VOC, NOx and SO2 were measured at 600-800°C. The main goal was to analyze thermal behaviors and gaseous emissions in order to select the most convenient biofuel for an application in domestic boiler installations. Regards to biofuel characteristics, date stone have the highest energy density (11.4GJ/m(3)) and the lowest ash content (close to 1.2%). Combustion tests show that among the tested date palm residues, date stone may be the promising biofuel for the design of combustion processing system. However, a special attention to the design of the secondary air supply should be given to prevent high emissions of CO and volatile matters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ion sheath effects on RF plasma probes - Experimental results in laboratory plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kist, R.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory work dealing with the frequency characteristic of the plasma impedance of spherical and cylindrical electrode systems is reported. The influence of the ion sheath on various features of the impedance characteristic is emphasized. Those features are the series and parallel resonance as well as additional resonances due to the excitation of electroacoustic and cyclotron harmonic waves. The dependence of the series and parallel resonances on dc biasing leads to a method of determining the ion sheath capacity for a cylindrical electrode system. The obtained values agree fairly well with those obtained from a theoretical model for the density and potential distribution in the sheath of a cylindrical sensor aligned with a supersonic plasma flow. The amplitude of resonances due to excitation of longitudinal plasma waves (electroacoustic and cyclotron harmonic) is reduced or even vanishes for sufficiently negative dc bias. Positive bias first leads to an increased amplitude up to a certain dc bias value above which, however, the amplitude decreases again due to electron absorption at the sensor surface.

  2. Experimental Demonstration of Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Scale with Guide Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsue; Egedal, Jan; Olsen, Joe; Endrizzi, Douglass; Wallace, John; TREX Team

    2017-10-01

    Through a process called magnetic reconnection, the opposing solar wind and Earth magnetic fields annihilate and allow energetic solar particles to enter the magnetosphere. This energetic plasma can cause major disturbances to satellite communication networks and navigation systems, as well as electrical power grids. To better understand this process and prevent significant economic losses, NASA has launched the MMS Mission in 2015, a cluster of spacecraft which directly probes the reconnection sites in the magnetosphere. Though in situ measurements of reconnection in space are essential to our understanding of the process, the mission comes at a cost of over 1 billion. Thus, smaller laboratory experiments become essential to compliment the data acquired by MMS at relatively low cost. The Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment (TREX) currently aims to probe a similar configuration to dayside reconnection by adding a toroidal guide magnetic field, where under the right conditions, high frequency turbulent fluctuations are expected. Using a set of fast Langmuir probes to diagnose the fluctuations, the global structure of the plasma turbulence can be reconstructed. In this poster, an overview of the upgraded experiment and design progress of the fast Lprobe will be provided. NSF/DOE award DE-SC0013032.

  3. Development and experimental validation of a thermoelectric test bench for laboratory lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The refrigeration process reduces the temperature of a space or a given volume while the power generation process employs a source of thermal energy to generate electrical power. Because of the importance of these two processes, training of engineers in this area is of great interest. In engineering courses it is normally studied the vapor compression and absorption refrigeration, and power generation systems such as gas turbine and steam turbine. Another type of cooling and generation less studied within the engineering curriculum, having a great interest, it is cooling and thermal generation based on Peltier and Seebeck effects. The theoretical concepts are useful, but students have difficulties understanding the physical meaning of their possible applications. Providing students with tools to test and apply the theory in real applications, will lead to a better understanding of the subject. Engineers must have strong theoretical, computational and also experimental skills. A prototype test bench has been built and experimentally validated to perform practical lessons of thermoelectric generation and refrigeration. Using this prototype students learn the most effective way of cooling systems and thermal power generation as well as basic concepts associated with thermoelectricity. It has been proven that students learn the process of data acquisition, and the technology used in thermoelectric devices. These practical lessons are implemented for a 60 people group of students in the development of subject of Thermodynamic including in the Degree in Engineering in Industrial Technologies of Public University of Navarra. Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE Individually ventilated cages impose cold stress on laboratory mice: a source of systemic experimental variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, John M; Knowles, Scott; Lamkin, Donald M; Stout, David B

    2013-11-01

    Individual ventilated cages (IVC) are increasing in popularity. Although mice avoid IVC in preference testing, they show no aversion when provided additional nesting material or the cage is not ventilated. Given the high ventilation rate in IVC, we developed 3 hypotheses: that mice housed in IVC experience more cold stress than do mice housed in static cages; that IVC-induced cold stress affects the results of experiments using mice; and that, when provided shelters, mice behaviorally thermoregulate and thereby rescue the cold-stress effects of IVC. To test these hypotheses, we housed mice in IVC, IVC with shelters, and static cages maintained at 20 to 21 °C. We quantified the cold stress of each housing system on mice by assessing nonshivering thermogenesis and brown adipose vacuolation. To test housing effects in a common, murine model of human disease, we implanted mice with subcutaneous epidermoid carcinoma cells and quantified tumor growth, tumor metabolism, and adrenal weight. Mice housed in IVC had histologic signs of cold stress and significantly higher nonshivering thermogenesis, smaller subcutaneous tumors, lower tumor metabolism, and larger adrenal weights than did mice in static cages. Shelters rescued IVC-induced nonshivering thermogenesis, adrenal enlargement, and phenotype-dependent cold-mediated histologic changes in brown adipose tissue and tumor size. IVC impose chronic cold stress on mice, alter experimental results, and are a source of systemic confounders throughout rodent-dependent research. Allowing mice to exhibit behavioral thermoregulation through seeking shelter markedly rescues the experiment-altering effects of housing-imposed cold stress, improves physiologic uniformity, and increases experimental reproducibility across housing systems.

  4. Experimental Analysis of Steady-State Maneuvering Effects on Transmission Vibration Patterns Recorded in an AH-1 Cobra Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Edward M.; Dzwonczyk, Mark; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Flight experiment was designed primarily to determine the extent to which steady-state maneuvers influence characteristic vibration patterns measured at the input pinion and output annulus gear locations of the main transmission. If results were to indicate that maneuvers systematically influence vibration patterns, more extensive studies would be planned to explore the response surface. It was also designed to collect baseline data for comparison with experimental data to be recorded at a later date from test stands at Glenn Research Center. Finally, because this was the first vibration flight study on the Cobra aircraft, considerable energy was invested in developing an in-flight recording apparatus, as well as exploring acceleration mounting methods, and generally learning about the overall vibratory characteristics of the aircraft itself.

  5. Conceptual study of moderately coupled plasmas and experimental comparison of laboratory x-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chikang [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center

    1993-12-01

    In this thesis the fundamental concepts of moderately coupled plasmas, for which 2≲lnΛb≲10, are, for the first time, presented. This investigation is motivated because neither the conventional Fokker-Planck approximation [for weakly coupled plasmas (lnΛb≲10)] nor the theory of dielectric response with correlations for strongly coupled plasmas (lnΛb≲1) has satisfactorily addressed this regime. Specifically, herein the standard Fokker-Planck operator for Coulomb collisions has been modified to include hitherto neglected terms that are directly associated with large-angle scattering. In addition a reduced electron-ion collision operator has been calculated that, for the first time, manifests 1/lnΛb corrections. Precise calculations of some relaxation rates and crude calculations of electron transport coefficients have been made. As one of major applications of the modified Fokker-Planck equation, the stopping powers and ρR have been calculated for charged fusion products (α`s, 3H, 3He) and hot electrons interacting with plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion. In the second major topic of this thesis, advances made in the area of laboratory x-ray sources are presented. First, and most importantly, through the use a Cockcroft-Walton linear accelerator, a charged particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) source has been developed. Intense line x radiation (including K-, L-, M-, and N-lines) with wavelengths from 0.5 Å to 111 Å have been successfully produced. Second, a new high intensity electron-beam x-ray generator has also been developed, and it has been used with advantage in the soft x-ray region ( < 3 keV). Finally, a direct comparisons of both sources (PIXE and electron-beam x-ray sources) to a commercially available radioactive α fluorescent x-ray source has been made.

  6. A laboratory based experimental study of mercury emission from contaminated soils in the River Idrijca catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kocman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Results obtained by a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS focused on investigating the kinetics of the mercury emission flux (MEF from contaminated soils of the Idrija Hg-mine region, Slovenia are presented. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentrations (4–417 μg g−1 and land cover (forest, meadow and alluvial soil alongside the River Idrijca were analysed to determine the variation in MEF versus distance from the source, regulating three major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature, soil moisture and solar radiation. MEFs ranged from less than 2 to 530 ng m−2 h−1, with the highest emissions from contaminated alluvial soils and soils near the mining district in the town of Idrija. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. The results revealed a strong positive effect of all three parameters investigated on momentum MEF. The light-induced flux was shown to be independent of the soil temperature, while the soil aqueous phase seems to be responsible for recharging the pool of mercury in the soil available for both the light- and thermally-induced flux. The overall flux response to simulated environmental conditions depends greatly on the form of Hg in the soil. Higher activation energies are required for the overall process to occur in soils where insoluble cinnabar prevails compared to soils where more mobile Hg forms and forms available for transformation processes are dominant.

  7. Deep-sea ciliates: Recorded diversity and experimental studies on pressure tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenle, Alexandra; Nitsche, Frank; Werner, Jennifer; Arndt, Hartmut

    2017-10-01

    Microbial eukaryotes play an important role in biogeochemical cycles not only in productive surface waters but also in the deep sea. Recent studies based on metagenomics report deep-sea protistan assemblages totally different from continental slopes and shelf waters. To give an overview about the ciliate fauna recorded from the deep sea we summarized the available information on ciliate occurrence in the deep sea. Our literature review revealed that representatives of the major phylogenetic groups of ciliates were recorded from the deep sea (> 1000 m depth): Karyorelictea, Heterotrichea, Spirotrichea (Protohypotrichia, Euplotia, Oligotrichia, Choreotrichia, Hypotrichia), Armophorea (Armophorida), Litostomatea (Haptoria), Conthreep (Phyllopharyngea incl. Cyrtophoria, Chonotrichia, Suctoria; Nassophorea incl. Microthoracida, Synhymeniida, Nassulida; Colpodea incl. Bursariomorphida, Cyrtolophosidida; Prostomatea; Plagiopylea incl. Plagiopylida, Odontostomatida; Oligohymenophorea incl. Peniculia, Scuticociliatia, Hymenostomatia, Apostomatia, Peritrichia, Astomatia). Species occurring in both habitats, deep sea and shallow water, are rarely found to our knowledge to date. This indicates a high deep-sea specific ciliate fauna. Our own studies of similar genotypes (SSU rDNA and cox1 gene) revealed that two small scuticociliate species (Pseudocohnilembus persalinus and Uronema sp.) could be isolated from surface as well as deep waters (2687 m, 5276 m, 5719 m) of the Pacific. The adaptation to deep-sea conditions was investigated by exposing the ciliate isolates directly or stepwise to different hydrostatic pressures ranging from 1 to 550 atm at temperatures of 2 °C and 13 °C. Although the results indicated no general barophilic behavior, all four isolated strains survived the highest established pressure. A better survival at 550 atm could be observed for the lower temperature. Among microbial eukaryotes, ciliates should be considered as a diverse and potentially

  8. Experimental chemotherapy of Schistosomiasis III: laboratory and clinical trials with trichlorphone, an organophosphorus compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naftale Katz

    1968-10-01

    Full Text Available Oogram studies have been carried out on mice, hamsters, and Cebus morikeys experimentally infected with Schistosoma mansoni and treated with trichlorphone (0,0-dimethyl 1-hydroxy-2, 2, 2-trichloroethylphosphonate. In mice, despite a slight hepatic shift of schistosomes, all animais presented oogram changes when dosed, per os, at the schedules of 200, and 100 mg/kg/day × 7. In hamsters, antischistosomal activity could be detected only at toxic leveis. In monkeys, trichlorphone showed insignificant action even after oral administration of 30 mg/kg/day for 10 consecutive days. In 5 volunteers, a sharp drop in cholinesterase plasma level was observed 24 hours after a single oral dose of 7.5 mg/kg. However, cholinesterase levels returned to the initial values within a period of 11 to 27 days. Trichlorphone was then administered to 12 schistosome patients (7.5 mg/kg/day, every fort- night, × 5. One month after therapy, interruption of egg laying was observed in 6 patients. Late parasitological control showed that all treated patients continued to pass viable S. mansoni eggs with their stools.

  9. An experimental investigation of reacting and nonreacting coaxial jet mixing in a laboratory rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Stephen Alexander

    Coaxial jets are commonly used as injectors in propulsion and combustion devices due to both the simplicity of their geometry and the rapid mixing they provide. In liquid rocket engines it is common to use coaxial jets in the context of airblast atomization. However, interest exists in developing rocket engines using a full flow staged combustion cycle. In such a configuration both propellants are injected in the gaseous phase. In addition, gaseous coaxial jets have been identified as an ideal test case for the validation of the next generation of injector modeling tools. For these reasons an understanding of the fundamental phenomena which govern mixing in gaseous coaxial jets and the effect of combustion on these phenomena in coaxial jet diffusion flames is needed. A study was performed to better understand the scaling of the stoichiometric mixing length in reacting and nonreacting coaxial jets with velocity ratios greater than one and density ratios less than one. A facility was developed that incorporates a single shear coaxial injector in a laboratory rocket engine capable of ten atmospheres. Optical access allows the use of flame luminosity and laser diagnostic techniques such as Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF). Stoichiometric mixing lengths (LS), which are defined as the distance along the centerline where the stoichiometric condition occurs, were measured using PLIF. Acetone was seeded into the center jet to provide direct PLIF measurement of the average and instantaneous mixture fraction fields for a range of momentum flux ratios for the nonreacting cases. For the coaxial jet diffusion flames, LS was measured from OH radical contours. For nonreacting cases the use of a nondimensional momentum flux ratio was found to collapse the mixing length data. The flame lengths of coaxial jet diffusion flames were also found to scale with the momentum flux ratio but different scaling constants are required which depended on the chemistry of the reaction. The

  10. Experimental Studies of Engineered Barrier Systems Conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (FY16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norskog, Katherine Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maner, James [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). School of Geology and Geophysics; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaich, Sarah [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cheshire, Michael C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-04

    Over the past five years the Used Fuel Campaign has investigated Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) at higher heat loads (up to 300°C) and pressure (150 bar). This past year experimental work was hindered due to a revamping of the hydrothermal lab. Regardless, two experiments were run this past year, EBS-18 and EBS-19. EBS-18 was run using Low Carbon Steel (LCS) and opalinus clay in addition to the bentonite and opalinus brine. Many of the past results were confirmed in EBS-18, such as the restriction of illite formation due to the bulk chemistry, pyrite degradation, and zeolite formation dependent on the bentonite and opalinus clay. The LCS show vast amounts of pit corrosion (over 100μm of corrosion in six weeks), leading a corrosion rate of 1083 μm/year. In addition, a mineral goethite, an iron-bearing hydroxide, formed in the pits of the LCS. Preliminary results from EBS-19 water chemistry are included but SEM imaging, micro probe and XRD are still needed for further results. Copper corrosion was investigated further and over 850 measurements were taken. It was concluded that pitting and pyrite degradation drastically increase the corrosion rate from 0.12 to 0.39 μm/day. However, the growth of a layer of the mineral chalcocite is thought to subdue the corrosion rate to 0.024 μm/day as observed in the EBS-13, a sixth month experiment. This document presents the findings of this past year.

  11. [Biological and non-biological elimination therapy of acute liver failure. Experimental study on large laboratory animal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryska, M; Lásziková, E; Pantoflícek, T; Kieslichová, E; Ryska, O; Prazák, J; Koblihová, E; Skibová, J

    2008-01-01

    Development of biological and non-biological artificial liver devices in the previous 20 years enabled effective treatment of acute liver failure (ALF) of patients waiting for liver transplantation or for spontaneous liver parenchyma regeneration. Aim of the study was the evaluation of the effectiveness of biological (BAL - bioartificial liver) and non-biological (FPSA - Fractionated plasma separation and adsorption) methods in the treatment of experimental ALF on large laboratory animal. Surgical model of ALF with liver devascularization in pigs (weight 25-40 kg) was provided following monitoring of ALF markers (AST, ALT, bilirubin, ammoniac, glycaemia, INR) including intracranial pressure (ICP). Control group included animals without treatment of ALF. Results of both experimental groups were compared and statistically worked-out with that of controls by T-test and Mann-Whitney non-parametric test by EXCEL and QUATRO. BAL group: 10 pigs (weight 30 +/- 5 kg) with ALF were treated by BAL with isolated hepatocytes. When plasma bilirubin was compared, significant differences (p < 0.05) in 6 and 9 hours interval were found favouring BAL group (18.1 vs. 13.1, 22.9 vs. 13.2 mmol/l). The value of ICP in both groups was no significant. Prometheus group: 14 pigs weight 35 kg (35 +/- 5 kg) with the identical ALF were treated by Prometheus (FPSA). Level of serum bilirubin in experimental group when compared to control group was significantly lower (p < 0.01) at 6 hour interval 12.81 +/- 6.54 vs. 29.84 +/- 9.99 at 9 hour 11.94 +/- 4.14 vs. 29.95 +/- 12.36 and at 12 hour 13.88 +/- 6.31 vs. 26.10 +/- 12.23 mmol/l. No significant difference in serum ammonia level was found. ICP was significantly different from 9 hour to 12 hour interval in favour of FPSA group (p < 0.01): 9 hour 19.1 +/- 4.09 vs. 24.1 +/- 2.85, 10 hour 21.9 +/- 3.63 vs. 25.1 +/- 2.19, 11 hour 22.5 +/- 3.98 vs. 26.3 +/- 3.50 and 12 hour 24.0 +/- 4.66 vs. 29.8 +/- 5.88 mm Hg. Significant improvement of bilirubin

  12. El método científico experimental en las clases de laboratorio de física / The experimental scientific method in Physics laboratory lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landa, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente estudio los autores abordan la aplicación del método científico experimental en el proceso de enseñanza de la Física como parte del modelo de aprendizaje como investigación en la carrera de Matemática-Física. El análisis de diferentes resultados investigativos publicados en la última década posibilitó identificar avances significativos en este campo, sobre todo en cuanto a la operacionalización del método y la utilización de simulaciones y experimentos virtuales en la enseñanza de la Física, sin embargo, aún persisten insuficiencias en el proceder de los docentes que limitan la apropiación del método por parte de los estudiantes. En particular, se ofrece a los docentes una alternativa metodológica para la introducción del método científico experimental, en las prácticas de laboratorio de Física, que contribuye al tránsito de los estudiantes por los procedimientos del citado método. Finalmente se expone un ejemplo concreto del modo en que se aplicó la alternativa metodológica en una clase de laboratorio de Física. This article deals with the application of the experimental scientific method in the teaching and learning process in Mathematics-Physics career as a part of learning by researching model. The study of references and the analysis of former research findings allow identifying significant achievements in the last ten years, mainly about the application of the method and also the use of virtual experiments and simulation in teaching Physics. However, there are several shortcomings of procedural nature that hinder the students’ appropriation of the method. The main finding is a proposal of a teaching alternative to achieve the learning of the experimental scientific method and its procedures by the students. Finally, that teaching alternative is illustrated in a particular Physics laboratory lesson

  13. DIissolution of low enriched uranium from the experimental breeder reactor-II fuel stored at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-28

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is actively engaged in the development of electrochemical processing technology for the treatment of fast reactor fuels using irradiated fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as the primary test material. The research and development (R&D) activities generate a low enriched uranium (LEU) metal product from the electrorefining of the EBR-II fuel and the subsequent consolidation and removal of chloride salts by the cathode processor. The LEU metal ingots from past R&D activities are currently stored at INL awaiting disposition. One potential disposition pathway is the shipment of the ingots to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for dissolution in H-Canyon. Carbon steel cans containing the LEU metal would be loaded into reusable charging bundles in the H-Canyon Crane Maintenance Area and charged to the 6.4D or 6.1D dissolver. The LEU dissolution would be accomplished as the final charge in a dissolver batch (following the dissolution of multiple charges of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)). The solution would then be purified and the 235U enrichment downblended to allow use of the U in commercial reactor fuel. To support this potential disposition path, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a dissolution flowsheet for the LEU using samples of the material received from INL.

  14. Guidelines for information about therapy experiments: a proposal on best practice for recording experimental data on cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Beltrán Alejandra N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biology, biomedicine and healthcare have become data-driven enterprises, where scientists and clinicians need to generate, access, validate, interpret and integrate different kinds of experimental and patient-related data. Thus, recording and reporting of data in a systematic and unambiguous fashion is crucial to allow aggregation and re-use of data. This paper reviews the benefits of existing biomedical data standards and focuses on key elements to record experiments for therapy development. Specifically, we describe the experiments performed in molecular, cellular, animal and clinical models. We also provide an example set of elements for a therapy tested in a phase I clinical trial. Findings We introduce the Guidelines for Information About Therapy Experiments (GIATE, a minimum information checklist creating a consistent framework to transparently report the purpose, methods and results of the therapeutic experiments. A discussion on the scope, design and structure of the guidelines is presented, together with a description of the intended audience. We also present complementary resources such as a classification scheme, and two alternative ways of creating GIATE information: an electronic lab notebook and a simple spreadsheet-based format. Finally, we use GIATE to record the details of the phase I clinical trial of CHT-25 for patients with refractory lymphomas. The benefits of using GIATE for this experiment are discussed. Conclusions While data standards are being developed to facilitate data sharing and integration in various aspects of experimental medicine, such as genomics and clinical data, no previous work focused on therapy development. We propose a checklist for therapy experiments and demonstrate its use in the 131Iodine labeled CHT-25 chimeric antibody cancer therapy. As future work, we will expand the set of GIATE tools to continue to encourage its use by cancer researchers, and we will engineer an ontology to

  15. Effect of Changing the Vocal Tract Shape on the Sound Production of the Recorder: An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    CERN Document Server

    Auvray, R; Terrien, S; Fabre, B; Vergez, C

    2016-01-01

    Changing the vocal tract shape is one of the techniques which can be used by the players of wind instruments to modify the quality of the sound. It has been intensely studied in the case of reed instruments but has received only little attention in the case of air-jet instruments. This paper presents a first study focused on changes in the vocal tract shape in recorder playing techniques. Measurements carried out with recorder players allow to identify techniques involving changes of the mouth shape as well as consequences on the sound. A second experiment performed in laboratory mimics the coupling with the vocal tract on an artificial mouth. The phase of the transfer function between the instrument and the mouth of the player is identified to be the relevant parameter of the coupling. It is shown to have consequences on the spectral content in terms of energy distribution among the even and odd harmonics, as well as on the stability of the first two oscillating regimes. The results gathered from the two exp...

  16. First record of Megaselia scalaris (Loew) (Diptera: Phoridae) infesting laboratory colonies of Triatoma brasiliensis Neiva (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Jane; Almeida, Carlos E.; Esperanca, Gleidson M.; Morales, Ninive [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept.de Entomologia. Lab. da Colecao Entomologica; Mallet, Jacenir R. dos S.; Goncalves, Teresa C.M. [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Transmissores de Leishmanioses. Nucleo de Ultraestrutura; Prado, Angelo P. do [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Parasitologia

    2007-11-15

    Megaselia scalaris (Loew) is a cosmopolitan and synanthropic scuttle fly, eclectic in its feeding habits and acts as detritivore, parasite, facultative parasite, and parasitoid. Here we report for the first time M. scalaris infesting laboratory colonies of Triatoma brasiliensis Neiva, the most important Chagas disease vector in semiarid areas of Brazil. M. scalaris larvae were found feeding inside bugs; pupae were found in the esophagus and intestinal regions of T. brasiliensis through dissection. Other relevant information about this finding is also described in this note, including some preventive measures to avoid laboratory colonies infestations. (author)

  17. First record of Megaselia scalaris (Loew) (Diptera: Phoridae) infesting laboratory colonies of Triatoma brasiliensis Neiva (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jane; Almeida, Carlos E; Esperança, Gleidson M; Morales, Nínive; Dos S Mallet, Jacenir R; Gonçalves, Teresa C M; do Prado, Angelo P

    2007-01-01

    Megaselia scalaris (Loew) is a cosmopolitan and synanthropic scuttle fly, eclectic in its feeding habits and acts as detritivore, parasite, facultative parasite, and parasitoid. Here we report for the first time M. scalaris infesting laboratory colonies of Triatoma brasiliensis Neiva, the most important Chagas disease vector in semiarid areas of Brazil. M. scalaris larvae were found feeding inside bugs; pupae were found in the esophagus and intestinal regions of T. brasiliensis through dissection. Other relevant information about this finding is also described in this note, including some preventive measures to avoid laboratory colonies infestations.

  18. CFD approach to modelling, hydrodynamic analysis and motion characteristics of a laboratory underwater glider with experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogang Singh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater gliders are buoyancy propelled vehicle which make use of buoyancy for vertical movement and wings to propel the glider in forward direction. Autonomous underwater gliders are a patented technology and are manufactured and marketed by corporations. In this study, we validate the experimental lift and drag characteristics of a glider from the literature using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach. This approach is then used for the assessment of the steady state characteristics of a laboratory glider designed at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT Madras. Flow behaviour and lift and drag force distribution at different angles of attack are studied for Reynolds numbers varying from 105 to 106 for NACA0012 wing configurations. The state variables of the glider are the velocity, gliding angle and angle of attack which are simulated by making use of the hydrodynamic drag and lift coefficients obtained from CFD. The effect of the variable buoyancy is examined in terms of the gliding angle, velocity and angle of attack. Laboratory model of glider is developed from the final design asserted by CFD. This model is used for determination of static and dynamic properties of an underwater glider which were validated against an equivalent CAD model and simulation results obtained from equations of motion of glider in vertical plane respectively. In the literature, only empirical approach has been adopted to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients of the AUG that are required for its trajectory simulation. In this work, a CFD approach has been proposed to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients and validated with experimental data. A two-mass variable buoyancy engine has been designed and implemented. The equations of motion for this two-mass engine have been obtained by modifying the single mass version of the equations described in the literature. The objectives of the present study are to understand the glider dynamics adopting a CFD approach

  19. New Experimental Technique for Nodularity and Mg Fading Control in Compacted Graphite Iron Production on Laboratory Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Juan Carlos; Domeij, Björn; González, Daniel; Amieva, José Manuel; Diószegi, Attila

    2017-11-01

    The narrow production window for compacted graphite iron material (CGI) drastically reduces the possibilities to produce it in small batches outside an industrial environment. This fact hinders laboratory-scale investigations on CGI solidification. This work presents a solution to that issue by introducing an experimental technique to produce graphitic cast iron of the main three families. Samples of a base hypereutectic spheroidal graphite iron (SGI) were re-melted in a resistance furnace under Ar atmosphere. Varying the holding time at 1723 K (1450 °C), graphitic irons ranging from spheroidal to lamellar were produced. Characterization of the graphite morphology evolution, in terms of nodularity as a function of holding time, is presented. The nodularity decay for the SGI region suggests a linear correlation with the holding time. In the CGI region, nodularity deterioration shows a slower rate, concluding with the sudden appearance of lamellar graphite. The fading process of magnesium, showing agreement with previous researchers, is described by means of empirical relations as a function of holding time and nodularity. The results on nodularity fade and number of nodules per unit area fade suggest that both phenomena occur simultaneously during the fading process of magnesium.

  1. THE IMPORTANCE OF INSTRUMENT MAKERS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: THE CASE OF ALFRED BINET AT THE SORBONNE LABORATORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Serge

    2016-07-01

    The importance of instrument firms in the development of psychology, and science in general, should not be underestimated since it would not have been possible for various leading psychologists at the turn of the twentieth century to conduct certain experiments without the assistance of instrument makers, as is often the case today. To illustrate the historical perspective introduced here, the example of Alfred Binet is taken, as he is an interesting case of a psychologist working in close collaboration with various French instrument designers of the time. The objective of this article is twofold: (1) to show the considerable activity carried out by early psychologists to finalize new laboratory instruments in order to develop their research projects; (2) to reassess the work of a major figure in French psychology through his activity as a designer of precision instruments. The development of these new instruments would certainly have been difficult without the presence in Paris of numerous precision instrument manufacturers such as Charles Verdin, Otto Lund, Henri Collin, and Lucien Korsten, on whom Binet successively called in order to develop his projects in the field of experimental psychology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Top ten challenges when interfacing a laboratory information system to an electronic health record: Experience at a large academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrides, Athena K; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Goonan, Ellen M; Landman, Adam B; Kantartjis, Michalis; Bates, David W; Melanson, Stacy E F

    2017-10-01

    Recent U.S. government regulations incentivize implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) with computerized order entry and structured results display. Many institutions have also chosen to interface their EHR to their laboratory information system (LIS). Reported long-term benefits include increased efficiency and improved quality and safety. In order to successfully implement an interfaced EHR-LIS, institutions must plan years in advance and anticipate the impact of an integrated system. It can be challenging to fully understand the technical, workflow and resource aspects and adequately prepare for a potentially protracted system implementation and the subsequent stabilization. We describe the top ten challenges that we encountered in our clinical laboratories following the implementation of an interfaced EHR-LIS and offer suggestions on how to overcome these challenges. This study was performed at a 777-bed, tertiary care center which recently implemented an interfaced EHR-LIS. Challenges were recorded during EHR-LIS implementation and stabilization and the authors describe the top ten. Our top ten challenges were selection and harmonization of test codes, detailed training for providers on test ordering, communication with EHR provider champions during the build process, fluid orders and collections, supporting specialized workflows, sufficient reports and metrics, increased volume of inpatient venipunctures, adequate resources during stabilization, unanticipated changes to laboratory workflow and ordering specimens for anatomic pathology. A few suggestions to overcome these challenges include regular meetings with clinical champions, advanced considerations of reports and metrics that will be needed, adequate training of laboratory staff on new workflows in the EHR and defining all tests including anatomic pathology in the LIS. EHR-LIS implementations have many challenges requiring institutions to adapt and develop new infrastructures. This article

  3. Isolation of Trichophyton mentogrophytes var mentogrophytes from naturally infected laboratory albino rats: experimental infection and treatment in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Issa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrated for the first time the occurrence of dermatophytosis in naturally infected rats and from asymptomatic and from breeding boxes of white rats kept in animal housing of college of Veterinary Medicine, University of Dohuk, Iraq. The prevalence rate of infection was (28%, clinically infected rats characterized by appearance of scaly ovoid type lesions with crusty edge and patch of hair loss mostly seen on the back, neck and face of the infected rats, itching was reported in some rats. Only one species of the trichophyton, T. mentogrophytes var mentogrophytes was isolated with growth rate (85.71% of samples collected from clinically infected rats, and (28.57% from asymptomatic and from breeding cages, the growth was observed within the 21 days at 25ºC on Sabouraud's Dextrose Agar. Lacto phenol cotton blue staining slides of T. mentogrophytes var mentogrophytes revealed both microconidia and macroconidia. Microconidia found in numerous numbers often in dense cluster which were hyaline, smooth walled and predominantly spherical to sub spherical in shape, varying numbers of chlamydoconidia. Spiral hyphae and smooth, thin walled clavate shaped multicelled macroconidia were also present. The study also dealt with experimental infection in rabbits with T. mentogrophytes var mentogrophytes and treated by two drugs, natural herbal preparation of acidic pomegranate (Punica granatum fruit and synthetic nystatine ointment. The complete recovery of lesions was recorded after 14 days and 21 days of topical application of a pomegranate and nystatine ointment for 5 successive days respectively.

  4. When Gender Identity Doesn't Equal Sex Recorded at Birth: The Role of the Laboratory in Providing Effective Healthcare to the Transgender Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Zil; Corneil, Trevor A; Greene, Dina N

    2017-08-01

    Transgender is an umbrella term used to describe individuals who identify with a gender incongruent to or variant from their sex recorded at birth. Affirming gender identity through a variety of social, medical, and surgical interventions is critical to the mental health of transgender individuals. In recent years, awareness surrounding transgender identities has increased, which has highlighted the health disparities that parallel this demographic. These disparities are reflected in the experience of transgender patients and their providers when seeking clinical laboratory services. Little is known about the effect of gender-affirming hormone therapy and surgery on optimal laboratory test interpretation. Efforts to diminish health disparities encountered by transgender individuals and their providers can be accomplished by increasing social and clinical awareness regarding sex/gender incongruence and gaining insight into the physiological manifestations and laboratory interpretations of gender-affirming strategies. This review summarizes knowledge required to understand transgender healthcare including current clinical interventions for gender dysphoria. Particular attention is paid to the subsequent impact of these interventions on laboratory test utilization and interpretation. Common nomenclature and system barriers are also discussed. Understanding gender incongruence, the clinical changes associated with gender transition, and systemic barriers that maintain a gender/sex binary are key to providing adequate healthcare to transgender community. Transgender appropriate reference interval studies are virtually absent within the medical literature and should be explored. The laboratory has an important role in improving the physiological understanding, electronic medical system recognition, and overall social awareness of the transgender community. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  5. In Situ and Laboratory Studies on the Fate of Specific Organic Compounds in an Anerobic Landfill Leachate Plume, 1. Experimental Conditions and Fate of Phenolic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Heron, Gorm

    1995-01-01

    microcosm experiments performed and the results on the fate of 7 phenolic compounds. Part 2 of this series of papers, also published in this issue, presents the results on the fate of 8 aromatic compounds and 4 chlorinated aliphatic compounds. The redox conditions in the plume were characterized...... by in situ and laboratory experiments, both concerning redox conditions and the fate of the phenolic compounds. However, for phenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, transformation was observed in some in situ experiments but not in the corresponding laboratory experiments. In some experiments, this could be explained......The transformation of specific organic compounds was investigated by in situ and laboratory experiments in an anaerobic landfill leachate pollution plume at four different distances from the landfill. This paper presents the experimental conditions in the in situ microcosm and laboratory batch...

  6. Projection multiplex recording of computer-synthesised one-dimensional Fourier holograms for holographic memory systems: mathematical and experimental modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betin, A Yu; Bobrinev, V I; Verenikina, N M; Donchenko, S S; Odinokov, S B [Research Institute ' Radiotronics and Laser Engineering' , Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Evtikhiev, N N; Zlokazov, E Yu; Starikov, S N; Starikov, R S [National Reseach Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-31

    A multiplex method of recording computer-synthesised one-dimensional Fourier holograms intended for holographic memory devices is proposed. The method potentially allows increasing the recording density in the previously proposed holographic memory system based on the computer synthesis and projection recording of data page holograms. (holographic memory)

  7. Use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-related drugs among 223 patients with an acute hip fracture in Finland: Comparison of benzodiazepine findings in medical records and laboratory assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi-Lüthje, Ilona; Kaukonen, Juha-Pekka; Lüthje, Peter; Naboulsi, Helena; Tanninen, Salla; Kataja, Matti; Kallio, Maija-Leena; Leppilampi, Marjatta

    2006-01-01

    CNS drugs are a risk factor for falls and fractures among older people. Our aim was to describe the use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-related drugs among patients admitted to two Finnish hospitals as a result of an acute hip fracture, and to analyse the concordance of benzodiazepine findings from different data sources. We studied the use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-related drugs by (i) asking the patient or his/her relatives about his/her use of hypnotics; (ii) checking the patient's medical records; and (iii) analysing for the presence of benzodiazepines in serum and urine. Blood and urine samples were taken at admission. Detection of benzodiazepines in serum and urine was achieved by the fluorescence polarisation method. Concordance in benzodiazepine findings between medical records and laboratory results was estimated by calculating the degree of agreement (kappa) and described graphically using a Venn diagram. A total of 223 patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, 71% were women. The mean age of women was 80.5 years (SD: 10) and of men, 73 years (SD: 12) [p Benzodiazepine in serum or urine was detected in 83 (37%) patients. Over half of the patients coming from residential homes (53%) and institutions (54%) were benzodiazepine-positive. For home dwellers the proportion of patients that were benzodiazepine-positive was 29%. In 48% (40/83) of the benzodiazepine-positive patients, the type of benzodiazepine could not be identified because of a lack of drug records regarding benzodiazepines. A total of 113 (51%) patients used benzodiazepines or benzodiazepine-related drugs when both laboratory results and medical drug records were taken into account. Thirty-nine percent of these patients were home dwellers, 69% came from residential care and 76% from institutional care. The concordance between medical records and laboratory results expressed as overlap area was 32% in men and 59% in women, 38% in community-dwelling patients, 63% in

  8. Wind Structural Testing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components...

  9. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  10. Non food-related environmental stimuli induce increased meal intake in healthy women: comparison of television viewing versus listening to a recorded story in laboratory settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisle, F; Dalix, A M; Slama, G

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the present study, performed under laboratory conditions, was to assess the impact of two non food-related environmental stimuli (television and auditory stimulus) on meal intake. Normal weight women (N = 48) ate lunch in the laboratory once a week for four weeks. All lunches were identical and included popular traditional foods, of which participants could eat ad libitum. The first and last lunches were eaten in the absence of the environmental stimuli (control conditions); in the other two tests, presented in random order, subjects ate while either watching television or listening to a recorded story. Energy intakes were determined for each meal, as were ratings of hunger, satiety and meal palatability. Subjects filled out the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire at the end of the meal series. Meal size was significantly larger in the presence of both environmental stimuli than in both control conditions (+11.6%, 280 kJ, p < 0.01). Television viewing induced a significant stimulation of intake, equal to, but not greater than the effect of the auditory stimulus. Ratings of hunger, satiety, and palatability were not significantly different between conditions, despite the differences in intake. These results suggest that environmental, non food-related stimuli could stimulate intake regardless of hunger-satiety or palatability conditions. Environmental stimulation of eating should be tested in other populations, eg subjects with weight control problems, and other conditions, e.g. free-living.

  11. Development and Experimental Validation of a Dry Non-Invasive Multi-Channel Mouse Scalp EEG Sensor through Visual Evoked Potential Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghyeon Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a dry non-invasive multi-channel sensor for measuring brainwaves on the scalps of mice. The research on laboratory animals provide insights to various practical applications involving human beings and other animals such as working animals, pets, and livestock. An experimental framework targeting the laboratory animals has the potential to lead to successful translational research when it closely resembles the environment of real applications. To serve scalp electroencephalography (EEG research environments for the laboratory mice, the dry non-invasive scalp EEG sensor with sixteen electrodes is proposed to measure brainwaves over the entire brain area without any surgical procedures. We validated the proposed sensor system with visual evoked potential (VEP experiments elicited by flash stimulations. The VEP responses obtained from experiments are compared with the existing literature, and analyzed in temporal and spatial perspectives. We further interpret the experimental results using time-frequency distribution (TFD and distance measurements. The developed sensor guarantees stable operations for in vivo experiments in a non-invasive manner without surgical procedures, therefore exhibiting a high potential to strengthen longitudinal experimental studies and reliable translational research exploiting non-invasive paradigms.

  12. Development and Experimental Validation of a Dry Non-Invasive Multi-Channel Mouse Scalp EEG Sensor through Visual Evoked Potential Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyeon; Yeon, Chanmi; Kim, Kiseon

    2017-02-09

    In this paper, we introduce a dry non-invasive multi-channel sensor for measuring brainwaves on the scalps of mice. The research on laboratory animals provide insights to various practical applications involving human beings and other animals such as working animals, pets, and livestock. An experimental framework targeting the laboratory animals has the potential to lead to successful translational research when it closely resembles the environment of real applications. To serve scalp electroencephalography (EEG) research environments for the laboratory mice, the dry non-invasive scalp EEG sensor with sixteen electrodes is proposed to measure brainwaves over the entire brain area without any surgical procedures. We validated the proposed sensor system with visual evoked potential (VEP) experiments elicited by flash stimulations. The VEP responses obtained from experiments are compared with the existing literature, and analyzed in temporal and spatial perspectives. We further interpret the experimental results using time-frequency distribution (TFD) and distance measurements. The developed sensor guarantees stable operations for in vivo experiments in a non-invasive manner without surgical procedures, therefore exhibiting a high potential to strengthen longitudinal experimental studies and reliable translational research exploiting non-invasive paradigms.

  13. Computer vision-based diameter maps to study fluoroscopic recordings of small intestinal motility from conscious experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, I; Pantrigo, J J; Montemayor, A S; López-Pérez, A E; Martín-Fontelles, M I; Brookes, S J H; Abalo, R

    2017-08-01

    When available, fluoroscopic recordings are a relatively cheap, non-invasive and technically straightforward way to study gastrointestinal motility. Spatiotemporal maps have been used to characterize motility of intestinal preparations in vitro, or in anesthetized animals in vivo. Here, a new automated computer-based method was used to construct spatiotemporal motility maps from fluoroscopic recordings obtained in conscious rats. Conscious, non-fasted, adult, male Wistar rats (n=8) received intragastric administration of barium contrast, and 1-2 hours later, when several loops of the small intestine were well-defined, a 2 minutes-fluoroscopic recording was obtained. Spatiotemporal diameter maps (Dmaps) were automatically calculated from the recordings. Three recordings were also manually analyzed for comparison. Frequency analysis was performed in order to calculate relevant motility parameters. In each conscious rat, a stable recording (17-20 seconds) was analyzed. The Dmaps manually and automatically obtained from the same recording were comparable, but the automated process was faster and provided higher resolution. Two frequencies of motor activity dominated; lower frequency contractions (15.2±0.9 cpm) had an amplitude approximately five times greater than higher frequency events (32.8±0.7 cpm). The automated method developed here needed little investigator input, provided high-resolution results with short computing times, and automatically compensated for breathing and other small movements, allowing recordings to be made without anesthesia. Although slow and/or infrequent events could not be detected in the short recording periods analyzed to date (17-20 seconds), this novel system enhances the analysis of in vivo motility in conscious animals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Measurement of Thermal Properties of Growing Media for Green Roofs: Assessment of a Laboratory Procedure and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Barozzi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While the Italian standard UNI 11235:2015 establishes minimum performance criteria, the thermal resistance of the growing medium of green roofs is not included in national regulations. Instead, thermal transmittance limits for roofs are obtained by referring to other stratigraphic layers. In the absence of specific national and international standards for laboratory calculations of the thermal performance of growing media for green roofs, a multi-year laboratory testing campaign was carried out on 8 samples which aimed to define the thermal resistance reference values of growing media as a function of density and water content. Thermal conductivity varies between 0.046–0.179 W/mK for dry samples as a function of density and between 0.046–0.47 W/mK as a function of moisture content. Defining a reference method, laboratory tests and restitution of the output in performance curves, was based on 108 tests carried out according to and deviating from the standard based on both guarded hot plate and heat flow meter methods. The significance of the results has prompted researchers and industrial partners to engage in further investment and ongoing tests in this area, targeting the definition of a standard laboratory method to be presented worldwide.

  15. A DNA Fingerprinting Simulation Laboratory for Biology Students: Hands-on Experimentation To Solve a Mock Forensic Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Michael A.; Cosentino, Emily

    2001-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to DNA fingerprinting. Demonstrates how undergraduate students can be involved in many aspects of this type of experiment and how DNA fingerprinting experiments can be incorporated into the laboratory curriculum of courses for majors and nonmajors. (NB)

  16. A Study on the Read/Write Experimental Results for a High-Definition Digital Video Disc Recorder using Blue-Laser Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ikuo

    2001-03-01

    At present, tape media are mainly used for video recording globally. However, in the near future, disc media will come into general use, as they possess many strong points compared with tape media. Thus, we are now researching the development of a high-definition digital video disc recorder with high capacity, high data transfer rate, and low cost. Our target specifications are 15 GB to 18 GB, and over 35 Mbps, using a 120 mm phase change disc and a blue-laser diode. To confirm that it is possible, numerous sample discs were manufactured and experiments were carried out. We succeeded in obtaining good experimental results. In this study, we demonstrate the possibility of realizing a high-definition digital video disc recorder using a 120 mm phase change disc and a blue-laser diode without using a disc cartridge or any extraordinary method that increases the cost.

  17. Design and assembly of an experimental laboratory for the study of atmosphere-plant interactions in the system of fumigation chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, S R; Pagliuso, J D

    2009-11-01

    An experimental laboratory was designed and assembled at the Botanical Institute of São Paulo, Brazil, in order to research atmosphere-plant interactions through the use of a system of fumigation chambers. A system of three "closed" fumigation chambers was designed to be used inside or outside the laboratory. The system was built to be used with a single pollutant or a mix of them. The innovation in this system is to allow chemical reactions inside the chambers that simulate atmospheric chemistry, especially photochemical processes involving high levels of ozone. Assessment of the performance and applicability of the system was based on the response of Nicotiana tabacum Bel W3 exposed to ozone produced alternatively by a generator and inside the chamber by reactions of its precursors. The results showed that the system can be well applied to the study of atmospheric chemistry interactions and the effects on plants.

  18. Effect of a Price Transparency Intervention in the Electronic Health Record on Clinician Ordering of Inpatient Laboratory Tests: The PRICE Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrak, Mina S; Myers, Jennifer S; Small, Dylan S; Nachamkin, Irving; Ziemba, Justin B; Murray, Dana; Kurtzman, Gregory W; Zhu, Jingsan; Wang, Wenli; Mincarelli, Deborah; Danoski, Daniel; Wells, Brian P; Berns, Jeffrey S; Brennan, Patrick J; Hanson, C William; Dine, C Jessica; Patel, Mitesh S

    2017-07-01

    Many health systems are considering increasing price transparency at the time of order entry. However, evidence of its impact on clinician ordering behavior is inconsistent and limited to single-site evaluations of shorter duration. To test the effect of displaying Medicare allowable fees for inpatient laboratory tests on clinician ordering behavior over 1 year. The Pragmatic Randomized Introduction of Cost data through the electronic health record (PRICE) trial was a randomized clinical trial comparing a 1-year intervention to a 1-year preintervention period, and adjusting for time trends and patient characteristics. The trial took place at 3 hospitals in Philadelphia between April 2014 and April 2016 and included 98 529 patients comprising 142 921 hospital admissions. Inpatient laboratory test groups were randomly assigned to display Medicare allowable fees (30 in intervention) or not (30 in control) in the electronic health record. Primary outcome was the number of tests ordered per patient-day. Secondary outcomes were tests performed per patient-day and Medicare associated fees. The sample included 142 921 hospital admissions representing patients who were 51.9% white (74 165), 38.9% black (55 526), and 56.9% female (81 291) with a mean (SD) age of 54.7 (19.0) years. Preintervention trends of order rates among the intervention and control groups were similar. In adjusted analyses of the intervention group compared with the control group over time, there were no significant changes in overall test ordering behavior (0.05 tests ordered per patient-day; 95% CI, -0.002 to 0.09; P = .06) or associated fees ($0.24 per patient-day; 95% CI, -$0.42 to $0.91; P = .47). Exploratory subset analyses found small but significant differences in tests ordered per patient-day based on patient intensive care unit (ICU) stay (patients with ICU stay: -0.16; 95% CI, -0.31 to -0.01; P = .04; patients without ICU stay: 0.13; 95% CI, 0.08-0.17; P < .001) and the

  19. Anatomical features for an adequate choice of experimental animal model in biomedicine: II. Small laboratory rodents, rabbit, and pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossi, Laura; D'Angelo, Livia; De Girolamo, Paolo; Merighi, Adalberto

    2016-03-01

    The anatomical features distinctive to each of the very large array of species used in today's biomedical research must be born in mind when considering the correct choice of animal model(s), particularly when translational research is concerned. In this paper we take into consideration and discuss the most important anatomical and histological features of the commonest species of laboratory rodents (rat, mouse, guinea pig, hamster, and gerbil), rabbit, and pig related to their importance for applied research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Emissions from waste combustion. An application of statistical experimental design in a laboratory-scale boiler and an investigation from large-scale incineration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaojing

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this thesis is a study of the emissions from the combustion of household refuse. The experiments were both on a laboratory-scale boiler and on full-scale incineration plants. In the laboratory, an artificial household refuse with known composition was fed into a pilot boiler with a stationary grate. Combustion was under non-optimum conditions. Direct sampling with a Tenax adsorbent was used to measure a range of VOCs. Measurements were also made of incompletely burnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen and flue gas temperature. Combustion and emission parameters were recorded continuously by a multi-point data logger. VOCs were analysed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The full-scale tests were on seven Swedish incineration plants. The data were used to evaluate the emissions from large-scale incineration plants with various type of fuels and incinerators, and were also compared with the laboratory results. The response surface model developed from the laboratory experiments was also validated. This thesis also includes studies on the gasification of household refuse pellets, estimations of particulate and soot emissions, and a thermodynamic analysis of PAHs from combustion flue gas. For pellet gasification, experiments were performed on single, well characterised refuse pellets under carefully controlled conditions. The aim was to see if the effects of pellets were different from those of untreated household refuse. The results from both laboratory and full-scale tests showed that the main contributions to emissions from household refuse are plastics and moisture. 142 refs, 82 figs, 51 tabs

  1. Microbial risk in wastewater irrigated lettuce: comparing Escherichia coli contamination from an experimental site with a laboratory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkaew, P; Miller, M; Fallowfield, H J; Cromar, N J

    This study assessed the contamination of Escherichia coli, in lettuce grown with treated domestic wastewater in four different irrigation configurations: open spray, spray under plastic sheet cover, open drip and drip under plastic sheet cover. Samples of lettuce from each irrigation configuration and irrigating wastewater were collected during the growing season. No E. coli was detected in lettuce from drip irrigated beds. All lettuce samples from spray beds were positive for E. coli, however, no statistical difference (p > 0.05) was detected between lettuces grown in open spray or covered spray beds. The results from the field experiment were also compared to a laboratory experiment which used submersion of lettuce in wastewater of known E. coli concentration as a surrogate method to assess contamination following irrigation. The microbial quality of spray bed lettuces was not significantly different from submersed lettuce when irrigated with wastewater containing 1,299.7 E. coli MPN/100 mL (p > 0.05). This study is significant since it is the first to validate that the microbial contamination of lettuce irrigated with wastewater in the field is comparable with a laboratory technique frequently applied in the quantitative microbial risk assessment of the consumption of wastewater irrigated salad crops.

  2. The relationship between the golden spiny mouse circadian system and its diurnal activity: an experimental field enclosures and laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Ofir; Dayan, Tamar; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

    2007-01-01

    Examples of animals that switch activity times between nocturnality and diurnality in nature are relatively infrequent. Furthermore, the mechanism for switching activity time is not clear: does a complete inversion of the circadian system occur in conjunction with activity pattern? Are there switching centers downstream from the internal clock that interpret the clock differently? Or does the switch reflect a masking effect? Answering these key questions may shed light on the mechanisms regulating activity patterns and their evolution. The golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus) can switch between nocturnal and diurnal activity. This study investigated the relationship between its internal circadian clock and its diurnal activity pattern observed in the field. The goal is to understand the mechanisms underlying species rhythm shifts in order to gain insight into the evolution of activity patterns. All golden spiny mice had opposite activity patterns in the field than those under controlled continuous dark conditions in the laboratory. Activity and body temperature patterns in the field were diurnal, while in the laboratory all individuals immediately showed a free-running rhythm starting with a nocturnal pattern. No phase transients were found toward the preferred nocturnal activity pattern, as would be expected in the case of true entrainment. Moreover, the fact that the free-running activity patterns began from the individuals' subjective night suggests that golden spiny mice are nocturnal and that their diurnality in their natural habitat in the field results from a change that is downstream to the internal clock or reflects a masking effect.

  3. Devonian micritic limestones used in the historic production of Prague hydraulic lime (‘pasta di Praga’): characterization of the raw material and experimental laboratory burning

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlovcev, P.; Přikryl, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Devonian micritic limestones from the Prague Basin (Barrandian area, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic), which were the primary raw material used for natural hydraulic lime burned in Prague, exhibit a feebly to eminently hydraulic character. Based on a laboratory experimental study, the burned product is composed of dominant free-lime (CaO) and/or portlandite (Ca(OH)2), larnite-belite (bicalcium silicate 2CaO.SiO2), and quartz (SiO2) - i.e. phases formed due to the decomposition of carbonat...

  4. Developing Tele-Operated Laboratories for Manufacturing Engineering Education. Platform for E-Learning and Telemetric Experimentation (PeTEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Erman Tekkaya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the PeTEX-project is to establish an e-Learning platform for the development, implementation, and delivery of educational training programs in the field of manufacturing engineering. The PeTEX team designs both: a technical platform for eLearning based on “Moodle” including distributed tele-operated experimentation facilities, and didactic and socio-technical requirements for a successful online learning community. User interfaces are deployed for remote access to instruments, data analysis and multiplexed data access via network protocols. Hence, the platform provides complex tools in order to perform various activities to support the educational process, from telemetric experimentation to virtual project groups for an entire community to the purpose of domain specific learning. This paper describes important steps of interdisciplinary participatory design and development of a remote lab-prototype in the field of manufacturing engineering.

  5. Experimental Methodology used by Cell Cultures Laboratory from INRMFB to assess the therapeutic effect of natural factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Constantin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The experimental study design on cell cultures allows the direct biological evaluation at the cellular level, of the therapeutic effect that natural factors can play over the organism.Techniques for obtaining cell cultures requires a complex and laborious task that starts from live tissue sampling, continuous with isolation of cells and their preparation for sowing a culture plate. This preparation involves mechanical and enzymatic action from the researcher on biological material. Derived cell cultures are monitored morphologically by high-performance inverted biological microscope, with video camera for image acquisition. In the final stage, the cells are scraped, and through biochemical and molecular techniques, the therapeutic efficiency hypothesis of the investigated natural factor is verified experimentally. The cell cultures can be crioconservated in special containers with liquid nitrogen.

  6. Experimental setup for deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) experiment in hall A at Jefferson Laboratory; Dispositif experimental pour la diffusion Compton virtuelle dans le regime profondement inelastique dans le hall A au Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camsonne, A

    2005-11-15

    The Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) experiment used the 5.757 GeV polarized electron beam available at Jefferson Laboratory and ran from september until december 2004. Using the standard Hall A left high resolution spectrometer three kinematical points were taken at a fixed x{sub b}(jorken) = 0.32 value for three Q{sup 2} values: 1.5 GeV{sup 2}, 1.91 GeV{sup 2}, 2.32 GeV{sup 2}. An electromagnetic Lead Fluoride calorimeter and a proton detector scintillator array designed to work at a luminosity of 10{sup 37} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} were added to ensure the exclusivity of the DVCS reaction. In addition to the new detectors new custom electronics was used: a calorimeter trigger module which determines if an electron photon coincidence has occurred and a sampling system allowing to deal with pile-up events during the offline analysis. Finally the data from the kinematic at Q{sup 2} = 2.32 GeV{sup 2} and s = 5.6 GeV{sup 2} allowed to get a preliminary result for the exclusive {pi}{sup 0} electroproduction on the proton. (author)

  7. Stress and consumption of alcohol in humans with a Type 1 family history of alcoholism in an experimental laboratory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordh, Anna H V Söderpalm; Brkic, Sejla; Söderpalm, Bo

    2011-10-01

    This paper investigates how stress interacts with alcohol consumption in subjects with a family history of alcoholism. One mechanism for increases in alcohol intake may be that stress alters the subjective effects produced by the drug. 58 healthy volunteers, divided into two groups of family history positive (FHP) and two groups of family history negative (FHN) participated in two laboratory sessions, in which they performed in one out of two sessions a stress task. Then subjects were allowed to choose up to six additional drinks of ethanol or placebo depending on which session they were randomly assigned to start with. It was found that FHP subjects increased their consumption of alcohol after stress. It is possible that both stress and alcohol specifically exaggerate the feelings of the reward in the FHP individuals in such way that it may increase the likelihood of consuming more alcohol. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Consequences of experimental cortisol manipulations on the thermal biology of the checkered puffer (Sphoeroides testudineus) in laboratory and field environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, F; Suski, C D; Shultz, A; Danylchuk, A J; O'Connor, C M; Murchie, K J; Cooke, S J

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is altering temperature regimes for coastal marine fishes. However, given that temperature changes will not occur in isolation of other stressors, it is necessary to explore the potential consequences of stress on the thermal tolerances and preferences of tropical marine fish in order to understand the thresholds for survival, and predict the associated coastal ecological consequences. In this study, we used exogenous cortisol injections to investigate the effects of a thermal challenge on checkered puffers (Sphoeroides testudineus) as a secondary stressor. There were no significant differences between control and cortisol-treated fish 48h following cortisol treatment for swimming ability (using a chase to exhaustion protocol), blood glucose concentrations or standard metabolic rate. In the lab, control and cortisol-treated puffers were exposed to ambient (29.1±1.5°C), ambient +5°C (heat shock) and ambient -5°C (cold shock) for 4h and to evaluate the consequences of abrupt temperature change on puff performance and blood physiology. Following cold shock, control fish exhibited increases in cortisol levels and weak 'puff' performance. Conversely, fish dosed with cortisol exhibited consistently high cortisol levels independent of thermal treatment, although there was a trend for an attenuated cortisol response in the cortisol-treated fish to the cold shock treatment. A 20-day complementary field study conducted in the puffer's natural habitat, a tidal creek in Eleuthera, The Bahamas, revealed that cortisol-injected fish selected significantly cooler temperatures, measured using accumulated thermal units, when compared to controls. These results, and particularly the discrepancies between consequences documented in the laboratory and the ecological trends observed in the field, highlight the need to establish the link between laboratory and field data to successfully develop management policies and conservation initiatives with regards

  9. An Experimental Path to Constraining the Origins of the Jupiter Trojans Using Observations, Theoretical Predictions, and Laboratory Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Eiler, John; Brown, Mike; Ehlmann, Bethany; Hand, Kevin; Hodyss, Robert; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael; Liu, Yang; Choukroun, Mathieu; Carey, Elizabeth; Wong, Ian

    2014-11-01

    Hypotheses based on recent dynamical models (e.g. the Nice Model) shape our current understanding of solar system evolution, suggesting radical rearrangement in the first hundreds of millions of years of its history, changing the orbital distances of Jupiter, Saturn, and a large number of small bodies. The goal of this work is to build a methodology to concretely tie individual solar system bodies to dynamical models using observables, providing evidence for their origins and evolutionary pathways. Ultimately, one could imagine identifying a set of chemical or mineralogical signatures that could quantitatively and predictably measure the radial distance at which icy and rocky bodies first accreted. The target of the work presented here is the Jupiter Trojan asteroids, predicted by the Nice Model to have initially formed in the Kuiper belt and later been scattered inward to co-orbit with Jupiter. Here we present our strategy which is fourfold: (1) Generate predictions about the mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions of materials accreted in the early solar system as a function of distance from the Sun. (2) Use temperature and irradiation to simulate evolutionary processing of ices and silicates, and measure the alteration in spectral properties from the UV to mid-IR. (3) Characterize simulants to search for potential fingerprints of origin and processing pathways, and (4) Use telescopic observations to increase our knowledge of the Trojan asteroids, collecting data on populations and using spectroscopy to constrain their compositions. In addition to the overall strategy, we will present preliminary results on compositional modeling, observations, and the synthesis, processing, and characterization of laboratory simulants including ices and silicates. This work has been supported by the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS). The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, under a contract with the National

  10. A 4-year record of sitka spruce and western hemlock seed fall on the Cascade Head Experimental Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. Ruth; Carl M. Berntsen

    1955-01-01

    Four years' measurement of seed fall in the spruce-hemlock type on the Cascade Head Experimental Forest indicates that an ample supply of seed is distributed over clear-cut areas under staggered-setting cutting. The largest tract sampled was 81 acres; in spite of a seed crop failure in 1950, it received an average of 243,000 viable spruce and hemlock seeds per...

  11. Experimental and modelling studies on a laboratory scale anaerobic bioreactor treating mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmikanthan, P; Sughosh, P; White, James; Sivakumar Babu, G L

    2017-07-01

    The performance of an anaerobic bioreactor in treating mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste was investigated using experimental and modelling techniques. The key parameters measured during the experimental test period included the gas yield, leachate generation and settlement under applied load. Modelling of the anaerobic bioreactor was carried out using the University of Southampton landfill degradation and transport model. The model was used to simulate the actual gas production and settlement. A sensitivity analysis showed that the most influential model parameters are the monod growth rate and moisture. In this case, pH had no effect on the total gas production and waste settlement, and only a small variation in the gas production was observed when the heat transfer coefficient of waste was varied from 20 to 100 kJ/(m d K)-1. The anaerobic bioreactor contained 1.9 kg (dry) of mechanically biologically treated waste producing 10 L of landfill gas over 125 days.

  12. Laboratory experimental infection of sheep to Ornithobilharzia turkestanicum and its confirmation using post-mortem examination and histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    gholamreza karimi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ornithobilharzia turkestanicum from genus Ornithobilharzia genus and family Schistosomatidae is an important agent of parasitological infection in sheep. This parasite has been reported from Russia, China, Turkestan (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Turkey and Iran. Parasitological infection due to this agent could be one of the important factors of decreasing the production rate of livestock in Iran. The purpose of this study, was to experimentally infect sheep with this parasite and confirm the infection by post-mortem examination and Histopathology which was done successfully. Twenty five sheep were used in the study of which 10 sheep were experimentally infected by Ornithobilharzia turkestanikum using subcutaneous injection and 10 sheep by skin contact method and the other 5 sheep were kept as control. Result of post-mortem and Histopathology during a one year period confirmed that all of sheep were infected and adult worm, were seen in their mesentery. Mean number of cercaria used for inducing the infection was 6425 and 462 adult worms were collected post-mortem. There was no significant relationship between the number of cercaria and adult worms collected. Male sheep were more infected than female.

  13. A Laboratory Experimental Study: An FBG-PVC Tube Integrated Device for Monitoring the Slip Surface of Landslides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Shaojie; Chen, Jiang; Teng, Pengxiao; Wei, Fangqiang; Chen, Qiao

    2017-10-30

    A new detection device was designed by integrating fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tube in order to monitor the slip surface of a landslide. Using this new FBG-based device, a corresponding slope model with a pre-set slip surface was designed, and seven tests with different soil properties were carried out in laboratory conditions. The FBG sensing fibers were fixed on the PVC tube to measure strain distributions of PVC tube at different elevation. Test results indicated that the PVC tube could keep deformation compatible with soil mass. The new device was able to monitor slip surface location before sliding occurrence, and the location of monitored slip surface was about 1-2 cm above the pre-set slip surface, which basically agreed with presupposition results. The monitoring results are expected to be used to pre-estimate landslide volume and provide a beneficial option for evaluating the potential impact of landslides on shipping safety in the Three Gorges area.

  14. Investigation of forest canopy temperatures recorded by the thermal infrared multispectral scanner at H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, Steven A.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data were collected over the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Western Oregon on July 29, 1983 at approximately 1:30 p.m., Pacific Standard Time. The relation of changes in canopy temperature to green leaf biomass levels in reforested clearcuts and old-growth forest was investigated. A digital data base was generated in order to isolate that portion of the thermal emission that could be attributed to surface properties other than the vegetation biomass component. The TIMS appears to be capable of detecting subtle differences in ERT as related to canopy closure and green lead biomass, however calibration techniques are needed to correct for emissivity and atmospheric effects.

  15. Review on different experimental techniques developed for recording force-deformation behaviour of soft tissues; with a view to surgery simulation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Elnaz; Rostami, Mostafa; Farahmand, Farzam

    2017-05-01

    Different experimental techniques which have been developed to obtain data related to force-deformation behaviour of soft tissues play an important role in realistically simulating surgery processes as well as medical diagnoses and minimally invasive procedures. Indeed, an adequate quantitative description of soft-tissue-mechanical-behaviour requires high-quality experimental data to be obtained and analysed. In this review article we will first scan the motivations and basic technical issues on surgery simulation. Then, we will concentrate on different experimental techniques developed for recording force-deformation (stress-strain) behaviour of soft tissues with focussing on the in-vivo experimental setups. We will thoroughly review the available techniques by classifying them to four groups; elastography, indentation, aspiration and grasping techniques. The evolutions, advantages and limitations of each technique will be presented by a historical review. At the end, a discussion is given with the aim of summarising the proposed points and predicting the future of techniques utilised in extracting data related to force-deformation behaviour.

  16. Ability of laboratory methods to predict in-use efficacy of antimicrobial preservatives in an experimental cosmetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, J K; Martz, E L; Wells, S J; Ennis, C C; Holder, J; Levchuk, J W; Avis, K E; Hoffman, P S; Hitchins, A D; Madden, J M

    1994-01-01

    The abilities of nine antimicrobial systems to preserve an experimental water-based cosmetic formulation were evaluated by six microbiological challenge tests: the U.S. Pharmacopeia test; the British Pharmacopeia test; the Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association test; the rapid screen test; the sequential challenge test; and the post-use test. The antimicrobial systems contained various combinations and amounts of two parabens and a quaternary compound in order to provide a broad range of preservation. The results obtained were compared with the abilities of the formulations to support maintenance and growth of microorganisms in microfloras obtained from human axilla areas and finger skin during an 8-week simulated in-use test. Without statistical analysis all of the tests predicted the results obtained with well-preserved or poorly preserved formulations. The rapid screen test was the best test for predicting differences at intermediate levels of preservation. Statistically, all of the tests were equivalent predictors of preservation efficacy in the in-use test (P = 0.05). At the P = 0.10 level, only the U.S. Pharmacopeia, British Pharmacopeia, rapid screen, Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association tests were significantly predictive. The results of prediction by a test, based on the preservative levels used, agreed well with the in-use test results (P = 0.01). A total of 20% of the formulations that contained excessive microbial levels contained human axilla microorganisms. The levels of preservation in failed products were similar to the levels of preservation in unused controls. PMID:7811091

  17. Design, development and experimental validation of a non-invasive device for recording respiratory events during bottle feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaiola, C; Tamilia, E; Massaroni, C; Morbidoni, G; Schena, E; Formica, D; Taffoni, F

    2014-01-01

    In newborns, a poor coordination between sucking, swallowing and breathing may undermine the effectiveness of oral feeding and signal immaturity of Central Nervous System. The aim of this work is to develop and validate a non-invasive device for recording respiratory events of newborns during bottle feeding. The proposed device working principle is based on the convective heat exchanged between two hot bodies and the infants' breathing. The sensing elements are inserted into a duct and the gas exchanged by infants is conveyed into this duct thanks to an ad hoc designed system to be mounted on a commercial feeding bottle. Two sets of experiments have been carried out in order to investigate the discrimination threshold of the device and characterize the sensor response at oscillating flows. The effect of distance and tilt between nostrils and device, and the breathing frequency, have been investigated simulating nostrils and neonatal respiratory pattern. The device has a discrimination threshold lower than 0.5 L/min at both 10° and 20° of tilt. Distance for these two settings does not affect the threshold in the investigated range (10-20 mm). Moreover, the device is able to detect breathing events, and to discriminate the onset of expiratory phase, during a neonatal respiratory task delivered by a lung simulator. The results foster the successful application of this device to the assessment of the temporal breathing pattern of newborns during bottle feeding with a non-invasive approach.

  18. Physical behaviour of calcareous nannofossil ooze and effects of clay and organic matter on pelagic sediment stability: experimental approach using laboratory flumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buls, Toms

    the erosional and depositional behaviour of the produced experimental nannofossil ooze utilising laboratory flumes. These experiments observed general decrease of calcareous nannofossil ooze mobility with decreasing bed porosity and with increasing concentration of clay and organic matter within the studied bed......This thesis explores the subject of physical behaviour of ancient calcareous nannofossil ooze that eventually formed kilometre-thick Upper Cretaceous chalk succession over vast areas of NW Europe and more than 65 Ma years later forms valuable hydrocarbon and ground-water reservoirs. This thesis...... porosity range (85–60 %). A transition from simple to complex erosional behaviour has been identified mostly when bed porosity decreases below 80 %. This complex erosion required definition of multiple erosion thresholds. Typically, erosion thresholds were increasing with decreasing bed porosity...

  19. Feasibility of processing the experimental breeder reactor-II driver fuel from the Idaho National Laboratory through Savannah River Site's H-Canyon facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magoulas, V. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to evaluate the potential to receive and process the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) uranium (U) recovered from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) driver fuel through the Savannah River Site’s (SRS) H-Canyon as a way to disposition the material. INL recovers the uranium from the sodium bonded metallic fuel irradiated in the EBR-II reactor using an electrorefining process. There were two compositions of EBR-II driver fuel. The early generation fuel was U-5Fs, which consisted of 95% U metal alloyed with 5% noble metal elements “fissium” (2.5% molybdenum, 2.0% ruthenium, 0.3% rhodium, 0.1% palladium, and 0.1% zirconium), while the later generation was U-10Zr which was 90% U metal alloyed with 10% zirconium. A potential concern during the H-Canyon nitric acid dissolution process of the U metal containing zirconium (Zr) is the explosive behavior that has been reported for alloys of these materials. For this reason, this evaluation was focused on the ability to process the lower Zr content materials, the U-5Fs material.

  20. Co-firing Bosnian coals with woody biomass: Experimental studies on a laboratory-scale furnace and 110 MWe power unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smajevic Izet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of research into cofiring two Bosnian cola types, brown coal and lignite, with woody biomass, in this case spruce sawdust. The aim of the research was to find the optimal blend of coal and sawdust that may be substituted for 100% coal in large coal-fired power stations in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Two groups of experimental tests were performed in this study: laboratory testing of co-firing and trial runs on a large-scale plant based on the laboratory research results. A laboratory experiment was carried out in an electrically heated and entrained pulverized-fuel flow furnace. Coal-sawdust blends of 93:7% by weight and 80:20% by weight were tested. Co-firing trials were conducted over a range of the following process variables: process temperature, excess air ratio and air distribution. Neither of the two coal-sawdust blends used produced any significant ash-related problems provided the blend volume was 7% by weight sawdust and the process temperature did not exceed 1250ºC. It was observed that in addition to the nitrogen content in the co-fired blend, the volatile content and particle size distribution of the mixture also influenced the level of NOx emissions. The brown coal-sawdust blend generated a further reduction of SO2 due to the higher sulphur capture rate than for coal alone. Based on and following the laboratory research findings, a trial run was carried out in a large-scale utility - the Kakanj power station, Unit 5 (110 MWe, using two mixtures; one in which 5%/wt and one in which 7%/wt of brown coal was replaced with sawdust. Compared to a reference firing process with 100% coal, these co-firing trials produced a more intensive redistribution of the alkaline components in the slag in the melting chamber, with a consequential beneficial effect on the deposition of ash on the superheater surfaces of the boiler. The outcome of the tests confirms the feasibility of using 7%wt of sawdust in combination

  1. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  2. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  3. Preliminary experimental results of Sewage Sludge (SS) Co-digestion with Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) for Enhanced Biogas Production in Laboratory Scale Anaerobic Digester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankari, R.; Kumaran, P.; Normanbhay, Saifuddin; Halim Shamsuddin, Abd

    2013-06-01

    An investigation on the feasibility of co-digesting Sewage Sludge with Palm Oil Mill Effluent for enhancing the biogas production and the corresponding effect of the co-digestion substrate ratio on the biogas production has been evaluated. Anaerobic co-digestion of POME with SS was performed at ratios of 100:0, 70:30, 60:40 and 0:100 to find the optimum blend required for enhanced waste digestion and biogas production. Single stage batch digestion was carried out for 12 days in a laboratory scale anaerobic digester. Co-digestion of sludge's at the 70:30 proportion resulted in optimal COD and C: N ratio which subsequently recorded the highest performance with regards to biogas production at 28.1 L's compared to the 1.98 L's of biogas produced from digestion of SS alone. From the results obtained, it is evident that co-digestion of POME and SS is an attractive option to be explored for enhancement of biogas production in anaerobic digesters.

  4. Oak Ridge Reservation Volume 3. Records relating to RaLa, iodine-131, and cesium-137 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Operations Office: A guide to record series of the Department of Energy and its contractors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-21

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each of the documents and record series pertaining to the production, release, and disposal of radioactive barium-lanthanum (RaLa), iodine-131, and cesium-137 at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, which seeks to verify and conduct inventories of epidemiologic and health-related records at various DOE and DOE contractor sites. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role. It provides information on the history of the DOE-Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), particularly ORNL. Specific attention is given to the production of RaLa and the fission products iodine-131 and cesium-137. This introduction also describes the methodologies HAI used in the selection and inventorying of documents and record series pertaining to RaLa, iodine-131, and cesium-137, and in the production of this guide. Concluding paragraphs describe the arrangement of the record series, explain the information contained in the record series descriptions, and indicate restrictions on access to the records.

  5. Experimental comparison of type of Tissucol dilution and composite mesh (Parietex) for laparoscopic repair of groin and abdominal hernia: observational study conducted in a university laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmi, Stefano; Addis, Alessandro; Domeneghini, Cinzia; Scaini, Alberto; Croce, Enrico

    2007-06-01

    The primary objective of this observational study was to determine the best possible dilution of fibrin glue (Tissucol) to employ for prosthesis fixing in laparoscopic treatment of abdominal wall defects and, secondly, to assess its feasibility and safety. This study was carried out in a university experimental animal laboratory in accordance with all international laws, ethics regulations and quality criteria associated with animal experiments. The tests were carried out on two pigs, using four samples of mesh (Parietex). All meshes were fixed using two different Tissucol dilutions (standard with distilled water and that with calcium chloride). Follow-up evaluations were at 15 days after 30 days, with the latter consisting of traction tests and a biopsy for histological analysis. No post-operative complications were observed. The collagen-coated polyester meshes showed 0% adhesions, and reperitonealization had ensued after 15 days. We saw no shrinkage or migration of any of the meshes. Histopathological analyses confirmed a greater stability, greater tissue integration and the largest number of fibroblasts in meshes fixed with a 1/10 Tissucol dilution without calcium chloride. This observational study using animals showed that the 1/10 standard dilution - not that with calcium chloride - provided the best fixation and integration and prevented the formation of intraperitoneal adhesions, provided a hydrophilic collagen film-covered mesh was used.

  6. Experimental study on bank erosion and protection using submerged vane placed at an optimum angle in a 180° laboratory channel bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Litan; Barbhuiya, Abdul Karim; Biswas, Piya

    2017-04-01

    Unsteadiness of the vertical velocity profile and secondary flow in open channel bends poses serious problems in hydraulic engineering design. Insertion of vertical submerged vanes in the channel bend at an optimum angle with the tangential component of flow can minimize the unsteadiness and generation of secondary flow resulting in the reduction of scour depth at the outer bank. A series of experiments were conducted in a 180° bend laboratory channel to study flow erosion and effective ness of the submerged vane in reducing scour depth. The average approach to flow velocity at 0.20 m flow depth above the lowest initial bed level was 25 cm/s. An Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) was used to measure the three-dimensional time-averaged velocity components at different azimuthal sections on stabilized nonscoured beds without vane. Scour bed profile without vanes shows that bank erosion in a 180° parabolic-shaped bed channel occurs mostly at the zone from bend angles 120° to 140°. Vanes were installed at angles of 10°, 15°, 20°, 30°, and 40° to the tangential flow component maintaining a spacingof 75 cm distance from one vane to another. Experimental results show that a 15° vane angle produces best result in reducing outer bank scour in a parabolic-shaped channel. The data presented in this paper can also be used for validating three-dimensional turbulence models for simulating flows in a curved channel.

  7. The effect of microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) experimentation on students' learning of capacitance in introductory college physics courses in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaya, Fahad S.

    This study attempted to identify effects of Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) experimentation on students' learning about capacitance in introductory college physics courses at King Saud University in Saudi Arabia. The study asked if students using MBL technique in a capacitor experiment understand capacitance better than do students taught via traditional hands-on activity, as measured by the Capacitor Experiment Achievement Test (CEAT). The study sample totaled 114 students in three introductory college physics courses (PHYS 101: 41 science and agriculture students; PHYS 104: 36 engineering and computer science students; PHYS 106: 37 health science students). Each course was randomly divided into MBL and control lab groups, resulting in 57 students in three control groups and 57 in three MBL groups. All groups had identical objectives, procedures, and capacitance and resistor values. Data collection method was the only difference, control groups using hands-on activity and MBL groups using MBL equipment. Two-Way ANOVA results showed MBL groups with significantly better understanding of capacitance concepts than control groups (p students' skills at interpreting graphs involving the capacitor experiment, results revealed a significant difference (p effect of courses nor interaction between type of treatment and courses was significant. These results clearly showed that the difference in student achievement on the CEAT came from Part 2 of the CEAT. This supported the idea that the most effective use of MBL was related to its ability to help students with graph interpretation.

  8. Devonian micritic limestones used in the historic production of Prague hydraulic lime (‘pasta di Praga’: characterization of the raw material and experimental laboratory burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlovcev, P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Devonian micritic limestones from the Prague Basin (Barrandian area, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic, which were the primary raw material used for natural hydraulic lime burned in Prague, exhibit a feebly to eminently hydraulic character. Based on a laboratory experimental study, the burned product is composed of dominant free-lime (CaO and/or portlandite (Ca(OH2, larnite-belite (bicalcium silicate 2CaO.SiO2, and quartz (SiO2 - i.e. phases formed due to the decomposition of carbonate and quartz, present in the original limestones. Proportions of the newly formed phases depend on: the composition of the raw material, maximum burning temperature (the highest amount of larnite-belite appearing at a burning temperature of 1200 °C, and the granulometry of the experimental batches (a coarsely-ground batch exhibited a higher amount of larnite-belite compared to the finely-ground one. The presence of minor phyllosilicates in the raw material contributed to the formation of gehlenite, brownmillerite, wollastonite, calcium aluminate, and/or spurrite.Las calizas micríticas devonianas provenientes de la Cuenca de Praga (área de Barrand, macizo de Bohemia, República checa que fueron la principal materia prima utilizada para la producción de la cal hidráulica natural calcinada en Praga, presentan un carácter hidráulico desde débil hasta alto. El estudio experimental de laboratorio, ha determinado que el producto calcinado está compuesto de cal viva (CaO como componente predominante y/o cal hidratada (Ca(OH2, larnita-belita (silicato bicálcico 2CaO.SiO2 y cuarzo (SiO2 – es decir, fases formadas como resultado de la descomposición de carbonato y cuarzo presentes en las calizas originales. Las proporciones de las nuevas fases formadas dependen de: la composición de la materia prima, temperatura máxima de calcinación (la mayor cantidad de larnita-belita se produce a la temperatura de calcinación de 1200 °C, y la granulometría de las

  9. Final record of decision soils and groundwater operable unit Army Materials Technology Laboratory. Task order 1. Remedial investigation/feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Declaration for the record of decision. Site name, location, and enforcement activities community participation. Scope and role of response action. Summary of site characteristics. Summary of site risks. Development and screening of screening of alternatives. Description of alternatives. Summary of the comparative analysis of alternatives. The selected remedy. Statutory determinations. Documentation of significant changes. Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection declaration of concurrence. Public comments and responsiveness summary. Summary of areas for selected remedy.

  10. Avaliação clínico-laboratorial de bovinos Nelore infectados experimentalmente com Trypanosoma vivax Clinical and laboratorial evaluation of Nellore cattle experimentally infected with Trypanosoma vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. M. Schenk

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se as alterações clínico-laboratoriais de seis bezerros Nelore, de ambos os sexos, inoculados experimentalmente com 10(7 organismos viáveis de Trypanosoma vivax, isolados de bovinos da região de Poconé, Estado de Mato Grosso. Os animais foram observados diariamente, durante 30 dias, quanto aos parâmetros de temperatura retal, volume globular (VG, parasitemia, produção de anticorpos, coloração de mucosas, comportamento e apetite. Determinaram-se os níveis séricos de aspartato aminotransferase (AST, fosfatase alcalina (FA, gama glutamiltransferase (GGT, creatina kinase (CK, colesterol, uréia, creatinina, cálcio, fósforo e o perfil eletroforético das proteínas séricas aos 4, 8, 12, 16, 23 e 30 dias pós-inoculação (DPI. Durante os 6 meses seguintes, os animais foram observados semanalmente, avaliando-se a temperatura retal, o VG e a parasitemia. T. vivax foi evidenciado a partir do terceiro e quarto DPI em todos os bezerros e persistiu até o 30° DPI em cinco dos seis animais em estudo. Ocorreu um decréscimo significativo (pIn order to evaluate the clinical-laboratorial alterations, six Nellore calves were inoculated with 10(7 Trypanosoma vivax isolated from Poconé region, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The animals were evaluated daily for rectal temperature, packed cell volume (PCV, parasitemia, antibody production, color of mucous membranes, behavior and appetite. Blood and serum samples for biochemical evaluation for aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (AF, gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT, cholesterol, urea, creatinine, creatine kinase (CK, calcium, phosphorus and proteinogram were collected on days 4, 8, 12, 16, 23 and 30 post inoculation (DPI. During the following 6 months rectal temperature, PCV and parasitemia were evaluated weekly. T. vivax was evidenced from 1 DPI in all calves and persisted until day 30 in five of six animals. A remarkable decrease (p<0.05 of PCV mean value (25% was observed on 10

  11. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville vicinity, Butte County, Idaho -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data. Historical American engineering record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report describes the history of the Old Waste Calcining Facility. It begins with introductory material on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Materials Testing Reactor fuel cycle, and the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report then describes management of the wastes from the processing plant in the following chapters: Converting liquid to solid wastes; Fluidized bed waste calcining process and the Waste Calcining Facility; Waste calcining campaigns; WCF gets a new source of heat; New Waste Calcining Facility; Last campaign; Deactivation and the RCRA cap; Significance/context of the old WCF. Appendices contain a photo key map for HAER photos, a vicinity map and neighborhood of the WCF, detailed description of the calcining process, and chronology of WCF campaigns.

  12. Impact of Laboratory Charge Display Within the Electronic Health Record Across an Entire Academic Medical Center: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert L; Colbert-Getz, Jorie M; Milne, Caroline K; Vargo, Daniel J; Hussong, Jerry W; Hoidal, John R; Markewitz, Boaz A; Walker, Brandon S; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2017-11-20

    To determine the impact of systemwide charge display on laboratory utilization. This was a randomized controlled trial with a baseline period and an intervention period. Tests were randomized to a control arm or an active arm. The maximum allowable Medicare reimbursement rate was displayed for tests in the active arm during the intervention period. Total volume of tests in the active arm was compared with those in the control arm. Residents were surveyed before and after the intervention to assess charge awareness. Charge display had no effect on order behavior. This result held for patient type (inpatient vs outpatient) and for insurance category (commercial, government, self-pay). Residents overestimated the charges of tests both before and after the intervention. Many residents failed to notice the charge display in the computerized order entry system. The impact of charge display depends on context. Charge display is not always effective.

  13. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  14. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  15. Experimental Studies on Electronic Configuration Mixing for the Even-Parity Levels of Gd I Using Isotope Shifts Recorded in the Visible Region with FTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Ankush

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic configuration (4f76s26p + 4f75d6s6p + 4f75d26p mixing studies in the high even-parity energy levels of Gd I spectrum have been carried out on the basis of isotope shift (IS data recorded in 49 spectral lines partially in the visible wavelength region on Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS and the relevant spectral line IS data available in the literature. We employed “Sharing rule” to the experimentally observed level isotope shifts (LIS of the even-parity levels for finding the percentage composition of each configuration being mixed. An FTS spectrum of Gd I in the region of 365–495 nm acquired employing the highly enriched Gd isotopes in liquid nitrogen cooled hollow cathode lamp (HCL as a light source and photomultiplier tube as the detector. The studies of altogether 48 even-levels have revealed that amongst the 20 high even parity levels assigned previously to >95% 4f75d6s6p configuration, 10 levels have agreed very well whereas 7 have exhibited large contribution of 4f75d6s6p configuration compared to 4f75d26p configuration and 3 levels have equal contribution of 4f75d6s6p and 4f75d26p configurations. Out of 8 unassigned levels, 6 have dominant 4f75d6s6p configuration compared to 4f75d26p configuration and the remaining two have dominancy in 4f75d26p configuration.

  16. Acoustics long-term passive monitoring using moored autonomous recorders in the Bering, Chukchi, and Western Beaufort Seas conducted by Alaska Fisheries Scientific Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 2007-08-15 to 2015-04-30 (NCEI Accession 0143303)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML) has deployed long-term passive acoustic recorders in various locations in Alaskan waters and in the High Arctic to...

  17. Short-term economic impact of body weight change among patients with type 2 diabetes treated with antidiabetic agents: analysis using claims, laboratory, and medical record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Andrew P; Wu, Eric Q; Birnbaum, Howard G; Emani, Srinivas; Fay, Madeleine; Pohl, Gerhardt; Wintle, Matthew; Yang, Elaine; Oglesby, Andalan

    2007-09-01

    Obesity is highly prevalent among patients with type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, weight gain may also be a consequence of some antidiabetic medications. Although clinical benefits of weight loss have been established, the economic consequence of weight change among patients with type 2 diabetes is unclear. The objective was to measure 1-year total and diabetes-related health care costs associated with weight change during the preceding 6-month period among type 2 diabetic patients on antidiabetic therapy. Administrative claims, electronic laboratory data and medical chart information were abstracted for continuously enrolled adults with type 2 diabetes from an health maintenance organization (HMO) for the period from July 1, 1997 through October 31, 2005. To assess the economic impact of weight change, three regression models were applied to estimate the following: (1) the effect of weight change in general (one-slope model); (2) the different effects of weight gain and no weight gain (two-slope model); and (3) the different effects of weight gain and no weight gain (i.e., no change or weight loss) among obese and non-obese patients (four-slope model). Patients included in the study had a baseline weight measurement and a second weight measurement approximately 6 months later. They were also required to be on at least one antidiabetic drug therapy within 1 month around the baseline weight measurement date (index date). Based on the measured weight change, patients were classified into two groups--weight gainers and non-weight gainer. Total health care cost and diabetes-related cost were measured during the 1-year period following the second weight measurement and were adjusted to 2004 dollars by the medical component of the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Generalized linear models with log link function and gamma distribution were applied to assess the impacts of weight change on the 1-year total health care cost as well as 1-year diabetes-related cost. All models

  18. Small-Engine Research Laboratory (SERL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Small-Engine Research Laboratory (SERL) is a facility designed to conduct experimental small-scale propulsion and power generation systems research....

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily III, W D

    2010-02-24

    This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300

  20. LABORATORY VOICE DATA ENTRY SYSTEM.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PRAISSMAN,J.L.SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2003-04-01

    We have assembled a system using a personal computer workstation equipped with standard office software, an audio system, speech recognition software and an inexpensive radio-based wireless microphone that permits laboratory workers to enter or modify data while performing other work. Speech recognition permits users to enter data while their hands are holding equipment or they are otherwise unable to operate a keyboard. The wireless microphone allows unencumbered movement around the laboratory without a ''tether'' that might interfere with equipment or experimental procedures. To evaluate the potential of voice data entry in a laboratory environment, we developed a prototype relational database that records the disposal of radionuclides and/or hazardous chemicals Current regulations in our laboratory require that each such item being discarded must be inventoried and documents must be prepared that summarize the contents of each container used for disposal. Using voice commands, the user enters items into the database as each is discarded. Subsequently, the program prepares the required documentation.

  1. Region 7 Laboratory Information Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Laboratory Information Management System (R7LIMS) which maintains records for the Regional Laboratory. Any Laboratory...

  2. HILL: The High-Intensity Laser Laboratory Core Team's Reply to Questions from the NNSA Experimental Facilities Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, B J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-02

    Question 1 - The type of physics regimes that HILL can access for weapons studies is quite interesting. The question that arises for the proposal team is what priority does this type of experimental data have versus data that can be obtained with NIF, and Z. How does HILL rank in priority compared to MARIE 1.0 in terms of the experimental data it will provide? We reiterate that isochoric heating experiments to be conducted with HILL are complementary to the high energy density physics experiments at NIF and Z and uniquely access states of matter that neither other facility can access. It is our belief that HILL will enable several important questions, e.g., as related to mix morphology, radiation transfer from corrugated surfaces, and equations of state, to be run to ground through carefully diagnosed, 'unit-physics' experiments. Such experiments will substantially improve confidence in our computer models and provide a rigorous science basis for certification. Question 2 - A secondary question relates to the interests of LLNL and SNL in the physics that HILL can address. This should be spelled out clearly. I would like to see the other labs be part of the discussion regarding how important this capability would be if built. Both sister Labs have a keen interest in the physics enabled by high-intensity, high-energy lasers, as evinced by the Z Petawatt and NIF ARC upgrades to their signature facilities. LANL scientists have teamed with scientists from both Laboratories in high-intensity laser 'first experiments' envisioned for HILL and we fully intend to continue these profitable discussions going forward. In the preparation of the HILL proposal, feedback was solicited from the broader HEDP and weapons science communities. The consensus view was that HILL filled a critical gap and that there was a need for a facility like HILL to address outstanding questions in weapons science. It was recognized that co-location of HILL with a facility such as

  3. Experimental macroevolution†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. PMID:26763705

  4. The effect of Sitagliptin (Januvia) on the liver of adult Albino rats in cases of experimental diabetes mellitus(Microscopic and laboratory studies)

    OpenAIRE

    Moustafa I. Hassan 1 Gamal S.El-Gharabawy 1 and Abdel-Ghany A. Moustafa

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of Sitagliptin (Januvia) on the liver of experimentally induced diabetes in albino rats.Material and Methods: Fifteen adult male albino rats were used and divided into three equal groups. The first group was considered as a control group. In the second group experimental induction of diabetes was performed by intraperitoneal injection of alloxan and left as a diabetic control for three weeks. The third group was consist...

  5. Blackroom Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Enables evaluation and characterization of materials ranging from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared (LWIR).DESCRIPTION: The Blackroom Laboratory is...

  6. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  7. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  8. Laboratory studies of H2SO4/H2O binary homogeneous nucleation from the SO2+OH reaction: evaluation of the experimental setup and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN of sulphuric acid and water (H2SO4/H2O is one of the most important atmospheric nucleation processes, but laboratory observations of this nucleation process are very limited and there are also large discrepancies between different laboratory studies. The difficulties associated with these experiments include wall loss of H2SO4 and uncertainties in estimation of H2SO4 concentration ([H2SO4] involved in nucleation. We have developed a new laboratory nucleation setup to study H2SO4/H2O BHN kinetics and provide relatively constrained [H2SO4] needed for nucleation. H2SO4 is produced from the SO2+OH→HSO3 reaction and OH radicals are produced from water vapor UV absorption. The residual [H2SO4] were measured at the end of the nucleation reactor with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS. Wall loss factors (WLFs of H2SO4 were estimated by assuming that wall loss is diffusion limited and these calculated WLFs were in good agreement with simultaneous measurements of the initial and residual [H2SO4] with two CIMSs. The nucleation zone was estimated from numerical simulations based on the measured aerosol sizes (particle diameter, Dp and [H2SO4]. The measured BHN rates (J ranged from 0.01–220 cm−3 s−1 at the initial and residual [H2SO4] from 108−1010 cm−3, a temperature of 288 K and relative humidity (RH from 11–23%; J increased with increasing [H2SO4] and RH. J also showed a power dependence on [H2SO4] with the exponential power of 3–8. These power dependences are consistent with other laboratory studies under similar [H2SO4] and RH, but different from atmospheric field observations which showed that particle number concentrations are often linearly dependent on [H2SO4]. These results, together with a higher [H2SO4] threshold (108–109 cm−3 needed to produce the unit J measured from the laboratory studies compared to the atmospheric conditions (106–107 cm−3, imply that H2SO4/H2O BHN alone is

  9. Quasi-experimental nonequivalent (pretest and posttest) control-group study of the effects of microcomputer-based laboratory systems on academic achievement in high school chemistry students at two South Carolina high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Jeffrey M.

    The literature on microcomputer-based laboratories (MBL) lacks quantitative studies that measure the effect of MBL on student achievement. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of MBL systems on the achievement of high school chemistry students. The first research question examined the effect of MBL systems on student achievement in high school chemistry laboratories. The second question analyzed the effect of MBL systems on the academic achievement of students of different genders, ethnicities, and socioeconomic backgrounds. This quasi-experimental quantitative research study evaluated the effects of MBL on student achievement in high school chemistry. The sample consisted of 124 college preparatory chemistry students at two high schools in a South Carolina school district. There were 42 participants in the experimental group and 82 participants in the control group. Both experimental and groups completed a pre- and post-test with MBL being the independent variable. The mean difference score for the experimental group was compared to that of the control group using an independent-measures t test and an analysis of variance. For the second research question, results were analyzed using a two-factor analysis of variance. Participant scores were broken down by gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status in order to identify potential differences. The results revealed no significant differences between the experimental and control groups, and no significant differences in effects of MBL on different segments of the population. Future studies should examine students using MBL for longer durations than one unit of study. As society continues to make technological advances, the effective assessment and implementation of technology resources for the classroom are becoming increasingly important.

  10. Eye-Movement Recording as a Tool for Studying Syntactic Processing in a Second Language: A Review of Methodologies and Experimental Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenck-Mestre, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    The complex trace of saccades, fixations and regressions that the eyes make while taking in a line of text is unquestionably one of the richest accounts available as concerns the process of reading. Recording these jumps, stops and re-takes provides a to-the-letter, millisecond-precise report of the readers' immediate syntactic processing as well…

  11. Experimental and modeling study of the effect of CO and H2 on the urea DeNO(x) process in a 150kW laboratory reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, M Tayyeb; Nimmo, W; Gibbs, B M

    2008-01-01

    An experimental and modeling investigation has been performed to study the effect of process additives, H2 and CO on NO(x) removal from flue gases by a selective non-catalytic reduction process using urea as a reducing agent. Experiments were performed with a flow reactor in which flue gas was generated by the combustion of propane in air at 3% excess oxygen and the desired levels of initial NO(x) (500ppm) were achieved by doping the flame with ammonia. Experiments were performed throughout the temperature range of interest, i.e. from 850 to 1200 degrees C for investigation of the effects of the process additives on the performance of aqueous urea DeNO(x). Subsequently, computational kinetic modeling with SENKIN code was performed to analyze the performance of urea providing a direct comparison of modeling prediction with experimental measurements. With CO addition, a downwards shift of 215 degrees C in the peak reduction temperature from 1125 to 910 degrees C was observed during the experimentation while the kinetic modeling suggests it to be 150 degrees C, i.e. from 1020 to 870 degrees C. The addition of H2 impairs the peak NO(x) reduction but suggests a low temperature application of the process. A downward shift of 250 degrees C in the peak reduction temperature, from 1020 to 770 degrees C, was observed during kinetic modeling studies. The kinetic modeling shows a good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations and reveals additional information about the process.

  12. Transonic Experimental Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Experimental Research Facility evaluates aerodynamics and fluid dynamics of projectiles, smart munitions systems, and sub-munitions dispensing systems;...

  13. Participation in a Year-Long CURE Embedded into Major Core Genetics and Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory Courses Results in Gains in Foundational Biological Concepts and Experimental Design Skills by Novice Undergraduate Researchers†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteroy-Kelly, Marcy A.; Marcello, Matthew R.; Crispo, Erika; Buraei, Zafir; Strahs, Daniel; Isaacson, Marisa; Jaworski, Leslie; Lopatto, David; Zuzga, David

    2017-01-01

    This two-year study describes the assessment of student learning gains arising from participation in a year-long curriculum consisting of a classroom undergraduate research experience (CURE) embedded into second-year, major core Genetics and Cellular and Molecular Biology (CMB) laboratory courses. For the first course in our CURE, students used micro-array or RNAseq analyses to identify genes important for environmental stress responses by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The students were tasked with creating overexpressing mutants of their genes and designing their own original experiments to investigate the functions of those genes using the overexpression and null mutants in the second CURE course. In order to evaluate student learning gains, we employed three validated concept inventories in a pretest/posttest format and compared gains on the posttest versus the pretest with student laboratory final grades. Our results demonstrated that there was a significant correlation between students earning lower grades in the Genetics laboratory for both years of this study and gains on the Genetics Concept Assessment (GCA). We also demonstrated a correlation between students earning lower grades in the Genetics laboratory and gains on the Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA) for year 1 of the study. Students furthermore demonstrated significant gains in identifying the variable properties of experimental subjects when assessed using the Rubric for Experimental (RED) design tool. Results from the administration of the CURE survey support these findings. Our results suggest that a year-long CURE enables lower performing students to experience greater gains in their foundational skills for success in the STEM disciplines. PMID:28904646

  14. Participation in a Year-Long CURE Embedded into Major Core Genetics and Cellular and Molecular Biology Laboratory Courses Results in Gains in Foundational Biological Concepts and Experimental Design Skills by Novice Undergraduate Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcy A. Peteroy-Kelly

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This two-year study describes the assessment of student learning gains arising from participation in a year-long curriculum consisting of a classroom undergraduate research experience (CURE embedded into second-year, major core Genetics and Cellular and Molecular Biology (CMB laboratory courses. For the first course in our CURE, students used micro-array or RNAseq analyses to identify genes important for environmental stress responses by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The students were tasked with creating overexpressing mutants of their genes and designing their own original experiments to investigate the functions of those genes using the overexpression and null mutants in the second CURE course. In order to evaluate student learning gains, we employed three validated concept inventories in a pretest/posttest format and compared gains on the posttest versus the pretest with student laboratory final grades. Our results demonstrated that there was a significant correlation between students earning lower grades in the Genetics laboratory for both years of this study and gains on the Genetics Concept Assessment (GCA. We also demonstrated a correlation between students earning lower grades in the Genetics laboratory and gains on the Introductory Molecular and Cell Biology Assessment (IMCA for year 1 of the study. Students furthermore demonstrated significant gains in identifying the variable properties of experimental subjects when assessed using the Rubric for Experimental (RED design tool. Results from the administration of the CURE survey support these findings. Our results suggest that a year-long CURE enables lower performing students to experience greater gains in their foundational skills for success in the STEM disciplines.

  15. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes

    OpenAIRE

    Galeazzi, Juan M.; Navajas, Joaquin; Mender, Bedeho M. W.; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw....

  16. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Navajas, Joaquín; Mender, Bedeho M W; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw. A camera mounted on the head captured images of the hand and jigsaw, while eye movements were recorded using an eye-tracking device. This combination of data allowed us to reconstruct the retinal images seen as humans undertook the jigsaw task. These retinal images were then fed into the neural network model during self-organization of its synaptic connectivity using a biologically plausible trace learning rule. A trace learning mechanism encourages neurons in the model to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur in close temporal proximity. In the data recorded from human subjects, we found that the participant's gaze often shifted through a sequence of locations around a fixed spatial configuration of the hand and one of the jigsaw pieces. In this case, trace learning should bind these retinal images together onto the same subset of output neurons. The simulation results consequently confirmed that some cells learned to respond selectively to the hand and a jigsaw piece in a fixed spatial configuration across different retinal views.

  17. Geomechanics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geomechanics Laboratory allows its users to measure rock properties under a wide range of simulated service conditions up to very high pressures and complex load...

  18. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  19. Experimental study of the method of recording color volume security holograms on different photosensitive materials on the base of the diffuser with a narrow indicatrix of laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, D. S.; Zherdev, A. Y.; Odinokov, S. B.; Markin, V. V.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the practical results of recording holographic stereograms. Advantages and disadvantages of methods for producing holographic stereograms using diffusers with different indicatrices scattering of the radiation in the object branch and without the use of a diffuser are presented. A new security element - multi-color microtext, is presented. Shows how to use multi-color microtext as a hidden security element. The method of multi-color microtext visualization is shown. The work was partially funded under the Agreement with the RF Ministry of Education and Science no. 14.577.21.0197, grant RFMEFI57715X0197.

  20. Records Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — All Federal Agencies are required to prescribe an appropriate records maintenance program so that complete records are filed or otherwise preserved, records can be...

  1. New experimental tools for bioassays with whitefly in laboratory Novas ferramentas experimentais para ensaios com mosca-branca em laboratório

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Luis Martins Fanela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to develop an experimental kit for assessments of repellency, deterrence for oviposition, and insecticidal activity on adults of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci biotype B. The kit, which consisted of arenas and nebulizer, was effective for conducting bioassays, and the application of aqueous extracts by inhaler was adequate. The techniques are simple, cheap, and may contribute to research on this insect.O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver um kit experimental para avaliações de repelência, deterrência à oviposição e atividade inseticida a adultos de mosca-branca, Bemisia tabaci biótipo B. O kit, constituído de arenas e nebulizador, foi eficaz para realização dos bioensaios, e a aplicação de extratos aquosos com o inalador foi adequada. As técnicas são simples, baratas e podem contribuir para as pesquisas com este inseto.

  2. An experimental study on particular physical properties of several interocclusal recording media. Part II: Linear dimensional change and accompanying weight change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalakis, Konstantinos X; Pissiotis, Argiris; Anastasiadou, Vassiliki; Kapari, Danai

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the linear dimensional change and accompanying weight change of several elastomeric interocclusal recording media. Ten 50 mm long, 8 mm wide, 3 mm deep Teflon molds and a stainless steel die were constructed for the purposes of this study. The die was made in order to produce standardized reference lines, which were used for the measurement of the linear change. After homogeneous mixing, each material was carried from the mixing pad or directly from the mixing tip to the Teflon mold. The mold was inverted onto the stainless steel die. The materials were allowed to set for the manufacturers' suggested setting time plus an additional 3 minutes to ensure polymerization of the material. An electronic scale (Galaxy 110, Ohaus, Pine Brook, NJ) was used for the measurement of the weight change of the specimens and a traveling micrometer microscope (Griffin Ltd., London, England) was used to measure the linear changes at 5 time intervals: 0, 1 hour, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Analysis of variance for a significance level of 5% revealed that there was a statistically significant effect of the "material" factor on the weight changes (F= 2,229.98, p Ramitec). Analysis of variance for a significance level of 5% revealed that there is a statistically significant effect of the "material" factor on the linear changes (F= 215.54, p Ramitec). Of all materials tested, Ramitec (polyether) presented the smallest linear change at all time intervals. Addition reaction silicones presented statistically significant differences in recordings of linear changes among them only at the 1st and the 24th hour. Linear changes did not seem to be associated with weight changes.

  3. Experimental macroevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-13

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation, Interstitial Laser Acupuncture, and Electroacupuncture in an Animal Experimental Setting: Preliminary Results from Heart Rate Variability and Electrocorticographic Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first study to investigate intravenous (i.v. laser blood irradiation, interstitial (i.st. laser acupuncture, and electroacupuncture (EA in combination with heart rate variability (HRV and electrocorticogram. We investigated 10 male anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats under the three conditions mentioned previously in Beijing, China, and data analysis was performed in Graz, Europe. For i.v. laser stimulation in the femoral vein and i.st. laser acupuncture at Neiguan (PC6, we used a European system (Modulas needle, Schwa-Medico, Germany; 658 nm, 50 mW, continuous wave mode, and for EA at Neiguan, a Chinese system (Hanshi-100A; Nanjing Jisheng Medical Technology Company, China; 15 Hz, 1 mA. HR, HRV, and electrocorticogram were recorded using a biophysical amplifier AVB-10 (Nihon-Kohden, Japan. HR changed significantly during i.st. laser acupuncture stimulation of Neiguan in anesthetized rats. Total HRV increased insignificantly during i.v. and i.st. laser stimulation. The LF/HF ratio showed significant changes only during i.v. laser blood irradiation. Integrated cortical EEG (electrocorticogram decreased insignificantly during EA and i.v. laser blood irradiation. Further studies concerning dosage-dependent alterations are in progress.

  5. Intravenous laser blood irradiation, interstitial laser acupuncture, and electroacupuncture in an animal experimental setting: preliminary results from heart rate variability and electrocorticographic recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Litscher, Gerhard; Wang, Xiaoyu; Jing, Xianghong; Shi, Hong; Shang, Hongyan; Zhu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate intravenous (i.v.) laser blood irradiation, interstitial (i.st.) laser acupuncture, and electroacupuncture (EA) in combination with heart rate variability (HRV) and electrocorticogram. We investigated 10 male anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats under the three conditions mentioned previously in Beijing, China, and data analysis was performed in Graz, Europe. For i.v. laser stimulation in the femoral vein and i.st. laser acupuncture at Neiguan (PC6), we used a European system (Modulas needle, Schwa-Medico, Germany; 658 nm, 50 mW, continuous wave mode), and for EA at Neiguan, a Chinese system (Hanshi-100A; Nanjing Jisheng Medical Technology Company, China; 15 Hz, 1 mA). HR, HRV, and electrocorticogram were recorded using a biophysical amplifier AVB-10 (Nihon-Kohden, Japan). HR changed significantly during i.st. laser acupuncture stimulation of Neiguan in anesthetized rats. Total HRV increased insignificantly during i.v. and i.st. laser stimulation. The LF/HF ratio showed significant changes only during i.v. laser blood irradiation. Integrated cortical EEG (electrocorticogram) decreased insignificantly during EA and i.v. laser blood irradiation. Further studies concerning dosage-dependent alterations are in progress.

  6. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  7. Laboratory Microcomputing

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Microcomputers will play a major role in the laboratory, not only in the calculation and interpretation of clinical test data, but also will have an increasing place of importance in the management of laboratory resources in the face of the transition from revenue generating to the cost center era. We will give you a glimpse of what can be accomplished with the management data already collected by many laboratories today when the data are processed into meaningful reports.

  8. Wiki Laboratory Notebooks: Supporting Student Learning in Collaborative Inquiry-Based Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Gwendolyn Angela; Grøndahl, Lisbeth; Boman, Simon; Andrews, Trish

    2016-06-01

    Recent examples of high-impact teaching practices in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory that include course-based undergraduate research experiences and inquiry-based experiments require new approaches to assessing individual student learning outcomes. Instructors require tools and strategies that can provide them with insight into individual student contributions to collaborative group/teamwork throughout the processes of experimental design, data analysis, display and communication of their outcomes in relation to their research question(s). Traditional assessments in the form of laboratory notebooks or experimental reports provide limited insight into the processes of collaborative inquiry-based activities. A wiki environment offers a collaborative domain that can potentially support collaborative laboratory processes and scientific record keeping. In this study, the effectiveness of the wiki in supporting laboratory learning and assessment has been evaluated through analysis of the content and histories for three consenting, participating groups of students. The conversational framework has been applied to map the relationships between the instructor, tutor, students and laboratory activities. Analytics that have been applied to the wiki platform include: character counts, page views, edits, timelines and the extent and nature of the contribution by each student to the wiki. Student perceptions of both the role and the impact of the wiki on their experiences and processes have also been collected. Evidence has emerged from this study that the wiki environment has enhanced co-construction of understanding of both the experimental process and subsequent communication of outcomes and data. A number of features are identified to support success in the use of the wiki platform for laboratory notebooks.

  9. Psychology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides testing stations for computer-based assessment of cognitive and behavioral Warfighter performance. This 500 square foot configurable space can...

  10. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  11. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  12. Propulsion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Lab simulates field test conditions in a controlled environment, using standardized or customized test procedures. The Propulsion Lab's 11 cells can...

  13. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  14. Montlake Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NWFSC conducts critical fisheries science research at its headquarters in Seattle, WA and at five research stations throughout Washington and Oregon. The unique...

  15. SNC Oxygen Fugacity Recorded in Pyroxenes and its Implications for the Oxidation State of the Martian Interior: An Experimental and Analytical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanta, M. C.; Rutherford, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the oxidation state of a magma is critical as it is one of the parameters which controls the nature and composition of the resulting crystals. In terrestrial magmatic systems, oxygen fugacity (fo2) is known to vary by over nine orders of magnitude. With variations of this magnitude, understanding the compositional differences, phase changes, and crystallization sequence variations, caused by the magma fo2, is essential in deciphering the origin of all igneous rocks. Magmatic oxidation state is of great importance in that it reflects the degree of oxidation of the source region and can provide insight into magmatic processes, such as metasomatism, degassing, and assimilation, which may have changed them. Carmichael [1991] argues that most magmas are unlikely to have their redox states altered from those of their source region. This assumption allows for estimation of the oxidation state of planetary interiors. Conversely, it is known that the fo2 of the magma can be affected by other processes, which occur outside of the source region and therefore, the oxidation state may record those too. Processes which could overprint source region fugacities include melt dehydrogenation or other volatile loss, water or melt infiltration, or assimilation of oxidized or reduced wallrock. Understanding which of these processes is responsible for the redox state of a magma can provide crucial information regarding igneous processes and other forces active in the region. The composition of the SNC basalts and their widely varying proposed oxidation states raise some interesting questions. Do the SNC meteorites have an oxidized or reduced signature? What was the oxygen fugacity of the SNC source region at the time of melt generation? Is the fugacity calculated for the various SNC samples the fugacity of the magma source region or was it overprinted by later events? Are there different oxidation states in the Martian interior or a single one? This proposal seeks to

  16. Effect of neonatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway by recording auditory brainstem responses in newborn piglets: a new experimentation model to study the perinatal hypoxic-ischemic damage on the auditory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Jose Alvarez

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia (HI is a major perinatal problem that results in severe damage to the brain impairing the normal development of the auditory system. The purpose of the present study is to study the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the auditory pathway by recording auditory brain responses in a novel animal experimentation model in newborn piglets.Hypoxia-ischemia was induced to 1.3 day-old piglets by clamping 30 minutes both carotid arteries by vascular occluders and lowering the fraction of inspired oxygen. We compared the Auditory Brain Responses (ABRs of newborn piglets exposed to acute hypoxia/ischemia (n = 6 and a control group with no such exposure (n = 10. ABRs were recorded for both ears before the start of the experiment (baseline, after 30 minutes of HI injury, and every 30 minutes during 6 h after the HI injury.Auditory brain responses were altered during the hypoxic-ischemic insult but recovered 30-60 minutes later. Hypoxia/ischemia seemed to induce auditory functional damage by increasing I-V latencies and decreasing wave I, III and V amplitudes, although differences were not significant.The described experimental model of hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets may be useful for studying the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway.

  17. Effect of neonatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway by recording auditory brainstem responses in newborn piglets: a new experimentation model to study the perinatal hypoxic-ischemic damage on the auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Francisco Jose; Revuelta, Miren; Santaolalla, Francisco; Alvarez, Antonia; Lafuente, Hector; Arteaga, Olatz; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Sanchez-del-Rey, Ana; Hilario, Enrique; Martinez-Ibargüen, Agustin

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is a major perinatal problem that results in severe damage to the brain impairing the normal development of the auditory system. The purpose of the present study is to study the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the auditory pathway by recording auditory brain responses in a novel animal experimentation model in newborn piglets. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced to 1.3 day-old piglets by clamping 30 minutes both carotid arteries by vascular occluders and lowering the fraction of inspired oxygen. We compared the Auditory Brain Responses (ABRs) of newborn piglets exposed to acute hypoxia/ischemia (n = 6) and a control group with no such exposure (n = 10). ABRs were recorded for both ears before the start of the experiment (baseline), after 30 minutes of HI injury, and every 30 minutes during 6 h after the HI injury. Auditory brain responses were altered during the hypoxic-ischemic insult but recovered 30-60 minutes later. Hypoxia/ischemia seemed to induce auditory functional damage by increasing I-V latencies and decreasing wave I, III and V amplitudes, although differences were not significant. The described experimental model of hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets may be useful for studying the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway.

  18. Aspectos clínico-patológicos e laboratoriais do envenenamento experimental por Bothrops alternatus em bovinos Clinic and pathological and laboratory aspects of experimental poisoning by Bothrops alternatus venom in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo A. Caldas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo teve como objetivo determinar as alterações clínico-patológicas e os achados laboratoriais em bovinos inoculados com a peçonha de Bothrops alternatus, no intuito de fornecer subsídios para o estabelecimento do diagnóstico e do diagnóstico diferencial, bem como esclarecer pontos obscuros da literatura pertinente. O veneno liofilizado foi diluído em 1 ml de solução fisiológica e administrado a cinco bovinos, por via subcutânea, nas doses de 0,0625, 0,125 e 0,25 mg/kg e a dois outros, por via intramuscular, nas doses de 0,25 e 0,45 mg/kg. Seis bovinos foram a óbito e um que recebeu a dose de 0,0625mg/kg, por via subcutânea, recuperou-se. Os sinais clínicos tiveram início entre 25 minutos a 5 horas 30 minutos após a inoculação. O período de evolução variou de 7 horas 18 minutos a 66 horas 12 minutos. Um animal recuperou-se após 92 horas. O quadro clínico, independentemente das doses, caracterizou-se por aumento de volume (hemorragia/hematoma no local da inoculação, tempo de sangramento aumentado, mucosas hipocoradas e apatia. O exame laboratorial revelou progressiva anemia normocítica normocrômica, trombocitopenia, redução de fibrinogênio e proteínas plasmáticas totais, hematócrito e hemoglobina diminuídos, além de leve aumento dos níveis de creatinaquinase e desidrogenase lática. Á necropsia, havia, a partir do local da inoculação, extensos hematomas e áreas de hemorragia no tecido celular subcutâneo dos animais que receberam o veneno por via subcutânea; nos animais inoculados por via intramuscular, adicionalmente, havia hemorragia intramuscular. O endocárdio esquerdo apresentava extensas hemorragias e verificaram-se petéquias na serosa do rúmen e do omaso e na mucosa do abomaso e da vesícula biliar. Em cinco animais, o cólon, reto e região perirrenal estavam envoltos por coágulos de sangue. Ao exame histológico observou-se, além do quadro hemorragíparo, necrose muscular coagulativa

  19. Envenenamento experimental por Bothropoides jararaca e Bothrops jararacussu em ovinos: aspectos clínico-patológicos e laboratoriais Experimental poisoning by Bothropoides jararaca and Bothrops jararacussu in sheep: clinic-pathological and laboratory aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Aragão

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo teve como objetivo determinar as alterações clínico-patológicas e laboratoriais em ovinos inoculados com a peçonha de Bothropoides jararaca e Bothrops jararacussu, no intuito de fornecer subsídios que possam facilitar o estabelecimento do diagnóstico e do diagnóstico diferencial dessa condição. Os venenos liofilizados foram diluídos em 1 ml de solução fisiológica e administrados a quatro ovinos por via subcutânea. Três ovinos foram a óbito e um que recebeu a dose de 0,5mg/kg (B. jararaca, recuperou-se. Os sinais clínicos tiveram início entre 7 minutos e 1 hora. O período de evolução variou de 7 horas 9 minutos a 21 horas 59 minutos. O quadro clínico, independentemente das doses, caracterizou-se por aumento de volume no local da inoculação, tempo de sangramento e de preenchimento capilar aumentados, taquicardia, dispnéia, mucosas hipocoradas e apatia. Os exames laboratoriais revelaram acentuada anemia normocítica normocrômica, trombocitopenia, acentuada redução de fibrinogênio e proteínas plasmáticas totais, hematócrito diminuído em dois animais, além de acentuado aumento de creatinaquinase e desidrogenase lática em todos os animais. À necropsia, os principais achados no local da inoculação e tecidos adjacentes eram extensas hemorragias no animal que recebeu o veneno de B. jararaca e edema e acentuado edema pulmonar agudo para os dois animais envenenados por B. jararacussu. Além de hemorragia e edema a principal alteração histopatológica verificada foi necrose das fibras musculares e de vasos, no local de inoculação e adjacências. A necrose tubular renal foi atribuída ao quadro de choque. Nos ovinos deste estudo, o aumento de volume observado no local de inoculação e adjacências era constituído predominantemente por sangue (B. jararaca e por edema (B. jararacussu.The purpose of this study was to establish the clinic-pathological and laboratory changes in sheep inoculated with

  20. Measuring meaningful learning in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.

    these studies revealed students' narrow cognitive expectations for learning that go largely unmet by their experiences and diverse affective expectations and experiences. Concurrently, a qualitative study was carried out to describe and characterize students' cognitive and affective experiences in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Students were video recorded while performing one of their regular laboratory experiments and then interviewed about their experiences. The students' descriptions of their learning experiences were characterized by their overreliance on following the experimental procedure correctly rather than developing process-oriented problem solving skills. Future research could use the MLLI to intentionally compare different types of laboratory curricula or environments.

  1. Physics Laboratory in UEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Tohru; Nakamura, Jin; Suzuki, Masaru

    All the first-year students in the University of Electro-Communications (UEC) take "Basic Physics I", "Basic Physics II" and "Physics Laboratory" as required subjects; Basic Physics I and Basic Physics II are calculus-based physics of mechanics, wave and oscillation, thermal physics and electromagnetics. Physics Laboratory is designed mainly aiming at learning the skill of basic experimental technique and technical writing. Although 95% students have taken physics in the senior high school, they poorly understand it by connecting with experience, and it is difficult to learn Physics Laboratory in the university. For this reason, we introduced two ICT (Information and Communication Technology) systems of Physics Laboratory to support students'learning and staff's teaching. By using quantitative data obtained from the ICT systems, we can easily check understanding of physics contents in students, and can improve physics education.

  2. Experimental growth pattern calibration of Antarctic bivalves shells to provide a biogenic archive of long-term high-resolution records of environmental and climatic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartaud, F.; Toulot, A.; Paulet, Y. M.

    2009-04-01

    . elliptica. Shell size measurements show that A. colbecki have a high growth rate, at least throughout the juvenile state. The big L. elliptica bivalves exhibit a lower shell growth rate than the pectinids. The counting of growth increments additionally to the use of calcein markings helps us to establish a chronological time scale in those polar bivalves. This sclerochronologic approach can be now used for geochemistry analyses. A. colbecki shells seem more appropriate for high-resolution archive and L. elliptica will provide information on a longer time scale. Berkman P.A., Cattaneo-Vietti R., Chiantore M.,Howard-Williams C., 2004. Polar emergence ad the influence of increased sea-ice extent on the Cenozoic biogeography of pectinid molluscs in Antarctic coastal areas. Deep-Sea Research II 51, 1839-1855. Heilmayer O., Brey T., Chiantore M., Cattaneo-Vietti R. and Arntz W.E., 2003. Age and productivity of the Antarctic scallop, Adamussium colbecki, in Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica).Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 288, 239-256. Wanamaker A.D., Richardson C.A., Scourse J.D. and Butler P.G., 2008. Ashell based reconstruction of environmental change on the North Icelandic shelf. EGU General Assembly.

  3. USGS Scientific Visualization Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Scientific Visualization Laboratory at the National Center in Reston, Va., provides a central facility where USGS employees can use state-of-the-art equipment for projects ranging from presentation graphics preparation to complex visual representations of scientific data. Equipment including color printers, black-and-white and color scanners, film recorders, video equipment, and DOS, Apple Macintosh, and UNIX platforms with software are available for both technical and nontechnical users. The laboratory staff provides assistance and demonstrations in the use of the hardware and software products.

  4. Audio Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment and facilities for auditory display research. A primary focus is the performance use of binaurally rendered 3D sound in conjunction...

  5. Elastomers Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Primary capabilities include: elastomer compounding in various sizes (micro, 3x5, 8x12, 8x15 rubber mills); elastomer curing and post curing (two 50-ton presses, one...

  6. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age and race What you eat and drink Medicines you take How well you followed pre-test instructions Your doctor may also compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  7. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  8. Whole Class Laboratories: More Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouh, Minjoon

    2016-01-01

    Typically, introductory physics courses are taught with a combination of lectures and laboratories in which students have opportunities to discover the natural laws through hands-on activities in small groups. This article reports the use of Google Drive, a free online document-sharing tool, in physics laboratories for pooling experimental data…

  9. A laboratory animal science pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostomitsopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-11-01

    Nikolaos Kostomitsopoulos, DVM, PhD, is Head of Laboratory Animal Facilities and Designated Veterinarian, Center of Clinical, Experimental Surgery and Translational Research, Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. Dr. Kostomitsopoulos discusses his successes in implementing laboratory animal science legislation and fostering collaboration among scientists in Greece.

  10. [Safety in the Microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Alados, Juan Carlos; de la Pedrosa, Elia Gómez G; Leiva, José; Pérez, José L

    2015-01-01

    The normal activity in the laboratory of microbiology poses different risks - mainly biological - that can affect the health of their workers, visitors and the community. Routine health examinations (surveillance and prevention), individual awareness of self-protection, hazard identification and risk assessment of laboratory procedures, the adoption of appropriate containment measures, and the use of conscientious microbiological techniques allow laboratory to be a safe place, as records of laboratory-acquired infections and accidents show. Training and information are the cornerstones for designing a comprehensive safety plan for the laboratory. In this article, the basic concepts and the theoretical background on laboratory safety are reviewed, including the main legal regulations. Moreover, practical guidelines are presented for each laboratory to design its own safety plan according its own particular characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-Directional Experimental Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ATLSS Multi-directional Experimental Laboratory was constructed in 1987 under funding from the National Science Foundation to be a major facility for large-scale...

  12. Experimental Yersinia pseudotuberculosis enteritis in laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and guinea pigs. Animals orally fed with clean water showed no symptoms of yersiniosis. Rabbits infected with Y. pseudotuberculosis showed signs of illness while guinea pigs did not show any clinical sign. Visceral organs of infected rabbits showed enteritis with necrotic lesions but no pathological changes were observed ...

  13. Experimental Yersinia pseudotuberculosis enteritis in laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-18

    Oct 18, 2007 ... Miller, 2001). The inv gene is thermoregulated and it encodes for a. 103 Kdal protein, invasin, which binds to specific receptors on mammalian cells and facilitates the entry of. Y. psuedotuberculosis into tissues (Iserberg and Leong, .... Robert Ashi and Miss Bunmi. S. Poroye for their support. REFERENCES.

  14. 76 FR 15945 - National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) Workshop for Laboratories Interested...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ..., laboratories conducting testing of HIT electronic health record technology will be required to meet ISO/IEC International Standard 17025, general requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories...

  15. Experimental economics in antitrust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Normann, H.T.; Müller, W.; Blair, R.D.; Sokol, D.D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter assesses the scope and the specific contribution of laboratory experiments for antitrust. It reviews experiments that have addressed specific antitrust issues, problems, and institutions. The chapter mainly covers experimental studies on collusion (tacit and explicit, conscious

  16. Nuclear test experimental science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Bucciarelli, G.; Carter, J.; Cherniak, J.; Donohue, M.L.; Kirvel, R.D.; MacGregor, P.; Reid, S. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory under the following topics: prompt diagnostics; experimental modeling, design, and analysis; detector development; streak-camera data systems; weapons supporting research.

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  18. PROPILVEN LABORATORY EVALUATION ACCORDING TO ISO 17025:2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Fereira R.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to evaluate the procedures and methods used in the laboratory Propilven accordance with the provisions of ISO 17025:2005. Propilven, a petrochemicals company in Venezuela and in his laboratory determined the quality of the manufactured product (polypropylene, at all stages, so that the application of this technical standard will increase the confidence level of the results. The research was descriptive, with a non-experimental design, field, using as a data collection method, the interview, survey, observation and review of documents and records. Among the results, the standard currently stands, is in the process of standardization in the laboratory, with a degree of implementation of 50%. Additionally, among the recommendations made, are a series of steps to establish a quality management system based on this standard, which apply not only to this company but for any others who wish to demonstrate their competence to carry out tests and / or calibrations.

  19. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  20. Phenological Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phenology is the scientific study of periodic biological phenomena, such as flowering, breeding, and migration, in relation to climatic conditions. The few records...

  1. Lunar laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.; Duke, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    An international research laboratory can be established on the Moon in the early years of the 21st Century. It can be built using the transportation system now envisioned by NASA, which includes a space station for Earth orbital logistics and orbital transfer vehicles for Earth-Moon transportation. A scientific laboratory on the Moon would permit extended surface and subsurface geological exploration; long-duration experiments defining the lunar environment and its modification by surface activity; new classes of observations in astronomy; space plasma and fundamental physics experiments; and lunar resource development. The discovery of a lunar source for propellants may reduce the cost of constructing large permanent facilities in space and enhance other space programs such as Mars exploration. 29 refs.

  2. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  3. Experimental demonstrations of record high REAM intensity modulator-enabled 19.25Gb/s real-time end-to-end dual-band optical OFDM colorless transmissions over 25km SSMF IMDD systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q W; Hugues-Salas, E; Giddings, R P; Wang, M; Tang, J M

    2013-04-08

    Record-high 19.25Gb/s real-time end-to-end dual-band optical OFDM (OOFDM) colorless transmissions across the entire C-band are experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, in reflective electro-absorption modulator (REAM)-based 25km standard SMF systems using intensity modulation and direct detection. Adaptively modulated baseband (0-2GHz) and passband (6.125 ± 2GHz) OFDM RF sub-bands, supporting signal line rates of 9.75Gb/s and 9.5Gb/s respectively, are independently generated and detected with FPGA-based DSP clocked at only 100MHz as well as DACs/ADCs operating at sampling speeds as low as 4GS/s. The two OFDM sub-bands are electrically multiplexed for intensity modulation of a single optical carrier by an 8GHz REAM. The REAM colorlessness is experimentally characterized, based on which optimum REAM operating conditions are identified. To maximize and balance the signal transmission performance of each sub-band, on-line adaptive transceiver optimization functions and live performance monitoring are fully exploited to optimize key OOFDM transceiver and system parameters. For different wavelengths within the C-band, corresponding minimum received optical powers at the FEC limit vary in a range of <0.5dB and bit error rate performances for both baseband and passband signals are almost identical. Furthermore, detailed investigations are also undertaken of the maximum aggregated signal line rate sensitivity to electrical sub-band power variation. It is shown that the aforementioned system has approximately 3dB tolerance to RF sub-band power variation.

  4. RECORDS REACHING RECORDING DATA TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    G. W. L. Gresik; S. Siebe; R. Drewello

    2013-01-01

    The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies) is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence...

  5. CERN's 50th anniversary open day attracts record number of visitors: an estimated 32,000 visitors, from across Europe and beyond, flocked to the laboratory for a day of tours, displays and presentations.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2004-01-01

    When CERN opened its doors to the public for its open day on 16 October, the laboratory took on the air of a county fair. Children took rides around the site in a big lorry, visitors ate ice cream that had been handmade in a flash using liquid nitrogen, and crowds strolled the lanes as they visited more than 50 events across various sites in Switzerland and France.

  6. Senior Laboratory Animal Technician | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Laboratory Animal Sciences Program (LASP) provides exceptional quality animal care and technical support services for animal research performed at the National Cancer Institute at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. LASP executes this mission by providing a broad spectrum of state-of-the-art technologies and services that are focused on the design, generation, characterization and application of genetically engineered and biological animal models of human disease, which are aimed at the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. LASP contributes to advancing human health, developing new treatments, and improving existing treatments for cancer and other diseases while ensuring safe and humane treatment of animals. Key Roles/Responsibilities The Senior Laboratory Animal Technician will be responsible for: Daily tasks associated with the care, breeding and treatment of research animals for experimental purposes Management of rodent breeding colonies consisting of multiple, genetically complex strains and associated record keeping and database management Colony management procedures including: tail clipping, animal identification, weaning Data entry consistent with complex colony management Collection of routine diagnostic samples Coordinating shipment of live animals and specimens Performing rodent experimental procedures including basic necropsy and blood collection Observation and recording of physical signs of animal health Knowledge of safe working practices using chemical carcinogen and biological hazards Work schedule may include weekend and holiday hours

  7. Vinyl Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartmanski, Dominik; Woodward, Ian

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we use the case of the vinyl record to show that iconic objects become meaningful via a dual process. First, they offer immersive engagements which structure user interpretations through various material experiences of handling, use, and extension. Second, they always work via enta...

  8. Design of a Cold Neutron Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sang Ik; Kim, Y. K.; Jung, H. S.; Park, Y. C.; Kim, H. G.; Lee, B. C.; Ahn, S. H.; Han, Y. S.; Kim, H. R

    2006-04-15

    This report is summarized of the design results of a Cold Neutron Laboratory Building (CNLB) and its whole technical documents submitted to the regulatory body. This report is composed of the CNLB's safety analysis report in the final version and the question and answer documents carried out for its screening to get an approval. The objective of this report is to keep the design results about following terms. Also, it is intended to record serially the technical work conducted for its screening and to find out easily the whole process of the CNLB project. Civil and Architectural Design for CNLB, Seismic and Structure Analysis for CNLB, Shielding Design of the Neutron Guide and the Experimental Equipment and Design of the Compressed Air, Cooling Water, Ventilation, Fire Protection, Electricity System, and etc on.

  9. Records Reaching Recording Data Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresik, G. W. L.; Siebe, S.; Drewello, R.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies) is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  10. RECORDS REACHING RECORDING DATA TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. L. Gresik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  11. Gait Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

  12. Mini review: Multielectrode recordings in insect brains

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavsar, Balvantray; Heinrich, Ralf; Stumpner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Currently, more and more laboratories are acquiring the capability of simultaneously detecting the extracellular activity of neurons in anaesthetized and awake animals by multielectrode recordings. In insects, multielectrode recordings are challenging due to the small size of the nervous system. Nevertheless, multielectrode recordings have been successfully established in brains of cockroaches, honeybees, fruit flies and grasshoppers to study sensory processing related to mechanosensation, ol...

  13. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials from 2005 until this past month are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the Trigger-Aware Analysis Tutorial by Monika Wielers on March 23 and the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal.Feedback WelcomeOur group is making arrangements now to record plenary sessions, tutorials, and other important ATLAS events for 2007. Your suggestions for potential recording, as well as your feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you.Enjoy the Lectures!

  14. Protocol for project IMPACT (improving millions hearts for provider and community transformation): a quasi-experimental evaluation of an integrated electronic health record and community health worker intervention study to improve hypertension management among South Asian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Priscilla M; Zanowiak, Jennifer; Goldfeld, Keith; Wyka, Katarzyna; Masoud, Ahmad; Beane, Susan; Kumar, Rashi; Laughlin, Phoebe; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Thorpe, Lorna; Islam, Nadia

    2017-12-06

    The Million Hearts® initiative aims to prevent heart disease and stroke in the United States by mobilizing public and private sectors around a core set of objectives, with particular attention on improving blood pressure control. South Asians in particular have disproportionately high rates of hypertension and face numerous cultural, linguistic, and social barriers to accessing healthcare. Interventions utilizing Health information technology (HIT) and community health worker (CHW)-led patient coaching have each been demonstrated to be effective at advancing Million Hearts® goals, yet few studies have investigated the potential impact of integrating these strategies into a clinical-community linkage initiative. Building upon this initiative, we present the protocol and preliminary results of a research study, Project IMPACT, designed to fill this gap in knowledge. Project IMPACT is a stepped wedge quasi-experimental study designed to test the feasibility, adoption, and impact of integrating CHW-led health coaching with electronic health record (EHR)-based interventions to improve hypertension control among South Asian patients in New York City primary care practices. EHR intervention components include the training and implementation of hypertension-specific registry reports, alerts, and order sets. Fidelity to the EHR intervention is assessed by collecting the type, frequency, and utilization of intervention components for each practice. CHW intervention components consist of health coaching sessions on hypertension and related risk factors for uncontrolled hypertensive patients. The outcome, hypertension control (Project IMPACT builds upon the evidence base of the effectiveness of CHW and Million Hearts® initiatives and proposes a unique integration of provider-based EHR and community-based CHW interventions. The project informs the effectiveness of these interventions in team-based care approaches, thereby, helping to develop relevant sustainability

  15. Trial of integrated laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Osamu; Takahashi, Yuzo; Abe, Chikara; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakashima, Akira; Morita, Hironobu

    2011-06-01

    In most laboratory practices for students in medical schools, a laboratory guidebook is given to the students, in which the procedures are precisely described. The students merely follow the guidebook without thinking deeply, which spoils the students and does not entice them to think creatively. Problem-based learning (PBL) could be one means for the students themselves to actively learn, find problems, and resolve them. Such a learning attitude nurtures medical students with lifelong learning as healthcare professionals. We merged PBL and laboratory practices to promote deep thinking habits and developed an integrated laboratory practice. We gave a case sheet to groups of students from several schools. The students raised hypotheses after vivid discussion, designed experimental protocols, and performed the experiments. If the results did not support or disproved the hypothesis, the students set up another hypothesis followed by experiments, lasting for 4 or 5 consecutive days. These procedures are quite similar to those of professional researchers. The main impact achieved was the fact that the students developed the experimental design by themselves, for the first time in their college lives. All students enjoyed the laboratory practice, which they had never experienced before. This is an antidote to the guidebook-navigated traditional laboratory practice, which disappoints many students. As educators in basic medical sciences stand on the edge in terms of educating the next generation, there is a need to provide a strong foundation for medical students to design and perform scientific experiments. The integrated laboratory practice may provide the solution.

  16. Environmental epidemiology applied to urban atmospheric pollution: a contribution from the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory (LPAE Epidemiologia ambiental aplicada à poluição atmosférica urbana: uma contribuição do Laboratório de Poluição Atmosférica Experimental (LPAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Afonso de André

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Systematic investigation on the effects of human exposure to environmental pollution using scientific methodology only began in the 20th century as a consequence of several environmental accidents followed by an unexpected mortality increase above expected mortality and as a result of observational epidemiological and toxicological studies conducted on animals in developed countries. This article reports the experience of the Experimental Air Pollution Laboratory at the School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, concerning the respiratory system and pathophysiological mechanisms involved in responses to exposure to pollution using toxicological and experimental procedures, complemented by observational epidemiological studies conducted in the city of São Paulo. It also describes these epidemiological studies, pointing out that air pollution is harmful to public health, not only among susceptible groups but also in the general population, even when the concentration of pollutants is below the limits set by environmental legislation. The study provides valuable information to support the political and economic decision-making processes aimed at preserving the environment and enhancing quality of life.A investigação sobre os efeitos da exposição humana à poluição ambiental iniciou de maneira sistemática, com abordagem científica, apenas no século XX, como conseqüência de uma série de acidentes ambientais percebidos por um significativo aumento na mortalidade e com a realização de estudos epidemiológicos observacionais e toxicológicos em animais. Tais estudos têm se concentrado nos países considerados desenvolvidos. Este artigo relata a experiência do Laboratório de Poluição Atmosférica Experimental (LPAE, da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, no estudo dos mecanismos fisiopatológicos do sistema respiratório em face da exposição aos poluentes, utilizando abordagens experimentais e toxicol

  17. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2011-01-01

    http://cern.ch/Record.Club November  Selections Just in time for the holiday season, we have added a number of new CDs and DVDs into the Club. You will find the full lists at http://cern.ch/record.club; select the "Discs of the Month" button on the left side on the left panel of the web page and then Nov 2011. New films include the all 5 episodes of Fast and Furious, many of the most famous films starring Jean-Paul Belmondo and those of Louis de Funes and some more recent films such as The Lincoln Lawyer and, according to some critics, Woody Allen’s best film for years – Midnight in Paris. For the younger generation there is Cars 2 and Kung Fu Panda 2. New CDs include the latest releases by Adele, Coldplay and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. We have also added the new Duets II CD featuring Tony Bennett singing with some of today’s pop stars including Lady Gaga, Amy Winehouse and Willy Nelson. The Club is now open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday ...

  18. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeremy Herr; Homer A. Neal; Mitch McLachlan

    The University of Michigan Web Archives for the 2006 ATLAS Week Plenary Sessions, as well as the first of 2007, are now online. In addition, there are a wide variety of Software and Physics Tutorial sessions, recorded over the past couple years, to chose from. All ATLAS-specific archives are accessible here.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Shaping Collaboration 2006The Michigan group is happy to announce a complete set of recordings from the Shaping Collaboration conference held last December at the CICG in Geneva.The event hosted a mix of Collaborative Tool experts and LHC Users, and featured presentations by the CERN Deputy Director General, Prof. Jos Engelen, the President of Internet2, and chief developers from VRVS/EVO, WLAP, and other tools...

  19. Record club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record club

    2010-01-01

      Bonjour a tous, Voici les 24 nouveaux DVD de Juillet disponibles depuis quelques jours, sans oublier les 5 CD Pop musique. Découvrez la saga du terroriste Carlos, la vie de Gainsbourg et les aventures de Lucky Luke; angoissez avec Paranormal Activity et évadez vous sur Pandora dans la peau d’Avatar. Toutes les nouveautés sont à découvrir directement au club. Pour en connaître la liste complète ainsi que le reste de la collection du Record Club, nous vous invitons sur notre site web: http://cern.ch/crc. Toutes les dernières nouveautés sont dans la rubrique « Discs of the Month ». Rappel : le club est ouvert les Lundis, Mercredis, Vendredis de 12h30 à 13h00 au restaurant n°2, bâtiment 504. A bientôt chers Record Clubbers.  

  20. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2011-01-01

    http://cern.ch/Record.Club Nouveautés été 2011 Le club de location de CDs et de DVDs vient d’ajouter un grand nombre de disques pour l’été 2011. Parmi eux, Le Discours d’un Roi, oscar 2011 du meilleur film et Harry Potter les reliques de la mort (1re partie). Ce n’est pas moins de 48 DVDs et 10 CDs nouveaux qui vous sont proposés à la location. Il y en a pour tous les genres. Alors n’hésitez pas à consulter notre site http://cern.ch/record.club, voir Disc Catalogue, Discs of the month pour avoir la liste complète. Le club est ouvert tous les Lundi, Mercredi, Vendredi de 12h30 à 13h dans le bâtiment du restaurent N°2 (Cf. URL: http://www.cern.ch/map/building?bno=504) A très bientôt.  

  1. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2011-01-01

    http://cern.ch/Record.Club June Selections We have put a significant number of new CDs and DVDs into the Club You will find the full lists at http://cern.ch/record.club and select the «Discs of the Month» button on the left side on the left panel of the web page and then June 2011. New films include the latest Action, Suspense and Science Fiction film hits, general drama movies including the Oscar-winning The King’s Speech, comedies including both chapter of Bridget Jones’s Diary, seven films for children and a musical. Other highlights include the latest Harry Potter release and some movies from the past you may have missed including the first in the Terminator series. New CDs include the latest releases by Michel Sardou, Mylene Farmer, Jennifer Lopez, Zucchero and Britney Spears. There is also a hits collection from NRJ. Don’t forget that the Club is now open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday lunchtimes from 12h30 to 13h00 in Restaurant 2, Building 504. (C...

  2. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  3. FOOTWEAR PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory provides biomechanical and physical analyses for both military and commercial footwear. The laboratory contains equipment that is integral to the us...

  4. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  5. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratoriesThe Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  6. Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research performs preclinical characterization of nanomaterials...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH and other variables measured from laboratory experiment studies from an experimental carbonate exposure system from 2013-05-15 to 2013-07-12 (NODC Accession 0123316)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains the carbon chemistry measurements of a laboratory experiment study to understand the effects of ocean acidification on winter...

  8. Laboratory experiment, the number of clams consumed by the fish of FLORIDA POMPANO in experimental tanks feeding on coquina clams individually and in groups from 2013-11-26 to 2013-12-03 (NCEI Accession 0127553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset includes the results from a laboratory experiment assessing whether juvenile Florida Pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) foraging success is greater when in...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH and other variables measured from laboratory experiment studies from an experimental carbonate exposure system from 2013-12-09 to 2014-01-31 (NODC Accession 0123317)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains the carbon chemistry measurements of a laboratory experiment study to understand the effects of ocean acidification on winter...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH and other variables measured from laboratory experiment studies from an experimental carbonate exposure system from 2012-02-29 to 2012-05-11 (NODC Accession 0123315)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains the carbon chemistry measurements of a laboratory experiment study to understand the effects of ocean acidification on winter...

  11. Synchronized whistlers recorded at Varanasi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 1273–1277. Synchronized whistlers recorded at Varanasi. RAJESH SINGH, ASHOK K SINGH and R P SINGH. Physics Department, Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Banaras Hindu University,. Varanasi 221 005 ... An attempt has been made to explain the dynamic spectra using lightning discharge generated.

  12. Nutritional Status and Laboratory Parameters among Internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ... Background: Malnutrition is a clinical state resulting in prolonged hospital stay, increase in severity of infections and poor wound healing. ... On admission, demographic data, anthropometric measurements, laboratory parameters and nutritional screening test results were recorded.

  13. Tape/Pictures in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, H. M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the use of cassette recorders plus color prints as a teaching aid in a laboratory situation, indicating advantages in the areas of education, organization, and ease of implementation. (Author/RAO)

  14. Record dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robe, Dominic M.; Boettcher, Stefan; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    When quenched rapidly beyond their glass transition, colloidal suspensions fall out of equilibrium. The pace of their dynamics then slows down with the system age, i.e., with the time elapsed after the quench. This breaking of time translational invariance is associated with dynamical observables...... which depend on two time-arguments. The phenomenology is shared by a broad class of aging systems and calls for an equally broad theoretical description. The key idea is that, independent of microscopic details, aging systems progress through rare intermittent structural relaxations that are de......-facto irreversible and become increasingly harder to achieve. Thus, a progression of record-sized dynamical barriers are traversed in the approach to equilibration. Accordingly, the statistics of the events is closely described by a log-Poisson process. Originally developed for relaxation in spin glasses...

  15. RECORD CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2010-01-01

    DVD James Bond – Series Complete To all Record Club Members, to start the new year, we have taken advantage of a special offer to add copies of all the James Bond movies to date, from the very first - Dr. No - to the latest - Quantum of Solace. No matter which of the successive 007s you prefer (Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan or Daniel Craig), they are all there. Or perhaps you have a favourite Bond Girl, or even perhaps a favourite villain. Take your pick. You can find the full selection listed on the club web site http://cern.ch/crc; use the panel on the left of the page “Discs of the Month” and select Jan 2010. We remind you that we are open on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 12:30 to 13:00 in Restaurant 2 (Bldg 504).

  16. Record breakers

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    In the sixties, CERN’s Fellows were but a handful of about 50 young experimentalists present on site to complete their training. Today, their number has increased to a record-breaking 500. They come from many different fields and are spread across CERN’s different activity areas.   “Diversifying the Fellowship programme has been the key theme in recent years,” comments James Purvis, Head of the Recruitment, Programmes and Monitoring group in the HR Department. “In particular, the 2005 five-yearly review introduced the notion of ‘senior’ and ‘junior’ Fellowships, broadening the target audience to include those with Bachelor-level qualifications.” Diversification made CERN’s Fellowship programme attractive to a wider audience but the number of Fellows on site could not have increased so much without the support of EU-funded projects, which were instrumental in the growth of the programme. ...

  17. Experimental music for experimental physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    Using the sonification technique, physicist and composer Domenico Vicinanza paid homage to CERN at its 60th anniversary ceremony. After months of hard work, he turned the CERN Convention and LHC data into music.   Click here to download the full score of the "LHChamber music". Every birthday deserves gifts and CERN’s 60th anniversary was no exception. Two gifts were very special, thanks to the hard work of Domenico Vicinanza, a physicist and composer. He created two experimental pieces by applying the sonification technique to the CERN Convention and to data recorded by the four LHC detectors during Run 1. “This technique allows us to ‘hear’ data using an algorithm that translates numbers or letters into notes. It keeps the same information enclosed in a graph or a document, but has a more aesthetic exposition,” explains Domenico Vicinanza. “The result is meant to be a metaphor for scientific cooperation, in which d...

  18. Records Control Schedules Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — The Records Control Schedules (RCS) repository provides access to scanned versions of records schedules, or Standard Form 115, Request for Records Disposition...

  19. The geological record of ocean acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hönisch, B.; Ridgwell, A.; Schmidt, D.N.; Thomas, E.; Gibbs, S.J.; Sluijs, A.; Zeebe, R.; Kump, L.; Martindale, R.C.; Greene, S.E.; Kiessling, W.; Ries, J.; Zachos, J.C.; Royer, D.L.; Barker, S.; Marchitto Jr., T.M.; Moyer, R.; Pelejero, C.; Ziveri, P.; Foster, G.L.; Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification may have severe consequences for marine ecosystems; however, assessing its future impact is difficult because laboratory experiments and field observations are limited by their reduced ecologic complexity and sample period, respectively. In contrast, the geological record

  20. The Geological Record of Ocean Acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hönisch, B.; Ridgwell, A.; Schmidt, D.N.; Thomas, E; Gibbs, S.J.; Sluijs, A.; Zeebe, R.; Kump, L.; Martindale, R.C.; Greene, S.E.; Kiessling, W.; Ries, J.; Zachos, J.C.; Royer, D.L.; Barker, S.; Marchitto, T.M.; Moyer, R.; Pelejero, C.; Ziveri, P.; Foster, G.L.; Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification may have severe consequences for marine ecosystems; however, assessing its future impact is difficult because laboratory experiments and field observations are limited by their reduced ecologic complexity and sample period, respectively. In contrast, the geological record

  1. Record Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Record Club

    2012-01-01

      March  Selections By the time this appears, we will have added a number of new CDs and DVDs into the Club. You will find the full lists at http://cern.ch/record.club; select the "Discs of the Month" button on the left panel of the web page and then Mar 2012. New films include recent releases such as Johnny English 2, Bad Teacher, Cowboys vs Aliens, and Super 8. We are also starting to acquire some of the classic films we missed when we initiated the DVD section of the club, such as appeared in a recent Best 100 Films published by a leading UK magazine; this month we have added Spielberg’s Jaws and Scorsese’s Goodfellas. If you have your own ideas on what we are missing, let us know. For children we have no less than 8 Tin-Tin DVDs. And if you like fast moving pop music, try the Beyonce concert DVD. New CDs include the latest releases from Paul McCartney, Rihanna and Amy Winehouse. There is a best of Mylene Farmer, a compilation from the NRJ 201...

  2. Smart Grid Integration Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troxell, Wade [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2011-12-22

    The initial federal funding for the Colorado State University Smart Grid Integration Laboratory is through a Congressionally Directed Project (CDP), DE-OE0000070 Smart Grid Integration Laboratory. The original program requested in three one-year increments for staff acquisition, curriculum development, and instrumentation all which will benefit the Laboratory. This report focuses on the initial phase of staff acquisition which was directed and administered by DOE NETL/ West Virginia under Project Officer Tom George. Using this CDP funding, we have developed the leadership and intellectual capacity for the SGIC. This was accomplished by investing (hiring) a core team of Smart Grid Systems engineering faculty focused on education, research, and innovation of a secure and smart grid infrastructure. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory will be housed with the separately funded Integrid Laboratory as part of CSU's overall Smart Grid Integration Center (SGIC). The period of performance of this grant was 10/1/2009 to 9/30/2011 which included one no cost extension due to time delays in faculty hiring. The Smart Grid Integration Laboratory's focus is to build foundations to help graduate and undergraduates acquire systems engineering knowledge; conduct innovative research; and team externally with grid smart organizations. Using the results of the separately funded Smart Grid Workforce Education Workshop (May 2009) sponsored by the City of Fort Collins, Northern Colorado Clean Energy Cluster, Colorado State University Continuing Education, Spirae, and Siemens has been used to guide the hiring of faculty, program curriculum and education plan. This project develops faculty leaders with the intellectual capacity to inspire its students to become leaders that substantially contribute to the development and maintenance of Smart Grid infrastructure through topics such as: (1) Distributed energy systems modeling and control; (2) Energy and power conversion; (3

  3. Region 7 Laboratory Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Laboratory Information Management System (R7LIMS) which maintains records for the Regional Laboratory. Any Laboratory analytical work performed is stored in this system which replaces LIMS-Lite, and before that LAST. The EPA and its contractors may use this database. The Office of Policy & Management (PLMG) Division at EPA Region 7 is the primary managing entity; contractors can access this database but it is not accessible to the public.

  4. Seismic imaging in laboratory trough laser Doppler vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Daniel; Poydenot, Valier; Garambois, Stéphane; Diaz, Julien; Bordes, Clarisse; Rolando, Jean-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Mimic near-surface seismic field measurements at a small scale, in the laboratory, under a well-controlled environment, may lead to a better understanding of wave propagation in complex media such as in geological materials. Laboratory experiments can help in particular to constrain and refine theoretical and numerical modelling of physical phenomena occurring during seismic propagation, in order to make a better use of the complete set of measurements recorded in the field. We have developed a laser Doppler vibrometer (laser interferometry) platform designed to measure non-contact seismic displacements (or velocities) of a surface. This technology enables to measure displacements as small as a tenth of a nanometer on a wide range of frequencies, from a few tenths to a few megahertz. Our experimental set-up is particularly suited to provide high-density spatial and temporal records of displacements on the edge of any vibrating material. We will show in particular a study of MHz wave propagation (excited by piezoelectric transducers) in cylindrical cores of typical diameter size around 10 cm. The laser vibrometer measurements will be first validated in homogeneous materials cylinders by comparing the measurements to a direct numerical simulation. Special attention will be given to the comparison of experimental versus numerical amplitudes of displacements. In a second step, we will conduct the same type of study through heterogeneous carbonate cores, possibly fractured. Tomographic images of velocity in 2D slices of the carbonate core will be derived based upon on the time of first arrival. Preliminary attempts of tomographic attenuation maps will also be presented based on the amplitudes of first arrivals. Experimental records will be confronted to direct numerical simulations and tomographic images will be compared to x-ray scanner imaging of the cylindrical cores.

  5. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  6. Instructional Efficiency of Tutoring in an Outreach Gene Technology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-06-01

    Our research objective focused on examining the instructional efficiency of tutoring as a form of instructional change as opposed to a non-tutoring approach in an outreach laboratory. We designed our laboratory based on cognitive load (CL) theory. Altogether, 269 twelfth-graders participated in our day-long module Genetic Fingerprinting. In a quasi-experimental design, the control group ( n = 121) followed the non-tutoring approach previously used, while the treatment group ( n = 148) followed the newly developed tutoring approach. Each tutor was in charge of two student work groups and recorded the tutoring activities requested by the tutees throughout the day. We measured the students' invested mental effort (as an index of CL), cognitive achievement (in a pre-post-follow-up design), and the students' cooperation in their work groups as well as calculated the student instructional involvement (as a motivational variable). Additionally, we examined which aspects of the hands-on phases were of particular relevance to the students' invested mental effort. Unexpectedly, the combined mental effort and cognitive achievement data indicated that our implemented tutoring approach resulted in a lower instructional efficiency despite the relevance of tutoring for students' mental effort invested during the experimental phases. Most of the tutor assistance was unnecessarily requested for performing the procedural steps and using the equipment. Our results indicate an assistance dilemma and consequently underscore the necessity for effective tutor preparation in outreach laboratories.

  7. Developing a Social Psychological Laboratory on a Shoestring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Jane; Hysom, Stuart; Lang, Louis; Love, Tony P.; Manago, Bianca; Le, Huong; Spivey, Tiffany

    2011-01-01

    One of the most vexing issues faced by experimental social psychologists is the creation and subsequent maintenance of a laboratory. Consequently, well-equipped experimental sociology laboratories are most likely to be found in institutions with larger resources and an established history of experimental research. Smaller institutions or those…

  8. Gran Sasso, laboratori fermi per inquinamento

    CERN Multimedia

    Arachi, Alessandra

    2003-01-01

    An experimental hall at the Gran Sasso laboratory has been closed by the Courts after a river was found contaminated. The institute decided to close all the installations in order to protect the health of citizens (1 page)

  9. Experimental Essays on Social and Agency Dilemmas

    OpenAIRE

    Casal, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Economic research frequently uses experimental methods to study, in the laboratory or in the field, behaviour of economic agents. The advantage of the laboratory experimental method is the collection of data which is, in some cases, otherwise impossible to obtain. In addition, experiments permit to test, ceteris paribus, the impact of a certain treatment on the behaviour of the economic agents. These are the reasons for the application of laboratory experimental methods in the three e...

  10. Low Cost Electrode Assembly for EEG Recordings in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Emily C; Flynn, Daniel T; Busciglio, Federico; Bohannan, Ryan C; Tran, Alison; Mahavongtrakul, Matthew; Busciglio, Jorge A

    2017-01-01

    Wireless electroencephalography (EEG) of small animal subjects typically utilizes miniaturized EEG devices which require a robust recording and electrode assembly that remains in place while also being well-tolerated by the animal so as not to impair the ability of the animal to perform normal living activities or experimental tasks. We developed simple and fast electrode assembly and method of electrode implantation using electrode wires and wire-wrap technology that provides both higher survival and success rates in obtaining recordings from the electrodes than methods using screws as electrodes. The new wire method results in a 51% improvement in the number of electrodes that successfully record EEG signal. Also, the electrode assembly remains affixed and provides EEG signal for at least a month after implantation. Screws often serve as recording electrodes, which require either drilling holes into the skull to insert screws or affixing screws to the surface of the skull with adhesive. Drilling holes large enough to insert screws can be invasive and damaging to brain tissue, using adhesives may interfere with conductance and result in a poor signal, and soldering screws to wire leads results in fragile connections. The methods presented in this article provide a robust implant that is minimally invasive and has a significantly higher success rate of electrode implantation. In addition, the implant remains affixed and produces good recordings for over a month, while using economical, easily obtained materials and skills readily available in most animal research laboratories.

  11. 40 CFR 792.195 - Retention of records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Records and Reports § 792.195 Retention of records... retained only as long as the quality of the preparation affords evaluation. Specimens obtained from...

  12. Critical Pedagogies and the Theatre Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Jonathan; Johnson, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    This dialogue contributes reflections on the "theatre laboratory" to the scholarly debate surrounding methodologies of drama education and applied performance. The co-authors suggest that the experimental and ensemble-led approach of the Samuel Beckett Laboratory, founded at Trinity College Dublin in 2013 as a space for research into…

  13. Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics (LEP) performs experimental and theoretical research on the heliosphere, the interstellar medium, and the magnetospheres and upper atmospheres of the planets, including Earth. LEP space scientists investigate the structure and dynamics of the magnetospheres of the planets including Earth. Their research programs encompass the magnetic fields intrinsic to many planetary bodies as well as their charged-particle environments and plasma-wave emissions. The LEP also conducts research into the nature of planetary ionospheres and their coupling to both the upper atmospheres and their magnetospheres. Finally, the LEP carries out a broad-based research program in heliospheric physics covering the origins of the solar wind, its propagation outward through the solar system all the way to its termination where it encounters the local interstellar medium. Special emphasis is placed on the study of solar coronal mass ejections (CME's), shock waves, and the structure and properties of the fast and slow solar wind. LEP planetary scientists study the chemistry and physics of planetary stratospheres and tropospheres and of solar system bodies including meteorites, asteroids, comets, and planets. The LEP conducts a focused program in astronomy, particularly in the infrared and in short as well as very long radio wavelengths. We also perform an extensive program of laboratory research, including spectroscopy and physical chemistry related to astronomical objects. The Laboratory proposes, develops, fabricates, and integrates experiments on Earth-orbiting, planetary, and heliospheric spacecraft to measure the characteristics of planetary atmospheres and magnetic fields, and electromagnetic fields and plasmas in space. We design and develop spectrometric instrumentation for continuum and spectral line observations in the x-ray, gamma-ray, infrared, and radio regimes; these are flown on spacecraft to study

  14. 27 CFR 24.319 - Carbon dioxide record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide record. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.319 Carbon dioxide record. A proprietor who uses carbon dioxide in still wine shall maintain a record of the laboratory tests conducted to...

  15. Histological changes caused by experimental Riedeliella graciliflora (Leg. Papilionoideae poisoning in cattle and laboratory animals Alterações histológicas na intoxicação experimental por Riedeliella graciliflora (Leg. Papilionoideae em bovinos e animais de laboratório

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Riet-Correa

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissues from cattle, mice, rats and guinea pigs experimentally intoxicated by Riedeliella graciliflora were studied histologically. Cattle lymph nodes, spleen, Peyer patches and peribronchial lymphoid tissues had diffuse necrosis of lymphocytes, mainly in the germinal centers of the follicles. This lesion was less severe in laboratory animals. All species had severe enteritis with infiltration of the lamina propria by mononuclear cells. Some cells in this infiltrate were necrotic. Degeneration and necrosis of the epithelial cells, mainly in the tip of the villi, and detachment of the epithelial lining from the lamina propria were also observed. In the liver the trabecular structure was disrupted and the hepatocytes had some degree of individual necrosis and degeneration. A tubular nephrosis was observed in the kidneys. Liver, lung, kidney, intestine and lymph nodes had different degrees of congestion. Those lesions are similar than those caused by Polygala klotzschii, a plant that contains 5-metoxi-podophyllotoxin.Foi realizado um estudo histológico de bovinos, camundongos, ratos e coelhos intoxicados experimentalmente por Riedeliella graciliflora. Em bovinos os gânglios linfáticos, baço, placas de Peyer e tecido peribronquial apresentavam necrose do tecido linfático, afetando, principalmente, os centros germinativos dos folículos. Esta lesão foi menos severa em animais de laboratório. Em todas as espécies havia severa enterite e infiltração da lâmina propria do intestino por células mononucleares. Algumas destas células estavam necróticas. Degeneração e necrose do epitélio, principalmente na superfície das vilosidades, e descamação das células epiteliais foram, também, observadas. No fígado havia desorganização da estrutura trabecular e alguns hepatócitos apresentavam-se degenerados ou necróticos. Os rins apresentavam nefrose tubular. Diferentes graus de congestão foram observados no fígado, pulmão, rins

  16. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  17. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  18. Gun Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Gun Dynamics Laboratory is a research multi-task facility, which includes two firing bays, a high bay area and a second floor laboratory space. The high bay area...

  19. Denver District Laboratory (DEN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesDEN-DO Laboratory is a multi-functional laboratory capable of analyzing most chemical analytes and pathogenic/non-pathogenic microorganisms found...

  20. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  1. Modernisation of the intermediate physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontro, Inkeri; Heino, Olga; Hendolin, Ilkka; Galambosi, Szabolcs

    2018-03-01

    The intermediate laboratory courses at the Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, were reformed using desired learning outcomes as the basis for design. The reformed laboratory courses consist of weekly workshops and small-group laboratory sessions. Many of the laboratory exercises are open-ended and have several possible ways of execution. They were designed around affordable devices, to allow for the purchase of multiple sets of laboratory equipment. This allowed students to work on the same problems simultaneously. Thus, it was possible to set learning goals which build on each other. Workshop sessions supported the course by letting the students solve problems related to conceptual and technical aspects of each laboratory exercise. The laboratory exercises progressed biweekly to allow for iterative problem solving. Students reached the learning goals well and the reform improved student experiences. Neither positive or negative changes in expert-like attitudes towards experimental physics (measured by E-CLASS questionnaire) were observed.

  2. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 60 years, Sandia has delivered essential science and technology to resolve the nation's most challenging security issues.Sandia National Laboratories...

  4. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  5. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  6. Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory at the University of Maryland provides the state of the art facilities for realizing next generation products and educating the...

  7. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  8. Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Coatings and Corrosion Laboratory is to develop and analyze the effectiveness of innovative coatings test procedures while evaluating the...

  9. Intelligent Optics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Intelligent Optics Laboratory supports sophisticated investigations on adaptive and nonlinear optics; advancedimaging and image processing; ground-to-ground and...

  10. Wireless Emulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Wireless Emulation Laboratory (WEL) is a researchtest bed used to investigate fundamental issues in networkscience. It is a research infrastructure that emulates...

  11. Geospatial Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: To process, store, and disseminate geospatial data to the Department of Defense and other Federal agencies.DESCRIPTION: The Geospatial Services Laboratory...

  12. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  13. Embedded Processor Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Embedded Processor Laboratory provides the means to design, develop, fabricate, and test embedded computers for missile guidance electronics systems in support...

  14. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  15. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  16. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  17. COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts basic and applied human research studies to characterize cognitive performance as influenced by militarily-relevant contextual and physical...

  18. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  19. Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory is used to design and integrate computer hardware and software and related electronic subsystems for tactical vehicles....

  20. Photovoltaic Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's PV characterization laboratory is used to measure the electrical performance and opto-electronic properties of solar cells and modules. This facility consists...

  1. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems.DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  2. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...

  3. ANALYTICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment that performs a broad array of microbiological analyses for pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. It performs challenge studies...

  4. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  5. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  6. Central Laboratories Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TVA Central Laboratories Services is a comprehensive technical support center, offering you a complete range of scientific, engineering, and technical services....

  7. The Automation of the Transonic Experimental Facility (TEF) and the Aerodynamic Experimental Facility (AEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Aerodynamic Experimental Facility (AEF) by Charith R Ranawake Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...Laboratory The Automation of the Transonic Experimental Facility (TEF) and the Aerodynamic Experimental Facility (AEF) by Charith R Ranawake Weapons...To) 05/2015–08/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Automation of the Transonic Experimental Facility (TEF) and the Aerodynamic Experimental Facility

  8. Synthesis of liquid crystals derived from nitroazobenzene: a proposed multistep synthesis applied to organic chemistry laboratory classes; Sintese de cristais liquidos derivados do nitroazobenzeno: uma proposta de sintese multi-etapas aplicada as aulas de quimica organica experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiano, Rodrigo; Cabral, Marilia Gabriela B.; Aquino, Rafael B. de; Cristiano, Claudia M.Z., E-mail: rcristiano@quimica.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2014-07-01

    We describe a synthetic route consisting of five steps from aniline to obtain liquid crystal compounds derived from nitroazobenzene. Syntheses were performed during the second half of the semester in organic chemistry laboratory classes. Students characterized the liquid crystal phase by the standard melting point techniques, differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy. These experiments allow undergraduate students to explore fundamentally important reactions in Organic Chemistry, as well as modern concepts in Chemistry such as self-assembly and self-organization, nanostructured materials and molecular electronics. (author)

  9. Series of selenoid valve pneumatic AC 220 volts with disposable contra angle as a replacement for micromotor in preclinic laboratory (experimental study on the health ministry of health polytechnic course D-III department of dental nursing Tasikmalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiyat Miko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To report on the essential performance characteristics of disposable air turbine handpiece and on aspect of their convenience and safety for preclinical use. The disposable handpiece is not recommended drilling in oral cavity. We use for student practical  in Operative Dentistry at preclinic laboratory. The other side micromotor low speed handpiece used as bur device on the phantom, the problem usually found in preclinik laboratory on practical conservation with the use of micromotor frequent damage to the handpiece (contra angel. Micromotor tend to heat up faster and have a low-speed, so it took a long time to complete the drilling, using the micromotor tend to be less safe because of the power generated from the flow of electricity at any time could damage. The price of  micromotor also is quite expensive. The limitations of the budget funds for maintenance, repair and procurement of mikromotor also became a problem. Based on these problems, the research team made a solution in the form of a replacement tool (substitute micromotor with the aim to resolve the existing problems as well as creating practices preclinic more effectively and efficiently. The use of a simple drill tool in the form of a series of Pneumatic Valve 220 volt (include electric compressor and Selenoid Disposible Handpiece Contra-angles as a new innovation in the laboratory of Dental Nursing. Majors preclinik Health Polytechnic Tasikmalaya  have been applied for last 3 years and have been able to more efficient cost of procurement tool of 70%. This disposible tool is apparently able to drill up to 20 times preparasicavity. This research uses descriptive method. Data collection techniques are used through the question form or questionnaire. Population and sample the study is a students collage 2nd years D-III of department of dental nursing Health Polytechnic Tasikmalaya. From the results of research that the majority of students expressed pleased and satisfied. This

  10. LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY COUNTING HANDBOOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Nuclear Instrumentation

    1966-10-01

    The Counting Handbook is a compilation of operational techniques and performance specifications on counting equipment in use at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, Berkeley. Counting notes have been written from the viewpoint of the user rather than that of the designer or maintenance man. The only maintenance instructions that have been included are those that can easily be performed by the experimenter to assure that the equipment is operating properly.

  11. Preservation of enucleated porcine eyes for use in a wet laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibourg, Lisanne M.; Koopmans, Steven A.

    PURPOSE: To design a method to preserve enucleated porcine eyes for use in a wet laboratory. SETTING: Laboratory of Experimental Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. DESIGN: Experimental study. METHODS: Porcine eyes were preserved using 15 methods including salt

  12. Experimental and theoretical investigations of falling film evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Hüseyin; Özdemir, Mustafa

    2012-06-01

    In this study, a mathematical model was developed for falling film evaporation in vacuum using heat transfer relations. An experimental device was designed. experimental set-up which was used was equipped with a triangular weir distribution device and it had the ability to record data up to 3 m. Experiments were performed in a single-effect process with sucrose-water solution varying from 3 to 20% concentration rate of sucrose and we used a vertical tube evaporator with the dimensions of laboratory scale. The model that was developed considers convection, shear stress, viscosity and conjugate heat transfer while most of the previous works ignored these factors. The main factors influencing the heat transfer mechanism performance of the unit were investigated and analyzed. We concluded that the experimental studies are verified by the developed model. Furthermore, it was also concluded that, the heat transfer is affected by the mass flow rate, sucrose concentration rate in solution, film thickness and pressure.

  13. Measuring Dynamic Kidney Function in an Undergraduate Physiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Scott; Harrington, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    Most undergraduate physiology laboratories are very limited in how they treat renal physiology. It is common to find teaching laboratories equipped with the capability for high-resolution digital recordings of physiological functions (muscle twitches, ECG, action potentials, respiratory responses, etc.), but most urinary laboratories still rely on…

  14. Laboratory Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory information systems (LISs) supply mission-critical capabilities for the vast array of information-processing needs of modern laboratories. LIS architectures include mainframe, client-server, and thin client configurations. The LIS database software manages a laboratory's data. LIS dictionaries are database tables that a laboratory uses to tailor an LIS to the unique needs of that laboratory. Anatomic pathology LIS (APLIS) functions play key roles throughout the pathology workflow, and laboratories rely on LIS management reports to monitor operations. This article describes the structure and functions of APLISs, with emphasis on their roles in laboratory operations and their relevance to pathologists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. iLAP: a workflow-driven software for experimental protocol development, data acquisition and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNally James

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the genome biology community has expended considerable effort to confront the challenges of managing heterogeneous data in a structured and organized way and developed laboratory information management systems (LIMS for both raw and processed data. On the other hand, electronic notebooks were developed to record and manage scientific data, and facilitate data-sharing. Software which enables both, management of large datasets and digital recording of laboratory procedures would serve a real need in laboratories using medium and high-throughput techniques. Results We have developed iLAP (Laboratory data management, Analysis, and Protocol development, a workflow-driven information management system specifically designed to create and manage experimental protocols, and to analyze and share laboratory data. The system combines experimental protocol development, wizard-based data acquisition, and high-throughput data analysis into a single, integrated system. We demonstrate the power and the flexibility of the platform using a microscopy case study based on a combinatorial multiple fluorescence in situ hybridization (m-FISH protocol and 3D-image reconstruction. iLAP is freely available under the open source license AGPL from http://genome.tugraz.at/iLAP/. Conclusion iLAP is a flexible and versatile information management system, which has the potential to close the gap between electronic notebooks and LIMS and can therefore be of great value for a broad scientific community.

  16. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  17. [The Rosenthal experiment or: about the site of productive research - on move of the physiological experimental laboratory of Isidor Rosenthal (1836-1915) from the city to the country].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2010-01-01

    The disciplinary development of the new science of experimental physiology is often associated with the conditions of cultural development and increasingly technical working contexts of the Industrial Age. Following this perspective, the germ cells of 19th century institutes of experimental physiology were particularly found in the metropolises of Paris, Leipzig or Berlin. Only the major cities sat the revolutionary trends and within this general process, the scientific trends were no exceptions - the provincial research universities simply followed the central ones in their normal science endeavours. Due to this interpretation, the development of the scientific community was pre-formatted as the interplay of innovation (the city) and reception (the periphery). Isidor Rosenthal (1836-1915) was born in Labischin (District of Bromberg/Posen) in 1836 and got his medical training in Berlin. Like not many other experimental physiologists, he can be used as a historiographical testing probe, to follow the conditions of knowledge transfer from center to periphery: After his studies at the Friedrich Wilhelms University and the completion of his dissertation in 1859, Rosenthal entered the newly founded Physiological Institute in Berlin as the first Research Associate of Emil DuBois-Reymond (1818-1896). Rosenthal worked here particularly on the problem of "direct and indirect muscle irritation" in frogs. These neurophysiological investigations led to his growing scientific renown. In 1872, Rosenthal became offered a first professorship in physiology at the Friedrich Alexander University in Bavaria, as one of only few Jewish scientists (and even before Wilhelm Wundt, 1832-1920). But his life and work proved not only exceptional because of his scientific achievements, but also due to his deep rootedness in cultural life--both during his time in Berlin and in Erlangen. By applying a comparative and microhistorical approach in this article, the working conditions of this

  18. [Tips to activate your laboratory technologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    For about two decades, Japanese clinical laboratories have been suffering depression because of the government policy to reduce medical expenditure. Here are my proposals to re-vitalize laboratory science in Japan. (1) Do not keep laboratory technologists stay inside laboratories. Take them out to bedside to show what is going on. Show your technologists' face to medical professionals to experience clinical demand. (2) Invite doctors who cared severely ill patients to your laboratory. Every month my laboratory holds case study meetings using electronic medical records (EMR). Doctors and residents present how laboratory data saved the patient's life. Attending the meeting, laboratory technologists realize how they contributed to improve the patients' destiny. This "case study meeting" with EMR stimulates laboratory technologists to understand they are really one of major players in dramatic story of clinical medicine. (3) Establish a sophisticated industry of biotechnology. Populations of senior citizens are growing in all the developed nations in the world. The healthcare demand is very likely to increase. Because Japan is experiencing "aging society" most drastically, the Japanese could get the first major chance to develop new technologies to improve senior citizens' quality of life. The more government reduce medical expenditure, the less healthcare industry grows up. Without major biotechnology industry, the Japanese have to import expensive technologies from overseas. In conclusion, Japanese society of laboratory medicine, together with related industries should get united to appeal how they can contribute to the nation, in order to obtain appropriate fee, as an investment for future people's health.

  19. How long shall we record electroencephalography?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craciun, L; Gardella, E; Alving, J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The duration of electroencephalography (EEG) recordings varies widely among laboratories. Although several recommendations had been published, there are no previous studies directly addressing this. AIMS OF THE STUDY: To assess the effect of the recording duration on detection of EEG...... provide evidence for recommending at least 20 min recording duration for standard awake EEGs and 30 min for sleep EEG recordings. As data were derived from patients referred to our epilepsy centre, the results are only valid for epilepsy-related indications....... abnormalities in a tertiary referral centre for epilepsy. METHODS: We have reviewed 1005 EEG recordings and determined the shortest recording duration necessary to identify interictal EEG abnormalities. RESULTS: Standard, awake recordings shorter than 20 min yielded a significantly lower incidence of abnormal...

  20. Rotational superradiance in fluid laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Vitor; Richartz, Mauricio; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Rotational superradiance has been predicted theoretically decades ago, and is the chief responsible for a number of important effects and phenomenology in black hole physics. However, rotational superradiance has never been observed experimentally. Here, with the aim of probing superradiance in the lab, we investigate the behaviour of sound and surface waves in fluids resting in a circular basin at the center of which a rotating cylinder is placed. We show that with a suitable choice for the material of the cylinder, surface and sound waves are amplified. By confining the superradiant modes near the rotating cylinder, an instability sets in. Our findings are experimentally testable in existing fluid laboratories and hence offer experimental exploration and comparison of dynamical instabilities arising from rapidly rotating boundary layers in astrophysical as well as in fluid dynamical systems.

  1. Laboratory testing in pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Trenti, Tommaso

    2010-07-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is traditionally defined as laboratory diagnostics performed at or near the site where clinical care is delivered. POCT thereby combines sample collection, analysis, and reporting of results into a robust integrated testing structure, with a simple user interface. The availability of reliable devices and consolidated tests for patient screening, diagnosis and monitoring has allowed broad diffusion of POCT to the patient's bedside, physician offices, pharmacies, other healthcare facilities, supermarkets, and even into the patient's home. However, current evidence clearly shows that POCT can be subjective, and might even amplify the traditional problems encountered in the preanalytical, analytical and postanalytical phases of the total testing process. This may especially be seen in inappropriateness of the test request, collection of unsuitable biological materials, inaccurate test performances, larger analytical imprecision, unsuitable report formatting, delayed reporting of critical value, and report recording/retrieval. POCT patient care service in the pharmacy can be regarded as a valuable option for the present and future since it might be beneficial for all parties. However, several economic, clinical and regulatory issues should also be addressed before this opportunity can turn into a real advantage for patients and the entire healthcare system. The most appropriate allocation of POCT within the diagnostic pathway, as well as its adjuvant role in screening, diagnosis and monitoring of diseases should also be clearly established in order to prevent widespread and deregulated implementation.

  2. Manufacture and maintenance of laboratory equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. K.; Whang, C. K.; Lee, J. H.; Youm, K. Y.; Hong, S. H.; Choi, H. Y.; An, C.; Park, I. W.; Kim, K. S.; Lee, W. J.; Yoon, K. B.; Kim, H. W.; Lee, I. B.; Lee, C. K.; Youm, J. H.; Oho, W. H.; Choi, B. K.; Jang, K. D.

    1996-12-01

    This report on the manufacture and maintenance of laboratory equipment contains working contents, scope and contents of a request working to the Machine Shop, also records the principal production design, manufacture contents and a relevant working drawing. The working content and scope of the Machine Shop is to support the successful and convenient performance of the R and D by manufacture and maintenance of all sorts of laboratory equipment. (author). 9 tabs., 12 figs.

  3. Manufacture and maintenance of laboratory equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Kyun; Hwang, Chang Kyu; Hwang, Bong Ha; Lee, Jong Wha; Yeom, Ki Eon; Park, Myung Ku; Hong, Soon Hyeon; Choi, Ho Young; An, Dae Kyu; An, Choon; Park, In Won; Kim, Kyeong Sik; Lee, In Bae; Yeom, Jeong Heon; Lee, Chul Ku; Sin, Keon Ju; Oh, Wan Ho; Choi, Byung Kwon; Chang, Kyeong Duk; Lee, Young Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    This report on the manufacture and maintenance of laboratory equipment contains working contents, scope and contents of a request working to the Machine Shop, also records the principal production design, manufacture contents and a relevant working drawing. The working content and scope of the Machine Shop is to support the successful and convenient performance of the Research and development by manufacture and maintenance of all sorts of laboratory equipment. 12 tabs., 5 figs. (Author) .new.

  4. Engineered barrier experiment Mont Terri underground laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayor, J.C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, E. [Universitat Polytechnica de Catalunya (UPC-CIMNE), Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sineriz, J.L. [AITEMIN, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    The Engineered Barrier (EB) experiment is being carried out at the Mont Terri underground laboratory (Switzerland). The aim of the EB experiment is the demonstration of a new concept for the buffer construction of HLW repositories in horizontal drifts, in competent clay formations. The principle of this new buffer construction method is based on the combined use of a lower bed made of compacted bentonite blocks, and an upper backfill made with a bentonite pellets based material. The emplacement layout proposed in this project represents an important innovation for repositories in horizontal drifts. The fact of filling the upper part of the gap between the canister and the rock with a pellets-based type of material makes the emplacement operation much simpler, eliminating some of the most critical aspects of such operation. The experiment is carried out in a gallery excavated in the shaly facies of the Opalinus clay of Mont Terri. The geometry of the test site is a horseshoe section, 2,55 m high, 3 m wide and 15 m long. A dummy canister of the same dimensions and weight than the reference one was installed on the top of a compacted bentonite blocks bed, and the gap canister-rock was backfilled with compacted bentonite pellets. The experimental area was isolated by a concrete plug. An artificial hydration system was installed to accelerate the hydration process. In order to monitor the evolution of the system and record the values of different parameters, a data acquisition system was installed. (authors)

  5. A 6.6-kV Transformerless Battery Energy Storage System Based on a Cascade Multilevel PWM Converter: Experimental Verification by a 200-V, 10-kW, 3.6-kWh Laboratory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shigenori; Maharjan, Laxman; Asakura, Jun; Akagi, Hirofumi

    Renewable energy sources such as wind turbine generators and photovoltaics are intermittent in nature, thus resulting in fluctuating electric power. Leveling of their electric power is indispensable to realize large-scale renewable energy sources, and to avoid severe power quality problems when they are interconnected into the grid. A battery energy storage system (BESS), combining batteries with a power converter and digital control, should be installed in the vicinity of an intermittent energy source. The fluctuating power is compensated by appropriately controlling an active power stored in, or released from, the battery. This paper describes a 6.6-kV transformerless battery energy storage system based on a cascade multilevel PWM (pulse-width-modulation) converter, with focus on a control method for active power and SOC (state-of-charge) balancing. A down-scaled 200-V, 10-kW, 3.6-kWh (13-MJ) laboratory model using nine NiMH (Nickel Metal Hydride) battery packs is designed, constructed, and tested to verify the viability and effectiveness of the 6.6-kV system.

  6. Experimental demonstration of a record high 11.25Gb/s real-time optical OFDM transceiver supporting 25km SMF end-to-end transmission in simple IMDD systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, R P; Jin, X Q; Hugues-Salas, E; Giacoumidis, E; Wei, J L; Tang, J M

    2010-03-15

    The fastest ever 11.25Gb/s real-time FPGA-based optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OOFDM) transceivers utilizing 64-QAM encoding/decoding and significantly improved variable power loading are experimentally demonstrated, for the first time, incorporating advanced functionalities of on-line performance monitoring, live system parameter optimization and channel estimation. Real-time end-to-end transmission of an 11.25Gb/s 64-QAM-encoded OOFDM signal with a high electrical spectral efficiency of 5.625bit/s/Hz over 25km of standard and MetroCor single-mode fibres is successfully achieved with respective power penalties of 0.3dB and -0.2dB at a BER of 1.0 x 10(-3) in a directly modulated DFB laser-based intensity modulation and direct detection system without in-line optical amplification and chromatic dispersion compensation. The impacts of variable power loading as well as electrical and optical components on the transmission performance of the demonstrated transceivers are experimentally explored in detail. In addition, numerical simulations also show that variable power loading is an extremely effective means of escalating system performance to its maximum potential.

  7. Laboratory Alluvial Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devauchelle, O.; Abramian, A.; Seizilles, G.; Lajeunesse, E.

    2015-12-01

    By which physical mechanisms does a river select its shape and size? We investigate this question using small laboratory rivers formed by laminar flows.In its simplest form, this experiment consists in a flow of glycerol over a uniform layer of plastic sediments. After a few hours, a channel forms spontaneously, and eventually reaches a stable geometry. This equilibrium state corresponds accurately to the force balance proposed by Henderson (1961).If we impose a sediment discharge at the inlet of the experiment, the river adjusts to this boundary condition by widening its channel. Observation suggests that this new equilibrium results from the balance between gravity, which pulls the entrained grains towards the center of the channel, and bedload diffusion, which returns them towards the banks. This balance explains why experimental rivers get wider and shallower as their sediment load increases.However, to test quantitatively this theory against observation, we need to evaluate independently the effect of transverse slope on bedload transport. We propose to use an instability generated by bedload diffusion to do so.

  8. Laboratory instruction and subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Barolli

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The specific aspects which determined the way some groups of students conducted their work in a university laboratory, made us understand the articulation of these groups´s dynamics, from elements that were beyond the reach of cognition. In more specific terms the conduction and the maintenance of the groups student´s dynamics were explicited based on a intergame between the non conscious strategies, shared anonymously, and the efforts of the individuals in working based on their most objective task. The results and issues we have reached so far, using a reference the work developed by W.R.Bion, with therapeutical groups, gave us the possibility for understanding the dynamics of the student´s experimental work through a new approach that approximates the fields of cognition and subjectivity. This approximation led us to a deeper reflection about the issues which may be involved in the teaching process, particularly in situations which the teacher deals with the class, organised in groups.

  9. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  10. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  11. Protective Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a 40 by 28 by 9 foot facility that is equipped with tools for the development of various items of control technology related to the transmission...

  12. Laboratory of Biological Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Biological Modeling is defined by both its methodologies and its areas of application. We use mathematical modeling in many forms and apply it to a...

  13. Energetics Laboratory Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These energetic materials laboratories are equipped with explosion proof hoods with blow out walls for added safety, that are certified for safe handling of primary...

  14. Building the Korogwe Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Richard, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania.......An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania....

  15. Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL)�is a scientific facility funded by DOE to create and implement innovative processes for environmental clean-up and...

  16. Geometric Design Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The mission of the Geometric Design Laboratory (GDL) is to support the Office of Safety Research and Development in research related to the geometric design...

  17. Detroit District Laboratory (DET)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesDET-DO Laboratory is equipped with the usual instrumentation necessary to perform a wide range of analyses of food, drugs and cosmetics. Program...

  18. FLEXIBLE FOOD PACKAGING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment to fabricate and test prototype packages of many types and sizes (e.g., bags, pouches, trays, cartons, etc.). This equipment can...

  19. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  20. Superfund Contract Laboratory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Contract Laboratory Program (CLP) is a national network of EPA personnel, commercial laboratories, and support contractors whose primary mission is to provide data of known and documented quality to the Superfund program.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lab has a proud history and heritage of almost 70 years of science and innovation. The people at the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best...

  2. Geological Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Researchers use computed tomography (CT) scanners at NETL’s Geological Services Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, to peer into geologic core samples to determine how...

  3. Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is an astronaut training facility and neutral buoyancy pool operated by NASA and located at the Sonny Carter Training Facility,...

  4. High Bay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a specially constructed facility with elevated (37 feet) ceilings and an overhead catwalk, and which is dedicated to research efforts in reducing...

  5. Human Factors Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The purpose of the Human Factors Laboratory is to further the understanding of highway user needs so that those needs can be incorporated in roadway design,...

  6. Electro-Deposition Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The electro-deposition laboratory can electro-deposit various coatings onto small test samples and bench level prototypes. This facility provides the foundation for...

  7. Product Evaluation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory offers the services of highly trained and experienced specialists that have a full complement of measuring equipment. It is equipped with two optical...

  8. Laboratory Demographics Lookup Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This website provides demographic information about laboratories, including CLIA number, facility name and address, where the laboratory testing is performed, the...

  9. Aircraft Fire Protection Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Navy Aircraft Protection Laboratory provides complete test support for all Navy air vehicle fire protection systems.The facility allows for the simulation of a...

  10. Philadelphia District Laboratory (PHI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Program CapabilitiesPHI-DO Pharmaceutical Laboratory specializes in the analyses of all forms and types of drug products.Its work involves nearly all phases of drug...

  11. CMS Records Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS Records Schedule provides disposition authorizations approved by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) for CMS program-related records...

  12. The "Life Potential": a new complex algorithm to assess "Heart Rate Variability" from Holter records for cognitive and diagnostic aims. Preliminary experimental results showing its dependence on age, gender and health conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Barra, Orazio A

    2013-01-01

    Although HRV (Heart Rate Variability) analyses have been carried out for several decades, several limiting factors still make these analyses useless from a clinical point of view. The present paper aims at overcoming some of these limits by introducing the "Life Potential" (BMP), a new mathematical algorithm which seems to exhibit surprising cognitive and predictive capabilities. BMP is defined as a linear combination of five HRV Non-Linear Variables, in turn derived from the thermodynamic formalism of chaotic dynamic systems. The paper presents experimental measurements of BMP (Average Values and Standard Deviations) derived from 1048 Holter tests, matched in age and gender, including a control group of 356 healthy subjects. The main results are: (a) BMP always decreases when the age increases, and its dependence on age and gender is well established; (b) the shape of the age dependence within "healthy people" is different from that found in the general group: this behavior provides evidence of possible illn...

  13. A wireless recording system that utilizes Bluetooth technology to transmit neural activity in freely moving animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Robert E; Collins, Vernell; Deadwyler, Sam A

    2009-09-15

    A new wireless transceiver is described for recording individual neuron firing from behaving rats utilizing Bluetooth transmission technology and a processor onboard for discrimination of neuronal waveforms and associated time stamps. This universal brain activity transmitter (UBAT) is attached to rodents via a backpack and amplifier headstage and can transmit 16 channels of captured neuronal firing data via a Bluetooth transceiver chip over very large and unconstrained distances. The onboard microprocessor of the UBAT allows flexible online control over waveform isolation criteria via transceiver instruction and the two-way communication capacity allows for closed-loop applications between neural events and behavioral or physiological processes which can be modified by transceiver instructions. A detailed description of the multiplexer processing of channel data as well as examples of neuronal recordings in different behavioral testing contexts is provided to demonstrate the capacity for robust transmission within almost any laboratory environment. A major advantage of the UBAT is the long transmission range and lack of object-based line of sight interference afforded by Bluetooth technology, allowing flexible recording capabilities within multiple experimental paradigms without interruption. Continuous recordings over very large distance separations from the monitor station are demonstrated providing experimenters with recording advantages not previously available with other telemetry devices.

  14. The potential of electronic medical records for health service management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, J. van der; Fleming, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The medical record held in primary care provides the most comprehensive summary of all medical events. Diagnostic, laboratory, and prescribing data are all linked in individual patient records. Networks of GPs in some European countries are routinely recording data electronically in a way which

  15. Digital event recorder capable of simple computations and with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An event recorder which can summate and display stored data is described. This instrument can be used to record behavioural events or sequences in the laboratory or the field and produces a punched tape record which may be read by a computer, without need for an interface. Its ability to perform simple calculations for ...

  16. Good Laboratory Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjicostas, Evsevios

    The principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) in conjunction with the principles of Total Quality Management (see chapter 6) ensure the quality and reliability of the laboratory results, which in turn help to ensure the protection of the environment and human health and safety. A step further is the accreditation of laboratories to ISO 17025 (see chapter 2) to perform specified activities.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  18. Keeping the Records Straight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Phil; Keynes, Milton

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines are given regarding keeping and using educational records for exceptional children in Great Britain. Procedures related to anecdotal records, observation inventories, and rating scales are delineated. (CL)

  19. Astroparticle Physics and the SNOLAB Underground Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Aksel

    2008-05-01

    Astroparticle physics explores the intersections between particle physics and astrophysics. Major questions include the direct detection of dark matter and the determination of the mass, character, and influence of neutrinos. SNOLAB, a deep underground clean laboratory in Sudbury, Ontario has been built to enable such measurements. The SNOLAB laboratory will be described, as well as two experimental projects that will be sited there: The SNO+ double beta decay neutrino experiment and the DEAP/Clean Liquid Argon dark matter detector.

  20. Communication and laboratory performance in parapsychology experiments: demand characteristics and the social organization of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooffitt, Robin

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports findings from a conversation analytic study of experimenter-participant interaction in parapsychology experiments. It shows how properties of communication through which the routine business of the experiment is conducted may have an impact on the research participant's subsequent performance. In this, the study explores social psychological features of the psychology laboratory. In particular, it examines aspects of Orne's (1962) account of what he called the demand characteristics of the psychological experiment. The data come from a corpus of audio recordings of experimenter-participant interaction during experiments on extra-sensory perception. These kinds of experiments, and the phenomena they purport to study, are undoubtedly controversial; however, the paper argues that there are grounds for social psychologists to consider parapsychology experiments as a class (albeit distinctive) of psychology experiments, and, therefore, as sites in which general social psychological and communicative phenomena can be studied. The empirical sections of the paper examine interaction during part of the experimental procedure when the experimenter verbally reviews a record of the participant's imagery reported during an earlier part of the experiment. The analysis shows that the way in which the experimenter acknowledges the research participants' utterances may be significant for the trajectory of the experiment and explores how the participants' subsequent performance in the experiment may be influenced by interactionally generated contingencies.

  1. Investigating Student Perceptions of the Chemistry Laboratory and Their Approaches to Learning in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Spencer Granett

    laboratory procedures. In order to test the effects of the intervention, an experimental group (N=87) completed these supplementary questions during two laboratory experiments while a control group (N=84) performed the same experiments without these additional questions. The effects of the intervention on laboratory exam performance were measured. Students in the experimental group had a higher average on the laboratory exam than students in the control group.

  2. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-01

    Efforts in the area of nuclear reactors and scientific computations are reported, including: robotics; reactor irradiation of nonend-bonded target slugs; computer link with Los Alamos National Laboratory; L-reactor thermal mitigation; aging of carbon in SRP reactor airborne activity confinement systems; and reactor risk assessment for earthquakes. Activities in chemical processes and environmental technology are reported, including: solids formation in a plutonium product stream; revised safety analysis reporting for F and H-Canyon operations; organic carbon analysis of DWPF samples; applications of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry; water chemistry analyzer for SRP reactors; and study of a biological community in Par Pond. Defense waste and laboratory operations activities include: Pu-238 waste incinerator startup; experimental canister frit blaster; saltstone disposal area design; powder metallurgy core diameter measurement; and a new maintenance shop facility. Nuclear materials planning encompasses decontamination and decommissioning of SRP facilities and a comprehensive compilation of environmental and nuclear safety issues. (LEW)

  3. Characterizing the Laboratory Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehabi, Arman [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ganeshalingam, Mohan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeMates, Lauren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mathew, Paul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sartor, Dale [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    Laboratories are estimated to be 3-5 times more energy intensive than typical office buildings and offer significant opportunities for energy use reductions. Although energy intensity varies widely, laboratories are generally energy intensive due to ventilation requirements, the research instruments used, and other health and safety concerns. Because the requirements of laboratory facilities differ so dramatically from those of other buildings, a clear need exists for an initiative exclusively targeting these facilities. The building stock of laboratories in the United States span different economic sectors, include governmental and academic institution, and are often defined differently by different groups. Information on laboratory buildings is often limited to a small subsection of the total building stock making aggregate estimates of the total U.S. laboratories and their energy use challenging. Previous estimates of U.S. laboratory space vary widely owing to differences in how laboratories are defined and categorized. A 2006 report on fume hoods provided an estimate of 150,000 laboratories populating the U.S. based in part on interviews of industry experts, however, a 2009 analysis of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) generated an estimate of only 9,000 laboratory buildings. This report draws on multiple data sources that have been evaluated to construct an understanding of U.S. laboratories across different sizes and markets segments. This 2016 analysis is an update to draft reports released in October and December 2016.

  4. On the Record: The Philosophy of Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Newman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available At the Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG conference in Durham in December 2009 I organised a session on the philosophy of recording, and the three articles presented here originated in that discussion. The aim of the session was to consider some fundamental questions about the recording that archaeologists undertake but which are often overlooked, and think about these in a theoretical way. These questions included: ◦Why do we choose to record the sites, monuments and artefacts that we do? Why do we select the units of information we choose to record about them? How have the things we record and the attributes recorded changed over time? ◦How can the adoption of a reflexive approach enable us to assess the recording choices we make and inform those that will be made in the future? ◦What do these recording choices tell us about archaeology and wider society over time? ◦Can something as intangible as a database record or a digital photograph be considered as an artefact and studied as material culture? ◦How are new technologies changing recording and adding to the material available for study, which will form the historic documents of the future? The first two of these questions are decisions that archaeologists have been making since the earliest origins of the discipline, often without a passing thought. It is not very often that we pause to analyse them at a theoretical level. As recording has developed we have been very good at categorizing, making inventories and constructing ontologies to describe the past around us, but less good about asking why we do so in the way we do.

  5. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.

    2015-01-01

    Developments in "omics" are creating a paradigm shift in Laboratory Medicine leading to Personalised Medicine. This allows the increasing in diagnostics and therapeutics focused on individuals rather than populations. In order to investigate whether Laboratory Medicine is able to implement new...... diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... for the era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware...

  6. Module Architecture for in Situ Space Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyzes internal outfitting architectures for space exploration laboratory modules. ISS laboratory architecture is examined as a baseline for comparison; applicable insights are derived. Laboratory functional programs are defined for seven planet-surface knowledge domains. Necessary and value-added departures from the ISS architecture standard are defined, and three sectional interior architecture options are assessed for practicality and potential performance. Contemporary guidelines for terrestrial analytical laboratory design are found to be applicable to the in-space functional program. Densepacked racks of system equipment, and high module volume packing ratios, should not be assumed as the default solution for exploration laboratories whose primary activities include un-scriptable investigations and experimentation on the system equipment itself.

  7. Defense Waste Processing Facility prototypic analytical laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Policke, T.A.; Bryant, M.F.; Spencer, R.B.

    1991-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Analytical Laboratory is a relatively new laboratory facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). It is a non-regulated, non-radioactive laboratory whose mission is to support research and development (R & D) and waste treatment operations by providing analytical and experimental services in a way that is safe, efficient, and produces quality results in a timely manner so that R & D personnel can provide quality technical data and operations personnel can efficiently operate waste treatment facilities. The modules are sample receiving, chromatography I, chromatography II, wet chemistry and carbon, sample preparation, and spectroscopy.

  8. Laboratory study on new particle formation from the reaction OH + SO2: influence of experimental conditions, H2O vapour, NH3 and the amine tert-butylamine on the overall process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Curtius

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Nucleation experiments starting from the reaction of OH radicals with SO2 have been performed in the IfT-LFT flow tube under atmospheric conditions at 293±0.5 K for a relative humidity of 13–61%. The presence of different additives (H2, CO, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene for adjusting the OH radical concentration and resulting OH levels in the range (4–300 ×105 molecule cm−3 did not influence the nucleation process itself. The number of detected particles as well as the threshold H2SO4 concentration needed for nucleation was found to be strongly dependent on the counting efficiency of the used counting devices. High-sensitivity particle counters allowed the measurement of freshly nucleated particles with diameters down to about 1.5 nm. A parameterization of the experimental data was developed using power law equations for H2SO4 and H2O vapour. The exponent for H2SO4 from different measurement series was in the range of 1.7–2.1 being in good agreement with those arising from analysis of nucleation events in the atmosphere. For increasing relative humidity, an increase of the particle number was observed. The exponent for H2O vapour was found to be 3.1 representing an upper limit. Addition of 1.2×1011 molecule cm−3 or 1.2×1012 molecule cm−3 of NH3 (range of atmospheric NH3 peak concentrations revealed that NH3 has a measureable, promoting effect on the nucleation rate under these conditions. The promoting effect was found to be more pronounced for relatively dry conditions, i.e. a rise of the particle number by 1–2 orders of magnitude at RH = 13% and only by a factor of 2–5 at RH = 47% (NH3 addition: 1.2×1012 molecule cm−3. Using the amine tert-butylamine instead of NH3, the enhancing impact of the base for nucleation and particle growth appears to be stronger. Tert-butylamine addition of about 1010 molecule cm−3 at RH = 13% enhances particle formation by about two orders of magnitude, while for NH3 only a small or negligible

  9. Your Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... still happens sometimes, but many health care providers now keep electronic records. You might hear medical people call these ... re all part of your medical records. Even electronic records aren't simple. ... For that reason, some states now manage records in a way that lets all ...

  10. Surgical medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15......A medical record is presented on the basis of selected linguistic pearls collected over the years from surgical case records Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/15...

  11. Effects of Sleep after Experimental Trauma on Intrusive Emotional Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleim, Birgit; Wysokowsky, Julia; Schmid, Nuria; Seifritz, Erich; Rasch, Björn

    2016-12-01

    To investigate sleep's effect in the immediate aftermath of experiencing an analog trauma in the laboratory on reducing intrusive emotional memory formation. Sixty-five healthy women were exposed to an experimental laboratory trauma. They viewed a neutral and a trauma film in the laboratory and were randomly allocated to either a group that slept following film viewing or a group that remained awake. Sleep was recorded with electroencephalogram in a subgroup of participants in the sleep group. All participants recorded intrusive memories in the week following the film. The sleep group experienced fewer and less distressing intrusive trauma memories compared to the wake group. These effects were particularly evident toward the end of the week. Duration spent in stage N2 as opposed to light N1 sleep, a higher number of fast parietal sleep spindles and a lower rapid eye movement sleep density predicted intrusion frequency. Our results have clinical implications and set the ground for early-intervention sleep studies following trauma and prevention of chronic posttrauma disorders.

  12. Miniature wireless recording and stimulation system for rodent behavioural testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnell, R. C.; Dempster, J.; Pratt, J.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Elucidation of neural activity underpinning rodent behaviour has traditionally been hampered by the use of tethered systems and human involvement. Furthermore the combination of deep-brain stimulation (DBS) and various neural recording modalities can lead to complex and time-consuming laboratory setups. For studies of this type, novel tools are required to drive forward this research. Approach. A miniature wireless system weighing 8.5 g (including battery) was developed for rodent use that combined multichannel DBS and local-field potential (LFP) recordings. Its performance was verified in a working memory task that involved 4-channel fronto-hippocampal LFP recording and bilateral constant-current fimbria-fornix DBS. The system was synchronised with video-tracking for extraction of LFP at discrete task phases, and DBS was activated intermittently at discrete phases of the task. Main results. In addition to having a fast set-up time, the system could reliably transmit continuous LFP at over 8 hours across 3-5 m distances. During the working memory task, LFP pertaining to discrete task phases was extracted and compared with well-known neural correlates of active exploratory behaviour in rodents. DBS could be wirelessly activated/deactivated at any part of the experiment during EEG recording and transmission, allowing for a seamless integration of this modality. Significance. The wireless system combines a small size with a level of robustness and versatility that can greatly simplify rodent behavioural experiments involving EEG recording and DBS. Designed for versatility and simplicity, the small size and low-cost of the system and its receiver allow for enhanced portability, fast experimental setup times, and pave the way for integration with more complex behaviour.

  13. Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory (HFIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Heat Flux Instrumentation Laboratory is used to develop advanced, flexible, thin film gauge instrumentation for the Air Force Research Laboratory....

  14. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  15. COMMERCIALLY ORIENTED CLINICAL LABORATORIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHAPMAN, W M

    1964-04-01

    Out-of-state flat-rate mail order contract laboratories operating from states which have little or no legal control over them can do business in California without obedience to regulations that govern laboratories located within the state. The flat-rate contract principle under which some out-of-state laboratories operate is illegal in California. The use of such laboratories increases physician liability. Legislation for the control of these laboratories is difficult to construct, and laws which might result would be awkward to administer. The best remedy is for California physicians not to use an out-of-state laboratory offering contracts or conditions that it could not legally offer if it were located in California.

  16. Materials Behavior Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to evaluate mechanical properties of materials including metals, intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, and ceramic-matrix composites under typical...

  17. Free Surface Hydrodynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Investigates processes and interactions at the air-sea interface, and compares measurements to numerical simulations and field data. Typical phenomena of...

  18. Head Impact Laboratory (HIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HIL uses testing devices to evaluate vehicle interior energy attenuating (EA) technologies for mitigating head injuries resulting from head impacts during mine/...

  19. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  20. Flying Electronic Warfare Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides NP-3D aircraft host platforms for Effectiveness of Navy Electronic Warfare Systems (ENEWS) Program antiship missile (ASM) seeker simulators used...

  1. Behavioral Neuroscience Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This lab supports cognitive research using rodent models. Capabilities for behavioral assessments include:Morris water maze and Barnes maze (spatial memory)elevate...

  2. Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs basic and applied research in interactive 3D computer graphics, including visual analytics, virtual environments, and augmented reality (AR). The...

  3. Applied Neuroscience Laboratory Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located at WPAFB, Ohio, the Applied Neuroscience lab researches and develops technologies to optimize Airmen individual and team performance across all AF domains....

  4. Biochemical Neuroscience Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This biochemistry lab is set up for protein analysis using Western blot, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, immunohistochemistry, and bead-based immunoassays. The...

  5. Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Structural dynamic testing is performed to verify the survivability of a component or assembly when exposed to vibration stress screening, or a controlled simulation...

  6. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL)Established to investigate, integrate, testand verifyperformance and technology readiness offuel cell systems and fuel reformers for use with...

  7. 8 October 2013 - Rolex Director- General G. Marini in the ATLAS Control Room with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and ATLAS Collaboration Senior Physicist C. Rembser; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1. Were also present from the Directorate: S. Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure; from the ATLAS Collaboration: Technische Universitaet Dortmund (DE) J. Jentzsch and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (US) G. Piacquadio.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    8 October 2013 - Rolex Director- General G. Marini in the ATLAS Control Room with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and ATLAS Collaboration Senior Physicist C. Rembser; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1. Were also present from the Directorate: S. Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure; from the ATLAS Collaboration: Technische Universitaet Dortmund (DE) J. Jentzsch and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (US) G. Piacquadio.

  8. Acompanhamento laboratorial da função renal de cães sadios tratados experimentalmente com doses terapêuticas de anfotericina B Laboratorial accompaniment of kidney funtion of health dogs experimentally treated with therapeutic dosages of amphotericin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Santin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho objetivou avaliar a função renal de dez cães adultos saudáveis submetidos à administração de doses terapêuticas do antifúngico anfotericina B, cuja utilização tem sido limitada pelo seu elevado potencial nefrotóxico, e avaliar o método laboratorial mais sensível e precoce de diagnóstico de lesão renal. Foram realizadas, diariamente, urinálise, excreção fracionada de sódio e potássio, dosagem sérica de creatinina e uréia e atividade urinária de gama-glutamiltransferase (GGT. Concluiu-se que a anfotericina B provoca lesões nos túbulos proximal e distal, induzindo acidose tubular renal do tipo I e Diabetes insipidus nefrogênico em cães. Avaliação da função renal, preferencialmente por dosagens de creatinina, uréia e potássio séricos, é recomendada antes de cada aplicação do fármaco. A densidade urinária foi o parâmetro mais precocemente alterado pela lesão renal. A GGT urinária não foi eficaz para o diagnóstico precoce de lesão induzida por anfotericina B.The objective of this experiment was to assess the renal function of ten healthy male adult dogs submitted to therapeutic doses of amphotericin B, whose use has been limited due to its high nephrotoxic potential, as well as to evaluate the more sensitive and early method to diagnose kidney lesions. The renal function was evaluated through daily urinalysis, fractioned excretion of sodium and potassium, serum concentration of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN and urinary activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT. It was concluded that amphotericin b provokes lesions in both proximal and distal tubules, inducing type I renal tubular acidosis and nephrogenic Diabetes insipidus in dogs. Renal function evaluation, preferably by serum creatinine, BUN and potassium dosage is recommended before each drug application. Urinalysis proved to diagnose kidney lesions in its earliest stage through a modification of the density parameters

  9. Audiotutorial Teaching of Laboratory Animal Medicine and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. D.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This audiotutorial course consists of 35 minicourses including biology, husbandry, and diseases of the common laboratory animals. Each minicourse includes an audiocassette tape recording and visual and written materials. The course is available for distribution. (Author/LBH)

  10. Aseptic laboratory techniques: plating methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Erin R

    2012-05-11

    Microorganisms are present on all inanimate surfaces creating ubiquitous sources of possible contamination in the laboratory. Experimental success relies on the ability of a scientist to sterilize work surfaces and equipment as well as prevent contact of sterile instruments and solutions with non-sterile surfaces. Here we present the steps for several plating methods routinely used in the laboratory to isolate, propagate, or enumerate microorganisms such as bacteria and phage. All five methods incorporate aseptic technique, or procedures that maintain the sterility of experimental materials. Procedures described include (1) streak-plating bacterial cultures to isolate single colonies, (2) pour-plating and (3) spread-plating to enumerate viable bacterial colonies, (4) soft agar overlays to isolate phage and enumerate plaques, and (5) replica-plating to transfer cells from one plate to another in an identical spatial pattern. These procedures can be performed at the laboratory bench, provided they involve non-pathogenic strains of microorganisms (Biosafety Level 1, BSL-1). If working with BSL-2 organisms, then these manipulations must take place in a biosafety cabinet. Consult the most current edition of the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) as well as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for Infectious Substances to determine the biohazard classification as well as the safety precautions and containment facilities required for the microorganism in question. Bacterial strains and phage stocks can be obtained from research investigators, companies, and collections maintained by particular organizations such as the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC). It is recommended that non-pathogenic strains be used when learning the various plating methods. By following the procedures described in this protocol, students should be able to: Perform plating procedures without contaminating media. Isolate single bacterial colonies by the streak

  11. Scientific Assistant Virtual Laboratory (SAVL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghband, Gita; Fardi, Hamid; Gnabasik, David

    2007-03-01

    The Scientific Assistant Virtual Laboratory (SAVL) is a scientific discovery environment, an interactive simulated virtual laboratory, for learning physics and mathematics. The purpose of this computer-assisted intervention is to improve middle and high school student interest, insight and scores in physics and mathematics. SAVL develops scientific and mathematical imagination in a visual, symbolic, and experimental simulation environment. It directly addresses the issues of scientific and technological competency by providing critical thinking training through integrated modules. This on-going research provides a virtual laboratory environment in which the student directs the building of the experiment rather than observing a packaged simulation. SAVL: * Engages the persistent interest of young minds in physics and math by visually linking simulation objects and events with mathematical relations. * Teaches integrated concepts by the hands-on exploration and focused visualization of classic physics experiments within software. * Systematically and uniformly assesses and scores students by their ability to answer their own questions within the context of a Master Question Network. We will demonstrate how the Master Question Network uses polymorphic interfaces and C# lambda expressions to manage simulation objects.

  12. Laboratory techniques in plant molecular biology taught with UniformMu insertion alleles of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    An undergraduate course - Laboratory Techniques in Plant Molecular Biology - was organized around our research application of UniformMu insertion alleles to investigate mitochondrial functions in plant reproduction. The course objectives were to develop students’ laboratory, record keeping, bioinfor...

  13. A Virtual Laboratory for Digital Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Chyi-Ren; Li, Yi-Hsung; Bai, Jin-Yu

    2006-01-01

    This work designs and implements a virtual digital signal processing laboratory, VDSPL. VDSPL consists of four parts: mobile agent execution environments, mobile agents, DSP development software, and DSP experimental platforms. The network capability of VDSPL is created by using mobile agent and wrapper techniques without modifying the source code…

  14. A Laboratory Exercise with Related Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sworder, Steven C.

    A laboratory experiment, based on a simple electric circuit that can be used to demonstrate the existence of real-world "related rates" problems, is outlined and an equation for voltage across the capacitor terminals during discharge is derived. The necessary materials, setup methods, and experimental problems are described. A student laboratory…

  15. Daily Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These daily weather records were compiled from a subset of stations in the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN)-Daily dataset. A weather record is...

  16. Iraq Radiosonde Launch Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Iraqi upper air records loaned to NCDC from the Air Force 14th Weather Squadron. Scanned notebooks containing upper air radiosonde launch records and data. Launches...

  17. Climate Record Books

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climate Record Books contain daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual averages, extremes, or occurrences. Most data are sequential by period of record 1871-1910,...

  18. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1999-09-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  19. Medical Laboratory Technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

  20. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  1. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory equipment to outside universities, industrial researchers, and elementary and secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division (RPSD) has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics, but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  2. Rethinking Laboratory Notebooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted; Zander, Pär-Ola

    2010-01-01

    We take digitalization of laboratory work practice as a challenging design domain to explore. There are obvious drawbacks with the use of paper instead of ICT in the collaborative writing that takes place in laboratory notebooks; yet paper persist in being the most common solution. The ultimate aim...

  3. Practical Laboratory Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, W. R.

    This book is intended as a guide for people who are planning chemistry and physics research laboratories. It deals with the importance of effective communication between client and architect, the value of preliminary planning, and the role of the project officer. It also discusses the size and layout of individual laboratories, the design of…

  4. Quality in Teaching Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubington, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a Japanese process-oriented approach called KAIZEN for improving the quality of existing teaching laboratories. It provides relevant quality measurements and indicates how quality can be improved. Use of process criteria sidesteps the difficulty of defining quality for laboratory experiments and allows separation of student assessment…

  5. Interpreting land records

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    Base retracement on solid research and historically accurate interpretation Interpreting Land Records is the industry's most complete guide to researching and understanding the historical records germane to land surveying. Coverage includes boundary retracement and the primary considerations during new boundary establishment, as well as an introduction to historical records and guidance on effective research and interpretation. This new edition includes a new chapter titled "Researching Land Records," and advice on overcoming common research problems and insight into alternative resources wh

  6. Duplicated laboratory tests: evaluation of a computerized alert intervention abstract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Sharon A; Papa, Linda; Norris, Anne E; Chase, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Redundant testing contributes to reductions in healthcare system efficiency. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine if the use of a computerized alert would reduce the number and cost of duplicated Acute Hepatitis Profile (AHP) laboratory tests and (2) assess what patient, test, and system factors were associated with duplication. This study used a quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design to determine the proportion of duplication of the AHP test before and after implementation of a computerized alert intervention. The AHP test was duplicated if the test was requested again within 15 days of the initial test being performed and the result present in the medical record. The intervention consisted of a computerized alert (pop-up window) that indicated to the clinician that the test had recently been ordered. A total of 674 AHP tests were performed in the pre-intervention period and 692 in the postintervention group. In the pre-intervention period, 53 (7.9%) were duplicated and in postintervention, 18 (2.6%) were duplicated (pimplementation of the alert was shown to significantly reduce associated costs of duplicated AHP tests (p≤.001). Implementation of computerized alerts may be useful in reducing duplicate laboratory tests and improving healthcare system efficiency. © 2012 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  7. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support.

  8. Experimental Research On Asset Pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noussair, C.N.; Tucker, S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This paper selectively surveys some of the more prominent laboratory experimental studies on asset market behavior. The strands of literature considered are market microstructure, pari-mutuel betting markets, characteristics of participants, the effect of information release, and studies of

  9. NATO IST 124 Experimentation Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-10

    company (24 nodes) from the NATO-IST-124 experimentation scenario in the Dynamically Allocated Virtual Clustering management system hosted in the US...Army Research Laboratory’s Network Science Research Laboratory. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dynamically Allocated Virtual Clustering, DAVC, network emulation...9 Fig. 18 Host file with experiment scenario hosts .............................................10 Fig

  10. Managing electronic records

    CERN Document Server

    McLeod, Julie

    2005-01-01

    For records management courses, this book covers the theory and practice of managing electronic records as business and information assets. It focuses on the strategies, systems and procedures necessary to ensure that electronic records are appropriately created, captured, organized and retained over time to meet business and legal requirements.

  11. Laboratory Constraints on Basal Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoet, L.; Ikari, M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Scuderi, M.; Alley, R. B.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Marone, C.

    2016-12-01

    Basal seismicity has been observed across a continuum of glacier morphologies and bed conditions, ranging from ice streams to alpine glaciers, and from hard to deformable beds. Passive seismicity provides a non-invasive method for observing basal processes and investigating ice-earth interactions in glaciated regions, offering the opportunity to characterize the bed (e.g. till stiffness, shear modulus, changes in subglacial hydrology) over glaciated regions. While analysis of glacial seismicity continues to be a widely-used method for studying ice-earth phenomena, the underlying mechanics that control glacial seismicity remain speculative. We have performed a series of experiments using a biaxial shearing apparatus that simulates glacier slip by shearing debris-laden ice over bedrock. By modifying and controlling the apparatus stiffness and frictional rheologic stiffness, we generated a range of stick-slip behaviors during shearing. Our data provide the first experimental insights into unstable glacier slip to be compared with field seismological observations. We found that our laboratory icequakes approximate several seismological field observations of glacier slip, such as dynamic slip distance, stress drop, velocity, and acceleration. Furthermore, the stress drop and peak slip velocity of laboratory ice-quakes are comparable with laboratory stick-slip on fault gouge. We found that once a critical sliding velocity was exceeded a transition from stable to unstable slip occurred as predicted by rate-and-state friction. Our results demonstrate that: (1) characteristics of basal glacial seismicity determined by traditional seismologic analysis techniques are corroborated by our laboratory measurements, (2) both icequakes and earthquakes on tectonic faults are controlled by similar physical mechanisms, and (3) slip behavior in glaciers can be accurately predicted by rate-and-state friction laws, which are traditionally used to describe rock friction.

  12. Software Engineering Laboratory Series: Collected Software Engineering Papers. Volume 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC and created to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies when applied to the development of application software. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that includes this document.

  13. Software Engineering Laboratory Series: Collected Software Engineering Papers. Volume 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC and created to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies when applied to the development of application software. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that includes this document.

  14. Software Engineering Laboratory Series: Collected Software Engineering Papers. Volume 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC and created to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies when applied to the development of application software. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that includes this document.

  15. Enclosed Small and Medium Caliber Firing Experimental Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility conducts completely instrumented terminal ballistics experimental tests with small and medium-caliber tungsten alloy penetrators against advanced armor...

  16. Experimental philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobe, Joshua; Buckwalter, Wesley; Nichols, Shaun; Robbins, Philip; Sarkissian, Hagop; Sommers, Tamler

    2012-01-01

    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free will as compatible with determinism? Fourth, how do people determine whether an entity is conscious?

  17. Laboratory Information Management System Chain of Custody: Reliability and Security

    OpenAIRE

    Tomlinson, J. J.; Elliott-Smith, W.; Radosta, T.

    2006-01-01

    A chain of custody (COC) is required in many laboratories that handle forensics, drugs of abuse, environmental, clinical, and DNA testing, as well as other laboratories that want to assure reliability of reported results. Maintaining a dependable COC can be laborious, but with the recent establishment of the criteria for electronic records and signatures by US regulatory agencies, laboratory information management systems (LIMSs) are now being developed to fully automate COCs. The extent of a...

  18. eComLab: remote laboratory platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontual, Murillo; Melkonyan, Arsen; Gampe, Andreas; Huang, Grant; Akopian, David

    2011-06-01

    Hands-on experiments with electronic devices have been recognized as an important element in the field of engineering to help students get familiar with theoretical concepts and practical tasks. The continuing increase the student number, costly laboratory equipment, and laboratory maintenance slow down the physical lab efficiency. As information technology continues to evolve, the Internet has become a common media in modern education. Internetbased remote laboratory can solve a lot of restrictions, providing hands-on training as they can be flexible in time and the same equipment can be shared between different students. This article describes an on-going remote hands-on experimental radio modulation, network and mobile applications lab project "eComLab". Its main component is a remote laboratory infrastructure and server management system featuring various online media familiar with modern students, such as chat rooms and video streaming.

  19. Record Statistics and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibani, Paolo; Jensen, Henrik J.

    2009-01-01

    The term record statistics covers the statistical properties of records within an ordered series of numerical data obtained from observations or measurements. A record within such series is simply a value larger (or smaller) than all preceding values. The mathematical properties of records strongly...... fluctuations of e. g. the energy are able to push the system past some sort of ‘edge of stability’, inducing irreversible configurational changes, whose statistics then closely follows the statistics of record fluctuations....

  20. Testing Experimental Compounds against Leishmaniansis in Laboratory Animal Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    Pentostam) and meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime), diamidines - Pentamidine, and the macrolide antibiotics - amphotericin B. Although these are generally...THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL-CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS DIVISION OF PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY ONCOLOGY April 10, 1984 ’,. Janet S. Keithly...es. c ely Ro Grady, Ph.D. istant Professor epartment of Pediatrics / Pharmacology THE DIVISION OF PEDIATRIC HEMATOLOGY/ONCOLOGY IS SUPPORTED BY THE

  1. Experimental Stress Analysis Activities in Selected European Laboratories. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    polycarbonate plates, as models of steel plates. A very interesting manufacturir,: technique used here is the preparation of epoxy tubes by...Ship Research and Development Cencer at Carderock,, Maryland, the old David Taylor Nbdel Basin. Nearby five thousand people work in stockyards ...cm, long and U.3 mm thick steel fibers. Sore of the folded places have been prestrcssed- concrete and steel fibers is a composite material of

  2. Experimental Psychopathology: From laboratory studies to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Philippot

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, David Barlow (2004, a pioneer in the field of anxiety disorders, has proposed that psychologists should abandon the concept of psychotherapy and rather use the one of “psychological treatment”. The provoking idea behind this proposal is that the concept of psychotherapy, relying on the notion of “therapeutic school” should be discarded by professional psychologists because it relies too much on conceptions based on pre-scientific models. Barlow (2004 insists that, today, psychology as an empirical science has gathered sufficient knowledge and know-how to found clinical practice. It is no longer necessary to rely on pre-scientific theories. Further, Barlow’s perspective opens clinical practice to the entire field of psychology, i.e. to the advances accomplished by research on emotion, cognition, learning, development, etc.

  3. Experimentation Using the Mir Station as a Space Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Institute for Machine Building (TsNIIMASH) Korolev, Moscow Region, Russia V. Teslenko and N. Shvets Energia Space Corporation Korolev, Moscow...N. Shvets Energia Space Corporation Korolev, Moscow Region, Russia J. A. Drakes/ D. G. Swann, and W. K. McGregor* Sverdrup Technology, Inc...and plume computations. Excitation of the plume gas molecular electronic states by solar radiation, geo- corona Lyman-alpha, and electronic impact

  4. [Experimental vaginal dysbiosis on the model of white laboratory mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronkova, O S; Sirokvasha, E A; Vinnikov, A I

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative composition of microbiocenosis of urogenital tract (UGT) of mice has been studied. When investigating UGT of mice in norm (n = 8), microorganisms of several genera with following occurrence frequency were detected: Lactobacillus (100%), Streptococcus (100%), Staphylococcus (87.5%), Micrococcus (12.5%), Bacillus (12.5%), Fusobacterium (87.5%), Peptococcus (62.5%), Peptostreptococcus (50%), Bacteroides (100%) and representatives of Enterobacteriaceae f (12.5%) family. A comparative analysis of UGT microflora in norm and under physiologically proceeding pregnancy helped to detect in the group of pregnant animals the increase of occurrence frequency of such conventionally-pathogenous organisms as representatives of Enterobacteriaceae family (6.86) and Peptococcus genus (1.37 times), representatives of Lactobacillus genus were found in 100% of animals. A possibility of UGT dysbiosis under microbialload made by the method of intravaginal introduction of 50 mkl of Staphilococcus aureus culture suspension which contains 1 x 109 cells/ml has been established. It was shown that clinical symptoms of dysbiosis (increase of pH, excretions at UGT outlet) correlate with disturbances in microbiocenosis of mice UGT which are characterized by a decrease of occurrence frequency and titer of saprophyte microorganisms, first of all, Lactobacillus (occurrence frequency decreased 15 times for anaerobic and 1.33 times for microaerophylic, and titers 1.32 times and 2.34 times, respectively), and by an increase of the titer of conventionally pathogenic bacteria, such as representatives of Enterobacteriaceae family (14.5 times) and Staphylococcus (6.17 times). Investigation of the effect of exogenic staphylococcal load on pregnancy has shown that the development of UGT dysbiosis affects the pregnancy result. Thus, it was established that there were three cases of abortion and two cases of natimortality which were registered in the group of female mice (n = 5) which were administered Staphylococcus after they became pregnant. The paper is presented in Russian.

  5. The Gran Sasso Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votano, L.

    2012-09-01

    The Gran Sasso underground laboratory is one of the four national laboratories run by the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). It is located under the Gran Sasso massif, in central Italy, between the cities of L'Aquila and Teramo, 120 km far from Rome. It is the largest underground laboratory for astroparticle physics in the world and the most advanced in terms of complexity and completeness of its infrastructures. The scientific program at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, LNGS)is mainly focused on astroparticle, particle and nuclear physics. The laboratory presently hosts many experiments as well as R&D activities, including world-leading research in the fields of solar neutrinos, accelerator neutrinos (CNGS neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso), dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay and nuclear cross-section of astrophysical interest. Associate sciences like earth physics, biology and fundamental physics complement the activities. The laboratory is operated as an international science facility and hosts experiments whose scientific merit is assessed by an international advisory Scientific Committee. A review of the main experiments carried out at LNGS will be given, together with the most recent and relevant scientific results achieved.

  6. Laboratory simulations of Mars evaporite geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Bullock, Mark A.; Newsom, Horton; Nelson, Melissa

    2010-06-01

    Evaporite-rich sedimentary deposits on Mars were formed under chemical conditions quite different from those on the Earth. Their unique chemistries record the chemical and aqueous conditions under which they were formed and possibly subsequent conditions to which they were subjected. We have produced evaporite salt mineral suites in the laboratory under two simulated Martian atmospheres: (1) present-day and (2) a model of an ancient Martian atmosphere rich in volcanic gases. The composition of these synthetic Mars evaporites depends on the atmospheres under which they were desiccated as well as the chemistries of their precursor brines. In this report, we describe a Mars analog evaporite laboratory apparatus and the experimental methods we used to produce and analyze the evaporite mineral suites. The acidic, “paleo-Mars” gas mixture was CO2 with trace amounts of SO2, N2O, and HCl to simulate an atmosphere influenced by volcanic emissions. Brines formed by the interaction of water with an SNC-derived synthetic Mars mineral mix were produced under the acidic Mars atmospheric gas mixture. The brines were then desiccated under the two different simulated Mars conditions in the evaporite apparatus. Infrared reflectance spectroscopy and SEM microprobe analyses reveal that salts precipitated from the brine evaporated under simulated present Mars conditions were chemically different from those formed under the acidic Mars atmosphere conditions. The primary salt precipitated from the brine evaporated under present-day Mars conditions was a hydrated calcium sulfate, with lesser amounts of a magnesium sulfate and aluminum sulfate. Salts precipitated from the brine evaporated under an acidic atmosphere were dominated by magnesium sulfates, with lesser amounts of Na2SO4. These experiments suggest ways that relative cation abundances in Martian sulfate-bearing sediments can indicate the atmospheric and aqueous conditions under which they were formed. We conclude that the

  7. Specialized Laboratory Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangott, Bryan

    2015-06-01

    Some laboratories or laboratory sections have unique needs that traditional anatomic and clinical pathology systems may not address. A specialized laboratory information system (LIS), which is designed to perform a limited number of functions, may perform well in areas where a traditional LIS falls short. Opportunities for specialized LISs continue to evolve with the introduction of new testing methodologies. These systems may take many forms, including stand-alone architecture, a module integrated with an existing LIS, a separate vendor-supplied module, and customized software. This article addresses the concepts underlying specialized LISs, their characteristics, and in what settings they are found. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Laboratory testing in hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebe, Stefan K G; Kahaly, George J

    2012-09-01

    The clinical diagnosis of hypo- or hyperthyroidism is difficult (full text available online: http://education.amjmed.com/pp1/272). Clinical symptoms and signs are often non-specific, and there is incomplete correlation between structural and functional thyroid gland changes. Laboratory testing is therefore indispensible in establishing the diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. Similar considerations apply to treatment monitoring. Laboratory testing also plays a crucial role in establishing the most likely cause for a patient's hyperthyroidism. Finally, during pregnancy, when isotopic scanning is relatively contraindicated and ultrasound is more difficult to interpret, laboratory testing becomes even more important. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Simula Research Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Tveito, Aslak

    2010-01-01

    The Simula Research Laboratory, located just outside Oslo in Norway, is rightly famed as a highly successful research facility, despite being, at only eight years old, a very young institution. This fascinating book tells the history of Simula, detailing the culture and values that have been the guiding principles of the laboratory throughout its existence. Dedicated to tackling scientific challenges of genuine social importance, the laboratory undertakes important research with long-term implications in networks, computing and software engineering, including specialist work in biomedical comp

  10. Laboratory Automation and Middleware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riben, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The practice of surgical pathology is under constant pressure to deliver the highest quality of service, reduce errors, increase throughput, and decrease turnaround time while at the same time dealing with an aging workforce, increasing financial constraints, and economic uncertainty. Although not able to implement total laboratory automation, great progress continues to be made in workstation automation in all areas of the pathology laboratory. This report highlights the benefits and challenges of pathology automation, reviews middleware and its use to facilitate automation, and reviews the progress so far in the anatomic pathology laboratory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Digital signal processing laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, B Preetham

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING Brief Theory of DSP ConceptsProblem SolvingComputer Laboratory: Introduction to MATLAB®/SIMULINK®Hardware Laboratory: Working with Oscilloscopes, Spectrum Analyzers, Signal SourcesDigital Signal Processors (DSPs)ReferencesDISCRETE-TIME LTI SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS Brief Theory of Discrete-Time Signals and SystemsProblem SolvingComputer Laboratory: Simulation of Continuous Time and Discrete-Time Signals and Systems ReferencesTIME AND FREQUENCY ANALYSIS OF COMMUNICATION SIGNALS Brief Theory of Discrete-Time Fourier Transform (DTFT), Discrete Fourier Transform

  12. Development of a system for monitoring and diagnosis using Fuzzy logic in control valves of laboratory test equipment of Experimental Center Aramar; Desenvolvimento de um sistema de monitoracao e diagnostico utilizando logica Fuzzy aplicado a valvulas de controle de processo do CEA - Centro Experimental Aramar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto Junior, Almir Carlos Soares

    2014-07-01

    The question of components reliability, specifically process control valves, has become an important issue to be investigated in nuclear power plants and other areas such as refinery or offshore oil rig, considering the safety and life extension of the plant. The development of non intrusive monitoring and diagnostic method allows the identification of defects in components of the plant during normal operation. The objective of this dissertation is to present an analysis and diagnosis of control valves of a steam plant part that simulates the secondary circuit of a pressurized water reactor. This installation is part of propulsion equipment testing laboratory of the Brazilian Navy, at Ipero-SP. The methodology for design is based on graphical analysis of two parameters, the valve air pressure actuator and the displacement of the valve plug. These data are extracted by a smart positioner, part of Delta V™ Automation System. An analysis is implemented in detecting anomalies by an approach using Expert Systems by the technique of fuzzy logic. Once the basic measures of control valves are taken, it is possible to detect symptoms of failure, leakage, friction, damage, etc. The monitoring and diagnostic system has been designed in MATLAB® version 2009{sup th} by the complement 'Fuzzy Logic Toolbox'. It is a noninvasive technique. Thus, it is possible to know what is happening with the chosen components, just analyzing the parameters of the valve. The software called ValveLink® (developed by Emerson) receives signals from hardware component (intelligent positioner) installed next to the control valve. These signals (electrical current) are transformed into information which are used input parameters: air pressure valve actuator and valve plug displacement. With the use of fuzzy logic, these parameters are interpreted. They suffer inferences by rules written by experts in valves. After these inferences, the information is processed and sent as output signals

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  14. Immersive Simulation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Develops and tests novel user interfaces for 3D virtual simulators and first-person shooter games that make user interaction more like natural interaction...

  15. Laboratory Handbook Electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    Laboratory manual 1966 format A3 with the list of equipment cables, electronic tubes, chassis, diodes transistors etc. One of CERN's first material catalogue for construction components for mechanical and electronic chassis.

  16. Active Materials Characterization Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lagoudas, Dimitris

    2001-01-01

    The Active Materials Laboratory has recently acquired upgraded and new equipment made possible by the AFOSR in the form of a research grant as a part of the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program...

  17. Biomedical Engineering Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bodruzzama, Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    ... and on-line analysis of the biomedical signals. Each Biopac system-based laboratory station consists of real-time data acquisition system, amplifiers for EMG, EKG, EEG, and equipment for the study of Plethysmography, evoked response, cardio...

  18. Structural Static Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Structural testing is performed to verify the structural integrity of space flight and ground test hardware. Testing is also performed to verify the finite element...

  19. European Molecular Biology Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    On 10 May an Agreement was signed at CERN setting up a new European Laboratory. It will be concerned with research in molecularbiology and will be located at Heidelberg in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  20. Satellite Control Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Bak, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The Satellite Laboratory at the Department of Control Engineering of Aalborg University (SatLab) is a dynamic motion facility designed for analysis and test of micro spacecraft. A unique feature of the laboratory is that it provides a completely gravity-free environment. A test spacecraft...... of the laboratory is to conduct dynamic tests of the control and attitude determination algorithms during nominal operation and in abnormal conditions. Further it is intended to use SatLab for validation of various algorithms for fault detection, accommodation and supervisory control. Different mission objectives...... can be implemented in the laboratory, e.g. three-axis attitude control, slew manoeuvres, spins stabilization using magnetic actuation and/or reaction wheels. The spacecraft attitude can be determined applying magnetometer measurements...