WorldWideScience

Sample records for experimental inflammatory bowel

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide, yet the reasons remain unknown. New therapeutic approaches have been introduced in medical IBD therapy, but their impact on the natural history of IBD remains uncertain. This review will summarize the recent findings...

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Peter R; Iser, John

    2005-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in frequency in Australia. General practitioners play an important role in early diagnosis and in a multidisciplinary approach to managing such patients. Keeping abreast of evolving concepts, particularly in treatment, is challenging. This article aims to address key issues in diagnosis and management to better equip general practitioners for their role in multidisciplinary management of patients with IBD. Making the diagnosis can be difficult, but is facilitated by appropriate clinical suspicion and sensible judgment as to who undergoes diagnostic tests such as colonoscopy. Treatment of ulcerative colitis has changed little in recent years, except for our improved ability to deliver mesalazine to the large bowel via the recent availability of several oral and rectal preparations. Prevention of relapse using these is an important strategy in the majority of patients. Treatment of Crohn disease is changing due to more realistic concepts of the natural history of the disease and the development of new, powerful anti-inflammatory therapies. Attention to issues other than intestinal inflammation such as nutrition, education and counselling, remain important in achieving optimal management.

  3. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Didde; Andreassen, Bente Utoft; Heegaard, Niels Henrik H

    2018-01-01

    Background: Kidney disease has been reported in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is regarded an extraintestinal manifestation or more rarely a side effect of the medical treatment. Methods: In this cross-sectional study we describe the extent of kidney pathology in a cohort of 56...... children with IBD. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for markers of kidney disease and ultrasonography was performed to evaluate pole-to-pole kidney length. Results: We found that 25% of the patients had either previously reported kidney disease or ultrasonographic signs of chronic kidney disease...... are at risk of chronic kidney disease, and the risk seems to be increased with the severity of the disease....

  4. Favorable results from the use of herbal and plant products in inflammatory bowel disease: evidence from experimental animal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillidis, John K.; Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Vagianos, Constantinos; Papalois, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy for inflammatory bowel disease is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in experimental colitis. All relevant studies published in Medline and Embase up to June 2015 have been reviewed. The results of bowel histology and serum parameters have been recorded. A satisfactory number of published experimental studies, and a quite large one of both herbal and plant products tested in different studies have been reported. The results showed that in the majority of the studies, herbal therapy reduced the inflammatory activity of experimental colitis and diminished the levels of many inflammatory indices, including serum cytokines and indices of oxidative stress. The most promising plant and herbal products were tormentil extracts, wormwoodherb, Aloe vera, germinated barley foodstuff, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, Panax notoginseng, Ixeris dentata, green tea, Cordia dichotoma, Plantago lanceolata, Iridoidglycosides, and mastic gum. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit via various mechanisms, including immune regulation, anti-oxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-κB, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing these natural substances should be urgently conducted. PMID:27366027

  5. Immunoregulatory mechanisms of macrophage PPAR γ in mice with experimental inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontecillas, Raquel; Horne, William T.; Climent, Montse; Guri, Amir J.; Evans, C.; Zhang, Y.; Sobral, Bruno W.; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR γ) is widely expressed in macrophages and has been identified as a putative target for the development of novel therapies against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Computational simulations identified macrophages as key targets for therapeutic interventions against IBD. This study aimed to characterize the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of macrophage PPAR γ in IBD. Macrophage-specific PPAR γ deletion significantly exacerbated clinical activity and colonic pathology, impaired the splenic and mesenteric lymph node regulatory T cell compartment, increased percentages of LP CD8+ T cells, increased surface expression of CD40, Ly6C, and TLR-4 in LP macrophages, and upregulated expression of colonic IFN-γ, CXCL9, CXCL10, IL-22, IL1RL1, CCR1, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 and MCH class II in mice with IBD. Moreover, macrophage PPAR γ was required for accelerating pioglitazone-mediated recovery from DSS colitis, providing a cellular target for the anti-inflammatory effects of PPAR γ agonists in IBD. PMID:21068720

  6. Immunoregulatory mechanisms of macrophage PPAR-γ in mice with experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontecillas, R; Horne, W T; Climent, M; Guri, A J; Evans, C; Zhang, Y; Sobral, B W; Bassaganya-Riera, J

    2011-05-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) is widely expressed in macrophages and has been identified as a putative target for the development of novel therapies against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Computational simulations identified macrophages as key targets for therapeutic interventions against IBD. This study aimed to characterize the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of macrophage PPAR-γ in IBD. Macrophage-specific PPAR-γ deletion significantly exacerbated clinical activity and colonic pathology, impaired the splenic and mesenteric lymph node regulatory T-cell compartment, increased percentages of lamina propria (LP) CD8+ T cells, increased surface expression of CD40, Ly6C, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) in LP macrophages, and upregulated expression of colonic IFN-γ, CXCL9, CXCL10, IL-22, IL1RL1, CCR1, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3, and MHC class II in mice with IBD. Moreover, macrophage PPAR-γ was required for accelerating pioglitazone-mediated recovery from dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis, providing a cellular target for the anti-inflammatory effects of PPAR-γ agonists in IBD.

  7. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ditlev Nytoft; Karstensen, John Gásdal; Riis, Lene Buhl

    2015-01-01

    included. Next, eligible studies were analysed with respect to several parameters, such as technique and clinical aim and definitions of outcomes. RESULTS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy has been used for a wide range of purposes in inflammatory bowel disease, covering assessment of inflammatory severity...... of confocal laser endomicroscopy for inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Available literature was searched systematically for studies applying confocal laser endomicroscopy in Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Relevant literature was reviewed and only studies reporting original clinical data were...... of histological features such as colonic crypts, epithelial gaps and epithelial leakiness to fluorescein. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal laser endomicroscopy remains an experimental but emerging tool for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is the only method that enables in vivo functional assessment...

  8. Immunoregulatory actions of epithelial cell PPAR gamma at the colonic mucosa of mice with experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Saroj K; Guri, Amir J; Climent, Montse; Vives, Cristina; Carbo, Adria; Horne, William T; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-04-20

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are nuclear receptors highly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and immune cells within the gut mucosa and are implicated in modulating inflammation and immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of targeted deletion of PPAR gamma in IEC on progression of experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the first phase, PPAR gamma flfl; Villin Cre- (VC-) and PPAR gamma flfl; Villin Cre+ (VC+) mice in a mixed FVB/C57BL/6 background were challenged with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 0, 2, or 7 days. VC+ mice express a transgenic recombinase under the control of the Villin-Cre promoter that causes an IEC-specific deletion of PPAR gamma. In the second phase, we generated VC- and VC+ mice in a C57BL/6 background that were challenged with 2.5% DSS. Mice were scored on disease severity both clinically and histopathologically. Flow cytometry was used to phenotypically characterize lymphocyte and macrophage populations in blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. Global gene expression analysis was profiled using Affymetrix microarrays. The IEC-specific deficiency of PPAR gamma in mice with a mixed background worsened colonic inflammatory lesions, but had no effect on disease activity (DAI) or weight loss. In contrast, the IEC-specific PPAR gamma null mice in C57BL/6 background exhibited more severe inflammatory lesions, DAI and weight loss in comparison to their littermates expressing PPAR gamma in IEC. Global gene expression profiling revealed significantly down-regulated expression of lysosomal pathway genes and flow cytometry results demonstrated suppressed production of IL-10 by CD4+ T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of IEC-specific PPAR gamma null mice. Our results demonstrate that adequate expression of PPAR gamma in IEC is required for the regulation of mucosal immune responses and prevention of experimental IBD, possibly by modulation of

  9. The role of T cell PPAR gamma in mice with experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri, Amir J; Mohapatra, Saroj K; Horne, William T; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-06-10

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is a nuclear receptor whose activation has been shown to modulate macrophage and T cell-mediated inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which the deletion of PPAR gamma in T cells modulates immune cell distribution and colonic gene expression and the severity of experimental IBD. PPAR gamma flfl; CD4 Cre+ (CD4cre) or Cre- (WT) mice were challenged with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate in their drinking water for 0, 2, or 7 days. Mice were scored on disease severity both clinically and histopathologically. Flow cytometry was used to assess lymphocyte and macrophage populations in the blood, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). Global gene expression in colonic mucosa was profiled using Affymetrix microarrays. The deficiency of PPAR gamma in T cells accelerated the onset of disease and body weight loss. Examination of colon histopathology revealed significantly greater epithelial erosion, leukocyte infiltration, and mucosal thickening in the CD4cre mice on day 7. CD4cre mice had more CD8+ T cells than WT mice and fewer CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) and IL10+ CD4+ T cells in blood and MLN, respectively. Transcriptomic profiling revealed around 3000 genes being transcriptionally altered as a result of DSS challenge in CD4cre mice. These included up-regulated mRNA expression of adhesion molecules, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-1beta, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS-3) on day 7. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that the ribosome and Krebs cycle pathways were downregulated while the apoptosis pathway was upregulated in colons of mice lacking PPAR gamma in T cells. The expression of PPAR gamma in T cells is involved in preventing gut inflammation by regulating colonic expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory mediators at later stages of disease while favoring the recruitment of Treg to the mucosal inductive

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Judith R; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is most often a polygenic disorder with contributions from the intestinal microbiome, defects in barrier function, and dysregulated host responses to microbial stimulation. There is, however, increasing recognition of single gene defects that underlie a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly those with early-onset disease, and this review focuses on the primary immunodeficiencies associated with early-onset inflammatory bowel disease. The advent of next-generation sequencing has led to an improved recognition of single gene defects underlying some cases of inflammatory bowel disease. Among single gene defects, immune response genes are the most frequent category identified. This is also true of common genetic variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease, supporting a pivotal role for host responses in the pathogenesis. This review focuses on practical aspects related to diagnosis and management of children with inflammatory bowel disease who have underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

  11. The Role of T cell PPAR γ in mice with experimental inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hontecillas Raquel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR γ is a nuclear receptor whose activation has been shown to modulate macrophage and T cell-mediated inflammation. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which the deletion of PPAR γ in T cells modulates immune cell distribution and colonic gene expression and the severity of experimental IBD. Methods PPAR γ flfl; CD4 Cre+ (CD4cre or Cre- (WT mice were challenged with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate in their drinking water for 0, 2, or 7 days. Mice were scored on disease severity both clinically and histopathologically. Flow cytometry was used to assess lymphocyte and macrophage populations in the blood, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN. Global gene expression in colonic mucosa was profiled using Affymetrix microarrays. Results The deficiency of PPAR γ in T cells accelerated the onset of disease and body weight loss. Examination of colon histopathology revealed significantly greater epithelial erosion, leukocyte infiltration, and mucosal thickening in the CD4cre mice on day 7. CD4cre mice had more CD8+ T cells than WT mice and fewer CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg and IL10+CD4+ T cells in blood and MLN, respectively. Transcriptomic profiling revealed around 3000 genes being transcriptionally altered as a result of DSS challenge in CD4cre mice. These included up-regulated mRNA expression of adhesion molecules, proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6 and IL-1β, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS-3 on day 7. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA showed that the ribosome and Krebs cycle pathways were downregulated while the apoptosis pathway was upregulated in colons of mice lacking PPAR γ in T cells. Conclusions The expression of PPAR γ in T cells is involved in preventing gut inflammation by regulating colonic expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory mediators at later stages of disease while favoring the recruitment

  12. Immunoregulatory actions of epithelial cell PPAR gamma at the colonic mucosa of mice with experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K Mohapatra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are nuclear receptors highly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC and immune cells within the gut mucosa and are implicated in modulating inflammation and immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of targeted deletion of PPAR gamma in IEC on progression of experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the first phase, PPAR gamma flfl; Villin Cre- (VC- and PPAR gamma flfl; Villin Cre+ (VC+ mice in a mixed FVB/C57BL/6 background were challenged with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS in drinking water for 0, 2, or 7 days. VC+ mice express a transgenic recombinase under the control of the Villin-Cre promoter that causes an IEC-specific deletion of PPAR gamma. In the second phase, we generated VC- and VC+ mice in a C57BL/6 background that were challenged with 2.5% DSS. Mice were scored on disease severity both clinically and histopathologically. Flow cytometry was used to phenotypically characterize lymphocyte and macrophage populations in blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. Global gene expression analysis was profiled using Affymetrix microarrays. The IEC-specific deficiency of PPAR gamma in mice with a mixed background worsened colonic inflammatory lesions, but had no effect on disease activity (DAI or weight loss. In contrast, the IEC-specific PPAR gamma null mice in C57BL/6 background exhibited more severe inflammatory lesions, DAI and weight loss in comparison to their littermates expressing PPAR gamma in IEC. Global gene expression profiling revealed significantly down-regulated expression of lysosomal pathway genes and flow cytometry results demonstrated suppressed production of IL-10 by CD4+ T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN of IEC-specific PPAR gamma null mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that adequate expression of PPAR gamma in IEC is required for the regulation of mucosal

  13. Immunoregulatory Actions of Epithelial Cell PPAR γ at the Colonic Mucosa of Mice with Experimental Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Saroj K.; Guri, Amir J.; Climent, Montse; Vives, Cristina; Carbo, Adria; Horne, William T.; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are nuclear receptors highly expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and immune cells within the gut mucosa and are implicated in modulating inflammation and immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of targeted deletion of PPAR γ in IEC on progression of experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methodology/Principal Findings In the first phase, PPAR γ flfl; Villin Cre- (VC-) and PPAR γ flfl; Villin Cre+ (VC+) mice in a mixed FVB/C57BL/6 background were challenged with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water for 0, 2, or 7 days. VC+ mice express a transgenic recombinase under the control of the Villin-Cre promoter that causes an IEC-specific deletion of PPAR γ. In the second phase, we generated VC- and VC+ mice in a C57BL/6 background that were challenged with 2.5% DSS. Mice were scored on disease severity both clinically and histopathologically. Flow cytometry was used to phenotypically characterize lymphocyte and macrophage populations in blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. Global gene expression analysis was profiled using Affymetrix microarrays. The IEC-specific deficiency of PPAR γ in mice with a mixed background worsened colonic inflammatory lesions, but had no effect on disease activity (DAI) or weight loss. In contrast, the IEC-specific PPAR γ null mice in C57BL/6 background exhibited more severe inflammatory lesions, DAI and weight loss in comparison to their littermates expressing PPAR γ in IEC. Global gene expression profiling revealed significantly down-regulated expression of lysosomal pathway genes and flow cytometry results demonstrated suppressed production of IL-10 by CD4+ T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of IEC-specific PPAR γ null mice. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that adequate expression of PPAR γ in IEC is required for the regulation of mucosal immune responses and prevention of

  14. Monoclonal antibody therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, S. J.; Camoglio, L.

    1997-01-01

    Animal models of inflammatory bowel disease have provided insight in the regulation of mucosal inflammation. This has resulted in novel therapeutic approaches that specifically target a single inflammatory mediator. Monoclonal antibody therapy has been used in steroid refractory Crohn's disease

  15. Familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Munkholm, P; Langholz, E

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We assessed the familial occurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in Copenhagen County, where there has been a long-term interest in the epidemiology of such disorders. In 1987 we interviewed 662 patients in whom inflammatory bowel disease had been diagnosed before 1979, a...

  16. Pregnancy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortoli, A; Pedersen, N; Duricova, D

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies.......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently affects women during their reproductive years. Pregnancy outcome in women with IBD is well described, particularly in retrospective studies....

  17. Surgical perspectives on inflammatory bowel disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VikasC

    Xia B, Crusius JBA, Meuwissen SGM, Pena AS. Inflammatory bowel disease: Definition, epidemiology, etiologic aspects, and immunologic studies. World J. Gastroentero 1998;4:44658. 2. Fry DR, Mahmood N, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau. J. Inflammatory bowel disease in Towsend: Sabiston. Textbook of Surgery.

  18. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue; Birkelund, Svend; Stensballe, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Unambiguous diagnosis of the two main forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD): Ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), represents a challenge in the early stages of the diseases. The diagnosis may be established several years after the debut of symptoms. Hence, protein biomarkers...... for early and accurate diagnostic could help clinicians improve treatment of the individual patients. Moreover, the biomarkers could aid physicians to predict disease courses and in this way, identify patients in need of intensive treatment. Patients with low risk of disease flares may avoid treatment...... with medications with the concomitant risk of adverse events. In addition, identification of disease and course specific biomarker profiles can be used to identify biological pathways involved in the disease development and treatment. Knowledge of disease mechanisms in general can lead to improved future...

  19. Monoclonal antibody therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, S. J.; Camoglio, L.

    1996-01-01

    Several anti-inflammatory drugs have therapeutic efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease, but their targets remain incompletely characterized. The development of monoclonal antibodies that either recognize epitopes on immune-competent cells, or neutralize pro-inflammatory cytokines, has helped to

  20. MRI for chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, H.J.; Hess, T.; Hahmann, M.; Erb, G.; Richter, G.M.; Duex, M.; Elsing, C.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed and monitored by the combination of colonoscopy and small bowel enteroklysis. Magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for the imaging of perirectal and pelvic fistulas. With the advent of ultrafast MRI small and large bowel imaging has become highly attractive and is being advocated more and more in the diagnostic work up of inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging protocols include fast T 1 -weighted gradient echo and T 2 -weighted TSE sequences and oral or rectal bowel distension. Furthermore, dedicated imaging protocols are based on breath-hold imaging under pharmacological bowel paralysis and gastrointestinal MR contrast agents (Hydro-MRI). High diagnostic accuracy can be achieved in Crohn's disease with special reference to the pattern of disease, depth of inflammation, mesenteric reaction, sinus tract depiction and formation of abscess. In ulcerative colitis, the mucosa-related inflammation causes significantly less bowel wall thickening compared to Crohn's disease. Therefore with MRI, the extent of inflammatory changes is always underestimated compared to colonoscopy. According to our experience in more than 200 patients as well as the results in other centers, Hydro-MRI possesses the potential to replace enteroklysis in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and most of the follow-up colonoscopies in Crohn's disease. Further technical improvements in 3D imaging will allow interactive postprocessing of the MR data. (orig.) [de

  1. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Background: A better understanding of the environmental factors leading to inflammatory bowel disease should help to prevent occurrence of the disease and its relapses. Aim: To review current knowledge on dietary risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: The PubMed, Medline and Cochrane...... Library were searched for studies on diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Results: Established non-diet risk factors include family predisposition, smoking, appendectomy, and antibiotics. Retrospective case–control studies are encumbered with methodological problems. Prospective studies...... on European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...

  2. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal

  3. Helping Patients Cope with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    these strategies can be effective as long as the strategy leads to 1) containment of guilt, fear, anxiety, and grief, 2) generation of hope , 3...patients with a sense of hope and a feeling that the disease can be coped with. The most difficult aspect of living with inflammatory bowel disease is...Recovery (mastectomy patients) and the Ostomy Association. They consist of people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Members support one another by sharing

  4. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis) is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by pro...

  5. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. [Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banai, János

    2009-05-03

    Aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is complex and probably multifactorial. Nutrition has been proposed to be an important aetiological factor for development of IBD. Several components of the diet (such as sugar, fat, fibre, fruit and vegetable, protein, fast food, preservatives etc.) were examined as possible causative agents for IBD. According to some researchers infant feeding (breast feeding) may also contribute to the development of IBD. Though the importance of environmental factors is evidenced by the increasing incidence in developed countries and in migrant population in recent decades, the aetiology of IBD remained unclear. There are many theories, but as yet no dietary approaches have been proved to reduce the risk of developing IBD. The role of nutrition in the management of IBD is better understood. The prevention and correction of malnutrition, the provision of macro- and micronutrients and vitamins and the promotion of optimal growth and development of children are key points of nutritional therapy. In active disease, the effective support of energy and nutrients is a very important part of the therapy. Natural and artificial nutrition or the combination of two can be chosen for supporting therapy of IBD. The author summarises the aetiological and therapeutic role of nutrition in IBD.

  7. Nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gómez, María Josefa; Melián Fernández, Cristóbal; Romeo Donlo, María

    2016-07-12

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic pathology that has an outbreaks course that in recent years have seen an increase in incidence, especially at younger ages. Malnutrition is frequently associated with this condition, therefore, it is very important to ensure a right nutritional intervention, especially in pediatric patients, to ensure an optimal growth and also an improvement in the clinic. Our goal will be updated the role of nutrition in this disease and in its treatment based on the published evidence. Malnutrition in these patients is frequent and is influenced by various factors such as, decreased food intake, increased nutrient requirements, increased protein loss and malabsorption of nutrients. Therefore there should be a nutritional monitoring of all of them, in which anthropometric measurements, laboratory tests and densitometry were made to establish the needs and sufficient caloric intake tailored to each patient. The use of enteral nutrition as a treatment in Crohn’s disease with mild to moderate outbreak in child population, is amply demonstrated, has even shown to be superior to the use of corticosteroids. Therefore we can conclude by stressing that nutritional intervention is a mainstay in the management of patients with IBD, which aims to prevent and / or control disease-related malnutrition to decrease morbidity and mortality and improve quality of life.

  8. Antibiotics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Maria Lia; Prantera, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterized by an altered composition of gut microbiota (dysbiosis) that may contribute to their development. Antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora, and a link between antibiotic use and onset of Crohn's disease (CD), but not ulcerative colitis, has been reported. The hypothesis that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) could be an etiologic agent of CD has not been confirmed by a large study on patients treated by an association of antibiotics active against MAP. The observations supporting a role of intestinal microbiota in CD pathogenesis provide the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the intestinal flora through the employment of antibiotics. However, current data do not strongly support a therapeutic benefit from antibiotics, and there is still controversy regarding their use as primary therapy for treatment of acute flares of CD, and for postoperative recurrence prevention. Nevertheless, clinical practice and some studies suggest that a subgroup of patients with colonic involvement, early disease, and abnormal laboratory test of inflammation may respond better to antibiotic treatment. Since their long-term use is frequently complicated by a high rate of side effects, the use of antibiotics that work locally appears to be promising.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawn B Beaulieu; Sunanda Kane

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis affect women in their child-bearing years. Family planning has come to be a common discussion between the gastroenterologist and the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient.Disease control prior to desired conception and throughout pregnancy is the most important thing to keep in mind when caring for the IBD patient. Continued medical management during pregnancy is crucial in optimizing outcomes. Studies indicate that quiescent disease prior to conception infer the best pregnancy outcomes, similar to those in the general population.Active disease prior to and during pregnancy, can lead to complications such as pre-term labor, low birth weight, and small for gestational age infants. Although there are no definitive long term effects of pregnancy on IBD, there are some limited studies that suggest that it may alter the disease course. Understanding the literature and its limitations is important in the modern era of IBD care. Educating the patient and taking a team approach with the obstetrician will help achieve successful outcomes for mother and baby.

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Ramona; Korelitz, Burton I.

    2001-06-01

    The management of both male and female patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who wish to have a baby is challenging. For women, the most important factor to bear in mind is that the outcome of pregnancy is largely influenced by disease activity at the time of conception. Women with quiescent disease are likely to have an uncomplicated pregnancy with the delivery of a healthy baby, whereas women with active disease are more likely to have complications such as spontaneous abortions, miscarriages, stillbirths, and exacerbation of the disease. This is more true of patients with Crohn's disease than of patients with ulcerative colitis. Although the safety of medications used during pregnancy is an important issue, the impact of the medications used to treat IBD is less important in comparison to disease activity itself. 5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) products appear to be safe during pregnancy; corticosteroids are probably safe; 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine should be used with caution; and methotrexate is contraindicated. There are inadequate data on the use of infliximab during pregnancy. In regard to men with IBD, the disease itself does not seem to have any negative impact on fertility. However, there is controversy about the effects of using 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine prior to and during fertilization. In view of possible adverse pregnancy outcomes, it would be prudent to withhold 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine therapy in men with IBD for 3 months prior to conception, when feasible. Most IBD medications should be continued before, during, and after pregnancy, with careful attention to the known cautions and exceptions. If IBD in a pregnant patient is in remission, the prognosis for pregnancy is the same as if she did not have IBD. Active disease should therefore be treated aggressively and remission accomplished before pregnancy is attempted. Similarly, a woman who unexpectedly becomes pregnant while her IBD is active should be treated

  11. Telmisartan attenuates colon inflammation, oxidative perturbations and apoptosis in a rat model of experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany H Arab

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has indicated the implication of angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD via its proinflammatory features. Telmisartan (TLM is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist with marked anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions that mediated its cardio-, reno- and hepatoprotective actions. However, its impact on IBD has not been previously explored. Thus, we aimed to investigate the potential alleviating effects of TLM in tri-nitrobenezene sulphonic acid (TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Pretreatment with TLM (10 mg/kg p.o. attenuated the severity of colitis as evidenced by decrease of disease activity index (DAI, colon weight/length ratio, macroscopic damage, histopathological findings and leukocyte migration. TLM suppressed the inflammatory response via attenuation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity as a marker of neutrophil infiltration besides restoration of interleukin-10 (IL-10. TLM also suppressed mRNA and protein expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB p65 and mRNA of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS proinflammatory genes with concomitant upregulation of PPAR-γ. The alleviation of TLM to colon injury was also associated with inhibition of oxidative stress as evidenced by suppression of lipid peroxides and nitric oxide (NO besides boosting glutathione (GSH, total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx. With respect to apoptosis, TLM downregulated the increased mRNA, protein expression and activity of caspase-3. It also suppressed the elevation of cytochrome c and Bax mRNA besides the upregulation of Bcl-2. Together, these findings highlight evidences for the beneficial effects of TLM in IBD which are mediated through modulation of colonic inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  12. Growth Hormone Resistance—Special Focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffer Soendergaard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone (GH plays major anabolic and catabolic roles in the body and is important for regulating several aspects of growth. During an inflammatory process, cells may develop a state of GH resistance during which their response to GH stimulation is limited. In this review, we will emphasize specific mechanisms governing the formation of GH resistance in the active phase of inflammatory bowel disease. The specific molecular effects mediated through individual inflammatory mediators and processes will be highlighted to provide an overview of the transcriptional, translational and post-translational inflammation-mediated impacts on the GH receptor (GHR along with the impacts on GH-induced intracellular signaling. We also will review GH’s effects on mucosal healing and immune cells in the context of experimental colitis, human inflammatory bowel disease and in patients with short bowel syndrome.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease: potential therapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Bregenholt, S

    1997-01-01

    This review deals with potential and possibly primary therapeutics that, through insight into the inflammatory cascade, result in more rational treatment principles replacing the classical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). These ne...

  14. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezza, Teresa; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects. PMID:27070642

  15. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Vezza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects.

  16. Neuroimmune regulation of inflammatory responses in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnierse, Anneke

    2006-01-01

    The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is used to describe chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. Patients suffer from abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding and a substantial personal burden. The etiology of IBD is gradually being unraveled but remains a complex

  17. Dietary α-eleostearic acid ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease in mice by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephanie N; Brannan, Lera; Guri, Amir J; Lu, Pinyi; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Bevan, David R

    2011-01-01

    Treatments for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are modestly effective and associated with side effects from prolonged use. As there is no known cure for IBD, alternative therapeutic options are needed. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) has been identified as a potential target for novel therapeutics against IBD. For this project, compounds were screened to identify naturally occurring PPARγ agonists as a means to identify novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics for experimental assessment of efficacy. Here we provide complementary computational and experimental methods to efficiently screen for PPARγ agonists and demonstrate amelioration of experimental IBD in mice, respectively. Computational docking as part of virtual screening (VS) was used to test binding between a total of eighty-one compounds and PPARγ. The test compounds included known agonists, known inactive compounds, derivatives and stereoisomers of known agonists with unknown activity, and conjugated trienes. The compound identified through VS as possessing the most favorable docked pose was used as the test compound for experimental work. With our combined methods, we have identified α-eleostearic acid (ESA) as a natural PPARγ agonist. Results of ligand-binding assays complemented the screening prediction. In addition, ESA decreased macrophage infiltration and significantly impeded the progression of IBD-related phenotypes through both PPARγ-dependent and -independent mechanisms in mice with experimental IBD. This study serves as the first significant step toward a large-scale VS protocol for natural PPARγ agonist screening that includes a massively diverse ligand library and structures that represent multiple known target pharmacophores.

  18. Use of Prebiotics for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Szilagyi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of diet in both the pathogenesis and the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease is an evolving science. Disturbance of intestinal microflora (dysbiosis is putatively a key element in the environmental component causing inflammatory bowel disease. Prebiotics are among the dietary components used in an attempt to counteract dysbiosis. Such predominantly carbohydrate dietary components exert effects on the luminal environment by physicochemical changes through pH alteration, by production of short chain fatty acids and by selectively promoting putatively 'health-beneficial' bacteria. The present review elaborates on some of the background rationale and mechanisms on the use of prebiotics. Additionally, published animal and human trials are discussed.

  19. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) that are crucial in maintaining intestinal...... of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets....

  20. Intestinal barrier integrity and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eric Olof; Pedersen, Jannie; Jørgensen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Disruption of normal barrier function is a fundamental factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, which includes increased epithelial cell death, modified mucus configuration, altered expression and distribution of tight junction-proteins, along with a decreased expression of antim......Disruption of normal barrier function is a fundamental factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, which includes increased epithelial cell death, modified mucus configuration, altered expression and distribution of tight junction-proteins, along with a decreased expression...... of antimicrobial peptides. Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with life-long morbidity for affected patients, and both the incidence and prevalence is increasing globally, resulting in substantial economic strain for society. Mucosal healing and re-establishment of barrier integrity is associated......, novel treatment strategies to accomplish mucosal healing and to re-establish normal barrier integrity in inflammatory bowel disease are warranted, and luminal stem cell-based approaches might have an intriguing potential. Transplantation of in vitro expanded intestinal epithelial stem cells derived...

  1. The epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2015-01-01

    and cancer risks. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Gold standard epidemiology data on the disease course and prognosis of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are based on unselected population-based cohort studies. RESULTS: The incidence of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) has increased...

  2. Innate lymphoid cells in inflammatory bowel diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C. P.; Mjösberg, J. M.; Bernink, J. H.; Spits, H.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are caused by an aberrant immune response to environmental triggers in genetically susceptible individuals. The exact contribution of the adaptive and innate immune system has not been elucidated. However, recent advances in treatments

  3. Clostridium difficile and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, Massimo; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Veres, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clostridium difficile infection is associated with pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in several ways. We sought to investigate C. difficile infection in pediatric patients with IBD in comparison with a group of children with celiac disease and to evaluate IBD disease course o...

  4. Novel targets for inflammatory bowel disease therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löwenberg, Mark; D'Haens, Geert

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, many new agents have been evaluated for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. In this paper, we critically review recently published literature about these novel therapies, which have been the result of extensive research identifying molecular targets. Of the various

  5. Thiopurines in inflammatory bowel disease revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Florian; Sina, Christian; Fellermann, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Although a great variety of new drugs have been introduced for the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases so far, a definite cure of the disease is still out of scope. An anti-inflammatory approach to induce remission followed by maintenance therapy with immunosupressants is still the mainstay of therapy. Thiopurines comprising azathioprine and its active metabolite mercaptopurine as well as tioguanine, are widely used in the therapy of chronic active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Their steroid sparing potential and efficacy in remission maintenance are out of doubt. Unfortunately, untoward adverse events are frequently observed and may preclude further administration or be life threatening. This review will focus on new aspects of thiopurine therapy in IBD, its efficacy and safety. PMID:23555158

  6. Nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2013-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which are both inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Both types of inflammatory bowel disease have a complex etiology, resulting from a genetically determined susceptibility interacting with environmental factors, including the diet and gut microbiota. Genome Wide Association Studies have implicated more than 160 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in disease susceptibility. Consideration of the different pathways suggested to be involved implies that specific dietary interventions are likely to be appropriate, dependent upon the nature of the genes involved. Epigenetics and the gut microbiota are also responsive to dietary interventions. Nutrigenetics may lead to personalized nutrition for disease prevention and treatment, while nutrigenomics may help to understand the nature of the disease and individual response to nutrients.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Ørskov; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Andersson, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be complicated by primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We aimed to assess the characteristics of Danish PSC-IBD patients and to compare their prognosis with IBD patients without PSC. METHODS: A retrospective nationwide population-based co......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be complicated by primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We aimed to assess the characteristics of Danish PSC-IBD patients and to compare their prognosis with IBD patients without PSC. METHODS: A retrospective nationwide population....... Among patients with PSC and Crohn's disease (CD) 91% had colonic involvement. The PSC-IBD patients had a significantly higher probability of receiving resective surgery (HR; 2.13, 95% CI: 1.50-3.03); of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) (HR; 21.4, 95% CI: 9.6-47.6), of cholangiocarcinoma (HR; 190, 95...

  8. Inflammatory pathways of importance for management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jannie; Coskun, Mehmet; Soendergaard, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Their etiologies are unknown, but they are characterised by an imbalanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators, e.g., tumor necrosis factor......-inflammatory cytokines, antibodies targeting integrins, and small anti-adhesion molecules that block adhesion between leukocytes and the intestinal vascular endothelium, reducing their infiltration into the inflamed mucosa. In this review we have elucidated the major signaling pathways of clinical importance for IBD...

  9. The evolving epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2009-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include assessments of disease burden and evolving patterns of disease presentation. Although it is hoped that sound epidemiologic studies provide aetiological clues, traditional risk factor-based epidemiology has provided limited insights into either Crohn\\'s disease or ulcerative colitis etiopathogenesis. In this update, we will summarize how the changing epidemiology of IBD associated with modernization can be reconciled with current concepts of disease mechanisms and will discuss studies of clinically significant comorbidity in IBD.

  10. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms “IBD AND male infertility”, ...

  11. Stem cell therapy for inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Duijvestein, Marjolijn

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal (MSC) cell therapy are currently under investigation as novel therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Hematopoietic stem cells are thought to repopulate the immune system and reset the immunological response to luminal antigens. MSCs have the capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of distinct cell lineages and to suppress immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The main goal of this thesis was to study the s...

  12. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Ocepek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in developed countries and Slovenia, and the incidence is still rising. Groups of people with higher risk for colorectal cancer are well defined. Among them are patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk is highest in patients in whom whole large bowel is affected by inflammation, it rises after 8 to 10 years and increases with the duration of the disease. Precancerous lesion is a displastic, chronically inflammed mucosa and not an adenoma as in cases of sporadic colorectal carcinoma.Conclusions: Many studies suggest that the influence of genetic factors differs between sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease related colorectal cancer. Symptomatic patients at the time of diagnosis have a much worse prognosis. The goal of prevention programes is therefore discovering early precancerous lesions. Established screening protocols are based on relatively frequent colonoscopies which are inconvinient for the patient as well as the endoscopist. Use of specific genetic markers, mutations of candidate genes, as a screening method and a prognostic predictor could greatly lighten therapeutic decisions.

  14. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos Fábio Guilherme

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  15. Inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2014-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are classically viewed as dichotomous conditions. The former is perceived as a typical organic disease, and the latter is regarded as a disorder of gut function driven by mood. Recent research identified some shared contributing factors, which will be discussed here. Mounting evidence shows the importance in both IBD and IBS of genetic, microbiological, epithelial, and immunological factors. In some instances, these factors overlap in the two conditions as shown by: involvement of brain-gut axis dysfunction in IBD, implication of TNFSF gene in Crohn's disease and IBS, evidence of abnormal microbiota and its impact on host functions, identification of low-grade inflammation in subsets of IBS patients, and development of IBS symptoms in patients with IBD in remission. IBD and IBS remain separate conditions although there are some overlapping mechanisms. Both research and clinical management would benefit from considering a functional approach for certain manifestations of IBD and accepting an organic view in subsets of IBS patients.

  16. Vicious circles in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Amnon; Collins, Judith F

    2006-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease can present with a bewildering array of disease manifestations whose overall impact on patient health is difficult to disentangle. The multitude of disease complications and therapeutic side effects result in conflicting ideas on how to best manage a patient. The aim of the study is to test the usefulness of influence diagrams in resolving conflicts centered on managing complex disease processes. The influences of a disease process and the ensuing medical interventions on the health of a patient with inflammatory bowel disease are modeled by an influence diagram. Patient health is the focal point of multiple influences affecting its overall strength. Any downstream influence represents the focal point of other preceding upstream influences. The mathematics underlying the influence diagram is similar to that of a decision tree. Its formalism allows one to consider additive and inhibitory influences and include in the same analysis qualitatively different types of parameters, such as diagnoses, complications, side effects, and therapeutic outcomes. Three exemplary cases are presented to illustrate the potential use of influence diagrams. In all three case scenarios, Crohn's disease resulted in disease manifestations that seemingly interfered with its own therapy. The presence of negative feedback loops rendered the management of each case particularly challenging. The analyses by influence diagrams revealed subtle interactions among the multiple influences and their joint contributions to the patient's overall health that would have been difficult to appreciate by verbal reasoning alone. Influence diagrams represent a decision tool that is particularly suited to improve decision-making in inflammatory bowel disease. They highlight key factors of a complex disease process and help to assess their quantitative interactions.

  17. Occult spondyloarthritis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandinelli, Francesca; Manetti, Mirko; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia

    2016-02-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is a frequent extra-intestinal manifestation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), although its real diffusion is commonly considered underestimated. Abnormalities in the microbioma and genetic predisposition have been implicated in the link between bowel and joint inflammation. Otherwise, up to date, pathogenetic mechanisms are still largely unknown and the exact influence of the bowel activity on rheumatic manifestations is not clearly explained. Due to evidence-based results of clinical studies, the interest on clinically asymptomatic SpA in IBD patients increased in the last few years. Actually, occult enthesitis and sacroiliitis are discovered in high percentages of IBD patients by different imaging techniques, mainly enthesis ultrasound (US) and sacroiliac joint X-ray examinations. Several diagnostic approaches and biomarkers have been proposed in an attempt to correctly classify and diagnose clinically occult joint manifestations and to define clusters of risk for patient screening, although definitive results are still lacking. The correct recognition of occult SpA in IBD requires an integrated multidisciplinary approach in order to identify common diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The use of inexpensive and rapid imaging techniques, such as US and X-ray, should be routinely included in daily clinical practice and trials to correctly evaluate occult SpA, thus preventing future disability and worsening of quality of life in IBD patients.

  18. Intestinal epithelium in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet eCoskun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelium has a strategic position as a protective physical barrier to luminal microbiota and actively contributes to the mucosal immune system. This barrier is mainly formed by a monolayer of specialized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs that are crucial in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Therefore, dysregulation within the epithelial layer can increase intestinal permeability, lead to abnormalities in interactions between IECs and immune cells in underlying lamina propria, and disturb the intestinal immune homeostasis, all of which are linked to the clinical disease course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Understanding the role of the intestinal epithelium in IBD pathogenesis might contribute to an improved knowledge of the inflammatory processes and the identification of potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease in children. Current trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikhare, G.; Kugathasan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Once considered rare in the East, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is now recognized to be an emerging entity in that region. East or West, the clinical features of and treatment options for IBD are the same, but it is possible that the exact pathogeneses or the initiating events differ. In this review, existing knowledge of IBD and new discoveries in the epidemiology, genetics and treatment of IBD are discussed in detail. The diagnosis and management of IBD in children has changed dramatically over the last decade, mainly due to increased awareness, the availability of newer diagnostic modalities such as MRI and video capsule endoscopy, and newer, more powerful treatments such as biologics. It is hoped that the combination of innovative research and advances in drug discoveries will change the natural history of IBD and make a major difference in children who are suffering from this unfortunate lifelong chronic inflammatory disorder. (author)

  20. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered

  1. Enteral nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassull, M A; Abad, A; Cabré, E; González-Huix, F; Giné, J J; Dolz, C

    1986-01-01

    To assess the effect of the addition of enteral tube feeding with polymeric diets to the standard treatment of acute attacks of inflammatory bowel disease a total of 43 patients admitted to hospital (23 with Crohn's disease and 20 with ulcerative colitis) were studied retrospectively. Total enteral nutrition was given to 26 as the sole nutritional supply and to 17 in conjunction with a normal ward diet, when appropriate, according to the severity of attack (control group). Nutritional state was assessed and classified in all patients at admission and at the end of the study, by measuring the triceps skinfold thickness, mid arm muscle circumference, and serum albumin concentration as representative of body fat, muscle protein, and visceral protein, respectively. At admission the three nutritional variables were not statistically different between the groups. There was a significantly positive effect on mid arm muscle circumference in patients on total enteral nutrition compared with the control group, but there was no effect on either triceps skinfold thickness or serum albumin concentration. The percentage of subjects requiring intravenous albumin infusion, however, was significantly less in the group fed enterally than in the control group. In addition, fewer patients in the group fed enterally required surgical treatment compared with the control group, despite the fact that one of the criteria for starting enteral nutritional support was the expectancy that surgery would be needed. Total enteral nutrition was well tolerated and no major side effects arose during its use in patients with acute exacerbations of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:3098646

  2. Solar radiation is inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Francisca; Riutort, Maria C; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Camargo, Carlos A; Borzutzky, Arturo

    To explore the associations between latitude and solar radiation with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile, the country with the largest variation in solar radiation in the world. This is an ecological study, which included data on all hospital-admitted population for inflammatory bowel disease between 2001 and 2012, according to different latitudes and solar radiation exposures in Chile. The data were acquired from the national hospital discharge database from the Department of Health Statistics and Information of the Chilean Ministry of Health. Between 2001 and 2012 there were 12,869 admissions due to inflammatory bowel disease (69% ulcerative colitis, 31% Crohn's disease). Median age was 36 years (IQR: 25-51); 57% were female. The national inflammatory bowel disease admission rate was 6.52 (95% CI: 6.40-6.63) per 100,000 inhabitants with increasing rates over the 12-year period. In terms of latitude, the highest admission rates for pediatric ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, as well as adult ulcerative colitis, were observed in the southernmost region with lowest annual solar radiation. Linear regression analysis showed that regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions in Chile (β: -.44, p = .03). Regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile; inflammatory bowel disease admissions were highest in the southernmost region with lowest solar radiation. Our results support the potential role of vitamin D deficiency on inflammatory bowel disease flares.

  3. Prevalence of occult inflammatory bowel disease in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, P B; Alea, J A; Kennedy, A C; McCluskey, R T; Green, F A

    1980-10-01

    Fifty-five patients with ankylosing spondylitis and 16 control patients matched for sex and age were examined for evidence of occult inflammatory bowel disease. In all patients evaluation included history and physical examination, barium enema, sigmoidoscopy, and rectal biopsy. The results of this study suggest that there is no increased prevalence of occult inflammatory bowel disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

  4. Comparison of two models of inflammatory bowel disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Cristina Sorina; Magdas, Cristian; Tabaran, Flaviu Alexandru; Crăciun, Elena Cristina; Deak, Georgiana; Magdaş, Virginia Ana; Cozma, Vasile; Gherman, Călin Mircea; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Dumitraşcu, Dan Lucian

    2018-03-26

    There is a need for experimental animal models for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but no proposed model has been unanimously accepted. The aim of this study was to develop 2 affordable models of IBD in rats and to compare them. We produced IBD in rats using either dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) or 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The requirements for experimental models were: a predictable clinical course, histopathology and inflammation similar to human ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The effect of acute administration of DSS and TNBS on oxidative stress (as measured by the assessment of glutathione peroxidase - GPx) was verified. The activity of whole blood GPx was measured using a commercially available Randox kit (Crumlin, UK). The administration of DSS increased GPx activity compared to the control and TNBS-treated groups, but not to a statistically significant degree. Histological examination of the colonic mucosa following the administration of DSS showed multifocal erosions with minimal to mild inflammatory infiltrate, mainly by polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), lymphocytes and plasma cells. For TNBS-induced colitis, the histological changes manifested as multifocal areas of ulcerative colitis with mild to severe inflammatory infiltrate. Whole blood GPx values displayed a direct dependence on the chemical agent used. Our results show a correlation between histopathology, proinflammatory state and oxidative stress. The experimental DSSor TNBS-induced bowel inflammation used in this study corresponds to human IBD and is reproducible with characteristics indicative of acute inflammation in the case of the protocols mentioned.

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n=172 and healthy controls (n=389 for polymorphisms in genes encoding various cytokines (interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist. Association of these genotypes to disease incidence and pathophysiology was investigated. No strong association was found with occurrence of IBD. Variation was observed between the ulcerative colitis study group and the control population for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism (p=0.0135. There was also variation in the frequency of IL-6-174 and TNF-α-308 genotypes in the ulcerative colitis group compared with the Crohn's disease group (p=0.01. We concluded that polymorphisms in inflammatory genes are associated with variations in IBD phenotype and disease susceptibility. Whether the polymorphisms are directly involved in regulating cytokine production, and consequently pathophysiology of IBD, or serve merely as markers in linkage disequilibrium with susceptibility genes remains unclear.

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Cervical Neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungoe, Christine; Simonsen, Jacob; Riis, Lene

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We examined the risk of cervical neoplasia (dysplasia or cancer) in women with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD). We also calculated the reverse, the risk for diagnosis with cervical neoplasia before development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We...... established a national cohort of women diagnosed with UC (n = 18,691) or CD (n = 8717) between 1979 and 2011 and a control cohort of individually matched women from the general population (controls, n = 1,508,334). Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of screening activity and diagnosis of cervical neoplasia in women...... with IBD were assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) of cervical neoplasia before diagnosis of IBD were calculated by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Women with CD underwent cervical cancer screening as often as women in the general population (IRR, 0...

  7. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishfaq Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD or Ulcerative Colitis (UC, two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis.

  8. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M A; Sanderson, J D

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects body image, relationships, family planning, fertility and pregnancy outcomes. However, the common misconception that IBD is a contraindication, or serious concern, in pregnancy is essentially a myth. Most patients with IBD can expect to have uneventful pregnancies. We present an overview of the management of IBD during pregnancy, including management in those planning pregnancy, the suitability of relevant medication during pregnancy and breast feeding, investigation and monitoring of IBD during pregnancy, surgical management and considerations relating to delivery. While there are some definite alterations required in the management of IBD during pregnancy, management is essentially unchanged. With close attention to aspects such as nutrition and smoking cessation, and optimal disease control in the run-up to and during pregnancy, we have an opportunity to help our patients with IBD achieve good pregnancy outcomes.

  9. Vedolizumab in Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledder, Oren; Assa, Amit; Levine, Arie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vedolizumab, an anti-integrin antibody, has proven to be effective in adults with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD], but the data in paediatrics are limited. We describe the short-term effectiveness and safety of vedolizumab in a European multi-centre paediatric IBD cohort. Method......: Retrospective review of children [aged 2-18 years] treated with vedolizumab from 19 centres affiliated with the Paediatric IBD Porto group of ESPGHAN. Primary outcome was Week 14 corticosteroid-free remission [CFR]. Results: In all, 64 children were included (32 [50%] male, mean age 14.5 ± 2.8 years...... minor drug-related adverse events. Only 3 of 16 children who underwent endoscopic evaluation had mucosal healing after treatment (19%). Conclusions: Vedolizumab was safe and effective in this cohort of paediatric refractory IBD. These data support previous findings of slow induction rate of vedolizumab...

  10. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  11. Medication adherence in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webber Chan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory condition with intestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Medications are the cornerstone of treatment of IBD. However, patients often adhere to medication poorly. Adherence to medications is defined as the process by which patients take their medications as prescribed. Treatment non-adherence is a common problem among chronic diseases, averaging 50% in developed countries and is even poorer in developing countries. In this review, we will examine the adherence data in IBD which vary greatly depending on the study population, route of administration, and methods of adherence measurement used. We will also discuss the adverse clinical outcomes related to non-adherence to medical treatment including increased disease activity, flares, loss of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy, and so forth. There are many methods to measure medication adherence namely direct and indirect methods, each with their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we will explore different intervention strategies to improve adherence to medications.

  12. Immunological pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hoon Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic inflammatory state of the gastrointestinal tract and can be classified into 2 main clinical phenomena: Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. The pathogenesis of IBD, including CD and UC, involves the presence of pathogenic factors such as abnormal gut microbiota, immune response dysregulation, environmental changes, and gene variants. Although many investigations have tried to identify novel pathogenic factors associated with IBD that are related to environmental, genetic, microbial, and immune response factors, a full understanding of IBD pathogenesis is unclear. Thus, IBD treatment is far from optimal, and patient outcomes can be unsatisfactory. As result of massive studying on IBD, T helper 17 (Th17 cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are investigated on their effects on IBD. A recent study of the plasticity of Th17 cells focused primarily on colitis. ILCs also emerging as novel cell family, which play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. IBD immunopathogenesis is key to understanding the causes of IBD and can lead to the development of IBD therapies. The aim of this review is to explain the pathogenesis of IBD, with a focus on immunological factors and therapies.

  13. Osteomyelitis and Osteonecrosis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis are skeletal disorders seen in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Osteomyelitis usually occurs in the pelvic bones, especially in complicated Crohn's disease, presumably by direct extension from a pelvic inflammatory mass, abscess or fistulous tract. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis may be difficult and can lead to spinal extension of the septic process with a resultant neurological deficit, including paraplegia. Osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis has been reported in patients with either ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, often, but not exclusively, during or following steroid treatment. The disease is often multifocal, but its natural history is unknown, especially if diagnosed early with modern imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance. In IBD patients, the relationship between osteonecrosis and steroid use is unknown. An adverse steroid effect on bones, especially the femoral heads, may develop in some patients with IBD but, to date, this hypothesis remains unproven. Critical evaluation of published data reveals no consistent association between osteonecrosis and steroid treatment in IBD patients.

  14. Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Sandborn, W; Sands, B E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE) program was initiated by the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IOIBD). It examined potential treatment targets for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to be used for a "treat-t...... target. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence- and consensus-based recommendations for selecting the goals for treat-to-target strategies in patients with IBD are made available. Prospective studies are needed to determine how these targets will change disease course and patients' quality of life....

  15. What People with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bowel Disease Need to Know About Osteoporosis What People With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Need to Know About ... in all or part of the large intestine. People with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often have diarrhea, ...

  16. Cannabis use amongst patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Simon; Prasad, Neeraj; Ryan, Manijeh; Tangri, Sabrena; Silverberg, Mark S; Gordon, Allan; Steinhart, Hillary

    2011-10-01

    Experimental evidence suggests the endogenous cannabinoid system may protect against colonic inflammation, leading to the possibility that activation of this system may have a therapeutic role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Medicinal use of cannabis for chronic pain and other symptoms has been reported in a number of medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate cannabis use in patients with IBD. One hundred patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 191 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) attending a tertiary-care outpatient clinic completed a questionnaire regarding current and previous cannabis use, socioeconomic factors, disease history and medication use, including complimentary alternative medicines. Quality of life was assessed using the short-inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire. A comparable proportion of UC and CD patients reported lifetime [48/95 (51%) UC vs. 91/189 (48%) CD] or current [11/95 (12%) UC vs. 30/189 (16%) CD] cannabis use. Of lifetime users, 14/43 (33%) UC and 40/80 (50%) CD patients have used it to relieve IBD-related symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhoea and reduced appetite. Patients were more likely to use cannabis for symptom relief if they had a history of abdominal surgery [29/48 (60%) vs. 24/74 (32%); P=0.002], chronic analgesic use [29/41 (71%) vs. 25/81 (31%); Pmedicine use [36/66 (55%) vs. 18/56 (32%); P=0.01] and a lower short inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire score (45.1±2.1 vs. 50.3±1.5; P=0.03). Patients who had used cannabis [60/139 (43%)] were more likely than nonusers [13/133 (10%); Pcannabis for IBD. Cannabis use is common amongst patients with IBD for symptom relief, particularly amongst those with a history of abdominal surgery, chronic abdominal pain and/or a low quality of life index. The therapeutic benefits of cannabinoid derivatives in IBD may warrant further exploration.

  17. Inflammatory pathways of importance for management of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jannie; Coskun, Mehmet; Soendergaard, Christoffer; Salem, Mohammad; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic disorders of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Their etiologies are unknown, but they are characterised by an imbalanced production of pro-inflammatory mediators, e.g., tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, as well as increased recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. Advantages in understanding the role of the inflammatory pathways in IBD and an inadequate response to conventional therapy in a large portion of patients, has over the last two decades lead to new therapies which includes the TNF inhibitors (TNFi), designed to target and neutralise the effect of TNF-α. TNFi have shown to be efficient in treating moderate to severe CD and UC. However, convenient alternative therapeutics targeting other immune pathways are needed for patients with IBD refractory to conventional therapy including TNFi. Indeed, several therapeutics are currently under development, and have shown success in clinical trials. These include antibodies targeting and neutralising interleukin-12/23, small pharmacologic Janus kinase inhibitors designed to block intracellular signaling of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, antibodies targeting integrins, and small anti-adhesion molecules that block adhesion between leukocytes and the intestinal vascular endothelium, reducing their infiltration into the inflamed mucosa. In this review we have elucidated the major signaling pathways of clinical importance for IBD therapy and highlighted the new promising therapies available. As stated in this paper several new treatment options are under development for the treatment of CD and UC, however, no drug fits all patients. Hence, optimisations of treatment regimens are warranted for the benefit of the patients either through biomarker establishment or other rationales to maximise the effect of the broad range of mode-of-actions of the present and future drugs in IBD.

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease in Nigerians: Still a rare diagnosis?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... immune to this affliction. Keywords: Inflammatory bowel disease, awareness, diagnosis, Nigerians .... anemia, mild leukocytosis, mild hypokalemia and. Ukwenya, et al. ... of four children but her last four pregnancies ended.

  19. Steroid allergy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M

    2007-11-01

    Background: Contact allergy to a steroid enema leading to worsening of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has recently been reported. This study was designed to look for evidence of steroid allergy in patients with IBD.

  20. Indium-111 granulocyte scintigraphy in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, A.; Moisan, A.; Heresbach, D.; Darnault, P.; Bretagne, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    The present paper reports our experience since 1963 concerning 111-indium labeled autologous granulocytes scanning in the assessment of inflammatory bowel diseases and in the assessment of activity in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. (authors). 94 refs., 3 figs

  1. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease: immunodiagnostics, immunotherapeutics, and ecotherapeutics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    Treatment options for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) reflect a continuing shift from empiricism to strategies based on improved understanding of the pathophysiology of disease. In susceptible individuals, IBD appears to be the result of defective regulation of mucosal immune interactions with the enteric microflora. This has prompted research directed at the interface of the traditional disciplines of immunology, microbiology, and epithelial cell biology. Whereas immunodiagnostics have been of limited clinical value in IBD, assessments of mucosal rather than systemic immune function are promising. Therapeutically, there is an increasing trend toward more aggressive and earlier use of immunomodulatory agents, particularly for prevention of relapse, with cytokine manipulation as a bridge therapy to achieve remission in patients with acute severe disease. Although most drug treatments are directed toward altering the host response, the rationale for manipulating the enteric flora appears sound and will be the basis of additional future therapeutic strategies. Notwithstanding the widening range of options for drug therapy in IBD, other outcome modifiers and well-established principles of managing chronic disease are as important as ever.

  3. Quality Improvement Initiatives in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sameer K; Siegel, Corey A; Melmed, Gil Y

    2017-08-01

    This article serves as an overview of several quality improvement initiatives in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is associated with significant variation in care, suggesting poor quality of care. There have been several efforts to improve the quality of care for patients with IBD. Quality improvement (QI) initiatives in IBD are intended to be patient-centric, improve outcomes for individuals and populations, and reduce costs-all consistent with "the triple aim" put forth by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). Current QI initiatives include the development of quality measure sets to standardize processes and outcomes, learning health systems to foster collaborative improvement, and patient-centered medical homes specific to patients with IBD in shared risk models of care. Some of these programs have demonstrated early success in improving patient outcomes, reducing costs, improving patient satisfaction, and facilitating patient engagement. However, further studies are needed to evaluate and compare the effects of these programs over time on clinical outcomes in order to demonstrate long-term value and sustainability.

  4. Inflammatory bowel disease, to personalized nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ortiz-Suárez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is increasing in countries that acquire a Western lifestyle. Its pathogenesis is not well defined but is associated with multifactorial causes. In genetically predisposed people, different environmental factors trigger alterations in the immune response; as a result, tolerance is lost towards commensal gut microbiota, with tissues damage and chronic inflammation. Among the environmental risk factors identified is diet. Diets high in sucrose, refined carbohydrates, omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and low in fruit, vegetables, and fiber are associated with an increased risk of IBD, particularly Crohn disease (CD. Nutritional recommendations in IBD cannot be generalized because patients respond differently. The emergence of disciplines such as nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and epigenetics allow a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, and at the same time, it opens up the possibility to an individualized approach from the nutritional standpoint. An example of this is found in carriers of the polymorphism 857C/T in the gene TNF (Tumor Necrosis Factor, in which a diet high in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is harmful and is associated with a more active disease phenotype. This paper reviews the latest scientific articles in these disciplines in relation to IBD and nutritional potential therapeutic applications, like antioxidants application or the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids v-6/v-3. It was used the database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI to search for articles, including selecting the most interest from 2007 to 2012.

  5. Mouth cancer in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagkou, E; Christodoulou, D K; Katsanos, K H

    2016-05-01

    Mouth cancer is a major health problem. Multiple risk factors for developing mouth cancer have been studied and include history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, age over 40, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, human papilloma virus infection (HPV), nutritional deficiencies, chronic irritation, and existence or oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia and lichen planus. An important risk factor for mouth cancer is chronic immunosuppression and has been extensively reported after solid organ transplantation as well as HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet considered as a risk factor for oral cancer development. However, a significant number of patients with IBD are receiving immunosuppressants and biological therapies which could represent potential oral oncogenic factors either by direct oncogenic effect or by continuous immunosuppression favoring carcinogenesis, especially in patients with HPV(+) IBD. Education on modifiable risk behaviors in patients with IBD is the cornerstone of prevention of mouth cancer. Oral screening should be performed for all patients with IBD, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or a biologic. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The role of fecal calprotectin in investigating inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Erbayrak

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Invasive and non-invasive tests can be used to evaluate the activity of inflammatory bowel diseases. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease activity and the correlation of fecal calprotectin with the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C reactive protein values in inflammatory bowel disease. METHOD: Sixty-five patients affected with inflammatory bowel disease were enrolled. Twenty outpatients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease comprised the control group. RESULTS: In the present study, all patients in the control group had an fecal calprotectin value lower than the cut-off point (50 mg/kg. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, fecal calprotectin was found to be strongly associated with colorectal inflammation indicating organic disease. Fecal calprotectin is a simple and non-invasive method for assessing excretion of macrophages into the gut lumen. Fecal calprotectin values can be used to evaluate the response to treatment, to screen asymptomatic patients, and to predict inflammatory bowel disease relapses.

  7. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-09-01

    The isoprenoid pathway produces three key metabolites--endogenous digoxin, dolichol, and ubiquinone. It was considered pertinent to assess the pathway in inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and regional ileitis). Since endogenous digoxin can regulate neurotransmitter transport, the pathway and the related cascade were also assessed in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance to find out the role of hemispheric dominance in its pathogenesis. All the patients with inflammatory bowel disease were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by the dichotic listening test. The following parameters were measured in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance: (1) plasma HMG CoA reductase, digoxin, dolichol, ubiquinone, and magnesium levels; (2) tryptophan/tyrosine catabolic patterns; (3) free-radical metabolism; (4) glycoconjugate metabolism; and (5) membrane composition and RBC membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity. Statistical analysis was done by ANOVA. In patients with inflammatory bowel disease there was elevated digoxin synthesis, increased dolichol and glycoconjugate levels, and low ubiquinone and elevated free radical levels. There was also an increase in tryptophan catabolites and a reduction in tyrosine catabolites. There was an increase in cholesterol:phospholipid ratio and a reduction in glycoconjugate level of RBC membrane in these groups of patients. Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with an upregulated isoprenoid pathway and elevated digoxin secretion from the hypothalamus. This can contribute to immune activation, defective glycoprotein bowel antigen presentation, and autoimmunity and a schizophreniform psychosis important in its pathogenesis. The biochemical patterns obtained in inflammatory bowel disease is similar to those obtained in left-handed/right hemispheric dominant individuals by the dichotic listening test. But all the patients with peptic ulcer disease were right

  8. Globalisation of inflammatory bowel disease: perspectives from the evolution of inflammatory bowel disease in the UK and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Gilaad G; Ng, Siew C

    2016-12-01

    The UK and China provide unique historical perspectives on the evolution of the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease, which might provide insight into its pathogenesis. Historical records from the UK document the emergence of ulcerative colitis during the mid-1800s, which was later followed by the recognition of Crohn's disease in 1932. During the second half of the 20th century, the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease rose dramatically in high-income countries. Globalisation at the turn of the 21st century led to rapid economic development of newly industrialised countries such as China. In China, the modernisation of society was accompanied by the recognition of a sharp rise in the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease. The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease is expected to continue to rise in high-income countries and is also likely to accelerate in the developing world. An understanding of the shared and different environmental determinants underpinning the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease in western and eastern countries is essential to implement interventions that will blunt the rising global burden of inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fine-mapping inflammatory bowel disease loci to single-variant resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Hailiang; Fang, Ming; Jostins, Luke; Umićević Mirkov, Maša; Boucher, Gabrielle; Anderson, Carl A; Andersen, Vibeke; Cleynen, Isabelle; Cortes, Adrian; Crins, François; D'Amato, Mauro; Deffontaine, Valérie; Dmitrieva, Julia; Docampo, Elisa; Elansary, Mahmoud; Farh, Kyle Kai-How; Franke, Andre; Gori, Ann-Stephan; Goyette, Philippe; Halfvarson, Jonas; Haritunians, Talin; Knight, Jo; Lawrance, Ian C; Lees, Charlie W; Louis, Edouard; Mariman, Rob; Meuwissen, Theo; Mni, Myriam; Momozawa, Yukihide; Parkes, Miles; Spain, Sarah L; Théâtre, Emilie; Trynka, Gosia; Satsangi, Jack; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Vermeire, Severine; Xavier, Ramnik J; Weersma, Rinse K; Duerr, Richard H; Mathew, Christopher G; Rioux, John D; McGovern, Dermot P B; Cho, Judy H; Georges, Michel; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 200 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci, but few have been conclusively resolved to specific functional variants. Here we

  10. Fine-mapping inflammatory bowel disease loci to single-variant resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Hailiang; Fang, Ming; Jostins, Luke

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have identified 200 inflammatory bowel disease-associated loci, but few have been conclusively resolved to specific functional variants. Here w...

  11. Biologic therapies for chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Martínez-Montiel

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC make up the so-called chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Advances in the understanding of IBD pathophysiologic mechanisms in the last few years have allowed the development of novel therapies such as biologic therapies, which at least theoretically represent a more specific management of this disease with fewer side effects. Currently, the only effective and widely accepted biologic therapy for the treatment of intraluminal, fistulizing CD, both for remission induction and maintenance, is infliximab. The role of other monoclonal antibodies such as adalimumab is not clearly established. It could be deemed an alternative for patients with allergic reactions to infliximab, and for those with lost response because of anti-infliximab antibody development. However, relevant issues such as dosage and administration regimen remain to be established. Anti-integrin α4 therapies, despite encouraging results in phase-3 studies, are still unavailable, as their marketing authorization was held back in view of a number of reports regarding progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy cases. Immunostimulating therapy may be highly relevant in the near future, as it represents a novel strategy against disease with the inclusion of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factors. Regarding ulcerative colitis, results from the ACT-1 and ACT-2 studies showed that infliximab is also useful for the management of serious UC flare-ups not responding to standard treatment, which will lead to a revision of therapeutic algorithms, where this drug should be given preference before intravenous cyclosporine. In the next few years, the role of anti-CD3 drugs (vilisilizumab, T-cell inhibiting therapies, and epithelial repair and healing stimulating factors will be established.

  12. Nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Lisa; Lichti, Pia; Rath, Eva; Haller, Dirk

    2012-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronically relapsing, immune-mediated disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. A major challenge in the treatment of IBD is the heterogenous nature of these pathologies. Both, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are of multifactorial etiology and feature a complex interaction of host genetic susceptibility and environmental factors such as diet and gut microbiota. Genome-wide association studies identified disease-relevant single-nucleotide polymorphisms in approximately 100 genes, but at the same time twin studies also clearly indicated a strong environmental impact in disease development. However, attempts to link dietary factors to the risk of developing IBD, based on epidemiological observations showed controversial outcomes. Yet, emerging high-throughput technologies implying complete biological systems might allow taking nutrient-gene interactions into account for a better classification of patient subsets in the future. In this context, 2 new scientific fields, "nutrigenetics" and "nutrigenomics" have been established. "Nutrigenetics," studying the effect of genetic variations on nutrient-gene interactions and "Nutrigenomics," describing the impact of nutrition on physiology and health status on the level of gene transcription, protein expression, and metabolism. It is hoped that the integration of both research areas will promote the understanding of the complex gene-environment interaction in IBD etiology and in the long-term will lead to personalized nutrition for disease prevention and treatment. This review briefly summarizes data on the impact of nutrients on intestinal inflammation, highlights nutrient-gene interactions, and addresses the potential of applying "omic" technologies in the context of IBD.

  13. Tc-99m sucralfate scanning for inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, L.M.; Becker, S.; Mekhmandarov, S.; Steinmetz, A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated 14 patients with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by administering Tc-99m sucralfate (TcS) orally and imaging the abdomen 4 and 24 hours after dose. All patients had either barium radiographic studies or colonoscopy before the scan. The scan identified seven of nine patients who had radiologically demonstrated small-bowel lesions and four of five patients with colonic disease. The authors' preliminary experience suggests that TcS maybe a useful procedure to document location and extent of active disease. It provides information about both small and large bowel in one procedure, is noninvasive, easy to perform, and has low radiation absorbed dose

  14. The expanding universe of inflammatory bowel disease genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, Jean-Paul; Duerr, Richard

    2008-07-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we will provide an update on the rapid advances in the discovery of inflammatory bowel disease, primarily Crohn's disease, associated genes. Seven recently published Crohn's disease genome-wide association studies have confirmed prior findings related to the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) gene and the IBD5 locus. In addition, 10 novel loci have been identified and well replicated. Several promising associations between Crohn's disease and gene variants have been identified and replicated, the two most widely replicated being variants in the IL23R and ATG16L1 genes. These findings highlight and further support the importance of the immune system and its interactions with the intestinal microflora in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. Fibre intake and the development of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Chan, Simon; Luben, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Background and Aims: Population-based prospective cohort studies investigating fibre intake and development of inflammatory bowel disease are lacking. Our aim was to investigate the association between fibre intake and the development of Crohn's disease [CD] and ulcerative colitis [UC] in a large...... for the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Each case was matched with four controls and odds ratios [ORs] for the exposures were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Sensitivity analyses according to smoking status were computed. Results: In total, 104 and 221 participants developed incident CD...

  16. 99mTc-sucralfate scintigraphy in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, P.B.; Lech, Y.; Moeller-Petersen, J.; Vilien, M.; Fallingborg, J.; Ekelund, S.

    1989-01-01

    Technetium-99m-labelled albumin-sucralfate was orally administered to 11 patients (Crohn's disease, 8; ulcerative colitis, 3) and 3 healthy volunteers. Serial scintigraphy was performed, and scintigraphic interpretations were compared with radiographic end endoscopic findings in an open study. It was not possible in any patient to relate the scintigraphic findings to the localizations of inflammatory bowel disease, nor was it possible to distinguish the scans in the patients from the scans of the healthy volunteers. It is concluded the 99m Tc-albumin-sucralfate scintigraphy is of no value in the detection of inflammatory bowel disease. 8 refs

  17. Culturing human intestinal stem cells for regenerative applications in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eo; Seidelin, Jakob B; Yin, Xiaolei

    2017-01-01

    Both the incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally; in the industrialized world up to 0.5% of the population are affected and around 4.2 million individuals suffer from IBD in Europe and North America combined. Successful engraftment in experimental colit...

  18. Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). IBD patients frequently complain of fatigue, and a substantial proportion of the patients have

  19. Bone mineral density and nutritional status in children with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Boot (Annemieke); J. Bouquet (Jan); E.P. Krenning (Eric); S.M.P.F. de Muinck Keizer-Schrama (Sabine)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Osteoporosis has been reported in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease. AIMS: To evaluate bone mineral density (BMD), nutritional status, and determinants of BMD in children with inflammatory bowel disease. PATIENTS: Fifty five patients

  20. Place of phosphatidylcholine in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Dorofeev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the pathogenesis of most diseases of the intestine, inflammation is important, and, often, critical. Its pathogenetic role in the inflammatory bowel disease was studied broadly and comprehensively. In recent years, research has begun on its contribution to intestinal damage in functional pathology — irritable bowel syndrome. The participation of inflammation in the development of erosive and ulcerative lesions of the lower gastrointestinal tract on the background of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID-enterocolopathy seems paradoxical. The role of phospholipids in the construction of cell membranes is well known. One of the main membrane phospholipids of most living organisms (with the exception of microbes is phosphatidylcholine (PC. In membranes of the intestinal epithelium, the content of PC increases from 10 to 50 % in the direction from the apical surface to the basal one, and the maximum amount of PC is located on the outside of the cell membranes. Phosphatidylcholine showed its high efficacy and safety in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, such as non-specific ulcerative colitis. People taking NSAIDs have demonstrated the protective role of PC in preventing damage to the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Given the common pathogenetic mechanisms between these diseases and irritable bowel syndrome, the use of PC in patients with irritable bowel syndrome seems promising, especially in its post-infection variant.

  1. Perceptions of medication safety among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Garret

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess attitudes towards and knowledge of medication safety in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD patients frequently require long-term treatment with potentially toxic medications. Techniques are employed to improve patient awareness of medication safety, but there are sparse data on their effectiveness.

  2. Association of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Maunoo; Krishnamurthy, Jayasree; Susi, Apryl; Sullivan, Carolyn; Gorman, Gregory H.; Hisle-Gorman, Elizabeth; Erdie-Lalena, Christine R.; Nylund, Cade M.

    2018-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) both have multifactorial pathogenesis with an increasing number of studies demonstrating gut-brain associations. We aim to examine the association between ASD and IBD using strict classification criteria for IBD. We conducted a retrospective case-cohort study using records from…

  3. Tuberculosis in an inflammatory bowel disease cohort from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Potent immunosuppressive therapy is standard treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but carries a risk of reactivating latent tuberculosis (TB). No data exist on the burden of TB in South African patients with IBD. Objective. To evaluate the burden of TB in IBD patients attending a large tertiary IBD clinic.

  4. Maternal inflammatory bowel disease and offspring body size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Teresa Adeltoft; Sorensen, Thorkild I A; Jess, Tine

    2012-01-01

    Maternal inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may influence intrauterine growth and hence size at birth, but the consequences for offspring in later life remain uncertain. This study investigated the growth of children of mothers with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC)....

  5. High frequency of early colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M. W. M. D.; Vleggaar, F. P.; Schipper, M. E. I.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; van der Woude, C. J.; Hommes, D. W.; de Jong, D. J.; Dijkstra, G.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; Oldenburg, B.; Samsom, M.

    Background and aim: To detect precancerous dysplasia or asymptomatic cancer, patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease often undergo colonoscopic surveillance based on American or British guidelines. It is recommended that surveillance is initiated after 8-10 years of extensive colitis, or

  6. High frequency of early colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M. W. M. D.; Vleggaar, F. P.; Schipper, M. E. I.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; van der Woude, C. J.; Hommes, D. W.; de Jong, D. J.; Dijkstra, G.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; Oldenburg, B.; Samsom, M.

    2008-01-01

    To detect precancerous dysplasia or asymptomatic cancer, patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease often undergo colonoscopic surveillance based on American or British guidelines. It is recommended that surveillance is initiated after 8-10 years of extensive colitis, or after 15-20 years

  7. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and disease distribution in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Aoibhlinn

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between site of intestinal inflammation and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) development in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not been studied extensively, but may be important in understanding the pathogenesis of PSC. We aimed to determine patterns of disease distribution in IBD patients with and without PSC.

  8. Cytomegalovirus in inflammatory bowel disease: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkens, T.E.; Bulte, G.J.; Nissen, L.H.; Drenth, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify definitions of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and intestinal disease, in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), to determine the prevalence associated with these definitions. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and interrogated PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane for literature on

  9. Recent developments in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietdijk, Svend T.; D'Haens, Geert R.

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases that have been treated with corticosteroids, 5-aminosalicates and thiopurines, but therapeutic options have been broadened with the arrival of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies. In this article we reviewed the current

  10. The burden of inflammatory bowel disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Jess, Tine; Martinato, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disabling gastrointestinal disorders impacting every aspect of the affected individual's life and account for substantial costs to the health care system and society. New epidemiological data suggest that the incidence and prevalence of the diseases a...

  11. Drug Repositioning in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Based on Genetic Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collij, Valerie; Festen, Eleonora A. M.; Alberts, Rudi; Weersma, Rinse K.

    2016-01-01

    Background:Currently, 200 genetic risk loci have been identified for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although these findings have significantly advanced our insight into IBD biology, there has been little progress in translating this knowledge toward clinical practice, like more cost-efficient

  12. Silk fibroin nanoparticles constitute a vector for controlled release of resveratrol in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano-Pérez AA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Abel Lozano-Pérez,1 Alba Rodriguez-Nogales,2 Víctor Ortiz-Cullera,1 Francesca Algieri,2 José Garrido-Mesa,2 Pedro Zorrilla,2 M Elena Rodriguez-Cabezas,2 Natividad Garrido-Mesa,2 M Pilar Utrilla,2 Laura De Matteis,3 Jesús Martínez de la Fuente,3 José Luis Cenis,1 Julio Gálvez2 1Instituto Murciano de Investigación y Desarrollo Agrario y Alimentario, Murcia, Spain; 2Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas en Red – Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas, Department of Pharmacology, ibs Granada, Center for Biomedical Research, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; 3Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain Purpose: We aimed to evaluate the intestinal anti-inflammatory properties of silk fibroin nanoparticles, around 100 nm in size, when loaded with the stilbene compound resveratrol, in an experimental model of rat colitis. Methods: Nanoparticles were loaded with resveratrol by adsorption. The biological effects of the resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles were tested both in vitro, in a cell culture of RAW 264.7 cells (mouse macrophages, and in vivo, in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis, when administered intracolonically.Results: The resveratrol liberation in 1× phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; pH 7.4 was characterized by fast liberation, reaching the solubility limit in 3 hours, which was maintained over a period of 80 hours. The in vitro assays revealed immunomodulatory properties exerted by these resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles since they promoted macrophage activity in basal conditions and inhibited this activity when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. The in vivo experiments showed that after evaluation of the macroscopic symptoms, inflammatory markers, and intestinal barrier function, the fibroin nanoparticles loaded with resveratrol had a better effect than the single treatments, being similar to that produced by the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Conclusion: Silk

  13. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  14. MAP kinases in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Olsen, Jørgen; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian family of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) is activated by diverse extracellular and intracellular stimuli, and thereby they play an essential role in connecting cell-surface receptors to changes in transcriptional programs. The MAPK signaling pathways regulate a wide range...... these signaling pathways have been exploited for the development of therapeutics and discuss the current knowledge of potential MAPK inhibitors and their anti-inflammatory effects in clinical trials related to IBD....

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Fargesin on Chemically Induced Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Yue

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Fargesin is a bioactive lignan from Flos Magnoliae, an herb widely used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, and headache in Asia. We sought to investigate whether fargesin ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in mice. Oral administration of fargesin significantly attenuated the symptoms of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis in mice by decreasing the inflammatory infiltration and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, reducing tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α secretion, and inhibiting nitric oxide (NO production in colitis mice. The degradation of inhibitory κBα (IκBα, phosphorylation of p65, and mRNA expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB target genes were inhibited by fargesin treatment in the colon of the colitis mice. In vitro, fargesin blocked the nuclear translocation of p-p65, downregulated the protein levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and dose-dependently inhibited the activity of NF-κB-luciferase in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Taken together, for the first time, the current study demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of fargesin on chemically induced IBD might be associated with NF-κB signaling suppression. The findings may contribute to the development of therapies for human IBD by using fargesin or its derivatives.

  16. Lymphogranuloma venereum proctosigmoiditis is a mimicker of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Marlene; Bradly, Dawn; Jakate, Shriram; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2012-07-07

    There has been an increasing prevalence of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) or Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) cases among the men who have sex with men (MSM) population, particularly in Europe and North America. These cases may present with an incomplete or undisclosed history and proctosigmoiditis without characteristic adenopathy syndrome. During the initial evaluation and colonoscopy, there is a strong clinical and endoscopic suspicion of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by virtue of presentation and endoscopic and histological findings. The diagnosis of IBD is subsequently modified to LGV proctosigmoiditis when one or more of the following transpire: (1) there is failure of response to IBD therapy; (2) additional components of history (MSM/travel) may be identified; (3) return of initially performed Chlamydia antibody test is positive; and (4) response to antibiotics effective against Chlamydia. We describe three such cases initially suspected to be an inflammatory bowel disease and subsequently identified as C. trachomatis proctosigmoiditis.

  17. What Are the Targets of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lega, Sara; Dubinsky, Marla C

    2018-04-25

    With recent evidence suggesting that keeping the inflammatory process under tight control prevents long-term disability, the aim of treatments in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has shifted from symptom control toward the resolution of bowel inflammation. Mucosal healing is currently recognized as the principal treatment target to be used in a "treat to target" paradigm, whereas histologic healing and normalization of biomarkers are being evaluated as potential future targets. Although symptom relief is no longer a sufficient target, patient experience with the disease is of unquestionable importance and should be assessed in the form of patient-reported outcomes, to be used as a co-primary target with an objective measure of disease activity. IBD in is a heterogeneous disease; thus besides defining common treatment targets, every effort should be made to deliver a personalized treatment plan based on the risk factors for disease progression and individual drug metabolism to improve treatment success.

  18. Job Strain and the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Madsen, Ida E H; Nyberg, Solja T

    2014-01-01

    -Work Consortium. Work-related psychosocial stress was operationalised as job strain (a combination of high demands and low control at work) and was self-reported at baseline. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis were ascertained from national hospitalisation and drug reimbursement registers. The associations...... between job strain and inflammatory bowel disease outcomes were modelled using Cox proportional hazards regression. The study-specific results were combined in random effects meta-analyses. RESULTS: Of the 95,379 participants who were free of inflammatory bowel disease at baseline, 111 men and women...... developed Crohn's disease and 414 developed ulcerative colitis during follow-up. Job strain at baseline was not associated with incident Crohn's disease (multivariable-adjusted random effects hazard ratio: 0.83, 95% confidence interval: 0.48, 1.43) or ulcerative colitis (hazard ratio: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.76, 1...

  19. Smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases: good, bad or ugly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Szamosi, Tamas; Lakatos, Laszlo

    2007-12-14

    Smoking is an important environmental factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), having different effects in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). A recent meta-analysis partially confirmed previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after onset of the disease, might improve its course, decreasing the need for colectomy. However, smoking increases the risk of developing CD and worsens its course, increasing the need for steroids, immunosuppressants and re-operations. Smoking cessation aggravates ulcerative colitis and improves CD. Data are however, largely conflictive as well as the potential mechanisms involved in this dual relationship are still unknown. In this review article, the authors review the role of smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  20. Is the disease course predictable in inflammatory bowel diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Kiss, Lajos S

    2010-01-01

    During the course of the disease, most patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) may eventually develop a stricturing or a perforating complication, and a significant number of patients with both CD and ulcerative colitis will undergo surgery. In recent years, research has focused on the determination of factors important in the prediction of disease course in inflammatory bowel diseases to improve stratification of patients, identify individual patient profiles, including clinical, laboratory and molecular markers, which hopefully will allow physicians to choose the most appropriate management in terms of therapy and intensity of follow-up. This review summarizes the available evidence on clinical, endoscopic variables and biomarkers in the prediction of short and long-term outcome in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:20518079

  1. Understanding Mircrobial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    chemistry , microbiology and worked with the second fellow from von Andrian lab on the immunology and microscopy. Teaching has come from several...to follow essentially any bacteria using fluorescent techniques into the host or other environments. This chemistry is also a potential method for...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0367 TITLE: Understanding Microbial Sensing in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Click Chemistry PRINCIPAL

  2. ANTI-CYTOKINE THERAPY FOR CHILDREN WITH INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Potapov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the findings of a pilot research devoted to the estimation of the efficiency of a therapy with TNF α inhibitors for children with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: we carried out the retrospective analysis for a therapy with Infliximab in 15 children with a nonspecific ulcerative colitis and Сrohn's disease. Results: 66% of the children with inflammatory bowel diseases react to the first injection of Infliximab, whereas 13% of the children demonstrate a clinical remission of their diseases. After the third injection, a positive response to the used therapy is shown by 60% of the children with inflammatory bowel diseases, and 33% of the children are diagnosed with a clinical remission. Conclusion: The use of Infliximab allowed the children with a refractory course of nonspecific ulcerative colitis and Сrohn's disease to make their inflammation significantly less active and improve the quality of their life.Key words: nonspecific ulcerative colitis, Сrohn's disease, treatment, TNF α inhibitors, children

  3. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Rok; Kamhi Trop, Tina

    2014-01-01

    It has been presumed that aberrant immune response to intestinal microorganisms in genetically predisposed individuals may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel disease, and there is a good deal of evidence supporting this hypothesis. Commensal enteric bacteria probably play a central role in pathogenesis, providing continuous antigenic stimulation that causes chronic intestinal injury. A strong biologic rationale supports the use of probiotics and prebiotics for inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Many probiotic strains exhibit anti-inflammatory properties through their effects on different immune cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion depression, and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines. There is very strong evidence supporting the use of multispecies probiotic VSL#3 for the prevention or recurrence of postoperative pouchitis in patients. For treatment of active ulcerative colitis, as well as for maintenance therapy, the clinical evidence of efficacy is strongest for VSL#3 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Moreover, some prebiotics, such as germinated barley foodstuff, Psyllium or oligofructose-enriched inulin, might provide some benefit in patients with active ulcerative colitis or ulcerative colitis in remission. The results of clinical trials in the treatment of active Crohn’s disease or the maintenance of its remission with probiotics and prebiotics are disappointing and do not support their use in this disease. The only exception is weak evidence of advantageous use of Saccharomyces boulardii concomitantly with medical therapy in maintenance treatment. PMID:25206258

  4. Association between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Mallbris, L; Warren, R B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis, Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory disorders with overlapping genetic architecture. However, data on the frequency and risk of CD and UC in psoriasis are scarce and poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between CD...... and UC in patients with psoriasis. METHODS: All Danish individuals aged ≥ 18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2012 were linked in nationwide registers. Psoriasis severity was defined in two models: hospital visits and medication. Incidence rates per 10 000 person-years were calculated......, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: In the total cohort (n = 5 554 100) there were 75 209 incident cases of psoriasis, 11 309 incident cases of CD and 30 310 incident cases of UC, during follow-up. The adjusted IRRs (95% confidence intervals) of CD were 1·28 (1...

  5. Quality of life of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Karla Vivan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Crohn's disease and non-specific ulcerative colitis are part of inflammatory bowel diseases. They have a chronic evolution, leading to important repercussions on patients’ quality of life. Measuring this subjective parameter requires an evaluation tool in clinical trials and health programs. The “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire” is an American instrument of McMaster University, which had its reproducibility and validity determined in studies in other countries as a measure of the quality of life in IBD. Objective: To evaluate the quality of life of patients with inflammatory bowel disease through the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, and to correlate the results with sociodemographic data of the patients. Methods: This is a prospective cross-sectional study carried out with 58 patients; the patients’ follow-up was conducted at the outpatient clinic of Coloproctology. Results: Among the 58 patients evaluated, 70.1% had DC, 62.1% were women, the mean age was 46.08 years, 96.6% were non-smokers, and 24.1% were submitted to surgery for the underlying disease. 43% were in a combination therapy scheme, 44% in monotherapy, and 12% were not using medication. Significant change in quality of life was observed in patients taking prednisone. Conclusion: The patients with better quality of life are those who were taking prednisone. There was no other correlation with significance in the patients’ quality of life. Resumo: Racional: Faz parte das doenças inflamatórias intestinais a doença de Crohn e a Retocolite Ulcerativa Inespecífica Possuem evolução crônica, gerando repercussões importantes na qualidade de vida dos doentes. Medir esse parâmetro subjetivo requer um instrumento de avaliação em ensaios clínicos e de programas de saúde. O “Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire” é um instrumento norte-americano da McMaster University, que teve sua reprodutibilidade e validade determinada em estudos em

  6. Prevalence and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Patients with Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Jemec, Gregor B.E.; Kimball, Alexa B.

    2017-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. In small studies, inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with the increased prevalence of HS, but the data on the concurrence of inflammatory bowel disease in patients with HS are limited. We therefore investigated...

  7. Breastfeeding and genetic factors in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theresa A Mikhailov; Sylvia E Furner

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic, debilitating disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease has not been elucidated, but is thought to be multifactorial with both environmental and genetic influences. A large body of research has been conducted to elucidate the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease. This article reviews this literature, emphasizing the studies of breastfeeding and the studies of genetic factors, particularly NOD2 polymorphisms.

  8. Bioactive dietary peptides and amino acids in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Hu, Chien-An A; Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Mine, Yoshinori

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), most commonly ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients affected with IBD experience symptoms including abdominal pain, persistent diarrhea, rectal bleeding, and weight loss. There is no cure for IBD; thus treatments typically focus on preventing complications, inducing and maintaining remission, and improving quality of life. During IBD, dysregulation of the intestinal immune system leads to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, and recruitment of activated immune cells to the intestine, causing tissue damage and perpetuating the inflammatory response. Recent biological therapies targeting specific inflammatory cytokines or pathways, in particular TNF-α, have shown promise, but not all patients respond to treatment, and some individuals become intolerant to treatment over time. Dietary peptides and amino acids (AAs) have been shown to modulate intestinal immune functions and influence inflammatory responses, and may be useful as alternative or ancillary treatments in IBD. This review focuses on dietary interventions for IBD treatment, in particular the role of dietary peptides and AAs in reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the gut, as well as recent advances in the cellular mechanisms responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity.

  9. Cytomegalovirus infection in inflammatory bowel disease is not associated with worsening of intestinal inflammatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Medeiros do Carmo

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus is highly prevalent virus and usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. The pathophysiology and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease often induce a state of immunosuppression. Because this, there are still doubts and controversies about the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease and cytomegalovirus.Evaluate the frequency of cytomegalovirus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and identify correlations.Patients with inflammatory bowel disease underwent an interview, review of records and collection of blood and fecal samples. The search for cytomegalovirus was performed by IgG and IgM blood serology, by real-time PCR in the blood and by qualitative PCR in feces. Results were correlated with red blood cell levels, C-reactive protein levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and fecal calprotectin levels for each patient.Among the 400 eligible patients, 249 had Crohn's disease, and 151 had ulcerative colitis. In the group of Crohn's disease, 67 of the patients had moderate or severe disease, but 126 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. In patients with ulcerative colitis, only 21 patients had moderate disease, but 76 patients presented with active disease, based on the evaluation of the fecal calprotectin. A large majority of patients had positive CMV IgG. Overall, 10 patients had positive CMV IgM, and 9 patients had a positive qualitative detection of CMV DNA by PCR in the feces. All 400 patients returned negative results after the quantitative detection of CMV DNA in blood by real-time PCR. Analyzing the 19 patients with active infections, we only found that such an association occurred with the use of combined therapy (anti-TNF-alpha + azathioprine.The findings show that latent cytomegalovirus infections are frequent and active cytomegalovirus infection is rare. We did not find any association between an active infection of CMV and inflammatory bowel

  10. Proctalgia fugax in patients with the irritable bowel, peptic ulcer, or inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W G

    1984-06-01

    One hundred forty-eight patients with gastrointestinal disease, 50 patients with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 49 each with peptic ulcer and inflammatory bowel disease, were interviewed to determine if they had proctalgia fugax (PF) and if the symptom was associated with the IBS. One-third of the patients had PF. It occurred in 51% of females and 12% of males (p less than 0.001). When corrected for sex, PF was no more prevalent in IBS than in peptic ulcer or inflammatory bowel disease. Only two of six previously described IBS symptoms were more prevalent in the PF patients. Attacks occurred in the day in 94%, and one-third of sufferers related them to defecation. The pain was localized in the anus in 90%, occurred less than five times a year in 51%, and lasted less than 1 min in 57%. In most, activity was not interrupted by this pain and only 20% had ever reported it to a physician. PF is very common among patients with abdominal symptoms, but is not related to the IBS. Since it is infrequent, benign, and transient, PF is usually not mentioned to the physician.

  11. INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE WITH A VERY EARLY ONSET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kornienko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has a tendency to manifest at earlier age. In childhood (< 6 years of age it has an especially severe course and is characterized by high grade inflammation, predominantly in the colon, by complication and extra-intestinal autoimmune injury. At younger age, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis require more aggressive treatment with frequently poor results. From genetic point of view, monogenic mutations controlling the immune response are characteristic for these diseases with an early onset; therefore, they are frequently associated with primary immunodeficiency. This implies various immunologic deficits, such as breakdown of the epithelial barrier, phagocytic dysfunction and dysfunction of Т and В lymphocytes and regulatory Т cells. Depending on this, a number of primary immunodeficiencies are identified associated with monogenic mutations of more than 50 genes. There some age-related specific features at manifestation. Thus, defects in interleukin 10 and FOXP3 manifest in the first months of life, whereas severe combined immunodeficiencies and phagocytosis defects become evident somewhat later. Virtually all 24 children with very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease, whom we examined, had immunologic defects and one child had a XIAP gene mutation. After identification of a specific immunologic defect, one can understand the mechanism of the disease and suspect one or another genetic defect with subsequent reasonable assessment of mutations in candidate genes. Detection of immunologic and genetic defects in children with a very early onset of inflammatory bowel disease allows for choosing an adequate strategy of non-conventional treatment that may differ depending on the mechanism of the disease.

  12. The microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease: current and therapeutic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane ER

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Erin R Lane,1 Timothy L Zisman,2 David L Suskind1 1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Seattle Children’s Hospital, 2Division of Gastroenterology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease is a heterogeneous group of chronic disorders that result from the interaction of the intestinal immune system with the gut microbiome. Until recently, most investigative efforts and therapeutic breakthroughs were centered on understanding and manipulating the altered mucosal immune response that characterizes these diseases. However, more recent studies have highlighted the important role of environmental factors, and in particular the microbiota, in disease onset and disease exacerbation. Advances in genomic sequencing technology and bioinformatics have facilitated an explosion of investigative inquiries into the composition and function of the intestinal microbiome in health and disease and have advanced our understanding of the interplay between the gut microbiota and the host immune system. The gut microbiome is dynamic and changes with age and in response to diet, antibiotics and other environmental factors, and these alterations in the microbiome contribute to disease onset and exacerbation. Strategies to manipulate the microbiome through diet, probiotics, antibiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation may potentially be used therapeutically to influence modulate disease activity. This review will characterize the factors involved in the development of the intestinal microbiome and will describe the typical alterations in the microbiota that are characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, this manuscript will summarize the early but promising literature on the role of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease with implications for utilizing this data for diagnostic or therapeutic application in the clinical management of patients with these diseases. Keywords

  13. [Classical medications in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvnjak, Marko; Bilić, Ante; Barsić, Neven; Tomasić, Vedran; Stojsavljević, Sanja

    2013-04-01

    The treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases is complex and requires individual approach to every single patient. Traditionally, the approach is based on introduction of so called "classical" medication into the treatment regimen, from ones less potent and with fewer side effects to the ones more toxic but also therapeutically more effective. Aminosalicylates were the first choice of treatment for a long time. However, the role of aminosalicylates is becoming more and more diminished, although they are still the drug of choice in the treatment of mild to moderate ulcerative colitis. Corticosteroids are the therapy of choice in treatment of active IBD for achieving remission in moderate to severe disease. Azathioprine and 6- mercaptopurine belong to a group of thiopurines with an immunomodulatory effect which, in Crohn's disease as well as in ulcerative colitis, primarily have a role in a steroid dependant or steroid refractory type of disease and in maintenance of remission. Lately, early introduction of these medications is proposed to enhance the number of patients that remain in remission. Methotrexate is used for the therapy of active and relapsing Crohn's disease and represents an alternative in patients who do not tolerate or do not respond to azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine therapy. Cyclosporine is used in treating steroid refractory ulcerative colitis and in some patients can postpone the need for colectomy. Antibiotics do not have a proven effect on the course of inflammatory bowel diseases and their primary role is to treat septic complications. Classic medications today represent a standard in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, and the combination of the previously mentioned drugs often has a more potent effect on the course of the disease than any medication on its own and their combination is still an object of investigations and clinical studies.

  14. Changing Infliximab Prescription Patterns in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lone; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Broberg, Marie Christine Hede

    2018-01-01

    Background: Long-term data on real life use of infliximab (IFX) for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are lacking. We studied prescription patterns during the first 16 years following marketing authorization. Methods: In a population-based cohort from the North Denmark Region, all IBD patients...... exposed to IFX during 1999 to 2014 were identified. Results: A total of 623 patients (210 with ulcerative colitis [UC] and 413 with Crohn's disease [CD]) were exposed to IFX. In patients with UC, age at first exposure decreased by 10 months per calendar year (P ... with CD, disease duration at time of first IFX exposure decreased by 7 months per calendar year (P

  15. Integrative Therapies and Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sanghamitra M

    2014-08-25

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) primarily describes two distinct chronic conditions with unknown etiology, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). UC is limited to the colon, while CD may involve any portion of the gastrointestinal tract from mouth to anus. These diseases exhibit a pattern of relapse and remission, and the disease processes are often painful and debilitating. Due to the chronic nature of IBD and the negative side effects of many of the conventional therapies, many patients and their families turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for symptom relief. This article focuses on the current available evidence behind CAM/integrative therapies for IBD.

  16. The Role of Physical Exercise in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bilski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed and analyzed the relationship between physical exercise and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD which covers a group of chronic, relapsing, and remitting intestinal disorders including Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis. The etiology of IBD likely involves a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. Physical training has been suggested to be protective against the onset of IBD, but there are inconsistencies in the findings of the published literature. Hypertrophy of the mesenteric white adipose tissue (mWAT is recognized as a characteristic feature of CD, but its importance for the perpetuation of onset of this intestinal disease is unknown. Adipocytes synthesize proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Hypertrophy of mWAT could play a role as a barrier to the inflammatory process, but recent data suggest that deregulation of adipokine secretion is involved in the pathogenesis of CD. Adipocytokines and macrophage mediators perpetuate the intestinal inflammatory process, leading to mucosal ulcerations along the mesenteric border, a typical feature of CD. Contracting skeletal muscles release biologically active myokines, known to exert the direct anti-inflammatory effects, and inhibit the release of proinflammatory mediators from visceral fat. Further research is required to confirm these observations and establish exercise regimes for IBD patients.

  17. The Changing Face of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Etiology, Physiopathology, Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Actis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD classically includes ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD. An abnormally increased mucosal permeability seems to underlie UC, whereas CD is thought to be the result of an immune deficiency state. Evidence Acquisition While these phenomena may well be labeled as genetic factors, the environment has its role as well. Drugs (chiefly, antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory molecules, with proton pump inhibitors recently joining the list and smoking habits are all being scrutinized as IBD causative factors. Results Once almost unknown, the prevalence of IBD, in the Eastern World and China, is now increasing by manifold, therefore arousing warning signals. Conclusions A multidisciplinary approach will soon be necessary, to face the tenacious behavior of IBD, on a global perspective.

  18. Colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Halfvarson, Jonas; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), may be complicated by colorectal cancer (CRC). In a recent population-based cohort study of 47 347 Danish patients with IBD by Tine Jess and colleagues 268 patients with UC and 70 patients with CD developed C...... preventive strategies in order to avoid CRC in IBD patients. The achieved knowledge may also be relevant for other inflammation-associated cancers.......The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), may be complicated by colorectal cancer (CRC). In a recent population-based cohort study of 47 347 Danish patients with IBD by Tine Jess and colleagues 268 patients with UC and 70 patients with CD developed CRC...... during 30 years of observation. The overall risk of CRC among patients with UC and CD was comparable with that of the general population. However, patients diagnosed with UC during childhood or as adolescents, patients with long duration of disease and those with concomitant primary sclerosing...

  19. Efficacy and Safety of Antiintegrin Antibody for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lianjie; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Dongxu; Zheng, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of available biologics that inhibit T-cell migration by blocking α4β7 integrins in inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether Crohn disease (CD) patients receiving either vedolizumab or natalizumab have any different effect in CD Activity Index (CDAI). Using Medline, Excerpta Medica dataBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Google Scholar until October 31, 2013, we identified 10 studies examining the safety and efficacy of specific integrin inhibitors—vedolizumab, which targets an epitope comprising the α4β7 heterodimer; natalizumab, which recognizes the α4 integrin subunit; etrolizumab, which is specific for the β7 subunit—in the treatment of CD and ulcerative colitis (UC). CD patients receiving either vedolizumab or natalizumab demonstrated a modest increase in remission rate, when compared with that of the placebo group. Further, although both treatments reduced the CDAI slightly, the observed clinical response was less robust than that of the remission rate. UC patients treated with vedolizumab and natalizumab were found to show more prominent increases in both remission and clinical response, compared with placebo, than patients with CD. Etrolizumab, however, was not found to significantly affect either response or remission rates in UC patients. Biologics targeting integrins show promise as therapeutics in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in patients who are either nonresponsive or intolerant to traditional approaches, though further research is necessary to optimize treatment efficacies. PMID:25761174

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease at the korle bu teaching hospital, accra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, Kn

    2008-03-01

    SummaryCase files of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) managed by the author in the Medical Department over the period 1997 - 2004 have been reviewed to identify some features of the disease that may aid improved diagnosis and management. The findings indicate that IBD may not be rare in the country and that there is usually a long delay in establishing the diagnosis. It appears that, in Ghana, more males than females are affected and that most are fifty years of age or below. Malignant colonic change is uncommon but there is a high default rate among the patients. Five patients (29%) died. Cases managed in an Arab country, between 1987 and 1996, have been compared. In that group more female than male patients were affected but the commonest age group affected was similar. The diagnosis was similarly delayed but no deaths were recorded as opposed to the Ghana patients. Since Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a potentially treatable condition medical practitioners need increased awareness to avoid undue delay in diagnosis.

  1. Role of Rifaximin in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Maria Lia

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by an altered composition of the intestinal microbiota, which may contribute to their development and maintenance in susceptible hosts. The involvement of bacteria in the inflammation has provided the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the gut flora through the use of antibiotics. However, the role of antibiotics has not been clearly demonstrated and their long-term employment is often restricted by an elevated number of adverse events. The use of rifaximin, which is characterised by an excellent safety profile thanks to its negligible intestinal absorption, appears to have some promise. Study results suggest that rifaximin could be useful in Crohn's disease, and a new gastroresistant formulation (rifaximin-extended intestinal release) has recently shown its efficacy in patients with moderate Crohn's disease. Less consistent data support the use of rifaximin in ulcerative colitis and in pouchitis, although the results of some studies have been encouraging. Further large controlled trials are warranted to confirm the role of rifaximin in inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

  2. European consensus on the histopathology of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, F; Langner, C; Driessen, A; Ensari, A; Geboes, K; Mantzaris, G J; Villanacci, V; Becheanu, G; Borralho Nunes, P; Cathomas, G; Fries, W; Jouret-Mourin, A; Mescoli, C; de Petris, G; Rubio, C A; Shepherd, N A; Vieth, M; Eliakim, R

    2013-11-01

    The histologic examination of endoscopic biopsies or resection specimens remains a key step in the work-up of affected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and can be used for diagnosis and differential diagnosis, particularly in the differentiation of UC from CD and other non-IBD related colitides. The introduction of new treatment strategies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) interfering with the patients' immune system may result in mucosal healing, making the pathologists aware of the impact of treatment upon diagnostic features. The European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) and the European Society of Pathology (ESP) jointly elaborated a consensus to establish standards for histopathology diagnosis in IBD. The consensus endeavors to address: (i) procedures required for a proper diagnosis, (ii) features which can be used for the analysis of endoscopic biopsies, (iii) features which can be used for the analysis of surgical samples, (iv) criteria for diagnosis and differential diagnosis, and (v) special situations including those inherent to therapy. Questions that were addressed include: how many features should be present for a firm diagnosis? What is the role of histology in patient management, including search for dysplasia? Which features if any, can be used for assessment of disease activity? The statements and general recommendations of this consensus are based on the highest level of evidence available, but significant gaps remain in certain areas. Copyright © 2013 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. All rights reserved.

  3. The Role of Diet in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivashankar, Raina; Lewis, James D

    2017-05-01

    Diet may play both a causal and therapeutic role for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Physicians caring for patients with IBD are often asked to make dietary recommendations. However, there are no well-established guidelines on the use of diet as a treatment of IBD. In this review, we describe the evidence supporting diet as a potential cause for IBD, patient-perceived symptoms based on diet, current research on various diets as a treatment for IBD, and areas of future research. New studies in murine models suggest that dietary emulsifiers may trigger the gut inflammatory cascade. New studies of restriction diets in patients have shown a relationship between dietary intake, symptoms, and bowel inflammation. Until several ongoing clinical trials are completed, a reasonable approach to dietary recommendations for patients with IBD is to propose a well-balanced, healthy (low-fat, low-sugar) diet prepared from fresh ingredients, such as the Mediterranean diet, with exclusions of self-identified foods that worsen or trigger IBD-related symptoms.

  4. Value-based health care for inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deen, Welmoed K; Esrailian, Eric; Hommes, Daniel W

    2015-05-01

    Increasing healthcare costs worldwide put the current healthcare systems under pressure. Although many efforts have aimed to contain costs in medicine, only a few have achieved substantial changes. Inflammatory bowel diseases rank among the most costly of chronic diseases, and physicians nowadays are increasingly engaged in health economics discussions. Value-based health care [VBHC] has gained a lot of attention recently, and is thought to be the way forward to contain costs while maintaining quality. The key concept behind VBHC is to improve achieved outcomes per encountered costs, and evaluate performance accordingly. Four main components need to be in place for the system to be effective: [1] accurate measurement of health outcomes and costs; [2] reporting of these outcomes and benchmarking against other providers; [3] identification of areas in need of improvement based on these data and adjusting the care delivery processes accordingly; and [4] rewarding high-performing participants. In this article we will explore the key components of VBHC, we will review available evidence focussing on inflammatory bowel diseases, and we will present our own experience as a guide for other providers. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Managing inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinder M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matthew Pinder,1 Katie Lummis,1 Christian P Selinger1,2 1Leeds Gastroenterology Institute, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, 2University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD affects many women of childbearing age. The course of IBD is closely related to pregnancy outcomes with poorly controlled IBD increasing the risk of prematurity, low weight for gestation, and fetal loss. As such, women with IBD face complex decision making weighing the risks of active disease versus those of medical treatments. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of IBD treatments during pregnancy and lactation aiming to provide up-to-date guidance for clinicians. Over 50% of women have poor IBD- and pregnancy-related knowledge, which is associated with views contrary to medical evidence and voluntary childlessness. This review highlights the effects of poor patient knowledge and critically evaluates interventions for improving patient knowledge and outcomes. Keywords: pregnancy, breast feeding, nursing, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis

  6. 111In autologous leucocytes in the diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Peters, A.M.; Reavy, H.J.; Danpure, H.J.; Osman, S.; Chadwick, V.S.; Hodgson, H.J.; Lavender, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    111 In-labelled leucocytes were used to obtain gamma camera images of inflamed of bowel in a wide variety of inflammatory bowel disease. No false positive scans were observed in the irritable bowel syndrome and in bowel malignancy. All patients with moderate or severely active disease had positive scans. Faecal excretion of 111 Indium increased with disease severity. 111 In-tropolone labelling appeared to offer the advantage over 111 In-acac labelling in localising inflamed bowel earlier. In many cases the bowel was imaged within 40 min of re-injection of the leucocytes. 111 In-leucocyte scanning provides a novel approach to the problem of diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is non-invasive, requires no bowel preparation and thus is safe in the acutely sick patient where conventional radiological imaging methods may be hazardous. 111 Indium faecal excretion provides an objective assessment of disease activity which should prove useful in evaluating treatment regimes

  7. MINERALIZATION DISORDER OF OSSEOUS TISSUE AMONG THE CHILDREN, SUFFERING FROM INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Yablokova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth rate of inflammatory bowel diseases among children actualizes early detection of this pathology form and its aftera effects, including secondary osteoporosis. The research purpose is to study the characteristics of osseous tissue mineralization, disorder of physical growth and sexual maturity of children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases. The researchers have examined 116 children, including 33 children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases; 26 children, suffering from persistent colitis; 29 children, suffering from gasatroduodenitis; and 28 children with no GI tract pathologies. The study deals with estimate of level of mineral osseous tissue density, biochemical rates of osseous metabolism, as well as physical growth and sexual maturity. reduction of mineral osseous tissue density was found among 48,5% of children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases, 23% of children, suffering from persistent colitis, 31% of children, suffering from chronic gastritis and 18% of almost healthy children, at the same time, it was more apparent among children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases. The lowest rates of mineral osseous tissue density were among girls. Calcium phosphoric metabolism did not change apart from calcium creatinine coefficient, if osteopenia was observed. Thus, reduction of mineral osseous tissue density is often observed among children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases, especially among adolescent girls. Therefore, it conditions the necessity to include densimetry into the conventional examination plan for children, suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases. Authors also find it advisable to monitor physical growth and sexual maturity of children.Key words: children, inflammatory bowel diseases, osteoporosis.

  8. Is there a role for prophylactic colectomy in Lynch syndrome patients with inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Kate L; Aronson, Melyssa D; Cohen, Zane

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome and chronic inflammatory bowel disease are two important risk factors for colorectal cancer. It is unclear whether Lynch syndrome patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at sufficiently increased risk for colorectal cancer to warrant prophylactic colectomy. This study aims to identify all cases of Lynch syndrome and concurrent inflammatory bowel disease in a large familial gastrointestinal cancer registry, define incidence of colorectal cancer, and characterize mismatch repair protein gene mutation status and inflammatory bowel disease-associated colorectal cancer risk factors. We retrospectively identified and collected clinical data for all cases with confirmed diagnoses of Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease in the Familial Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Twelve cases of confirmed Lynch syndrome, and concurrent inflammatory bowel disease were identified. Four cases developed colorectal cancer. An additional five cases had colectomy; one was performed for severe colitis, and four were performed for low-grade dysplasia. None of these surgical specimens contained malignancy or high-grade dysplasia. The presentation of Lynch syndrome with inflammatory bowel disease is uncommon and not well described in the literature. This small but important series of twelve cases is the largest reported to date. In this series, patients with Lynch syndrome and concurrent inflammatory bowel disease do not appear to have sufficiently increased risk for colorectal cancer to recommend prophylactic surgery. Therefore, the decision to surgery should continue to be guided by surgical indications for each disease. Further evaluation of this important area will require multi-institutional input.

  9. From Pulmonary Embolism to Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Give Tunnel Vision up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajdini, Masih; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multisystem disorder with gastrointestinal tract involvement. These patients have the higher risk for thromboembolic events compared to normal population. This report describes a unique case of pulmonary embolism as a first manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Risk of inflammatory bowel disease following a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Chad K

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD symptoms often overlap. In some IBS cases there are subtle inflammatory changes similar to the immune-mediated pathophysiology of IBD, and the risk of both increases after infectious gastroenteritis (IGE. Methods To evaluate the effect of IBS and IGE on IBD risk utilizing US Department of Defense medical encounter data, active duty personnel with IBS were matched to subjects without IBS. Medical encounter history was analyzed to assess for incident IBD. IGE was identified from documented medical encounters and by self-report. Relative risks were calculated using Poisson regression models. Results We identified 9,341 incident IBS cases and 18,678 matched non-IBS subjects and found an 8.6-fold higher incidence (p p  Conclusions These data reflect a complex interaction between illness presentation and diagnosis of IBS and IBD and suggest intercurrent IGE may increase IBD risk in IBS patients. Additional studies are needed to determine whether IBS lies on the causal pathway for IBD or whether the two are on a pathophysiological spectrum of the same clinical illness. These data suggest consideration of risk reduction interventions for IGE among IBS patients at high disease risk.

  11. Faecal S100A12 as a non-invasive marker distinguishing inflammatory bowel disease from irritable bowel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, T; Langhorst, J; Wittkowski, H; Becker, K; Friedrich, A W; Rueffer, A; Dobos, G J; Roth, J; Foell, D

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: S100A12 is a pro-inflammatory protein that is secreted by granulocytes. S100A12 serum levels increase during inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We performed the first study analysing faecal S100A12 in adults with signs of intestinal inflammation. METHODS: Faecal S100A12 was determined by

  12. [Changes of fecal flora and its correlation with inflammatory indicators in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Ye; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Youlian; Zhang, Shaoheng; Wang, Pu; Xie, Shan; Jiang, Bo

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the changes in fecal flora and its correlation with the occurrence and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We collected fresh fecal specimens from 167 IBD patients (including 113 with ulcerative colitis and 54 with Crohn's disease) and 54 healthy volunteers. The fecal flora was analyzed by gradient dilution method and the data of inflammatory markers including WBC, PLT, CRP and ESR were collected to assess the association between the fecal flora and the inflammatory markers. The species Enterrococcus (6.60∓0.23, Pflora. The changes in fecal flora did not show a significant correlation with these inflammatory markers. IBD patients have fecal flora imbalance compared with the healthy controls, and this imbalance may contribute to the occurrence and progression of IBD. The decline of Eubacterium contributes to the occurrence and development of IBD.

  13. Therapeutic Use of Cannabis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Seymour

    2016-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa and its derivatives, cannabinoids, have grown increasingly popular as a potential therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Studies have shown that modulation of the endocannabinoid system, which regulates various functions in the body and has been shown to play a key role in the pathogenesis of IBD, has a therapeutic effect in mouse colitis. Epidemiologic data and human therapy studies reveal a possible role for cannabinoids in the symptomatic treatment of IBD, although it has yet to be determined in human populations whether cannabinoids have therapeutic anti-inflammatory effects in IBD or are simply masking its many debilitating symptoms. Large, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials using serial inflammatory markers, biopsy findings, and endoscopic disease severity to demonstrate objective improvement in IBD are necessary before cannabis can be empirically accepted and recommended as an IBD treatment option. Questions concerning its safety profile and adverse effects prompt the need for further research, particularly in regard to dosing and route of administration to maximize benefits and limit potential harms. Cannabis use should be reserved for symptomatic control in patients with severe IBD refractory to the currently available standard-of-care and complementary and alternative medicines. PMID:28035196

  14. Social Media Use in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling; Reich, Jason; Groshek, Jacob; Farraye, Francis A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with chronic illnesses such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) have been more keen to utilize the Internet and in particular, social media to obtain patient educational information in recent years. It is important for the gastroenterologist to be aware of these modalities and how they might affect information exchange and ultimately, disease management. This article addresses the current prevalence of social media use, advent of mobile health applications, social media usage in patients with chronic conditions, usage amongst providers, and most notably, the usage and preferences in IBD patients. Over the last decade there has been an increasing desire from patients to receive educational material about their disease through social media. We reviewed the medical literature on the quality of IBD-related information on social media. Given the disparity of information available on the Internet, we remark on the quality of this information and stress the need for further research to assess the validity of IBD information posted on social media.

  15. Gastric emptying and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Binnewies, Ulrich; Rösch, Marie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastric emptying (GE) is delayed in a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We have shown before that altered release of gastrointestinal hormones may contribute to GE disturbances, but overall effects of disease activity remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to evaluate GE...... test (baseline test). Plasma glucose, cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured periodically throughout the test. A total of 16 patients underwent a second GE test after 3-4 months of therapy. RESULTS: At baseline, nine patients with IBD had...... pathologically delayed GE half-time (T½ > 150 min) (P = 0·028 vs. HC). Moreover, T½ was significantly longer in the total group of patients with IBD than in HC (129 ± 12 min vs. 96 ± 7, P = 0·030). Postprandial GLP-1 responses were elevated in IBD (P = 0·002 vs. HC) and correlated with T½ (P = 0·05). Following...

  16. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder......, be disease specific, mirror the disease activity and, finally, be easily applicable for routine clinical purposes. However, no such disease markers have yet been identified for IBD. In this article, classical disease markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins (especially...... orosomucoid and CRP), leukocyte and platelet counts, albumin, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin will be reviewed together with emerging disease markers such as antibodies of the ANCA/ASCA type, cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-2Ralpha, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TNF-alpha receptors) and with various adhesion...

  17. Pharmacological treatments and infectious diseases in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, Valeria; Romano, Claudio

    2018-03-01

    The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rising, as is the employment of immunosuppressive and biological drugs. Most patients with IBD receive immunosuppressive therapies during the course of the disease. These molecules are a double-edged sword; while they can help control disease activity, they also increase the risk of infections. Therefore, it is important that pediatricians involved in primary care, pediatric gastroenterologists, and infectious disease physicians have a thorough knowledge of the infections that can affect patients with IBD. Areas covered: A broad review of the major infectious diseases that have been reported in children and adolescents with IBD was performed, and information regarding surveillance, diagnosis and management were updated. The possible correlations with IBD pharmacological tools are discussed. Expert commentary: Opportunistic infections are possible in pediatric IBD, and immunosuppressive and immunomodulator therapy seems to play a causative role. Heightened awareness and vigilant surveillance leading to prompt diagnosis and treatment are important for optimal management.

  18. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M

    2000-01-01

    orosomucoid and CRP), leukocyte and platelet counts, albumin, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin will be reviewed together with emerging disease markers such as antibodies of the ANCA/ASCA type, cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-2Ralpha, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TNF-alpha receptors) and with various adhesion......Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder......, be disease specific, mirror the disease activity and, finally, be easily applicable for routine clinical purposes. However, no such disease markers have yet been identified for IBD. In this article, classical disease markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins (especially...

  19. Osteodensitometry in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, C.; Kahn, T.; Borte, G.; Borte, M.; Richter, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the quantity and severity of bone disorders in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and to examine the correlation to whole body growth. Materials and methods: in this study 89 bone mineral density measurements were performed and retrospectively analyzed. Results: under consideration of growth retardation, over 65.2% of the patients with Cohn's disease showed a reduced bone mineral density. Osteopenia/Osteoporosis is seldom seen in patients with ulcerative colitis, i.e., only 34.8% showed a reduction in bone mineral density. Growth retardation and reduced bone mineral density are correlated. Patients with cohn's disease and a body length below the 25th height percentile showed a reduced bone mineral density in 78.1% of the cases. Patients with a body length below the 10th height percentile had a reduced bone mineral density in 83.3% of the cases. (orig.)

  20. Etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease: today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Heitor S P

    2017-07-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), represent chronic diseases of unknown cause, and they are regarded as prototypical complex diseases. Despite all the recent advances, a complete appreciation of the pathogenesis of IBD is still limited. In this review, we present recent information contributing to a better understanding of mechanisms underlying IBD. Here, we attempt to highlight novel environmental triggers, data on the gut microbiota, its interaction with the host, and the potential influence of diet and food components. We discuss recent findings on defective signaling pathways and the potential effects on the immune response, and we present new data on epigenetic changes, inflammasome, and damage-associated molecular patterns associated with IBD. The continuing identification of several epigenetic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic alterations in patients with IBD reflects the complex nature of the disease and suggests the need for innovative approaches such as systems biology for identifying novel relevant targets in IBD.

  1. Enteral Nutrition Support to Treat Malnutrition in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Roberta; Damiano, Giuseppe; Abruzzo, Alida; Palumbo, Vincenzo Davide; Tomasello, Giovanni; Buscemi, Salvatore; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common consequence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Diet has an important role in the management of IBD, as it prevents and corrects malnutrition. It is well known that diet may be implicated in the aetiology of IBD and that it plays a central role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal-tract disease. Often oral nutrition alone is not sufficient in the management of IBD patients, especially in children or the elderly, and must be combined with oral supplementation or replaced with tube enteral nutrition. In this review, we describe several different approaches to enteral nutrition—total parenteral, oral supplementation and enteral tube feeding—in terms of results, patients compliance, risks and and benefits. We also focus on the home entaral nutrition strategy as the future goal for treating IBD while focusing on patient wellness. PMID:25816159

  2. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations occur rather frequently in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), e.g. ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The present paper provides an overview of the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, diagnostic process, and management of rheumatic......, metabolic, dermatologic (mucocutaneous), ophthalmologic, hepatobiliary, hematologic, thromboembolic, urinary tract, pulmonary, and pancreatic extraintestinal manifestations related to IBD. Articles were identified through search of the PubMed and Embase databases, the Cochrane Library, and the web sites......', 'thromboembolism', and 'treatment'. The search was performed on English-language reviews, practical guidelines, letters, and editorials. Articles were selected based on their relevance, and additional papers were retrieved from their reference lists. Since some of the diseases discussed are uncommon, valid...

  3. [Natural history, complications, safety and pregnancy in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, María

    2015-09-01

    Numerous studies were presented in Digestive Disease Week 2015 (DDW 2015) on the natural history, complications, and safety of treatments in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as novel findings on fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. The present article reviews presentations on the natural history of IBD, the risk of complications and their prevention, treatment safety, aspects related to fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding, as well as the risk of cancer and its association with IBD and with drugs used in its treatment. In the next few years, more data will become available on treatment safety and the possible complications that can develop in IBD patients due to the disease itself and the drugs employed in its treatment, which will allow measures to be adopted to improve prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement...... available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library......, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia...

  5. Prediction of disease course in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2010-06-07

    Clinical presentation at diagnosis and disease course of both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis are heterogeneous and variable over time. Since most patients have a relapsing course and most CD patients develop complications (e.g. stricture and/or perforation), much emphasis has been placed in the recent years on the determination of important predictive factors. The identification of these factors may eventually lead to a more personalized, tailored therapy. In this TOPIC HIGHLIGHT series, we provide an update on the available literature regarding important clinical, endoscopic, fecal, serological/routine laboratory and genetic factors. Our aim is to assist clinicians in the everyday practical decision-making when choosing the treatment strategy for their patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases.

  6. Impact of exome sequencing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Christopher J; Kelsen, Judith R; Baldassano, Robert N; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2013-01-01

    Approaches to understanding the genetic contribution to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have continuously evolved from family- and population-based epidemiology, to linkage analysis, and most recently, to genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The next stage in this evolution seems to be the sequencing of the exome, that is, the regions of the human genome which encode proteins. The GWAS approach has been very fruitful in identifying at least 163 loci as being associated with IBD, and now, exome sequencing promises to take our genetic understanding to the next level. In this review we will discuss the possible contributions that can be made by an exome sequencing approach both at the individual patient level to aid with disease diagnosis and future therapies, as well as in advancing knowledge of the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:24187447

  7. Impact of sleep disturbances in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Ziba; Keefer, Laurie; Farhadi, Ashkan; Stepanski, Edward; Sedghi, Shahriar; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2007-11-01

    Normal sleep is paramount for a healthy lifestyle and high quality of life. Sleep modulates the immune system and thus affects the course of several chronic inflammatory conditions. There are no reported studies that address the role of sleep disturbance in the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to characterize sleep disturbance in IBD using validated measures of sleep and quality of life. A self-administered, mail-in questionnaire package was sent to 205 subjects after a brief instruction. The questionnaire package was composed of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a measure of disease severity and the IBD-Quality of Life Questionnaire. A total of 119 subjects were recruited (58% response rate): 80 with inactive IBD, 24 with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 15 healthy controls. The IBD subjects reported significantly prolonged sleep latency, frequent sleep fragmentation, higher rate of using sleeping pills, decreased day-time energy, increased tiredness and poor overall sleep quality compared to healthy controls. The abnormal sleep patterns in IBD subjects were similar to IBS subjects. The reported sleep quality was correlated with IBD disease severity score (r(2) = 0.55, P = 0.02). Both IBD and IBS subjects thought that sleep and their disease status were correlated. The results show that IBD patients have significant sleep disturbance even when their disease is not active. This problem might affect quality of life, gastrointestinal symptoms and coping ability, and might potentially modify disease severity or increase risk of flare-up. Regardless of the primary or secondary origin of this problem, sleep disturbance should be addressed in the clinical management of patients with IBD.

  8. The histopathological approach to inflammatory bowel disease: a practice guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Cord; Magro, Fernando; Driessen, Ann; Ensari, Arzu; Mantzaris, Gerassimos J; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Becheanu, Gabriel; Borralho Nunes, Paula; Cathomas, Gieri; Fries, Walter; Jouret-Mourin, Anne; Mescoli, Claudia; de Petris, Giovanni; Rubio, Carlos A; Shepherd, Neil A; Vieth, Michael; Eliakim, Rami; Geboes, Karel

    2014-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are lifelong disorders predominantly present in developed countries. In their pathogenesis, an interaction between genetic and environmental factors is involved. This practice guide, prepared on behalf of the European Society of Pathology and the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation, intends to provide a thorough basis for the histological evaluation of resection specimens and biopsy samples from patients with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. Histopathologically, these diseases are characterised by the extent and the distribution of mucosal architectural abnormality, the cellularity of the lamina propria and the cell types present, but these features frequently overlap. If a definitive diagnosis is not possible, the term indeterminate colitis is used for resection specimens and the term inflammatory bowel disease unclassified for biopsies. Activity of disease is reflected by neutrophil granulocyte infiltration and epithelial damage. The evolution of the histological features that are useful for diagnosis is time- and disease-activity dependent: early disease and long-standing disease show different microscopic aspects. Likewise, the histopathology of childhood-onset IBD is distinctly different from adult-onset IBD. In the differential diagnosis of severe colitis refractory to immunosuppressive therapy, reactivation of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection should be considered and CMV should be tested for in all patients. Finally, patients with longstanding IBD have an increased risk for the development of adenocarcinoma. Dysplasia is the universally used marker of an increased cancer risk, but inter-observer agreement is poor for the categories low-grade dysplasia and indefinite for dysplasia. A diagnosis of dysplasia should not be made by a single pathologist but needs to be confirmed by a pathologist with expertise in gastrointestinal pathology.

  9. Link Between Celiac Disease and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ayesha; Walker, Marjorie; Burger, Daniel; Martin, Neal; von Wulffen, Moritz; Koloski, Natasha; Jones, Mike; Talley, Nicholas J; Holtmann, Gerald J

    2018-05-14

    The aim of this analysis was to assess in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) the risk of celiac disease and in celiac disease patients the risk of IBD. Previous studies report a possible association between IBD and celiac disease; however, this link is controversial. Using the search terms "inflammatory bowel disease" and "celiac disease," we identified initially 1525 publications. In total 27 studies met inclusion criteria. Proportions and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the prevalence of IBD in celiac disease and vice versa were compared with published prevalence rates for the respective geographic regions. We included 41,482 adult IBD patients (20,357 with Crohn's disease; 19,791 with ulcerative colitis; and 459 patients with celiac disease). Overall, in IBD patients the prevalence of celiac disease was 1110/100,000 (95% CI, 1010-1210/100,000) as compared with a prevalence of 620/100,000 (95% CI, 610-630/100,000) in the respective populations (odds ratio, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.99-2.50). In contrast, in patients with celiac disease, 2130/100,000 had IBD (95% CI, 1590-2670/100,000) as compared with 260/100,000 (95% CI, 250/100,000-270/100,000) in the respective populations (odds ratio, 11.10; 95% CI, 8.55-14.40). This effect was not different for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Although there was no evidence for publication bias for celiac disease in IBD, the funnel plot suggested that the association between IBD in celiac disease might be influenced by publication bias. The data are consistent with the notion that celiac disease is a risk factor for IBD and to lesser degree patients with IBD have an increased risk of celiac disease.

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg ND

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Neil D Goldberg Emeritus Chief of Gastroenterology, University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, MD, USA Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. Keywords: anemia, inflammatory bowel disease, intravenous iron, iron deficiency, oral iron, therapy

  11. Toll-like receptor activation by helminths or helminth products to alleviate inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song YanXia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helminth infection may modulate the expression of Toll like receptors (TLR in dendritic cells (DCs and modify the responsiveness of DCs to TLR ligands. This may regulate aberrant intestinal inflammation in humans with helminthes and may thus help alleviate inflammation associated with human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Epidemiological and experimental data provide further evidence that reducing helminth infections increases the incidence rate of such autoimmune diseases. Fine control of inflammation in the TLR pathway is highly desirable for effective host defense. Thus, the use of antagonists of TLR-signaling and agonists of their negative regulators from helminths or helminth products should be considered for the treatment of IBD.

  12. Adiponectin and adiponectin receptor 1 overexpression enhance inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-Ju; Shen, Tang-Long; Chen, Yu-Shan; Mersmann, Harry John; Liu, Bing-Hsien; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2018-03-14

    Adiponectin (ADN) is an adipokine derived from adipocytes. It binds to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 (AdipoR1 and R2) to exert its function in regulating whole-body energy homeostasis and inflammatory responses. However, the role of ADN-AdipoR1 signaling in intestinal inflammation is controversial, and its role in the regulation of neutrophils is still unclear. Our goal was to clarify the role of AdipoR1 signaling in colitis and the effects on neutrophils. We generated porcine AdipoR1 transgenic mice (pAdipoR1 mice) and induced murine colitis using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to study the potential role of AdipoR1 in inflammatory bowel disease. We also treated a THP-1 macrophage and a HT-29 colon epithelial cell line with ADN recombinant protein to study the effects of ADN on inflammation. After inducing murine colitis, pAdipoR1 mice developed more severe symptoms than wild-type (WT) mice. Treatment with ADN increased the expression of pro-inflammatory factors in THP-1 and HT-29 cells. Moreover, we also observed that the expression of cyclooxygenase2 (cox2), neutrophil chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL5), and the infiltration of neutrophils were increased in the colon of pAdipoR1 mice. Our study showed that ADN-AdipoR1 signaling exacerbated colonic inflammation through two possible mechanisms. First, ADN-AdipoR1 signaling increased pro-inflammatory factors. Second, AdipoR1 enhanced neutrophil chemokine expression and recruited neutrophils into the colonic tissue to increase inflammation.

  13. Plain magnetic resonance imaging as an alternative in evaluating inflammation and bowel damage in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jesuratnam-Nielsen, Kayalvily; Løgager, Vibeke B; Rezanavaz-Gheshlagh, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    -52%, 83-94% and 76-92% for DWI, respectively. The κ values for bowel wall thickening, DWI, and mural hyperenhancement were detected with fair agreement (κ = 0.26-0.39) at both MRI examinations, whereas only bowel wall thickening in MRFT were detected with moderate agreement (κ = 0.47) Conclusion. Plain......OBJECTIVE: To compare prospectively the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without use of contrast medium orally or intravenously (plain MRI) with magnetic resonance follow-through (MRFT) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Plain MRI...

  14. Phenotype and Clinical Course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Co-Existent Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chung Sang; Deepak, Parakkal; De La Fuente, Jaime; Bledsoe, Adam C; Larson, Joseph J; Murray, Joseph A; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2018-05-07

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, principally Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease are among the most common immune-mediated gastrointestinal diseases. We aim to elucidate the clinical course and outcomes of patients with concomitant inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease, a unique population that remains scarcely studied to date. A retrospective matched case-control study of adults with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease was performed at a tertiary referral institution in North America. Logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier curves compared disease characteristics and clinical outcomes of the two groups. A total of 342 inflammatory bowel disease patients were included in this study, of which 114 had coexistent celiac disease and 228 did not. Patients with coexistent inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease had higher rates of primary sclerosing cholangitis (19.3% vs 5.7%; odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-9.4; pceliac disease (10.5% vs 3.5%; odds ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.3-8.2; p=0.01), compared to patients without concomitant celiac disease. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease with concomitant celiac disease have unique phenotypic features compared to non-celiac inflammatory bowel disease, with higher risks for colitis-related hospitalizations, extensive colitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Increased recognition of coexistent IBD and celiac disease can prompt clinicians to investigate for concomitant disease sooner, particularly in patients with seemingly refractory disease.

  15. An observational study of cognitive function in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrill, J W; Gallacher, J; Hood, K; Green, J T; Matthews, S B; Campbell, A K; Smith, A

    2013-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are associated with several risk factors for developing cognitive impairment. These include altered cytokine levels, concurrent mood disorders, and the presence of chronic pain. This observational study aimed to explore the cognitive profile of patients with these conditions. Participants completed the Cardiff Cognitive Battery, a series of computerized neuropsychological performance tests that examine a range of cognitive function including psychomotor speed, memory, and intelligence. A progressive analysis of covariance model was used with demographic details, anxiety and depression scores entered as covariates. Fecal calprotectin levels were measured in IBD patients to determine disease activity. In total 231 participants were recruited (150 IBD patients, 40 IBS patients, and 41 healthy controls). IBD patients had significantly lower scores on fluid (p = 0.01) and crystalline intelligence tests (p = 0.028) compared to healthy volunteers, however, this reflected differences in concurrent mood disorder and level of education. When these factors were added as covariates, there was no significant difference between the groups. Duration and activity of disease did not affect cognitive function in IBD patients. Severity of symptoms had no impact on cognition in patients with IBS. The results of this observational study do not support the hypothesis that IBS or IBD have an intrinsic disease process that is associated with cognitive dysfunction. It is possible that concurrent mood disorders, in particular depression, may affect the cognitive performance of patients with IBD in specific tasks. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Current concepts of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    Although the cause of inflammatory bowel disease is not known, the pathogenesis involves an immune-mediated tissue damage that is the result of an interaction among genetic predisposing factors, exogenous triggers and endogenous modifying influences. Multiple genes are involved and operate at the level of the immune response and at the target organ. Exogenous triggers include the enteric microflora which might stimulate the mucosal immune system in genetically predisposed individuals. Endogenous modifying factors such as the psychoneuroendocrine system have regulatory effects on the immune system and the inflammatory response, and may influence the course of the disease. While autoimmune phenomena do occur, particularly in ulcerative colitis, there is no evidence that they are directly responsible for the tissue damage. It appears more likely, particularly in Crohn\\'s disease, that tissue injury may occur as an indirect or "bystander" effect of mucosal T-cell hyperactivation, perhaps in response to a normal enteric microbial antigen. Most of the immunologic and histologic features of Crohn\\'s disease can be explained by the effects of T-cell derived and other cytokines on the epithelium, the local immune system, the microvasculature, and the recruitment of auxiliary effector cells such as neutrophils.

  17. Diet as a Trigger or Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James D; Abreu, Maria T

    2017-02-01

    The most common question asked by patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is, "Doctor, what should I eat?" Findings from epidemiology studies have indicated that diets high in animal fat and low in fruits and vegetables are the most common pattern associated with an increased risk of IBD. Low levels of vitamin D also appear to be a risk factor for IBD. In murine models, diets high in fat, especially saturated animal fats, also increase inflammation, whereas supplementation with omega 3 long-chain fatty acids protect against intestinal inflammation. Unfortunately, omega 3 supplements have not been shown to decrease the risk of relapse in patients with Crohn's disease. Dietary intervention studies have shown that enteral therapy, with defined formula diets, helps children with Crohn's disease and reduces inflammation and dysbiosis. Although fiber supplements have not been shown definitively to benefit patients with IBD, soluble fiber is the best way to generate short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate, which has anti-inflammatory effects. Addition of vitamin D and curcumin has been shown to increase the efficacy of IBD therapy. There is compelling evidence from animal models that emulsifiers in processed foods increase risk for IBD. We discuss current knowledge about popular diets, including the specific carbohydrate diet and diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols. We present findings from clinical and basic science studies to help gastroenterologists navigate diet as it relates to the management of IBD. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thrombospondin-1 and VEGF in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Alkim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is an important process in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation. We aimed to study the angiogeneic balance in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD by evaluating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 on colonic epithelial cells, together with the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS.Twenty-one ulcerative colitis (UC, 14 Crohn's disease (CD, 11 colorectal cancer patients, and 11 healthy controls colonic biopsy samples were evaluated immunohistochemically.The expressions of TSP-1, VEGF, and iNOS in UC and CD groups were higher than expression in healthy control group, all with statistical significance. However, in colorectal cancer group, VEGF and iNOS expressions were increased importantly, but TSP-1 expression was not statistically different from healthy control group's expression. Both TSP-1 and VEGF expressions were correlated with iNOS expression distinctly but did not correlate with each other.Both pro-angiogeneic VEGF and antiangiogeneic TSP-1 expressions were found increased in our IBD groups, but in colorectal cancer group, only VEGF expression was increased. TSP-1 increases in IBD patients as a response to inflammatory condition, but this increase was not enough to suppress pathologic angiogenesis and inflammation in IBD.

  19. Minimally invasive approaches for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marco Zoccali; Alessandro Fichera

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in medical management of inflammatory bowel disease,many of these patients still require surgery at some point in the course of their disease.Their young age and poor general conditions,worsened by the aggressive medical treatments,make minimally invasive approaches particularly enticing to this patient population.However,the typical inflammatory changes that characterize these diseases have hindered wide diffusion of laparoscopy in this setting,currently mostly pursued in high-volume referral centers,despite accumulating evidences in the literature supporting the benefits of minimally invasive surgery.The largest body of evidence currently available for terminal ileal Crohn's disease shows improved short term outcomes after laparoscopic surgery,with prolonged operative times.For Crohn's colitis,high quality evidence supporting laparoscopic surgery is lacking.Encouraging preliminary results have been obtained with the adoption of laparoscopic restorative total proctocolectomy for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.A consensus about patients' selection and the need for staging has not been reached yet.Despite the lack of conclusive evidence,a wave of enthusiasm is pushing towards less invasive strategies,to further minimize surgical trauma,with single incision laparoscopic surgery being the most realistic future development.

  20. Probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease--therapeutic rationale and role.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    The intestinal flora has a conditioning effect on intestinal homeostasis, delivering regulatory signals to the epithelium, the mucosal immune system and to the neuromuscular activity of the gut. Beneficial metabolic activities of the enteric flora include nutrient production, metabolism of dietary carcinogens, conversion of prodrugs to active drugs. However, increasing evidence suggests that some components of the enteric flora are essential ingredients in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); this has prompted interest in therapeutic manipulation of the flora with probiotics. Probiotics are biologic control agents-described as live microbial food supplements which confer a health benefit beyond inherent basic nutrition. Multiple potential beneficial effects have been attributed to the probiotic use of lactic acid bacteria, bifidobacteria and other non-pathogenic commensals. At present, much of the promise of probiotics remains outside the realm of evidence-based medicine and awaits the results of prospective trials, now underway. No reliable in vitro predictors of in vivo efficacy of putative probiotics have been identified. Rigorous comparisons of probiotic performance have not been performed and the suitability of a given probiotic for different individuals is largely unexplored. Notwithstanding, an improved understanding of the normal commensal flora and host-flora interactions has the potential to open up new therapeutic strategies for inflammatory disorders of the gut.

  1. Role of Incretin Axis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihua Duan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs, including Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract and involve a complicated reciprocity of environmental, genetic, and immunologic factors. Despite substantial advances in the foundational understanding of the immunological pathogenesis of IBD, the detailed mechanism of the pathological progression in IBD remains unknown. In addition to Th1/Th2 cells, whose role in IBD has been previously well defined, recent evidence indicates that Th17 cells and Tregs also play a crucial role in the development of IBD. Diets which contain excess sugars, salt, and fat may also be important actors in the pathogenesis of IBD, which may be the cause of high IBD incidence in western developed and industrialized countries. Up until now, the reason for the variance in prevalence of IBD between developed and developing countries has been unknown. This is partly due to the increasing popularity of western diets in developing countries, which makes the data harder to interpret. The enterocrinins glucagon-like peptides (GLPs, including GLP-1 and GLP-2, exhibit notable benefits on lipid metabolism, atherosclerosis formation, plasma glucose levels, and maintenance of gastric mucosa integrity. In addition to the regulation of nutrient metabolism, the emerging role of GLPs and their degrading enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 in gastrointestinal diseases has gained increasing attention. Therefore, here we review the function of the DPP-4/GLP axis in IBD.

  2. Catechins and Their Therapeutic Benefits to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Yan Fan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Catechins are natural polyphenolic phytochemicals that exist in food and medicinal plants, such as tea, legume and rubiaceae. An increasing number of studies have associated the intake of catechins-rich foods with the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases in humans, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Some studies have demonstrated that catechins could significantly inhibit the excessive oxidative stress through direct or indirect antioxidant effects and promote the activation of the antioxidative substances such as glutathione peroxidases (GPO and glutathione (GSH, reducing the oxidative damages to the colon. In addition, catechins can also regulate the infiltration and proliferation of immune related-cells, such as neutrophils, colonic epithelial cells, macrophages, and T lymphocytes, helping reduce the inflammatory relations and provide benefits to IBD. Perhaps catechins can further inhibit the deterioration of intestinal lesions through regulating the cell gap junctions. Furthermore, catechins can exert their significant anti-inflammatory properties by regulating the activation or deactivation of inflammation-related oxidative stress-related cell signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs, transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2, signal transducer and the activator of transcription 1/3 (STAT1/3 pathways. Finally, catechins can also stabilize the structure of the gastrointestinal micro-ecological environment via promoting the proliferation of beneficial intestinal bacteria and regulating the balance of intestinal flora, so as to relieve the IBD. Furthermore, catechins may regulate the tight junctions (TJ in the epithelium. This paper elaborates the currently known possible molecular mechanisms of catechins in favor of IBD.

  3. Changing treatment paradigms for the management of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jong Pil; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Joo Sung

    2018-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic and progressive inf lammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract causing bowel damage, hospitalizations, surgeries, and disability. Although there has been much progress in the management of IBD with established and evolving therapies, most current approaches have failed to change the natural course. Therefore, the treatment approach and follow-up of patients with IBD have undergone a significant change. Usage of immunosuppressants and/or biologics early during the course of the disease, known as top-down or accelerated step-up approach, was shown to be superior to conventional management in patients who had been recently diagnosed with IBD. This approach can be applied to selected groups based on prognostic factors to control disease activity and prevent progressive disease. Therapeutic targets have been shifted from clinical remission mainly based on symptoms to objective parameters such as endoscopic healing due to the discrepancies observed between symptoms, objectively evaluated inf lammatory activity, and intestinal damage. The concept of treat-to-target in IBD has been supported by population-based cohort studies, post hoc analysis of clinical trials, and meta-analysis, but more evidence is needed to support this concept to be applied to the clinical practice. In addition, individualized approach with tight monitoring of non-invasive biomarker such as C-reactive protein and fecal calprotectin and drug concentration has shown to improve clinical and endoscopic outcomes. An appropriate de-escalation strategy is considered based on patient demographics, disease features, current disease status, and patients' preferences.

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Associated with Virulence Factors in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, traditionally divided into Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). UC is a relapsing non-transmural chronic inflammatory disease that is restricted to the colon and during flares the diseas...

  5. Paediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical Presentation and Disease Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Danish Abdul; Moin, Maryum; Majeed, Atif; Sadiq, Kamran; Biloo, Abdul Gaffar

    2017-01-01

    To determine different clinical presentationsand disease location demarcatedby upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopyand relevant histopathologyin children diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This is 5 years (2010 to 2015) retrospective studyconducted at the Aga Khan University Hospitalenrolling65admitted children between 6 months to 15years from either gender, diagnosed with IBD on clinical presentation, endoscopy and biopsy. Different clinical presentations at the time of diagnosis were noted in different categories of the disease. All patients underwent upper and lower (up to the terminal ileum) endoscopy with multiple punch biopsies and histologic assessment of mucosal specimens. All endoscopies were done by paediatric gastroenterologists at endoscopy suite of the hospital and all specimens were reported by the pathology department. ESPGHAN revised criteria for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease in children and an adolescent was used to standardize our diagnosis. Extent of disease on endoscopy and relevant histopathology of the biopsy samples were noted at the time of diagnosis. Data was summarized using mean, standard deviation, numbers and percentages for different variables. Total 56 children were enrolled according to inclusion criteria. There were 34children (61.53%) diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC), 10 patients (16.92%) had Crohn'sDisease (CD) and 11 (21.53%) patients were labeled as Indeterminate colitis (IC). Mean age at onset of symptoms was10.03±2.44 and mean age at diagnosis was11.10±2.36. Abdominal pain (80%) and chronic diarrhea (70%) were common symptoms in CD whereas bloody diarrhea (79.41%) and rectal bleeding(64.70%)were common presentation in UC. Patients diagnosed with indeterminate colitis(IC) had similar clinical features as in UC patients. Only 7% patients had some extra-intestinal features in the form of joint pain and/or uveitis. Aspartate aminotransferase level (95.18 ±12.89) was relatively high in

  6. Review article: the gut microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease-avenues for microbial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, J; Ianiro, G; Mukhopadhya, I; Hansen, R; Hold, G L

    2018-01-01

    The concept of an altered collective gut microbiota rather than identification of a single culprit is possibly the most significant development in inflammatory bowel disease research. We have entered the "omics" era, which now allows us to undertake large-scale/high-throughput microbiota analysis which may well define how we approach diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the future, with a strong steer towards personalised therapeutics. To assess current epidemiological, experimental and clinical evidence of the current status of knowledge relating to the gut microbiome, and its role in IBD, with emphasis on reviewing the evidence relating to microbial therapeutics and future microbiome modulating therapeutics. A Medline search including items 'intestinal microbiota/microbiome', 'inflammatory bowel disease', 'ulcerative colitis', 'Crohn's disease', 'faecal microbial transplantation', 'dietary manipulation' was performed. Disease remission and relapse are associated with microbial changes in both mucosal and luminal samples. In particular, a loss of species richness in Crohn's disease has been widely observed. Existing therapeutic approaches broadly fall into 3 categories, namely: accession, reduction or indirect modulation of the microbiome. In terms of microbial therapeutics, faecal microbial transplantation appears to hold the most promise; however, differences in study design/methodology mean it is currently challenging to elegantly translate results into clinical practice. Existing approaches to modulate the gut microbiome are relatively unrefined. Looking forward, the future of microbiome-modulating therapeutics looks bright with several novel strategies/technologies on the horizon. Taken collectively, it is clear that ignoring the microbiome in IBD is not an option. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Dyadic confirmatory factor analysis of the inflammatory bowel disease family responsibility questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, Rachel Neff; Reed-Knight, Bonney; Blount, Ronald L; Wilson, Helen W

    2013-09-01

    Evaluate the factor structure of youth and maternal involvement ratings on the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Family Responsibility Questionnaire, a measure of family allocation of condition management responsibilities in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Participants included 251 youth aged 11-18 years with inflammatory bowel disease and their mothers. Item-level descriptive analyses, subscale internal consistency estimates, and confirmatory factor analyses of youth and maternal involvement were conducted using a dyadic data-analytic approach. Results supported the validity of 4 conceptually derived subscales including general health maintenance, social aspects, condition management tasks, and nutrition domains. Additionally, results indicated adequate support for the factor structure of a 21-item youth involvement measure and strong support for a 16-item maternal involvement measure. Additional empirical support for the validity of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Family Responsibility Questionnaire was provided. Future research to replicate current findings and to examine the measure's clinical utility is warranted.

  8. Pharmacology and optimization of thiopurines and methotrexate in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Steenholdt, Casper; de Boer, Nanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Improving the efficacy and reducing the toxicity of thiopurines and methotrexate (MTX) have been areas of intense basic and clinical research. An increased knowledge on pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of these immunomodulators has optimized treatment strategies in inflammatory bowel disease...

  9. Treg subsets in inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal carcinoma: Characteristics, role, and therapeutic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herk, Egbert H.; te Velde, Anje A.

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) play an important role in the regulation of autoimmunity, autoinflammation, allergic diseases, infection, and the tumor environment. Different subsets are characterized that use a number of regulatory mechanisms. Tregs can influence the progression of inflammatory bowel

  10. The association between the gut microbiota and the inflammatory bowel disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosberg, Michelle V; Bendtsen, Flemming; Vind, Ida

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) involves complex interactions between the microbiome and the immune system. We evaluated the association between the gut microbiota and disease activity in IBD patients. METHODS: Systematic review of clinical studies based...

  11. Filiform serrated adenomatous polyposis arising in a diverted rectum of an inflammatory bowel disease patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Mogensen, Anne Mellon; Jespersen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Klarskov L, Mogensen AM, Jespersen N, Ingeholm P, Holck S. Filiform serrated adenomatous polyposis arising in a diverted rectum of an inflammatory bowel disease patient. APMIS 2011; 119: 393-8. A 54-year-old man, previously colectomized for inflammatory bowel disease, developed carcinoma in the i......Klarskov L, Mogensen AM, Jespersen N, Ingeholm P, Holck S. Filiform serrated adenomatous polyposis arising in a diverted rectum of an inflammatory bowel disease patient. APMIS 2011; 119: 393-8. A 54-year-old man, previously colectomized for inflammatory bowel disease, developed carcinoma...... during the adenoma carcinoma sequence included the acquisition of CK7 expression in the malignant portion. Gastric mucin may play a role in the initial step of the neoplastic evolution and CK7 may denote neoplastic progression. This case confirms the notion of a widely variegated morphology of precursor...

  12. Evaluation of a psychoeducational intervention for adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, M.A.; Maurice-Stam, H.; Derkx, B.H.; Last, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprising Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and indeterminate colitis, often has its onset in adolescence. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a psychoeducational group intervention (aiming to enhance information seeking and giving about

  13. Patients’ Diets and Preferences in a Pediatric Population with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Green

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the dietary practices of the pediatric inflammatory bowel disease population at the Children's Hospital of the Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation and the reported effectiveness of those diets.

  14. Are Probiotics or Prebiotics useful in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eGuandalini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are notoriously either inadequate (IBS or loaded with potentially serious side effects and risks (IBD. In recent years a growing interest for effective and safer alternatives has focused on the potential role of probiotics and their metabolic substrates, prebiotics. It is in fact conceivable that the microbiome might be targeted by providing the metabolic fuel needed for the growth and expansion of beneficial microorganisms (prebiotics or by administering to the host such microorganisms (probiotics. This review presents a concise update on currently available data, with a special emphasis on children.Data for prebiotics in IBS are scarce. Low doses have shown a beneficial effect, while high doses are counterproductive. On the contrary, several controlled trials of probiotics have yielded encouraging results. A meta-analysis including 9 randomized clinical trials in children showed an improvement in abdominal pain for Lactobacillus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and the probiotic mixture VSL#3. The patients most benefitting from probiotics were those with predominant diarrhea or with a post-infectious IBS. In IBD, the use of prebiotics has been tested only rarely and in small scale clinical trials, with mixed results. As for probiotics, data in humans from about 3 dozens clinical trials offer mixed outcomes. So far none of the tested probiotics has proven successful in Crohn’s disease, while in ulcerative colitis a recent meta-analysis on 12 clinical trials (1 of them in children showed efficacy for the probiotic mixture VSL#3 in contributing to induce and to maintain remission. It is evident that this is a rapidly evolving and promising field; more data are very likely to yield a better understanding on what strains and in what doses should be used in different specific clinical settings.

  15. High prevalence of morphometric vertebral deformities in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heijckmann, AC; Huijberts, MSP; Schoon, EJ; GEUSENS, Piet; de Vries, J.; Menheere, Paul P. C. A.; van der Veer, E.; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; Stockbrugger, RW; Dumitrescu, B; Kruseman, ACN

    2008-01-01

    Background Earlier studies have documented that the prevalence of decreased bone mineral density (BMD) is elevated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of vertebral deformities in inflammatory bowel disease patients and their relation with BMD and bone turnover. Methods One hundred and nine patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and 72 with ulcerative colitis (UC) (age 44.5 +/- 14.2 years) were studied. BMD of the hip (by dual ...

  16. Lifestyle Issues in Inflammatory Bowel Disease – Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Benoni

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available During the pa t decade, smoking habit has been identified as a major exogenous factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. It is associated not only with the development of the disease but al o with the clinical course in established disease. IBD combines absolute opposites as smoking is associated with Crohn’s disease and nonsmoking or former smoking with ulcerative colitis. The first reports of a negative association between smoking and ulcerative colitis were based on independent, clinical observations; from those studies a positive association was found between smoking and Crohn’s disease. Epidemiological studies that followed consistently showed that smokers have a reduced risk of ulcerative colitis and an increased risk of Crohn’s disease and that exsmokers have an increased risk of ulcerative colitis. In ulcerative colitis, but not in Crohn’s disease, a dose-response pattern has been demonstrated. Changes in clinical course, in disease severity and extension, and in recurrence rate indicate substantial clinical effects of smoking with a protective effect of smoking in ulcerative colitis and an aggravating effect in Crohn’s disease. There are also indications of smoking’s effects on changes in IBD epidemiology and sex distribution. The biological explanation to the finding is unknown. Smoking may aggravate Crohn’s disease by vascular effects. Theories on the protective effect in ulcerative colitis include effects on immune and inflammatory response, on mucus and on intestinal permeability. Possibly, beneficial effects in ulcerative colitis are exerted by nicotine but further studies are needed. Due to overall negative effects of smoking, IBD patients should not smoke. It seems, however, reasonable to give individual advice in patients with ulcerative colitis who have experienced a beneficial effect of ·making considering both current health status and life situation.

  17. Perinatal outcome in women with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotr, Woźniak; Brucka-Kaczor, Aleksandra; Ewelina, Litwińska; Przemysław, Oszukowski; Agnieszka, Pięta-Dolińska

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a lifelong, chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. IBD morbidity rate in Europe has been steadily growing for the last six decades. Women with IBD are often diagnosed during the childbearing years, which makes the influence of the disease on pregnancy and birth outcomes an important clinical issue. The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of the IBD process among pregnant women on maternal, fetal and neonatal parameters. A retrospective analysis of data on patients suffering from IBD, diagnosed before pregnancy who were admitted to the Department of Perinatology and Gynecology Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital Research Institute for delivery between 2009-2013, was conducted. IBD was diagnosed in 10 cases. The control group consisted of 10 healthy pregnant women near delivery IBD activity status at conception in women receiving continuous mesalazine treatment does not correlate with gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score or maternal platelet count at delivery in comparison to controls. IBD patients under mesalazine management had lower: i) maternal body mass index and platelet count, ii) neonatal birth weight and Apgar score as compared to controls. However, no impact of IBD on the frequency of congenital anomalies was noted. To the best of our knowledge, this has been the first study conducted among pregnant women with IBD in Poland. The analysis demonstrates that pharmacological treatment has a deteriorating influence on maternal weight gain in pregnancy as well as production and activity of platelets. Moreover, it diminishes fetal growth and worsens short-term neonatal condition. Further studies with larger sample size are necessary but the rarity of this complication limits the possibility of research therapeutic perspectives.

  18. Biosimilars in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Facts and Fears of Extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Horin, Shomron; Vande Casteele, Niels; Schreiber, Stefan; Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2016-12-01

    Biologic drugs such as infliximab and other anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibodies have transformed the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]). However, the complex manufacturing processes involved in producing these drugs mean their use in clinical practice is expensive. Recent or impending expiration of patents for several biologics has led to development of biosimilar versions of these drugs, with the aim of providing substantial cost savings and increased accessibility to treatment. Biosimilars undergo an expedited regulatory process. This involves proving structural, functional, and biological biosimilarity to the reference product (RP). It is also expected that clinical equivalency/comparability will be demonstrated in a clinical trial in one (or more) sensitive population. Once these requirements are fulfilled, extrapolation of biosimilar approval to other indications for which the RP is approved is permitted without the need for further clinical trials, as long as this is scientifically justifiable. However, such justification requires that the mechanism(s) of action of the RP in question should be similar across indications and also comparable between the RP and the biosimilar in the clinically tested population(s). Likewise, the pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and safety of the RP should be similar across indications and comparable between the RP and biosimilar in the clinically tested population(s). To date, most anti-tumor necrosis factor biosimilars have been tested in trials recruiting patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Concerns have been raised regarding extrapolation of clinical data obtained in rheumatologic populations to IBD indications. In this review, we discuss the issues surrounding indication extrapolation, with a focus on extrapolation to IBD. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Differential patterns of histone acetylation in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adcock Ian M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Post-translational modifications of histones, particularly acetylation, are associated with the regulation of inflammatory gene expression. We used two animal models of inflammation of the bowel and biopsy samples from patients with Crohn's disease (CD to study the expression of acetylated histones (H 3 and 4 in inflamed mucosa. Acetylation of histone H4 was significantly elevated in the inflamed mucosa in the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of colitis particularly on lysine residues (K 8 and 12 in contrast to non-inflamed tissue. In addition, acetylated H4 was localised to inflamed tissue and to Peyer's patches (PP in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-treated rat models. Within the PP, H3 acetylation was detected in the mantle zone whereas H4 acetylation was seen in both the periphery and the germinal centre. Finally, acetylation of H4 was significantly upregulated in inflamed biopsies and PP from patients with CD. Enhanced acetylation of H4K5 and K16 was seen in the PP. These results demonstrate that histone acetylation is associated with inflammation and may provide a novel therapeutic target for mucosal inflammation.

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease and self-esteem in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfred, H; Saalman, R; Nilsson, S; Reichenberg, K

    2008-02-01

    To compare the self-esteem of adolescents suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with that of healthy adolescents, and to identify factors affecting self-esteem in the presence of IBD. A self-assessment questionnaire, 'I think I am' (ITIA), was completed by 71 (41 boys) out of 77 adolescents (10-16 years) with IBD. Of the participating adolescents, 23 had Crohn's disease, 44 had ulcerative colitis and 4 had indeterminate colitis. The self-esteem of adolescents with IBD was compared with that of 1037 school children. In this population-based study, children with IBD estimated their self-esteem in the same range as healthy adolescents. Using a multiple regression analysis, the self-esteem of adolescents with IBD was related to disease course severity and cohabitation status of parents. Children with severe disease and children of single parents were found to be most at risk of low self-esteem. This study shows that, as a group, adolescents with IBD have self-esteem in the same range as their healthy peers, but that there are some adolescents with IBD who are at risk of low self-esteem. Special attention should be given to adolescents with a severe disease course and to those with separated parents.

  1. EHealth Technologies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Belinda D; Gray, Kathleen; Knowles, Simon R; De Cruz, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Electronic-health technologies (eHealth) such as Web-based interventions, virtual clinics, smart-phone applications, and telemedicine are being used to manage patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to: (1) Evaluate the impact of eHealth technologies on conventional clinical indices and patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) in IBD; (2) assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and feasibility of using eHealth technologies to facilitate the self-management of individuals with IBD, and; (3) provide recommendations for their design and optimal use for patient care. Relevant publications were identified via a literature search, and 17 publications were selected based on predefined quality parameters. Six randomized controlled trials and nine observational studies utilizing eHealth technologies in IBD were identified. Compared with standard outpatient-led care, eHealth technologies have led to improvements in: Relapse duration [(n = 1) 18 days vs 77 days, p eHealth studies include heterogeneity of outcome measures, lack of clinician/patient input, lack of validation against conventional clinical indices and PROs, and limited cost-benefit analyses. EHealth technologies have the potential for promoting self-management and reducing the impact of the growing burden of IBD on health care resource utilization. A theoretical framework should be applied to the development, implementation, and evaluation of eHealth interventions. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Genetic characteristics of inflammatory bowel disease in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyuno, Yuta; Yamazaki, Keiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esaki, Motohiro; Kawaguchi, Takaaki; Takazoe, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Motoya, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yasuo; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Kitazono, Takanari; Kubo, Michiaki

    2016-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 163 susceptibility loci for IBD among European populations; however, there is limited information for IBD susceptibility in a Japanese population. We performed a GWAS using imputed genotypes of 743 IBD patients (372 with CD and 371 with UC) and 3321 controls. Using 100 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (P Japanese and European populations. In the IBD GWAS, two East Asia-specific IBD susceptibility loci were identified in the Japanese population: ATG16L2-FCHSD2 and SLC25A15-ELF1-WBP4. Among 163 reported SNPs in European IBD patients, significant associations were confirmed in 18 (8 CD-specific, 4 UC-specific, and 6 IBD-shared). In Japanese CD patients, genes in the Th17-IL23 pathway showed stronger genetic effects, whereas the association of genes in the autophagy pathway was limited. The association of genes in the epithelial barrier and the Th17-IL23R pathways were similar in the Japanese and European UC populations. We confirmed two IBD susceptibility loci as common for CD and UC, and East Asian-specific. The genetic architecture in UC appeared to be similar between Europeans and East Asians, but may have some differences in CD.

  3. Childhood inflammatory bowel disease: Parental concerns and expectations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AS Day; KE Whitten; TD Bohane

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To document the concerns and expectations of parents of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)within the context of a multidisciplinary IBD clinic, and to highlight the importance of a holistic approach to the care of these children.METHODS: The parents of 60 children with IBD were surveyed by mailed questionnaire. Parents were asked to provide details of their concerns regarding their child's condition and to express their expectations of medical care. In addition, enquiry was made in respect to the respondents' learning about IBD.RESULTS: Forty-six questionnaires (77%) returned. Fiftytwo percent of the patients were male. Patients were aged a mean of 10.9 (±4.1) years and diagnosed at an average age of 2.1 (±1.8) years previously. The most common concerns expressed by the parents related to the side- effects of medications and the future prospects for their child. Overall, parents were satisfied with aspects of care within the IBD clinic but many suggested additional personnel such as counselors or educators should be available. Parents also reported the need for continuing education and easy access to up-to-date information.CONCLUSION: Parents of children and adolescents with IBD have many common concerns regarding their child's condition. On-going attention to holistic care, including psychosocial and educational elements for patients and families, is appropriate in the context of the chronic and unpredictable nature of IBD.

  4. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn's disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B 12 , folic acid and homocysteine. Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn's disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease.

  5. Antilaminaribioside and antichitobioside antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejchrt, S; Drahosová, M; Kopácová, M; Cyrany, J; Douda, T; Pintér, M; Bures, J

    2008-01-01

    Testing antilaminaribioside (ALCA) and antichitobioside (ACCA) antibodies in 89 Crohn's disease (CD), 31 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 50 controls, mean values were 38.6 and 53.0 ELISA units for CD, 34.0 and 32.6 for UC, 34.5 and 36.4 for controls, respectively. There was no significant difference of ALCA values between CD and UC (p = 0.401), CD and control subjects (p = 0.698) or UC and controls (p = 0.898). ACCA were significantly higher in CD compared with UC (p = 0.011) but not with the controls (p = 0.095). No significant difference of ACCA values between UC and controls (p = 0.107) was found. ALCA and ACCA values significantly correlated in CD (r = 0.548, p ACCA), the negative ones (to exclude CD) 25 (ALCA) and 86 % (ACCA). Small and/or large bowel involvement or disease type (i.e. stenosing, perforating or inflammatory) of CD did not differ in the two values. The idea that ALCA and ACCA may be useful either to differentiate between CD, UC and healthy subjects or to stratify CD was not confirmed.

  6. Molecular Pathophysiology of Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Y. Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, the scientific community has explored myriads of theories in search of the etiology and a cure for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. The cumulative evidence has pointed to the key role of the intestinal barrier and the breakdown of these mechanisms in IBD. More and more scientists and clinicians are embracing the concept of the impaired intestinal epithelial barrier and its role in the pathogenesis and natural history of IBD. However, we are missing a key tool that bridges these scientific insights to clinical practice. Our goal is to overcome the limitations in understanding the molecular physiology of intestinal barrier function and develop a clinical tool to assess and quantify it. This review article explores the proteins in the intestinal tissue that are pivotal in regulating intestinal permeability. Understanding the molecular pathophysiology of impaired intestinal barrier function in IBD may lead to the development of a biochemical method of assessing intestinal tissue integrity which will have a significant impact on the development of novel therapies targeting the intestinal mucosa.

  7. Effects of inflammatory bowel disease on students' adjustment to college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadani, S Bashar; Adler, Jeremy; Browning, Jeff; Green, Elan H; Helvie, Karla; Rizk, Rafat S; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2014-12-01

    Successful adjustment to college is required for academic success. We investigated whether inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) activity affects this adjustment process. We created an online survey that included a Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire (SACQ), a general quality of life survey (SF-12), a disease-specific short IBD quality of life survey (SIBDQ), and disease activity indices. Undergraduate students across the United States were recruited via social media. Surveys were completed by 65 students with Crohn's disease (CD), 28 with ulcerative colitis, and 214 healthy students (controls). Disease-specific quality of life (SIBDQ results) correlated with IBD disease activity (rho = -0.79; P academic work (P academic challenges (P academically successful (P academics-especially among students with CD. Successful adjustment is important for academic success, affecting graduation rates and future economic success. Strategies to increase disease control and provide social and emotional support during college could improve adjustment to college and academic performance, and increase patients' potential. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Profiles of Patients Who Use Marijuana for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlin, Ann Marie; Long, Millie; Kappelman, Michael; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S

    2018-06-01

    Marijuana is legal in a number of states for indications that include inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and patients are interested in its potential benefits. We aimed to describe the legal use of marijuana in individuals with IBD in the USA who participate within the CCFA Partners internet-based cohort. A total of 2357 participants who lived in states where prescription or recreational marijuana was legal, were offered the opportunity to complete a survey on marijuana use and IBD symptoms including perceived benefits of therapy. Bivariate statistics and logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with marijuana use. Surveys were completed by 1666 participants (71%) with only 214 (12.8%) indicating they had asked their medical doctor about its use and 73 actually using prescribed marijuana (4.4%). Within the respondent group (N = 1666), 234 participants lived where both medical and recreational marijuana is legal and 49 (20.9%) reported recreational marijuana use specifically for IBD. Users reported positive benefits (80.7%), but users also reported more depression, anxiety, pain interference, and lower social satisfaction than non-users. Those prescribed marijuana reported more active disease, and more use of steroids, narcotics, and zolpidem. Few IBD patients consulted their medical doctors about marijuana use or used prescription marijuana. Where recreational marijuana was available, usage rates were higher. Users reported benefits but also more IBD symptoms, depression, anxiety, and pain. Marijuana use may be higher in patients with IBD symptoms not well treated by conventional medical approaches.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease in the Western Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawaja, Azhar Q; Sawan Ali S

    2009-01-01

    To observe the pattern of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) among the people of Western region of Saudi Arabia, and to correlate the findings with published data. This is a retrospective study. All colonic biopsies were reviewed which were received, and processed at the Histopathology Department of King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from January 2002 to July 2007. Ethical approval was obtained from the Bioethical and Research Committee. There were 711 colonic biopsies received during this period. One hundred and twenty-two patients were diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC). There were 65 males and 57 females. The age ranged between 4-73 years. Most of the UC patients presented in adolescence, and in the adult age. Crohn's disease (CD) was diagnosed in 15 patients, 7 males and 8 females. The age ranged from 1-40 years. Most of the cases were seen in the adult age group. We conclude that IBD is certainly one of the major serious colonic lesions in our society, which should be thoroughly investigated by the combined efforts of clinicians and pathologists. We also conclude that gastrointestinal tuberculosis and infective colitis should always be investigated before suggesting the specific diagnosis of IBD. We recommend a broad based epidemiological study, simultaneously involving clinicians, and pathologists, to document the characteristics of this disease in our society. (author)

  10. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease: Potential role of molecular biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Koma, Amosy E

    2014-11-27

    Accurate diagnosis of predominantly colonic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not possible in 30% of patients. For decades, scientists have worked to find a solution to improve diagnostic accuracy for IBD, encompassing Crohn's colitis and ulcerative colitis. Evaluating protein patterns in surgical pathology colectomy specimens of colonic mucosal and submucosal compartments, individually, has potential for diagnostic medicine by identifying integrally independent, phenotype-specific cellular and molecular characteristics. Mass spectrometry (MS) and imaging (I) MS are analytical technologies that directly measure molecular species in clinical specimens, contributing to the in-depth understanding of biological molecules. The biometric-system complexity and functional diversity is well suited to proteomic and diagnostic studies. The direct analysis of cells and tissues by Matrix-Assisted-Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) MS/IMS has relevant medical diagnostic potential. MALDI-MS/IMS detection generates molecular signatures obtained from specific cell types within tissue sections. Herein discussed is a perspective on the use of MALDI-MS/IMS and bioinformatics technologies for detection of molecular-biometric patterns and identification of differentiating proteins. I also discuss a perspective on the global challenge of transferring technologies to clinical laboratories dealing with IBD issues. The significance of serologic-immunometric advances is also discussed.

  11. Multi-omics analysis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hu; Vangay, Pajau; McKinlay, Christopher E; Knights, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, known together as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are severe autoimmune disorders now causing gut inflammation and ulceration, among other symptoms, in up to 1 in 250 people worldwide. Incidence and prevalence of IBD have been increasing dramatically over the past several decades, although the causes for this increase are still unknown. IBD has both a complex genotype and a complex phenotype, and although it has received substantial attention from the medical research community over recent years, much of the etiology remains unexplained. Genome-wide association studies have identified a rich genetic signature of disease risk in patients with IBD, consisting of at least 163 genetic loci. Many of these loci contain genes directly involved in microbial handling, indicating that the genetic architecture of the disease has been driven by host-microbe interactions. In addition, systematic shifts in gut microbiome structure (enterotype) and function have been observed in patients with IBD. Furthermore, both the host genotype and enterotype are associated with aspects of the disease phenotype, including location of the disease. This provides strong evidence of interactions between host genotype and enterotype; however, there is a lack of published multi-omics data from IBD patients, and a lack of bioinformatics tools for modeling such systems. In this article we discuss, from a computational biologist's point of view, the potential benefits of and the challenges involved in designing and analyzing such multi-omics studies of IBD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diet, gut microbes, and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Kyle T; Chang, Eugene B

    2017-01-01

    The rising incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases in recent decades has notably paralleled changing lifestyle habits in Western nations, which are now making their way into more traditional societies. Diet plays a key role in IBD pathogenesis, and there is a growing appreciation that the interaction between diet and microbes in a susceptible person contributes significantly to the onset of disease. In this review, we examine what is known about dietary and microbial factors that promote IBD. We summarize recent findings regarding the effects of diet in IBD epidemiology from prospective population cohort studies, as well as new insights into IBD-associated dysbiosis. Microbial metabolism of dietary components can influence the epithelial barrier and the mucosal immune system, and understanding how these interactions generate or suppress inflammation will be a significant focus of IBD research. Our knowledge of dietary and microbial risk factors for IBD provides important considerations for developing therapeutic approaches through dietary modification or re-shaping the microbiota. We conclude by calling for increased sophistication in designing studies on the role of diet and microbes in IBD pathogenesis and disease resolution in order to accelerate progress in response to the growing challenge posed by these complex disorders. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ugo, S; Stasi, E; Gaspari, A L; Sileri, P

    2015-12-01

    Perianal disease is a common complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It includes different conditions from more severe and potentially disabling ones, such as abscesses and fistulas, to more benign conditions such as hemorrhoids, skin tags and fissures. Most literature has been focused on anal sepsis and fistulae, as they carry the majority of disease burden and often alter the natural course of the disease. Hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with IBD have been overlooked, although they can represent a challenging problem. The management of hemorrhoids and fissures in IBD patients may be difficult and may significantly differ compared to the non-affected population. Historically surgery was firmly obstructed, and hemorrhoidectomy or sphincterotomy in patients with associated diagnosis of IBD was considered harmful, although literature data is scant and based on small series. Various authors reported an incidence of postoperative complications higher in IBD than in the general populations, with potential severe events. Considering that a spontaneous healing is possible, the first line management should be a medical therapy. In patients non-responding to conservative measures it is possible a judicious choice of surgical options on a highly selective basis; this can lead to acceptable results, but the risk of possible complications needs to be considered. In this review it is analyzed the current literature on the incidence, symptoms and treatment options of hemorrhoids and anal fissures in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

  14. Association between Polymorphisms in Antioxidant Genes and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Costa Pereira

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the driving force in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and its link to oxidative stress and carcinogenesis has long been accepted. The antioxidant system of the intestinal mucosa in IBD is compromised resulting in increased oxidative injury. This defective antioxidant system may be the result of genetic variants in antioxidant genes, which can represent susceptibility factors for IBD, namely Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the antioxidant genes SOD2 (rs4880 and GPX1 (rs1050450 were genotyped in a Portuguese population comprising 436 Crohn's disease and 367 ulcerative colitis patients, and 434 healthy controls. We found that the AA genotype in GPX1 is associated with ulcerative colitis (OR = 1.93, adjusted P-value = 0.037. Moreover, we found nominal significant associations between SOD2 and Crohn's disease susceptibility and disease subphenotypes but these did not withstand the correction for multiple testing. These findings indicate a possible link between disease phenotypes and antioxidant genes. These results suggest a potential role for antioxidant genes in IBD pathogenesis and should be considered in future association studies.

  15. Marijuana use patterns among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikoff Allegretti, Jessica; Courtwright, Andrew; Lucci, Matthew; Korzenik, Joshua R; Levine, Jonathan

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence and perceived effectiveness of marijuana use has not been well studied in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) despite increasing legal permission for its use in Crohn's disease. Health care providers have little guidance about the IBD symptoms that may improve with marijuana use. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, sociodemographic characteristics, and perceived benefits of marijuana use among patients with IBD. Prospective cohort survey study of marijuana use patterns in patients with IBD at an academic medical center. A total of 292 patients completed the survey (response rate = 94%); 12.3% of patients were active marijuana users, 39.0% were past users, and 48.6% were never users. Among current and past users, 16.4% of patients used marijuana for disease symptoms, the majority of whom felt that marijuana was "very helpful" for relief of abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea. On multivariate analysis, age and chronic abdominal pain were associated with current marijuana use (odds ratio [OR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-0.97; P marijuana (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.89-0.97; P marijuana for abdominal pain, were it legally available. A significant number of patients with IBD currently use marijuana. Most patients find it very helpful for symptom control, including patients with ulcerative colitis, who are currently excluded from medical marijuana laws. Clinical trials are needed to determine marijuana's potential as an IBD therapy and to guide prescribing decisions.

  16. Childhood inflammatory bowel disease: parental concerns and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, A-S; Whitten, K-E; Bohane, T-D

    2005-02-21

    To document the concerns and expectations of parents of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) within the context of a multidisciplinary IBD clinic, and to highlight the importance of a holistic approach to the care of these children. The parents of 60 children with IBD were surveyed by mailed questionnaire. Parents were asked to provide details of their concerns regarding their child's condition and to express their expectations of medical care. In addition, enquiry was made in respect to the respondents' learning about IBD. Forty-six questionnaires (77%) returned. Fifty-two percent of the patients were male. Patients were aged a mean of 10.9 (+/-4.1) years and diagnosed at an average age of 2.1 (+/-1.8) years previously. The most common concerns expressed by the parents related to the side- effects of medications and the future prospects for their child. Overall, parents were satisfied with aspects of care within the IBD clinic but many suggested additional personnel such as counselors or educators should be available. Parents also reported the need for continuing education and easy access to up-to-date information. Parents of children and adolescents with IBD have many common concerns regarding their child's condition. On-going attention to holistic care, including psychosocial and educational elements for patients and families, is appropriate in the context of the chronic and unpredictable nature of IBD.

  17. Management of inflammatory bowel disease with Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aoust, Julie; Battat, Robert; Bessissow, Talat

    2017-07-21

    To address the management of Clostridium difficile ( C. difficile ) infection (CDI) in the setting of suspected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-flare. A systematic search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases by independent reviewers identified 70 articles including a total of 932141 IBD patients or IBD-related hospitalizations. In those with IBD, CDI is associated with increased morbidity, including subsequent escalation in IBD medical therapy, urgent colectomy and increased hospitalization, as well as excess mortality. Vancomycin-containing regimens are effective first-line therapies for CDI in IBD inpatients. No prospective data exists with regards to the safety or efficacy of initiating or maintaining corticosteroid, immunomodulator, or biologic therapy to treat IBD in the setting of CDI. Corticosteroid use is a risk factor for the development of CDI, while immunomodulators and biologics are not. Strong recommendations regarding when to initiate IBD specific therapy in those with CDI are precluded by a lack of evidence. However, based on expert opinion and observational data, initiation or resumption of immunosuppressive therapy after 48-72 h of targeted antibiotic treatment for CDI may be considered.

  18. Lymphogranuloma venereum proctitis: a differential diagnose to inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høie, Sverre; Knudsen, Lene Surland; Gerstoft, Jan

    2011-04-01

    Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually transmitted disease, endemic in tropical and subtropical areas for many years. After 2003 there have been several outbreaks in western countries, especially among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). An important manifestation of LGV is a proctitis, with a clinical presentation and endoscopic findings resembling those of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). LGV is considered new in Scandinavia. This case report focuses on difficulties in differentiating LGV and IBD. This case report used a systematic search in the literature using PubMed and clinical cases from the Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark (Cases 1-3) and the Section of Surgery, Hamar Hospital, Norway (Case 4). Clinical and endoscopic findings in LGV and IBD resemble each other. All cases were MSM. Three out of four were HIV-positive. Three out of four contacted their general practitioner (GP) due to gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, and were referred to a gastroenterologist (GE) with suspicion of IBD. Because of non-successful IBD treatment, control of HIV status, relapses of GI-symptoms or extended information concerning sexual habits, LGV was suspected and diagnosed. All patients responded with remission of GI-symptoms and endoscopic findings after oral treatment with doxycycline. Due to similarities between LGV and IBD, LGV should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with proctitis or IBD-related symptoms, especially among HIV-positive men. Hence LGV patients may be spared long-lasting examination, mistreatment and surgery.

  19. Endoscopic Therapeutic Approach for Dysplasia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Noh Hong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-standing intestinal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD induces dysplastic change in the intestinal mucosa and increases the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer. The evolving endoscopic techniques and technologies, including dye spraying methods and high-definition images, have been replacing random biopsies and have been revealed as more practical and efficient for detection of dysplasia in IBD patients. In addition, they have potential usefulness in detailed characterization of lesions and in the assessment of endoscopic resectability. Most dysplastic lesions without an unclear margin, definite ulceration, non-lifting sign, and high index of malignant change with suspicion for lymph node or distant metastases can be removed endoscopically. However, endoscopic resection of dysplasia in chronic IBD patients is usually difficult because it is often complicated by submucosal fibrosis. In patients with dysplasias that demonstrate submucosa fibrosis or a large size (≥20 mm, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD or ESD with snaring (simplified or hybrid ESD is an alternative option and may avoid a colectomy. However, a standardized endoscopic therapeutic approach for dysplasia in IBD has not been established yet, and dedicated specialized endoscopists with interest in IBD are needed to fully investigate recent emerging techniques and technologies.

  20. Hypnotherapy for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Across the Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigethy, Eva

    2015-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by lifelong relapsing gastrointestinal symptoms and associated with high rates of chronic pain, depression, and anxiety. In this review the author covers the existing literature including randomized controlled studies, open trials, and case reports as well as expert opinion in evaluating how hypnotherapy can be most beneficial in adolescents and adults with IBD. Hypnotherapy evidence for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) is also reviewed as many of the gut-focused hypnotherapy (GHT) approaches used in IBD trials were developed for this latter population. Collectively, the strongest evidence of use of hypnotherapy is its association with reduced IBD-related inflammation and improved health-related quality of life with mixed results in terms of its effects on psychological and pain outcomes in adults with IBD. Studies of hypnotherapy for FGID symptoms show consistently more positive results. Post-operative hypnotherapy may also be helpful based on findings in other surgical samples. Adolescents with IBD have not been as systematically studied but small case series support the use of hypnotherapy to improve inflammation and pain. Future studies are needed to better delineate the specific brain-gut pathways which are most influenced by hypnotherapy in the IBD population and to investigate the longer-term course of the positive short-term findings.

  1. Optimization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Cohort Studies in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Wai K

    2015-07-01

    With the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) increasing rapidly in many Asian countries, including Hong Kong, it is important that patient characteristics are better understood. For example, are the phenotypes, behaviors, complications, and even treatment responses found in Asian patients similar to those of their Western counterparts? To formally address these questions, a properly designed local cohort study is needed. Whilst IBD is still relatively uncommon in Asia, the establishment of a local IBD registry will significantly contribute to the answering of these questions. The Hong Kong IBD registry was established to fill the gap in the understanding of IBD patients, and to foster research into IBD in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong IBD registry is a territory-wide registry that includes all public hospitals in Hong Kong. We included all IBD patients who were currently receiving medical care at these hospitals. With the help of the central computer medical record system of the Hospital Authority of Hong Kong, all clinical events, medications usage, endoscopy records, and laboratory results of patients in the registry were captured. Apart from data collection, the registry is also establishing a bio-specimen bank of blood and stool samples of IBD patients for future research. The IBD registry is a very useful platform for population-based studies on IBD in Asia.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease in children of middle eastern descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Christina Mai Ying; Leach, Steven T; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are now seen in populations where it was once uncommon. The pattern of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent in Australia has never been reported. This study aimed to investigate the burden of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent at the Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick (SCHR). The SCHR IBD database was used to identify patients of self-reported Middle Eastern ethnicity diagnosed between 1987 and 2011. Demographic, diagnosis, and management data was collected for all Middle Eastern children and an age and gender matched non-Middle Eastern IBD control group. Twenty-four patients of Middle Eastern descent were identified. Middle Eastern Crohn's disease patients had higher disease activity at diagnosis, higher use of thiopurines, and less restricted colonic disease than controls. Although there were limitations with this dataset, we estimated a higher prevalence of IBD in Middle Eastern children and they had a different disease phenotype and behavior compared to the control group, with less disease restricted to the colon and likely a more active disease course.

  3. News and controversy in inflammatory bowel disease treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Straforini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The treatment of Inflammatory bowel disease comes from many years of esperience, clinical trials and mistakes. Discussion: In patients with active Crohn disease steroids are considerated the first choice, but recently, the introduction of anti-TNF alfa agents (infliximab and adalimumab has changed the protocols. Anti-TNF are also used for closing fistula after surgical curettage. An efficently preventive treatment of Crohn disease still has not been found but hight dose of oral salicylates, azatioprine or 6-MP and antibiotics might be useful. In severe attacks of ulcerative colitis, high dose iv treatment of steroids are required for a few days. Later on, a further treatment with anti- TNF might delay the need of surgery. In patients with mild to moderate attacks of ulcerative colitis, topical treatment is preferred, it consists of enemas, suppositories or foams containing 5-aminosalycilic acid, traditional steroids, topical active steroids. Topical treatment can be associated with oral steroids or oral salicylates. Oral salicylates or azatioprine are used for prevention of relaps.

  4. Immunization history of children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Ing Shian; deBruyn, Jennifer C C; Wrobel, Iwona

    2013-04-01

    Protection against vaccine-preventable diseases is important in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) due to frequent immunosuppressive therapy use. The chronic relapsing nature and treatment regimen of IBD may necessitate modified timing of immunizations. To evaluate the completeness of immunizations in children with IBD. Immunization records of all children with IBD followed at the Alberta Children's Hospital (Calgary, Alberta) were reviewed. For children with incomplete immunization according to the province of Alberta schedule, the reasons for such were clarified. Demographic data and age at diagnosis were also collected. Immunization records were obtained from 145 (79%) children with IBD. Fifteen children had incomplete routine childhood immunizations, including two with no previous immunizations. The most common incomplete immunizations included hepatitis B (n=9), diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis at 14 to 16 years of age (n=7), and diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, inactivated polio at four to six years of age (n=6). The reasons for incomplete immunization included use of immunosuppressive therapy at time of scheduled immunization; IBD-related symptoms at time of scheduled immunization; parental refusal; recent move from elsewhere with different immunization schedule; unawareness of routine immunization; and needle phobia. Although the majority of children with IBD had complete childhood immunizations, suboptimal immunizations were present in 10%. With increasing use of immunosuppressive therapy in IBD, physicians caring for children with IBD must periodically evaluate immunization status and ensure the completeness of childhood immunizations.

  5. Current Landscape of Telemedicine Practice in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Seema A; Cross, Raymond K

    2018-04-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprised of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, affects 1.6 million people in the United States. Although effective medical treatments exist to treat the disease, outcomes are still suboptimal. The reasons for poor outcomes vary but include nonadherence to therapy, inadequate monitoring of patients, limited access to IBD specialty care, concurrent psychiatric disease, limited patient knowledge of the disease and treatments, and patient provider discordance. Telemedicine is a candidate intervention that can be used to improve patient outcomes through more frequent monitoring, patient self-management, delivery of education (patient and provider), and to increase access to multidisciplinary IBD care. Telemedicine includes remote monitoring, telehealth, teleconsultation, and teleconferencing.Telemedicine systems have been used in patients with IBD with widespread patient acceptance of the technology. However, early clinical trials demonstrated high attrition rates among intervention patients. In general, use of telemedicine systems have been associated with improved quality of life, improved patient knowledge, and decreased utilization of health care resources. Early studies evaluating telehealth visits report high patient satisfaction, decreased indirect costs to patients, and no decrease in quality of care delivered.Due to widespread access to computers and smart phones among patients, telemedicine will continue to expand in the care of patients with IBD. To optimize use and effectiveness of telemedicine, barriers for use including concerns over increased liability, need for informed consent, licensure restrictions to providing interstate telehealth visits, and cybersecurity need to be addressed.

  6. Prevalence of amebiasis in inflammatory bowel disease in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Sebnem; Dagci, Hande; Aksoy, Umit; Guruz, Yuksel; Ersoz, Galip

    2003-08-01

    To explore the prevalence of amebiasis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Turkey. In this study, amoeba prevalence in 160 cases of IBD, 130 of ulcerative colitis and 30 of Crohn's disease were investigated in fresh faeces by means of wet mount+Lugol's iodine staining, modified formol ethyl acetate and trichrome staining methods and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of wet mount+Lugol's iodine staining, modified formol ethyl acetate and trichrome staining methods in the diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica)/ Entamoeba dispar (E. dispar). E. histolytica/E. dispar cysts and trophozoites were found in 14 (8.75 %) of a total of 160 cases, 13 (10.0 %) of the 130 patients with ulcerative colitis and 1 (3.3 %) of the 30 patients with Crohn's disease. As for the 105 patients in the control group who had not any gastrointestinal complaints, 2 (1.90 %) patients were found to have E. histolytica /E. dispar cysts in their faeces. Parasite prevalence in the patient group was determined to be significantly higher than that in the control group (Fischer's Exact Test, Pparasites were compared with one another, the most effective one was found to be trichrome staining method (Kruskal-Wallis Test, Pprevalence compared to the normal population. The trichrome staining method is more effective for the detection of E. histolytica /E. dispar than the wet mount+Lugol's iodine staining, modified formol ethyl acetate methods.

  7. New serological markers in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Márta; Müller, Katalin Eszter; Papp, Mária; Lakatos, Péter László; Csöndes, Mihály; Veres, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of serological markers associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rapidly growing. Due to frequently delayed or missed diagnoses, the application of non-invasive diagnostic tests for IBD, as well as differentiation between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), would be useful in the pediatric population. In addition, the combination of pancreatic autoantibodies and antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies/perinuclear cytoplasmic antibody (pANCA) improved the sensitivity of serological markers in pediatric patients with CD and UC. Some studies suggested that age-associated differences in the patterns of antibodies may be present, particularly in the youngest children. In CD, most patients develop stricturing or perforating complications, and a significant number of patients undergo surgery during the disease course. Based on recent knowledge, serum antibodies are qualitatively and quantitatively associated with complicated CD behavior and CD-related surgery. Pediatric UC is characterized by extensive colitis and a high rate of colectomy. In patients with UC, high levels of anti-CBir1 and pANCA are associated with the development of pouchitis after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Thus, serologic markers for IBD can be applied to stratify IBD patients into more homogeneous subgroups with respect to disease progression. In conclusion, identification of patients at an increased risk of rapid disease progression is of great interest, as the application of early and more aggressive pharmaceutical intervention could have the potential to alter the natural history of IBD, and reduce complications and hospitalizations. PMID:24803798

  8. Progress with infliximab biosimilars for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Gonczi, Lorant; Lakatos, Peter L

    2018-04-29

    Biological therapies have revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in the last two decades. Though biological drugs are effective, their use is associated with high costs and access to biological agents varies among countries. As the patent for the reference products expired, the advent of biosimilar monoclonal antibodies has been expected. Biosimilars represent less expensive alternatives compared to the reference product. Areas covered: In this review, authors will review the literature on the clinical efficacy, safety and immunogenicity of current and future biosimilar infliximabs. Short- and medium-term data from real-life cohorts and from randomized-clinical trials in IBD demonstrated similar outcomes in terms of efficacy, safety and immunogenicity as the reference product for CT-P13. Switch data from the reference to the biosimilar product are also accumulating (including the NOR-SWITCH and the CT-P13 3.4 study). Expert opinion: The use of biosimilar infliximab in IBD is increasing worldwide. Its use may be associated with budget savings leading to better access to biological therapies and consequently improved health outcomes. Switching from the originator to a biosimilar in patients with IBD is acceptable, although scientific and clinical evidence is lacking regarding reverse switching, multiple switching, and cross-switching among biosimilars in IBD patients.

  9. Epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases from west to east.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Peter L

    2017-02-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) show considerable variation over time and across geographical regions. The first studies on the epidemiology of IBD were mainly from traditionally high-incidence areas, such as North America, and northern and western Europe. In the last two decades, more and more studies have been published from Eastern European and Asian countries with increasing incidence rates from some regions. According to recent studies, the high incidence and prevalence of IBD in some Western countries is plateauing and in some Eastern countries increasing incidences have been reported. In the era of new multicenter epidemiological studies with common methodology the direct comparison of incidences and prevalences has became possible. In the present review we summarized the currently available literatures on west-east differences in the incidences and prevalences of IBD. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Biosimilars for the management of inflammatory bowel diseases: economic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulacsi, Laszlo; Pentek, Marta; Rencz, Fanni; Brodszky, Valentin; Baji, Petra; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Gecse, Krisztina B; Danese, Silvio; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Lakatos, Peter L

    2017-04-06

    Biological drugs revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, not all clinically eligible patients have access to biologicals, due to significant costs and budget impact. Biosimilars are highly comparable to their originator product in terms of clinical efficacy and safety. Biosimilars are priced 15-75% lower than their reference product, which makes them a less costly alternative and is expected to offer better patients access to biologicals. The total projected cost savings are significant. If the achieved budget savings were used to cover more biological therapy, several additional IBD patients could be treated. Currently, the main barriers to the increasing uptake of biosimilars are the few incentives of the key stakeholders, while physicians' and patients' skepticism towards biosimilars seems to be changing. Over the coming years, biosimilars are expected to gain a growing importance in the treatment of IBD, contributing to a better access to treatment, improving population-level health gain and sustainability of health systems. This review summarizes the results of the literature on the economic considerations of biosimilars in IBD and the role of biosimilar infliximab in the treatment of IBD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Nanomedicine and drug delivery strategies for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takedatsu, Hidetoshi; Mitsuyama, Keiichi; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-10-28

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are two important categories of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Because the precise mechanisms of the inflammation and immune responses in IBD have not been fully elucidated, the treatment of IBD primarily aims to inhibit the pathogenic factors of the inflammatory cascade. Inconsistencies exist regarding the response and side effects of the drugs that are currently used to treat IBD. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nanomedicine might be advantageous for the treatment of intestinal inflammation because nano-sized molecules can effectively penetrate epithelial and inflammatory cells. We reviewed nanomedicine treatments, such as the use of small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, and anti-inflammatory molecules with delivery systems in experimental colitis models and clinical trials for IBD based on a systematic search. The efficacy and usefulness of the treatments reviewed in this manuscript have been demonstrated in experimental colitis models and clinical trials using various types of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine is expected to become a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of IBD.

  12. Is cytomegalovirus infection related to inflammatory bowel disease, especially steroid-resistant inflammatory bowel disease? A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ya-li Lv, Fei-fei Han, Yang-jie Jia, Zi-rui Wan, Li-li Gong, He Liu, Li-hong Liu Department of Pharmacy, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Numerous studies have been conducted to analyze the association between HCMV infection and risk of IBD and steroid-resistant IBD, but no clear consensus had been reached. Objectives: The aim of this study was to confirm this relationship precisely by doing a systematic review and meta-analysis. Study design: We identified relevant studies through a search of PubMed and Embase. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they 1 evaluated the association between HCMV infection and IBD disease; 2 evaluated the association between HCMV infection and steroid-resistant IBD disease; 3 were case–control studies or nested case–control studies; 4 provided the numbers (or percentage of positivity for HCMV infection in cases and controls, respectively. Data were extracted and analyzed independently by two investigators. Results and conclusion: A total of 18 studies including 1,168 patients and 951 health groups was identified, and HCMV infection was distinctly confirmed as a risk factor for the occurrence and development of IBD. When involving 17 studies including 1,306 IBD patients, a total of 52.9% of patients in the cytomegalovirus (CMV-positive groups were observed to have steroid resistance, compared with 30.2% of patients in the CMV-negative groups. There was a significant difference in the risk of steroid resistance between people exposed to HCMV infection and those not exposed HCMV infection in IBD patients. This meta-analysis suggested that HCMV infection is associated with an increased risk for IBD and steroid-resistant IBD. Keywords: cytomegalovirus, infection, inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, meta-analysis

  13. Impact of restless legs syndrome in patients with inflammatory bowel disease on sleep, fatigue, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindlbeck, Katharina A; Becker, Janek; Berger, Felix; Mehl, Arne; Rewitzer, Charlotte; Geffe, Sarah; Koch, Peter M; Preiß, Jan C; Siegmund, Britta; Maul, Jochen; Marzinzik, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease has been associated with neurological symptoms including restless legs syndrome. Here, we investigated the impact of restless legs syndrome in patients with inflammatory bowel disease on sleep, fatigue, mood, cognition, and quality of life. Two groups of inflammatory bowel disease patients, with and without restless legs syndrome, were prospectively evaluated for sleep disorders, fatigue, daytime sleepiness, depression, anxiety, and health-related quality of life. Furthermore, global cognitive function, executive function, attention, and concentration were assessed in both groups. Disease activity and duration of inflammatory bowel disease as well as current medication were assessed by interview. Inflammatory bowel disease patients with and without restless legs syndrome were matched for age, education, severity, and duration of their inflammatory bowel disease. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease and clinically relevant restless leg syndrome suffered significantly more frequent from sleep disturbances including sleep latency and duration, more fatigue, and worse health-related quality of life as compared to inflammatory bowel disease patients without restless legs syndrome. Affect and cognitive function including cognitive flexibility, attention, and concentration showed no significant differences among groups, indicating to be not related to restless legs syndrome. Sleep disorders including longer sleep latency, shorter sleep duration, and fatigue are characteristic symptoms of restless legs syndrome in inflammatory bowel disease patients, resulting in worse health-related quality of life. Therefore, clinicians treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease should be alert for restless legs syndrome.

  14. Management of Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dhruvan; Trivedi, Chinmay; Khan, Nabeel

    2018-03-01

    Anemia is the most common complication as well as an extra intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is associated with a significant impact on patient's quality of life (QoL); as well it represents a common cause of frequent hospitalization, delay of hospital inpatient discharge and overall increased healthcare burden. In spite of all these, anemia is still often underdiagnosed and undertreated. Our aim in this review is to provide a pathway for physicians to help them achieve early diagnosis as well as timely and appropriate treatment of anemia which in turn would hopefully reduce the prevalence and subsequent complications of this condition among IBD patients. The etiology of anemia among IBD patients is most commonly due to iron deficiency anemia (IDA) followed by anemia of chronic disease. Despite this, more than a third of anemic ulcerative colitis (UC) patients are not tested for IDA and among those tested and diagnosed with IDA, a quarter are not treated with iron replacement therapy. A new algorithm has been validated to predict who will develop moderate to severe anemia at the time of UC diagnosis. While oral iron is effective for the treatment of mild iron deficiency-related anemia, the absorption of iron is influenced by chronic inflammatory states as a consequence of the presence of elevated levels of hepcidin. Also, it is important to recognize that ferritin is elevated in chronic inflammatory states and among patients with active IBD, ferritin levels less than 100 are considered to be diagnostic of iron deficiency. Newer formulations of intra-venous (IV) iron have a good safety profile and can be used for replenishment of iron stores and prevention of iron deficiency in the future. Routine screening for anemia is important among patients with IBD. The cornerstone for the accurate management of anemia in IBD patients lies in accurately diagnosing the type of anemia. All IBD patients with IDA should be considered appropriate for

  15. An unusual white blood cell scan in a child with inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porn, U; Howman-Giles, R; O'Loughlin, E; Uren, R; Chaitow, J

    2000-10-01

    Technetium-99m-labeled leukocyte (WBC) imaging is a valuable screening method for inflammatory bowel disease, especially in children, because of its high rate of sensitivity, low cost, and ease of preparation. A 14-year-old girl is described who had juvenile arthritis and iritis complicated by inflammatory bowel disease. She was examined for recurrent abdominal pain. A Tc-99m stannous colloid WBC scan was performed, and tracer accumulation was seen in the small bowel in the region of the distal ileum on the initial 1-hour image. Delayed imaging at 3 hours also revealed tracer accumulation in the cecum and ascending colon, which was not seen on the early image. A biopsy of the colon during endoscopy showed no evidence of active inflammation in the colon. The small bowel was not seen. Computed tomography revealed changes suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease in the distal ileum. The appearance on the WBC study was most likely a result of inflammatory bowel disease involving the distal ileum, with transit of luminal activity into the large bowel.

  16. Vascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Gerarda Gravina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases, including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory conditions involving primarily the gastrointestinal tract. However, they may be also associated with systemic manifestations and comorbidities. The relationship between chronic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction has been extensively demonstrated. Mucosal immunity and gastrointestinal physiology are modified in inflammatory bowel diseases, and these modifications are mainly sustained by alterations of endothelial function. The key elements involved in this process are cytokines, inflammatory cells, growth factors, nitric oxide, endothelial adhesion molecules, and coagulation cascade factors. In this review, we discuss available data in literature concerning endothelial dysfunction in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease and we focus our attention on both pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapeutic targets.

  17. Age at diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease influences early development of colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease patients: A nationwide, long-term survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Baars (Judith); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); M. van Haastert (M.); J.J. Nicolai (Jan); A.C. Poen (Alexander); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data on clinical characteristics of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related colorectal cancer (CRC) are scarce and mainly originate from tertiary referral centres. We studied patient and disease characteristics of IBD-related CRC in a nationwide IBD cohort in

  18. Nitric oxide as a potential biomarker in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesina Avdagić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate changes in serum nitric oxide (NO concentration in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD patients and its use as potential biomarker in differential diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn's disease (CD and in disease activity assessment. In 60 patients of both genders - 30 with ulcerative colitis and 30 with Crohn's disease - and 30 controls serum nitric oxide concentration was determined by measuring nitrite concentration, a stable metabolic product of NO with oxygen. Conversion of nitrates (NO3- to nitrites (NO2- was done with elementary zinc. The nitrite concentration was determined by classic colorimetrical Griess reaction. Median serum NO concentration was statistically different (p=0,0005 between UC patients (15.25 µmol/L; 13.47 - 19.88 µmol/L, CD patients (14.54 µmol/L; 13.03 -16.32 µmol/L and healthy controls (13.29 µmol/L; 12.40 - 13.92 µmol/L. When active UC and CD patients were compared with inactive UC and CD patients respectively a significant difference in serum NO level was found (p=0.0005. With a cut-off level of 17.39 µmol/L NO had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% in discriminating between active and inactive UC patients. With cut-off value of 14.01 µmol/L serum NO level had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 69% in distinguishing between patients with active CD and inactive CD. Serum NO concentration is a minimally invasive and rapid tool for discriminating between active and inactive IBD patients and could be used as useful biomarker in monitoring of disease activity in IBD patients.

  19. Clinicopathological features of inflammatory bowel disease in Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlington Ewaen Obaseki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventionally, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is considered to be more common in western countries. Nevertheless, it is relatively rare in most developing countries. Aim: The purpose of this study is to determine the frequency and morphological patterns of IBD in Benin City, Nigeria, and to compare our findings with the reports from other centers. Materials and Methods: The study is a four-year analysis of 32 histologically confirmed cases of IBD, presenting at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH and a private specialist gastroenterology hospital, based in Benin City, Southern Nigeria. Both centers serve as referral centers to most hospitals in South-Southern Nigeria. All suspected patients were examined with rectosigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy after obtaining consent. These specimens were formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, sectioned at 3-5 microns, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E. Results: In this four-year study, there were a total of 78 suspected cases, of which 32 were histologically confirmed IBD cases. Among the 32 patients, 14 (43.8% were cases of Crohn′s disease (CD, while 12 (37.5% were cases of ulcerative colitis (UC. The remaining six patients (18.7% were with indeterminate colitis (IC. A total of 21 males and 11 females presented, giving a ratio of 1.9:1, with a mean age of 51.1 years ± 7.2 standard deviation (SD. In CD, seven cases constituting 53.9%, had ileocolonic involvement. In UC, six cases involved left-sided colitis, accounting for 50%. Conclusion: IBD was twice more common in males than females, with majority of involvement in both the colonic and ileo-colonic anatomic sites. However, there is a slight higher preponderance of CD than UC in this environment.

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease in Accra: what new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, T N; Nkrumah, K N

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been more common in Western Europe and North America. Initially IBD had been thought to be low in incidence among Sub-Saharan Africans. However, it is now being increasingly recognised in patients of African descent. A comparative assessment of the patterns of IBD in Accra from 1997 to 2011. This study used a retrospective design to access clinical details of follow-up patients attending the Gastroenterology Unit of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra between February, 1997 and May, 2011. It was a comparative seven-year review of clinical presentations of IBD between April, 2004 -August, 2011 (t2) and February, 1997 - March, 2004 (t1) for changing patterns of disease in tertiary care. Twenty-eight (28) new IBD patients were seen in the Gastroenterology Clinic, KBTH with IBD during 2004 - 2011 (t2) in comparison to 17 patients over 1997 - 2004 (t1). Presentations of severe diarrhoea were 70.4% and 55.6% in (t1) and (t2) respectively. Eighty-two percent (82%) of patients with IBD in (t2) had a severely inflamed colon on the index colonoscopy. Most patients (70-80%) responded to medical therapy (steroids, sulfasalazine) with no colon resections for steroid-refractory colitis. Although relatively uncommon, IBD recorded a 65% rise in incidence over the study periods with a male preponderance. Most patients with IBD were presenting late with severe clinical and endoscopic features of disease yet medically responsive. Non-specific (indeterminate) colitis gained prominence in (t2).

  1. CEACAM6 gene variants in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, Jürgen; Seiderer, Julia; Fries, Christoph; Tillack, Cornelia; Pfennig, Simone; Weidinger, Maria; Beigel, Florian; Olszak, Torsten; Lass, Ulrich; Göke, Burkhard; Ochsenkühn, Thomas; Wolf, Christiane; Lohse, Peter; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Diegelmann, Julia; Czamara, Darina; Brand, Stephan

    2011-04-29

    The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) acts as a receptor for adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) and its ileal expression is increased in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Given its contribution to the pathogenesis of CD, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic variants in the CEACAM6 region in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In this study, a total of 2,683 genomic DNA samples (including DNA from 858 CD patients, 475 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), and 1,350 healthy, unrelated controls) was analyzed for eight CEACAM6 SNPs (rs10415946, rs1805223 = p.Pro42Pro, rs4803507, rs4803508, rs11548735 = p.Gly239Val, rs7246116 = pHis260His, rs2701, rs10416839). In addition, a detailed haplotype analysis and genotype-phenotype analysis were performed. Overall, our genotype analysis did not reveal any significant association of the investigated CEACAM6 SNPs and haplotypes with CD or UC susceptibility, although certain CEACAM6 SNPs modulated CEACAM6 expression in intestinal epithelial cell lines. Despite its function as receptor of AIEC in ileal CD, we found no association of the CEACAM6 SNPs with ileal or ileocolonic CD. Moreover, there was no evidence of epistasis between the analyzed CEACAM6 variants and the main CD-associated NOD2, IL23R and ATG16L1 variants. This study represents the first detailed analysis of CEACAM6 variants in IBD patients. Despite its important role in bacterial attachment in ileal CD, we could not demonstrate a role for CEACAM6 variants in IBD susceptibility or regarding an ileal CD phenotype. Further functional studies are required to analyze if these gene variants modulate ileal bacterial attachment.

  2. Characteristics of Japanese inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Yoshiaki; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Onodera, Kei; Nagaishi, Kanna; Yamashita, Kentaro; Sonoda, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Takazoe, Masakazu; Yamazaki, Keiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Fujimiya, Mineko; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2014-08-01

    There are substantial differences in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) genetics depending on the populations examined. We aimed to identify Japanese population-specific or true culprit susceptibility genes through a meta-analysis of past genetic studies of Japanese IBD. For this study, we reviewed 2,703 articles. The review process consisted of three screening stages: we initially searched for relevant studies and then relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Finally, we adjusted them for the meta-analysis. To maximize our chances of analysis, we introduced proxy SNPs during the first stage. To minimize publication bias, no significant SNPs and solitary SNPs without pairs were combined to be reconsidered during the third stage. Additionally, two SNPs were newly genotyped. Finally, we conducted a meta-analysis of 37 published studies in 50 SNPs located at 22 loci corresponding to the total number of 4,853 Crohn's disease (CD), 5,612 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and 14,239 healthy controls. We confirmed that the NKX2-3 polymorphism is associated with common susceptibility to IBD and that HLA-DRB1*0450 alleles increase susceptibility to CD but reduce risk for UC while HLA-DRB1*1502 alleles increase susceptibility to UC but reduce CD risk. Moreover, we found individual disease risk loci: TNFSF15 and TNFα to CD and HLA-B*5201, and NFKBIL1 to UC. The genetic risk of HLA was substantially high (odds ratios ranged from 1.54 to 2.69) while that of common susceptibility loci to IBD was modest (odds ratio ranged from 1.13 to 1.24). Results indicate that Japanese IBD susceptibility loci identified by the meta-analysis are closely associated with the HLA regions.

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Heather A.; Basit, Saima; Harpsøe, Maria C.; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Jess, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Existing data on pregnancy complications in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are inconsistent. To address these inconsistencies, we investigated potential associations between IBD, IBD-related medication use during pregnancy, and pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, preterm delivery, Apgar score, and congenital abnormalities. Methods We conducted a cohort study in >85,000 Danish National Birth Cohort women who were pregnant in the period 1996-2002 and had information on IBD, IBD-related medication use (systemic or local corticosteroids, 5-aminosalicylates), pregnancy outcomes and potential confounders. We evaluated associations between IBD and adverse pregnancy/birth outcomes using Cox regression and log-linear binomial regression. Results IBD was strongly and significantly associated with severe pre-eclampsia, preterm premature rupture of membranes and medically indicated preterm delivery in women using systemic corticosteroids during pregnancy (hazard ratios [HRs] >7). IBD was also associated with premature preterm rupture of membranes in women using local corticosteroid medications (HR 3.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-8.20) and with medically indicated preterm delivery (HR 1.91, 95% CI 0.99-3.68) in non-medicated women. Furthermore, IBD was associated with low 5-minute Apgar score in term infants (risk ratio [RR] 2.19, 95% CI 1.03-4.66). Finally, Crohn’s disease (but not ulcerative colitis) was associated with major congenital abnormalities in the offspring (RR 1.85, 95% CI 1.06-3.21). No child with a congenital abnormality born to a woman with IBD was exposed to systemic corticosteroids in utero. Conclusion Women with IBD are at increased risk of severe pre-eclampsia, medically indicated preterm delivery, preterm premature rupture of membranes, and delivering infants with low Apgar score and major congenital malformations. These associations are only partly explained by severe disease as reflected by systemic corticosteroid use

  4. Risk factors of anxiety and depression in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahon, Stéphane; Lahmek, Pierre; Durance, Christelle; Olympie, Alain; Lesgourgues, Bruno; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Gendre, Jean-Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Little is known in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) regarding risk factors for psychological distress. The aim of this work was to study the disease characteristics and socioeconomic factors associated with anxiety and depression in IBD. From December 2008 to June 2009, 1663 patients with IBD (1450 were members of the Association Francois Aupetit, French association of IBD patients) answered a questionnaire about psychological and socioeconomic factors and adherence to treatment. In this study we focused the analysis on the characteristics of IBD (type, location, severity, treatment) and socioeconomic factors (professional, educational, and marital status and Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centers [EPICES] score of socioeconomic deprivation; score established in medical centers in France; http://www.cetaf.asso.fr) associated with depression and anxiety. Anxiety and depression were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Comparison between groups according to the existence of depression or anxiety was carried out using univariate and multivariate analysis. In all, 181 patients (11%) were depressed; 689 patients (41%) were anxious. By multivariate analysis, factors associated with anxiety were: severe disease (P = 0.04), flares (P = 0.05), nonadherence to treatment (P = 0.03), disabled or unemployed status (P = 0.002), and socioeconomic deprivation (P < 0.0001). Factors associated with depression were: age (P = 0.004), flares (P = 0.03), disabled or unemployed status (P = 0.03), and socioeconomic deprivation (P < 0.0001). In this large cohort of IBD patients, risk factors for anxiety and depression were severe and active disease and socioeconomic deprivation. Psychological interventions would be useful when these factors are identified. Copyright © 2012 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  5. The history and philosophy of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Many interesting statements about inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and also Crohn's disease have been made in recent years in journals and scientific meetings. They have influenced our thinking and the perception of the diseases. Among these statements is the notion that IBDs are 'relatively new diseases', that 'IBD is rather a syndrome than a disease' or that with the new insights into pathophysiology, 'we will be able to discriminate many different Crohn's diseases based on genetic risk factors'. A look into history and philosophy may help to clarify misconceptions and prove that many of these statements are either wrong or misleading. People suffered from symptoms that are suggestive of Crohn's disease centuries before the disease concept evolved in the early 19th century and before Burrill B. Crohn could describe a complex of symptoms he suggested to be a so far non-identified disease. Early concepts on the pathophysiology of CD were not so different to present-time theories as it may be assumed. 'Pre-ideas' and basic concepts were leading the search for a cause of Crohn's disease and IBD. With respect to pathophysiology, we have to accept that most likely we will never come up with one unifying concept ('the cause of IBD') as different scientific schools and think-collectives exist. Therefore, the 'classical adaptive immunologists' and the 'innate immunologist' as well as scientists focused on barrier function or the microbiome will never completely understand each other and each other's concepts. As for many other diseases, several different pathophysiological concepts existed in parallel and will do so in the future as it is impossible to prove the exclusive 'truth' of one of the concepts for reasons that will be further discussed below. This means on the other hand that none of the concepts on pathophysiology of IBD we have at present will ever unequivocally be proven to be wrong.

  6. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  7. CEACAM6 gene variants in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Glas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 acts as a receptor for adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC and its ileal expression is increased in patients with Crohn's disease (CD. Given its contribution to the pathogenesis of CD, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic variants in the CEACAM6 region in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. METHODOLOGY: In this study, a total of 2,683 genomic DNA samples (including DNA from 858 CD patients, 475 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC, and 1,350 healthy, unrelated controls was analyzed for eight CEACAM6 SNPs (rs10415946, rs1805223 = p.Pro42Pro, rs4803507, rs4803508, rs11548735 = p.Gly239Val, rs7246116 = pHis260His, rs2701, rs10416839. In addition, a detailed haplotype analysis and genotype-phenotype analysis were performed. Overall, our genotype analysis did not reveal any significant association of the investigated CEACAM6 SNPs and haplotypes with CD or UC susceptibility, although certain CEACAM6 SNPs modulated CEACAM6 expression in intestinal epithelial cell lines. Despite its function as receptor of AIEC in ileal CD, we found no association of the CEACAM6 SNPs with ileal or ileocolonic CD. Moreover, there was no evidence of epistasis between the analyzed CEACAM6 variants and the main CD-associated NOD2, IL23R and ATG16L1 variants. CONCLUSIONS: This study represents the first detailed analysis of CEACAM6 variants in IBD patients. Despite its important role in bacterial attachment in ileal CD, we could not demonstrate a role for CEACAM6 variants in IBD susceptibility or regarding an ileal CD phenotype. Further functional studies are required to analyze if these gene variants modulate ileal bacterial attachment.

  8. Environmental factors affecting inflammatory bowel disease: have we made progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is only partially understood; various environmental and host (e.g. genetic, epithelial, immune, and nonimmune) factors are involved. The critical role for environmental factors is strongly supported by recent worldwide trends in IBD epidemiology. One important environmental factor is smoking. A meta-analysis partially confirms previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after the onset of the disease, might improve its course, decreasing the need for colectomy. In contrast, smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease and aggravates its course. The history of IBD is dotted by cyclic reports on the isolation of specific infectious agents responsible for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The more recently published cold chain hypothesis is providing an even broader platform by linking dietary factors and microbial agents. An additional, recent theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of 'protective' versus 'harmful' intestinal bacteria - this concept has been termed dysbiosis resulting in decreased bacterial diversity. Other factors such as oral contraceptive use, appendectomy, dietary factors (e.g. refined sugar, fat, and fast food), perinatal events, and childhood infections have also been associated with both diseases, but their role is more controversial. Nonetheless, there is no doubt that economic development, leading to improved hygiene and other changes in lifestyle ('westernized lifestyle') may play a role in the increase in IBD. This review article focuses on the role of environmental factors in the pathogenesis and progression of IBDs. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Vedolizumab Therapy in Severe Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Máire A; Stein, Ronen E; Maxwell, Elizabeth C; Albenberg, Lindsey; Baldassano, Robert N; Dawany, Noor; Grossman, Andrew B; Mamula, Petar; Piccoli, David A; Kelsen, Judith R

    2016-10-01

    Vedolizumab is effective for inducing and maintaining remission in adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, there is limited pediatric data. This study aimed to describe the adverse events and clinical response to vedolizumab in refractory pediatric IBD. Disease activity indices, clinical response, concomitant medication use, and adverse events were measured over 22 weeks in an observational prospective cohort study of children with refractory IBD who had failed anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy and subsequently initiated vedolizumab therapy. Twenty-one subjects, 16 with Crohn disease, received vedolizumab. Clinical response was observed in 6/19 (31.6%) of the evaluable subjects at week 6 and in 11/19 (57.9%) by week 22. Before induction, 15/21 (71.4%) participants were treated with systemic corticosteroids, as compared with 7/21 (33.3%) subjects at 22 weeks. Steroid-free remission was seen in 1/20 (5.0%) subjects at 6 weeks, 3/20 (15.0%) at 14 weeks, and 4/20 (20.0%) at 22 weeks. There was statistically significant improvement in serum albumin and hematocrit; however, C-reactive protein increased by week 22 (P < 0.05). There were no infusion reactions. Vedolizumab was discontinued in 2 patients because of severe colitis, requiring surgical intervention. There is limited experience with vedolizumab therapy in pediatric IBD. There seems to be a marked number of subjects with clinical response in the first 6 weeks that increases further by week 22 despite the severity of disease in this cohort. Adverse events may not be directly related to vedolizumab. This study is limited by small sample size, and larger prospective studies are warranted.

  10. Health care as perceived by persons with inflammatory bowel disease - a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnovska, Katarina Pihl; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla; Hjortswang, Henrik; Hjelm, Katarina; Börjeson, Sussanne

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of health care among persons living with inflammatory bowel disease. The quality of care plays an important role in the life of persons with a chronic disease. To define what persons with inflammatory bowel disease perceive as high-quality care, greater focus must be placed on the individual's own perspective of living with the condition. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted based on focus groups. Five focus groups were conducted with adult persons living with inflammatory bowel disease, 14 men and 12 women aged 19-76 years. The interviews were performed between January-June 2014. The perceptions of health care from the perspective of persons living with inflammatory bowel disease were summarised in two categories: 'professional attitudes of healthcare staff' and 'structure of the healthcare organisation'. Persons with inflammatory bowel disease want to be encountered with respect, experience trust and obtain information at the right time. They also expect shared decision-making, communication and to encounter competent healthcare professionals. Furthermore, the expectations on and perceptions of the structure of the healthcare organisation comprise access to care, accommodation, continuity of care, as well as the pros and cons of specialised care. The findings show the importance of establishing a respectful and trusting relationship, facilitating healthcare staff and persons with inflammatory bowel disease to work as a team in fulfilling individual care needs - but there is room for improvement in terms of quality of care. A person-centred approach, which places the individual and her/his family at the centre, considering them experts on their own health and enabling them to collaborate with healthcare staff, seems important to reach a high-quality healthcare organisation for patients with Inflammatory bowel disease. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Role of the Innate Immune System in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lierop, Pieter P. E.; Samsom, Janneke N.; Escher, Johanna C.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.

    Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract commonly denoted as inflammatory bowel diseases. It has been proposed that these diseases result from aberrant mucosal immune responses to nonpathogenic microbial residents of the intestines. Recently, it

  12. How will insights from genetics translate to clinical practice in inflammatory bowel disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festen, E. A. M.; Weersma, R. K.

    Inflammatory bowel disease, consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gut, which arises through an excessive immune response to the normal gut flora in a genetically susceptible host. The disease affects predominantly young adults and due to its

  13. Five genetic markers in the interleukin 1 family in relation to inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkers, P. C.; van Aken, B. E.; Basoski, N.; Reitsma, P. H.; Tytgat, G. N.; van Deventer, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    An imbalance between the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) has been postulated as a pathogenic factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To study allelic frequencies of novel polymorphisms in the genes for

  14. Quality of health care in inflammatory bowel disease: developement of a reliable questionnaire (QUOTE-IBD) and first results.

    OpenAIRE

    Eijk, I. van der; Sixma, H.; Smeets, T.; Veloso, F.T.; Odes, S.; Montague, S.; Fornaciari, G.; Moum, B.; Stockbrugger, R.; Russel, M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: As inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic disorder, usually with an early onset in life, quality of care plays an important role for patients. The aim of this study was to develop a questionnaire to measure quality of care through the eyes of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Ten generic questions were already available because the questionnaire is based on an existing instrument. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease in seven countries were involved in the de...

  15. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have increased risk of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Morten L; Kjeldsen, Jens; Knudsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    were significantly increased (P celiac disease, type 1 diabetes (T1D), sarcoidosis, asthma, iridocyclitis, psoriasis, pyoderma gangrenosum, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Restricted to UC (P ...AIM: To investigate whether immune mediated diseases (IMD) are more frequent in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: In this population based registry study, a total of 47325 patients with IBD were alive and registered in the Danish National Patient Registry on December 16, 2013....... Controls were randomly selected from the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) and matched for sex, age, and municipality. We used ICD 10 codes to identify the diagnoses of the included patients. The IBD population was divided into three subgroups: Ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD) and Both...

  16. Immunoscintigraphy with 99Tc-labelled monoclonal anti granulocyte antibodies in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klisarova, A.; Tranulov, G.

    1996-01-01

    Antigranulocyte immunoscintigraphy with 99 Tc-labelled monoclonal antigranolocyte antibodies (MAb BW 250/83, Granulozyt) was carried out in ten patients with symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease to exclude or confirm the presence of an inflammatory process. A slow iv infusion of 740 MBq of the antibodies was performed 40 minutes after labelling. A whole-body scan was done at hours 4 and 24 post injection. In four patients planar scintigraphy of abdominal region only was also performed for better visualization of the pathological findings. Immunoscintigraphy provided evidence of an inflammatory bowel process in 8 cases (true positive), and excluded the diagnosis in one case (true negative). There was one false negative result.The study shows that immunoscintigraphy with 99 Tc-labelled antibodies (Granulozyt) is an easily performed procedure, with high specificity for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and can be carried out as a routine practice in nuclear medicine. 7 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs. (author)

  17. Improving quality of care in inflammatory bowel disease: what changes can be made today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panés, Julián; O'Connor, Marian; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Irving, Peter; Petersson, Joel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2014-09-01

    There are a number of gaps in our current quality of care for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. This review proposes changes that could be made now to improve inflammatory bowel disease care. Evidence from the literature and clinical experience are presented that illustrate best practice for improving current quality of care of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Best care for inflammatory bowel disease patients will involve services provided by a multidisciplinary team, ideally delivered at a centre of excellence and founded on current guidelines. Dedicated telephone support lines, virtual clinics and networking may also provide models through which to deliver high-quality, expert integrated patient care. Improved physician-patient collaboration may improve treatment adherence, producing tangible improvements in disease outcomes, and may also allow patients to better understand the benefits and risks of a disease management plan. Coaching programmes and tools that improve patient self-management and empowerment are likely to be supported by payers if these can be shown to reduce long-term disability. Halting disease progression before there is widespread bowel damage and disability are ideal goals of inflammatory bowel disease management. Improving patient-physician communication and supporting patients in their understanding of the evidence base are vital for ensuring patient commitment and involvement in the long-term management of their condition. Furthermore, there is a need to create more centres of excellence and to develop inflammatory bowel disease networks to ensure a consistent level of care across different settings. Copyright © 2014 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The epidemiology and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlinger, Kinga E-mail: karlking@radi.sote.hu; Gyoerke, Tamas; Makoe, Erno; Mester, Adam; Tarjan, Zsolt

    2000-09-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown. However, a satisfactory solution cannot be far away. IBD actually encompasses two diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerous colitis (UC). These diseases resemble each other so closely that they cannot be distinguished even pathologically, but differ from each other sufficiently to regard them as independent entities. Epidemiological observations may be helpful in identifying the true causative factors of this evasive disease. Geographically, the prevalence of the disease has a slope from North to South and, to a lesser degree, from West to East. The Western-Eastern discrepancy can be attributed to a difference in Western life styles. The incidence of the disease has been increasing world-wide of late, but its spread has been slowing down in highly affected countries. Racial and ethnic relations in different populations and immigration studies offer interesting data which can reflect genetic, inherited, environmental and behavioural factors. The disease seems to have a characteristic racial-ethnic distribution: the Jewish population is highly susceptible everywhere, but its prevalence in that population nears that of the domestic society in which they live. In Hungary, the Roma (Gypsies) have a considerably lower prevalence than the average population. This can be attributed to a genetic or environmental influence. According to age, the onset of the disease occurs more often in the second or the third decade of life, but there also is another peak in the 60s. Regarding sexual distribution, there is a slight preponderance of colitis ulcerosa in men and of Crohn's disease in women. It may correspond to the stronger auto-immune affection in the process of Crohn's disease. Environmental factors and behavioural influences also are investigated. Diet, the role of the early ages, smoking habits and the influence of hormonal status and drugs are viewed as useful contributing factors in

  19. The epidemiology and the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlinger, Kinga; Gyoerke, Tamas; Makoe, Erno; Mester, Adam; Tarjan, Zsolt

    2000-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unknown. However, a satisfactory solution cannot be far away. IBD actually encompasses two diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerous colitis (UC). These diseases resemble each other so closely that they cannot be distinguished even pathologically, but differ from each other sufficiently to regard them as independent entities. Epidemiological observations may be helpful in identifying the true causative factors of this evasive disease. Geographically, the prevalence of the disease has a slope from North to South and, to a lesser degree, from West to East. The Western-Eastern discrepancy can be attributed to a difference in Western life styles. The incidence of the disease has been increasing world-wide of late, but its spread has been slowing down in highly affected countries. Racial and ethnic relations in different populations and immigration studies offer interesting data which can reflect genetic, inherited, environmental and behavioural factors. The disease seems to have a characteristic racial-ethnic distribution: the Jewish population is highly susceptible everywhere, but its prevalence in that population nears that of the domestic society in which they live. In Hungary, the Roma (Gypsies) have a considerably lower prevalence than the average population. This can be attributed to a genetic or environmental influence. According to age, the onset of the disease occurs more often in the second or the third decade of life, but there also is another peak in the 60s. Regarding sexual distribution, there is a slight preponderance of colitis ulcerosa in men and of Crohn's disease in women. It may correspond to the stronger auto-immune affection in the process of Crohn's disease. Environmental factors and behavioural influences also are investigated. Diet, the role of the early ages, smoking habits and the influence of hormonal status and drugs are viewed as useful contributing factors in the

  20. The role of hypnotherapy for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Gabriele

    2014-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic disorders of unknown aetiology which are characterized by episodes of exacerbations and remissions. There is evidence that perceived distress contributes to IBD symptom flares; anxiety and depression are frequently found in patients with the active disease. Because there is no cure, treatment has to focus on prevention of complications, induction/maintenance of remission and improvement of quality of life. Gut-directed hypnotherapy (GHT) has been used successfully in functional gastrointestinal disorders. Few experimental studies and case reports have been published for IBD; GHT increases the health-related quality of life and reduces symptoms. Additionally, GHT seems to have an immune-modulating effect and is able to augment clinical remission in patients with quiescent ulcerative colitis.

  1. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Expanding Global Health Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amosy E. M'koma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a summary of the global epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. It is now clear that IBD is increasing worldwide and has become a global emergence disease. IBD, which includes Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC, has been considered a problem in industrial-urbanized societies and attributed largely to a Westernized lifestyle and other associated environmental factors. Its incidence and prevalence in developing countries is steadily rising and has been attributed to the rapid modernization and Westernization of the population. There is a need to reconcile the most appropriate treatment for these patient populations from the perspectives of both disease presentation and cost. In the West, biological agents are the fastest-growing segment of the prescription drug market. These agents cost thousands of dollars per patient per year. The healthcare systems, and certainly the patients, in developing countries will struggle to afford such expensive treatments. The need for biological therapy will inevitably increase dramatically, and the pharmaceutical industry, healthcare providers, patient advocate groups, governments and non-governmental organizations should come to a consensus on how to handle this problem. The evidence that IBD is now affecting a much younger population presents an additional concern. Meta-analyses conducted in patients acquiring IBD at a young age also reveals a trend for their increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC, since the cumulative incidence rates of CRC in IBD-patients diagnosed in childhood are higher than those observed in adults. In addition, IBD-associated CRC has a worse prognosis than sporadic CRC, even when the stage at diagnosis is taken into account. This is consistent with additional evidence that IBD negatively impacts CRC survival. A continuing increase in IBD incidence worldwide associated with childhood-onset of IBD coupled with the diseases’ longevity

  2. The Role of CD39 in Modulating Effector Immune Responses in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Huang

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with excessive inflammation of the bowel and intestinal tissues in genetically susceptible individuals. IBD can manifest in two major forms, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. T helper type 17 cells (Th17) are effector lymphocytes that have been linked to intestinal inflammation in both mice and humans. Effector Th17 cells and regulatory T cells (Treg) – a subset pivotal to immune-tolerance maintenance – derive from the same CD4 progenitors. Our i...

  3. A novel pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease from the perspective of glyco-immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Iijima, Hideki; Fujii, Hironobu; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Naka, Tetsuji; Takehara, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2017-05-01

    Oligosaccharide modifications play an essential role in various inflammatory diseases and cancers, but their pathophysiologic roles, especially in inflammation, are not clear. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an intractable chronic inflammatory disorder with an unknown aetiology, and the number of patients with IBD is increasing throughout the world. Certain types of immunosuppressant drugs, such as corticosteroids, are effective for IBD, suggesting that immune function is closely associated with the pathophysiology of IBD. Recent progress in the analysis of oligosaccharides revealed a role for oligosaccharides in intestinal inflammation based on both experimental models and human samples from IBD patients. Moreover, changes in the oligosaccharide structures on glycoproteins in the sera and tissue samples may serve as biomarkers of IBD. Here, we present current studies of IBD with regard to the immunologic aspects of glycobiology, suggesting a novel concept for IBD pathogenesis and the function of oligosaccharides on immune cells, termed "glyco-immunology". © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Distinct inflammatory and cytopathic characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates from inflammatory bowel disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stina Rikke; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) may be implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as implied from a higher prevalence of mucosa-associated E. coli in the gut of IBD-affected individuals. However, it is unclear whether different non-diarrheagenic E. coli spp. segregate from eac...

  5. /sup 111/In autologous leucocytes in the diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. [Tropolone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Peters, A.M.; Chadwick, V.S.; Hodgson, H.J.; Lavender, J.P. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK))

    1982-01-01

    Indium-111 autologous leukocyte scanning is now established as an effective method of localising sepsis (Ascher and others, 1980). In view of the extensive leucocyte infiltration of the intestinal wall in inflammatory bowel disease, the authors have prospectively studied the use of indium-111 labelled white cells in a variety of inflammatory bowel disorders. Leukocytes were labelled in 68 patients using /sup 111/In acetylacetonate and in 18 patients /sup 111/In tropolone. Crude mixed leukocytes preparations were used in 74 patients and pure neutrophil preparation used in 12 patients. Gamma scans over the abdomen were performed from 40 min later after re-injection of the labelled cells and assessed. /sup 111/In-tropolone labelling appeared to offer the advantage over /sup 111/In-acac labelling in localising inflamed bowel earlier. The technique of /sup 111/In-leukocyte scanning offers several advantages over the alternative technique of imaging diseased bowel using gallium-67 citrate. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning provides a novel approach to the problem of diagnosis and assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. It is non-invasive, requires no bowel preparation and this is safe in the acutely sick patient where conventional radiological imaging methods may be hazardous. /sup 111/In faecal excretion provides an objective assessment of disease activity which should prove useful in evaluating treatment regimes.

  6. Interactions between infections and immune-inflammatory cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus and inflammatory bowel diseases: evidences from animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Nicoletti, F; Stosic-Grujicic, S

    2008-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are multifactorial disorders of autoimmune origin.Several microbial agents have been reported to be associated with the development of type 1 diabetes and inflammatory bowel diseases in animal models by different mechanisms...

  7. [Towards new therapeutic paradigms beyond symptom control in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, Stefano; Zerboni, Giulia; Aratari, Annalisa; Ballanti, Riccardo; Papi, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing conditions that may result in progressive bowel damage, high risk of complications, surgery and permanent disability. The conventional therapeutic approach for inflammatory bowel diseases is based mainly on symptom control. Unfortunately, a symptom-based therapeutic approach has little impact on major long-term disease outcomes. In other chronic disabling conditions such as diabetes, hypertension and rheumatoid arthritis, the development of new therapeutic approaches has led to better outcomes. In this context a "treat to target" strategy has been developed. This strategy is based on identification of high-risk patients, regular assessment of disease activity by means of objective measures, adjustment of treatment to reach the pre-defined target. A treat to target approach has recently been proposed for inflammatory bowel disease with the aim at modifying the natural history of the disease. In this review, the evidence and the limitations of the treat to target paradigm in inflammatory bowel disease are analyzed and discussed.

  8. Solid lipid nanoparticles as anti-inflammatory drug delivery system in a human inflammatory bowel disease whole-blood model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpe, Loredana; Canaparo, Roberto; Daperno, Marco; Sostegni, Raffaello; Martinasso, Germana; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Ippolito, Laura; Vivenza, Nicoletta; Pera, Angelo; Eandi, Mario; Gasco, Maria Rosa; Zara, Gian Paolo

    2010-03-18

    Standard treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) necessitates frequent intake of anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive drugs, leading to significant adverse events. To evaluate the role solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) play as drug delivery system in enhancing anti-inflammatory activity for drugs such as dexamethasone and butyrate in a human inflammatory bowel diseases whole-blood model. ELISA assay and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine mRNA expression levels were evaluated by quantitative SYBR Green real-time RT-PCR to determine the IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-10 secretion in inflammatory bowel diseases patients' PBMC culture supernatants. There was a significant decrease in IL-1beta (p<0.01) and TNF-alpha (p<0.001) secretion, whilst IL-10 (p<0.05) secretion significantly increased after cholesteryl butyrate administration, compared to that of butyrate alone at the highest concentration tested (100 microM), at 24h exposure. There was a significant decrease in IL-1beta (p<0.01), TNF-alpha (p<0.001) and IL-10 (p<0.001) secretion after dexamethasone loaded SLN administration, compared to dexamethasone alone at the highest concentration tested (250 nM) at 24h exposure. No IFN-gamma was detected under any conditions and no cytotoxic effects observed even at the highest concentration tested. The incorporation of butyrate and dexamethasone into SLN has a significant positive anti-inflammatory effect in the human inflammatory bowel disease whole-blood model. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease exacerbation associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroulia, Evangelia; Pitiriga, Vassiliki C; Piperaki, Evangelia-Theophano; Spanakis, Nicholas E; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2013-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus infection is associated with inflammatory bowel disease, but its role as a pathogenetic or exacerbating factor remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Epstein-Barr virus infection and inflammatory bowel disease, particularly in regard to exacerbation of disease activity. This was a nonrandomized crosssectional study in subgroups of patients with inflammatory bowel disease compared with a control group with noninflammatory disease. Participants were patients treated for ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease and individuals undergoing evaluation for noninflammatory disease recruited from 2 urban adult gastrointestinal referral centers in Greece. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease was based on standard clinical and endoscopic criteria. Demographic and clinical characteristics of all participants were recorded. Whole blood samples and fresh tissue samples from biopsy of intestinal sites were obtained from each participant. The presence of Epstein-Barr virus was determined by amplifying the LMP1 gene of the virus in blood and intestinal tissue samples. The study comprised 94 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (63 with ulcerative colitis and 31 with Crohn's disease) and 45 controls with noninflammatory disease. Of the 94 patients, 67 (71.3%) had disease exacerbation and 27 (28.7%) were in remission. The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus genome was significantly higher in patients than in controls for intestinal tissue (44 patients, 46.8% vs 6 controls, 13.3%; p = 0.001), but not for whole blood (24 patients, 25.5% vs 9 controls, 20%; p = 0.3). The viral genome was found significantly more frequently in intestinal samples from patients with disease exacerbation compared with patients in remission (38 patients with exacerbation, 56.7% vs 6 patients in remission, 22.2%; p = 0.001), but no significant difference was found for whole blood (18 patients with exacerbation, 26.8% vs 6 patients in remission, 22

  10. sup 99m Tc-sucralfate scintigraphy in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, P.B.; Lech, Y.; Moeller-Petersen, J.; Vilien, M.; Fallingborg, J. (Aalborg Sygehus (Denmark)); Ekelund, S. (Copenhagen County Hospital (Denmark))

    1989-01-01

    Technetium-99m-labelled albumin-sucralfate was orally administered to 11 patients (Crohn's disease, 8; ulcerative colitis, 3) and 3 healthy volunteers. Serial scintigraphy was performed, and scintigraphic interpretations were compared with radiographic end endoscopic findings in an open study. It was not possible in any patient to relate the scintigraphic findings to the localizations of inflammatory bowel disease, nor was it possible to distinguish the scans in the patients from the scans of the healthy volunteers. It is concluded the {sup 99m}Tc-albumin-sucralfate scintigraphy is of no value in the detection of inflammatory bowel disease. 8 refs.

  11. Mucormycosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheen Z. Abidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare and often fatal invasive fungal infection mostly seen in immune-compromised individuals. A high index of clinical suspicion is necessary, so that effective preemptive therapy can be started, as timely intervention is crucial. In this series we present three cases of invasive mucormycosis in patients with underlying inflammatory bowel disease that had received therapy with immunomodulators prior to the infection. All three had varied clinical manifestations. We also review the literature of invasive mucormycosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, General University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sofia Children' s Hospital, First Department of Paediatrics, Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and {tau}2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L.; Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna

    2009-01-01

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and Τ2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  14. [Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome during ulcerative colitis: A rare extra-intestinal sign of inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aounallah, A; Zerriaa, S; Ksiaa, M; Jaziri, H; Boussofara, L; Ghariani, N; Mokni, S; Saidi, W; Sriha, B; Belajouza, C; Denguezli, M; Nouira, R

    2016-05-01

    Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome (BADAS) is characterized by combined pustular skin eruption and arthralgia. It may be associated with inflammatory bowel disease or bowel bypass surgery. We report a case of BADAS in a patient with ulcerative colitis. A 39-year-old woman was being treated for a severe flare-up of ulcerative colitis present over the preceding 2 months and treated with prednisone, azathioprine and cyclosporine. She was also presenting a cutaneous eruption and arthralgia that had begun three days earlier. Dermatological examination revealed profuse vesicular and pustular lesions. Biopsy specimens showed mature neutrophilic infiltrate within the dermis. A diagnosis of BADAS was made and the same treatment was maintained. Systemic symptoms were resolved but the vesicular lesions were superseded by hypertrophic scars. Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome consists of a vesiculopustular eruption associated with arthralgia and/or arthritis and fever, as was the case in our patient. The histological picture is characterized by abundant neutrophilic infiltrate in the superficial dermis. The clinical and histological features and the course of BADAS allow this entity to be classified within the spectrum of neutrophilic dermatoses. Treatment chiefly involves systemic corticosteroids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Review article: The clinical importance of growth in children with inflammatory bowel disease: is it important to the gastroenterologist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taminiau, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Growth in children with inflammatory bowel disease is often compromised. To explore the origins of growth retardation in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease and to consider management strategies. Relevant literature was identified and reviewed. A combination of the following factors results in

  16. Safety of treatments for inflammatory bowel disease: Clinical practice guidelines of the Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IG-IBD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancone, Livia; Annese, Vito; Ardizzone, Sandro; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Calabrese, Emma; Caprioli, Flavio; Castiglione, Fabiana; Comberlato, Michele; Cottone, Mario; Danese, Silvio; Daperno, Marco; D'Incà, Renata; Frieri, Giuseppe; Fries, Walter; Gionchetti, Paolo; Kohn, Anna; Latella, Giovanni; Milla, Monica; Orlando, Ambrogio; Papi, Claudio; Petruzziello, Carmelina; Riegler, Gabriele; Rizzello, Fernando; Saibeni, Simone; Scribano, Maria Lia; Vecchi, Maurizio; Vernia, Piero; Meucci, Gianmichele

    2017-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are chronic conditions of unknown etiology, showing a growing incidence and prevalence in several countries, including Italy. Although the etiology of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is unknown, due to the current knowledge regarding their pathogenesis, effective treatment strategies have been developed. Several guidelines are available regarding the efficacy and safety of available drug treatments for inflammatory bowel diseases. Nevertheless, national guidelines provide additional information adapted to local feasibility, costs and legal issues related to the use of the same drugs. These observations prompted the Italian Group for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IG-IBD) to establish Italian guidelines on the safety of currently available treatments for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. These guidelines discuss the use of aminosalicylates, systemic and low bioavailability corticosteroids, antibiotics (metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, rifaximin), thiopurines, methotrexate, cyclosporine A, TNFα antagonists, vedolizumab, and combination therapies. These guidelines are based on current knowledge derived from evidence-based medicine coupled with clinical experience of a national working group. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome-type symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a real association or reflection of occult inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, John; O'Mahony, Caitlin; O'Mahony, Liam; O'Mahony, Siobhan; Quigley, Eamonn M; Shanahan, Fergus

    2010-08-01

    Do gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in apparent remission reflect the coexistence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or subclinical inflammation? The aims of this study were as follows: (i) to prospectively determine the prevalence of IBS symptoms in IBD patients in remission; and (ii) to determine whether IBS symptoms correlate with levels of fecal calprotectin. Remission was defined by physician assessment: Crohn's disease (CD) activity index inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire), the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD), and fecal calprotectin were measured. Rome II criteria for IBS were fulfilled in 37/62 (59.7%) of CD patients and by 17/44 (38.6%) of those with ulcerative colitis (UC). However, fecal calprotectin was significantly elevated above the upper limit of normal in both IBD patient groups, indicating the presence of occult inflammation. Furthermore, calprotectin levels were significantly higher in CD and UC patients with criteria for IBS than in those without IBS-type symptoms. QOL scores were lower and HAD scores higher among UC patients with IBS symptoms in comparison to those who did not have IBS symptoms. IBS-like symptoms are common in patients with IBD who are thought to be in clinical remission, but abnormal calprotectin levels suggest that the mechanism in most cases is likely to be occult inflammation rather than coexistent IBS.

  18. Immunopathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease: how genetics link barrier dysfunction and innate immunity to inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Minesh; Ahmed, Shifat; Dryden, Gerald

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) comprise a distinct set of clinical symptoms resulting from chronic or relapsing immune activation and corresponding inflammation within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Diverse genetic mutations, encoding important aspects of innate immunity and mucosal homeostasis, combine with environmental triggers to create inappropriate, sustained inflammatory responses. Recently, significant advances have been made in understanding the interplay of the intestinal epithelium, mucosal immune system, and commensal bacteria as a foundation of the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Complex interactions between specialized intestinal epithelial cells and mucosal immune cells determine different outcomes based on the environmental input: the development of tolerance in the presence of commensal bacterial or the promotion of inflammation upon recognition of pathogenic organisms. This article reviews key genetic abnormalities involved in inflammatory and homeostatic pathways that enhance susceptibility to immune dysregulation and combine with environmental triggers to trigger the development of chronic intestinal inflammation and IBD.

  19. The importance of vitamin D in the pathology of bone metabolism in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Stawczyk-Eder, Kamila; Klimczak, Katarzyna; Linke, Krzysztof; Horst-Sikorska, Wanda

    2015-10-12

    Etiological factors of bone metabolism disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases have been the subject of interest of many researchers. One of the questions often raised is vitamin D deficiency. Calcitriol acts on cells, tissues and organs through a vitamin D receptor. The result of this action is the multi-directional effect of vitamin D. The reasons for vitamin D deficiency are: decreased exposure to sunlight, inadequate diet, inflammatory lesions of the intestinal mucosa and post-gastrointestinal resection states. This leads not only to osteomalacia but also to osteoporosis. Of significance may be the effect of vitamin D on the course of the disease itself, through modulation of the inflammatory mechanisms. It is also necessary to pay attention to the role of vitamin D in skeletal pathology in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and thus take measures aimed at preventing and treating these disorders through the supplementation of vitamin D.

  20. Gut-Brain Interactions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Clinician’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore M Bayless

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available While most physicians and some patients consider psychosocial factors important in aggravating already existing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, most of the information is based on a few recent scientific studies, varied anecdotal observations and a tendency for patients and some physicians to view psychosocial and stress-related issues with speculation, bias and some stigmatization. Patients with proctitis who have experienced recrudescence of mucosal friability and rectal bleeding within a day of a severe life stress provide a dramatic example of such anecdotes. Time-lag studies have indicated that stress, especially major life events, precedes illness aggravation in patients with IBD but that stress is not disease-specific. The symptoms studied, pain and diarrhea, were more likely to be physiological responses to acute stress rather than reflections of increased disease activity. Current scientific research supposes the prospect that environmental factors influence disease susceptibility through the central nervous system. Stress is associated with alterations in both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms in humans and in experimental animals. While psychosocial factors may not initiate inflammation in IBD, it is possible that they lead to alterations in the immune response and thereby alter disease activity. Mind-gut interactions affect salivation, gastric secretion, gastric motility and colonic motility, as well as numerous other gastrointestinal functions. These ‘physiological’ responses are expected in the IBD patient and perhaps will be accentuated by inflammation and its multiple effects on gut function. Because 10 to 13% of the general population have a tendency to suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, it is expected that the same percentage of IBD patients will have both IBD and IBS. An example of clinically relevant alterations in pathophysiology is the association of acute proctosigmoiditis with an increase in IBS symptoms

  1. Induction of an antigen specific gut inflammatory reaction in mice and rats: a model for human Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlinde Agate Platais Brasil Teixeira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is an adverse reaction that occurs in susceptible people when they eat sensitizing foods and is one of the causes of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD. The effort to understand the induction process of these diseases is important as IBD is increasing worldwide, including in Brazil. The aim of this study was to develop an experimental antigen specific inflammatory process of the gut of mice and rats, using peanut seeds. Animals were immunized with peanut protein extract before their exposure to the in natura peanut seeds. Results showed that systemic immunization with peanut protein extracts rendered significantly higher antibody titers than control groups and that immunized animals submitted to a challenge diet containing peanuts presented time dependent alterations of the gut similar to celiac disease. In conclusion, results suggested that this experimental model was a convenient tool to study the evolution of alterations in chronic antigen specific gut inflammatory process.A alergia alimentar consiste em uma reação adversa que ocorre em pessoas susceptíveis quando ingerem alimentos sensibilizantes, sendo uma das causas das Doenças Inflamatórias Intestinais (IBD. O objetivo deste estudo foi desenvolver um protocolo experimental de indução de um processo inflamatório intestinal antígeno-específico em camundongos e ratos. Foi escolhida para a indução deste processo a semente de amendoim. Os animais foram imunizados com o extrato protéico previamente à exposição com a semente in natura. Nossos resultados mostram que a imunização sistêmica com extratos protéicos de amendoim ocasiona títulos significativamente maiores de anticorpos quando comparado ao grupo controle e que os animais imunizados submetidos ao desafio com a dieta contendo exclusivamente amendoim apresentam alterações intestinais tempo-dependente similares àquelas observadas na doença celíaca. Os resultados obtidos sugerem que este modelo

  2. Role of biologics and biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: current trends and future perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Rawla,Prashanth; Sunkara,Tagore; Raj,Jeffrey Pradeep

    2018-01-01

    Prashanth Rawla,1 Tagore Sunkara,2 Jeffrey Pradeep Raj3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County, Martinsville, VA, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Clinical Affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Pharmacology, St John’s Medical College, Bangalore, India Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an idiopathic chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestina...

  3. Role of biologics and biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: current trends and future perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Rawla P; Sunkara T; Raj JP

    2018-01-01

    Prashanth Rawla,1 Tagore Sunkara,2 Jeffrey Pradeep Raj3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County, Martinsville, VA, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Clinical Affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Pharmacology, St John’s Medical College, Bangalore, India Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an idiopathic chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal sy...

  4. Adhesive small bowel obstruction due to pelvic inflammatory disease: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razan A Al-Ghassab

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of a 32-year-old woman with adhesive small bowel obstruction due to pelvic inflammatory disease. She had no history of abdominal surgery, gynecological complaints or constitutional symptoms of chronic illness. The diagnosis was based on the laparoscopic findings of small bowel adhesions, free peritoneal fluid, “violin string” adhesions of Fitz-Hugh–Curtis syndrome and left hydrosalpinx. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis was performed successfully, and the patient had an uneventful postoperative course. The authors conclude that pelvic inflammatory disease should be included as a cause of adhesive small bowel obstruction in sexually active young women with no history of abdominal surgery or constitutional symptoms of chronic disease. When performed by experienced surgeons, laparoscopy in such patients is feasible and safe.

  5. Detection of acute inflammatory bowel disease with Tc-99m-HSA-sucralfate scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, T.C.; Houle, S.; Jeejeebhoy, K.N.

    1987-01-01

    Sucralfate binds to mucosal ulcerations. Twelve studies were performed in 11 patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Technetium-sucralfate was prepared in vitro and given orally. Images were obtained at 4-6, 24, and 48 hours. Persistent focal abnormalities or activity in the large bowel beyond 48 hours was interpreted as positive. Patients' charts were reviewed. Technetium-sucralfate was positive in ten of ten studies in nine patients with active disease, one with equivocal activity, and negative in one patient with inactive disease. Nine of 19 abnormal sites were detected with technetium-sucralfate and radiology or endoscopy; six of ten were detected with technetium-sucralfate only. Technetium-sucralfate is very sensitive in detecting active inflammatory bowel disease in individual patients

  6. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis: An Update Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshi Ma

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cells serve essential roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, which relies on appropriate endoplasmic reticulum (ER function for proper protein folding, modification, and secretion. Exogenous or endogenous risk factors with an ability to disturb the ER function can impair the intestinal barrier function and activate inflammatory responses in the host. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress in the understanding of the functional role of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR in the gut homeostasis and its significant contribution to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Herein, we review recent evidence supporting the viewpoint that deregulation of ER stress and UPR signaling in the intestinal epithelium, including the absorptive cells, Paneth cells, goblet cells, and enteroendocrine cells, mediates the action of genetic or environmental factors driving colitis in experimental animals and IBD patients. In addition, we highlight pharmacologic application of chaperones or small molecules that enhance protein folding and modification capacity or improve the function of the ER. These molecules represent potential therapeutic strategies in the prevention or treatment of IBD through restoring ER homeostasis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  7. The Efficacy of Assisted Reproduction in Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and the Impact of Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, S; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Fedder, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, we analyze the chance of a live birth and the impact of inflammatory bowel disease surgery in women with Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) who have undergone assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments. METHODS: This is a nationwide cohort study based...

  8. Patient health communication mediating effects between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the effects of patient health communication regarding their inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to their health care providers and significant others in their daily life as a mediator in the relationship between gastrointestinal symptoms and gastrointestinal worry in pediatric patients. ...

  9. Smoking is associated with extra-intestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Severs; S.J.H. van Erp; M.E. van der Valk (Mirthe); M.J.J. Mangen; M. Fidder (Melissa); M. van der Have (Mike); A.A. van Bodegraven (Ad); D.J. de Jong; C.J. van der Woude (Janneke); M. Romberg-Camps (Mariëlle); P.R. Clemens (Paula ); J.M. Jansen (Jeroen); P.C. van de Meeberg (Paul); N. Mahmmod (Nofel); C.Y. Ponsioen (Cyril); C. Bolwerkm; J.R. Vermeijden (J. Reinoud); M. Pierik (Marieke); P.D. Siersema (Peter); M. Leenders (Max); A.E. van der Meulen-de Jong (Andrea); G. Dijkstra (Gerard); B. Oldenburg (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground and aims: Smoking affects the course of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to study the association between smoking and extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods: We cross-sectionally

  10. Smoking is Associated With Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, M.; Erp, S.J. van; Valk, M.E. van der; Mangen, M.J.; Fidder, H.H.; Have, M. van der; Bodegraven, A.A. van; Jong, D.J. de; Woude, C.J. van der; Romberg-Camps, M.J.; Clemens, C.H.; Jansen, J.M.; Meeberg, P.C. van de; Mahmmod, N.; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Bolwerk, C.; Vermeijden, J.R.; Pierik, M.J.; Siersema, P.D.; Leenders, M.; Meulen-Jong, A.E. van der; Dijkstra, G.; Oldenburg, B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Smoking affects the course of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to study the association between smoking and extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We cross-sectionally explored the

  11. Smoking is Associated With Extra-intestinal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, M.; van Erp, S. J. H.; van der Valk, M. E.; Mangen, M. J. J.; Fidder, H. H.; van der Have, M.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; de Jong, D. J.; van der Woude, C. J.; Romberg-Camps, M. J. L.; Clemens, C. H. M.; Jansen, J. M.; van de Meeberg, P. C.; Mahmmod, N.; Ponsioen, C. Y.; Bolwerk, C.; Vermeijden, J. R.; Pierik, M. J.; Siersema, P. D.; Leenders, M.; van der Meulen-de Jong, A. E.; Dijkstra, G.; Oldenburg, B.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking affects the course of disease in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to study the association between smoking and extra-intestinal manifestations (EIMs) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We cross-sectionally explored the association between smoking and

  12. Risk of inflammatory bowel disease according to self-rated health, pregnancy course, and pregnancy complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Jørgensen, Kristian Tore; Frisch, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Poor self-rated health (SRH) has been connected to immunological changes, and pregnancy complications have been suggested in the etiology of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We evaluated the impact of self-rated pre-pregnancy health and pregnancy course, hyperemesis......, gestational hypertension, and preeclampsia on risk of IBD....

  13. HLA-DR and -DQ phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkers, P. C.; Reitsma, P. H.; Tytgat, G. N.; van Deventer, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is partially genetically determined and the HLA class II genes are candidates for a role in genetic susceptibility to IBD, because their products play a central role in the immune response. Multiple studies have reported associations between HLA-DR

  14. Review article: the incidence and prevalence of colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, P

    2003-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC), complicating ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, only accounts for 1-2% of all cases of CRC in the general population, it is considered a serious complication of the disease and accounts for approximately 15% of all deaths in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD...

  15. Differences in phenotype and disease course in adult and paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Bartek, Jiri; Wewer, Anne Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have compared phenotype and disease course in children and adults with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim To compare phenotype, treatment and disease course in children (<15 years) and adults (=18 years) with IBD. Methods Two population-based cohorts comprising paediatri...

  16. The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in Denmark 1980-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lophaven, S. N.; Lynge, E.; Burisch, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Globally, the incidence rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasing; however, data from high-incidence areas are conflicting. Previous studies in Denmark have assessed incidence rates of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) using short observation periods. Aim...

  17. Development and Validation of an Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Monitoring Index for Use With Mobile Health Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deen, Welmoed K.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Parekh, Nimisha K.; Kane, Ellen; Zand, Aria; DiNicola, Courtney A.; Hall, Laurin; Inserra, Elizabeth K.; Choi, Jennifer M.; Ha, Christina Y.; Esrailian, Eric; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Hommes, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health technologies are advancing rapidly as smartphone use increases. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) might be managed remotely through smartphone applications, but no tools are yet available. We tested the ability of an IBD monitoring tool, which can be used with mobile

  18. Patient's perspectives important for early anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Baars (Judith); C.A. Siegel (Corey); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground/Aim: We hypothesized that limited information is given to patients on the risks and benefits of individual therapy, and feedback is lacking to verify if patients correctly interpreted the given information. We assessed the perspectives of patients with inflammatory bowel

  19. Does canine inflammatory bowel disease influence gut microbial profile and host metabolism?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jia; Verbrugghe, Adronie; Lourenço, Marta; Janssens, Geert P.J.; Liu, Daisy J.X.; Wiele, Van de Tom; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Immerseel, Van Filip; Maele, Van de Isabel; Niu, Yufeng; Bosch, Guido; Junius, Greet; Wuyts, Brigitte; Hesta, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) refers to a diverse group of chronic gastrointestinal diseases, and gut microbial dysbiosis has been proposed as a modulating factor in its pathogenesis. Several studies have investigated the gut microbial ecology of dogs with IBD but it is yet unclear

  20. Family planning and inflammatory bowel disease: the patient and the practitioner.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, Desmond

    2013-02-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are commonly in their child-bearing years. Maintainance medication, as recommended by international guidelines, is an emotive topic and an anxiety source. This study measures the awareness of patients and primary practitioners of the issues involved.

  1. Cogan's Syndrome in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease--A Case Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavricka, Stephan R; Greuter, Thomas; Scharl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cogan's syndrome (CSy) is a very rare autoimmune disorder, mainly affecting the inner ear and the eye, and is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: This was a European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) retrospective observational study, performed as part of ...

  2. Evolution of Costs of Inflammatory Bowel Disease over Two Years of Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M. van der; Mangen, M.J.; Severs, M.; Have, M. van der; Dijkstra, G.; Bodegraven, A.A. van; Fidder, H.H.; Jong, D.J. de; Woude, C.J. van der; Romberg-Camps, M.J.; Clemens, C.H.; Jansen, J.M.; Meeberg, P.C. van de; Mahmmod, N.; Meulen-de Jong, A.E. van der; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Bolwerk, C.; Vermeijden, J.R.; Siersema, P.D.; Leenders, M.; Oldenburg, B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the increasing use of anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a shift of costs has been observed with medication costs replacing hospitalization and surgery as major cost driver. We aimed to explore the evolution of IBD-related costs over two years of follow-up.

  3. Evolution of Costs of Inflammatory Bowel Disease over Two Years of Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Mirthe E.; Mangen, Marie-Josee J.; Severs, Mirjam; van der Have, Mike; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Fidder, Herma H.; de Jong, Dirk J.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Romberg-Camps, Marielle J. L.; Clemens, Cees H. M.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; de Meeberg, Paul C. van; Mahmmod, Nofel; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Bolwerk, Clemens; Vermeijden, J. Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D.; Leenders, Max; Oldenburg, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Background With the increasing use of anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a shift of costs has been observed with medication costs replacing hospitalization and surgery as major cost driver. We aimed to explore the evolution of IBD-related costs over two years of follow-up. Methods

  4. Evolution of Costs of Inflammatory Bowel Disease over Two Years of Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Valk, Mirthe E.; Mangen, Marie-Josée J.; Severs, Mirjam; van der Have, Mike; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Fidder, Herma H.; de Jong, Dirk J.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Romberg-Camps, Mariëlle J. L.; Clemens, Cees H. M.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; van de Meeberg, Paul C.; Mahmmod, Nofel; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Bolwerk, Clemens; Vermeijden, J. Reinoud; Siersema, Peter D.; Leenders, Max; Oldenburg, Bas

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing use of anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a shift of costs has been observed with medication costs replacing hospitalization and surgery as major cost driver. We aimed to explore the evolution of IBD-related costs over two years of follow-up. In total 1,307

  5. Evolution of costs of inflammatory bowel disease over two years of follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van der Valk (Mirthe); M.J.J. Mangen; M. Severs; M. van der Have (Mike); G. Dijkstra (Gerard); A.A. van Bodegraven (Ad); M. Fidder (Melissa); D.J. De Jong (Dirk J.); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke); M. Romberg-Camps (Mariëlle); P.R. Clemens (Paula ); J.M. Jansen (Jeroen); P.C. van de Meeberg (Paul); N. Mahmmod (Nofel); A.E. van der Meulen-de Jong (Andrea); C.Y. Ponsioen (Cyril); C.L. Bolwerk (Clemens); J.R. Vermeijden (J. Reinoud); P.D. Siersema (Peter); M. Leenders (Max); B. Oldenburg (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: With the increasing use of anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a shift of costs has been observed with medication costs replacing hospitalization and surgery as major cost driver. We aimed to explore the evolution of IBD-related costs over two years of

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease after liver transplantation : Risk factors for recurrence and De novo disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonka, RC; Dijkstra, G; Haagsma, EB; Shostrom, VK; Van den Berg, AP; Kleibeuker, JH

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and can recur or develop de novo after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of IBD after liver

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease after liver transplantation : a role for cytomegalovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, Robert C; Haagsma, Elizabeth B; Van Den Berg, Aad P; Karrenbeld, Arend; Slooff, Maarten J H; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Dijkstra, Gerard

    OBJECTIVE: Despite the use of immunosuppressive drugs, recurrent and de novo inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can develop after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. The aim of this study was to

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease after liver transplantation : A role for cytomegalovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, RC; Haagsma, EB; Van Den Berg, AP; Karrenbeld, A; Slooff, MJH; Kleibeuker, JH; Dijkstra, G

    Objective. Despite the use of immunosuppressive drugs, recurrent and de novo inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can develop after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. The aim of this study was to

  9. Adherence to Oral Maintenance Treatment in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Kindermann, Angelika

    Objectives:The aim of this study was to systematically review the rates of nonadherence to oral maintenance treatment in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to describe perceived barriers to adherence and psychosocial factors involved.Methods:The article considered studies

  10. Adherence to Oral Maintenance Treatment in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Kindermann, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the rates of nonadherence to oral maintenance treatment in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to describe perceived barriers to adherence and psychosocial factors involved. The article considered studies published in MEDLINE,

  11. Initial Disease Course and Treatment in an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inception Cohort in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Pedersen, Natalia; Cukovic-Cavka, Silvja

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The EpiCom cohort is a prospective, population-based, inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients from 31 European centers covering a background population of 10.1 million. The aim of this study was to assess the 1-year outcome in the EpiCom cohort. METHODS: Patients...

  12. Parental Distress and Quality of Life in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Implications for the Outpatient Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diederen, Kay; Haverman, Lotte; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    The interrelation between the course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in children and parent's distress, and the subsequent impact this may have on Health-Related Quality Of Life (HRQOL) of the child is unclear. Therefore, we investigated (I) patient's HRQOL and parental distress, and (II) the

  13. F-calprotectin and Blood Markers Correlate to Quality of Life in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Katrine; Jakobsen, Christian; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to investigate predictors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) with respect to changes in disease parameters over time in children with inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: This was a prospective longitudinal study examining the association between HRQoL (IMPACT III...

  14. Renal impairment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: association with aminosalicylate therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elseviers, M. M.; D'Haens, G.; Lerebours, E.; Plane, C.; Stolear, J. C.; Riegler, G.; Capasso, G.; van Outryve, M.; Mishevska-Mukaetova, P.; Djuranovic, S.; Pelckmans, P.; de Broe, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, several case reports have been published suggesting an association between the use of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the development of chronic tubulo-interstitial nephritis. Apart from lesions associated to 5-ASA treatment,

  15. Incidence of Interval Colorectal Cancer Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Undergoing Regular Colonoscopic Surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, Erik; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; Kremer, Willemijn; Siersema, Peter D.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance is recommended for patients with long-term inflammatory bowel disease because they have an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). To study the effectiveness of surveillance, we determined the incidence of CRC after negative findings from surveillance colonoscopies (interval CRC). We

  16. Incidence of Interval Colorectal Cancer Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Undergoing Regular Colonoscopic Surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, Erik; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; van Bodegraven, Ad A.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mahmmod, Nofel; Kremer, Willemijn; Siersema, Peter D.; Oldenburg, Bas

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance is recommended for patients with long-term inflammatory bowel disease because they have an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). To study the effectiveness of surveillance, we determined the incidence of CRC after negative findings from surveillance colonoscopies (interval CRC).

  17. Incidence of Interval Colorectal Cancer Among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Undergoing Regular Colonoscopic Surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiweer, E.; Maulen- de Jong, A.E. van der; Ponsioen, C.Y.; Woude, C.J. van der; Bodegraven, A.A. van; Jansen, J.M.; Mahmmod, N.; Kremer, W.; Siersema, P.D.; Oldenburg, B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Surveillance is recommended for patients with long-term inflammatory bowel disease because they have an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). To study the effectiveness of surveillance, we determined the incidence of CRC after negative findings from surveillance colonoscopies

  18. Acceptable short-term outcome of laparoscopic subtotal colectomy for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frid, Natalie Lassen; Bulut, Orhan; Pachler, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic colectomy for both benign and malignant disease, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), has recently been shown to have many advantages compared with open surgery. This study aimed to compare the effect of laparoscopic versus open subtotal colectomy (STC) for IBD on overall...

  19. Diagnostic test strategies in children at increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, Gea A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Norbruis, Obbe F.; Escher, Johanna C.; Walhout, Laurence C.; Kindermann, Angelika; de Rijke, Yolanda B.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2017-01-01

    In children with symptoms suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who present in primary care, the optimal test strategy for identifying those who require specialist care is unclear. We evaluated the following three test strategies to determine which was optimal for referring children with

  20. Diagnostic test strategies in children at increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, Gea A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Yvonne; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Norbruis, Obbe F.; Escher, Johanna C.; Walhout, Laurence C.; Kindermann, Angelika; de Rijke, Yolanda B.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In children with symptoms suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who present in primary care, the optimal test strategy for identifying those who require specialist care is unclear. We evaluated the following three test strategies to determine which was optimal for referring

  1. Diagnostic test strategies in children at increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Holtman (Gea A); Y. Lisman-van Leeuwen (Yvonne); B.J. Kollen (Boudewijn ); O.F. Norbruis (Obbe); J.C. Escher (Johanna); L.C. Walhout (Laurence); A. Kindermann; Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); P.F. van Rheenen (Patrick); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In children with symptoms suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who present in primary care, the optimal test strategy for identifying those who require specialist care is unclear. We evaluated the following three test strategies to determine which was optimal for

  2. Sex-dimorphic adverse drug reactions to immune suppressive agents in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Zelinkova (Zuzana); E. Bultman (Evelien); L. Vogelaar (Lauran); C. Bouziane (Cheima); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); C.J. van der Woude (Janneke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAIM: To analyze sex differences in adverse drug reactions (ADR) to the immune suppressive medication in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: All IBD patients attending the IBD outpatient clinic of a referral hospital were identifed through the electronic diagnosis

  3. Colonoscopic surveillance improves survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M. W. M. D.; Oldenburg, B.; Siersema, P. D.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; Dijkstra, G.; Hommes, D. W.; de Jong, D. J.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; van der Woude, C. J.; Vleggaar, F. P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colonoscopic surveillance provides the best practical means for preventing colorectal cancer (CRC) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Strong evidence for improved survival from surveillance programmes is sparse. METHOD: The aim of this study was to compare tumour stage and

  4. Colonoscopic surveillance improves survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M. W. M. D.; Oldenburg, B.; Siersema, P. D.; van Bodegraven, A. A.; Dijkstra, G.; Hommes, D. W.; de Jong, D. J.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; van der Woude, C. J.; Vleggaar, F. P.

    2009-01-01

    Colonoscopic surveillance provides the best practical means for preventing colorectal cancer (CRC) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Strong evidence for improved survival from surveillance programmes is sparse. The aim of this study was to compare tumour stage and survival of IBD

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine in inflammatory bowel disease patients: frequency and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Alberto; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Vallejo, Nicolau; Iglesias, Marta; Carmona, Amalia; González-Portela, Carlos; Lorenzo, Aurelio; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2012-11-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine in inflammatory bowel disease patients is progressively increased. To evaluate the use of complementary and alternative medicine in inflammatory bowel disease patients and to know potential risk factors for their use. The subjective response of these therapies and the impact on treatment adherence were also evaluated. Prospective, descriptive and transversal study. Inflammatory bowel disease patients were classified according to demographic and clinical characteristics. A questionnaire about the use of complementary and alternative medicine was collected. 705 patients were included. 126 patients (23%) had used complementary and alternative medicine. The most commonly used was herbal remedies (n=61), homoeopathy (n=36), acupuncture (n=31), kefir (n=31) and aloe vera (n=25). Factors associated with its use were extraintestinal manifestations (OR 1.69, CI 95% 1.11-2.57) and long-term evolution of the disease (OR 2.08, CI 95% 1.44-2.99). Most patients (74%) had the subjective feeling that use of complementary and alternative medicine had not improved their condition, 11 had adverse events related to its use and 11% of patients discontinued their conventional drugs. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in inflammatory bowel disease patients is frequent, especially in those with extraintestinal manifestations and long-term evolution. The use of these therapies was not perceived as a benefit for patients. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease: Investigation of the IL-10 signaling pathway in Iranian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemati, Shahram; Teimourian, Shahram; Tabrizi, Mina; Najafi, Mehri; Dara, Naghi; Imanzadeh, Farid; Ahmadi, Mitra; Aghdam, Maryam Kazemi; Tavassoli, Mohmoud; Rohani, Pejman; Madani, Seyyed Ramin; de Boer, Martin; Kuijpers, T. W.; Roos, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Background & aim: Comparing to adult inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), those with early onset manifestations have different features in terms of the underlying molecular pathology, the course of disease and the response to therapy. We investigated the IL-10 signaling pathway previously reported as

  7. Employment status, difficulties at work and quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, Angela G. E. M.; Evertsz', Floor Bennebroek; Stokkers, Pieter C.; Bockting, Claudia L.; Sanderman, Robbert; Hommes, Daniel W.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2016-01-01

    ObjectivesTo assess employment status, difficulties at work and sick leave in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and their relation with sociodemographic and clinical factors, quality of life (QoL), and anxiety and depression.Materials and methodsIBD patients attending an IBD outpatients'

  8. Illness perceptions and outcomes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease : Is coping a mediator?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, Sanne J. H.; Brakenhoff, Lianne K. P. M.; Vollmann, M.; van der Heijde, Désirée M.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Fidder, Herma H.; Hommes, D.W.; Kaptein, Ad A.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Scharloo, Margreet

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often experience severe impairment in different life domains. Psychological factors, such as illness perceptions and coping, may play a role in the adjustment to IBD as indicated by mental and physical health, activity and work impairment. The

  9. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Is Associated With an Increased Risk of Hospitalization for Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events, but a relation to heart failure (HF) is uncertain. We investigated the IBD-associated risk of HF in a nationwide setting. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 5 436 647 Danish citizens, with no history of IBD...

  10. Is ileoscopy with biopsy worthwhile in patients presenting with symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geboes, K.; Ectors, N.; D'Haens, G.; Rutgeerts, P.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the value of adding ileoscopy with biopsy to colonoscopy, hence increasing the indications for ileoscopy in patients presenting with symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. Two hundred fifty-seven patients with persistent diarrhea and 43 patients with sporadic colonic polyps were studied

  11. Analysis of a positional candidate gene for inflammatory bowel disease: NRAMP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkers, P. C.; Huibregtse, K.; Leegwater, A. C.; Reitsma, P. H.; Tytgat, G. N.; van Deventer, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    Genome scans have identified a region spanning 40 cM on the long arm of chromosome 12 as a susceptibility locus for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This locus contains several candidate genes for IBD, one of which is the gene for the natural resistance associated macrophage protein 2 (NRAMP2).

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents: mental health and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, I

    1999-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease in children and adolescents often leads to an extremely complex somatic and psychiatric situation. The psychological effect of inflammatory bowel disease warrants further investigation, especially concerning salutogenetic factors that may lead to good mental health despite bad somatic conditions. These studies used a multimethod design comprising both semiquantitative measures, such as rating scales and questionnaires, and qualitative in-depth interviews with both the child and his or her parents. Clinical comparison groups of matched children with diabetes and chronic tension headaches and matched children without chronic physical disease were examined. Inflammatory bowel disease often leads to psychiatric sequelae. Emotional disorders, especially depression and anxiety symptoms, were found to be common. Self-esteem was lowered. A subgroup of children with good mental health despite bad somatic conditions was found. They exhibited certain characteristics, including good knowledge of the disease, an internal locus of control, a good family climate, and an open social network. This study shows that the well-being of a chronically ill child depends not only on the course of the physical disease but also on the psychological and social complications that often seem to accompany a disease of this kind. The importance of taking good care of the psychosocial aspects of inflammatory bowel disease within the comprehensive treatment program is discussed.

  13. Colorectal Cancer Risk in Patients With Lynch Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, L.A.A.P.; Smits, L.J.T.; Lent-van Vliet, S. van; Dekker, E.; Aalfs, C.M.; Kouwen, M.C.A. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Hoentjen, F.

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it is not clear whether the risk of CRC is even higher for patients with a combination of Lynch syndrome and IBD. We investigated the risk for CRC in this subgroup by

  14. Characterization of the enhancer and promoter landscape of inflammatory bowel disease from human colon biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Thodberg, Malte; Vitezic, Morana

    2018-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal disorder, with two main types: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), whose molecular pathology is not well understood. The majority of IBD-associated SNPs are located in non-coding regions and are hard to characterize since...

  15. Ferric carboxymaltose prevents recurrence of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evstatiev, Rayko; Alexeeva, Olga; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common systemic complication of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Iron-deficiency anemia recurs frequently and rapidly after iron-replacement therapy in patients with IBD. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine if administration...... of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) prevents anemia in patients with IBD and low levels of serum ferritin....

  16. The complexity of evaluating and increasing adherence in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weimers, Petra; Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), due to their chronic and progressive nature, require lifelong treatment to relief and/or prevent inflammation and symptoms, obtaining mucosal healing at best. Therefore, adherence to treatment is an essential topic to address when treating patients with IBD...

  17. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard Larry; Jain, Suvinit

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cell growth regulation has been reported to be altered in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The cell growth regulatory factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), may be partly responsible for this phenomenon. So far, IGFBP-3 levels have been assessed...

  18. Evaluation of a psychoeducational intervention for adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Derkx, Bert H.; Last, Bob F.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprising Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and indeterminate colitis, often has its onset in adolescence. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a psychoeducational group intervention (aiming to enhance information seeking and giving about the disease,

  19. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weismueller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Faerkkilae, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew L.; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; de Valle, Maria Benito; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. METHODS: We

  20. Patient Age, Sex, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Phenotype Associate With Course of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weismuller, Tobias J.; Trivedi, Palak J.; Bergquist, Annika; Imam, Mohamad; Lenzen, Henrike; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Holm, Kristian; Gotthardt, Daniel; Farkkila, Martti A.; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Thorburn, Douglas; Weersma, Rinse K.; Fevery, Johan; Mueller, Tobias; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Schulze, Kornelius; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Almer, Sven; Pereira, Stephen P.; Levy, Cynthia; Mason, Andrew; Naess, Sigrid; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Floreani, Annarosa; Halilbasic, Emina; Yimam, Kidist K.; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Beuers, Ulrich; Huynh, Dep K.; Pares, Albert; Manser, Christine N.; Dalekos, George N.; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Berg, Christoph P.; Kirchner, Gabi I.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zimmer, Vincent; Fabris, Luca; Braun, Felix; Marzioni, Marco; Juran, Brian D.; Said, Karouk; Rupp, Christian; Jokelainen, Kalle; Benito de Valle, Maria; Saffioti, Francesca; Cheung, Angela; Trauner, Michael; Schramm, Christoph; Chapman, Roger W.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Schrumpf, Erik; Strassburg, Christian P.; Manns, Michael P.; Lindor, Keith D.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Boberg, Kirsten M.

    2017-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is an orphan hepatobiliary disorder associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to estimate the risk of disease progression based on distinct clinical phenotypes in a large international cohort of patients with PSC. We performed a retrospective

  1. The potential of radiologic procedures in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Dubrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there is no "golden standard" of diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Each and every individual case requires a thorough analysis of clinical symptoms in their association with endoscopic, histological, radiological and laboratory data. This review paper analyzes both conventional and novel methods of radiological investigations. Some of them have changed their significance from the "golden standard" to rare and limited application and from promising, then frequent and currently sporadic use of small bowel enema. Traditional ileocolonoscopy maintains its diagnostic potential, especially as a tool for follow up of patients with colonic and ileac disorders. The state-of-the-art non-invasive (ultrasound examination and limitedly non-invasive (computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging procedures are considered to be the most accurate methods for assessment of inflammatory bowel disorders in patient with already confirmed diagnosis and those with suspected cases of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The paper describes preparation of patient for each method, assessment technique, advantages and limitations for use, diagnostic criteria for intestinal wall thickness, accuracy of methods and discusses the perspectives of their use. The main sign of inflammatory bowel disease is thickening of intestinal wall. Usually its mean thickness in Crohn's disease (11 to 13 mm is higher than that in ulcerative colitis (7 to 8 mm. This may provide a diagnostic key during differential diagnosis of an isolated colon disease. The amount of the contrast cumulated by the intestinal wall directly correlates with inflammation activity. Intensive contract cumulation in the intestinal wall after intravenous contrast enhancement is a symptom of active inflammatory process. However, despite progression in the technologies, initial signs of inflammatory bowel diseases are quite superficial and remain hardly visible, being below the resolution

  2. Risk factors for tuberculosis in inflammatory bowel disease: anti-tumor necrosis factor and hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabino Riestra

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine risk factors for active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: Retrospective, case-control study at 4 referral hospitals in Spain. Cases developed tuberculosis after a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Controls were inflammatory bowel disease patients who did not develop tuberculosis. For each case, we randomly selected 3 controls matched for sex, age (within 5 years and time of inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis (within 3 years. Inflammatory bowel disease characteristics, candidate risk factors for tuberculosis and information about the tuberculosis episode were recorded. Multivariate analysis and a Chi-squared automatic interaction detector were used. Results: Thirty-four cases and 102 controls were included. Nine of the 34 cases developed active tuberculosis between 1989 and 1999, and 25 became ill between 2000 and 2012. Multivariate regression showed an association between active tuberculosis and anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor therapy in the previous 12 months (OR 7.45; 95% CI, 2.39-23.12; p = 0.001; hospitalization in the previous 6 months (OR 4.38; 95% CI, 1.18-16.20; p = 0.027; and albumin levels (OR 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95; p = 0.001. The median time between the start of biologic therapy and the onset of active tuberculosis was 13 (interquartile range, 1-58 months. Tuberculosis developed after a year of anti-TNF therapy in 53%, and late reactivation occurred in at least 3 of 8 patients. Conclusions: The main risks factors for developing tuberculosis were anti-TNF therapy and hospitalization. Over half the cases related to anti-TNF treatment occurred after a year.

  3. Endoscopic assessment of inflammatory bowel disease: colonoscopy/esophagogastroduodenoscopy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Grace

    2012-06-01

    Endoscopy plays an important role in the initial diagnosis of IBD, including the evaluation of disease severity, activity, and extent. The implications of complete mucosal healing further confirm the function of endoscopy in the follow-up of IBD patients. The use of therapeutic endoscopy, for example stricture dilatation, can avoid the need for bowel resection. Modalities such as capsule endoscopy, EUS, NBI, CE, and other emerging techniques are likely to have an increasing role in the management of IBD, particularly in the area of dysplasia surveillance and treatment.

  4. Periodontal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: emerging epidemiologic and biologic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agossa, K; Dendooven, A; Dubuquoy, L; Gower-Rousseau, C; Delcourt-Debruyne, E; Capron, M

    2017-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease and periodontitis are both described as a disproportionate mucosal inflammatory response to a microbial environment in susceptible patients. Moreover, these two conditions share major environmental and lifestyle-related risk factors. Despite this intriguing pathogenic parallel, large-scale studies and basic research have only recently considered periodontal outcomes as relevant data. There are mounting and consistent arguments, from recent epidemiologic studies and animal models, that these two conditions might be related. This article is a comprehensive and critical up-to-date review of the current evidence and future prospects in understanding the biologic and epidemiologic relationships between periodontal status and inflammatory bowel disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of three different MRI protocols in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesuratnam-Nielsen, Kayalvily; Løgager, Vibeke Berg; Munkholm, Pia; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for workup and control of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, disagreement remains as to how the MRI should be performed. To compare prospectively the diagnostic accuracy of MRI with neither oral nor intravenous contrast medium (plain MRI), magnetic resonance follow-through (MRFT) and MR enteroclysis (MRE) using MRE as the reference standard in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Plain MRI and MRE were carried out in addition to MRFT. All patients underwent both plain MR and MRFT on the same day and MRE within seven days. For the evaluation, the bowel was divided into nine segments. One radiologist, blinded to clinical findings, evaluated bowel wall thickness, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), mural hyperenhancement, and other inflammatory changes in each bowel segment. Twenty patients (6 men, 14 women; median age, 43.5 years; age range, 26–76 years) underwent all three examinations; 10 with Crohn’s disease (CD), three with ulcerative colitis (UC), and seven with IBD unclassified (IBD-U). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were in the range of 0–75%, 81–96%, and 75–95% for wall thickening, and 0–37%, 59–89%, and 50–86% for DWI in plain MRI, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were in the range of 0–50%, 96–100%, and 90–100% for wall thickening, 0–50%, 84–97%, and 82–95% for DWI, and 0–71%, 94–100%, and 85–100% for mural hyperenhancement in MRFT, respectively. The use of oral and intravenous contrast agent improves detection of bowel lesions resulting in MRFT remaining the superior choice over plain MRI for diagnostic workup in patients with IBD

  6. Selye's general adaptation syndrome: stress-induced gastro-duodenal ulceration and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, George

    2017-03-01

    Hans Selye in a note to Nature in 1936 initiated the field of stress research by showing that rats exposed to nocuous stimuli responded by way of a 'general adaptation syndrome' (GAS). One of the main features of the GAS was the 'formation of acute erosions in the digestive tract, particularly in the stomach, small intestine and appendix'. This provided experimental evidence for the view based on clinical data that gastro-duodenal (peptic) ulcers could be caused by stress. This hypothesis was challenged by Marshall and Warren's Nobel Prize (2005)-winning discovery of a causal association between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcers. However, clinical and experimental studies suggest that stress can cause peptic ulceration in the absence of H. pylori Predictably, the etiological pendulum of gastric and duodenal ulceration has swung from 'all stress' to 'all bacteria' followed by a sober realization that both factors play a role, separately as well as together. This raises the question as to whether stress and H. pylori interact, and if so, how? Stress has also been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and related disorders; however, there is no proof yet that stress is the primary etiological trigger for IBD. Central dopamine mechanisms seem to be involved in the stress induction of peptic ulceration, whereas activation of the sympathetic nervous system and central and peripheral corticotrophin-releasing factor appears to mediate stress-induced IBD. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  7. Colonic inflammation in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: detection with magnetic resonance enterography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campari, Alessandro [E. Bassini Hospital - ASST Nord Milano, Radiology Department, Milan (Italy); V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital - ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Pediatric Radiology Department, Milan (Italy); Napolitano, Marcello [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital - ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Pediatric Radiology Department, Milan (Italy); Zuin, Giovanna [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital - ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Pediatric Department, Milan (Italy); Maestri, Luciano [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital - ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Pediatric Surgery Department, Milan (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, Milan (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    Colonic involvement in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is common. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography is considered the best imaging modality for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease evaluation. It is unclear whether the lack of a dedicated large bowel preparation prevents a reliable colonic assessment. To determine the diagnostic performance of standard MR enterography in detecting and grading colonic inflammatory activity. We retrospectively evaluated children who underwent both MR enterography and ileocolonoscopy with biopsies <4 weeks apart. Two radiologists independently reviewed MR examinations and quantified inflammation in each of the five colonic segments using a standardized MR score system. Findings were compared with histological examination of the corresponding segment. Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, Jonckheere-Terpstra and Bland-Altman statistics were used. One hundred seventy-five segments from 37 examinations were included. MR enterography diagnostic performance for inflammation was as follows: sensitivity 94% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 90-97%), specificity: 64% (95% CI: 57-71%). A significant positive correlation was found between MR score and inflammatory activity histologically graded (P<0.001, Jonckheere-Terpstra test). The interobserver agreement was good (mean difference between MR enterography scores was -0.03; limits of agreement -2.8 to 2.7). Standard MR enterography is sensitive for the detection of actively inflamed colonic segments. MR enterography might provide useful information for guiding biopsies and its role as an alternative to ileocolonoscopy in monitoring colonic disease activity in children should be further investigated. (orig.)

  8. Colonic inflammation in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: detection with magnetic resonance enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campari, Alessandro; Napolitano, Marcello; Zuin, Giovanna; Maestri, Luciano; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Colonic involvement in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is common. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography is considered the best imaging modality for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease evaluation. It is unclear whether the lack of a dedicated large bowel preparation prevents a reliable colonic assessment. To determine the diagnostic performance of standard MR enterography in detecting and grading colonic inflammatory activity. We retrospectively evaluated children who underwent both MR enterography and ileocolonoscopy with biopsies <4 weeks apart. Two radiologists independently reviewed MR examinations and quantified inflammation in each of the five colonic segments using a standardized MR score system. Findings were compared with histological examination of the corresponding segment. Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, Jonckheere-Terpstra and Bland-Altman statistics were used. One hundred seventy-five segments from 37 examinations were included. MR enterography diagnostic performance for inflammation was as follows: sensitivity 94% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 90-97%), specificity: 64% (95% CI: 57-71%). A significant positive correlation was found between MR score and inflammatory activity histologically graded (P<0.001, Jonckheere-Terpstra test). The interobserver agreement was good (mean difference between MR enterography scores was -0.03; limits of agreement -2.8 to 2.7). Standard MR enterography is sensitive for the detection of actively inflamed colonic segments. MR enterography might provide useful information for guiding biopsies and its role as an alternative to ileocolonoscopy in monitoring colonic disease activity in children should be further investigated. (orig.)

  9. Can inflammatory bowel disease be permanently treated with short-term interventions on the microbiome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Dana; Clemente, Jose C; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    2015-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is a chronic, relapsing and remitting set of conditions characterized by an excessive inflammatory response leading to the destruction of the gastrointestinal tract. While the exact etiology of inflammatory bowel disease remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests that the human gastrointestinal microbiome plays a critical role in disease pathogenesis. Manipulation of the gut microbiome has therefore emerged as an attractive alternative for both prophylactic and therapeutic intervention against inflammation. Despite its growing popularity among patients, review of the current literature suggests that the adult microbiome is a highly stable structure resilient to short-term interventions. In fact, most evidence to date demonstrates that therapeutic agents targeting the microflora trigger rapid changes in the microbiome, which then reverts to its pre-treatment state once the therapy is completed. Based on these findings, our ability to treat inflammatory bowel disease through short-term manipulations of the human microbiome may only have a transient effect. Thus, this review is intended to highlight the use of various therapeutic options, including diet, pre- and probiotics, antibiotics and fecal microbiota transplant, to manipulate the microbiome, with specific attention to the alterations made to the microflora along with the duration of impact.

  10. Laparoscopic approach for inflammatory bowel disease surgical managment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiori, Léon; Panis, Yves

    2012-01-01

    For IBD surgical management, laparoscopic approach offers several theoretical advantages over the open approach. However, the frequent presence of adhesions from previous surgery and the high rate of inflammatory lesions have initially questioned its feasibility and safety. In the present review article, we will discuss the role of laparoscopic approach for IBD surgical management, along with its potential benefits as compared to the open approach.

  11. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard; Greenstein, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSES/OBJECTIVE: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer treated over a 34 year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty five patients had Ulcerative Colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's Disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In 2 of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent post-operative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median - 24 months). RESULTS: The 5 year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5 year rate of 86% for patients with Tis - T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p ) were noted in 3 patients (20%) receiving radiation therapy and these included two cases of grade 3 skin reactions and one case of grade

  12. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Small Bowel Cancer Risk, Clinical Characteristics, and Histopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Rasmus Dahlin; Riis, Lene Buhl; Høgdall, Estrid

    2017-01-01

    descriptions, we identified 40 cases of IBD-SBC. Risk was calculated by standardized incidence ratio (SIR) (observed/expected); patient characteristics were derived from medical files, and surgery specimens were obtained from hospitals nationwide for histopathological and molecular analyses. RESULTS: During...... 241,620 person-years of follow-up, 23 patients with Crohn's disease developed small bowel adenocarcinoma (SIR, 14.38; 95% confidence interval, 8.78-22.20) and 9 developed neuroendocrine tumors (SIR, 6.83; 95% confidence interval, 3.13-12.97). No significantly increased risk of SBC was found among...... had evidence of microsatellite instability. CONCLUSIONS: In a population-based study of patients in Denmark with IBD and SBC, we found risk of adenocarcinomas and neuroendocrine tumors to be increased among persons with Crohn's disease. Most patients with IBD-SBC had extensive IBD of moderate...

  13. Transition of adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease from pediatric to adult care: a survey of adult gastroenterologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hait, Elizabeth J.; Barendse, Renée M.; Arnold, Janis H.; Valim, Clarissa; Sands, Bruce E.; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Fishman, Laurie N.

    2009-01-01

    Transition of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) from pediatric to adult providers requires preparation. Gastroenterologists for adult patients ("adult gastroenterologists") may have expectations of patients that are different from those of pediatric patients. We sought to explore the

  14. Fecal Calprotectin Is Not Affected by Pregnancy: Clinical Implications for the Management of Pregnant Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julsgaard, Mette; Hvas, Christian L; Gearry, Richard B

    2017-01-01

    Background: Noninvasive biomarkers of inflammation for monitoring inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are important in pregnancy. Clinical and laboratory markers are often affected by the physiological adaption that occurs during pregnancy, although, few, if any, data exist on fecal calprotectin (FC...

  15. Brief report: development of the inflammatory bowel disease family responsibility questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, Rachel Neff; Doughty, Alyssa; Stephens, Mike; Kugathasan, Subra

    2010-03-01

    To present psychometric data on youth and parent versions of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease-Family Responsibility Questionnaire (IBD-FRQ), a measure of family involvement in IBD management. Fifty-eight adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), along with 55 mothers and 26 fathers completed the IBD-FRQ, a demographics questionnaire, and a measure of family involvement in decision making in non-IBD domains. Medical information was obtained via chart review. Support for the internal consistency of the IBD-FRQ was obtained. Evidence of validity was documented via moderate to high intercorrelations among reporters. Youth involvement increased with youth age, while maternal and paternal involvement decreased with youth age. Across all reporters, maternal involvement was higher than paternal involvement. Preliminary analyses offer support for the measure's reliability and validity. The measure shows promise as a means of assessing family involvement in IBD condition management; however, further validation studies are needed.

  16. The relationship between coping, health competence and patient participation among patients with inactive inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Seema; Jedel, S; Hood, M M; Mutlu, E; Swanson, G; Keshavarzian, A

    2014-05-01

    Coping is an integral part of adjustment for patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease but has not been well described in the literature. This study explored the relationship between coping, perceived health competence, patient preference for involvement in their treatment, depression and quality of life, particularly among patients with inactive disease (in remission). Subjects (n=70) with active and inactive IBD completed questionnaires, including the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Perceived Health Competence Scale and the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations. The Harvey Bradshaw Index measured disease activity. Patients with inactive IBD demonstrated significantly more interest in participating in their treatment (pperceived health competence (p=.001), less depressive symptoms (pperceived control of their health, and exhibit less depression symptoms. Our findings may increase awareness of the importance of identifying coping strategies for IBD patients, including those in remission. © 2013.

  17. Neuro-immune interactions in inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome: Future therapeutic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraneveld, A.D.; Rijnierse, A.; Nijkamp, F.P.; Garssen, J.

    2008-01-01

    The gastro-intestinal tract is well known for its largest neural network outside the central nervous system and for the most extensive immune system in the body. Research in neurogastroenterology implicates the involvement of both enteric nervous system and immune system in symptoms of inflammatory

  18. Neuro-immune interactions in inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome : Future therapeutic targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraneveld, A.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126612838; Rijnierse, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830224; Nijkamp, F.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067668852; Garssen, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086369962

    2008-01-01

    The gastro-intestinal tract is well known for its largest neural network outside the central nervous system and for the most extensive immune system in the body. Research in neurogastroenterology implicates the involvement of both enteric nervous system and immune system in symptoms of inflammatory

  19. Health care and patients' education in a European inflammatory bowel disease inception cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Vegh, Z; Pedersen, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    was the Internet (92% vs. 88% p=0.23). In Western Europe, significantly more patients were educated by nurses (19% vs. 1%, p... care and education of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: A quality of care (QoC) questionnaire was developed in the EpiCom group consisting of 16 questions covering 5 items: time interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, information, education, empathy and access...

  20. Does canine inflammatory bowel disease influence gut microbial profile and host metabolism?

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jia; Verbrugghe, Adronie; Louren?o, Marta; Janssens, Geert P. J.; Liu, Daisy J. X.; Van de Wiele, Tom; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Van de Maele, Isabel; Niu, Yufeng; Bosch, Guido; Junius, Greet; Wuyts, Brigitte; Hesta, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) refers to a diverse group of chronic gastrointestinal diseases, and gut microbial dysbiosis has been proposed as a modulating factor in its pathogenesis. Several studies have investigated the gut microbial ecology of dogs with IBD but it is yet unclear if this microbial profile can alter the nutrient metabolism of the host. The aim of the present study was to characterize the faecal bacterial profile and functionality as well as to determine host me...

  1. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorders: A systematized review of comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilzarbe, L; Fàbrega, M; Quintero, R; Bastidas, A; Pintor, L; García-Campayo, J; Gomollón, F; Ilzarbe, D

    2017-11-01

    Research has shown that there is an association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease, anxiety and mood disorders, however little is known about their association with Eating Disorders. In this paper we will present a case of a young female with a comorbid diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorder, and then discuss the results from a systematic review of the literature, describing published cases of patients with the same condition. A systematized review of the literature was conducted according to MOOSE guidelines. A computerized literature search of MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE, and a manual search through reference lists of selected original articles were performed to identify all published case-reports, case series and studies of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorders. Fourteen articles were included, encompassing 219 cases, including ours. The vast majority were females ranging from 10 to 44years old. Anorexia Nervosa (n=156) and Crohn's Disease (n=129) was the most frequent combination (n=90) reported in the literature. These cases present a poor prognosis because of corticoid refusal, medication abandon and/or deliberate exacerbation of IBD symptoms, in the context of trying to lose weight. Recent evidence suggests there is a possible association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Eating Disorders, although the mechanisms involved in its ethiopathogenesis are still unknown. To be aware of this association is important because a delayed diagnosis of this comorbidity may lead to worse prognosis. Further research and a multidisciplinary approach could facilitate earlier diagnosis and provide therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabonomics uncovers a reversible proatherogenic lipid profile during infliximab therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Steenholdt, Casper; Ainsworth, Mark; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Reed, Michelle A.C.; Atkins, Karen; Günther, Ulrich Leonhard; Hao, Fuhua; Wang, Yulan

    2017-01-01

    Background One-third of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients show no response to infliximab (IFX) induction therapy, and approximately half of patients responding become unresponsive over time. Thus, identification of potential treatment response biomarkers are of great clinical significance. This study employs spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling of serum from patients with IBD treated with IFX and healthy subjects (1) to substantiate the use of spectroscopy as a semi-invasive diagnos...

  3. Inflammatory bowel disease in central India: a single centre experience over five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ajay K; Sircar, Shohini; Jain, Mayank; Adkar, Sagar; Waghmare, Chandrashekhar

    2012-10-01

    In this retrospective study, the records of all patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease between 2005 and 2010 were analysed. Ulcerative colitis is far more common than Crohn's disease in our setting. The incidence is similar in both sexes and the age at diagnosis for both is similar. Limited left-sided ulcerative colitis is more common. Crohn's disease is difficult to diagnose and is commonly treated as tuberculosis in our setting.

  4. Expert opinion: Experience with 6-mercaptopurine in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Korelitz, Burton I

    2013-01-01

    Arbitrarily, modern day treatment of inflammatory bowel disease begins with the introduction of immunosuppressives for ulcerative colitis. Clinical improvement with sulfasalazine had been meaningful but modest. Treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosteroids led to clinical responses never before realized but it took much too long to recognize that they were not capable of maintaining remission, that adverse reactions were subtle but potentially devastating and that some other ...

  5. Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease following Bacille Calmette-Guérin and Smallpox Vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Anne Marie; Jess, Tine; Sørup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Childhood immunology has been suggested to play a role in development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) based on the studies of childhood vaccinations, infections, and treatment with antibiotics. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and smallpox vaccinations were gradually phased-out in Denmark...... for children born between 1965 and 1976, hence allowing the study of subsequent risk of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in a unique prospective design....

  6. Non-Invasive Mapping of the Gastrointestinal Microbiota Identifies Children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Papa, Eliseo; Docktor, Michael; Smillie, Christopher; Weber, Sarah; Preheim, Sarah P.; Gevers, Dirk; Giannoukos, Georgia; Ciulla, Dawn; Tabbaa, Diana; Ingram, Jay; Schauer, David B.; Ward, Doyle V.; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Bousvaros, Athos

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is challenging to diagnose because of the non-specificity of symptoms; an unequivocal diagnosis can only be made using colonoscopy, which clinicians are reluctant to recommend for children. Diagnosis of pediatric IBD is therefore frequently delayed, leading to inappropriate treatment plans and poor outcomes. We investigated the use of 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples and new analytical methods to assess differences in the microbiota o...

  7. Biomarkers of Therapeutic Response in the IL-23 Pathway in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cayatte, Corinne; Joyce-Shaikh, Barbara; Vega, Felix; Boniface, Katia; Grein, Jeffrey; Murphy, Erin; Blumenschein, Wendy M; Chen, Smiley; Malinao, Maria-Christina; Basham, Beth; Pierce, Robert H; Bowman, Edward P; McKenzie, Brent S; Elson, Charles O; Faubion, William A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Interleukin-23 (IL-23) has emerged as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As biomarkers of disease state and treatment efficacy are becoming increasingly important in drug development, we sought to identify efficacy biomarkers for anti-IL-23 therapy in Crohn's disease (CD). METHODS: Candidate IL-23 biomarkers, downstream of IL-23 signaling, were identified using shotgun proteomic analysis of feces and colon lavages obtained from a short-...

  8. Customer Quality of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease In Tabriz, 1391

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Hasanzadeh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Customer Quality is one of the most important dimensions of quality in health care which refers to service receiver's knowledge, attitude and skills that play effective role in treatment process. This study is aimed at assessing customer quality score in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Tabriz city in 2012. Material and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study which was conducted with the participation of 94 Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients who referred to Tabriz Imam Reza Hospital and Golgasht clinic. Customer Quality was measured using a questionnaire with 19 items which its validity was confirmed by 10 experts and its reliability was reviewed using Cronbach's alpha index (α =0.78.  Obtained data were analyzed using SPSS17.   Results: The results illustrated that average score of customer quality among patients with inflammatory bowel disease is 70.63 (±9.67. All the participants achieved stage 1 scores of Customer Quality in self-management but only 11.7% reported highest customer quality score and were able to continue their self-care in high pressure circumstances such as stress and financial problems. Also, there was a significant relation between customer quality score and patient’s education (P-value=0.05, so that by having higher education level, the customer quality score was increased as well. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that customer quality status in assessed patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease is partially acceptable, but major problems in some areas are evident and require more attention of health care managers and policy makers. ​

  9. EXCESSIVE WEIGHT – MUSCLE DEPLETION PARADOX AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN OUTPATIENTS WITH INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Izabel Siqueira de ANDRADE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Evidence suggests a nutritional transition process in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Obesity, which was once an uncommon occurrence in such patients, has grown in this population at the same prevalence rate as that found in the general population, bringing with it an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the nutritional status and occurrence of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Methods A case-series cross-sectional study was conducted involving male and female adult outpatients with inflammatory bowel disease. Data were collected on demographic, socioeconomic, clinical and anthropometric variables as well as the following cardiovascular risk factors: sedentary lifestyle, excess weight, abdominal obesity, medications in use, comorbidities, alcohol intake and smoking habits. The significance level for all statistical tests was set to 5% (P< 0.05. Results The sample comprised 80 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, 56 of whom (70.0% had ulcerative colitis and 24 of whom (30.0% had Crohn's disease. Mean age was 40.3±11 years and the female genre accounted for 66.2% of the sample. High frequencies of excess weight (48.8% and abdominal obesity (52.5% were identified based on the body mass index and waist circumference, respectively, in both groups, especially among those with ulcerative colitis. Muscle depletion was found in 52.5% of the sample based on arm muscle circumference, with greater depletion among patients with Crohn’s disease (P=0.008. The most frequent risk factors for cardiovascular disease were a sedentary lifestyle (83.8%, abdominal obesity (52.5% and excess weight (48.8%. Conclusion The results of the complete anthropometric evaluation draw one’s attention to a nutritional paradox, with high frequencies of both - muscle depletion, as well as excess weight and abdominal obesity.

  10. Review article: the potential role of nitric oxide in chronic inflammatory bowel disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Rask-Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    The aetiology of the chronic inflammatory bowel diseases-ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease-as well as 'microscopic colitis'-both collagenous (COC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)-remains unknown. Autoimmune mechanisms, cytokine polymorphism, commensal bacteria, infectious agents and vascular...... impairment have all been proposed as playing important roles in the pathogenesis of this spectrum of diseases. A variety of proinflammatory mediators, including tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, interferon gamma, leukotriene B4 and platelet activating factor, promote the adherence...

  11. Motivational interviewing in inflammatory bowel disease patients: a useful tool for outpatient counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocciaro, Filippo; Di Mitri, Roberto; Russo, Giuseppina; Leone, Salvo; Quercia, Valerio

    2014-10-01

    Most inflammatory bowel disease patients miss follow-up visits and are non-adherent to therapy due to the lack of an engaging patient-physician relationship. Motivational interviewing is a patient-centred counselling method used to elicit/strengthen motivation towards change. The aim of this study was to assess the role of motivational interviewing in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease. The study included consecutive patients with inflammatory bowel disease presenting for the first consultation (June 2012-February 2013). All consultations were carried out applying the motivational interviewing approach. After each consultation, patients filled out a questionnaire asking demographic data, and their past and current experience. Overall, 23 males (51.1%) and 22 females (48.9%), mean age 36.1±15.2 years, were enrolled. Before and after experiencing the motivational interviewing approach (mean visit duration 41.5±8.7min) "overall satisfaction rate", "physician's communication skills", and "perceived empathy" were 60% vs 100%, 40% vs 95.6%, and 40% vs 100%, respectively. Satisfaction was lower in patients affected by indeterminate colitis (p=0.004), and of younger age (p=0.02). The motivational interview approach is appreciated by inflammatory bowel disease patients. Despite being time-consuming, the motivational interview appears considerably worthwhile at the first visit and in younger patients. Motivational interviewing can help physicians to deal with their patients, moving from "cure" to "care". Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. On the Problem of Differential Diagnosis of Inflammatory and Functional Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Ya. Budzak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the problems of differential diagnosis of inflammatory (ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and functional (irritable bowel syndrome disease of the intestine. The necessity of such differential diagnosis in certain categories of patients was noted. The possibilities of instrumental and laboratory methods of study are shown. Particular attention is paid to the definition of fecal tests — calprotectin and lactoferrin. An analysis of the studies of their information content has been carried out.

  13. Cannabis and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: change blossoms a mile high

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffenberg, Edward J.; Newman, Heike; Collins, Colm; Leinwand, Kristina; Tarbell, Sally

    2017-01-01

    The trend towards decriminalization of cannabis (marijuana) continues sweeping across the United States. Colorado has been a leader of legalization of medical and recreational cannabis use. The growing public interest in the medicinal properties of cannabis and its use by patients with a variety of illnesses including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) makes it important for pediatric gastroenterologists to understand this movement and its potential impact on patients. This article describes th...

  14. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Pichai, Madharasi VA; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn’s disease are highly debilitating. There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications, failures in adequate drug delivery, and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD. This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics. This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine, studied ...

  15. Patients’ Diets and Preferences in a Pediatric Population with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Timothy J; Issenman, Robert M; Jacobson, Kevan

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the dietary practices of the pediatric inflammatory bowel disease population at the Children's Hospital of the Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation and the reported effectiveness of those diets.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A questionnaire mailed to 153 pediatric patients was returned by 125 patients (76 Crohn's disease [CD] and 49 ulcerative colitis [UC] patients) - an 82% response rate.RESULTS: The median age of respondents was 13 years, and 62% were male. Ninety per cent and ...

  16. Steroid dependency and pediatric inflammatory bowel disease in the era of immunomodulators-A population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Munkholm, Pia Susanne; Paerregaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: The aim was to investigate the impact of systemic steroid treatment (SST) and immunomodulators (IM) on disease course in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS:: All IBD patients in eastern Denmark......BACKGROUND:: The aim was to investigate the impact of systemic steroid treatment (SST) and immunomodulators (IM) on disease course in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS:: All IBD patients in eastern Denmark...

  17. Hepatocyte growth factor treatment ameliorates diarrhea and bowel inflammation in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, L Grier; Schwartz, Marshall Z; Kuenzler, Keith A; Birbe, Ruth

    2004-02-01

    Transfection of the HLA-B27 gene into normal Fischer rats induces phenotypic changes similar to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study investigated the benefits of 2 doses of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on the manifestations of IBD in this rat model. Fischer rats and HLA-B27 rats were divided into 4 groups: Fischer rats treated with saline, HLA-B27 rats treated with saline, HGF at 150 microg/kg/d, and HGF at 300 microg/kg/d. HGF or saline was infused for 14 days via an osmotic pump attached to a catheter in the internal jugular vein. After treatment, rats were evaluated for diarrhea and reduction in gross and microscopic bowel inflammation. Statistics were determined using analysis of variance (ANOVA). A P value diarrhea by 40%, gross inflammation by 41%, and microscopic inflammation by 72% (P diarrhea by 46%, gross inflammation by 45%, and microscopic inflammation by 54% (P < or =.05). HGF administration reduces the clinical manifestations of IBD in this rat model. Similar effects were seen at both doses of HGF administration, implying that there is a plateau above which further increases in HGF levels provides no added benefit. HGF administration may be clinically useful in the management of IBD.

  18. The prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases, microscopic colitis, and colorectal cancer in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy El-Salhy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is symptom-based and experts have developed diagnostic criteria for IBS. Distinguishing inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD from IBS, especially with mild disease activity, can be difficult. Another concern is microscopic colitis (MC. MC and IBS have similar symptoms and a normal endoscopic appearance. Our study investigated the prevalence of patients with IBD, MC, and colorectal cancer among 968 patients that fulfill the Rome III criteria for IBS. Among these patients, four were found with IBD (0.4% and seven with MC (0.7%. Among the IBD patients, three suffered from Crohn’s disease, affecting the terminal ileum, and one with ulcerative rectosigmoiditis. Of the seven patients with MC, two had collagenous colitis and five had lymphocytic colitis. Two IBS diarrhea-predominant patients had adenocarcin­oma in the sigmoid colon. These patients were a female aged 58 years and a male aged 56 years. We concluded from our study and earl­ier studies that symptom-based diagnosis of IBS may lead to missing a number of other gastrointestinal disorders that require quite different management than that for IBS.

  19. Review article: gut-directed hypnotherapy in the management of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S L; Muir, J G; Gibson, P R

    2015-06-01

    Gut-directed hypnotherapy is being increasingly applied to patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to a lesser extent, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To review the technique, mechanisms of action and evidence for efficacy, and to identify gaps in the understanding of gut-directed hypnotherapy as a treatment for IBS and IBD. A review of published literature and a systematic review of clinical trials in its application to patients with IBS and IBD were performed. Gut-directed hypnotherapy is a clearly described technique. Its potential mechanisms of action on the brain-gut axis are multiple with evidence spanning psychological effects through to physiological gastrointestinal modifications. Six of seven randomised IBS studies reported a significant reduction (all P hypnotherapy ranged between 24% and 73%. Efficacy was maintained long-term in four of five studies. A therapeutic effect was also observed in the maintenance of clinical remission in patients with ulcerative colitis. Uncontrolled trials supported the efficacy and durability of gut-directed hypnotherapy in IBS. Gaps in understanding included to whom and when it should be applied, the paucity of adequately trained hypnotherapists, and the difficulties in designing well controlled-trials. Gut-directed hypnotherapy has durable efficacy in patients with IBS and possibly ulcerative colitis. Whether it sits in the therapeutic arsenal as a primary and/or adjunctive therapy cannot be ascertained on the current evidence base. Further research into efficacy, mechanisms of action and predictors of response is required. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mechanisms behind efficacy of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Caroline Meyer; Coskun, Mehmet; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Biological treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors is successful in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). All TNF inhibitors antagonize the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α but with varying efficacies in IBD. The variations in efficacy probably are caused by structural ...... inhibitors in order to identify mechanisms of importance for their efficacy in IBD. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanistic basis for clinical efficacy can lead to a more rational use of TNF inhibitors in the management of IBD....

  1. Novel catalase loaded nanocores for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Arun K S; Srivastava, Shikha; Patel, Satish; Singh, Manju R; Singh, Deependra

    2017-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory disorder of the digestive tract reported to be primarily caused by oxidative stress. In this study, alginate encapsulated nanoceramic carriers were designed to deliver acid labile antioxidant enzyme catalase orally. Complete system was characterized for size, loading efficiency, in vitro antioxidant assay and in vitro release. The prepared nanoceramic system was found to be spherical with diameter of 925 ± 6.81 nm. The in vitro release data followed the Higuchi model in acidic buffer whereas in alkaline pH sustained and almost first order release of enzyme was observed up to 6 h.

  2. Host-microbe interactions have shaped the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jostins, Luke; Ripke, Stephan; Weersma, Rinse K

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome-wide association studies and subsequent meta-analyses of these two diseases as separate...... phenotypes have implicated previously unsuspected mechanisms, such as autophagy, in their pathogenesis and showed that some IBD loci are shared with other inflammatory diseases. Here we expand on the knowledge of relevant pathways by undertaking a meta-analysis of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis...

  3. Technical Quality of Delivered Care for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Tabriz Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Somi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and objectives : Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD is a chronic disease and requires complex treatment. Due to the various treatment options and gradual understanding of specialists about the risks and benefits of different treatments of IBD, delivering care according to the treatment protocols and guidelines is essential. This study was conducted to assess delivered care from the perspective of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted with 94 participants with IBD selected randomly in Emam Reza hospital and Golgasht clinic in Tabriz. Data were collected by an approved researcher-made questionnaire via interviewing patients. Chi-Squared Test was used to evaluate the relationship between demographic variables and accordance of delivered care with standards. SPSS17 was used for data analysis. Results : The results indicated that "visit by specialist" and "providing dietary recommendation by nutritionist" aspects had highest and lowest degree of accordance with standards, respectively. Furthermore, the aspects of “delivered care in exacerbation status of disease” and “delivered care by other specialists” had only 20 percent compliance with standards. Also, there was a significant relationship between age, job, education status, smoking and compliance with related standards in some care aspects (p Conclusion : The study results indicated that there is a deep gap between delivered cares for patients with inflammatory bowel disease and related standards. These deficiencies showed the parts that need improvement and require healthcare managers and policy makers’ attention.

  4. Surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease: A low prevalence, developing country perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasim, Sana; Chawla, Tabish; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2016-03-01

    To determine the outcomes of surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease. The retrospective case series was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised medical record of adult patients operated between January 1986 and December 2010 for inflammatory bowel disease. Outcomes consisted of complications till last follow-up and 30-day mortality (disease or procedure related). Functional status of patients with ileal pouch was determined via telephone. SPSS 16 was used to analyse data. Of the 36 patients whose records were reviewed, 21(58%) were males, and body mass index was less than 23 in 34(91%). A total of 27(75%) patients underwent elective surgery for their condition. Ileal pouch was formed in 9(25%). Overall mortality was 14(38.8%). Overall incidence of complications was 26(72%), with wound infection being the most common early morbidity in 11(30.5%). Late morbidity included pouchitisin 4/9 (44.9%) and strictures 2/36 (5.5%).On telephonic follow-up, 6 of the remaining 7patients (85%) with ileal pouch were satisfied with the functional results of the procedure. The retrospective case series represents results from a developing country with low prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease and hence limited experience.

  5. Biomarkers as Potential Treatment Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B Murdoch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the concept of ‘treat-to-target’ in inflammatory bowel disease as a mechanism to standardize management and prevent complications. While clinical, radiographic and endoscopic treatment end points will figure prominently in this promising management paradigm, the role that noninvasive biomarkers will play is currently undefined. The goal of the present systematic review was to investigate the potential value of biomarkers as treatment targets in inflammatory bowel disease, with particular focus on those best studied: serum C-reactive protein (CRP and fecal calprotectin. In Crohn disease, elevated CRP levels at baseline predict response to anti-tumour necrosis factor agents, and normalization is usually associated with clinical and endoscopic remission. CRP and hemoglobin levels can be used to help predict clinical relapse in the context of withdrawal of therapy. Ultimately, the authors conclude that currently available biomarkers should not be used as treatment targets in inflammatory bowel disease because they have inadequate operational characteristics to make them safe surrogates for clinical, endoscopic and radiographic evaluation. However, CRP and fecal calprotectin are important adjunctive measures that help alert the clinician to pursue further investigation.

  6. Ostomy creation with fewer sutures using tissue adhesives (cyanoacrylates) in inflammatory bowel disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, M; Ikeuchi, H; Bando, T; Sasaki, H; Chohno, T; Horio, Y; Takesue, Y

    2018-03-01

    Introduction Fistula formation around the ostomy site is a stoma-related complication often requiring surgical intervention. This complication may be caused by sutures or may develop as a complication of inflammatory bowel disease. Before conducting a clinical trial, we set out to investigate the safety of ostomy creation with fewer sutures using tissue adhesives in this pilot study. Methods Patients with inflammatory bowel disease who required surgery with ostomy creation at the Hyogo College of Medicine between January 2014 and December 2015 were enrolled. Safety was assessed by evaluating the incidence of stoma-related complications. Ostomy was restricted to loop ileostomy and was created with two sutures and tissue adhesives. Results A total of 14 patients were enrolled. Mean body mass index was 18.9 ± 2.0 kg/m 2 . There were no cases of ostomy retraction and no severe adverse events were observed. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrates that ostomy creation using tissue adhesives is safe. Although retraction and adverse events were not observed, even in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who generally exhibit delayed wound healing, the body mass index was extremely low in this series. This study does not strongly recommend ostomy creation with tissue adhesives; further studies are needed to clarify the efficacy and safety of the procedure.

  7. Impact of ethnicity, geography, and disease on the microbiota in health and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prideaux, Lani; Kang, Seungha; Wagner, Josef; Buckley, Michael; Mahar, Jackie E; De Cruz, Peter; Wen, Zhonghui; Chen, Liping; Xia, Bing; van Langenberg, Daniel R; Lockett, Trevor; Ng, Siew C; Sung, Joseph J Y; Desmond, Paul; McSweeney, Chris; Morrison, Mark; Kirkwood, Carl D; Kamm, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    The gut microbiota is central to health and disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Differences in microbiota related to geography and ethnicity may hold the key to recent changes in the incidence of microbiota-related disorders. Gut mucosal microbiota was analyzed in 190 samples from 87 Caucasian and Chinese subjects, from Australia and Hong Kong, comprising 22 patients with Crohn's disease, 30 patients with ulcerative colitis, 29 healthy controls, and 6 healthy relatives of patients with Crohn's disease. Bacterial 16S rRNA microarray and 454 pyrosequencing were performed. The microbiota was diverse in health, regardless of ethnicity or geography (operational taxonomic unit number and Shannon diversity index). Ethnicity and geography, however, did affect microbial composition. Crohn's disease resulted in reduced bacterial diversity, regardless of ethnicity or geography, and was the strongest determinant of composition. In ulcerative colitis, diversity was reduced in Chinese subjects only, suggesting that ethnicity is a determinant of bacterial diversity, whereas composition was determined by disease and ethnicity. Specific phylotypes were different between health and disease. Chinese patients with inflammatory bowel disease more often than healthy Chinese tended to have had a Western diet in childhood, in the East and West. The healthy microbiota is diverse but compositionally affected by geographical and ethnic factors. The microbiota is substantially altered in inflammatory bowel disease, but ethnicity may also play an important role. This may be key to the changing epidemiology in developing countries, and emigrants to the West.

  8. QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE: importance of clinical, demographic and psychosocial factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana MAGALHÃES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Inflammatory bowel disease causes physical and psychosocial consequences that can affect the health related quality of life. Objectives To analyze the relationship between clinical and sociodemographic factors and quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients. Methods Ninety two patients with Crohn’s disease and 58 with ulcerative colitis, filled in the inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ-32 and a questionnaire to collect sociodemographic and clinical data. The association between categorical variables and IBDQ-32 scores was determined using Student t test. Factors statistically significant in the univariate analysis were included in a multivariate regression model. Results IBDQ-32 scores were significantly lower in female patients (P<0.001, patients with an individual perception of a lower co-workers support (P<0.001 and career fulfillment (P<0.001, patients requiring psychological support (P = 0.010 and pharmacological treatment for anxiety or depression (P = 0.002. A multivariate regression analysis identified as predictors of impaired HRQOL the female gender (P<0.001 and the perception of a lower co-workers support (P = 0.025 and career fulfillment (P = 0.001. Conclusions The decrease in HRQQL was significantly related with female gender and personal perception of disease impact in success and social relations. These factors deserve a special attention, so timely measures can be implemented to improve the quality of life of patients.

  9. Maintaining Intestinal Health: The Genetics and Immunology of Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel DiseaseSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith R. Kelsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a multifactoral disease caused by dysregulated immune responses to commensal or pathogenic microbes in the intestine, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation. An emerging population of patients with IBD younger than 5 years of age represent a unique form of disease, termed very early onset IBD (VEO-IBD, which is phenotypically and genetically distinct from older-onset IBD. VEO-IBD is associated with increased disease severity, aggressive progression, and poor responsiveness to most conventional therapies. Further investigation into the causes and pathogenesis of VEO-IBD will help improve treatment strategies and may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms that are essential to maintain intestinal health or provoke the development of targeted therapeutic strategies to limit intestinal inflammation and promote tissue repair. Here, we discuss the phenotypic nature of VEO-IBD, the recent identification of novel gene variants associated with disease, and functional immunologic studies interrogating the contribution of specific genetic variants to the development of chronic intestinal inflammation. Keywords: Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Whole Exome Sequencing, Mucosal Immunology

  10. Neural control disturbances of the gastrointestinal tract and visceral pain in inflammatory bowel diseases 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ciesielczyk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a chronic intestinal inflammatory condition, the etiology of which is composed of factors such as the environment, genetic predisposition, gut dysbiosis and inadequate immune response. The pathologic findings in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are related to dysfunction of gastrointestinal secretion and motility and also disturbed visceral sensory function, with accompanying intestinal and parenteral complications. The systemic inflammatory response affects neurological control via the gut-brain axis, which modulates the cooperation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS, enteric nervous system (ENS and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT. In chronic inflammation the intestinal neuropathy disrupts peristalsis and intestinal secretion as well as causing unpleasant symptoms of the patients. Pain receptors are stimulated by inflammatory mediators, and due to the intensified activation of the nociceptive system visceral hypersensitivity through central and peripheral sensitization is generated. Chronic visceral pain negatively influences the course of disease and the quality of the patient’s life. The growing knowledge about the neurological control dysfunction of the intestine and immune system dysregulation could provide proper directives for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  11. Transcriptomic landscape of lncRNAs in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Aashiq Hussain; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2015-01-01

    -coding genes and microRNAs in modulating the immune responses in IBD. METHODS: In the present study, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome profiling of lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in 96 colon pinch biopsies (inflamed and non-inflamed) extracted from multiple colonic locations from 45 patients (CD = 13...... differentially expressed lncRNAs, respectively, while in cases of the non-inflamed CD and UC, we identified 12 and 19 differentially expressed lncRNAs, respectively. We also observed significant enrichment (P-value ... their involvement in the immune response, pro-inflammatory cytokine activity and MHC protein complex. CONCLUSIONS: The lncRNA expression profiling in both inflamed and non-inflamed CD and UC successfully stratified IBD patients from the healthy controls. Taken together, the identified lncRNA transcriptional...

  12. Dyssynergic defecation: a treatable cause of persistent symptoms when inflammatory bowel disease is in remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Lilani P; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Guilday, Corinne; Remshak, Kristin; Zadvornova, Yelena; Naik, Amar S; Stein, Daniel J; Massey, Benson T

    2013-12-01

    Introduction of biologic agents in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has increased the likelihood of disease remission. Despite resolution of active inflammation, a subset of IBD patients report persistent defecatory symptoms. To evaluate a group of patients with inflammatory bowel disease with suspected functional defecatory disorders, by use of anorectal manometric testing and subsequent biofeedback therapy. A group of IBD patients with persistent defecatory problems despite clinical improvement were included in this study. These patients had no evidence of left-sided disease. Endoscopic and radiographic study findings and timing in relation to the manometry study were recorded. Anorectal manometry was performed by the standard protocol and included rectal sensory assessment, ability to expel a balloon, and pressure dynamics with simulated defecation. Thirty IBD patients (Crohn's 23 patients; ulcerative colitis six patients) presented with defecatory disorders including constipation (67%) increased stooling (10%), and rectal urgency and/or incontinence and rectal pain (6%). All but one patient had anorectal manometric criteria of dyssynergia (presence of anismus motor pattern and inability to expel the balloon). Of the patients who completed biofeedback therapy, 30% had a clinically significant (≥7-point) improvement in SIBDQ score, with a reduction in health-care utilization after a six-month period (p=0.02). Despite remission, some inflammatory bowel disease patients have persistent defecatory symptoms. Defecatory symptoms may not be predictive of an underlying inflammatory disorder. Lack of inflammatory activity and absence of left-sided disease should prompt investigation of functional disorders. Anorectal manometric testing and biofeedback therapy for patients with a diagnosis of dyssynergia may be a useful therapy.

  13. Wegener’s granulomatosis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease and presenting with chronic enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahedi K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Shahedi,1,2 Ramy Magdy Hanna,1,2 Oleg Melamed,1,2 James Wilson2,31Department of Medicine Olive-View UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, CA, 2David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 3UCLA Medical Center-UCLA Stone Center, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Wegener’s granulomatosis, also known as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis, is a small vessel vasculitis with primarily pulmonary, renal, and sinus disease manifestations. The prevalence of Wegener’s granulomatosis is three cases per 100,000 patients. Cardiovascular, neurologic, cutaneous, and joint manifestations have been reported in many case reports and case series. Gastrointestinal manifestations are less noted in Wegener’s granulomatosis, although they have been previously reported in the form of intestinal perforation and intestinal ischemia. Additionally, there are characteristic findings of vasculitis that are noted with active Wegener’s granulomatosis of the small bowel. We report a case of an elderly patient who presented with weight loss, diarrhea, and hematochezia. His symptoms were chronic and had lasted for more than 1 year before diagnosis. Inflammatory bowel disease or chronic enteritis due to Salmonella arizonae because of reptile exposure originally were suspected as etiologies of his presentation. The findings of proteinuria, renal failure, and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy, in conjunction with an elevated c-ANCA titer, confirmed the diagnosis of Wegener’s granulomatosis with associated intestinal vasculitis. This case demonstrates an atypical presentation of chronic duodenitis and jejunitis secondary to Wegener’s granulomatosis, which mimicked inflammatory bowel disease.Keywords: ANCA-associated vasculitis, Wegener’s syndrome, pauci-immune glomerulonephritis, Salmonella arizonae, inflammatory bowel disease

  14. Prevalence and risk factors of Clostridium difficile infection in patients hospitalized for flare of inflammatory bowel disease: a retrospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnault, Helene; Bourrier, Anne; Lalande, Valerie; Nion-Larmurier, Isabelle; Sokol, Harry; Seksik, Philippe; Barbut, Frederic; Cosnes, Jacques; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have identified a high frequency of Clostridium difficile infections in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. To retrospectively assess the determinants and results of Clostridium difficile testing upon the admission of patients hospitalized with active inflammatory bowel disease in a tertiary care centre and to determine the predicting factors of Clostridium difficile infections. We reviewed all admissions from January 2008 and December 2010 for inflammatory bowel disease flare-ups. A toxigenic culture and a stool cytotoxicity assay were performed for all patients tested for Clostridium difficile. Out of 813 consecutive stays, Clostridium difficile diagnostic assays have been performed in 59% of inpatients. The independent predictive factors for the testing were IBD (ulcerative colitis: OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.9; pClostridium difficile infection was present in 7.0% of the inpatients who underwent testing. In a multivariate analysis, the only independent predictor was the intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs within the two months before admission (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.2-12.3; p=0.02). Clostridium difficile infection is frequently associated with active inflammatory bowel disease. Our study suggests that a recent intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is a risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease -associated Clostridium difficile infection. Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of inflammatory bowel disease activity by technetium 99m phagocyte scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullman, W.E.; Sullivan, P.J.; Barratt, P.J.; Lising, J.; Booth, J.A.; Doe, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    Autologous technetium 99m-labeled phagocyte scanning has been used to assess disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease in 51 consecutive patients. Strong correlations were found between the 24-h fecal excretion of isotope and the histologic score of mucosal biopsy specimens (rS = 0.84, p less than 0.001, where rS is Spearman's rank correlation coefficient), and between the 24-h fecal excretion of isotope and a clinical inflammatory bowel disease activity index based on the Crohn's disease activity index (rS = 0.87, p less than 0.001). To develop a clinically useful and objective measure of inflammatory bowel disease activity that did not require a 24-h stool collection, the intensity of bowel uptake on scanning was graded visually from 0 to 4, a ratio of count rates for the region of interest to the iliac crest reference region was calculated, and the rapidity of labeled phagocyte uptake into inflamed bowel was measured as the peak uptake time. Visual grading of disease activity on the scans was validated by comparing it with the ratio of count rates from inflamed bowel regions of interest and those from the iliac crest reference region. The ratio of count rates showed a significant correlation with the clinical disease activity index (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001). The visual scan grade also correlated well with the clinical activity index (r = 0.87, p less than 0.001). Count rates from hourly scans were also used to calculate the time of peak uptake of counts for a given region of interest. There was a strong negative correlation between this peak uptake time and the fecal excretion of isotope (rS = -0.81, p less than 0.001), a clinical activity index (r = -0.60, p less than 0.001), and the histologic score of the mucosal biopsy specimens (r = -0.84, p less than 0.001)

  16. Physiological basis for novel drug therapies used to treat the inflammatory bowel diseases I. Pathophysiological basis and prospects for probiotic therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, Fergus

    2012-02-03

    Mechanisms underlying the conditioning influence of the intestinal flora on mucosal homeostasis, including development and function of immune responses, are attracting increasing scientific scrutiny. The intestinal flora is a positive asset to host defense, but some of its components may, in genetically susceptible hosts, become a risk factor for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It follows that strategies to enhance assets or offset microbial liabilities represent a therapeutic option; therein lies the rationale for manipulation of the flora in IBD. In addition, the diversity of regulatory signalling among the flora and host epithelum, lymphoid tissue, and neuromuscular apparatus is an untapped reservoir from which novel therapeutics may be mined. Moreover, the capacity to engineer food-grade or commensal bacteria to deliver therapeutic molecules to the intestinal mucosa promises to extend the scope of microbial manipulation for the benefit of mankind.

  17. Validation of the Persian version of the inflammatory bowel disease questionnaire (IBDQ) in ulcerative colitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Iradj; Taghvaei, Tarang; Barzin, Maryam; Amin, Kamyar; Khalilian, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are a group of inflammatory conditions of the colon and small intestine that may have critical consequences on patient's quality of life (QOL). Many disease-specific QOL tools have been developed recently. The McMaster Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ) is one of them. The aim of this study was to translate the IBDQ from English to Persian and evaluate the validity and reliability of this version of the McMaster IBDQ. 68 subjects with ulcerative colitis were recruited in this study. The original IBDQ was translated into Persian using back- translation method. The reliability of the subscales and the summary score of the Persian IBDQ was demonstrated by intraclass correlation coefficients, their validity was evaluated by their correlations with SF-36, visual analogue scale and colitis activity index. All dimensions of IBDQ met the standards of construct validity and were correlated well with SF-36, visual analog scale and colitis activity index. IBDQ was able to discriminate the different groups of patients. The intraclass correlation coefficient was very high and its value was close to one (P<0.05). All dimensional scores differed significantly between the baseline and the follow-up measurement. The findings of this study conclude that the Persian translation of IBDQ confers satisfactory psychometric and cultural properties when applied to a sample of Iranian population with inflammatory bowel disease. This questionnaire is recommended for use in clinical trials and in the assessment of efficacy of interventions and therapy.

  18. The application of RNAi-based treatments for inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten Tobias Jarlstad; Gonzalez, Borja Ballarin; Howard, Ken

    2014-01-01

    in which small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediates specific downregulation of key molecular targets of the IBD inflammatory process may offer a precise, potent and safer alternative to conventional treatments. This review describes the aetiology of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis and the cellular...... and molecular basis for current treatments to highlight target candidates for an RNAi-based approach. Promising preclinical studies support an RNAi application; however, optimal siRNA designs that maximise potency and development of enabling technologies for site- and cellular-specific delivery......Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, relapsing, idiopathic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract with no permanent cure. Present immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies are often ineffective and associated with severe side effects. An RNA interference (RNAi)-based approach...

  19. Intestinal inflammation in TNBS sensitized rats as a model of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Selve

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An enteritis, based on a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, was induced in TNBS (2,4,4-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid sensitized rats by multiple intrajejunal challenge with TNBS via an implanted catheter. This treatment induced chronic inflammation of the distal small intestine characterized by intense hyperaemia, oedema and gut wall thickening as assessed by macroscopic scoring and weighing a defined part of the dissected intestine. Histologically, the inflammatory response included mucosal and submucosal cell infiltration by lymphocytes and histiocytes, transmural granulomatous inflammation with multinucleated cells and activated mesenteric lymph nodes. Ex vivo stimulated release of the inflammatory mediator LTB4 in the dissected part of the intestine was increased following TNBS treatment. Drug treatment with sulphasalazine or 5-aminosalicylic acid improved the enteritis score and attenuated TNBS induced oedema formation and LTB4 production. The applicability and relevance of this new model are discussed with respect to drug development and basic research of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) Polymorphisms and Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Scottish and Danish Case–Control Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Nimmo, Elaine; Krarup, Henrik B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are a result of interactions between luminal pathogens and the intestinal immune response. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a key role in the regulation of the inflammatory response upon stimulation by luminal pathogens via Toll-like receptors. Methods...

  1. Quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography of the bowel wall can predict disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanini, Laura, E-mail: laura.romanini@libero.it [Department of Radiology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Passamonti, Matteo, E-mail: matteopassamonti@gmail.com [Department of Radiology-AO Provincia di Lodi, Via Fissiraga, 15, 26900 Lodi (Italy); Navarria, Mario, E-mail: navarria.mario@tiscali.it [Department of Radiology-ASL Vallecamonica-Sebino, Via Manzoni 142, 25040 Esine, BS (Italy); Lanzarotto, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.lanzarotto@spedalicivili.brescia.it [Department of Gastroenterology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Villanacci, Vincenzo, E-mail: villanac@alice.it [Department of Pathology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Grazioli, Luigi, E-mail: radiologia1@spedalicivili.brescia.it [Department of Radiology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Calliada, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.calliada@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Pavia, Viale Camillo Golgi 19, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Maroldi, Roberto, E-mail: rmaroldi@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of quantitative analysis of bowel wall enhancement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) by comparing the results with vascular density in a biopsy sample from the same area of the intestinal tract, and to determine the usefulness of this analysis for the prediction of disease activity. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institute's ethics committee and all patients gave written informed consent. We enrolled 33 consecutive adult patients undergoing colonoscopy and biopsy for IBD. All patients underwent CEUS and the results were quantitatively analyzed. Vessel count per high-power field on biopsy specimens was compared with colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS findings, and with analysis of peak intensity, time to peak, regional blood volume, mean transit time, and regional blood flow. Results in patients with high and low vascular density were compared using Fisher's test, t-test, Pearson's correlation test, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Cutoff values were determined using ROC analysis, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: High vascular density (>265 vessels per field) on histological examination was significantly correlated with active disease on colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS (p < .0001). Quantitative analysis showed a higher enhancement peak, a shorter time to peak enhancement, a higher regional blood flow and regional blood volume in patients with high vascular density than in those with low vascular density. Cutoff values to distinguish between active and inactive disease were identified for peak enhancement (>40.5%), and regional blood flow (>54.8 ml/min). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of CEUS data correlates with disease activity as determined by vascular density. Quantitative parameters of CEUS can be used to predict active disease with high sensitivity and

  2. Comparison of comorbid depression between irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: A meta-analysis of comparative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Qin; Zhang, Qing-E; Wang, Fei; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Chee H; Ungvari, Gabor S; Wang, Gang; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2018-09-01

    The prevalence of comorbid depression is high in chronic gastrointestinal disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For these two disorders in particular, the findings have not been consistent. This meta-analysis systematically compares the rates and severity of comorbid depression between IBS and IBD patients. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, Cochrane Library, Wan Fang, SinoMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure from their inception date to September 12, 2017 for comparative studies on IBS and IBD patients. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) and odds ratios (OR) of comorbid depression were calculated using random effect models. Data on comorbid anxiety in the included studies were also extracted and analyzed. Altogether, 22 studies with 1,244 IBS and 1,048 IBD patients were included. While there was no significant group difference in the prevalence of depression (10 studies, OR = 1.18, 95%CI: 0.87-1.60, P = 0.29), the IBS group had more severe depression (pooled SMD = 0.18, 95%CI: 0.04-0.33, P = 0.01) and anxiety than the IBD group (pooled SMD = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.14-0.49, P = 0.0006). Sixteen (72.7%) studies were assessed as 'high quality' using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Although the prevalence of comorbid depression was similar between groups, IBS patients had more severe comorbid depressive and anxiety symptoms compared to IBD patients. Appropriate assessment and treatment of depressive and anxiety symptoms in these patient groups should be implemented. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. How Patients View Probiotics: Findings from a Multicenter Study of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, MaryBeth; Brinich, Margaret A.; Geller, Gail; Harrison, Krista; Highland, Janelle; James, Katherine; Marshall, Patricia; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Tilburt, Jon; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Farrell, Ruth M.; Sharp, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have access to a growing number of probiotic products marketed to improve digestive health. It is unclear how patients make decisions about probiotics and what role they expect their gastroenterologists to play as they consider using probiotics. Understanding patients’ knowledge, attitudes and expectations of probiotics may help gastroenterologists engage patients in collaborative discussions about probiotics. Study Focus groups were conducted with patients with IBD and IBS at the Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins University. Inductive analytic methods were utilized to identify common themes and draw interpretations from focus group narratives. Results One hundred thirty-six patients participated in 22 focus groups between March and August 2009. Patients viewed probiotics as an appealing alternative to pharmaceutical drugs and understood probiotics as a more “natural,” low-risk therapeutic option. Many patients were hesitant to use them without consulting their gastroenterologists. Patients would weigh the risks and benefits of probiotics, their disease severity and satisfaction with current treatments when considering probiotic use. Conclusions Patients are interested in probiotics but have many unanswered questions about their use. Our findings suggest that patients with IBD and IBS will look to gastroenterologists and other clinicians as trustworthy advisors regarding the utility of probiotics as an alternative or supplement to pharmaceutical drugs. Gastroenterologists and other clinicians who care for patients with these diseases should be prepared to discuss the potential benefits and risks of probiotics and assist patients in making informed decisions about their use. PMID:21716123

  4. Quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography of the bowel wall can predict disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanini, Laura; Passamonti, Matteo; Navarria, Mario; Lanzarotto, Francesco; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Grazioli, Luigi; Calliada, Fabrizio; Maroldi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of quantitative analysis of bowel wall enhancement in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) by comparing the results with vascular density in a biopsy sample from the same area of the intestinal tract, and to determine the usefulness of this analysis for the prediction of disease activity. Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by our institute's ethics committee and all patients gave written informed consent. We enrolled 33 consecutive adult patients undergoing colonoscopy and biopsy for IBD. All patients underwent CEUS and the results were quantitatively analyzed. Vessel count per high-power field on biopsy specimens was compared with colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS findings, and with analysis of peak intensity, time to peak, regional blood volume, mean transit time, and regional blood flow. Results in patients with high and low vascular density were compared using Fisher's test, t-test, Pearson's correlation test, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Cutoff values were determined using ROC analysis, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Results: High vascular density (>265 vessels per field) on histological examination was significantly correlated with active disease on colonoscopy, baseline ultrasonography, and CEUS (p < .0001). Quantitative analysis showed a higher enhancement peak, a shorter time to peak enhancement, a higher regional blood flow and regional blood volume in patients with high vascular density than in those with low vascular density. Cutoff values to distinguish between active and inactive disease were identified for peak enhancement (>40.5%), and regional blood flow (>54.8 ml/min). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of CEUS data correlates with disease activity as determined by vascular density. Quantitative parameters of CEUS can be used to predict active disease with high sensitivity and

  5. Comparison of three commercial fecal calprotectin ELISA test kits used in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Bachmann Holmetoft, Ulla; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fecal calprotectin is a noninvasive marker of intestinal inflammation used to distinguish between functional and organic bowel diseases and to evaluate disease activity among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The goal of this study was to compare three different ELISA tests...... and 18 to 67 years, respectively. Disease activity in the patients was established using the following clinical activity indices: the Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index (SCCAI), the Harvey Bradshaw Index (HBI) and the Modified Pouchitis Disease Activity Index (MPDAI). Three ELISA calprotectin tests...... (EK-CAL, CALPRO and HK325) were performed on fecal specimens and results compared. RESULTS: The CALPRO calprotectin ELISA test was shown to have the best specificity of 96% compared to the HK325 and the EK-CAL calprotectin ELISA tests with 28% specificity and 74% specificity, respectively...

  6. Effects of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases on left ventricular structure and function: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botti Fiorenzo

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental evidences suggest an increased collagen deposition in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. In particular, large amounts of collagen type I, III and V have been described and correlated to the development of intestinal fibrotic lesions. No information has been available until now about the possible increased collagen deposition far from the main target organ. In the hypothesis that chronic inflammation and increased collagen metabolism are reflected also in the systemic circulation, we aimed this study to evaluate the effects on left ventricular wall structure by assessing splancnic and systemic collagen metabolism (procollagen III assay, deposition (ultrasonic tissue characterization, and cardiac function (echocardiography in patients with different long standing history of IBD, before and after surgery. Methods Thirty patients affected by active IBD, 15 with Crohn and 15 with Ulcerative Colitis, submitted to surgery will be enrolled in the study in a double blind fashion. They will be studied before the surgical operation and 6, 12 months after surgery. A control group of 15 healthy age and gender-matched subjects will also be studied. At each interval blood samples will be collected in order to assess the collagen metabolism; a transthoracic echocardiogram will be recorded for the subsequent determination of cardiac function and collagen deposition. Discussion From this study protocol we expect additional information about the association between IBD and cardiovascular disorders; in particular to address the question if chronic inflammation, through the altered collagen metabolism, could affect left ventricular structure and function in a manner directly related to the estimated duration of the disease.

  7. Application of 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Preparations in the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the comparative characterization of different derivatives of 5-aminosalicylic acid. Researches of the past decades have changed the presentation of the potential use of aminosalicylates in the therapy of various inflammatory bowel diseases. In connection with unknown etiology of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, there is no causal treatment of these diseases. The essence of treatment is reduced to inhibition of inflammatory activity during exacerbations and a course of preventive treatment. Numerous studies over the past 20 years have shown that the basis of basic treatment for nonspecific chronic inflammatory bowel diseases is 5-aminosalicylic acid drugs, or salicylates. When choosing the dosage form, you should take into account the differences between mesalazine preparations depending on the type of the coat. It is shown that in terms of pharmacokinetics, the most effective mesalazine dosage forms for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease with lesions of the colon are enteric coated tablets that provides a pH-dependent gradual release of 5-aminosalicylic acid throughout the entire colon. 5-aminosalicylic acid drugs available today on the pharmaceutical market are able to control the course of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease with lesions of the colon in the majority of patients. The use of 5-aminosalicylic acid preparations is not limited to the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. The drug is widely used in other diseases of the bowel, such as diverticular disease of the colon, colitis banal, radiation damages of the colon, as well as to treat common diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome. The study, which was conducted in the department bowel disease of the State Institution «Institute of Gastroenterology» for 2 years, showed a positive effect of 20-day treatment with Mesacol in uncomplicated diverticular disease. The use of Mesacol at a dose of 1,600 mg

  8. [Cutaneous involvement in chronic inflammatory bowel disease : Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, L; Rappersberger, K

    2016-12-01

    Over recent decades, both the incidence and prevalence of chronic inflammatory bowel disease have continued to rise in industrialized countries; the disease is frequently associated with extracutaneous involvement and comorbidity. The purpose of this work was to investigate the frequency and specificity of mucocutaneous manifestations in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). An extensive search in peer-reviewed journals via PubMed was performed; presented is a summary and analysis of various studies and data, including data of patients treated at our department. CD and UC are frequently associated with mucocutaneous symptoms; however, primary/specific disease-associations are exclusively seen in CD patients. These include peri-anal and -stomal fistulas and ulcerations, "metastatic" Crohn's disease as well as oral granulomatous disease. Moreover, in both CD and UC, there occur several other inflammatory skin conditions such as erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, hidradenitis suppurativa, chronic oral aphthous disease, Sweet syndrome, pyostomatitis vegetans, and bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome. Malnutrition syndromes (zinc and vitamin deficiencies) are only rarely observed. On skin and oral/genital mucous membranes various different inflammatory manifestations may be observed during the course of CD or UC. However, most data about a direct pathogenic relationship of the gastrointestinal and dermatologic disorders are quite heterogeneous or even contradictory. Nevertheless, knowledge of these conditions and their possible association with CD and UC could be crucial for early diagnosis and initiation of an appropriate therapy and thus be essential to prevent secondary tissue damage.

  9. A clinical review of recent findings in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponder A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Alexis Ponder, Millie D LongDepartment of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, including both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are disorders of chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract marked by episodes of relapse and remission. Over the past several decades, advances have been made in understanding the epidemiology of IBD. The incidence and prevalence of both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis have been increasing worldwide across pediatric and adult populations. As IBD is thought to be related to a combination of individual genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, and alterations in the gut microbiome that stimulate an inflammatory response, understanding the potentially modifiable environmental risk factors associated with the development or the course of IBD could impact disease rates or management in the future. Current hypotheses as to the development of IBD are reviewed, as are a host of environmental cofactors that have been investigated as both protective and inciting factors for IBD onset. Such environmental factors include breast feeding, gastrointestinal infections, urban versus rural lifestyle, medication exposures, stress, smoking, and diet. The role of these factors in disease course is also reviewed. Looking forward, there is still much to be learned about the etiology of IBD and how specific environmental exposures intimately impact the development of disease and also the potential for relapse.Keywords: clinical epidemiology, inflammatory bowel disease, environmental risk factors

  10. ORAL MUCOSA LESIONS AND ORAL SYMPTOMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE PATIENTS

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    Nuno LARANJEIRA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease is known for its extra intestinal manifestations, the oral cavity is no exception. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and oral mucosa lesions and symptoms, and complementary to evaluate their possible relation with oral hygiene, smoking habits, drug therapy, duration and activity of the disease. Methods Patients were selected from the Gastroenterology Clinic of a Portuguese tertiary referral hospital. This sample consisted of 113 patients previously diagnosed with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease along with a control group of 58 healthy individuals that were accompanying the study group patients to their appointments. Clinical interviews and clinical examinations were performed for data collection. Results The patients in the study group were more affected by oral symptoms (P=0.011, and showed a trend towards a higher incidence of oral mucosal lesions, even though statistical significance was not reached (8.8% versus 3.4% in the control group; P=0.159. Patients in active phase were the most affected. No differences were detected between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, or concerning smoking habits. The corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy seemed to increase the incidence of oral symptoms (P=0.052. The oral mucosa lesions increased and the oral symptoms decreased over the course of the disease, however without statistical significance. Conclusion Oral mucosa’s lesions and oral symptoms were positively associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, mainly during disease activity periods and conceivably, associated with corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy.

  11. Radio localization of inflammatory bowel diseases using 99mtc-colloidal bismuth subcitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, G.; Miranda, M.; Sanchez, I.; Oliva, J.; Velasco, M.; Paniagua, M.; Pinol, F.; Riano, A.; Paneque, A.; Castillo, J.; Leyvad, R.

    2006-01-01

    A correct diagnosis and adequate assessment of disease activity is crucial in the management and surveillance of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). However, in certain occasions the obtained results by means of traditional techniques are not correlated specifically with the inflammatory state of the mucosal wall, mainly in case of the small bowel, due to its no accessibility. This investigation constituted a multi centric clinical trial phase I-II. Forty-four patients were prospectively evaluated with the objective of determining the validity of the scintigraphy with 99mTc-Sn-CBS for the diagnosis of illnesses with ulcerations of the intestinal tube. Of the evaluated patients, 20 presented Cohns Disease (in 1 of them the scintigraphy was not useful), Idiopathic Ulcerative Colitis, 3 gastric ulcer and 20 patients were seemingly healthy, conforming these last ones the group control. Five hundred mgs of CBS were labelled with 370 MBq (10 mCi) of 99mTc and administered by oral via as unique dose. The diagnostic test had duration of three days for each patient: first day for the patient's preparation with soft diet and 20% mannitol and two days for the image registrations. The images were carried out at 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours post administered the product. All procedures were performed by experienced examiners, who were blinded to the clinical data and other results. It was determined the sensibility and specificity of this technique taking like reference test, the colonoscopy, gastroduodenoscopy, intestinal transit and/or biopsy, achieving a sensibility of 91,3% and a specificity of 90%. During the whole study an adverse event appeared, which had not very probable causation according to the scale of Karch and Lasagna. It can be concluded that the diagnostic criteria established in this study can be useful for the evaluation of inflammatory bowel diseases by scintigraphy with 99mTc-Sn-CBS. (Author)

  12. Impotence after mesorectal and close rectal dissection for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, I; George, B D; Kettlewell, M G; Mortensen, N J

    2001-06-01

    Close rectal dissection is a surgical technique used by some surgeons in inflammatory bowel disease. It is performed within the mesorectum, close to the rectal muscle wall, with the aim of minimizing damage to the pelvic sexual nerves. Other surgeons dissect in the more anatomical mesorectal plane. Our aim was to determine whether close rectal dissection is more protective of the pelvic sexual nerves than mesorectal dissection. Patients undergoing surgery for inflammatory bowel disease were entered prospectively into a database. Male patients were mailed a standardized, validated, urologic impotence questionnaire: the International Index of Erectile Function. There was an 81 percent response rate. Six of 156 assessable patients were totally impotent (3.8 percent). They were all in the 50-year-old to 70-year-old age group, with no impotence in patients younger than 50 years old. Twenty-one patients complained of minor diminution of erectile function (13.5 percent), where sexual activity was still possible. There was no statistical difference in the rate of complete (2.2 percent vs. 4.5 percent, P = 0.67) or partial (13.5 percent vs. 13.3 percent, P = 0.99) impotence between close rectal and mesorectal dissection (Fisher's exact test). There were no ejaculatory difficulties. The time elapsed since surgery ranged from 2.7 months to 192.7 months, with a median of 74.5 months. Rectal excision for inflammatory bowel disease can be conducted with low rates of impotence. Minor degrees of erectile dysfunction may be more common than currently recognized. We could not demonstrate that close rectal dissection significantly protects the patient from impotence compared with operating in the anatomical mesorectal plane. Age appears to be the most important risk factor for postoperative impotence.

  13. Down's syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: is there a real link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Souto-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Down's syndrome (DS is a genetic disease that has been associated with several immune and autoimmune diseases, including digestive and liver diseases, like celiac disease, autoimmune chronic hepatitis and sclerosing cholangitis. Despite in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD pathogenesis, genetics and immune mechanism play an important role, the association among DS and IBD has been poorly studied. Data about IBD diagnosis in DS patients is very scarce with only some individual case-reports. We report three cases of DS patients diagnosed of IBD and we discuss the possible association of these two entities.

  14. Risk of Ectopic Pregnancy in Women With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Silva, Punyanganie S; Hansen, Helene H; Wehberg, Sonja

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Few data are available on adverse events of pregnancy in women with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), such as ectopic pregnancy. We assessed the risk of an ectopic pregnancy in pregnancies of women in Denmark with IBD compared with those without IBD over a 22-year period. We...... also examined the disease-specific risks of ectopic pregnancies in pregnancies of women with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) who underwent IBD-related surgical procedures. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of all women of child-bearing age (ages, 15-50 y) registered...

  15. Laparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2008-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is technically demanding but can offer improved short-term outcomes. The introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) as the default operative approach for IBD, however, may have inherent learning curve-associated disadvantages. We hypothesise that the establishment of MIS as the standard operative approach does not increase patient morbidity as assessed in the initial period of its introduction into a specialised unit, and that it confers earlier postoperative gastrointestinal recovery and reduced hospitalisation compared with conventional open resection.

  16. Increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke during active stages of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, S. L.; Lindhardsen, J.; Ahlehoff, O.

    2014-01-01

    patients with new-onset IBD and 236 275 age- and sex-matched controls. Poisson regression analyses with continuously updated covariates were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of AF and stroke. Disease activity stages of flare (new disease activity), persistent activity, and remission were...... defined by corticosteroid prescriptions, IBD hospital admissions, and biological treatment. Inflammatory bowel disease patients had a mean age of 43.9 years, 53.9 were women, and mean follow-up was 6.8 years. Among IBD patients, 685 had AF and 549 had a stroke, corresponding to incidence rates per 1000...

  17. Evidence-based consensus on opportunistic infections in inflammatory bowel disease (republication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients are a high-risk population for opportunistic infections. The IBD group of the Chinese Society of Gastroenterology of the Chinese Medical Association organized an expert group to discuss and develop this consensus opinion. This consensus opinion referenced clinical study results from China and other countries to provide guidance for clinical practices. Eight major topics, including cytomegalovirus infection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, viral hepatitis, bacterial infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, fungal infection, parasitic infection, and vaccines were introduced in this article.

  18. Review article: the incidence and prevalence of colorectal cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, P

    2003-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC), complicating ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, only accounts for 1-2% of all cases of CRC in the general population, it is considered a serious complication of the disease and accounts for approximately 15% of all deaths in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD...... of symptoms, and extent of the disease, with pancolitis having a more severe inflammation burden and risk of the dysplasia-carcinoma cascade. Considering the chronic nature of the disease, it is remarkable that there is such a low incidence of CRC in some of the population-based studies, and possible...... in Crohn's disease, the number was significantly increased in relation to the expected number....

  19. Optimizing the Care and Health of Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Nee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD including both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is increasing worldwide. Although diagnosis is equally found in men and women, the chronicity of IBD poses a unique impact on the milestones of a woman’s life. As the gastroenterologist becomes increasingly important in the health maintenance of patients with IBD, this review stresses the unique gender issues in women with IBD related to menstruation, cervical cancer, sexual health, contraception, and menopause that may affect the course of disease, treatment decisions, and quality of life.

  20. East-West gradient in the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J.; Pedersen, N; Cukovic-Cavka, S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe. The reasons for these changes remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an East-West gradient in the incidence of IBD in Europe exists. DESIGN: A prospective, uniformly diagnosed...... treatment as rescue therapy. Of all European CD patients, 20% received only 5-aminosalicylates as induction therapy. CONCLUSIONS: An East-West gradient in IBD incidence exists in Europe. Among this inception cohort-including indolent and aggressive cases-international guidelines for diagnosis and initial...

  1. Ferrokinetic Parameters and Regulation of Iron Metabolism in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Y. Boiko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Article presents parameters of iron metabolism and cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (CIBD. The material for the study was the blood of 69 patients with CIBD and anemia and 26 — without anemia. We have studied the features of main ferrokinetic parameters — iron, total iron-binding capacity of serum, transferrin saturation, ferritin, transferrin receptor, erythropoietin, hepcidin depending on hemoglobin level and the type of anemia. The relationship of iron metabolism disorders with the level of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α is shown.

  2. Comparison of geographic distributions of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Inflammatory Bowel Disease fail to support common evolutionary roots: Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases are not related by evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Andrew; Xue, Xiaoqing

    2018-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) shares overlapping symptoms and some features of pathogenesis with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD: Crohn's disease [CD], and Ulcerative Colitis [UC]). Geographic markers such as latitude/sunshine and more recently lactase population distributions are found to be correlated with IBD. As a result of clinical and pathogenic similarities between the 2 conditions, some authorities questioned whether a connection exists between them. We compare IBS directly with IBD, and indirectly with geographic markers associated with IBD, in order to evaluate possible evolutionary links between IBS and IBD. Similar correlations may link IBS as a precursor to IBD and possibly other conditions which are geographically connected with IBD. Data from four systematic reviews on IBD incidence and prevalence, IBS prevalence, and lactase distributions were included. Pearson's correlations were used for comparisons, with IBD values log-transformed because of skewed distribution. The articles provided 18-28 complete set of national data. Direct comparison between IBS and IBD showed no significant correlations (r = -0.14, r = -0.06 for CD and UC prevalence, r = -0.10 for CD incidence). Indirect comparisons also failed to show correlations of IBS with lactase distributions (r = -0.17), sunshine (r = -0.2) or latitude (r = 0.097); however, there was significant correlation between lactase distributions and CD incidence (r = -0.84), prevalence (r = -0.55) and UC prevalence (r = -0.59). Both sunshine (r= -0.53) and latitude (r = 0.58) are also significantly related to CD incidence. It is concluded that IBS and IBD do not follow similar global geographic patterns. This suggests a lack of an evolutionary genetic background coincident with emergence of lactase persistence. As well, vitamin D has no obvious impact on development of IBS. Similarities with IBD may result from sub groups (not yet identified) within the current Rome

  3. Rectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease: natural history and implications for radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Sheryl; Stock, Richard; Greenstein, Adrian

    1995-07-01

    PURPOSES/OBJECTIVE: There exists little information concerning the natural history of rectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, the tolerance of pelvic irradiation in these patients is unknown. We analyzed the largest series of patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer in order to determine the natural history of the disease as well as the effect and tolerance of pelvic irradiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and rectal cancer treated over a 34 year period (1960-1994) was performed. Thirty five patients had Ulcerative Colitis and 12 patients had Crohn's Disease. There were 31 male patients and 16 female patients. The stage (AJC) distribution was as follows: stage 0 in 5 patients, stage I in 13 patients, stage II in 7 patients, stage III in 13 patients and stage IV in 9 patients. Surgical resection was performed in 44 patients. In 2 of these patients, preoperative pelvic irradiation was given followed by surgery. Twenty of these patients underwent post-operative adjuvant therapy (12 were treated with chemotherapy and pelvic irradiation and 8 with chemotherapy alone). Three patients were found to have unresectable disease and were treated with chemotherapy alone (2 patients) or chemotherapy and radiation therapy (1 patient). Radiation complications were graded using the RTOG acute and late effects scoring criteria. Follow up ranged from 4 to 250 months (median - 24 months). RESULTS: The 5 year actuarial results revealed an overall survival (OS) of 42%, a disease free survival (DFS) of 43%, a pelvic control rate (PC) of 67% and a freedom from distant failure (FFDF) of 47%. DFS decreased with increasing T stage with a 5 year rate of 86% for patients with Tis - T2 disease compared to 10% for patients with T3-T4 disease (p < 0.0001). The presence of lymph node metastases also resulted in a decrease in DFS with a 5 year rate of 67% for patients with N0 disease

  4. Sleep and inflammatory bowel disease: exploring the relationship between sleep disturbances and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnucan, Jami A; Rubin, David T; Ali, Tauseef

    2013-11-01

    Sleep disturbances are associated with a greater risk of serious adverse health events, economic consequences, and, most importantly, increased all-cause mortality. Several studies support the associations among sleep, immune function, and inflammation. The relationship between sleep disturbances and inflammatory conditions is complex and not completely understood. Sleep deprivation can lead to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein, which can lead to further activation of the inflammatory cascade. The relevance of sleep in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, has recently received more attention. Several studies have shown that patients with both inactive and active IBD have self-reported sleep disturbances. Here, we present a concise review of sleep and its association with the immune system and the process of inflammation. We discuss the studies that have evaluated sleep in patients with IBD as well as possible treatment options for those patients with sleep disturbances. An algorithm for evaluating sleep disturbances in the IBD population is also proposed. Further research is still needed to better characterize sleep disturbances in the IBD population as well as to assess the effects of various therapeutic interventions to improve sleep quality. It is possible that the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disturbances in this population may provide an opportunity to alter disease outcomes.

  5. Periodontal and inflammatory bowel diseases: Is there evidence of complex pathogenic interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira-Junior, Ronaldo; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo

    2016-09-21

    Periodontal disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are both chronic inflammatory diseases. Their pathogenesis is mediated by a complex interplay between a dysbiotic microbiota and the host immune-inflammatory response, and both are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. This review aimed to provide an overview of the evidence dealing with a possible pathogenic interaction between periodontal disease and IBD. There seems to be an increased prevalence of periodontal disease in patients with IBD when compared to healthy controls, probably due to changes in the oral microbiota and a higher inflammatory response. Moreover, the induction of periodontitis seems to result in gut dysbiosis and altered gut epithelial cell barrier function, which might contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD. Considering the complexity of both periodontal disease and IBD, it is very challenging to understand the possible pathways involved in their coexistence. In conclusion, this review points to a complex pathogenic interaction between periodontal disease and IBD, in which one disease might alter the composition of the microbiota and increase the inflammatory response related to the other. However, we still need more data derived from human studies to confirm results from murine models. Thus, mechanistic studies are definitely warranted to clarify this possible bidirectional association.

  6. Curcumin and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Potential and Limits of Innovative Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Vecchi Brumatti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin belongs to the family of natural compounds collectively called curcuminoids and it possesses remarkable beneficial anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and neuroprotective properties. Moreover it is commonly assumed that curcumin has also been suggested as a remedy for digestive diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, a chronic immune disorder affecting the gastrointestinal tract and that can be divided in two major subgroups: Crohn’s disease (CD and Ulcerative Colitis (UC, depending mainly on the intestine tract affected by the inflammatory events. The chronic and intermittent nature of IBD imposes, where applicable, long-term treatments conducted in most of the cases combining different types of drugs. In more severe cases and where there has been no good response to the drugs, a surgery therapy is carried out. Currently, IBD-pharmacological treatments are generally not curative and often present serious side effects; for this reason, being known the relationship between nutrition and IBD, it is worthy of interesting the study and the development of new dietary strategy. The curcumin principal mechanism is the suppression of IBD inflammatory compounds (NF-κB modulating immune response. This review summarizes literature data of curcumin as anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant in IBD, trying to understand the different effects in CD e UC.

  7. Diverting Ileostomy for the Treatment of Severe, Refractory, Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Elizabeth C; Dawany, Noor; Baldassano, Robert N; Mamula, Petar; Mattei, Peter; Albenberg, Lindsey; Kelsen, Judith R

    2017-09-01

    Diverting ileostomy is used as a temporizing therapy in patients with perianal Crohn disease; however, little data exist regarding its use for colonic disease. The primary aim of the present study was to determine the role of diversion in severe refractory colonic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a pediatric population. Retrospective study of patients who underwent diverting ileostomy at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from 2000 to 2014 for the management of severe, refractory colonic IBD. Clinical variables were compared in the 1 year before ileostomy and 1 year after diversion. Surgical and disease outcomes including changes in diagnosis were reviewed through 2015. Twenty-four patients underwent diverting ileostomy for refractory colonic disease. Initial diagnoses were Crohn disease in 10 (42%), ulcerative colitis in 1 (4%), and IBD-unclassified in 13 patients (54%). Comparing data before and after surgery, there were statistically significant improvements in height and weight velocities, height velocity z score, blood transfusion requirement, hemoglobin, and hospitalization rates. Chronic steroid use decreased from 71% to 22%. At the conclusion of the study, 10 patients had undergone subsequent colectomy, 7 had successful bowel reanastomosis, and 7 remain diverted. Seven patients (29%) had a change in diagnosis. There were 13 surgical complications in 7 subjects, including prolapse reduction, stoma revision, and resection of ischemic bowel. In pediatric patients with refractory colonic IBD, diverting ileostomy can be a successful intervention to induce clinical stability. Importantly, diversion is a steroid-sparing therapy and allows additional time to clarify the diagnosis.

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Metabolism and Its Role in the Development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Wollny

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Beyond their role as structural molecules, sphingolipids are involved in many important cellular processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation, and migration. Altered sphingolipid metabolism is observed in many pathological conditions including gastrointestinal diseases. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD represents a state of complex, unpredictable, and destructive inflammation of unknown origin within the gastrointestinal tract. The mechanisms explaining the pathophysiology of IBD involve signal transduction pathways regulating gastro-intestinal system’s immunity. Progressive intestinal tissue destruction observed in chronic inflammation may be associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a sphingolipid metabolite, functions as a cofactor in inflammatory signaling and becomes a target in the treatment of IBD, which might prevent its conversion to cancer. This paper summarizes new findings indicating the impact of (S1P on IBD development and IBD-associated carcinogenesis.

  9. Food, nutrients and nutraceuticals affecting the course of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranga, José Antonio; López-Miranda, Visitación; Lombó, Felipe; Abalo, Raquel

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis; Crohn's disease) are debilitating relapsing inflammatory disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract, with deleterious effect on quality of life, and increasing incidence and prevalence. Mucosal inflammation, due to altered microbiota, increased intestinal permeability and immune system dysfunction underlies the symptoms and may be caused in susceptible individuals by different factors (or a combination of them), including dietary habits and components. In this review we describe the influence of the Western diet, obesity, and different nutraceuticals/functional foods (bioactive peptides, phytochemicals, omega 3-polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin D, probiotics and prebiotics) on the course of IBD, and provide some hints that could be useful for nutritional guidance. Hopefully, research will soon offer enough reliable data to slow down the spread of the disease and to make diet a cornerstone in IBD therapy. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  10. Histamine release from gut mast cells from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolte, Hendrik; Spjeldnæs, Nikolaj; Kruse, Aksel

    1990-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators from intestinal mast cells may serve as initiators of acute and delayed inflammation. Mast cell histamine release was measured in 19 patients with inflammatory bowel diseases using gut mast cells from enzymatically dispersed endoscopic forceps biopsy specimens...... of macroscopically inflamed and normal tissue. Mast cells and corresponding basophils were challenged with anti-IgE, anti-IgG, subclass anti-IgG4, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and results were compared with those from nine patient control subjects. The mast cell count in patients with ulcerative...... colitis was increased compared with that in control subjects and patients with Crohn's disease, and the mast cell count obtained from inflamed tissue was greater than that of normal tissue. The study also shows the heterogeneity of the responsiveness of the histamine releasing cells to various...

  11. Thiopurine monitoring in children with inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konidari, Anastasia; Anagnostopoulos, Antonios; Bonnett, Laura J; Pirmohamed, Munir; El-Matary, Wael

    2014-09-01

    The aim was to systematically review the evidence on the clinical usefulness of thiopurine metabolite and white blood count (WBC) monitoring in the assessment of clinical outcomes in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of controlled trials and http://www.clinicaltrials.gov were screened in adherence to the PRISMA statement by two independent reviewers for identification of eligible studies. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies and large case series of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (6MMPR) as an indicator of hepatotoxicity. Low thiopurine metabolite concentration may be indicative of non-compliance. Thiopurine metabolite testing does not safely predict clinical outcome, but may facilitate toxicity surveillance and treatment optimization in poor responders. Current evidence favours the combination of thiopurine metabolite/WBC monitoring and clinic follow-up for prompt identification of haematologic/hepatic toxicity safe dose adjustment, and treatment modification in cases of suboptimal clinical outcome or non-compliance. Well designed RCTs for the identification of robust surrogate markers of thiopurine efficacy and toxicity are required. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Patients' diets and preferences in a pediatric population with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, T J; Issenman, R M; Jacobson, K

    1998-01-01

    To determine the dietary practices of the pediatric inflammatory bowel disease population at the Children's Hospital of the Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation and the reported effectiveness of those diets. A questionnaire mailed to 153 pediatric patients was returned by 125 patients (76 Crohn's disease [CD] and 49 ulcerative colitis [UC] patients)--an 82% response rate. The median age of respondents was 13 years, and 62% were male. Ninety per cent and 71% of CD and UC patients, respectively, had changed their diets since diagnosis. Caloric supplements (eg, BOOST [Mead Johnson Nutritionals]), sole source nutrition, low fibre and lactose-free diets were used by more than 15% of CD patients, whereas lactose-free, nonspicy, low acid, additive-free, caloric supplement and low fibre diets were used by more than 15% of UC patients. A diet supplement was more commonly used in CD patients (P juice. A benefit was reported for 103 of 141 reported diets, with the most commonly alleviated symptoms being abdominal pain, diarrhea and flatulence. Many children with inflammatory bowel disease have altered their diets to manage their disease and have attributed symptomatic relief to these diets.

  13. Assessment of inflammatory bowel disease with two different 99mTc-leucocytes labelling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, V.N.; Plaza, P.J.L.; Roca, M.; Armero, F.; Martin-Comin, J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of 99mTc-HMPAO white blood cell scintigraphy using two different cell suspension mediums: leukocyte poor plasma (LPP) and Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) in patients with suspicion of active inflammatory bowel disease. Materials and Methods: Leukocytes from 30 patients were labelled using LPP and in 28 using HBSS . In LPP method the leukocytes were resuspended in 0,5 ml cell-free plasma while in HBSS method the cells were resuspended in 0,5 ml HBSS. Scintigraphic images were obtained at 30 min and 2 h after injection of 185-200 MBq 99mTc-HMPAO leukocytes. Results: Leukocytes labelling efficiency were 65,5%, and 89,0%, respectively for LPP and HBSS methods. There were 22 true-positive, 7 true-negative and 1 false-negative results in the LPP group, while in the HBSS group results were 18, 10 and 0, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy was similar with both methods though sensitivity was slightly higher in the HBSS group. Conclusion These date indicate that leukocytes scintigraphy labelled using HBSS as resuspension medium should be used as first option method for WBC labelling and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease

  14. Validation of the Italian translation of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Klersy, Catherine; Russo, Maria Luisa; Valli, Monica; Boccaccio, Vincenzo; Imbesi, Venerina; Ardizzone, Sandro; Porro, Gabriele Bianchi; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2011-07-01

    Health-related quality of life is an important measure of treatment outcome; its evaluation requires the use of internationally validated ad hoc questionnaires. The McMaster Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ) is the most used specific instrument. To assess the validity and reliability of the Italian translation of the IBDQ. The IBDQ underwent forward and backward translation; 13 patients were enrolled for cognitive testing of the Italian version to increase clarity. For field testing, 113 patients (65 with Crohn's disease and 48 with ulcerative colitis) completed both the IBDQ and the generic instrument 36-item Short Form Health Survey scale (SF-36). Data quality was optimal with high completeness and low floor and ceiling effect. Item internal consistency was satisfied for 100% of patients, while discriminant validity showed a few items with higher correlations with other scales. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.96. Test-retest correlations indicated good reliability (Pearson R 0.81). Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the original grouping of the item was suboptimal. The score proved sensitive to disease activity, gender and quality of life as measured by the SF-36. The Italian translation of the McMaster Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire sounds natural and is easy to understand. A field test gave results comparable to other international validations, supporting its use in cross-national surveys. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Patterns of Engagement With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Online Support Groups: Comparing Posters and Lurkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the varying patterns of member engagement within inflammatory bowel disease online support groups. The aim of the study was, therefore, to compare posters and lurkers (i.e., those who read messages but choose not to post) in terms of engagement and motives for accessing online groups as well as to explore reasons why lurkers do not make an active contribution through posting messages. The findings revealed that those who posted messages visited groups more often and spent longer periods of time accessing them. However, there was no difference between posters and lurkers in terms of length of time as a group member. Furthermore, posters were more inclined to access online support groups to both seek and provide emotional, informational, and experiential support. Finally, four main reasons were described by lurkers for not posting messages and these focused on personal factors, illness severity, being helpful, and new member. For those healthcare professionals or patient volunteers who are involved in supporting inflammatory bowel disease online support groups, there are a number of practical strategies arising from these results which can be implemented to help integrate and encourage active participation by all members.

  16. Low Risk of Unemployment, Sick Leave, and Work Disability Among Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Marianne K; Prosberg, Michelle V; Vind, Ida

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the occurrence and risk of unemployment (UE), sick leave (SL), and work disability (WD) in incident patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after 7 years of follow-up compared with the background population and to determine outcome predictors. METHODS: The study popul...... underscores the need for the early identification of risk factors. A multidisciplinary approach to secure IBD patients' participation in the labor market is recommended.......BACKGROUND: To assess the occurrence and risk of unemployment (UE), sick leave (SL), and work disability (WD) in incident patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) after 7 years of follow-up compared with the background population and to determine outcome predictors. METHODS: The study...... population consisted of patients aged 18 to 67 years (N = 379) from an IBD inception cohort registered January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2004 in the Copenhagen area. Clinical data were retrospectively collected from medical records. Data on UE, SL, and WD were retrieved from national registries. A random...

  17. Antibiotics and probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease: why, when, and how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantera, Cosimo; Scribano, Maria Lia

    2009-07-01

    To summarize recent evidence on the role of intestinal bacteria in inflammatory bowel diseases, and of antibiotics and probiotics in their treatment. The implications connected with the use of antibiotics are also examined. The hypothesis that Mycobacterium paratuberculosis could be a causative agent of Crohn's disease has not been confirmed by a large trial on symptomatic patients treated by a combination of antibiotics active against this bacterium. An increased number of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli have been found in the intestinal tissue of patients with Crohn's disease, but their role in the pathogenesis of this condition remains to be defined. The combination of metronidazole and azathioprine, associating the effects of a reduced bacterial load with immunosuppression, appears to be a therapeutic option to decrease the recurrence of postoperative Crohn's disease in high-risk patients. However, concerns are raised by the possibility that antibiotics may induce disease relapse due to Clostridium difficile infection. Recent literature provides increasing support for the use of antibiotics in Crohn's disease, although the side effects limit their long-term use. The efficacy of antibiotics in ulcerative colitis is not confirmed by the available literature, except in severe colitis. More trials are needed to support the use of probiotics as therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. SORPTION РATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF ENDOGENOUS INTOXICATION OF PEDIATRIC CHRONIC INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Fedorova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gut endotoxicosis caused by penetration of bacterial and metabolic toxins from chime on the background of increasing permeability of gut wall is of great importance in pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (nonspecific ulcerative colitis — NUC and Crohn’s disease. It is accompanied by disturbance of regulating homeostasis system with the following disturbances of organs and systems of toxication. Developed endotoxicosis accordingly contributes to maintain and to progress of metabolic and immunological changes. To obtain the precise degree and phase of development of endotoxicosis we estimated quantitative and qualitative changes of metabolic status in accordance with content in erythrocytes, plasma and urine LMMWP (low and medium molecular weight peptides. Taking into concideration the peculiarities of children endotoxicosis with, we suggested patogenetical absorption therapy. Therefore, the therapeutic complex was added enterosorbent ensoral, which absorb eczo and endogenic toxins and, moreover, positive influence for composition of intestinal microflora. Prominent clinical effect was accompanied by positive dynamics of laboratory-instrumental parameters.Key words: endogenous intoxication, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonspecific ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, low and medium molecular weight peptides, enterosorbents, children.

  19. Thiopurines, a previously unrecognised cause for fatigue in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas W T; Iser, John H; Sparrow, Miles P; Newnham, Evan D; Headon, Belinda J; Gibson, Peter R

    2009-09-01

    Active inflammatory bowel disease, anaemia, iron deficiency and depression, alone or in combination, are known contributing factors of fatigue in inflammatory bowel disease. However, in some patients, fatigue cannot be attributed to known causes. Thiopurines are not a recognized cause. To describe the clinical scenario of a series of patients where thiopurines were the likely cause of fatigue. The clinical scenario of 5 patients was examined with specific reference to the temporal association of thiopurine therapy with fatigue, the effect of its withdrawal and rechallenge, and drug specificity. The onset of severe fatigue was related to the introduction of azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine, rapid relief was experienced on its withdrawal in all patients, and fatigue rapidly occurred on rechallenge. The speed of onset was rapid in two patients and in the context of gradual withdrawal of moderate steroid dose, but recurred rapidly on rechallenge when not on steroids. Marked fatigue is a previously unrecognized adverse effect of thiopurines. It does not appear to be drug-specific. Its onset might be masked by concurrent steroid therapy.

  20. Quality of life and time perspective in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguette, Vanessa; Apostolidis, Themis; Dany, Lionel; Bellon, Nelly; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Lagouanelle-Simeoni, Marie-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown the impact of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on patient quality of life (QoL), but no research has yet examined the impact of time's experience in the assessment of QoL in IBD. Our goal is to explore the links between QoL and time perspective (TP) and the role of TP as a determinant of QoL. Data were collected from 156 patients who completed a questionnaire comprising a generic measure (SF-12) and a specific measure (Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire) of QoL, a measure of TP (ZTPI) and a collection of socio-demographic and medical data. Correlational analyses illustrated the links between TP and QoL. Regression analyses revealed that records of Past-negative and Present-hedonistic perspectives predicted QoL. Past-negative time perspective seemed to have a deleterious impact, while a Present-hedonistic time perspective predicted a better QoL, and this was irrespective of the level of severity of the disease. These results suggest the importance of considering TP as a determinant of psychological QoL. They corroborate earlier findings on the relationship between TP and QoL associated with other pathologies. The past-negative register, which indicates rumination, tells us about the importance of considering the psychological experience of time in order to improve the QoL of patients.

  1. The role of laparoscopic surgery in the management of children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Anna E; Sashittal, Shikha G; Chatzizacharias, Nikolaos A; Davies, R Justin

    2015-05-01

    Although laparoscopic surgery is readily used in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in adults, its role in the surgical treatment of IBD in the pediatric population is not well established. The aim of this narrative review was to analyze the published evidence comparing laparoscopic and open resection in the management of children and adolescents with IBD. The Pubmed and Embase databases were searched using the terms "inflammatory bowel disease," "children," "adolescents," "laparoscopic," and "colectomy." The review identified 10 appropriate studies. Even though laparoscopic surgery generally resulted in longer operating times (between a mean of 40 and 140 min), benefits included reduced postoperative pain (mean duration of opiate use 3 vs 6 days) and reduced length of stay (median length of stay 5-8 vs 10.5-19 days) compared with open surgery. Postoperative complication rates were similar following both approaches. Due to the limited available data and the small sample size of the published series, definite recommendations are not able to be drawn. Nevertheless, current evidence indicates that laparoscopic colorectal resection is safe and feasible in the management of IBD in the paediatric population, with reductions in postoperative pain and length of hospital stay achievable.

  2. Environmental factors in a population-based inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Pedersen, Natalia; Cukovic-Cavka, S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe possibly due to changes in environmental factors towards a more "westernised" standard of living. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in exposure to environmental factors prior ...... and Western European patients differed in environmental factors prior to diagnosis. Eastern European patients exhibited higher occurrences of suspected risk factors for IBD included in the Western lifestyle.......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe possibly due to changes in environmental factors towards a more "westernised" standard of living. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in exposure to environmental factors prior...... to diagnosis in Eastern and Western European IBD patients. METHODS: The EpiCom cohort is a population-based, prospective inception cohort of 1560 unselected IBD patients from 31 European countries covering a background population of 10.1 million. At the time of diagnosis patients were asked to complete an 87...

  3. Targeting S1P in Inflammatory bowel disease: new avenues for modulating intestinal leukocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danese, Silvio; Furfaro, Federica; Vetrano, Stefania

    2017-07-28

    Sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid mediator involved in the regulation of several cellular processes though the activation of a G protein-coupled receptor family known as the S1P receptors (S1PRs). Advances in the understanding of the biological activities mediated by S1PRs have sparked great interest in the S1P/S1PRs axes as new therapeutic targets for the modulation of several cellular processes. In particular, S1P/ S1PR1 axis has been identified as key regulator for the lymphocyte migration from lymph nodes. The blockade of this axis is emerging as a new therapeutic approach to control the aberrant leukocytes migration into the mucosa in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This review briefly summarizes the current evidence coming from clinical studies and discusses the future prospects of S1P inhibitors for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2017 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Enteric Glial Cells: A New Frontier in Neurogastroenterology and Clinical Target for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Turco, Fabio; Linan-Rico, Andromeda; Soghomonyan, Suren; Whitaker, Emmett; Wehner, Sven; Cuomo, Rosario; Christofi, Fievos L

    2016-02-01

    The word "glia" is derived from the Greek word "γλoια," glue of the enteric nervous system, and for many years, enteric glial cells (EGCs) were believed to provide mainly structural support. However, EGCs as astrocytes in the central nervous system may serve a much more vital and active role in the enteric nervous system, and in homeostatic regulation of gastrointestinal functions. The emphasis of this review will be on emerging concepts supported by basic, translational, and/or clinical studies, implicating EGCs in neuron-to-glial (neuroglial) communication, motility, interactions with other cells in the gut microenvironment, infection, and inflammatory bowel diseases. The concept of the "reactive glial phenotype" is explored as it relates to inflammatory bowel diseases, bacterial and viral infections, postoperative ileus, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and motility disorders. The main theme of this review is that EGCs are emerging as a new frontier in neurogastroenterology and a potential therapeutic target. New technological innovations in neuroimaging techniques are facilitating progress in the field, and an update is provided on exciting new translational studies. Gaps in our knowledge are discussed for further research. Restoring normal EGC function may prove to be an efficient strategy to dampen inflammation. Probiotics, palmitoylethanolamide (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α), interleukin-1 antagonists (anakinra), and interventions acting on nitric oxide, receptor for advanced glycation end products, S100B, or purinergic signaling pathways are relevant clinical targets on EGCs with therapeutic potential.

  5. Use of azathioprine and the risk of cancer in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternak, Björn; Svanström, Henrik; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    interval: 0.83, 1.25) or increasing cumulative received doses (increase in rate ratio per 365 additional defined daily doses = 1.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.89, 1.27) were not. In subgroup analyses, azathioprine use was associated with increased risk of lymphoid tissue cancer (rate ratio = 2.40, 95......Increased risks of lymphoma and skin cancer associated with thiopurine use among patients with inflammatory bowel disease have been shown, but data on the overall cancer risk are limited. We conducted a historical cohort study of 45,986 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (of whom, 5,197 (11.......9 (interquartile range: 3.5-12.0) person-years of follow-up, 2,596 incident cases of cancer were detected. Azathioprine use was associated with an increased risk of overall cancer (rate ratio = 1.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.15, 1.74), whereas former use of azathioprine (rate ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence...

  6. Potential impact of diet on treatment effect from anti-TNF drugs in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the current knowledge on the impact of diet on anti-TNF response in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), to identify dietary factors that warrant further investigations in relation to anti-TNF treatment response, and, finally, to discuss potential strategies for such invest......We wanted to investigate the current knowledge on the impact of diet on anti-TNF response in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), to identify dietary factors that warrant further investigations in relation to anti-TNF treatment response, and, finally, to discuss potential strategies...... for such investigations. PubMed was searched using specified search terms. One small prospective study on diet and anti-TNF treatment in 56 patients with CD found similar remission rates after 56 weeks among 32 patients with good compliance that received concomitant enteral nutrition and 24 with poor compliance that had......% CI: 1.73–4.31, p diet on anti-TNF treatment response for clinical use is scarce. Here we propose a mechanism by which Western style diet high in meat and low in fibre may promote colonic...

  7. A systematic review of patient inflammatory bowel disease information resources on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, André; Langille, Morgan; Hughes, Stephanie; Rose, Caren; Leddin, Desmond; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, Sander

    2007-09-01

    The Internet is a widely used information resource for patients with inflammatory bowel disease, but there is variation in the quality of Web sites that have patient information regarding Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The purpose of the current study is to systematically evaluate the quality of these Web sites. The top 50 Web sites appearing in Google using the terms "Crohn's disease" or "ulcerative colitis" were included in the study. Web sites were evaluated using a (a) Quality Evaluation Instrument (QEI) that awarded Web sites points (0-107) for specific information on various aspects of inflammatory bowel disease, (b) a five-point Global Quality Score (GQS), (c) two reading grade level scores, and (d) a six-point integrity score. Thirty-four Web sites met the inclusion criteria, 16 Web sites were excluded because they were portals or non-IBD oriented. The median QEI score was 57 with five Web sites scoring higher than 75 points. The median Global Quality Score was 2.0 with five Web sites achieving scores of 4 or 5. The average reading grade level score was 11.2. The median integrity score was 3.0. There is marked variation in the quality of the Web sites containing information on Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Many Web sites suffered from poor quality but there were five high-scoring Web sites.

  8. Antioxidant effects of herbal therapies used by patients with inflammatory bowel disease: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmead, L; Dawson, C; Hawkins, C; Banna, N; Loo, S; Rampton, D S

    2002-02-01

    Herbal remedies used by patients for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease include slippery elm, fenugreek, devil's claw, Mexican yam, tormentil and wei tong ning, a traditional Chinese medicine. Reactive oxygen metabolites produced by inflamed colonic mucosa may be pathogenic. Aminosalicylates (5-ASA) are antioxidant and other such agents could be therapeutic. To assess the antioxidant effects of herbal remedies in cell-free oxidant-generating systems and inflamed human colorectal biopsies. Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence in a xanthine/xanthine oxidase cell-free system was used to detect superoxide scavenging by herbs and 5-ASA, and fluorimetry to define peroxyl radical scavenging using a phycoerythrin degradation assay. Chemiluminescence was used to detect herbal effects on generation of oxygen radicals by mucosal biopsies from patients with active ulcerative colitis. Like 5-ASA, all herbs, except fenugreek, scavenged superoxide dose-dependently. All materials tested scavenged peroxyl dose-dependently. Oxygen radical release from biopsies was reduced after incubation in all herbs except Mexican yam, and by 5-ASA. All six herbal remedies have antioxidant effects. Fenugreek is not a superoxide scavenger, while Mexican yam did not inhibit radical generation by inflamed biopsies. Slippery elm, fenugreek, devil's claw, tormentil and wei tong ning merit formal evaluation as novel therapies in inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. Tuberculosis in pregnancy:a challenging differential diagnosisfor inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, E F M; Araujo Júnior, E; Campanharo, F F; Sarmento, S G P; Saito, C S; Moron, F A

    2014-08-01

    To describe a case of tuberculosis with intestinal variant in a pregnant woman in the 17th week of pregnancy. Case report. Department of Obstetrics, Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), São Paulo-SP, Brazil. Tuberculosis is a public health problem that concerns many countries in the world. It was declareda public emergency by the World Health Organization in 2005. Its presence during pregnancy brings maternal risk and fetal impairment if not treated quickly and properly. The intestinal variant is not the most common form of the disease and may be confused with inflammatory bowel diseases, especially Crohns disease. Knowledge of the specific characteristics, combined with a detailed medical history and appropriate diagnostic methods can make all the difference in gestational prognosis. We report the case of a pregnant woman who wrongly underwent treatment for inflammatory bowel disease at another service. After admission to our university hospital, fruitful diagnostic clarification was achieved and the patient was diagnosed and treated for tuberculosis. We describe the details of the investigation and, in particular, review the main characteristics in the literature for differentiating the two diseases.

  10. From Pulmonary Embolism to Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Give Tunnel Vision up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masih Tajdini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a multisystem disorder with gastrointestinal tract involvement. These patients have the higher risk for thromboembolic events compared to normal population. This study describes a unique case of pulmonaryembolism as a first manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease. Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

  11. Potential Impact of Diet on Treatment Effect from Anti-TNF Drugs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the current knowledge on the impact of diet on anti-TNF response in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), to identify dietary factors that warrant further investigations in relation to anti-TNF treatment response, and, finally, to discuss potential strategies for such invest...... inflammation and potentially impact treatment response to anti-TNF drugs. Further studies using hypothesis-driven and data-driven strategies in prospective observational, animal and interventional studies are warranted.......We wanted to investigate the current knowledge on the impact of diet on anti-TNF response in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), to identify dietary factors that warrant further investigations in relation to anti-TNF treatment response, and, finally, to discuss potential strategies......% CI: 1.73-4.31, p impact of diet on anti-TNF treatment response for clinical use is scarce. Here we propose a mechanism by which Western style diet high in meat and low in fibre may promote colonic...

  12. The real-world effectiveness of vedolizumab on intestinal and articular outcomes in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Fabio Salvatore; Orlando, Rosalba; Fries, Walter; Scolaro, Mariangela; Magnano, Antonio; Pluchino, Dario; Cappello, Maria; Morreale, Gaetano Cristian; Siringo, Sebastiano; Privitera, Antonino Carlo; Ferracane, Concetta; Belluardo, Nunzio; Alberghina, Nadia; Ventimiglia, Marco; Rizzuto, Giulia; Renna, Sara; Cottone, Mario; Orlando, Ambrogio

    2018-03-01

    The effectiveness of vedolizumab in real-world practice is under evaluation, while its role in inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthritis is still unclear. To report real-world data about the effectiveness of vedolizumab on intestinal and articular symptoms after 10 and 22 weeks of treatment. Web-based data from the cohort of the Sicilian Network for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (SN-IBD) were extracted to perform a prospective multicentre observational study. 163 patients (84 with Crohn's disease and 79 with ulcerative colitis) were included. At week 10, a steroid-free remission was achieved in 71 patients (43.6%), while at week 22 a steroid-free remission was obtained in 40.8% of patients. A response on articular symptoms was reported after 10 weeks of treatment in 17 out of 43 (39.5%) patients with active spondyloarthritis at baseline, and in 10 out of 22 (45.4%) patients at week 22. The only factor associated with articular response was the coexistence of clinical benefit on intestinal symptoms (at week 10: OR 8.471, p = 0.05; at week 22: OR 5.600, p = 0.08). Vedolizumab showed good effectiveness after 10 and 22 weeks of treatment. A subset of patients reported improvement also on articular symptoms, probably as a consequence of the concomitant control of gut inflammation. Copyright © 2018 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effectiveness of natural and synthetic immunomodulators in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychlik, Andrzej; Nieradka, Renata; Kander, Małgorzata; Nowicki, Marcin; Wdowiak, Michał; Kołodziejska-Sawerska, Anna

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of immunomodulators in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in dogs. Twenty-eight dogs diagnosed with IBD took part in the study. The animals received a food containing extruded immunomodulators: β-1,3/1,6-D-glucan, β-hydroxy-β-methyl-butyrate (HMB) and levamisole for 42 days. Whole blood samples were analysed before and after therapy assessing changes in phagocyte activity (respiratory burst activity, RBA and potential killing activity, PKA), evaluation of proliferation response of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes and serum gamma globulin levels, lysozyme activity, ceruloplasmin levels and interleukin activity (IL-6 and IL-10). In this experiment, β-1,3/1,6-D-glucan delivered the highest level of treatment efficacy by producing the quickest therapeutic effect, lowering Canine Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity Index (CIBDAI) values to below 3, improving histopathological parameters, decreasing IL-6 levels, increasing IL-10 concentrations, and producing remission periods longer than six months. HMB and levamisole were also effective in lowering CIBDAI scores, but the abatement of clinical symptoms was slower and less pronounced in comparison with β-1,3/1,6-D-glucan. The results indicate that β-1,3/1,6-D-glucan can be useful in the treatment of canine IBD.

  14. Chromium 51-ethylenediaminetetraacetate test: a useful test in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Morain, C.A.; Abelow, A.C.; Chervu, L.R.; Fleischner, G.M.; Das, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of urinary excretion values in assessing mucosal damage in inflammatory bowel disease after administration of chromium 51-labeled EDTA either orally or rectally. In the oral study, 19 controls, 18 patients with Crohn's disease, and 13 patients with ulcerative colitis were given 100 microCi 51 Cr-EDTA by mouth. The amount of 51 Cr-EDTA in a 24-hour urine collection was expressed as a percentage of the ingested dose. The patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel excreted 6.3% +/- 4.3%, which was significantly (P less than 0.001) higher than the percentage in patients with ulcerative colitis (1.7% +/- 1.1%) and controls (1.4% +/- 0.6%). In the enema study, 19 patients with ulcerative colitis, two with Crohn's disease, two with radiation colitis, and four controls (spastic colitis, lactose intolerance) were given 100 microCi 51 Cr-EDTA by retention enema. The patients with active colonic inflammation excreted 8.4% +/- 3.9% of the dose given by enema, which was significantly (P less than 0.01) higher than in other controls (1.9% +/- 0.91%) or patients with inactive colitis (2.2% +/- 1.9%). The 51 Cr-EDTA excretion test is a safe, inexpensive test useful in evaluating patients with inflammatory bowel disease. It can be given orally to screen patients with abdominal complaints who are suspected of having Crohn's disease involving the small intestine, and when given by enema it provides additional objective assessment of idiopathic ulcerative colitis or proctitis

  15. An initial report of sleep disturbance in inactive inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Laurie; Stepanski, Edward J; Ranjbaran, Ziba; Benson, Laura M; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2006-10-15

    There is an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms, peptic ulcer disease, and colon cancer in night-shiftworkers, whose sleep is commonly disrupted. Sleep complaints are an extrapyramidal symptom of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Sleep disruption may contribute to increased medical morbidity by weakening the ability of the immune system to protect against endotoxins-this pathway could be of potential importance to the pathogenesis and/or clinical course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a chronic immunoinflammatory gastrointestinal disorder associated with marked reductions in quality of life. This is the first study to comprehensively examine sleep concerns in patients with IBD. Sixteen patients with biopsy-proven inactive IBD (8 with Crohn disease and 8 with ulcerative colitis), 9 patients with IBS, and 7 healthy controls completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, SF-12, and a single overnight polysomnogram. Polysomnography and arousals were scored according to standard criteria. Multivariate analyses were used to compare subjective and objective sleep parameters between groups and to identify associations between sleep complaints and quality of life. Patients with IBD did not seem to significantly differ from patients with IBS, who have established sleep complaints. On polysomnography, total sleep time differentiated the 3 groups well, with the IBS and IBD groups appearing numerically similar. Whereas IBS and IBD groups were similar with respect to observed sleep parameters, IBS patients did report the most concerns, consistent with earlier research suggesting that hyperarousal and perceptual differences may contribute to symptom reporting. Sleep parameters greatly influenced quality of life in both groups and highlight the need to address sleep concerns as part of IBD management.

  16. Expert opinion: experience with 6-mercaptopurine in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korelitz, Burton I

    2013-05-28

    Arbitrarily, modern day treatment of inflammatory bowel disease begins with the introduction of immunosuppressives for ulcerative colitis. Clinical improvement with sulfasalazine had been meaningful but modest. Treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosteroids led to clinical responses never before realized but it took much too long to recognize that they were not capable of maintaining remission, that adverse reactions were subtle but potentially devastating and that some other agent would be necessary to capitalize on their transient advantage. This of course was true in the treatment of Crohn's disease as well. Not much was ever made of the role of sulfasalazine for Crohn's disease, but with the severing of the diazobond and the elimination of the sulphur component, the 5-aminosalacylic acid (5-ASA) products clearly led to clinical improvement, especially in cases of Crohn's colitis and those with ileitis where the 5-ASA product was released in the terminal ileum and more proximal in the small bowel as well as in ulcerative colitis. The induction of remission was first demonstrated by 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with case reports and uncontrolled trials in patients with ulcerative colitis, but its placebo controlled trial for Crohn's disease firmly established its role in inducing remission. No subsequent trial has confirmed its similar role for ulcerative colitis, but nevertheless clinicians know well that 6-MP works at least as well and probably more effectively for ulcerative colitis than for Crohn's disease. What changes have taken place utilizing 6-MP in the management of inflammatory bowel disease since its introduction in the 1960's and 1970's and its trial for Crohn's disease published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1980?

  17. Chromium 51-ethylenediaminetetraacetate test: a useful test in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Morain, C.A.; Abelow, A.C.; Chervu, L.R.; Fleischner, G.M.; Das, K.M.

    1986-11-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of urinary excretion values in assessing mucosal damage in inflammatory bowel disease after administration of chromium 51-labeled EDTA either orally or rectally. In the oral study, 19 controls, 18 patients with Crohn's disease, and 13 patients with ulcerative colitis were given 100 microCi /sup 51/Cr-EDTA by mouth. The amount of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA in a 24-hour urine collection was expressed as a percentage of the ingested dose. The patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel excreted 6.3% +/- 4.3%, which was significantly (P less than 0.001) higher than the percentage in patients with ulcerative colitis (1.7% +/- 1.1%) and controls (1.4% +/- 0.6%). In the enema study, 19 patients with ulcerative colitis, two with Crohn's disease, two with radiation colitis, and four controls (spastic colitis, lactose intolerance) were given 100 microCi /sup 51/Cr-EDTA by retention enema. The patients with active colonic inflammation excreted 8.4% +/- 3.9% of the dose given by enema, which was significantly (P less than 0.01) higher than in other controls (1.9% +/- 0.91%) or patients with inactive colitis (2.2% +/- 1.9%). The /sup 51/Cr-EDTA excretion test is a safe, inexpensive test useful in evaluating patients with inflammatory bowel disease. It can be given orally to screen patients with abdominal complaints who are suspected of having Crohn's disease involving the small intestine, and when given by enema it provides additional objective assessment of idiopathic ulcerative colitis or proctitis.

  18. Congenital Sodium Diarrhea: A Form of Intractable Diarrhea, With a Link to Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecke, Andreas R; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Müller, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Congenital diarrheal disorders (CDDs) represent a group of challenging clinical conditions for pediatricians because of the severity of the presentation and the broad range of possible differential diagnoses. CDDs arise from alterations in the transport of nutrients and electrolytes across the intestinal mucosa, from enterocyte and enteroendocrine cell differentiation and/or polarization defects, and from the modulation of the intestinal immune response. Advances were made recently in deciphering the etiology and pathophysiology of one of these disorders, congenital sodium diarrhea (CSD). CSD refers to an intractable diarrhea of intrauterine onset with high fecal sodium loss. CSD is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. A syndromic form of CSD features choanal and intestinal atresias as well as recurrent corneal erosions. Small bowel histology frequently detects an epithelial "tufting" dysplasia. It is autosomal recessively inherited, and caused by SPINT2 mutations. The nonsyndromic form of CSD can be caused by dominant activating mutations in GUCY2C, encoding intestinal receptor guanylate cyclase C (GC-C), and by autosomal recessive SLC9A3 loss-of-function mutations. SLC9A3 encodes Na/H antiporter 3, the major intestinal brush border Na/H exchanger, and a downstream target of GC-C. A number of patients with GUCY2C and SLC9A3 mutations developed inflammatory bowel disease. Both the number of recognized CDD forms as well as the number of underlying disease genes are gradually increasing. Knowledge of these CDD genes enables noninvasive, next-generation gene panel-based testing to facilitate an early diagnosis in CDD. Primary Na/H antiporter 3 and GC-C malfunction is implicated as a predisposition for inflammatory bowel disease in subset of patients.

  19. Immune deficiency vs. immune excess in inflammatory bowel diseases-STAT3 as a rheo-STAT of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, Moritz; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have provided many genetic alterations, conferring susceptibility to multifactorial polygenic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Yet, how specific genetic alterations functionally affect intestinal inflammation often remains elusive. It is noteworthy that a large overlap of genes involved in immune deficiencies with those conferring inflammatory bowel disease risk has been noted. This has provided new arguments for the debate on whether inflammatory bowel disease arises from either an excess or a deficiency in the immune system. In this review, we highlight the functional effect of an inflammatory bowel disease-risk allele, which cannot be deduced from genome-wide association studies data alone. As exemplified by the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), we show that a single gene can have a plethora of effects in various cell types of the gut. These effects may individually contribute to the restoration of intestinal homeostasis on the one hand or pave the way for excessive immunopathology on the other, as an inflammatory "rheo-STAT". © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  20. Nutrition in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Position Paper on Behalf of the Porto Inflammatory Bowel Disease Group of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, Erasmo; Shamir, Raanan; Aloi, Marina; Assa, Amit; Braegger, Christian; Bronsky, Jiri; de Ridder, Lissy; Escher, Johanna C; Hojsak, Iva; Kolaček, Sanja; Koletzko, Sibylle; Levine, Arie; Lionetti, Paolo; Martinelli, Massimo; Ruemmele, Frank; Russell, Richard K; Boneh, Rotem Sigall; van Limbergen, Johan; Veereman, Gigi; Staiano, Annamaria

    2018-04-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the need for detailed attention to nutrition and diet in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to define the steps in instituting dietary or nutritional management in light of the current evidence and to offer a useful and practical guide to physicians and dieticians involved in the care of pediatric IBD patients. A group of 20 experts in pediatric IBD participated in an iterative consensus process including 2 face-to-face meetings, following an open call to Nutrition Committee of the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Porto, IBD Interest, and Nutrition Committee. A list of 41 predefined questions was addressed by working subgroups based on a systematic review of the literature. A total of 53 formal recommendations and 47 practice points were endorsed with a consensus rate of at least 80% on the following topics: nutritional assessment; macronutrients needs; trace elements, minerals, and vitamins; nutrition as a primary therapy of pediatric IBD; probiotics and prebiotics; specific dietary restrictions; and dietary compounds and the risk of IBD. This position paper represents a useful guide to help the clinicians in the management of nutrition issues in children with IBD.

  1. Role of biologics and biosimilars in inflammatory bowel disease: current trends and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawla P

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Prashanth Rawla,1 Tagore Sunkara,2 Jeffrey Pradeep Raj3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County, Martinsville, VA, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Clinical Affiliate of The Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Pharmacology, St John’s Medical College, Bangalore, India Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an idiopathic chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal system. The spectrum is of predominantly two types, namely, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. The incidence of IBD has been increasing steadily since 1990, and so the number of agents used in their treatment. Biologics that are derived partly or completely from living biological sources such as animals and humans have become widely available, which provide therapeutic benefits to the IBD patients. Currently, monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab, and golimumab, integrins (vedolizumab and natalizumab, and interleukin (IL-12 and IL-23 antagonists (ustekinumab are approved for use in IBD. Biosimilars of infliximab and adalimumab are also available for the treatment of IBD. This review summarizes the clinical pharmacology, studies leading to their approval, overall indications and their use in IBD, usage in pregnancy and lactation, and the adverse effects of these agents. This review also summarizes the recent advances and future perspectives specific to biologics and biosimilars in IBD. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, biologics, biosimilars, tumor necrosis factor, integrin, interleukin, adalimumab, Humira®, certolizumab, Cimzia®, golimumab, Simponi®, infliximab, Remicade®, vedolizumab, Entyvio, natalizumab, Tysabri®, ustekinumab, Stelara® 

  2. Identification of Two Additional Susceptibility Loci for Inflammatory Bowel Disease in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiucai Lan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To investigate the associations between the rs1250569 (zinc finger MIZ-type containing 1, ZMIZ1, rs1042522 (tumour protein p53, TP53, and rs10114470 (tumour necrosis factor-like cytokine 1A, TL1A polymorphisms and the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in a Chinese (Han population. We analysed the expression of genes that predispose patients to Crohn’s disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. Methods: A total of 381 IBD patients and 517 healthy controls were recruited into our study. Polymorphisms at the three loci were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-ligation detection reactions (PCR-LDR. Genotype-phenotype correlations were analysed. Blood and gut samples were obtained and analysed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry to investigate the mRNA and protein levels and in situ expression of genes found to predispose patients to IBD. Furthermore, the expression of susceptible genes was further verified using a mouse dextran sulphate sodium (DSS-induced acute colitis model. Results: No significant association was detected between rs1250569 and rs1042522 genotypes and CD or UC susceptibility. However, the frequency of allele A of rs1250569 was much higher in CD patients than that in healthy controls (55.03% vs. 48.48%, respectively; p = 0.044. The mutation rates at rs10114470 were dramatically lower at both the genotype and allele level in patients than those in healthy controls (p = 0.002 at both the genotype and allele level. Additionally, increased ZMIZ1 and TL1A levels were detected in intestinal samples obtained from both IBD patients and DSS-treated mice. Conclusion: rs1250569 (ZMIZ1 and rs10114470 (TL1A are two novel loci that indicate susceptibility to IBD in Han-Chinese patients. Consistent with previous studies, TL1A expression levels were higher in Chinese Han IBD patients and DSS-treated mice. Most importantly, we found that ZMIZ1 expression was

  3. Does MRI with oral contrast medium allow single-study depiction of inflammatory bowel disease enteritis and colitis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin, Carmel G.; Lohan, Derek G.; Browne, Ann Michelle; Roche, Clare; Murphy, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the bowel in concurrent small- and large-bowel evaluation for the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Over a 5-year period, 62 MR examinations performed on 53 patients demonstrated evidence of IBD. Sixteen of these 53 (30.1%) patients had imaging findings of colonic disease and underwent 19 formal MR small bowel examinations. These were further evaluated for bowel distention and image quality. The sensitivity and specificity of the technique compared with colonoscopy as the 'gold standard' was evaluated. Simultaneous imaging of the colon is feasible at MR small bowel follow-through with moderate-to-excellent colonic visibility and colon distention obtained when the contrast medium is present in the colon at the time of image acquisition. MR imaging had a sensitivity of 80% (0.56-0.93), specificity of 100% (0.77-1.00), positive predictive value (PPV) of 1 and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 0.8 for the identification of colitis (based on available concurrent correlation of 38/62 examinations with colonoscopy). Small and large bowel MR imaging with orally consumed contrast medium represents a promising, feasible, non-invasive, non-radiating single mode of assessment of the entire gastrointestinal tract, performed at a single sitting. (orig.)

  4. Applications of Genetically Modified Immunobiotics with High Immunoregulatory Capacity for Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, Suguru; Shimosato, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are chronic inflammatory diseases characterized by dysregulated immune responses of the gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, the incidence of IBDs has increased in developed nations, but their prophylaxis/treatment is not yet established. Site-directed delivery of molecules showing anti-inflammatory properties using genetically modified (gm)-probiotics shows promise as a new strategy for the prevention and treatment of IBD. Advantages of gm-probiotics include (1) the ability to use bacteria as a delivery vehicle, enabling safe and long-term use by humans, (2) decreased risks of side effects, and (3) reduced costs. The intestinal delivery of anti-inflammatory proteins such as cytokines and enzymes using Lactococcus lactis has been shown to regulate host intestinal homeostasis depending on the delivered protein-specific machinery. Additionally, clinical experience using interleukin 10-secreting Lc. lactis has been shown to be safe and to facilitate biological containment in IBD therapy. On the other hand, some preclinical studies have demonstrated that gm-strains of immunobiotics (probiotic strains able to beneficially regulate the mucosal immunity) provide beneficial effects on intestinal inflammation as a result of the synergy between the immunoregulatory effects of the bacterium itself and the anti-inflammatory effects of the delivered recombinant proteins. In this review, we discuss the rapid progression in the development of strategies for the prophylaxis and treatment of IBD using gm-probiotics that exhibit immune regulation effects (gm-immunobiotics). In particular, we discuss the type of strains used as delivery agents.

  5. Incidence, management, and course of cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algaba, Alicia; Guerra, Iván; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Quintanilla, Elvira; López-Serrano, Pilar; García-Sánchez, María Concepción; Casis, Begoña; Taxonera, Carlos; Moral, Ignacio; Chaparro, María; Martín-Rodríguez, Daniel; Martín-Arranz, María Dolores; Manceñido, Noemí; Menchén, Luis; López-Sanromán, Antonio; Castaño, Ángel; Bermejo, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] are at increased risk for developing some types of neoplasia. Our aims were to determin the risk for cancer in patients with IBD and to describe the relationship with immunosuppressive therapies and clinical management after tumor diagnosis. Retrospective, multicenter, observational, 5-year follow-up, cohort study. Relative risk [RR] of cancer in the IBD cohort and the background population, therapeutic strategies, and cancer evolution were analyzed. A total of 145 cancers were diagnosed in 133 of 9100 patients with IBD (global cumulative incidence 1.6% vs 2.4% in local population; RR = 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-0.78). Patients with IBD had a significantly increased RR of non-melanoma skin cancer [RR = 3.85; 2.53-5.80] and small bowel cancer [RR = 3.70; 1.23-11.13]. After cancer diagnosis, IBD treatment was maintained in 13 of 27 [48.1%] patients on thiopurines, in 2 of 3 on methotrexate [66.6%], none on anti-TNF-α monotherapy [n = 6] and 4 of 12 [33.3%] patients on combined therapy. Rate of death and cancer remission during follow-up did not differ [p > 0.05] between patients who maintained the treatment compared with patients who withdrew [5% vs 8% and 95% vs 74%, respectively]. An association between thiopurines [p = 0.20] or anti-TNF-α drugs [p = 0.77] and cancer was not found. Patients with IBD have an increased risk for non-melanoma skin cancer and small bowel cancer. Immunosuppresive therapy is not related to a higher overall risk for cancer or worse tumor evolution in patients who maintain these drugs after cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Probiotics, fibre and herbal medicinal products for functional and inflammatory bowel disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Pecere, Silvia; Bibbò, Stefano; Cammarota, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Functional bowel disorders (FBD), mainly irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional constipation (FC, also called chronic idiopathic constipation), are very common worldwide. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, although less common, has a strong impact on patients' quality of life, as well as being highly expensive for our healthcare. A definite cure for those disorders is still yet to come. Over the years, several therapeutic approaches complementary or alternative to traditional pharmacological treatments, including probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, fibre and herbal medicinal products, have been investigated for the management of both groups of diseases. However, most available studies are biased by several drawbacks, including small samples and poor methodological quality. Probiotics, in particular Saccharomyces boulardii and Lactobacilli (among which Lactobacillus rhamnosus), synbiotics, psyllium, and some herbal medicinal products, primarily peppermint oil, seem to be effective in ameliorating IBS symptoms. Synbiotics and fibre seem to be beneficial in FC patients. The probiotic combination VSL#3 may be effective in inducing remission in patients with mild‐to‐moderate ulcerative colitis, in whom Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 seems to be as effective as mesalamine in maintaining remission. No definite conclusions can be drawn as to the efficacy of fibre and herbal medicinal products in IBD patients due to the low number of studies and the lack of randomized controlled trials that replicate the results obtained in the individual studies conducted so far. Thus, further, well‐designed studies are needed to address the real role of these therapeutic options in the management of both FBD and IBD. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Principles of Pharmacological Research of Nutraceuticals. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph

  7. Therapeutic potential of flavonoids in inflammatory bowel disease: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaritabar, Ali; Darvishi, Behrad; Hadjiakhoondi, Farzaneh; Manayi, Azadeh; Sureda, Antoni; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Fitzpatrick, Leo R; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2017-07-28

    The inflammatory process plays a central role in the development and progression of numerous pathological situations, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disorders. IBDs involve inflammation of the gastrointestinal area and mainly comprise Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Both pathological situations usually involve recurring or bloody diarrhea, pain, fatigue and weight loss. There is at present no pharmacological cure for CD or UC. However, surgery may be curative for UC patients. The prescribed treatment aims to ameliorate the symptoms and prevent and/or delay new painful episodes. Flavonoid compounds are a large family of hydroxylated polyphenolic molecules abundant in plants, including vegetables and fruits which are the major dietary sources of these compounds for humans, together with wine and tea. Flavonoids are becoming very popular because they have many health-promoting and disease-preventive effects. Most interest has been directed towards the antioxidant activity of flavonoids, evidencing a remarkable free-radical scavenging capacity. However, accumulating evidence suggests that flavonoids have many other biological properties, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, anticancer, and neuroprotective activities through different mechanisms of action. The present review analyzes the available data about the different types of flavonoids and their potential effectiveness as adjuvant therapy of IBDs.

  8. Circadian rhythm abnormalities - Association with the course of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Szemraj, Janusz; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Fichna, Jakub; Wiśniewska-Jarosińska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the main representatives of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a group of chronic, immune system-mediated inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The pathogenesis of the intestinal lesions in IBD is not entirely identified and understood: excessive activation of the immune system may come as a result of the interaction of various environmental and infectious factors, genetic predisposition, and the mediation of abnormal intestinal flora. The main objective of the current study is to further identify the risk factors for the development of IBD. Currently, there is very little knowledge about circadian rhythm and IBD and there are only a few studies on the relationship between sleep disturbances and the course of the disease, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine profile and general immune system functioning. Furthermore, the relationship between the expression of circadian rhythm genes and severe course of IBD is still unknown. The aim of this review is to show the current state of knowledge about the relationship between circadian rhythm disorders, sleep disturbance and inflammation in the GI tract and to analyze the possibility of employing this knowledge in diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. The Value of Fecal Markers in Predicting Relapse in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca J. Galgut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs are lifelong chronic illnesses that place an immense burden on patients. The primary aim of therapy is to reduce disease burden and prevent relapse. However, the occurrence of relapses is often unpredictable. Current disease monitoring is primarily by way of clinical indices, with relapses often only recognized once the inflammatory episode is established with subsequent symptoms and gut damage. The window between initial upregulation of the inflammatory response and the recognition of symptoms may provide an opportunity to prevent the relapse and associated morbidity. This review will describe the existing literature surrounding predictive indicators of relapse of IBD with a specific focus on fecal biomarkers. Fecal biomarkers offer promise as a convenient, non-invasive, low cost option for disease monitoring that is predictive of subsequent relapse. To exploit the potential of fecal biomarkers in this role, further research is now required. This research needs to assess multiple fecal markers in context with demographics, disease phenotype, genetics, and intestinal microbiome composition, to build disease behavior models that can provide the clinician with sufficient confidence to intervene and change the long-term disease course.

  10. Crosstalk between mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages in inflammatory bowel disease and associated colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Mao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are attractive seed cells for immunotherapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and multidirectional differentiation abilities, diverse immunoregulatory functions and ease of isolation from a wide range of tissues. MSCs exert their immunoregulatory effect on immune cells via cell-to-cell contact and paracrine mechanisms. In turn, MSCs can also be modulated by immune cells. Macrophages are constantly present in the mucosa of the intestinal tract of mammals and play an important role in the development and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, a chronic and recurrent inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract characterized by idiopathic mucosal inflammation. The increased morbidity and mortality of IBD have made it a disease hard to cure in the clinic. MSCs have emerged as an important tool for IBD therapy due to their abilities to differentiate into enterocyte-like cells and regulate inflammatory cells, especially macrophages. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the interaction between MSCs and macrophages in diseases, with an emphasis on IBD. We propose that an optimized MSC-based therapy would provide a novel strategy for the treatment of IBD and the prevention of IBD-associated colorectal cancer (CRC.

  11. Perioperative Parenteral Nutrition in Adults With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Emily

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition with numerous nutrition implications, including an increased risk of malnutrition and various nutrient deficiencies. Surgical interventions are often necessary in the treatment of IBD, and patients with IBD presenting for surgery often have multiple issues, including acute inflammatory processes, malnutrition, anemia, and infections, which may increase the likelihood of poor surgical outcomes. Thus, determining adjunctive treatments that may decrease postoperative complications is paramount. Although enteral nutrition (EN) is considered the preferred nutrition support modality when the gastrointestinal tract is accessible and functional, parenteral nutrition (PN) may provide a suitable alternative when the use of EN is not feasible. The aim of this review is to evaluate the currently available literature on the impact of perioperative PN on postoperative complications, disease severity, and nutrition status in adults with IBD. Six studies within the past 10 years investigated this topic and are analyzed here. Results indicate general trends toward improvements in postoperative outcomes, disease severity, and nutrition status associated with perioperative PN use. Although results appear promising, additional, larger studies with an emphasis on PN composition will improve our understanding of the benefits of perioperative PN in adults with IBD. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. T-cell transfer and cytokine/TCR gene deletion models in the study of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregenholt, S; Delbro, D; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1997-01-01

    Until recently there existed no appropriate immunological animal models for human inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Today a number of models, mostly in the mouse and rat, have proved useful in the study of several aspects of IBD, including the histopathology and the disease-inductive and -protec...... and in gene-deleted mice....

  13. Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease : A European Nested Case-Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstelten, Jorrit L; Beelen, Rob M J; Leenders, Max; Hoek, Gerard; Brunekreef, Bert; van Schaik, Fiona D M; Siersema, Peter D; Eriksen, Kirsten T; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Carbonnel, Franck; de Hoogh, Kees; Key, Timothy J; Luben, Robert; Chan, Simon S M; Hart, Andrew R; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Oldenburg, Bas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Industrialization has been linked to the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). AIM: We investigated the association between air pollution exposure and IBD. METHODS: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort was used to identify cases with Crohn's

  14. Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A European Nested Case-Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstelten, J.L.; Beelen, R.M.; Leenders, M.; Hoek, G.; Brunekreef, B.; Schaik, F.D. van; Siersema, P.D.; Eriksen, K.T.; Raaschou-Nielsen, O.; Tjonneland, A.; Overvad, K.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Carbonnel, F.; Hoogh, K. de; Key, T.J.; Luben, R.; Chan, S.S.; Hart, A.R.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Oldenburg, B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Industrialization has been linked to the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). AIM: We investigated the association between air pollution exposure and IBD. METHODS: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort was used to identify cases with Crohn's

  15. Association analyses identify 38 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and highlight shared genetic risk across populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Jimmy Z.; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Huang, Hailiang; Ng, Siew C.; Alberts, Rudi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ripke, Stephan; Lee, James C.; Jostins, Luke; Shah, Tejas; Abedian, Shifteh; Cheon, Jae Hee; Cho, Judy; Daryani, Naser E.; Franke, Lude; Fuyuno, Yuta; Hart, Ailsa; Juyal, Ramesh C.; Juyal, Garima; Kim, Won Ho; Morris, Andrew P.; Poustchi, Hossein; Newman, William G.; Midha, Vandana; Orchard, Timothy R.; Vahedi, Homayon; Sood, Ajit; Sung, Joseph J. Y.; Malekzadeh, Reza; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yamazaki, Keiko; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Franke, Andre; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Parkes, Miles; Thelma, B. K.; Daly, Mark J.; Kubo, Michiaki; Anderson, Carl A.; Weersma, Rinse K.

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here we report the first transancestry association study of IBD, with genome-wide or Immunochip genotype data from an extended cohort of 86,640 European individuals and Immunochip data from 9,846

  16. Ankyrin repeat and zinc-finger domain-containing 1 mutations are associated with infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Haaften-Visser, Désirée Y.; Harakalova, Magdalena; Mocholi, Enric; Van Montfrans, Joris M.; Elkadri, Abdul; Rieter, Ester; Fiedler, Karoline; Van Hasselt, Peter M.; Triffaux, Emily M.M.; Van Haelst, Mieke M.; Nijman, Isaac J.; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Muise, Aleixo M.; Cuppen, Edwin; Houwen, Roderick H.J.; Coffer, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Infantile-onset inflammatory bowel disease (IO IBD) is an invalidating illness with an onset before 2 years of age and has a complex pathophysiology in which genetic factors are important. Homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in an IO IBD patient and subsequent sequencing of the candidate

  17. Does pregnancy change the disease course? A study in a European cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, L; Vind, Ida; Politi, P

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often affects patients in their fertile age. The aim of this study was to describe pregnancy outcome in a European cohort of IBD patients. As data are limited regarding the effect of pregnancy on disease course, our second objective was to inv...

  18. Development, validation and clinical assessment of a short questionnaire to assess disease-related knowledge in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keegan, Denise

    2013-02-01

    Only two inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) knowledge scales are available, both primarily aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of clinical education programs. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a short knowledge questionnaire for clinical and academic research purposes.

  19. Use of azathioprine and corticosteroids during pregnancy and birth outcome in women diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veie Plauborg, Anne; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Garne, Ester

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to describe prescription patterns for azathioprine and corticosteroids for pregnant women with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) before, during, and after pregnancy and to describe pregnancy outcomes. METHODS: A cohort composed of all singleton pregnancies in...

  20. Costs and resource utilization for diagnosis and treatment during the initial year in a European inflammatory bowel disease inception cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, Johan; Vardi, Hillel; Pedersen, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    :: The EpiCom cohort is a prospective population-based inception cohort of unselected inflammatory bowel disease patients from 31 Western and Eastern European centers. Patients were followed every third month from diagnosis, and clinical data regarding treatment and investigations were collected. Costs were...

  1. Pilot evaluation of an instrument to measure quality of life in British children with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogden, Cassandra Anne; Abbott, Janice; Aggett, Peter; Derkx, Bert H.; Maity, Santanu; Thomas, Adrian G.

    2008-01-01

    The IMPACT questionnaire was developed in Canada to measure quality of life in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, 20 children with IBD completed 2 versions of the IMPACT questionnaire with a Likert scale or visual analog scale (VAS), 5 of whom expressed problems

  2. Agreement Between Home-Based Measurement of Stool Calprotectin and ELISA Results for Monitoring Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Anke; Knol, Mariska; Kobold, Anneke Muller; Bootsman, Josette; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Rheenen, Patrick F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: An increasing number of physicians use repeated measurements of stool calprotectin to monitor intestinal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). A lateral flow-based rapid test allows patients to measure their own stool calprotectin values at home. The

  3. Quality of life in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease measured by a generic and a disease-specific questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, H. J.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Last, B. F.; Koopman, H. M.; Derkx, H. H. F.

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children and adolescents. using both a generic and a disease-specific instrument. Three questionnaires were sent to all patients (8-18 y old) from the database of two large

  4. Self-Management Education for Rehabilitation Inpatients Suffering from Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, A.; Weiland, R.; Gerlich, C.; Dreger, K.; Derra, C.; Mainos, D.; Tuschhoff, T.; Berding, A.; Witte, C.; Kaltz, B.; Faller, H.

    2016-01-01

    Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects patients' psychological well-being, previous educational programs have failed to demonstrate effects on psychosocial outcomes and quality of life. Therefore, we developed a group-based psychoeducational program that combined provision of both medical information and psychological self-management…

  5. Pain management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: insights for the clinician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinath, Arvind Iyengar; Walter, Chelsea; Newara, Melissa C.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and has a profound negative impact on patients’ lives. There are growing data suggesting that pain is variably related to the degree of active inflammation. Given the multifactorial etiologies underlying the pain, the treatment of abdominal pain in the IBD population is best accomplished by individualized plans. This review covers four clinically relevant categories of abdominal pain in patients with IBD, namely, inflammation, surgical complications, bacterial overgrowth, and neurobiological processes and how pain management can be addressed in each of these cases. The role of genetic factors, psychological factors, and psychosocial stress in pain perception and treatment will also be addressed. Lastly, psychosocial, pharmacological, and procedural pain management techniques will be discussed. An extensive review of the existing literature reveals a paucity of data regarding pain management specific to IBD. In addition, there is growing consensus suggesting a spectrum between IBD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. Thus, this review for adult and pediatric clinicians also incorporates the literature for the treatment of functional abdominal pain and the clinical consensus from IBD and IBS experts on pharmacological, behavioral, and procedural methods to treat abdominal pain in this population. PMID:22973418

  6. Worries and Concerns among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Followed Prospectively over One Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars-Petter Jelsness-Jørgensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disease-related worries are frequently reported in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, but longitudinal assessments of these worries are scarce. In the present study, patients completed the rating form of IBD patient concerns (RFIPC at three occasions during one year. One-way analysis of variance (ANO VA, t-tests, bivariate correlation, and linear regression analyses were used to analyse data. The validity and reliability of the Norwegian RFIPC was tested. A total of 140 patients were included (V1, ulcerative colitis (UC n = 92, Crohn's disease (CD n = 48, mean age 46.9 and 40.0-year old, respectively. The highest rated worries included having an ostomy bag, loss of bowel control, and reduced energy levels. Symptoms were positively associated with more worries. A pattern of IBD-related worries was consistent over a period of one year. Worries about undergoing surgery or having an ostomy bag seemed to persist even when symptoms improved. The Norwegian RFIPC is valid and reliable.

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease and exercise: results of a Crohn's and Colitis UK survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, D; Robbins, H; Rogers, S; Clark, S; Poullis, A

    2014-01-01

    Over 250 000 people in the UK are affected with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and approximately 10 000 new cases are diagnosed every year. These chronic bowel conditions have been shown to affect both work and recreational activity. In the general population, regular exercise has numerous benefits to health and well-being and there are additional benefits for those with IBD. However, people with IBD face significant challenges in trying to take regular exercise. With the renewed focus on sport brought about by the recent London Olympics, Crohn's and Colitis UK surveyed its members to explore their sport and fitness habits. 918 members participated in the survey, which is the largest survey of its kind, investigating the exercise habits of people with IBD. The survey showed widespread uptake of exercise in those with IBD, with a large number feeling better for it. However, it also identified a considerable number of respondents who reported a significant negative impact of IBD on their ability to take up, enjoy and derive benefit from sporting activities. Asking questions about sporting leisure activity in clinical consultations may identify those in need of help and support and possibly identify factors to be dealt with, in order to enable them to take part in these beneficial activities.

  8. Chlamydial Proctitis in a Young Man Who Has Sex with Men: Misdiagnosed as Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Jaeyeon; Shin, Dong Hwan; Jung, Jun Oh; Koh, Seokyoung; Kim, Ka Young; Lee, Jae Min

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a 20-year-old man with a 2-month history of anal pain and bloody rectal discharge. He was referred to our clinic of gastroenterology for suspected inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The colonoscopy showed mucosal nodularities on the rectum and an anal tag. Because the colonoscopic findings were not consistent with the typical manifestations of IBD, we took an additional sexual history and performed studies for infectious proctitis, including serologic tests for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Treponema pallidum. He had homosexual experience, and the serologic tests and PCR of a rectal swab were positive for C. trachomatis infection. Finally he was diagnosed as having chlamydial proctitis and was treated with intramuscular ceftriaxone 250 mg in a single dose and doxycycline 100 mg orally twice daily for 7 days. After 2 months, he had no lower abdominal symptoms and his endoscopic findings were improved.

  9. The role of JAM-A in inflammatory bowel disease: unrevealing the ties that bind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrano, Stefania; Danese, Silvio

    2009-05-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) are junctional proteins whose function is to maintain an intact intestinal epithelial barrier and regulate the paracellular movement of water and solutes. Altered TJ structure and epithelial permeability are observed in inflammatory bowel disease and seem to have an important role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a protein expressed at tight junctions of epithelial and endothelial cells, as well as on circulating leukocytes. Its function at tight junctions appears to be crucial as an extracellular adhesive molecule in the direct regulation of intestinal barrier function. This review focuses on the role of JAM-A in controlling mucosal homeostasis by regulating the integrity and permeability of epithelial barrier function.

  10. Self-managed eHealth Disease Monitoring in Children and Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Katrine; Jakobsen, Christian; Houen, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of eHealth on disease activity, the need for hospital contacts, and medical adherence in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, to assess eHealth's influence on school attendance and quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Patients...... with IBD, 10 to 17 years attending a public university hospital, were prospectively randomized to a 2-year open label case-controlled eHealth intervention. The eHealth-group used the web-application young.constant-care.com (YCC) on a monthly basis and in case of flare-ups, and were seen at one annual......: Fifty-three patients in nonbiological treatment were included (27 eHealth/26 control). We found no differences between the groups regarding escalation in treatment and disease activity (symptoms, fecal calprotectin, and blood). The number of total outpatient visits (mean: eHealth 3.26, SEM 0.51; control...

  11. The Establishment of a National Tissue Bank for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Research in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Collins

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada (CCFC has established a national bank for tissue, serum and blood from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Investigators from across the country submit material to the bank together with clinical data. Investigators may access their own patient information from the bank for their own study purposes, but the distribution of tissue is restricted to specific CCFC-funded projects. Currently, tissues are being collected from newly diagnosed, untreated IBD patients to support a recent initiative aimed at characterizing microbes in colonic and ileal biopsies from such patients. In the future, criteria for the submission of tissue will be tailored to specific research questions. This bank is believed to be the first national bank of its kind dedicated to research in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

  12. Assessment of the validity of a multigene analysis in the diagnostics of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, J T; Nyberg, Caroline; Olsen, J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The findings of a previous multigene study indicated that the expression of a panel of seven specific genes had strong differential power regarding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) versus non-IBD, as well as ulcerative colitis (UC) versus Crohn's disease (CD). This prospective...... confirmatory study based on an independent patient cohort from a national Danish IBD centre was conducted in an attempt to verify these earlier observations. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A total of 119 patients were included in the study (CD, UC and controls). Three mucosal biopsies were retrieved from......, a reliable and simple diagnostic tool is still warranted for optimal diagnosis and treatment of patients with IBD, especially the subgroup with unclassified disease....

  13. The clinical implication of drug dependency in children and adults with inflammatory bowel disease: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duricova, Dana; Pedersen, Natalia; Lenicek, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Drug dependency in adult and paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is described and the significance of this response pattern in clinical practice discussed in this review. Dependent patients maintain remission while on the treatment, but they relapse shortly after drug...... corticosteroid dependency. Infliximab dependency was described in 42-66% of children and 29% of adults with Crohn's disease. The risk of surgery 50 and 40 months after treatment start was 10% and 23% in infliximab dependent children and adults, respectively. Maintenance of infliximab in dependent patients...... was suggested to postpone if not avoid the need of surgery. Lastly, mesalazine dependency was identified in 23% of adults with Crohn's disease. These patients were characterized by mild disease course and lower surgical risk compared to non-responders to mesalazine (32 vs. 61%). Identification of drug...

  14. Systematic identification of core transcription factors mediating dysregulated links bridging inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xiao

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows a tight link between inflammation and cancer. However, comprehensive identification of pivotal transcription factors (i.e., core TFs mediating the dysregulated links remains challenging, mainly due to a lack of samples that can effectively reflect the connections between inflammation and tumorigenesis. Here, we constructed a series of TF-mediated regulatory networks from a large compendium of expression profiling of normal colonic tissues, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs and colorectal cancer (CRC, which contains 1201 samples in total, and then proposed a network-based approach to characterize potential links bridging inflammation and cancer. For this purpose, we computed significantly dysregulated relationships between inflammation and their linked cancer networks, and then 24 core TFs with their dysregulated genes were identified. Collectively, our approach provides us with quite important insight into inflammation-associated tumorigenesis in colorectal cancer, which could also be applied to identify functionally dysregulated relationships mediating the links between other different disease phenotypes.

  15. Fatal infections in older patients with inflammatory bowel disease on anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Way-Seah Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF is highly effective in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; however, it is associated with an increased risk of infections, particularly in older adults. We reviewed 349 patients with IBD, who were observed over a 12-month period, 74 of whom had received anti-TNF therapy (71 patients were aged <60 years and 3 were aged ≥60 years. All the 3 older patients developed serious infectious complications after receiving anti-TNFs, although all of them were also on concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. One patient developed disseminated tuberculosis, another patient developed cholera diarrhea followed by nosocomial pneumonia, while the third patient developed multiple opportunistic infections (Pneumocystis pneumonia, cryptococcal septicemia and meningitis, Klebsiella septicemia. All 3 patients died within 1 year from the onset of the infection(s. We recommend that anti-TNF, especially when combined with other immunosuppressive therapy, should be used with extreme caution in older adult patients with IBD.

  16. Efficacy and safety of bisphosphonates in management of low bone density in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liwei; Wang, Haiqing; Dong, Wenwei; Liu, Zhenxin; Mao, Haijiao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to determine whether bisphosphonates are safe, as well as effective against bone mineral loss in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A computerized search of electronic databases from 1966 to 2016 was performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in this review to evaluate the role of bisphosphonates in the management of osteoporosis in IBD patients. A revised 7-point Jadad scale was used to evaluate the quality of each study. Overall, 13 RCTs and 923 patients met the inclusion criteria of this meta-analysis. The result showed that bisphosphonates decreased bone mass density (BMD) loss at the lumbar spine (P = 0.0002), reduced the risk of new fractures (P = 0.01), and retained the similar adverse events (P = 0.86). Bisphosphonates may provide protection and safety against bone mineral loss in IBD patients. PMID:28099343

  17. [An analysis of the DNA fingerprinting of intestinal flora in inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run-mei; Han, Ying; Wang, Ji-heng; Wang, Zhi-hong

    2007-02-01

    DNA fingerprinting for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and healthy subjects was carried out to compare the difference of intestinal flora between the two groups. DNA fingerprinting for IBD patients and healthy persons was set up with enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC-PCR) technology and the difference of intestinal flora between the two groups compared. DNA fingerprinting of the IBD patients and healthy subjects was identified and a significant difference was noticed between them. There were lots of bands in the DNA fingerprinting of the healthy subjects but few in that of the IBD patients. Strikingly, same distribution of the principal band of DNA fingerprinting was noticed in IBD patients. The variety of intestinal flora in healthy subjects is more apparent than that in IBD patients. An unique principal band might be the sequence of the presence of specific etiopathogenetic bacterium, or it might be the combined sequence of mixed bacterial flora.

  18. The establishment of a national tissue bank for inflammatory bowel disease research in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Stephen M; McHugh, Kevin; Croitoru, Ken; Howorth, Michael

    2003-02-01

    The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada (CCFC) has established a national bank for tissue, serum and blood from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Investigators from across the country submit material to the bank together with clinical data. Investigators may access their own patient information from the bank for their own study purposes, but the distribution of tissue is restricted to specific CCFC-funded projects. Currently, tissues are being collected from newly diagnosed, untreated IBD patients to support a recent initiative aimed at characterizing microbes in colonic and ileal biopsies from such patients. In the future, criteria for the submission of tissue will be tailored to specific research questions. This bank is believed to be the first national bank of its kind dedicated to research in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

  19. Central endoscopy reads in inflammatory bowel disease clinical trials: The role of the imaging core lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Harris; Berzin, Tyler M; Yu, Hui Jing; Huang, Christopher S; Mishkin, Daniel S

    2014-08-01

    Clinical trials in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are evolving at a rapid pace by employing central reading for endoscopic mucosal assessment in a field that was, historically, largely based on assessments by local physicians. This transition from local to central reading carries with it numerous technical, operational, and scientific challenges, many of which can be resolved by imaging core laboratories (ICLs), a concept that has a longer history in clinical trials in a number of diseases outside the realm of gastroenterology. For IBD trials, ICLs have the dual goals of providing objective, consistent assessments of endoscopic findings using central-reading paradigms whilst providing important expertise with regard to operational issues and regulatory expectations. This review focuses on current approaches to using ICLs for central endoscopic reading in IBD trials. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  20. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and inflammatory bowel disease characteristics in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Gabriela; Mihai, Catalina; Dranga, Mihaela; Prelipcean, Cristina Cijevschi

    2014-03-07

    To describe the relationship between vitamin D levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) characteristics in northeastern Romanian patients. This was a prospective study of 47 consecutive IBD patients admitted to The Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in Iasi, Romania between March 2011 and June 2012. The diagnosis of IBD was established based on endoscopic, histologic and radiologic findings. Demographic data, disease characteristics, ongoing treatments and biological parameters of patients (including markers of inflammation: C-reactive protein level, fibrinogen level, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) were recorded. Serum vitamin D levels were measured and compared with age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers from the same geographic area. Vitamin D levels were defined as sufficient (> 30 ng/mL), insufficient (20-30 ng/mL), or severely deficient (Romania, with the lowest levels occurring in CD patients with moderate to severe disease activity.