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Sample records for experimental electron density

  1. An experimental electron density investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    based on X-ray diffraction measurements at 130 K. The electron density and its associated properties have been evaluated at the bond and the ring critical points for the naphthalene residues as well as for the central ring. The variation of the Laplacian along the axis, above and below the ring plane, is found to be symmetric ...

  2. Experimental charge density from electron microscopic maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jimin

    2017-08-01

    The charge density (CD) distribution of an atom is the difference per unit volume between the positive charge of its nucleus and the distribution of the negative charges carried by the electrons that are associated with it. The CDs of the atoms in macromolecules are responsible for their electrostatic potential (ESP) distributions, which can now be visualized using cryo-electron microscopy at high resolution. CD maps can be recovered from experimental ESP density maps using the negative Laplacian operation. CD maps are easier to interpret than ESP maps because they are less sensitive to long-range electrostatic effects. An ESP-to-CD conversion involves multiplication of amplitudes of structure factors as Fourier transforms of these maps in reciprocal space by 1/d2 , where d is the resolution of reflections. In principle, it should be possible to determine the charges carried by the individual atoms in macromolecules by comparing experimental CD maps with experimental ESP maps. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  4. Experimental electron density determinations on penicillins and a fullerene derivative

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Armin

    2010-01-01

    The number of experimental charge density studies increased during the past years. This is prior to technical developments, especially the now widely spread area detectors which allow to measure high resolution X-ray diffraction data sets in a reasonable time. With the program system XD a computer program is available which enables the user to easily handle the substantial parameters in the Hansen-Coppens multipole formalism. The combination of the area detection technique with the high...

  5. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse

    candidate because of its many similarities with diamond: bonding pattern in the extended network structure, hardness, and the quality of the crystallites.3 However, some degree ionic interaction is a part of the bonding in boron nitride, which is not present in diamond. By investigating the core density...... beyond multipolar modeling of the valence density. As was recently shown in a benchmark study of diamond by Bindzus et al.1 The next step is to investigate more complicated chemical bonding motives, to determine the effect of bonding on the core density. Cubic boron nitride2 lends itself as a perfect...... in boron nitride we may obtain a deeper understanding of the effect of bonding on the total density. We report here a thorough investigation of the charge density of cubic boron nitride with a detailed modelling of the inner atom charge density. By combining high resolution powder X-ray diffraction data...

  6. Determination of the vertical electron-density profile in ionospheric tomography: experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of the vertical electron-density profile is a fundamental problem in ionospheric tomography. Lack of near-horizontal ray paths limits the information available on the vertical profile, so that the resultant image of electron density is biased in a horizontal sense. The vertical profile is of great importance as it affects the authenticity of the entire tomographic image. A new method is described whereby the vertical profile is selected using relative total-electron-content measurements. The new reconstruction process has been developed from modelling studies. A range of background ionospheres, representing many possible peak heights, scale heights and electron densities are formed from a Chapman profile on the bottomside with a range of topside profiles. The iterative reconstruction process is performed on all of these background ionospheres and a numerical selection criterion employed to select the final image. The resulting tomographic images show excellent agreement in electron density when compared with independent verification provided by the EISCAT radar.

  7. Approaching an experimental electron density model of the biologically active trans -epoxysuccinyl amide group-Substituent effects vs. crystal packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Ming W.; Stewart, Scott G.; Sobolev, Alexandre N.; Dittrich, Birger; Schirmeister, Tanja; Luger, Peter; Hesse, Malte; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Spackman, Peter R.; Spackman, Mark A.; Grabowsky, Simon (Heinrich-Heine); (Freie); (UC); (Bremen); (JG-UM); (UWA)

    2017-01-24

    The trans-epoxysuccinyl amide group as a biologically active moiety in cysteine protease inhibitors such as loxistatin acid E64c has been used as a benchmark system for theoretical studies of environmental effects on the electron density of small active ingredients in relation to their biological activity. Here, the synthesis and the electronic properties of the smallest possible active site model compound are reported to close the gap between the unknown experimental electron density of trans-epoxysuccinyl amides and the well-known function of related drugs. Intramolecular substituent effects are separated from intermolecular crystal packing effects on the electron density, which allows us to predict the conditions under which an experimental electron density investigation on trans-epoxysuccinyl amides will be possible. In this context, the special importance of the carboxylic acid function in the model compound for both crystal packing and biological activity is revealed through the novel tool of model energy analysis.

  8. D-region electron density and effective recombination coefficients during twilight – experimental data and modelling during solar proton events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Osepian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of electron density in the lower D-region (below 70 km altitude are rarely made. This applies both with regard to measurements by ground-based facilities and by sounding rockets, and during both quiet conditions and conditions of energetic electron precipitation. Deep penetration into the atmosphere of high-energy solar proton fluxes (during solar proton events, SPE produces extra ionisation in the whole D-region, including the lower altitudes, which gives favourable conditions for accurate measurements using ground-based facilities. In this study we show that electron densities measured with two ground-based facilities at almost the same latitude but slightly different longitudes, provide a valuable tool for validation of model computations. The two techniques used are incoherent scatter of radio waves (by the EISCAT 224 MHz radar in Tromsø, Norway, 69.6° N, 19.3° E, and partial reflection of radio-waves (by the 2.8 MHz radar near Murmansk, Russia, 69.0° N, 35.7° E. Both radars give accurate electron density values during SPE, from heights 57–60 km and upward with the EISCAT radar and between 55–70 km with the partial reflection technique. Near noon, there is little difference in the solar zenith angle between the two locations and both methods give approximately the same values of electron density at the overlapping heights. During twilight, when the difference in solar zenith angles increases, electron density values diverge. When both radars are in night conditions (solar zenith angle >99° electron densities at the overlapping altitudes again become equal. We use the joint measurements to validate model computations of the ionospheric parameters f+, λ, αeff and their variations during solar proton events. These parameters are important characteristics of the lower ionosphere structure which cannot be determined by other methods.

  9. D-region electron density and effective recombination coefficients during twilight - experimental data and modelling during solar proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osepian, A.; Kirkwood, S.; Dalin, P.; Tereschenko, V.

    2009-10-01

    Accurate measurements of electron density in the lower D-region (below 70 km altitude) are rarely made. This applies both with regard to measurements by ground-based facilities and by sounding rockets, and during both quiet conditions and conditions of energetic electron precipitation. Deep penetration into the atmosphere of high-energy solar proton fluxes (during solar proton events, SPE) produces extra ionisation in the whole D-region, including the lower altitudes, which gives favourable conditions for accurate measurements using ground-based facilities. In this study we show that electron densities measured with two ground-based facilities at almost the same latitude but slightly different longitudes, provide a valuable tool for validation of model computations. The two techniques used are incoherent scatter of radio waves (by the EISCAT 224 MHz radar in Tromsø, Norway, 69.6° N, 19.3° E), and partial reflection of radio-waves (by the 2.8 MHz radar near Murmansk, Russia, 69.0° N, 35.7° E). Both radars give accurate electron density values during SPE, from heights 57-60 km and upward with the EISCAT radar and between 55-70 km with the partial reflection technique. Near noon, there is little difference in the solar zenith angle between the two locations and both methods give approximately the same values of electron density at the overlapping heights. During twilight, when the difference in solar zenith angles increases, electron density values diverge. When both radars are in night conditions (solar zenith angle >99°) electron densities at the overlapping altitudes again become equal. We use the joint measurements to validate model computations of the ionospheric parameters f+, λ, αeff and their variations during solar proton events. These parameters are important characteristics of the lower ionosphere structure which cannot be determined by other methods.

  10. The topology of the Coulomb potential density. A comparison with the electron density, the virial energy density, and the Ehrenfest force density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lizé-Mari; Eaby, Alan; Dillen, Jan

    2017-12-15

    The topology of the Coulomb potential density has been studied within the context of the theory of Atoms in Molecules and has been compared with the topologies of the electron density, the virial energy density and the Ehrenfest force density. The Coulomb potential density is found to be mainly structurally homeomorphic with the electron density. The Coulomb potential density reproduces the non-nuclear attractor which is observed experimentally in the molecular graph of the electron density of a Mg dimer, thus, for the first time ever providing an alternative and energetic foundation for the existence of this critical point. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Determination of electron temperature and electron density in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The electron temperatures and electron densities of air and argon have been measured at various pds (pressure times distance). The electron temperatures have been computed using the Johnson-Malter double-probe method. The electron densities have been computed using the total positive ion current and the ...

  12. Valence electronic state density in thorium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Anton Yu.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the fine low energy (0-40 eV X-ray photoelectron spectra of ThO2, taking into account relativistic Xα-discrete variation electronic structure calculations for the ThO8 (D4h cluster reflecting thorium's close environment in ThO2. As a result, it was theoretically shown and experimentally confirmed that Th5f electrons in ThO2 can participate directly (~0.6 Th5f electrons in chemical bond formation.Th6p electrons were shown to be a significant part (~0.44 Th6p electrons not only of inner valence molecular orbitals, but to play a significant role in outer valence molecular orbitals formation, as well. Inner valence molecular orbitals composition and sequent order were established to belong to the binding energy range of 13 eV to 40 eV. The valence electronic state density in the range of 0-40 eV in ThO2 was also calculated. For the first time, these data allowed an interpretation of the fine X-ray photoelectron spectra (0-40 eV and high resolution O4,5(Th X-ray emition spectral structure (~60 - ~85 eV of ThO2.

  13. Analyticity of the density of electronic wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Østergaard; Fournais, S.; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, M.

    2004-01-01

    We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei.......We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei....

  14. Measurement of electron density profile by microwave reflectometry on tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonet, F.

    1985-05-01

    A new method for measuring the electron density spatial profile has been successfully tested on the tokamak of Fontenay aux Roses (TFR). This method is based on the total reflection experienced by a wave of frequency F on the layer where F = F/sub p/e(r). The experimental results show that the maximum electron density in the discharge is also easily measured and that accurate determination of a density profile can be obtained with a time resolution of 5 ms. This diagnostic is well adapted to all fusion devices where access to the total plasma cross section is limited, particularly for large tokamaks.

  15. Experimental electron density studies as key for understanding the chemical and physical properties in selected model systems; Experimentelle Elektronendichtestudien als Schluessel zum Verstaendnis chemischer und physikalischer Eigenschaften in ausgewaehlten Modellsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, Christoph

    2014-12-17

    The topological analysis of experimentally determined electron density distributions, employing the quantum theory of atoms in molecules developed by Richard FW Bader, was used in this thesis to study chemically or physically motivated questions in appropriate model systems. First, transition metal complexes with activated C-H bonds or Si-H bonds were examined which led to a better understanding of agostic interactions. An important tool during these investigations is the so called atomic graph, which describes the characteristic spatial arrangement of the critical points of the Laplacefield of the electron density distribution in the valence shell of the relevant atoms. It reveals zones with a locally concentrated or depleted electron density distribution. This leads to the empirical rule, that a strong activation of C-H bonds or Si-H bonds is only observed when the hydrogen atom faces a pronounced charge depletion zone at the transition metal atom. In addition, the quasi one-dimensional rare-earth transition metal carbides Sc{sub 3}FeC{sub 4}, Sc{sub 3}CoC{sub 4} and Sc{sub 3}NiC{sub 4} were examined. Although all three compounds are isotypic at room temperature, it was revealed during this thesis, that only Sc{sub 3}CoC{sub 4} undergoes a structural phase transition at a temperature of ∝ 70 K and becomes superconducting below a critical temperature of 4.5 K. The main reason for this behaviour is the variation of the valence electrons through the exchange of Fe by Co or Ni. This results in the occupation of progressively higher energy electronic states and a raising of the Fermi level. The change in the nature of the electronic states at the Fermi level is in turn reflected by the different atomic graphs of the transition metal atoms and the distinct physical properties of these three compounds.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Runaway Electron Generation in Textor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Jaspers,; Finken, K.H.; Mank, G.; Hoenen, F.; Boedo, J. A.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Schüller, F. C.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study of the generation of runaway electrons in TEXTOR has been performed. From the infrared synchrotron radiation emitted by relativistic electrons, the number of runaway electrons can be obtained as a function of time. In low density discharges (n(e)BAR < 1 X 10(19) m-3)

  17. Bedforms formed by experimental supercritical density flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Hajime; Izumi, Norihiro; Yokokawa, Miwa; Muto, Tetsuji

    2014-05-01

    This study reveals characteristics and formative conditions of bedforms produced by saline density flows in supercritical flow conditions, especially focusing on the mechanism of the formation of plane bed. The motion of sediment particles forming bedforms was resolved by high-speed cameras (1/1000 frame/seconds). Experimental density flows were produced by mixtures of salt water (1.01-1.04 in density) and plastic particles (1.5 in specific density, 140 or 240 mm in diameter). Salt water and plastic particles are analogue materials of muddy water and sand particles in turbidity currents respectively. Acrylic flume (4.0 m long, 2.0 cm wide and 0.5 m deep) was submerged in an experimental tank (6.0 m long, 1.8 m wide and 1.2 m deep) that was filled by clear water. Features of bedforms were observed when the bed state in the flume reached equilibrium condition. The experimental conditions range 1.5-4.2 in densimetric Froude number and 0.2-0.8 in Shields dimensionless stress. We report the two major discoveries as a result of the flume experiments: (1) Plane bed under Froude-supercritical flows and (2) Geometrical characteristics of cyclic steps formed by density flows. (1) Plane bed was formed under the condition of supercritical flow regime. In previous studies, plane bed has been known to be formed by subcritical unidirectional flows (ca. 0.8 in Froude number). However, this study implies that plane bed can also be formed by supercritical conditions with high Shields dimensionless stress (>0.4) and very high Froude number (> 4.0). This discovery may suggest that previous estimations of paleo-hydraulic conditions of parallel lamination in turbidites should be reconsidered. The previous experimental studies and data from high-speed camera suggest that the region of plane bed formation coincides with the region of the sheet flow developments. The particle transport in sheet flow (thick bedload layer) induces transform of profile of flow shear stress, which may be

  18. Electron Density and Temperature Measurements, and Abundance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using spectra obtained from the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) spectrograph on the spacecraft SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), we investigate the height dependence of electron density, temperature and abundance anomalies in the solar atmosphere. In particular, we present ...

  19. Models for Experimental High Density Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Swoboda, Julia; Nowak, Katarzyna; Dziechciarz, Klaudia

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the effects of research on models of high density housing. The authors present urban projects for experimental high density housing estates. The design was based on research performed on 38 examples of similar housing in Poland that have been built after 2003. Some of the case studies show extreme density and that inspired the researchers to test individual virtual solutions that would answer the question: How far can we push the limits? The experimental housing projects show strengths and weaknesses of design driven only by such indexes as FAR (floor attenuation ratio - housing density) and DPH (dwellings per hectare). Although such projects are implemented, the authors believe that there are reasons for limits since high index values may be in contradiction to the optimum character of housing environment. Virtual models on virtual plots presented by the authors were oriented toward maximising the DPH index and DAI (dwellings area index) which is very often the main driver for developers. The authors also raise the question of sustainability of such solutions. The research was carried out in the URBAN model research group (Gliwice, Poland) that consists of academic researchers and architecture students. The models reflect architectural and urban regulations that are valid in Poland. Conclusions might be helpful for urban planners, urban designers, developers, architects and architecture students.

  20. Experimental study of density pump-out on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouxin; Liu, Haiqing; Jie, Yinxian; Zang, Qing; Lyu, Bo; Zhang, Tao; Zeng, Long; Zhang, Shoubiao; Shi, Nan; Lan, Ting; Zou, Zhiyong; Li, Weiming; Yao, Yuan; Wei, Xuechao; Lian, Hui; Li, Gen; Xu, Handong; Zhang, Xinjun; Wu, Bin; Sun, Youwen; EAST Team

    2017-01-01

    In the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak, density pump-out phenomena were observed by using a multi-channel polarimeter-interferometer system under different heating schemes of ion cyclotron resonant heating, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and neutral beam injection. The density pump-out was also induced with application of resonant magnetic perturbation, accompanied with a degradation of particle confinement. For the comparison analysis in all heating schemes, the typical plasma parameters are plasma current 400 kA, toroidal field 2 T, and line average density 2 × 1019 m-3. The experimental results show that the degree of pump-out is concerned with electron density and heating power. Low density deuterium low confinement (L-mode) plasmas (<3.5 × 1019 m-3) show strong pump-out effects. The density pump-out correlated with a significant drop of particle confinement. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China (Nos.2012GB101002 and 2014GB106002), and National Nature Science Foundation of China (Nos.11375237 and 11105184).

  1. Electron momentum spectroscopy study of amantadine: binding energy spectra and valence orbital electron density distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinyuk, I. V.; Zheng, Y.; Brion, C. E.

    2000-11-01

    The electron binding energy spectrum and valence orbital electron momentum density distributions of amantadine (1-aminoadamantane), an important anti-viral and anti-Parkinsonian drug, have been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy. Theoretical momentum distributions, calculated at the 6-311++G** and AUG-CC-PVTZ levels within the target Hartree-Fock and also the target Kohn-Sham density functional theory approximations, show good agreement with the experimental results. The results for amantadine are also compared with those for the parent molecule, adamantane, reported earlier (Chem. Phys. 253 (2000) 41). Based on the comparison tentative assignments of the valence region ionization bands of amantadine have been made.

  2. Electron Density Determination, Bonding and Properties of Tetragonal Ferromagnetic Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiezorek, Jorg [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The project developed quantitative convergent-beam electron diffraction (QCBED) methods by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and used them in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the electron density distribution in metallic and intermetallic phases with different cubic and non-cubic crystal structures that comprise elements with d-electron shells. The experimental methods developed here focus on the bonding charge distribution as one of the quantum mechanical characteristics central for understanding of intrinsic properties and validation of DFT calculations. Multiple structure and temperature factors have been measured simultaneously from nano-scale volumes of high-quality crystal with sufficient accuracy and precision for comparison with electron density distribution calculations by DFT. The often anisotropic temperature factors for the different atoms and atom sites in chemically ordered phases can differ significantly from those known for relevant pure element crystals due to bonding effects. Thus they have been measured from the same crystal volumes from which the structure factors have been determined. The ferromagnetic ordered intermetallic phases FePd and FePt are selected as model systems for 3d-4d and 3d-5d electron interactions, while the intermetallic phases NiAl and TiAl are used to probe 3d-3p electron interactions. Additionally, pure transition metal elements with d-electrons have been studied. FCC metals exhibit well defined delocalized bonding charge in tetrahedral sites, while less directional, more distributed bonding charge attains in BCC metals. Agreement between DFT calculated and QCBED results degrades as d-electron levels fill in the elements, and for intermetallics as d-d interactions become prominent over p-d interactions. Utilizing the LDA+U approach enabled inclusion of onsite Coulomb-repulsion effects in DFT calculations, which can afford improved agreements with QCBED results

  3. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechula, J., E-mail: wiechula@physik.uni-frankfurt.de; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J. [Plasma Physics Group, Institute of Applied Physics, Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH{sub 2} at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ⋅ 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ⋅ 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  4. Experimental and theoretical distribution of electron density and thermopolimerization in crystals of Ph3Sb(O2CCH=CH2)2 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukin, Georgy K.; Samsonov, Maxim A.; Arapova, Alla V.; Mazur, Anton S.; Artamonova, Tatiana O.; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail A.; Vasilyev, Aleksander V.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we present the results of a high-resolution single crystal X-ray diffraction experiment of a triphenylantimony diacrylate (Ph3Sb(O2CCH=CH2)2 (1)) and a subsequent charge density study based on a topological analysis according to quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) together with density functional theory (DFT) calculation of isolated molecule. The QTAIM was used to investigate nature of the chemical bonds and molecular graph of Ph3Sb(O2CCH=CH2)2 complex. The molecular graph shows that only in one acrylate group there is an evidence of bonding between antimony and carbonyl oxygen atom in terms of the presence of a bond path. Thus the molecular graph for this class of compounds does not provide a definitive picture of the chemical bonding and should be complemented with other descriptors, such as and а source function (SF), noncovalent interaction (NCI) index and delocalization index (DI). Moreover the realization of π…π interactions between double bonds of acrylate groups in adjacent molecules allowed us to carry out a thermopolimerization reaction in crystals of Ph3Sb(O2CCH=CH2)2 complex and to determine a probable structure of polymer by solid state CP/MAS 13C NMR.

  5. Density variation in the electron-hole liquid in stressed germanium and silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, S.M.

    1979-08-01

    A detailed study is presented of the variation in electron-hole pair density in the electron-hole liquid (EHL) in stressed Ge and Si. First, the variation of the density and other properties of the EHL is studied theoretically as a function of uniaxial stress in both Ge and Si. Second, the variation of the density with position is studied both theoretically and experimentally in the strain-confined electron-hole liquid (SCEHL) in Ge.

  6. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D'’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    —In a series of systematic optical pump - terahertz probe experiments we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in a large range of carrier densities. The electron scattering time decreases by as much as a factor of 4, from 320 to 60 fs, as the electron density...

  7. Application of the maximum entropy method to electron density determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Wendo

    1985-12-01

    The principle of maximum entropy is adopted to derive a procedure for obtaining the electron density distribution in crystals from incomplete X-ray diffraction data. This method was applied to cementite and the result proved to be better than the conventional Fourier inversion in resolution as well as in the absence of ripples. The potential advantages of this method are: (1) the amount of subjective judgment imposed on unavailable data is significantly limited, and (2) the result of this method is consistent with the known information and maximally noncommittal with regard to the unknowns. It is shown that the method is especially well suited to the problem of the determination of a high-resolution electron density map from insufficient experimental data. (orig.).

  8. Electronic structure of square planar bis(benzene-1,2-dithiolato)metal complexes [M(L)(2)](z) (z = 2-, 1-, 0; M = Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Au): an experimental, density functional, and correlated ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Kallol; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Neese, Frank; Wieghardt, Karl

    2005-07-25

    The three diamagnetic square planar complexes of nickel(II), palladium(II), and platinum(II) containing two S,S-coordinated 3,5-di-tert-butylbenzene-1,2-dithiolate ligands, (L(Bu))(2-), namely [M(II)(L(Bu))(2)](2-), have been synthesized. The corresponding paramagnetic monoanions [M(II)(L(Bu))(L(Bu)(*))](-) (S = (1)/(2)) and the neutral diamagnetic species [M(II)(L(Bu)(*))(2)] (M = Ni, Pd, Pt) have also been generated in solution or in the solid state as [N(n-Bu)(4)][M(II)(L(Bu))(L(Bu)(*))] salts. The corresponding complex [Cu(III)(L(Bu))(2)](-) has also been investigated. The complexes have been studied by UV-vis, IR, and EPR spectroscopy and by X-ray crystallography; their electro- and magnetochemistry is reported. The electron-transfer series [M(L(Bu))(2)](2-,-,0) is shown to be ligand based involving formally one (L(Bu)(*))(-) pi radical in the monoanion or two in the neutral species [M(II)(L(Bu)(*))(2)] (M = Ni, Pd, Pt). Geometry optimizations using all-electron density functional theory with scalar relativistic corrections at the second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) and zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) levels result in excellent agreement with the experimentally determined structures and electronic spectra. For the three neutral species a detailed analysis of the orbital structures reveals that the species may best be described as containing two strongly antiferromagnetically interacting ligand radicals. Furthermore, multiconfigurational ab initio calculations using the spectroscopy oriented configuration interaction (SORCI) approach including the ZORA correction were carried out. The calculations predict the position of the intervalence charge-transfer band well. Chemical trends in the diradical characters deduced from the multiconfigurational singlet ground-state wave function along a series of metals and ligands were discussed.

  9. The effective density of randomly moving electrons and related characteristics of materials with degenerate electron gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Palenskis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of the conductivity of metals, of superconductors in the normal state and of semiconductors with highly degenerate electron gas remains a significant issue if consideration is based on the classical statistics. This study is addressed to the characterization of the effective density of randomly moving electrons and to the evaluation of carrier diffusion coefficient, mobility, and other parameters by generalization of the widely published experimental results. The generalized expressions have been derived for various kinetic parameters attributed to the non-degenerate and degenerate electron gas, by analyzing a random motion of the single type carriers in homogeneous materials. The values of the most important kinetic parameters for different metals are also systematized and discussed. It has been proved that Einstein's relation between the diffusion coefficient and the drift mobility of electrons is held for any level of degeneracy if the effective density of randomly moving carriers is properly taken into account.

  10. Equation satisfied by electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional

    OpenAIRE

    Joubert, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-electron mutual Coulomb repulsion energy density functional satisfies an equation that links functionals and functional derivatives at N-electron and (N-1)-electron densities for densities determined from the same adiabatic scaled external potential for the N-electron system.

  11. Electron-density topology in molecular systems: Paired and unpaired densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobayan, Rosana M.; Bochicchio, Roberto C.; Lain, Luis; Torre, Alicia

    2005-10-01

    This work studies the partitioning of the electron density into two contributions which are interpreted as the paired and the effectively unpaired electron densities. The topological features of each density field as well as of the total density are described localizing the corresponding critical points in simple selected molecules (local formalism). The results show that unpaired electron-density concentrations occur out of the topological bonding regions whereas the paired electron densities present accumulations inside those regions. A comparison of these results with those arising from population analysis techniques (nonlocal or integrated formalisms) is reported.

  12. The experimental study of neutralized electron beams for electron cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Bosser, Jacques; MacCaferri, R; Molinari, G; Tranquille, G; Varenne, F; Korotaev, Yu V; Meshkov, I N; Polyakov, V A; Smirnov, A; Syresin, E M

    1996-01-01

    In this report we present the latest experimental results on electron beam neutralization. These experiments have been made at LEAR and on the JINR test bench. The main difficulty in obtaining neutralized beams resides in an instability which is dependent on the electron beam current. A number of methods have been developed in order to overcome this instability and have enabled us to further investigate the possibility of generating intense low energy electron beams for the cooling of Pb ions.

  13. Experimental demonstration of relativistic electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaitsev, S.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Kroc, T.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Sutherland, M.; Schmidt,; Seletskiy, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of electron cooling of high-energy antiprotons circulating in a storage ring. In our experiments, electron cooling, a well-established method at low energies (< 500 MeV/nucleon), was carried out in a new region of beam parameters, requiring a multi-MeV dc electron beam and an unusual beam transport line. In this letter we present the results of the longitudinal cooling force measurements and compare them with theoretical predictions.

  14. Automated segmentation of molecular subunits in electron cryomicroscopy density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew L; Yu, Zeyun; Chiu, Wah; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2006-12-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) is capable of imaging large macromolecular machines composed of multiple components. However, it is currently only possible to achieve moderate resolution at which it may be possible to computationally extract the individual components in the machine. In this work, we present application details of an automated method for detecting and segmenting the components of a large machine in an experimentally determined density map. This method is applicable to object with and without symmetry and takes advantage of global and local symmetry axes if present. We have applied this segmentation algorithm to several cryoEM data sets already deposited in EMDB with various complexities, symmetries and resolutions and validated the results using manually segmented density and available structures of the components in the PDB. As such, automated segmentation could become a useful tool for the analysis of the ever-increasing number of structures of macromolecular machines derived from cryoEM.

  15. Analytical Schwartz density applied to heavy two-electron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romera, E.; Dehesa, J.S. [Universidad de Granada (Spain); Koga, Toshikatsu [Muroran Institute of Technology (Japan)

    1997-01-20

    An analytical expression of the electron density function p(r) due to Schwartz for two-electron atomic systems is applied to a detailed study of density-dependent properties of relatively heavy two-electron ions. Comparison of the Schwartz results with those from accurate Hartree-Fock and Hylleraas wave functions shows that despite its simple yet analytical form, the Schwartz density has a quantitative applicability in the density study of two-electron atoms within the nonrelativistic framework. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Tailoring laser wakefield accelerated electron beams. An experimental study on the influence of experimental conditions on electron beam parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couperus, Jurjen P.; Koehler, Alexander; Zarini, Omid; Huebl, Axel; Schramm, Ulrich [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Jochmann, Axel; Debus, Alexander; Irman, Arie [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has emerged as a promising concept for the next generation of high energy electron accelerators. In LFWA a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse drives plasma density waves, inducing a high accelerating field gradient in the order of GV/m. To create stable reproducible electron beams, tailoring of experimental parameters like gas density, laser energy and laser pulse duration is required. In this talk we present an overview of our experimental studies with the DRACO (3 J on target, 30 fs) laser on ultrasonic gas-jet targets (He and He-N{sub 2} mixtures). We discuss the influence of experimental parameters on beam parameters like beam charge, shot-to-shot stability and energy distribution, both in the self-injecting bubble regime as well as in the ionisation injection regime.

  17. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.  Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  18. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    1998-01-01

    1. Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  19. Electronic DC transformer with high power density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovský, M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the possibilities of increasing the power density of high-power dc-dc converters with galvanic isolation. Three cornerstones for reaching high power densities are identified as: size reduction of passive components, reduction of losses particularly in active components

  20. Polar cap electron densities from DE 1 plasma wave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    Electric-field-spectum measurements from the plasma-wave instrument on the Dynamics Explorer 1 spacecraft are used to study the local electron density at high altitudes in the northern polar-cap region. The electron density is determined from the upper cutoff of whistler-mode radiation at the electron plasma frequency. Median density values over the polar cap at L greater than 10 are found to vary from 35.2 + or - 8.5 cu cm at 2.1 earth radii to 0.99 + or - 0.51 cu cm at 4.66 earth radii. The steady-state radial-outflow model is examined for consistency with the observed density profile. A power-law fit to the radial variation of the electron density yields an exponent of - 3.85 + or - 0.32, which for the radial-outflow model implies a flow velocity increasing nearly linearly with incresing radial distance. Comparison of the observed electron densities with theoretical polar-wind densities yields consistent results up to 2.8 earth radii. A comparison of the observed electron densities with low-altitude density profiles from the Alouette II and ISIS 1 spacecraft illustrates transitions in the slope of the profile at 1.16 earth radii and between 1.55 and 2.0 earth radii. The changes in the density profile suggest that changes occur in the basic radial-transport processes at these altitudes.

  1. Electron localization in low-density quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederiva, F.; Emperador, A.; Lipparini, E.

    2002-10-01

    We present a systematic study of ground and excited states of the six-electron nanoscopic ring by fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations for a wide range of ring diameters and strengths of the harmonic confinement. We compare the density and correlation energies to the predictions of local spin density approximation theory, Hartree-Fock theory, and a model in which electrons are localized along the vertices of an hexagon, and analyze the electron-electron pair-correlation functions. We find evidence for a Wigner crystallization transition as the density is lowered. Conversely, evidence for a spin polarization transition is not found.

  2. Effective atomic numbers and electron density of dosimetric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaginelli S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of x-rays employing NaI (Tl detector system and radioactive sources is described.in this paper. A rigid geometry arrangement and gating of the spectrometer at FWHM position and selection of absorber foils are all done following detailed investigation, to minimize the effect of small angle scattering and multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient, m/r, value. Firstly, for standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental foils such as Aluminum, Copper, Molybdenum, Tantalum and Lead are measured and then, this method is utilized for dosimetric interested material (sulfates. The experimental mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with the theoretical values to find good agreement between the theory and experiment within one to two per cent. The effective atomic numbers of the biological substitute material are calculated by sum rule and from the graph. The electron density of dosimetric material is calculated using the effective atomic number. The study has discussed in detail the attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of dosimetric material/biological substitutes.

  3. Density Measurements in Low Pressure, Weakly Magnetized, RF Plasmas: Experimental Verification of the Sheath Expansion Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunchao Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This experimental study shows the validity of Sheridan's method in determining plasma density in low pressure, weakly magnetized, RF plasmas using ion saturation current data measured by a planar Langmuir probe. The ion density derived from Sheridan's method which takes into account the sheath expansion around the negatively biased probe tip, presents a good consistency with the electron density measured by a cylindrical RF-compensated Langmuir probe using the Druyvesteyn theory. The ion density obtained from the simplified method which neglects the sheath expansion effect, overestimates the true density magnitude, e.g., by a factor of 3 to 12 for the present experiment.

  4. Density measurements in low pressure, weakly magnetized, RF plasmas: experimental verification of the sheath expansion effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick W.

    2017-07-01

    This experimental study shows the validity of Sheridan's method in determining plasma density in low pressure, weakly magnetized, RF plasmas using ion saturation current data measured by a planar Langmuir probe. The ion density derived from Sheridan's method which takes into account the sheath expansion around the negatively biased probe tip, presents a good consistency with the electron density measured by a cylindrical RF-compensated Langmuir probe using the Druyvesteyn theory. The ion density obtained from the simplified method which neglects the sheath expansion effect, overestimates the true density magnitude, e.g., by a factor of 3 to 12 for the present experiment.

  5. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, Alexander, E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Alessi, James G., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Beebe, Edward N., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  6. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R

    2016-09-30

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  7. Experimental Evidence for Static Charge Density Waves in Iron Oxypnictides

    KAUST Repository

    Martinelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this Letter we report high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscope analysis of Mn-substituted LaFeAsO samples, demonstrating that a static incommensurate modulated structure develops across the low-temperature orthorhombic phase, whose modulation wave vector depends on the Mn content. The incommensurate structural distortion is likely originating from a charge-density-wave instability, a periodic modulation of the density of conduction electrons associated with a modulation of the atomic positions. Our results add a new component in the physics of Fe-based superconductors, indicating that the density wave ordering is charge driven.

  8. Ion and electron sheath characteristics in a low density and low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgohain, Binita; Bailung, H.

    2017-11-01

    Ion and electron sheath characteristics in a low electron temperature (Te ˜ 0.25-0.40 eV) and density (ne ˜ 106-107 cm-3) plasma are described. The plasma is produced in the experimental volume through diffusion from a hot cathode discharge plasma source by using a magnetic filter. The electron energy distribution function in the experimental plasma volume is measured to be a narrow Maxwellian distribution indicating the absence of primary and energetic electrons which are decoupled in the source side by the cusp magnetic field near the filter. An emissive probe is used to measure the sheath potential profiles in front of a metal plate biased negative and positive with respect to the plasma potential. For a positive plate bias, the electron density decreases considerably and the electron sheath expands with a longer presheath region compared to the ion sheath. The sheath potential structures are found to follow the Debye sheath model.

  9. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI) Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density

    OpenAIRE

    Jiguang Du; Xiyuan Sun; Gang Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI) complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC) basis set. The Pu– O y l bond orders show significant line...

  10. MGS RS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains 5600 ionospheric electron density profiles (EDS files) derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation data. The profiles were...

  11. QTAIM electron density study of natural chalcones

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Moa, María J.; Mandado, Marcos; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2007-09-01

    QTAIM atomic and bond properties, ionization potential, and O-H bond dissociation energies calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level indicate the natural chalcones bear a significant radical scavenging activity. However, their ionization potentials indicate they decrease the electron-transfer rate between antioxidant and oxygen that yields the pro-oxidative cations less than other natural antioxidants. Rings A and B display slight and similar positive charges, whereas ring B is involved in exocycle delocalization at a larger extension.

  12. Experimental determination of core electron deformation in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindzus, Niels; Straasø, Tine; Wahlberg, Nanna; Becker, Jacob; Bjerg, Lasse; Lock, Nina; Dippel, Ann Christin; Iversen, Bo B

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data are used to determine the core electron deformation of diamond. Core shell contraction inherently linked to covalent bond formation is observed in close correspondence with theoretical predictions. Accordingly, a precise and physically sound reconstruction of the electron density in diamond necessitates the use of an extended multipolar model, which abandons the assumption of an inert core. The present investigation is facilitated by negligible model bias in the extraction of structure factors, which is accomplished by simultaneous multipolar and Rietveld refinement accurately determining an atomic displacement parameter (ADP) of 0.00181 (1) Å(2). The deconvolution of thermal motion is a critical step in experimental core electron polarization studies, and for diamond it is imperative to exploit the monatomic crystal structure by implementing Wilson plots in determination of the ADP. This empowers the electron-density analysis to precisely administer both the deconvolution of thermal motion and the employment of the extended multipolar model on an experimental basis.

  13. Wigner-like crystallization of Anderson-localized electron systems with low electron densities

    CERN Document Server

    Slutskin, A A; Pepper, M

    2002-01-01

    We consider an electron system under conditions of strong Anderson localization, taking into account interelectron long-range Coulomb repulsion. We establish that at sufficiently low electron densities and sufficiently low temperatures the Coulomb electron interaction brings about ordering of the Anderson-localized electrons into a structure that is close to an ideal (Wigner) crystal lattice, provided the dimension of the system is > 1. This Anderson-Wigner glass (AWG) is a new macroscopic electron state that, on the one hand, is beyond the conventional Fermi glass concept, and on the other hand, qualitatively differs from the known 'plain' Wigner glass (inherent in self-localized electron systems) in that the random slight electron displacements from the ideal crystal sites essentially depend on the electron density. With increasing electron density the AWG is found to turn into the plain Wigner glass or Fermi glass, depending on the width of the random spread of the electron levels. It is shown that the res...

  14. Self-consistent versus experimental densities in the ion-ion potential derived using the energy density formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirao, A.; Vinas, X. (Dept. de Estructura y Constituyentes de la Materia, Univ. Barcelona (Spain)); Diaz, J. (Dept. de Fisica Atomica Molecular y Nuclear, Burjassot (Spain) IFIC, Burjassot (Spain))

    1992-06-01

    We have used the energy density formalism together with Skyrme forces to build up the real part of the ion-ion potential. We have analysed the elastic scattering data for the {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca reaction at several bombarding energies including a phenomenological imaginary part. The results obtained using as input the nuclear density derived from electron scattering are compared with those from theoretical semiclassical calculations of different degree of complexity. Finally, we study the role of some properties of the nuclear interactions on some magnitudes that can be compared with the experimental ones. (orig.).

  15. Efficient Density Functional Approximation for Electronic Properties of Conjugated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Marília J.; Pinheiro, José Maximiano, Jr.; Blum, Volker; Rinke, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    There is on-going discussion about reliable prediction of electronic properties of conjugated oligomers and polymers, such as ionization potential IP and energy gap. Several exchange-correlation (XC) functionals are being used by the density functional theory community, with different success for different properties. In this work we follow a recent proposal: a fraction α of exact exchange is added to the semi-local PBE XC aiming consistency, for a given property, with the results obtained by many-body perturbation theory within the G0W0 approximation. We focus the IP, taken as the negative of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy. We choose α from a study of the prototype family trans-acetylene, and apply this same α to a set of oligomers for which there is experimental data available (acenes, phenylenes and others). Our results indicate we can have excellent estimates, within 0,2eV mean ave. dev. from the experimental values, better than through complete EN - 1 -EN calculations from the starting PBE functional. We also obtain good estimates for the electrical gap and orbital energies close to the band edge. Work supported by FAPESP, CNPq, and CAPES, Brazil, and DAAD, Germany.

  16. Plasma sheath: An equivalent nonlinear mirror between electron density and transmitted electromagnetic signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bo; Li, Xiaoping; Shi, Lei; Liu, Yanming; Lei, Fan; Zhu, Congying

    2017-10-01

    An experiment on the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) signals in continuous time-varying plasma is designed to establish the nonlinear mirror between electron density and transmission coefficient. The nonlinearity is confirmed from the theoretical and experimental results. The amplitude and phase can be considered nonlinear functions of electron density when the complex interaction between plasma and EM waves is ignored. Results show that amplitude and phase distributions are asymmetrical when electron density follows symmetric distribution. The skewness of amplitude is positive, whereas the skewness of phase is negative. The nonlinear degree is closely related to the ratio of plasma frequency to the incident wave frequency and the range of electron density. The conclusions are crucial to the modeling of plasma sheath channels and understanding the blackout problem.

  17. Electronic density of states of amorphous Si and Ge: Application of a molecular-liquid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, N. C.

    1980-01-01

    The electronic structures of a-Si and a-Ge have been investigated by introducing the molecular-liquid model (MLM). The theoretical structure factors have been expressed in terms of three simple parameters-nearest-neighbor distance, packing density, and coordination number. For the electronic density of states (EDS), nonlocal energy-dependent pseudopotentials have been considered to second order in perturbation theory. When compared with the experimental structure factors, the MLM structure factors agree well for the momentum transfer in the region of 0agreement with recent theoretical and experimental results.

  18. Strain-confined electron-hole liquid in Ge: Density variations and compressibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, S.M.

    1982-07-15

    We present a detailed theoretical and experimental investigation of a spatial variation in the electron-hole--pair density in the strain-confined electron-hole liquid in Ge. The density variation can be dramatic: We observed a compression of the central density by a factor of 3 for our largest drop radius, Rroughly-equal0.7 mm. Our experimental density profiles, obtained using Abel transforms of spatial luminescence profiles, are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions of approximately parabolic profiles with densities larger than the equilibrium value at the center of the drop. Our previous first-order theory has been extended to include the full density dependence of the pair free energy at finite stress and temperature. We discuss the shape and power dependence of spatial luminescence profiles and luminescence spectra, since the spatial density variation increases with drop size. We use the central densities for drop sizes ranging over an order of magnitude to measure the density dependence of the electron-hole--liquid chemical potential, providing a sensitive test of many-body theories for the correlation energy. We obtain an improved value for the isothermal compressibility of the strain-confined liquid: K/sub T/ = 0.067 +- 0.017 cm/sup 2//dyn for n = 0.47 x 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/, T = 1.9 K, and -sigma = 5.5 kgf/mm/sup 2/, where kgf represents kilogram force.

  19. Tomography of the ionospheric electron density with geostatistical inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Minkwitz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In relation to satellite applications like global navigation satellite systems (GNSS and remote sensing, the electron density distribution of the ionosphere has significant influence on trans-ionospheric radio signal propagation. In this paper, we develop a novel ionospheric tomography approach providing the estimation of the electron density's spatial covariance and based on a best linear unbiased estimator of the 3-D electron density. Therefore a non-stationary and anisotropic covariance model is set up and its parameters are determined within a maximum-likelihood approach incorporating GNSS total electron content measurements and the NeQuick model as background. As a first assessment this 3-D simple kriging approach is applied to a part of Europe. We illustrate the estimated covariance model revealing the different correlation lengths in latitude and longitude direction and its non-stationarity. Furthermore, we show promising improvements of the reconstructed electron densities compared to the background model through the validation of the ionosondes Rome, Italy (RO041, and Dourbes, Belgium (DB049, with electron density profiles for 1 day.

  20. Precision Electron Density Measurements in the SSX MHD Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen-Lewis, Emma M.; Barbano, Luke J.; Shrock, Jaron E.; Kaur, Manjit; Schaffner, David A.; Brown, Michael R.

    2017-10-01

    We characterize fluctuations of the line averaged electron density of Taylor states produced by the magnetized coaxial plasma gun of the SSX device using a 632.8 nm HeNe laser interferometer. The analysis method uses the electron density dependence of the refractive index of the plasma to determine the electron density of the Taylor states. Typical magnetic field and density values in the SSX device approach about B ≅ 0.3 T and n = 0 . 4 ×1016 cm-3 . Analysis is improved from previous density measurement methods by developing a post-processing method to remove relative phase error between interferometer outputs and to account for approximately linear phase drift due to low-frequency mechanical vibrations of the interferometer. Precision density measurements coupled with local measurements of the magnetic field will allow us to characterize the wave composition of SSX plasma via density vs. magnetic field correlation analysis, and compare the wave composition of SSX plasma with that of the solar wind. Preliminary results indicate that density and magnetic field appear negatively correlated. Work supported by DOE ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  1. Electron densities in the upper ionosphere of Mars from the excitation of electron plasma oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Morgan, D. D.; Modolo, R.; Nagy, A. F.; Najib, D.

    2008-07-01

    In addition to remote radio sounding of the ionosphere of Mars, the MARSIS (Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding) instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft is also able to measure the in situ electron density from the excitation of local electron plasma oscillations. This paper presents an investigation of the electron density in the upper ionosphere of Mars based on the frequency of these oscillations. The advantage of this method is that electron densities can be measured at much higher altitudes than can be determined from remote radio soundings. Using this technique electron densities from 503 orbits have been analyzed over the period from 4 August 2005 to 31 July 2007 for altitudes ranging from about 275 to 1300 km. Although there is considerable variability from orbit to orbit, the median electron density at a given solar zenith angle (SZA) on the dayside of Mars decreases systematically with increasing altitude with a characteristic plasma scale height varying from about 80 to 145 km. At a fixed altitude, the electron density remains almost constant for SZAs less than about 80°. For SZAs greater than about 80° the electron density decreases rapidly with increasing SZA, approaching very low values on the nightside. Simulations performed using both magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid codes show that the nearly constant density at a given altitude is caused by the horizontal transport of plasma from the dayside toward the nightside due to interaction with the solar wind.

  2. A tunable electron beam source using trapping of electrons in a density down-ramp in laser wakefield acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerfelt, Henrik; Hansson, Martin; Gallardo González, Isabel; Davoine, Xavier; Lundh, Olle

    2017-09-25

    One challenge in the development of laser wakefield accelerators is to demonstrate sufficient control and reproducibility of the parameters of the generated bunches of accelerated electrons. Here we report on a numerical study, where we demonstrate that trapping using density down-ramps allows for tuning of several electron bunch parameters by varying the properties of the density down-ramp. We show that the electron bunch length is determined by the difference in density before and after the ramp. Furthermore, the transverse emittance of the bunch is controlled by the steepness of the ramp. Finally, the amount of trapped charge depends both on the density difference and on the steepness of the ramp. We emphasize that both parameters of the density ramp are feasible to vary experimentally. We therefore conclude that this tunable electron accelerator makes it suitable for a wide range of applications, from those requiring short pulse length and low emittance, such as the free-electron lasers, to those requiring high-charge, large-emittance bunches to maximize betatron X-ray generation.

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Electron and Magnetization Densities in Molecules and Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    1980-01-01

    The interest of describing the ground state properties of a system in terms of one electron density (or its two spin components) is obvious, in particular due to the simple physical significance of this function. Recent experimental progress in diffraction made the measurement of charge and magnetization densities in crystalline solids possible, with an accuracy at least as good as theoretical accuracy. Theoretical developments of the many-body problem have proved the extreme importance of the one electron density function and presently, accurate methods of band structure determination become available. Parallel to the diffraction techniques, other domains of research (inelastic scattering, resonance, molecular spectroscopy) deal with quantities directly related to the one particle density. But the two types of studies do not interfere enough and one should obviously gain more information by interpreting all experiments that are related to the density together. It became necessary to have an International Sch...

  4. Auroral E-region electron density gradients measured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haldoupis

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available In the theory of E-region plasma instabilities, the ambient electric field and electron density gradient are both included in the same dispersion relation as the key parameters that provide the energy for the generation and growth of electrostatic plasma waves. While there exist numerous measurements of ionospheric electric fields, there are very few measurements and limited knowledge about the ambient electron density gradients, ∇Ne, in the E-region plasma. In this work, we took advantage of the EISCAT CP1 data base and studied statistically the vertical electron density gradient length, Lz=Ne/(dNe/dz, at auroral E-region heights during both eastward and westward electrojet conditions and different ambient electric field levels. Overall, the prevailing electron density gradients, with Lz ranging from 4 to 7 km, are found to be located below 100 km, but to move steadily up in altitude as the electric field level increases. The steepest density gradients, with Lz possibly less than 3 km, occur near 110 km mostly in the eastward electrojet during times of strong electric fields. The results and their implications are examined and discussed in the frame of the linear gradient drift instability theory. Finally, it would be interesting to test the implications of the present results with a vertical radar interferometer.Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities  

  5. Auroral E-region electron density gradients measured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hussey

    Full Text Available In the theory of E-region plasma instabilities, the ambient electric field and electron density gradient are both included in the same dispersion relation as the key parameters that provide the energy for the generation and growth of electrostatic plasma waves. While there exist numerous measurements of ionospheric electric fields, there are very few measurements and limited knowledge about the ambient electron density gradients, ∇Ne, in the E-region plasma. In this work, we took advantage of the EISCAT CP1 data base and studied statistically the vertical electron density gradient length, Lz=Ne/(dNe/dz, at auroral E-region heights during both eastward and westward electrojet conditions and different ambient electric field levels. Overall, the prevailing electron density gradients, with Lz ranging from 4 to 7 km, are found to be located below 100 km, but to move steadily up in altitude as the electric field level increases. The steepest density gradients, with Lz possibly less than 3 km, occur near 110 km mostly in the eastward electrojet during times of strong electric fields. The results and their implications are examined and discussed in the frame of the linear gradient drift instability theory. Finally, it would be interesting to test the implications of the present results with a vertical radar interferometer.Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities  

  6. Electronic Structure of Matter Wave Functions and Density Functionals.

    CERN Document Server

    Kohn, W

    1999-01-01

    Since the 1920's Schroedinger wave functions have been the principal theoretical concept for understanding and computing the electronic structure of matter. More recently, Density Functional Theory (DFT), couched in terms of the electronic density distribution, n(r), has provided a new perspective and new computational possibilities, especially for systems consisting of very many (up to ~1000) atoms. In this talk some fundamental limitations of wave function methods for very-many-atom-systems will be discussed. The DFT approach will be explained together with some physical/chemical applications and a discussion of its strenghts and weaknesses.

  7. Analysis of the IMAGE RPI electron density data and CHAMP plasmasphere electron density reconstructions with focus on plasmasphere modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzen, T.; Feltens, J.; Jakowski, N.; Galkin, I.; Reinisch, B.; Zandbergen, R.

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of the topside ionosphere and the plasmasphere contributes essentially to the overall Total Electron Content (TEC) budget affecting Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals. The plasmasphere can cause half or even more of the GNSS range error budget due to ionospheric propagation errors. This paper presents a comparative study of different plasmasphere and topside ionosphere data aiming at establishing an appropriate database for plasmasphere modelling. We analyze electron density profiles along the geomagnetic field lines derived from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite/Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) records of remote plasma sounding with radio waves. We compare these RPI profiles with 2D reconstructions of the topside ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density derived from GNSS based TEC measurements onboard the Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite. Most of the coincidences between IMAGE profiles and CHAMP reconstructions are detected in the region with L-shell between 2 and 5. In general the CHAMP reconstructed electron densities are below the IMAGE profile densities, with median of the CHAMP minus IMAGE residuals around -588 cm-3. Additionally, a comparison is made with electron densities derived from passive radio wave RPI measurements onboard the IMAGE satellite. Over the available 2001-2005 period of IMAGE measurements, the considered combined data from the active and passive RPI operations cover the region within a latitude range of ±60°N, all longitudes, and an L-shell ranging from 1.2 to 15. In the coincidence regions (mainly 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 4), we check the agreement between available active and passive RPI data. The comparison shows that the measurements are well correlated, with a median residual of ∼52 cm-3. The RMS and STD values of the relative residuals are around 22% and 21% respectively. In summary, the results encourage the application of IMAGE RPI data for

  8. Electron-beam guiding by a reduced-density channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, D. R.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Godfrey, B. B.

    1990-12-01

    A new regime of density-channel guiding of a relativistic electron beam in air has been found using a three-dimensional charged-particle simulation code, and confirmed in a double-pulse electron-beam experiment. The guiding results from the temperature dependence of the electron-neutral momentum-transfer frequency nu(m). The mechanism does not require a deep channel to obtain a significant guiding force. For the 13-kA MEDEA II (and beams of similar parameters), guiding persists 10 nsec into the beam pulse, with the force per channel displacement as high as 4 G/cm.

  9. [The reconstruction of welding arc 3D electron density distribution based on Stark broadening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xue-Ming; Pan, Cheng-Gang; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2012-10-01

    The three-dimensional electron density is very important for welding arc quality control. In the present paper, Side-on characteristic line profile was collected by a spectrometer, and the lateral experimental data were approximated by a polynomial fitting. By applying an Abel inversion technique, the authors obtained the radial intensity distribution at each wavelength and thus constructed a profile for the radial positions. The Fourier transform was used to separate the Lorentz linear from the spectrum reconstructed, thus got the accurate Stark width. And we calculated the electronic density three-dimensional distribution of the TIG welding are plasma.

  10. Applications of electron density studies in molecular and solid state science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The present dissertation contains the distillate of my scientific output in the field of experimental and theoretical electron density studies roughly over the last decade and a little more, since earning my PhD-degree in 2001. There are several reasons that I have chosen to write my dissertation...... to the technical developments driven not least by the efforts from large commercial manufacturers such as Bruker AXS and Agilent Technologies. It is also not unwarranted to claim that the electron density community is a driving force in this technological improvement as it is essential to push these instruments...

  11. Electron density distribution in Si and Ge using multipole, maximum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work, the local structural information has also been obtained by analyzing the atomic pair distribution function. An attempt has been made in the present work to utilize the X-ray powder data sets to refine the structure and electron density distribution using the currently available versatile methods, MEM, multipole ...

  12. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density. (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of lanthanides using mass attenuation coefficient from WinXCom and mass energy absorption coef- ficient from Hubbell and Seltzer.

  13. Monitoring the three-dimensional ionospheric electron density ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, an IRI model assisted GPS-based Computerized Ionospheric Tomography (CIT) technique is developed to inverse the ionospheric electron density (IED) distribution over China. Essentially, an improved algebraic reconstruction technique (IART) is first proposed to reconstruct the ionospheric images with high ...

  14. The electron-propagator approach to conceptual density-functional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Both electron propagator theory and density-functional theory provide conceptually useful information about chemical reactivity and, most especially, charge transfer. This paper elucidates thequalitative and quantitative links between the two theories, with emphasis on how the reactivity indicators of conceptual ...

  15. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Plasma produced by a 355 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 6 ns focussed onto a copper solid sample in air at atmospheric pressure is studied spectroscopically. The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion ...

  16. Bottomside Ionospheric Electron Density Specification using Passive High Frequency Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeppler, S. R.; Cosgrove, R. B.; Mackay, C.; Varney, R. H.; Kendall, E. A.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The vertical bottomside electron density profile is influenced by a variety of natural sources, most especially traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). These disturbances cause plasma to be moved up or down along the local geomagnetic field and can strongly impact the propagation of high frequency radio waves. While the basic physics of these perturbations has been well studied, practical bottomside models are not well developed. We present initial results from an assimilative bottomside ionosphere model. This model uses empirical orthogonal functions based on the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) to develop a vertical electron density profile, and features a builtin HF ray tracing function. This parameterized model is then perturbed to model electron density perturbations associated with TIDs or ionospheric gradients. Using the ray tracing feature, the model assimilates angle of arrival measurements from passive HF transmitters. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the model using angle of arrival data. Modeling results of bottomside electron density specification are compared against suitable ancillary observations to quantify accuracy of our model.

  17. Electron Densities in the Upper Ionosphere of Mars from the Excitation of Local Electron Plasma Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Morgan, D. D.; Modolo, R.; Nagy, A. F.; Najib, D.; Plaut, J. J.; Picardi, G.

    2007-12-01

    In addition to the remote sounding of the ionosphere, the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, also excites local electron plasma oscillations. This paper summarizes the investigation of the local electron density using measurements of the locally excited electron plasma oscillation frequency. One of the advantages of this method is that the electron densities can be measured at very high altitudes, where remote ionospheric echoes cannot be detected. Measurements from 503 orbits over the period from August 4, 2005 to July 31, 2007 show that the average electron densities at a given solar zenith angle (SZA) decrease exponentially with increasing altitude. There is considerable variability at a given altitude due to the fact that the data at a specific altitude are obtained from different orbits. On the dayside of Mars, this exponential behavior continues up to altitudes of around 750 km. The scale height, in this altitude region, ranges between 130 km and 190 km. The average electron density is almost constant throughout the dayside in a given altitude range, but decreases rapidly as the spacecraft goes into the nightside. Simulations performed using different methods, show that the nearly constant density at a given altitude is due to transport effects. Investigation of individual orbits shows that the electron density throughout a pass often has large fluctuations, sometimes as much as ne/ne ~ 50 %, on time scales as small as 8 s.

  18. Fast electronic resistance switching involving hidden charge density wave states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaskivskyi, I.; Mihailovic, I. A.; Brazovskii, S.; Gospodaric, J.; Mertelj, T.; Svetin, D.; Sutar, P.; Mihailovic, D.

    2016-05-01

    The functionality of computer memory elements is currently based on multi-stability, driven either by locally manipulating the density of electrons in transistors or by switching magnetic or ferroelectric order. Another possibility is switching between metallic and insulating phases by the motion of ions, but their speed is limited by slow nucleation and inhomogeneous percolative growth. Here we demonstrate fast resistance switching in a charge density wave system caused by pulsed current injection. As a charge pulse travels through the material, it converts a commensurately ordered polaronic Mott insulating state in 1T-TaS2 to a metastable electronic state with textured domain walls, accompanied with a conversion of polarons to band states, and concurrent rapid switching from an insulator to a metal. The large resistance change, high switching speed (30 ps) and ultralow energy per bit opens the way to new concepts in non-volatile memory devices manipulating all-electronic states.

  19. Beliefs and Experimentation with Electronic Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kelvin; Forster, Jean L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous cross-sectional studies found that positive beliefs about electronic nicotine delivery systems (commonly known as electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes) were associated with use of these products. However, the prospective association between these beliefs and subsequent use of e-cigarettes is unclear. Purpose To identify the beliefs predicting subsequent use of e-cigarettes. Methods 1379 young adults (mean age=24.1 years) from the Minnesota Adolescent Community Cohort who reported never using e-cigarettes at baseline (collected Oct 2010–Mar 2011) and completed follow-up data collection (during Oct 2011–Mar 2012) were included in this analysis. Participants’ beliefs about e-cigarettes (potential as quit aids, harmfulness and addictiveness relative to cigarettes) were asked at baseline (yes/no). At follow-up, participants were asked if they had ever used e-cigarettes. Logistic regression models were used to assess the associations between beliefs about e-cigarettes and subsequent experimentation. Analysis was conducted in 2012. Results At follow-up, 7.4% of the sample reported ever using e-cigarettes (21.6% among baseline current smokers, 11.9% among baseline former smokers, and 2.9% among baseline nonsmokers). Participants who believed e-cigarettes can help people quit smoking and perceived e-cigarettes to be less harmful than cigarettes at baseline were more likely to report experimenting with e-cigarettes at follow-up (pe-cigarettes as quit aids and the unknown health risk of e-cigarettes may deter young adults from trying these products. PMID:24439352

  20. Applications of electron density studies in molecular and solid state science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    the research in the area is directed. The method of electron density determination itself, as we shall see later, is strongly dependent on the access to very accurate X-ray structure factors collected to a high scattering angle. Data that fulfill these criteria are now becoming increasingly available due......The present dissertation contains the distillate of my scientific output in the field of experimental and theoretical electron density studies roughly over the last decade and a little more, since earning my PhD-degree in 2001. There are several reasons that I have chosen to write my dissertation...... of electron density studies in connection with the UN declared International Year of Crystallography in 2014. In addition, a number of reviews on the method have very recently appeared showing that the time is ripe to look back on the achievements of the last 10 years and also to look ahead to see where...

  1. Applications of electron density studies in molecular and solid state science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The present dissertation contains the distillate of my scientific output in the field of experimental and theoretical electron density studies roughly over the last decade and a little more, since earning my PhD-degree in 2001. There are several reasons that I have chosen to write my dissertation...... of electron density studies in connection with the UN declared International Year of Crystallography in 2014. In addition, a number of reviews on the method have very recently appeared showing that the time is ripe to look back on the achievements of the last 10 years and also to look ahead to see where...... the research in the area is directed. The method of electron density determination itself, as we shall see later, is strongly dependent on the access to very accurate X-ray structure factors collected to a high scattering angle. Data that fulfill these criteria are now becoming increasingly available due...

  2. Maps for electron cloud density in Large Hadron Collider dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Demma

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a quasistationary electron cloud inside the beam pipe through beam-induced multipacting processes has become an area of intensive study. The analyses performed so far have been based on heavy computer simulations taking into account photoelectron production, secondary emission, electron dynamics, and space charge effects, providing a detailed description of the electron-cloud evolution. Iriso and Peggs [U. Iriso and S. Peggs, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 024403 (2005PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.024403] have shown that, for the typical parameters of RHIC, the bunch-to-bunch evolution of the average electron-cloud density at a point can be represented by a cubic map. Simulations based on this map formalism are orders of magnitude faster compared to those based on standard particle tracking codes. In this communication we show that the map formalism is also applicable to the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, and that, in particular, it reproduces the average electron-cloud densities computed using a reference code to within ∼15% for general LHC bunch filling patterns. We also illustrate the dependence of the polynomial map coefficients on the physical parameters affecting the electron cloud (secondary emission yield, bunch charge, bunch spacing, etc..

  3. Development and application of a 2-electron reduced density matrix approach to electron transport via molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Erik P.; Mazziotti, David A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2017-11-01

    Can an electronic device be constructed using only a single molecule? Since this question was first asked by Aviram and Ratner in the 1970s [Chem. Phys. Lett. 29, 277 (1974)], the field of molecular electronics has exploded with significant experimental advancements in the understanding of the charge transport properties of single molecule devices. Efforts to explain the results of these experiments and identify promising new candidate molecules for molecular devices have led to the development of numerous new theoretical methods including the current standard theoretical approach for studying single molecule charge transport, i.e., the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF). By pairing this formalism with density functional theory (DFT), a wide variety of transport problems in molecular junctions have been successfully treated. For some systems though, the conductance and current-voltage curves predicted by common DFT functionals can be several orders of magnitude above experimental results. In addition, since density functional theory relies on approximations to the exact exchange-correlation functional, the predicted transport properties can show significant variation depending on the functional chosen. As a first step to addressing this issue, the authors have replaced density functional theory in the NEGF formalism with a 2-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) method, creating a new approach known as the NEGF-RDM method. 2-RDM methods provide a more accurate description of electron correlation compared to density functional theory, and they have lower computational scaling compared to wavefunction based methods of similar accuracy. Additionally, 2-RDM methods are capable of capturing static electron correlation which is untreatable by existing NEGF-DFT methods. When studying dithiol alkane chains and dithiol benzene in model junctions, the authors found that the NEGF-RDM predicts conductances and currents that are 1-2 orders of magnitude below

  4. The electron density of Saturn's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Morooka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated statistically the electron density below 5 cm−3 in the magnetosphere of Saturn (7–80 RS, Saturn radii using 44 orbits of the floating potential data from the RPWS Langmuir probe (LP onboard Cassini. The density distribution shows a clear dependence on the distance from the Saturnian rotation axis (√X2+Y2 as well as on the distance from the equatorial plane (|Z|, indicating a disc-like structure. From the characteristics of the density distribution, we have identified three regions: the extension of the plasma disc, the magnetodisc region, and the lobe regions. The plasma disc region is at L<15, where L is the radial distance to the equatorial crossing of the dipole magnetic field line, and confined to |Z|<5 RS. The magnetodisc is located beyond L=15, and its density has a large variability. The variability has quasi-periodic characteristics with a periodicity corresponding to the planetary rotation. For Z>15 RS, the magnetospheric density distribution becomes constant in Z. However, the density still varies quasi-periodically with the planetary rotation also in this region. In fact, the quasi-periodic variation has been observed all over the magnetosphere beyond L=15. The region above Z=15 RS is identified as the lobe region. We also found that the magnetosphere can occasionally move latitudinally under the control of the density in the magnetosphere and the solar wind. From the empirical distributions of the electron densities obtained in this study, we have constructed an electron density model of the Saturnian nightside magnetosphere beyond 7 RS. The obtained model can well reproduce the observed density distribution, and can thus be useful for magnetospheric modelling studies.

  5. Two-resonance probe for measuring electron density in low-pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, W. Y.

    2017-04-01

    A technique for measuring double-checked electron density using two types of microwave resonance is presented. Simultaneous measurement of the resonances (plasma and quarter-wavelength resonator resonances), which were used for the cutoff probe (CP) and hairpin probe (HP), was achieved by the proposed microwave resonance probe. The developed two-resonance probe (TRP) consists of parallel separated coaxial cables exposing the radiation and detection tips. The structure resembles that of the CP, except the gapped coaxial cables operate not only as a microwave feeder for the CP but also as a U- shaped quarter-wavelength resonator for the HP. By virtue of this structure, the microwave resonances that have typically been used for measuring the electron density for the CP and HP were clearly identified on the microwave transmission spectrum of the TRP. The two types of resonances were measured experimentally under various power and pressure conditions for the plasma. A three-dimensional full-wave simulation model for the TRP is also presented and used to investigate and reproduce the resonances. The electron densities inferred from the resonances were compared and showed good agreement. Quantitative differences between the densities were attributed to the effects of the sheath width and spatial density gradient on the resonances. This accessible technique of using the TRP to obtain double-checked electron densities may be useful for comparative study and provides complementary uses for the CP and HP.

  6. Nearly degenerate electron distributions and superluminal radiation densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomaschitz, Roman, E-mail: tom@geminga.or [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagami-yama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    Polylogarithmic fugacity expansions of the partition function, the caloric and thermal equations of state, and the specific heat of fermionic power-law distributions are derived in the nearly degenerate low-temperature/high-density quantum regime. The spectral functions of an ultra-relativistic electron plasma are obtained by averaging the tachyonic radiation densities of inertial electrons with Fermi power-laws, whose entropy is shown to be extensive and stable. The averaged radiation densities are put to test by performing tachyonic cascade fits to the gamma-ray spectrum of the TeV blazar Markarian 421 in a low and high emission state. Estimates of the thermal electron plasma in this active galactic nucleus are extracted from the spectral fits, such as temperature, number count, and internal energy. The tachyonic cascades reproduce the quiescent as well as a burst spectrum of the blazar obtained with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov detectors. Double-logarithmic plots of the differential tachyon flux exhibit intrinsic spectral curvature, caused by the Boltzmann factor of the electron gas.

  7. Maps for electron cloud density in Large Hadron Collider dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Demma, T; Ruggiero, F; Rumolo, G; Zimmermann, F

    2007-01-01

    The generation of a quasistationary electron cloud inside the beam pipe through beam-induced multipacting processes has become an area of intensive study. The analyses performed so far have been based on heavy computer simulations taking into account photoelectron production, secondary emission, electron dynamics, and space charge effects, providing a detailed description of the electron-cloud evolution. Iriso and Peggs [U. Iriso and S. Peggs, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 024403 (2005)] have shown that, for the typical parameters of RHIC, the bunch-to-bunch evolution of the average electron-cloud density at a point can be represented by a cubic map. Simulations based on this map formalism are orders of magnitude faster compared to those based on standard particle tracking codes. In this communication we show that the map formalism is also applicable to the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and that, in particular, it reproduces the average electron-cloud densities computed using a reference code to wi...

  8. Excess electrons in ice: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Somesh Kr; Inam, Fakharul; Scandolo, Sandro

    2014-02-21

    We present a density functional theory study of the localization of excess electrons in the bulk and on the surface of crystalline and amorphous water ice. We analyze the initial stages of electron solvation in crystalline and amorphous ice. In the case of crystalline ice we find that excess electrons favor surface states over bulk states, even when the latter are localized at defect sites. In contrast, in amorphous ice excess electrons find it equally favorable to localize in bulk and in surface states which we attribute to the preexisting precursor states in the disordered structure. In all cases excess electrons are found to occupy the vacuum regions of the molecular network. The electron localization in the bulk of amorphous ice is assisted by its distorted hydrogen bonding network as opposed to the crystalline phase. Although qualitative, our results provide a simple interpretation of the large differences observed in the dynamics and localization of excess electrons in crystalline and amorphous ice films on metals.

  9. Experimental Device for Electron Beam Micromachining

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dupák, Libor; Zobač, Martin; Dupák, Jan; Vlček, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, 5-6 (2006), s. 272-275 ISSN 0861-4717. [EBT 2006 - International Conference on Electron Beam Technologies /8./. Varna, 05.06.2006-10.06.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : electron beam drilling * quartz glass Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  10. Evolution of density-dependent movement during experimental range expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronhofer, E A; Gut, S; Altermatt, F

    2017-12-01

    Range expansions and biological invasions are prime examples of transient processes that are likely impacted by rapid evolutionary changes. As a spatial process, range expansions are driven by dispersal and movement behaviour. Although it is widely accepted that dispersal and movement may be context-dependent, for instance density-dependent, and best represented by reaction norms, the evolution of density-dependent movement during range expansions has received little experimental attention. We therefore tested current theory predicting the evolution of increased movement at low densities at range margins using highly replicated and controlled range expansion experiments across multiple genotypes of the protist model system Tetrahymena thermophila. Although rare, we found evolutionary changes during range expansions even in the absence of initial standing genetic variation. Range expansions led to the evolution of negatively density-dependent movement at range margins. In addition, we report the evolution of increased intrastrain competitive ability and concurrently decreased population growth rates in range cores. Our findings highlight the importance of understanding movement and dispersal as evolving reaction norms and plastic life-history traits of central relevance for range expansions, biological invasions and the dynamics of spatially structured systems in general. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Simple Fully Nonlocal Density Functionals for Electronic Repulsion Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    2017-07-06

    From a simplified version of the mathematical structure of the strong coupling limit of the exact exchange-correlation functional, we construct an approximation for the electronic repulsion energy at physical coupling strength, which is fully nonlocal. This functional is self-interaction free and yields energy densities within the definition of the electrostatic potential of the exchange-correlation hole that are locally accurate and have the correct asymptotic behavior. The model is able to capture strong correlation effects that arise from chemical bond dissociation, without relying on error cancellation. These features, which are usually missed by standard density functional theory (DFT) functionals, are captured by the highly nonlocal structure, which goes beyond the "Jacob's ladder" framework for functional construction, by using integrals of the density as the key ingredient. Possible routes for obtaining the full exchange-correlation functional by recovering the missing kinetic component of the correlation energy are also implemented and discussed.

  12. Temperature dependence of electron density and electron-electron interactions in monolayer epitaxial graphene grown on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chieh-Wen; Chuang, Chiashain; Yang, Yanfei; Elmquist, Randolph E.; Ho, Yi-Ju; Lee, Hsin-Yen; Liang, Chi-Te

    2017-06-01

    We report carrier density measurements and electron-electron (e-e) interactions in monolayer epitaxial graphene grown on SiC. The temperature (T)-independent carrier density determined from the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations clearly demonstrates that the observed logarithmic temperature dependence of the Hall slope in our system must be due to e-e interactions. Since the electron density determined from conventional SdH measurements does not depend on e-e interactions based on Kohn’s theorem, SdH experiments appear to be more reliable compared with the classical Hall effect when one studies the T dependence of the carrier density in the low T regime. On the other hand, the logarithmic T dependence of the Hall slope δR xy /δB can be used to probe e-e interactions even when the conventional conductivity method is not applicable due to strong electron-phonon scattering.

  13. Multibeam scanning electron microscope : Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the first results obtained with their multibeam scanning electron microscope. For the first time, they were able to image 196 (array of 14×14) focused beams of a multielectron beam source on a specimen using single beam scanning electron microscope (SEM) optics. The system

  14. Determination of the electronic density of states near buried interfaces: Application to Co/Cu multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A.; Sthör, J.; Wiell, T.

    1996-01-01

    High-resolution L(3) x-ray absorption and emission spectra of Co and Cu in Co/Cu multilayers are shown to provide unique information on the occupied and unoccupied density of d states near buried interfaces. The d bands of both Co and Cu interfacial layers are shown to be considerably narrowed re...... relative to the bulk metals, and for Cu interface layers the d density of states is found to be enhanced near the Fermi level. The experimental results are confirmed by self-consistent electronic structure calculations....

  15. RENNSH: a novel α-helix identification approach for intermediate resolution electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lingyu; Reisert, Marco; Burkhardt, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Accurate identification of protein secondary structures is beneficial to understand three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules. In this paper, a novel refined classification framework is proposed, which treats alpha-helix identification as a machine learning problem by representing each voxel in the density map with its Spherical Harmonic Descriptors (SHD). An energy function is defined to provide statistical analysis of its identification performance, which can be applied to all the α-helix identification approaches. Comparing with other existing α-helix identification methods for intermediate resolution electron density maps, the experimental results demonstrate that our approach gives the best identification accuracy and is more robust to the noise.

  16. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James; Sarff, John; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David; Parke, Eli; Chapman, Brett; Terry, Paul; Pueschel, M. J.; Williams, Zach

    2017-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM). Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking, which are suppressed via inductive control for this work. The improved confinement is associated with an increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have f 50 kHz, kϕρs , and propagate in the electron drift direction. Their spectral emergence coincides with a sharp decrease in global tearing mode associated fluctuations, their amplitude increases with local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R /Ln 15 . The GENE code, modified for the RFP, predicts the onset of density-gradient-driven TEM for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations, comparable to experimental magnetic fluctuations, causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Work supported by US DOE.

  17. Generation of a neutral, high-density electron-positron plasma in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Sarri, G; Cole, J; Schumaker, W; Di Piazza, A; Reville, B; Doria, D; Dromey, B; Gizzi, L; Green, A; Grittani, G; Kar, S; Keitel, C H; Krushelnick, K; Kushel, S; Mangles, S; Najmudin, Z; Thomas, A G R; Vargas, M; Zepf, M

    2013-01-01

    We report on the laser-driven generation of purely neutral, relativistic electron-positron pair plasmas. The overall charge neutrality, high average Lorentz factor ($\\gamma_{e/p} \\approx 15$), small divergence ($\\theta_{e/p} \\approx 10 - 20$ mrad), and high density ($n_{e/p}\\simeq 10^{15}$cm$^{-3}$) of these plasmas open the pathway for the experimental study of the dynamics of this exotic state of matter, in regimes that are of relevance to electron-positron astrophysical plasmas.

  18. Density-functional method for nonequilibrium electron transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.

    2002-01-01

    We describe an ab initio method for calculating the electronic structure, electronic transport, and forces acting on the atoms, for atomic scale systems connected to semi-infinite electrodes and with an applied voltage bias. Our method is based on the density-functional theory (DFT) as implemented...... the contact and the electrodes on the same footing. The effect of the finite bias (including self-consistency and the solution of the electrostatic problem) is taken into account using nonequilibrium Green's functions. We relate the nonequilibrium Green's function expressions to the more transparent scheme...... wires connected to aluminum electrodes with extended or finite cross section, (ii) single atom gold wires, and finally (iii) large carbon nanotube systems with point defects....

  19. Study of argon ions density and electron temperature and density in magnetron plasma by optical emission spectroscopy and collisional-radiative model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill E. Evdokimov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical emission spectroscopy (OES combined with the models of plasma light emission becomes non-intrusive and versatile method of plasma parameters determination. In this paper we have studied the densities of charge carriers and electron temperature in Ar plasma of pulsed DC magnetron in different experimental conditions. Electron density and temperature were determined by fitting of relative emission line intensities calculated from collisional-radiative model (CRM to experimental ones. The model describes the kinetics of the first 40 excited states of neutral argon Ar and takes into account the following processes: electron impact excitation/deexcitation, spontaneous light emission, radiation trapping, electron impact ionization, and metastable quenching due to diffusion to walls. Then, ions density was determined from relative intensity of 488 nm Ar+ emission line and simple CRM accounting excitation from ground states of neutral Ar and ion Ar+. The values of electron and ion density agree very well. To test the stability of results, we performed Monte-Carlo calculations with random variation of experimental spectrum as well as of excitation cross-sections and estimated confidence intervals and errors for plasma parameters. Also, we validated OES study by comparison with Langmuir probe measurements. The agreement between optical and probe techniques is satisfactory.

  20. The density functional study of electronic structure, electronic charge density, linear and nonlinear optical properties of single crystal alpha-LiAlTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A.H. [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Khan, Wilayat, E-mail: walayat76@gmail.com [New Technologies-Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • FP-LAPW technique is used for calculating the electronic structure. • The band structure shows that the calculated compound is semiconductor. • The complex dielectric function has been calculated. • Nonlinear optical properties has also been calculated. • This compound can be used for molecular engineering of the crystals. - Abstract: Self-consistent calculations is performed using the full potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) technique based on density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic band structure, density of states, electronic charge density, linear and non-linear optical properties of α-LiAlTe{sub 2} compound having tetragonal symmetry with space group I4{sup ¯}2d. The electronic structure are calculated using the Ceperley Alder local density approach (CA-LDA), Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof generalize gradient approach (PBE-GGA), Engel–Vosko generalize gradient approach (EVGGA) and modified Becke Johnson approach (mBJ). Band structure calculations of (α-LiAlTe{sub 2}) depict semiconducting nature with direct band gap of 2.35 eV (LDA), 2.48 eV (GGA), 3.05 eV (EVGGA) and 3.13 eV (mBJ), which is comparable to experimental value. The calculated electronic charge density show ionic interaction between Te and Li atoms and polar covalent interaction between Al and Te atoms. Some optical susceptibilities like dielectric constants, refractive index, extension co-efficient, reflectivity and energy loss function have been calculated and analyzed on the basis of electronic structure. The compound α-LiAlTe{sub 2} provides a considerable negative value of birefringence of −0.01. Any anisotropy observed in the linear optical properties which are in favor to enhance the nonlinear optical properties. The symbol χ{sub abc}{sup (2)}(ω) represents the second order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, possess six non-zero components in this symmetry (tetragonal), called: 1 2 3, 2 1 3, 2 3 1, 1 3 2, 3 1 2 and 3 2 1

  1. Molecular and electronic structures of the members of the electron transfer series [Mn(bpy)3]n (n = 2+, 1+, 0, 1-) and [Mn(tpy)2]m (m = 4+, 3+, 2+, 1+, 0). An experimental and density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; England, Jason; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Wieghardt, Karl

    2014-02-17

    The members of the electron transfer series [Mn(bpy)3](n) (n = 2+, 1+, 0, 1-) and [Mn(tpy)2](m) (m = 2+, 1+, 0) have been investigated using a combination of magnetochemistry, electrochemistry, and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy; and X-ray crystal structures of [Mn(II)((Me)bpy(•))2((Me)bpy(0))](0), [Li(THF)4][Mn(II)(bpy(•))3], and [Mn(II)(tpy(•))2](0) have been obtained (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; (Me)bpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine; tpy = 2,2':6,2″-terpyridine; THF = tetrahydrofuran). It is the first time that the latter complex has been isolated and characterized. Through these studies, the electronic structures of each member of both series of complexes have been elucidated, and their molecular and electronic structures further corroborated by broken symmetry (BS) density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations. It is shown that all one-electron reductions that comprise the aforementioned redox series are ligand-based. Hence, all species contain a central high-spin Mn(II) ion (SMn = 5/2). In contrast, the analogous series of Tc(II) and Re(II) complexes possess low-spin electron configurations.

  2. Experimental system of ejected electron spectroscopy with ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazawa, Sin-iti [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-09-01

    The experiment of analyzing energy spectrum of electrons ejected from multiple electron capture process on ion-atom collision is carried out using ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion source. An old collision system using gas atoms as target and a new system using vapour atoms are developed. In this report, the developments and exploitations of the experimental systems for the ejected electron spectroscopy with ECR Ion source are presented. (author).

  3. Inversion of Ionospheric Electron Density from GPS Beacon Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zou Yu-hua; Xu Ji-sheng

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the mathematical foundation of time-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) for reconstructing ionospheric electron density, Ne, from ground-based GPS beacon observations. After simplifying the relation between Ne and time,the time-dependent 3-D inversion in consideration is reduced to a 3-D tomography with incomplete projections.To see clearly the effects of the incompleteness on the quality of reconstruction under 3-D condition, the formula of 3-D parallel-beam tomography is deduced theoretically. After establishing the mathematical foundation, simulations based on actual GPS ray paths with the help of the IRI-90 model are performed,and reasonable time-dependent 3-D distribution images of Neare obtained when taking proper layout of the network and allowing variable resolutions. The quality of the reconstruction is rather good when compared with the images from the IRI-90 model directly. Therefore, results in this paper demon-strate that imaging of the ionospheric electron density distri-bution from GPS beacon observations is reasonable in theory and feasible in practice.

  4. Inversion of Ionospheric Electron Density from GPS Beacon Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZouYu-hua; XuJi-sheng

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies the mathematical foundation of time-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) for reconstructing ionospheric electron density, N~, from ground-based GPS beacon observations. After simplifying the relation between N. and time,the time-dependent 3-D inversion in consideration is reduced to a 3-D tomography with incomplete projections. To see clearly the effects of the incompleteness on the quality of reconstruction under 3-D condition, the formula of 3-D parallelbeam tomogtTaphy is deduced theoretically. After establishing the mathematical foundation, simulations based on actual GPS ray paths with the help of the IRI-90 model are performed,and reasonable time-dependent 3-D distribution images of Ne are obtained when taking proper layout of the network and allowing variable resolutions. The quality of the reconstruction is rather good when compared with the images from the IRI-90 model directly. Therefore, results in this paper demonstrate that imaging of the ionospheric electron density distribution from GPS beacon observations is reasonable in theor yand feasible in practice.

  5. Structure of the electron momentum density of atomic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romera, E.; Dehesa, J.S. [Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna; Koga, T. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido 050 (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    The present paper addresses the controversial problem on the nonmonotonic behavior of the spherically-averaged momentum density {gamma}(p) observed previously for some ground-state atoms based on the Roothaan-Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave functions of Clementi and Roetti. Highly accurate RHF wave functions of Koga et al. are used to study the existence of extrema in the momentum density {gamma}(p) of all the neutral atoms from hydrogen to xenon. Three groups of atoms are clearly identified according to the nonmonotonicity parameter {mu}, whose value is either equal to, larger, or smaller than unity. Additionally, it is found that the function p{sup -{alpha}} {gamma}(p) is (i) monotonically decreasing from the origin for {alpha}{>=}0.75, (ii) convex for {alpha}{>=}1.35, and (iii) logarithmically convex for {alpha}{>=}3.64 for all the neutral atoms with nuclear charges Z = 1-54. Finally, these monotonicity properties are applied to derive simple yet general inequalities which involve three momentum moments left angle p{sup t} right angle. These inequalities not only generalize similar inequalities reported so far but also allow us to correlate some fundamental atomic quantities, such as the electron-electron repulsion energy and the peak height of Compton profile, in a simple manner. (orig.) 40 refs.

  6. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 2. Density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    Full Text Available Using spacecraft potential measurements of the Polar electric field experiment, we investigate electron density variations of key plasma regions within the magnetosphere, including the polar cap, cusp, trough, plasmapause, and auroral zone. The statistical results were presented in the first part of this study, and the present paper reports detailed structures revealed by individual satellite passes. The high-altitude (> 3 RE polar cap is generally one of the most tenuous regions in the magnetosphere, but surprisingly, the polar cap boundary does not appear as a steep density decline. At low altitudes (1 RE in summer, the polar densities are very high, several 100 cm-3 , and interestingly, the density peaks at the central polar cap. On the noonside of the polar cap, the cusp appears as a dense, 1–3° wide region. A typical cusp density above 4 RE distance is between several 10 cm-3 and a few 100 cm-3 . On some occasions the cusp is crossed multiple times in a single pass, simultaneously with the occurrence of IMF excursions, as the cusp can instantly shift its position under varying solar wind conditions, similar to the magnetopause. On the nightside, the auroral zone is not always detected as a simple density cavity. Cavities are observed but their locations, strengths, and sizes vary. Also, the electric field perturbations do not necessarily overlap with the cavities: there are cavities with no field disturbances, as well as electric field disturbances observed with no clear cavitation. In the inner magnetosphere, the density distributions clearly show that the plasmapause and trough densities are well correlated with geomagnetic activity. Data from individual orbits near noon and midnight demonstrate that at the beginning of geomagnetic disturbances, the retreat speed of the plasmapause can be one L-shell per hour, while during quiet intervals the

  7. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 2. Density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Using spacecraft potential measurements of the Polar electric field experiment, we investigate electron density variations of key plasma regions within the magnetosphere, including the polar cap, cusp, trough, plasmapause, and auroral zone. The statistical results were presented in the first part of this study, and the present paper reports detailed structures revealed by individual satellite passes. The high-altitude (> 3 RE polar cap is generally one of the most tenuous regions in the magnetosphere, but surprisingly, the polar cap boundary does not appear as a steep density decline. At low altitudes (1 RE in summer, the polar densities are very high, several 100 cm-3 , and interestingly, the density peaks at the central polar cap. On the noonside of the polar cap, the cusp appears as a dense, 1–3° wide region. A typical cusp density above 4 RE distance is between several 10 cm-3 and a few 100 cm-3 . On some occasions the cusp is crossed multiple times in a single pass, simultaneously with the occurrence of IMF excursions, as the cusp can instantly shift its position under varying solar wind conditions, similar to the magnetopause. On the nightside, the auroral zone is not always detected as a simple density cavity. Cavities are observed but their locations, strengths, and sizes vary. Also, the electric field perturbations do not necessarily overlap with the cavities: there are cavities with no field disturbances, as well as electric field disturbances observed with no clear cavitation. In the inner magnetosphere, the density distributions clearly show that the plasmapause and trough densities are well correlated with geomagnetic activity. Data from individual orbits near noon and midnight demonstrate that at the beginning of geomagnetic disturbances, the retreat speed of the plasmapause can be one L-shell per hour, while during quiet intervals the plasmapause can expand anti-earthward at the same speed. For the trough region, it is found

  8. Experimental charge density studies of disordered N-phenylpyrrole and N-(4-fluorophenyl)pyrrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, Kathrin; Henn, Julian; Kocher, Nikolaus; Leusser, Dirk; Zachariasse, Klaas A; Sheldrick, George M; Koritsanszky, Tibor; Stalke, Dietmar

    2009-09-03

    The static electron densities of the title compounds were extracted from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data using the nucleus-centered finite multipole expansion technique. The interpretation of the data collected for the N-phenylpyrrole crystal revealed a static disorder that could be successfully resolved within the aspherical-atom formalism. The local and integrated topological properties of the density obtained via a constrained multipole refinement are in statistical agreement with those calculated at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory for the isolated molecule and for those derived from the experimental density of the para-fluorinated derivative N-(4-fluorophenyl)pyrrole. The topological analysis of the densities indicates neither pyramidal character of the pyrrole N-atom nor a quinoidal structure of the phenyl rings in either molecule. The fluorine substitution appears to have only a minor effect on the density of the remaining constituents but it results in markedly different features of the electrostatic potential of the two compounds. The consistency of the multipole refinement is validated by residual density analysis.

  9. Experimental Study of Electronic States at Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    AE h (h )COR ELLU VIH E E V AOTOIh EDSOImhhA E - EEonmonsoE EhhhhEhh EhhhoshEEEEshE Inn 190 ~uM -~11H1 IM~ *22 -us - II 1.1 ’I-huh .25 16III...2300 K) via electron bombard- ment heating from a Ta filament (n) directly beneath the sample. After this treatment , the low-temperature FIG. 4. Top

  10. Comparison of F-region electron density observations by satellite radio tomography and incoherent scatter methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nygrén

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available In November 1995 a campaign of satellite radiotomography supported by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar and several other instruments was arranged in Scandinavia. A chain of four satellite receivers extending from the north of Norway to the south of Finland was installed approximately along a geomagnetic meridian. The receivers carried out difference Doppler measurements using signals from satellites flying along the chain. The EISCAT UHF radar was simultaneously operational with its beam swinging either in geomagnetic or in geographic meridional plane. With this experimental set-up latitudinal scans of F-region electron density are obtained both from the radar observations and by tomographic inversion of the phase observations given by the difference Doppler experiment. This paper shows the first results of the campaign and compares the electron densities given by the two methods.

  11. Applications of electron density studies in molecular and solid state science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The present dissertation contains the distillate of my scientific output in the field of experimental and theoretical electron density studies roughly over the last decade and a little more, since earning my PhD-degree in 2001. There are several reasons that I have chosen to write my dissertation...... of electron density studies in connection with the UN declared International Year of Crystallography in 2014. In addition, a number of reviews on the method have very recently appeared showing that the time is ripe to look back on the achievements of the last 10 years and also to look ahead to see where...... at this point in time. Given the development in the underlying technology of X-ray diffraction in the last two decades it is relevant to describe the impact that this has had on the possible output, and this is well exemplified by the studies that I have been involved in. It is also timely to present a status...

  12. Variations of the ionospheric electron density during the Bhuj seismic event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Trigunait

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric perturbations by natural geophysical activity, such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes, have been studied since the great Alaskan earthquake in 1964. Measurements made from the ground show a variation of the critical frequency of the ionosphere layers before and after the shock. In this paper, we present an experimental investigation of the electron density variations around the time of the Bhuj earthquake in Gujarat, India. Several experiments have been used to survey the ionosphere. Measurements of fluctuations in the integrated electron density or TEC (Total Electron Content between three satellites (TOPEX-POSEIDON, SPOT2, SPOT4 and the ground have been done using the DORIS beacons. TEC has been also evaluated from a ground-based station using GPS satellites, and finally, ionospheric data from a classical ionospheric sounder located close to the earthquake epicenter are utilized. Anomalous electron density variations are detected both in day and night times before the quake. The generation mechanism of these perturbations is explained by a modification of the electric field in the global electric circuit induced during the earthquake preparation. Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances – Radio Science (ionospheric physics – History of geophysics (seismology

  13. Effect of current density on electron beam induced charging in MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughariou, Aicha [LaMaCoP, Universite de Sfax, Faculte des Sciences, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia)]. E-mail: aicha_boughariou@yahoo.fr; Hachicha, Olfa [LaMaCoP, Universite de Sfax, Faculte des Sciences, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, Ali [LaMaCoP, Universite de Sfax, Faculte des Sciences, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Blaise, Guy [LPS, Universite Paris-Sud XI, Batiment 510, Orsay 91405 (France)

    2005-11-15

    It is well known that the presence of space charge in an insulator is correlated with an electric breakdown. Many studies have been carried out on the experimental characterization of space charges. In this paper, we outline the dependence on the current density of the charge-trapping phenomenon in magnesium oxide. Our study was performed with a dedicated scanning electron microscope (SEM) on the electrical property evolution of surface of magnesium oxide (1 0 0) (MgO) single crystal, during a 1.1, 5 and 30 keV electron irradiation. The types of charges trapped on the irradiated areas and the charging kinetics are determined by measuring the total secondary electron emission (SEE) {sigma} during the injection process by means of two complementary detectors. At low energies 1.1 and 5 keV, two different kinds of self-regulated regime ({sigma} = 1) were observed as a function of current density. At 30 keV energy, the electron emission appears to be stimulated by the current density, due to the Poole-Frenkel effect.

  14. Injection of auxiliary electrons for increasing the plasma density in highly charged and high intensity ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorici, F; Malferrari, L; Montanari, A; Rizzoli, R; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Neri, L

    2016-02-01

    Different electron guns based on cold- or hot-cathode technologies have been developed since 2009 at INFN for operating within ECR plasma chambers as sources of auxiliary electrons, with the aim of boosting the source performances by means of a higher plasma lifetime and density. Their application to microwave discharge ion sources, where plasma is not confined, has required an improvement of the gun design, in order to "screen" the cathode from the plasma particles. Experimental tests carried out on a plasma reactor show a boost of the plasma density, ranging from 10% to 90% when the electron guns are used, as explained by plasma diffusion models.

  15. Ultra-Stretchable Interconnects for High-Density Stretchable Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Shafqat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The exciting field of stretchable electronics (SE promises numerous novel applications, particularly in-body and medical diagnostics devices. However, future advanced SE miniature devices will require high-density, extremely stretchable interconnects with micron-scale footprints, which calls for proven standardized (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS-type process recipes using bulk integrated circuit (IC microfabrication tools and fine-pitch photolithography patterning. Here, we address this combined challenge of microfabrication with extreme stretchability for high-density SE devices by introducing CMOS-enabled, free-standing, miniaturized interconnect structures that fully exploit their 3D kinematic freedom through an interplay of buckling, torsion, and bending to maximize stretchability. Integration with standard CMOS-type batch processing is assured by utilizing the Flex-to-Rigid (F2R post-processing technology to make the back-end-of-line interconnect structures free-standing, thus enabling the routine microfabrication of highly-stretchable interconnects. The performance and reproducibility of these free-standing structures is promising: an elastic stretch beyond 2000% and ultimate (plastic stretch beyond 3000%, with <0.3% resistance change, and >10 million cycles at 1000% stretch with <1% resistance change. This generic technology provides a new route to exciting highly-stretchable miniature devices.

  16. Electron correlation in solids via density embedding theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chen, Weibing [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Scuseria, Gustavo E. [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Density matrix embedding theory [G. Knizia and G. K.-L. Chan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 186404 (2012)] and density embedding theory [I. W. Bulik, G. E. Scuseria, and J. Dukelsky, Phys. Rev. B 89, 035140 (2014)] have recently been introduced for model lattice Hamiltonians and molecular systems. In the present work, the formalism is extended to the ab initio description of infinite systems. An appropriate definition of the impurity Hamiltonian for such systems is presented and demonstrated in cases of 1, 2, and 3 dimensions, using coupled cluster theory as the impurity solver. Additionally, we discuss the challenges related to disentanglement of fragment and bath states. The current approach yields results comparable to coupled cluster calculations of infinite systems even when using a single unit cell as the fragment. The theory is formulated in the basis of Wannier functions but it does not require separate localization of unoccupied bands. The embedding scheme presented here is a promising way of employing highly accurate electronic structure methods for extended systems at a fraction of their original computational cost.

  17. Interaction of the electron density fluctuations with electron cyclotron waves from the equatorial launcher in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snicker, A.; Poli, E.; Maj, O.; Guidi, L.; Köhn, A.; Weber, H.; Conway, G. D.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2018-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of electron cyclotron beams interacting with electron density fluctuations in the ITER 15 MA H-mode scenario. In particular, here we study how the beam from the equatorial launcher, which shall be utilized to influence the sawtooth instability, is affected by the fluctuations. Moreover, we present the theory and first estimates of the power that is scattered from the injected O-mode to a secondary X-mode in the presence of the fluctuations. It is shown that for ITER parameters the scattered power stays within acceptable limits and broadening of the equatorial beams is less than those from the upper launcher.

  18. Experimental Studies on Electronic Portfolios in Turkey: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, Selahattin; Sünbül, Ali Murat

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a literature review was conducted about an individual's selected efforts, products stored in electronic format, and electronic portfolios that reflect the development and capacity of multimedia systems. In this context, relevant experimental studies performed in Turkey are collected to show e-portfolio application forms, their…

  19. Reduced density matrix hybrid approach: Application to electronic energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Reichman, David R. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 3000 Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Markland, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-02-28

    Electronic energy transfer in the condensed phase, such as that occurring in photosynthetic complexes, frequently occurs in regimes where the energy scales of the system and environment are similar. This situation provides a challenge to theoretical investigation since most approaches are accurate only when a certain energetic parameter is small compared to others in the problem. Here we show that in these difficult regimes, the Ehrenfest approach provides a good starting point for a dynamical description of the energy transfer process due to its ability to accurately treat coupling to slow environmental modes. To further improve on the accuracy of the Ehrenfest approach, we use our reduced density matrix hybrid framework to treat the faster environmental modes quantum mechanically, at the level of a perturbative master equation. This combined approach is shown to provide an efficient and quantitative description of electronic energy transfer in a model dimer and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and is used to investigate the effect of environmental preparation on the resulting dynamics.

  20. Effect of Electron Seeding on Experimentally Measured Multipactor Discharge Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Jonathan; Graves, Timothy; Lemon, Colby; Looper, Mark; Farkas, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Multipactor is a vacuum phenomenon in which electrons, moving in resonance with an externally applied electric field, impact material surfaces. If the number of secondary electrons created per primary electron impact averages more than unity, the resonant interaction can lead to an electron avalanche. Multipactor is a generally undesirable phenomenon, as it can cause local heating, absorb power, or cause detuning of RF circuits. In order to increase the probability of multipactor initiation, test facilities often employ various seeding sources such as radioactive sources (Cesium 137, Strontium 90), electron guns, or photon sources. Even with these sources, the voltage for multipactor initiation is not certain as parameters such as material type, RF pulse length, and device wall thickness can all affect seed electron flux and energy in critical gap regions, and hence the measured voltage threshold. This study investigates the effects of seed electron source type (e.g., photons versus beta particles), material type, gap size, and RF pulse length variation on multipactor threshold. In addition to the experimental work, GEANT4 simulations will be used to estimate the production rate of low energy electrons (< 5 keV) by high energy electrons and photons. A comparison of the experimental fluxes to the typical energetic photon and particle fluxes experienced by spacecraft in various orbits will also be made. Initial results indicate that for a simple, parallel plate device made of aluminum, there is no threshold variation (with seed electrons versus with no seed electrons) under continuous-wave RF exposure.

  1. Existence of a virtual cathode close to a strongly electron emissive wall in low density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierno, S. P., E-mail: sp.tierno@upm.es; Donoso, J. M.; Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Conde, L. [Department of Applied Physics, E.T.S.I. Aeronáutica y del Espacio. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    The interaction between an electron emissive wall, electrically biased in a plasma, is revisited through a simple fluid model. We search for realistic conditions of the existence of a non-monotonic plasma potential profile with a virtual cathode as it is observed in several experiments. We mainly focus our attention on thermionic emission related to the operation of emissive probes for plasma diagnostics, although most conclusions also apply to other electron emission processes. An extended Bohm criterion is derived involving the ratio between the two different electron densities at the potential minimum and at the background plasma. The model allows a phase-diagram analysis, which confirms the existence of the non-monotonic potential profiles with a virtual cathode. This analysis shows that the formation of the potential well critically depends on the emitted electron current and on the velocity at the sheath edge of cold ions flowing from the bulk plasma. As a consequence, a threshold value of the governing parameter is required, in accordance to the physical nature of the electron emission process. The latter is a threshold wall temperature in the case of thermionic electrons. Experimental evidence supports our numerical calculations of this threshold temperature. Besides this, the potential well becomes deeper with increasing electron emission, retaining a fraction of the released current which limits the extent of the bulk plasma perturbation. This noninvasive property would explain the reliable measurements of plasma potential by using the floating potential method of emissive probes operating in the so-called strong emission regime.

  2. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weikum, M.K., E-mail: maria.weikum@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Li, F.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Assmann, R.W. [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sheng, Z.M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jaroszynski, D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented. - Highlights: • LWFA with an upramp density profile can trap and accelerate sub-fs electron beams. • A reduction of the necessary threshold laser intensity by a factor 4 is presented. • Electron properties are tuned by varying initial laser and plasma parameters. • Simulations predict electron bunch lengths below 200 attoseconds with pC charge. • Strong bunch evolution effects and a large energy spread still need to be improved.

  3. Grand canonical electronic density-functional theory: Algorithms and applications to electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A.; Arias, Tomas A.

    2017-03-01

    First-principles calculations combining density-functional theory and continuum solvation models enable realistic theoretical modeling and design of electrochemical systems. When a reaction proceeds in such systems, the number of electrons in the portion of the system treated quantum mechanically changes continuously, with a balancing charge appearing in the continuum electrolyte. A grand-canonical ensemble of electrons at a chemical potential set by the electrode potential is therefore the ideal description of such systems that directly mimics the experimental condition. We present two distinct algorithms: a self-consistent field method and a direct variational free energy minimization method using auxiliary Hamiltonians (GC-AuxH), to solve the Kohn-Sham equations of electronic density-functional theory directly in the grand canonical ensemble at fixed potential. Both methods substantially improve performance compared to a sequence of conventional fixed-number calculations targeting the desired potential, with the GC-AuxH method additionally exhibiting reliable and smooth exponential convergence of the grand free energy. Finally, we apply grand-canonical density-functional theory to the under-potential deposition of copper on platinum from chloride-containing electrolytes and show that chloride desorption, not partial copper monolayer formation, is responsible for the second voltammetric peak.

  4. Applications of electron density studies in molecular and solid state science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The present dissertation contains the distillate of my scientific output in the field of experimental and theoretical electron density studies roughly over the last decade and a little more, since earning my PhD-degree in 2001. There are several reasons that I have chosen to write my dissertation...... to their limits to obtain the required data resolution and quality. The apparent variation in subjects of the presented chapters is not a sign of a lack of scientific direction but merely underlines the fact that the method is applicable throughout chemistry and that I have also taken advantage...

  5. In Silico Modeling of Indigo and Tyrian Purple Single-Electron Nano-Transistors Using Density Functional Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and implement an in silico model of indigoid-based single-electron transistor (SET) nanodevices, which consist of indigoid molecules from natural dye weakly coupled to gold electrodes that function in a Coulomb blockade regime. The electronic properties of the indigoid molecules were investigated using the optimized density-functional theory (DFT) with a continuum model. Higher electron transport characteristics were determined for Tyrian purple, consistent with experimentally derived data. Overall, these results can be used to correctly predict and emphasize the electron transport functions of organic SETs, demonstrating their potential for sustainable nanoelectronics comprising the biodegradable and biocompatible materials.

  6. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Electron Beam Air Plasma Properties at Moderate Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Tan, Yonghua; Han, Xianwei

    2014-01-01

    Large size of air plasma at near atmospheric pressure has specific effects in aerospace applications. In this paper, a two dimensional multi-fluid model coupled with Monte Carlo (MC) model is established, and some experiments were carried out to investigate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma at pressure of 100-170 Torr. Based on the model, the properties of electron beam air plasma are acquired. The electron density is of the order of 1016 m-3 and the longitudinal size can exceed 1.2 m. The profiles of charged particles demonstrate that the oxygen molecule is very important for air plasma and its elementary processes play a key role in plasma equilibrium processes. The potential is almost negative and a very low potential belt is observed at the edge of plasma acting as a protection shell. A series of experiments were carried out in a low pressure vacuum facility and the beam plasma densities were diagnosed. The experimental results demonstrate that electron density increased with the electron beam energy, and the relatively low pressure was favorable for gaining high density plasma. Hence in order to achieve high density and large size plasma, it requires the researchers to choose proper discharge parameters.

  7. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin, E-mail: zhaohailin@ipp.ac.cn; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R − R{sub 0})/a, R{sub 0} = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of k{sub θ} < 2.4 cm{sup −1}. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  8. Measurement of electrons from albedo neutron decay and neutron density in near-Earth space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlin; Selesnick, Richard; Schiller, Quintin; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Hong; Baker, Daniel N; Temerin, Michael A

    2017-12-21

    The Galaxy is filled with cosmic-ray particles, mostly protons with kinetic energies greater than hundreds of megaelectronvolts. Around Earth, trapped energetic protons, electrons and other particles circulate at altitudes from about 500 to 40,000 kilometres in the Van Allen radiation belts. Soon after these radiation belts were discovered six decades ago, it was recognized that the main source of inner-belt protons (with kinetic energies of tens to hundreds of megaelectronvolts) is cosmic-ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND). In this process, cosmic rays that reach the upper atmosphere interact with neutral atoms to produce albedo neutrons, which, being prone to β-decay, are a possible source of geomagnetically trapped protons and electrons. These protons would retain most of the kinetic energy of the neutrons, while the electrons would have lower energies, mostly less than one megaelectronvolt. The viability of CRAND as an electron source has, however, been uncertain, because measurements have shown that the electron intensity in the inner Van Allen belt can vary greatly, while the neutron-decay rate should be almost constant. Here we report measurements of relativistic electrons near the inner edge of the inner radiation belt. We demonstrate that the main source of these electrons is indeed CRAND, and that this process also contributes to electrons in the inner belt elsewhere. Furthermore, measurement of the intensity of electrons generated by CRAND provides an experimental determination of the neutron density in near-Earth space-2 × 10-9 per cubic centimetre-confirming theoretical estimates.

  9. Measurement of electrons from albedo neutron decay and neutron density in near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlin; Selesnick, Richard; Schiller, Quintin; Zhang, Kun; Zhao, Hong; Baker, Daniel N.; Temerin, Michael A.

    2017-12-01

    The Galaxy is filled with cosmic-ray particles, mostly protons with kinetic energies greater than hundreds of megaelectronvolts. Around Earth, trapped energetic protons, electrons and other particles circulate at altitudes from about 500 to 40,000 kilometres in the Van Allen radiation belts. Soon after these radiation belts were discovered six decades ago, it was recognized that the main source of inner-belt protons (with kinetic energies of tens to hundreds of megaelectronvolts) is cosmic-ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND). In this process, cosmic rays that reach the upper atmosphere interact with neutral atoms to produce albedo neutrons, which, being prone to β-decay, are a possible source of geomagnetically trapped protons and electrons. These protons would retain most of the kinetic energy of the neutrons, while the electrons would have lower energies, mostly less than one megaelectronvolt. The viability of CRAND as an electron source has, however, been uncertain, because measurements have shown that the electron intensity in the inner Van Allen belt can vary greatly, while the neutron-decay rate should be almost constant. Here we report measurements of relativistic electrons near the inner edge of the inner radiation belt. We demonstrate that the main source of these electrons is indeed CRAND, and that this process also contributes to electrons in the inner belt elsewhere. Furthermore, measurement of the intensity of electrons generated by CRAND provides an experimental determination of the neutron density in near-Earth space—2 × 10‑9 per cubic centimetre—confirming theoretical estimates.

  10. Ionic and electronic transport properties in dense plasmas by orbital-free density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    We validate the application of our recent orbital-free density functional theory (DFT) approach [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155006 (2014);] for the calculation of ionic and electronic transport properties of dense plasmas. To this end, we calculate the self-diffusion coefficient, the viscosity coefficient, the electrical and thermal conductivities, and the reflectivity coefficient of hydrogen and aluminum plasmas. Very good agreement is found with orbital-based Kohn-Sham DFT calculations at lower temperatures. Because the computational costs of the method do not increase with temperature, we can produce results at much higher temperatures than is accessible by the Kohn-Sham method. Our results for warm dense aluminum at solid density are inconsistent with the recent experimental results reported by Sperling et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 115001 (2015)].

  11. Quantitative evaluation of magnetic flux density in a magnetic recording head and pseudo soft underlayer by electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Weixing; Hirata, Kei; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoichi; Kasai, Hiroto; Yanagiuchi, Katsuaki; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic interaction between the pole tip of a single-pole head and a pseudo soft underlayer in perpendicular magnetic recording was observed by electron holography. The magnetic flux density inside the soft underlayer was quantitatively evaluated. The distribution of magnetic flux density was calculated using the finite element method, and the influences of the modulation of the reference wave and stray fields were investigated by comparison with experimental results. The flux density observed was found to be underestimated due to the modulation of the phase shift in reference wave. The magnetic flux measured experimentally was larger than that inside the specimen because of the relatively large stray fields above and below the specimen in the direction of the electron beam.

  12. Structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of curium dioxide: Density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ling; Li, Wei-Dong; Wang, Fangwei; Eriksson, Olle; Wang, Bao-Tian

    2017-12-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the structural, magnetic, electronic, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of CmO2 with the local density approximation (LDA)+U and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)+U approaches. The strong Coulomb repulsion and the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects on the lattice structures, electronic density of states, and band gaps are carefully studied, and compared with other A O2 (A =U , Np, Pu, and Am). The ferromagnetic configuration with half-metallic character is predicted to be energetically stable while a charge-transfer semiconductor is predicted for the antiferromagnetic configuration. The elastic constants and phonon spectra show that the fluorite structure is mechanically and dynamically stable. Based on the first-principles phonon density of states, the lattice vibrational energy is calculated using the quasiharmonic approximation. Then, the Gibbs free energy, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat, and entropy are obtained and compared with experimental data. The mode Grüneisen parameters are presented to analyze the anharmonic properties. The Slack relation is applied to obtain the lattice thermal conductivity in temperature range of 300-1600 K. The phonon group velocities are also calculated to investigate the heat transfer. For all these properties, if available, we compare the results of CmO2 with other A O2 .

  13. Investigation of the Electron Acceleration by a High-Power Laser and a Density-Tapered Mixed-Gas Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinju; Phung, Vanessa L. J.; Kim, Minseok; Hur, Min-Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-based accelerators can generate about 1000 times stronger acceleration field compared with RF-based conventional accelerators, which can be done by high power laser and plasma. There are many issues in this research and one of them is development of a good plasma source for higher electron beam energy. For this purpose, we are investigating a special type of plasma source, which is a density-tapered gas cell with a mixed-gas for easy injection. By this type of special gas cell, we expect higher electron beam energies with easy injection in the wakefield. In this poster, some experimental results for electron beam generation with the density-tapered mixed-gas cell are presented. In addition to the experimental results, CFD (Computational-Fluid-Dynamics) and PIC (Particle-In-Cell) simulation results are also presented for comparison studies.

  14. On the electron density localization in elemental cubic ceramic and FCC transition metals by means of a localized electrons detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aray, Yosslen; Paredes, Ricardo; Álvarez, Luis Javier; Martiz, Alejandro

    2017-06-14

    The electron density localization in insulator and semiconductor elemental cubic materials with diamond structure, carbon, silicon, germanium, and tin, and good metallic conductors with face centered cubic structure such as α-Co, Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, and Au, was studied using a localized electrons detector defined in the local moment representation. Our results clearly show an opposite pattern of the electron density localization for the cubic ceramic and transition metal materials. It was found that, for the elemental ceramic materials, the zone of low electron localization is very small and is mainly localized on the atomic basin edges. On the contrary, for the transition metals, there are low-valued localized electrons detector isocontours defining a zone of highly delocalized electrons that extends throughout the material. We have found that the best conductors are those in which the electron density at this low-value zone is the lowest.

  15. Experimental Measurements and Modeling of a Helicon Plasma Source with Large Axial Density Gradients*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tysk, Shane; Denning, Mark; Scharer, John; Akhtar, Kamran

    2003-10-01

    Wave magnetic field, density and temperature profiles, electron distribution function and wave-correlated Argon optical emission are examined. The experimental facility is a 10 cm ID magnetized Pyrex tube and up to 1.3 kW of pulsed RF power is coupled to a half-turn, double-helix antenna with densities of 10e11-5x10e13 cm-3. The plasmas have different characteristics than the type-III coil1 and WOMBAT2 experiments. Wave-correlated optical emission and modulation is externally measured at Ar II 443 nm and phase-correlated with the 13.56 MHz source. The plasma, wave character and optical emission characteristics of the transition and helicon modes are examined. Helicon wave harmonic components of the antenna current driving frequency are also observed. The Ar II wave phase-correlated optical emission character is different for the transition and helicon regimes. The 2-D MaxEB and 1-D AntenaII codes and an ionization code are used to model the conditions present in the system and provide a comprehensive picture of wave field behavior and fast and thermal electron ionization processes in the source. 1 X. Guo, J.E. Scharer, Y. Mouzouris and L. Louis, Physics of Plasmas 6 (8), 3400 (1999). 2 J. Scharer, A. Degeling, G. Borg, and R. Boswell, Physics of Plasmas 9 (9), 3734 (2002). *Research supported by NSF and AFOSR

  16. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. II - Experimental support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    Strong observational support from data obtained on three different satellites and reported by three independent experimental groups is presented for all of the theoretically predicted correlations of a previous paper concerning local and global processes that affect solar-wind electrons. Specifically, it is shown that: (1) subthermal electrons behave most nearly as a classical gas; (2) the solar-wind extrathermal fraction of the electron density is anticorrelated within steady-state stream patterns with the local bulk speed; (3) the extrathermal electrons form a spectrally distinguishable subpopulation whose differential 'temperature' is anticorrelated with the local bulk speed; (4) the heat flux carried by electrons is anticorrelated with the bulk speed; and (5) the extrathermal 'temperature' is nearly independent of radius in the inner heliosphere. It is concluded that the previously discussed global and local Coulomb collisional effects are essential aspects of the solar-wind plasma as it is observed.

  17. Temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric electron density profiles over South Africa during strong magnetic storms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yao, Y. B; Chen, P; Zhang, S; Chen, J. J

    2013-01-01

    ...) and vertical total electron content (VTEC) data from the Jason-1 satellite were used to analyze the variations in ionospheric electron density profiles over South Africa before and after the severe geomagnetic storms on 15 May 2005...

  18. Experimental determination of the electron-avalanche and the electron-ion recombination coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernst, G.J.; Boer, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    The electron-ion recombination coefficient γ and the avalanche coefficient δ = (α − a) · vd, where α and a are the ionizat ion and attachment coefficients respectively and vd the drift velocity of the electrons, have been experimentally determined in a self-sustained CO2-laser system (1:1:3 mixture)

  19. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating of a High-Density Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F. Ramskov

    1986-01-01

    Various schemes for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas with the ratio of electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency, "»pe/^ce* larger than 1 on axis, are investigated. In particular, a mode conversion scheme is investigated using ordinary waves at the fundamental...

  20. Grand-canonical-ensemble representability problem for the one-electron reduced density matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoba, D. R.; Bochicchio, R. C.; Massacessi, G. E.; Lain, L.; Torre, A.

    2007-01-01

    We deal with many-electron systems having a noninteger number of electrons, which cannot be described properly by means of pure states or by canonical statistical ensemble states. The study of the one-electron reduced density matrix for these systems raises the problem of its representability in statistical ensembles of grand canonical type. We derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the representability of the one-electron reduced density matrix of grand-canonical statistical ensembles.

  1. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs in strongly diffusive regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of systematic optical pump–terahertz probe experiments, we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in the regime of strong carrier diffusion. The terahertz frequency-resolved transient sheet conductivity spectra are perfectly described by the Drude...... model, directly yielding the electron scattering rates. A diffusion model is applied to determine the spatial extent of the photoexcited electron-hole gas at each moment after photoexcitation, yielding the time-dependent electron density, and hence the density-dependent electron scattering time. We find...

  2. Reliability of High I/O High Density CCGA Interconnect Electronic Packages under Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non-destructive inspection tools were used to assess the reliability of high density CCGA packages for deep space extreme temperature missions. Ceramic column grid array (CCGA) packages have been increasing in use based on their advantages such as high interconnect density, very good thermal and electrical performances, compatibility with standard surface-mount packaging assembly processes, and so on. CCGA packages are used in space applications such as in logic and microprocessor functions, telecommunications, payload electronics, and flight avionics. As these packages tend to have less solder joint strain relief than leaded packages or more strain relief over lead-less chip carrier packages, the reliability of CCGA packages is very important for short-term and long-term deep space missions. We have employed high density CCGA 1152 and 1272 daisy chained electronic packages in this preliminary reliability study. Each package is divided into several daisy-chained sections. The physical dimensions of CCGA1152 package is 35 mm x 35 mm with a 34 x 34 array of columns with a 1 mm pitch. The dimension of the CCGA1272 package is 37.5 mm x 37.5 mm with a 36 x 36 array with a 1 mm pitch. The columns are made up of 80% Pb/20%Sn material. CCGA interconnect electronic package printed wiring polyimide boards have been assembled and inspected using non-destructive x-ray imaging techniques. The assembled CCGA boards were subjected to extreme temperature thermal atmospheric cycling to assess their reliability for future deep space missions. The resistance of daisy-chained interconnect sections were monitored continuously during thermal cycling. This paper provides the experimental test results of advanced CCGA packages tested in extreme temperature thermal environments. Standard optical inspection and x-ray non

  3. Experimental Electron Heat Diffusion in TJ-II ECRH Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, V.I.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Herranz, J.; Castejon, F.

    2006-07-01

    Interpretative transport has been used to revisit the global scalings of TJ-II ECRH plasmas from a local perspective. Density, rotational transform and ERCH power scans were analysed based upon Thomson Scattering data (electron density and temperature) in steady state discharges. A simple formula to obtain the thermal conductivity, assuming pure diffusion and negligible convective heat fluxes was used in a set of 161 discharges. All the analysis was performed with the ASTRA transport shell. The density scan indicates that inside n=0,4 there is no significant change of e with density in the range studied (0.4 (1019m-3) 1.0), while in 0,5 <0,8 approximately, e decreases with density. In the rotational transform scan it is found that the values of e when a low order rational of the rotational transform is present locally seem to be smaller for the corresponding range, although it is apparent a general beneficial effect of the corresponding change in magnetic structure. Finally, in the ECRH power scan, e is found to have an overall increment in 0,2density gradient region (n 0,7). (Author) 22 refs.

  4. Electron momentum density and the momentum density of positron annihilation pairs in alkali metals: high-momentum components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sob, M.

    1985-08-01

    The valence electron momentum density (EMD) and the momentum density of positron annihilation pairs (MDAP) are calculated ab initio for alkali metals from Li to Cs. It is shown that the proportion of valence electrons having their momenta within the central Fermi surface ranges from 75% (Cs) to 93% (Na); the momenta of the remaining valence electrons lie in the Umklapp Fermi surfaces centred at the surrounding reciprocal lattice points. In the calculation of the MDAP, various enhancement factors describing the effect of the many-body electron-positron interaction are examined; it seems that the recent model of enhancement of Umklapp terms presented by Sormann et al is not fully adequate. A relation between the EMD and MDAP is briefly discussed and the connection between the occupation of the central Fermi surface and other parameters of the electronic structure is pointed out.

  5. Density dependence of the yield of hydrated electrons in the low-LET radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C: influence of the geminate recombination of subexcitation-energy electrons prior to thermalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesungnoen, Jintana; Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2013-10-21

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the yield of hydrated electrons (eaq(-)) in the low-linear energy transfer radiolysis of supercritical water at 400 °C as a function of water density over the range of ~0.15 to 0.6 g cm(-3). Very good agreement was found between our calculations and picosecond pulse radiolysis experimental data at ~60 ps and 1 ns at high density (>0.35 g cm(-3)). At densities lower than ~0.35 g cm(-3), our eaq(-) yields were lower than the experimental data, especially at ~60 ps. However, if we incorporated into the simulations a prompt geminate electron-cation (H2O˙(+)) recombination (prior thermalization of the electron) that decreased as the density decreased, our computed eaq(-) yields at ~60 ps and 1 ns compared fairly well with the experimental data for the entire density range studied.

  6. The probability density function of energy loss for an electron by bremsstrahlung radiation in a thickness of a target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    The probability density function (PDF) of energy loss for an electron by bremsstrahlung radiation in a thickness of a target is obtained by solving the collision term of the Boltzmann equation for the Bethe-Heitler differential cross section. It is demonstrated that the values of the energy loss for an electron by bremsstrahlung radiation will be important in order to calculate the total energy loss when the amount of screening from the atomic electrons becomes important. In this case, a stochastic equation based on the electron energy and the target properties is derived to calculate the energy loss of an electron by bremsstrahlung radiation in a thickness of a target. The results obtained from this analysis are in good agreement with the experimental data and the folding theory for the PDFs of total energy loss for an electron at a certain depth of a target reported in the literature.

  7. BioMEA: a versatile high-density 3D microelectrode array system using integrated electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Guillaume; Rousseau, Lionel; Billoint, Olivier; Gharbi, Sadok; Rostaing, Jean-Pierre; Joucla, Sébastien; Trevisiol, Michel; Bourgerette, Alain; Chauvet, Philippe; Moulin, Céline; Goy, François; Mercier, Bruno; Colin, Mikael; Spirkovitch, Serge; Fanet, Hervé; Meyrand, Pierre; Guillemaud, Régis; Yvert, Blaise

    2010-04-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer a powerful tool to both record activity and deliver electrical microstimulations to neural networks either in vitro or in vivo. Microelectronics microfabrication technologies now allow building high-density MEAs containing several hundreds of microelectrodes. However, dense arrays of 3D micro-needle electrodes, providing closer contact with the neural tissue than planar electrodes, are not achievable using conventional isotropic etching processes. Moreover, increasing the number of electrodes using conventional electronics is difficult to achieve into compact devices addressing all channels independently for simultaneous recording and stimulation. Here, we present a full modular and versatile 256-channel MEA system based on integrated electronics. First, transparent high-density arrays of 3D-shaped microelectrodes were realized by deep reactive ion etching techniques of a silicon substrate reported on glass. This approach allowed achieving high electrode aspect ratios, and different shapes of tip electrodes. Next, we developed a dedicated analog 64-channel Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) including one amplification stage and one current generator per channel, and analog output multiplexing. A full modular system, called BIOMEA, has been designed, allowing connecting different types of MEAs (64, 128, or 256 electrodes) to different numbers of ASICs for simultaneous recording and/or stimulation on all channels. Finally, this system has been validated experimentally by recording and electrically eliciting low-amplitude spontaneous rhythmic activity (both LFPs and spikes) in the developing mouse CNS. The availability of high-density MEA systems with integrated electronics will offer new possibilities for both in vitro and in vivo studies of large neural networks. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Beta-Barrel Detection for Medium Resolution Cryo-Electron Microscopy Density Maps Using Genetic Algorithms and Ray Tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Albert; Si, Dong

    2017-10-16

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a technique that produces three-dimensional density maps of large protein complexes. This allows for the study of the structure of these proteins. Identifying the secondary structures within proteins is vital to understanding the overall structure and function of the protein. The [Formula: see text]-barrel is one such secondary structure, commonly found in lipocalins and membrane proteins. In this article, we present a novel approach that utilizes genetic algorithms, kd-trees, and ray tracing to automatically detect and extract [Formula: see text]-barrels from cryo-EM density maps. This approach was tested on simulated and experimental density maps with zero, one, or multiple barrels in the density map. The results suggest that the proposed approach is capable of performing automatic detection of [Formula: see text]-barrels from medium resolution cryo-EM density maps.

  9. The effects of incident electron current density and temperature on the total electron emission yield of polycrystalline CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhaj, M; Tondu, T; Inguimbert, V [ONERA/DESP 2, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse Cedex (France); Barroy, Pierre; Silva, Francois; Gicquel, Alix, E-mail: Mohamed.Belhaj@onera.f [LIMHP, Universite Paris 13, CNRS Institut Galilee, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2010-04-07

    The effects of temperature and incident electron current density on the total electron emission yield (TEEY) of polycrystalline diamond deposited by the chemical vapour deposition technique (CVD) were investigated at low electron beam fluence. It was found that the TEEY reversibly increases with the temperature and reversibly decreases with the current density. This behaviour is explained on the basis of a dynamic competition between the accumulation of holes (positive space charge), which internally reduces the secondary electron emission, and the thermally activated conductivity that tends to reduce the space charge formation.

  10. High-energy-density electron beam from interaction of two successive laser pulses with subcritical-density plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that a narrow electron beam with high energy and charge density can be generated in a subcritical-density plasma by two consecutive laser pulses. Although the first laser pulse dissipates rapidly, the second pulse can propagate for a long distance in the thin wake channel created by the first pulse and can further accelerate the preaccelerated electrons therein. Given that the second pulse also self-focuses, the resulting electron beam has a narrow waist and high charge and energy densities. Such beams are useful for enhancing the target-back space-charge field in target normal sheath acceleration of ions and bremsstrahlung sources, among others.

  11. Picture change error in quasirelativistic electron/spin density, Laplacian and bond critical points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bučinský, Lukáš, E-mail: lukas.bucinsky@stuba.sk [Slovak University of Technology, FCHPT, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Radlinskeho 9, Bratislava SK-812 37 (Slovakia); Kucková, Lenka; Malček, Michal; Kožíšek, Jozef; Biskupič, Stanislav [Slovak University of Technology, FCHPT, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Radlinskeho 9, Bratislava SK-812 37 (Slovakia); Jayatilaka, Dylan [University of Western Australia, Department of Chemistry, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Büchel, Gabriel E. [University of Vienna, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Währinger Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Division for Physical Sciences and Engineering and KAUST Catalysis Center, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Arion, Vladimir B. [University of Vienna, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Währinger Str. 42, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-25

    Highlights: • Quasirelativistic study of electron density topology of Os and Ru complexes. • Electron/spin densities and negative Laplacian of electron density presented. • Analytic correction of picture change error at IOTC level. • Relativistic and spin–orbit effects are considered, IOTC vs. DKH2 compared. - Abstract: The change of picture of the quasirelativistic Hartree–Fock wave functions is considered for electron/spin densities, the negative Laplacian of electron density and the appropriate bond critical point characteristics from the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). [OsCl{sub 5}(Hpz)]{sup −} and [RuCl{sub 5}(NO)]{sup 2−} transition metal complexes are considered. Both, scalar relativistic and spin–orbit effects have been accounted for using the Infinite Order Two Component (IOTC) Hamiltonian. Picture change error (PCE) correction in the electron and spin densities and the Laplacian of electron density are treated analytically. Generally, PCE is found significant only in the core region of the atoms for the electron/spin density as well as Laplacian.

  12. Four ways to determine the electron density in low-temperature plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroeks, R.F.G.; Steenbakkers, M.F.M.; Qing, Z.; van de Sanden, M.C.M.; Schram, D.C.

    Four ways to measure the electron density in low-temperature plasmas are presented: Thomson scattering, Langmuir probe, optical-emission spectroscopy, and continuum-radiation analysis. The results of the four methods are compared to each other and discussed. For the electron-density range of

  13. Electron density distribution and bonding in ZnSe and PbSe using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    directions are relatively low in conformity with the loosely packed structure of ZnSe. (The interaction of atomic charges will be less and hence the electron densities along directions other than bonding are expected to be minimum). Figure 8(b) of PbSe shows unequal electron densities along the three directions. This is due ...

  14. Experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center is described. A sensory evaluation of the high density foods was conducted first to test the acceptability of the products. A shelf-life study of the high density foods was also conducted for three different time lengths at three different temperatures. The nutritional analysis of the high density foods is at present incomplete.

  15. Tuning the electron energy by controlling the density perturbation position in laser plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Brijesh, P; Phuoc, K T; Corde, S; Lambert, G; Malka, V; Mangles, S P D; Bloom, M; Kneip, S

    2012-01-01

    A density perturbation produced in an underdense plasma was used to improve the quality of electron bunches produced in the laser-plasma wakefield acceleration scheme. Quasi-monoenergetic electrons were generated by controlled injection in the longitudinal density gradients of the density perturbation. By tuning the position of the density perturbation along the laser propagation axis, a fine control of the electron energy from a mean value of 60 MeV to 120 MeV has been demonstrated with a relative energy-spread of 15 +/- 3.6%, divergence of 4 +/- 0.8 mrad and charge of 6 +/- 1.8 pC.

  16. Structural, elastic, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of MgAgSb investigated by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Fei; Fu, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Jun-Tao; Li, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Zhen-Yi

    2016-08-01

    The structural, elastic, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of thermoelectric material MgAgSb in γ,β,α phases are studied with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The optimized lattice constants accord well with the experimental data. According to the calculated total energy of the three phases, the phase transition order is determined from α to γ phase with cooling, which is in agreement with the experimental result. The physical properties such as elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and anisotropy factor are also discussed and analyzed, which indicates that the three structures are mechanically stable and each has a ductile feature. The Debye temperature is deduced from the elastic properties. The total density of states (TDOS) and partial density of states (PDOS) of the three phases are investigated. The TDOS results show that the γ phase is most stable with a pseudogap near the Fermi level, and the PDOS analysis indicates that the conduction band of the three phases is composed mostly of Mg-3s, Ag-4d, and Sb-5p. In addition, the changes of the free energy, entropy, specific heat, thermal expansion of γ-MgAgSb with temperature are obtained successfully. The obtained results above are important parameters for further experimental and theoretical tuning of doped MgAgSb as a thermoelectric material at high temperature. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11504088), the Fund from Henan University of Technology, China (Grant Nos. 2014YWQN08 and 2013JCYJ12), the Natural Science Fund from the Henan Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 16A140027), the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province of China (Grant Nos. 2013JQ1018 and 15JK1759), and the Science Foundation of Northwest University of China (Grant No. 14NW23).

  17. Neural-network-based depth-resolved multiscale structural optimization using density functional theory and electron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Robert S.; Coll, Catalina; Estradé, Sònia; Peiró, Francesca; Koch, Christoph T.

    2018-01-01

    Iterative neural-network-based three-dimensional structural optimization of atomic positions over tens of nanometers is performed using transmission electron microscope (TEM) diffraction data simulated from density functional theory (DFT) all-electron densities, thus retrieving parameter variations along the beam direction. We first use experimental data to show that the GPAW DFT code's all-electron densities are considerably more accurate for electron diffraction calculations compared to conventional isolated-atom scattering factors, and they also compare well to Wien2K DFT simulations. This DFT-TEM combination is then integrated into an iterative neural-network-optimization-based algorithm (PRIMES, parameter retrieval and inversion from multiple electron scattering) to retrieve nanometer-scale ferroelectric polarization domains and strain in theoretical bulklike specimens from TEM data. DFT and isolated-atom methods produce substantially different diffraction patterns and retrieved polarization domain parameters, and DFT is sufficient to retrieve strain properties from a silicon specimen simulated using experimentally derived structure factors. Thus, we show that the improved accuracy, fast computation, and intuitive integration make the GPAW DFT code well suited for three-dimensional materials characterization and demonstrate this using an iterative neural-network algorithm that is verifiable on the mesoscale and, with DFT integration, self-consistent on the nanoscale.

  18. Picture change error in quasirelativistic electron/spin density, Laplacian and bond critical points

    KAUST Repository

    Bučinský, Lukáš

    2014-06-01

    The change of picture of the quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock wave functions is considered for electron/spin densities, the negative Laplacian of electron density and the appropriate bond critical point characteristics from the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). [OsCl5(Hpz)]- and [RuCl5(NO)]2- transition metal complexes are considered. Both, scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects have been accounted for using the Infinite Order Two Component (IOTC) Hamiltonian. Picture change error (PCE) correction in the electron and spin densities and the Laplacian of electron density are treated analytically. Generally, PCE is found significant only in the core region of the atoms for the electron/spin density as well as Laplacian.©2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. ELECTRON BEAM CURING OF EPOXY ACRYLATE COATINGS ON MEDIUM-DENSITY FIBERBOARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiarto Danu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the medium-density fiberboard (MDF as an engineered woods need surface coating process before entering final products, such as furniture and building materials. The wood surface should be covered for surface protection from damage during service life as well as to enhance its appearance. Surface coating of MDF was conducted using epoxy acrylate resin either for clear and pigmented coatings. Titanium dioxide was used for white pigmented coatings. Coating was conducted at variation thickness level of 30 to 150 μm. Curing was carried out by using 350 kV electron beam accelerator at 1.35 mA current and 1.6 m/min conveyor speed to get the absorbed dose of 3 Mrad. Effect of coating thickness was evaluated by measuring the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of cured samples, i.e., hardness, gloss, transparency, adhesion, abrasion resistance, and chemical, solvent and stain resistance. Experimental results showed that pendulum hardness and abrasion resistance slightly increased whereas gloss, transparency and adhesion resistance decreased with increasing coating thickness, while chemical, solvent and stain resistance remains similar. In general, clear coating provides better properties than pigmented coating.   Keywords: electron-beam; coating; epoxy-acrylate; pigment; medium-density fiberboard

  20. Europium Luminescence: Electronic Densities and Superdelocalizabilities for a Unique Adjustment of Theoretical Intensity Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, José Diogo L.; Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Freire, Ricardo O.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2015-09-01

    We advance the concept that the charge factors of the simple overlap model and the polarizabilities of Judd-Ofelt theory for the luminescence of europium complexes can be effectively and uniquely modeled by perturbation theory on the semiempirical electronic wave function of the complex. With only three adjustable constants, we introduce expressions that relate: (i) the charge factors to electronic densities, and (ii) the polarizabilities to superdelocalizabilities that we derived specifically for this purpose. The three constants are then adjusted iteratively until the calculated intensity parameters, corresponding to the 5D0→7F2 and 5D0→7F4 transitions, converge to the experimentally determined ones. This adjustment yields a single unique set of only three constants per complex and semiempirical model used. From these constants, we then define a binary outcome acceptance attribute for the adjustment, and show that when the adjustment is acceptable, the predicted geometry is, in average, closer to the experimental one. An important consequence is that the terms of the intensity parameters related to dynamic coupling and electric dipole mechanisms will be unique. Hence, the important energy transfer rates will also be unique, leading to a single predicted intensity parameter for the 5D0→7F6 transition.

  1. Reproducibility of the cutoff probe for the measurement of electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J., E-mail: sjyou@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, J. H.; You, K. H.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H., E-mail: jhkim86@kriss.re.kr [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.-S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan 573-540 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Since a plasma processing control based on plasma diagnostics attracted considerable attention in industry, the reproducibility of the diagnostics using in this application has become a great interest. Because the cutoff probe is one of the potential candidates for this application, knowing the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement becomes quit important in the cutoff probe application research. To test the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement, in this paper, a comparative study among the different cutoff probe measurements was performed. The comparative study revealed remarkable result: the cutoff probe has a great reproducibility for the electron density measurement, i.e., there are little differences among measurements by different probes made by different experimenters. The discussion including the reason for the result was addressed via this paper by using a basic measurement principle of cutoff probe and a comparative experiment with Langmuir probe.

  2. Tuning the conductivity threshold and carrier density of two-dimensional electron gas at oxide interfaces through interface engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Harsan Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG formed at the perovskite oxides heterostructures is of great interest because of its potential applications in oxides electronics and nanoscale multifunctional devices. A canonical example is the 2DEG at the interface between a polar oxide LaAlO3 (LAO and non-polar SrTiO3 (STO. Here, the LAO polar oxide can be regarded as the modulating or doping layer and is expected to define the electronic properties of 2DEG at the LAO/STO interface. However, to practically implement the 2DEG in electronics and device design, desired properties such as tunable 2D carrier density are necessary. Here, we report the tuning of conductivity threshold, carrier density and electronic properties of 2DEG in LAO/STO heterostructures by insertion of a La0.5Sr0.5TiO3 (LSTO layer of varying thicknesses, and thus modulating the amount of polarization of the oxide over layers. Our experimental result shows an enhancement of carrier density up to a value of about five times higher than that observed at the LAO/STO interface. A complete thickness dependent metal-insulator phase diagram is obtained by varying the thickness of LAO and LSTO providing an estimate for the critical thickness needed for the metallic phase. The observations are discussed in terms of electronic reconstruction induced by polar oxides.

  3. Optical excitation and electron relaxation dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: a combined approach of density functional and density matrix theory applied to the silicon (001) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecking, N.

    2007-11-05

    In this work a new theoretical formalism is introduced in order to simulate the phononinduced relaxation of a non-equilibrium distribution to equilibrium at a semiconductor surface numerically. The non-equilibrium distribution is effected by an optical excitation. The approach in this thesis is to link two conventional, but approved methods to a new, more global description: while semiconductor surfaces can be investigated accurately by density-functional theory, the dynamical processes in semiconductor heterostructures are successfully described by density matrix theory. In this work, the parameters for density-matrix theory are determined from the results of density-functional calculations. This work is organized in two parts. In Part I, the general fundamentals of the theory are elaborated, covering the fundamentals of canonical quantizations as well as the theory of density-functional and density-matrix theory in 2{sup nd} order Born approximation. While the formalism of density functional theory for structure investigation has been established for a long time and many different codes exist, the requirements for density matrix formalism concerning the geometry and the number of implemented bands exceed the usual possibilities of the existing code in this field. A special attention is therefore attributed to the development of extensions to existing formulations of this theory, where geometrical and fundamental symmetries of the structure and the equations are used. In Part II, the newly developed formalism is applied to a silicon (001)surface in a 2 x 1 reconstruction. As first step, density-functional calculations using the LDA functional are completed, from which the Kohn-Sham-wave functions and eigenvalues are used to calculate interaction matrix elements for the electron-phonon-coupling an the optical excitation. These matrix elements are determined for the optical transitions from valence to conduction bands and for electron-phonon processes inside the

  4. Density functional study of : Electronic and optical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K C Bhamu

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... the refractive index in zero frequency limits is 2.42. The absorption coefficient predicts the applicability of AgScO2 in solar cells and flat panel liquid crystal display as a transparent top window layer. Keywords. Density functional theory; band structure; optical properties. PACS Nos 71.15.Mb; 71.20.−b; 78.20.

  5. High Power Density Power Electronic Converters for Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk

    assessments of these specific VSCs so that their power densities and reliabilities are quantitatively determined, which requires extensive utilization of the electro-thermal models of the VSCs under investigation. In this thesis, the three-level neutral-point-clamped VSCs (3L-NPC-VSCs), which are classified...

  6. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI) Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiguang; Sun, Xiyuan; Jiang, Gang

    2016-04-11

    The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI) complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC) basis set. The Pu- O y l bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu-Ligand bonds, like Pu-OH(-), show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu-ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA) energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu-Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI) approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI) complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified.

  7. Exploring the Interaction Natures in Plutonyl (VI Complexes with Topological Analyses of Electron Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiguang Du

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The interaction natures between Pu and different ligands in several plutonyl (VI complexes are investigated by performing topological analyses of electron density. The geometrical structures in both gaseous and aqueous phases are obtained with B3LYP functional, and are generally in agreement with available theoretical and experimental results when combined with all-electron segmented all-electron relativistic contracted (SARC basis set. The Pu– O y l bond orders show significant linear dependence on bond length and the charge of oxygen atoms in plutonyl moiety. The closed-shell interactions were identified for Pu-Ligand bonds in most complexes with quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM analyses. Meanwhile, we found that some Pu–Ligand bonds, like Pu–OH−, show weak covalent. The interactive nature of Pu–ligand bonds were revealed based on the interaction quantum atom (IQA energy decomposition approach, and our results indicate that all Pu–Ligand interactions is dominated by the electrostatic attraction interaction as expected. Meanwhile it is also important to note that the quantum mechanical exchange-correlation contributions can not be ignored. By means of the non-covalent interaction (NCI approach it has been found that some weak and repulsion interactions existed in plutonyl(VI complexes, which can not be distinguished by QTAIM, can be successfully identified.

  8. Noncovalent interactions from electron density topology and solvent effects on spectral properties of Schiff bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhimathi, S.; Balakrishnan, C.; Theetharappan, M.; Neelakantan, M. A.; Venkataraman, R.

    2017-03-01

    Two Schiff bases were prepared by the condensation of o-allyl substituted 2,4-dihydroxy acetophenone with 1,2-diaminopropane (L1) and ethanediamine (L2) and characterized by elemental analysis, and ESI-MS, IR, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectral techniques. The effect of solvents with respect to different polarities on UV-Vis and emission spectra of L1 and L2 was investigated at room temperature show that the compounds exist in keto and enol forms in solution and may be attributed to the intramolecular proton transfer in the ground state. The solute-solvent interactions, change in dipole moment and solvatochromic properties of the compounds were studied based on the solvent polarity parameters. For L1 and L2, the ground and excited state electronic structure calculations were carried out by DFT and TD-DFT at B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level, respectively. The IR, NMR and electronic absorption spectra computed were compared with the experimental observations. The intramolecular charge transfer within the molecule is evidenced from the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and surface analysis. The noncovalent interactions like hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions were identified from the molecular geometry and electron localization function. These interactions in molecules have been studied by using reduced density gradient and graphed by Multiwfn.

  9. Simulation and Experimentation for Low Density Drain AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; He, Yun-Long; Ding, Ning; Zheng, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Peng; Ma, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Hao, Yue

    2014-03-01

    In order to improve the breakdown voltage of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), we report a feasible method of low density drain (LDD) HEMT. The fluoride-based plasma treatment using CF4 gas is performed on the drain-side of the gate edge. The channel two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) concentrations are modulated by fluoride plasma treatment, and the peak electric field at the gate edge is effectively reduced, so the breakdown voltage is improved. The electric field distributions of the LDD-HEMTs are simulated using the Silvaco software, and the peak of the electric field on the gate edge is effectively reduced. Experimental results show that, compared with the conventional HEMT, LDD-HEMTs have a lower reverse leakage current of the gate, and the breakdown voltage is increased by 36%. The current collapse characteristics of the LDD-HEMTs are confirmed by dual-pulse measurement, and an obvious pulse current reduction is due to the surface states by implanting F ions between the gate and the drain.

  10. Experimental and theoretical spectroscopic studies of anticancer drug rosmarinic acid using HF and density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.; Manoharan, S.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we reported a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and NBO analysis of anticancer drug of rosmarinic acid. The optimized molecular structure, atomic charges, vibrational frequencies, natural bond orbital analysis and ultraviolet-visible spectral interpretation of rosmarinic acid have been studied by performing HF and DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The FT-IR (solid and solution phase), FT-Raman (solid phase) spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 and 3500-50 cm-1, respectively. The UV-Visible absorption spectra of the compound that dissolved in ethanol were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. The scaled wavenumbers are compared with the experimental values. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. The formation of hydrogen bond was investigated in terms of the charge density by the NBO calculations. Based on the UV spectra and TD-DFT calculations, the electronic structure and the assignments of the absorption bands were carried out. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMO) analysis were investigated using theoretical calculations.

  11. Long-term observations of D-region electron densities at high and middle northern latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Werner; Keuer, Dieter; Friedrich, Martin; Strelnikova, Irina; Latteck, Ralph

    D-region electron densities are estimated using Doppler radars at frequencies around 3 MHz in Andenes, Norway (69.3°N, 16.0°E) since summer 2003 and in Juliusruh, Germany (54.6°N, 13.4°E) since summer 2006. Both experiments utilize partial reflections of ordinary and extraordinary component waves from scatterers in the altitude range 50-90 km to estimate electron number densities from differential absorption (DAE) and differential phase (DPE) measurements. Height profiles of electron density are obtained between about 55 km and 90 km with sampling times of 2-3 minutes and height resolution of 1.5 km at Andenes and 3 km at Juliusruh. The electron density profiles independently derived from DAE and DPE measurements agree remarkably well. The radar results are compared with co-located simultaneously measured electron densities by rocket-borne radio wave propagation experiments (differential absorption, Faraday rotation, and impedance probe) in Andenes with good agreement between insitu and ground-based measurements. The diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities as observed at high and mid-latitudes under quiet ionospheric conditions is presented and compared to the corresponding electron density profiles of the International Reference Ionosphere. The response of D-region ionization to regular solar activity variation as well as to solar activity storms and geomagnetic disturbances has been studied at polar latitudes. Characteristic electron density variations are found during downwelling events of nitric oxide due to strong vertical coupling during stratospheric warming events. In addition, we discuss the inter-relation between D-region electron densities from radar observations, riometer absorption, and the empirical model IMAZ at different levels of solar activity and during particle precipitation events.

  12. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Julie

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lymphatics form a second circulatory system that drains the extracellular fluid and proteins from the tumor microenvironment, and provides an exclusive environment in which immune cells interact and respond to foreign antigen. Both cancer and inflammation are known to induce lymphangiogenesis. However, little is known about bladder lymphatic vessels and their involvement in cancer formation and progression. Methods A double transgenic mouse model was generated by crossing a bladder cancer-induced transgenic, in which SV40 large T antigen was under the control of uroplakin II promoter, with another transgenic mouse harboring a lacZ reporter gene under the control of an NF-κB-responsive promoter (κB-lacZ exhibiting constitutive activity of β-galactosidase in lymphatic endothelial cells. In this new mouse model (SV40-lacZ, we examined the lymphatic vessel density (LVD and function (LVF during bladder cancer progression. LVD was performed in bladder whole mounts and cross-sections by fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC using LYVE-1 antibody. LVF was assessed by real-time in vivo imaging techniques using a contrast agent (biotin-BSA-Gd-DTPA-Cy5.5; Gd-Cy5.5 suitable for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF. In addition, IHC of Cy5.5 was used for time-course analysis of co-localization of Gd-Cy5.5 with LYVE-1-positive lymphatics and CD31-positive blood vessels. Results SV40-lacZ mice develop bladder cancer and permitted visualization of lymphatics. A significant increase in LVD was found concomitantly with bladder cancer progression. Double labeling of the bladder cross-sections with LYVE-1 and Ki-67 antibodies indicated cancer-induced lymphangiogenesis. MRI detected mouse bladder cancer, as early as 4 months, and permitted to follow tumor sizes during cancer progression. Using Gd-Cy5.5 as a contrast agent for MRI-guided lymphangiography, we determined a possible reduction of lymphatic

  13. The electron-propagator approach to conceptual density-functional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    theory) to evaluate the quantities appearing in (16). In fact, the terms in (16) are often discussed using vocabulary more often associated with molecular- orbital theory. Using Klopman's classification of different chemical reaction types,32 the terms on the second line, which depend on the change in the number of electrons ...

  14. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nique to provide remote, in-situ, rapid and multi-elemental analysis of bulk and trace sample in any phase (solid, liquid and gas) with no or minimal sample prepa- ration [2–4]. The characterization of LIPs by determining their temperature and electron den- sity is essential and has gained considerable interest in recent years ...

  15. Electron-positron momentum density in TTF-TCNQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishibashi, S.; Manuel, A.A.; Hoffmann, L.

    1997-01-01

    We present measurements of the positron two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) in TTF-TCNQ. We report also theoretical simulations of the 2D-ACAR in which the electron wave functions were expressed as TTF or TCNQ molecular orbitals obtained from self-consistent qu...

  16. Determination of the Electron Density and Electron Temperature in A Magnetron Discharge Plasma Using Optical Spectroscopy and the Collisional-Radiative Model of Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evdokimov, K. E.; Konishchev, M. E.; Pichugin, V. F.; Pustovalova, A. A.; Ivanova, N. M.; Sun', Ch.

    2017-09-01

    A method for determining the electron temperature and electron density in a plasma is proposed that is based on minimization of the difference between the experimental relative intensities of the spectral argon (Ar) lines and those same intensities calculated with the aid of the collisional-radiative model. The model describes the kinetics of the ground state and 40 excited states of the Ar atom and takes into account the following processes: excitation and deactivation of the states of the atom by electron impact, radiative decay of the excited states, self-absorption of radiation, ionization of excited states by electron impact, and quenching of metastable states as a consequence of collisions with the chamber walls. Using the given method, we have investigated the plasma of a magnetron discharge on a laboratory setup for intermediate-frequency magnetron sputtering for a few selected operating regimes.

  17. An accurate density functional theory calculation for electronic excitation energies: the least-squares support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ting; Sun, Shi-Ling; Shi, Li-Li; Li, Hui; Li, Hong-Zhi; Su, Zhong-Min; Lu, Ying-Hua

    2009-05-14

    Support vector machines (SVMs), as a novel type of learning machine, has been very successful in pattern recognition and function estimation problems. In this paper we introduce least-squares (LS) SVMs to improve the calculation accuracy of density functional theory. As a demonstration, this combined quantum mechanical calculation with LS-SVM correction approach has been applied to evaluate the electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules. The newly introduced LS-SVM approach reduces the root-mean-square deviation of the calculated electronic excitation energies of 160 organic molecules from 0.32 to 0.11 eV for the B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculation. Thus, the LS-SVM correction on top of B3LYP/6-31G(d) is a better method to correct electronic excitation energies and can be used as the approximation of experimental results which are impossible to obtain experimentally.

  18. Density Functional Theory Study on the Electronic Structures of Oxadiazole Based Dyes as Photosensitizer for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Mehmood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular structures and UV-visible absorption spectra of complex photosensitizers comprising oxadiazole isomers as the π-bridges were analyzed by density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent DFT. The ground state and excited state oxidation potentials, HOMOs and LUMOs energy levels, and electron injection from the dyes to semiconductor TiO2 have been computed in vacuum here. The results show that all of the dyes may potentially be good photosensitizers in DSSC. To justify the simulation basis, N3 dye was also simulated under the similar conditions. Simulated absorption spectrum, HOMO, LUMO, and band gap values of N3 were compared with the experimental values. We also computed the electronic structure properties and absorption spectra of dye/(TiO28 systems to elucidate the electron injection efficiency at the interface. This work is expected to give proper orientation for experimental synthesis.

  19. Experimental studies of electron-phonon interactions in gallium nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Stanton, N M

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents an experimental investigation of the electron-phonon interaction in GaN. Bulk epilayers, grown by MBE, and AIGaN/GaN heterostructure grown by MOCVD, have been studied. The energy relaxation rate for hot electrons has been measured over a wide range of temperatures, allowing both acoustic and optic phonon emission to be studied in GaN epilayers. Direct phonon measurements, both studying the emission and absorption processes, have been performed. Detection of phonons emitted when hot electrons relax their excess energy complements the measurements of relaxation rates. Absorption of acoustic phonons by the epilayers, using both fixed and extended metal film phonon sources, allowed investigation into the effectiveness of the 2k sub F cutoff in the low mobility layers. The experimental findings are compared with the predictions of theory. AIGaN/GaN heterostructures were characterised and measurements of the energy relaxation rate in the temperature range 4K-40K obtained. Excellent agreement wi...

  20. Transmission electron microscopy of the preclinical phase of experimental phytophotodermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Larangeira de Almeida Jr

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the epidermis in induced phytophotodermatitis using transmission electron microscopy in order to detect histologic changes even before lesions are visible by light microscopy. INTRODUCTION: In the first six hours after the experimental induction of phytophotodermatitis, no changes are detectable by light microscopy. Only after 24 hours can keratinocyte necrosis and epidermal vacuolization be detected histologically, and blisters form by 48 hours. METHODS: The dorsum of four adult rats (Rattus norvegicus was manually epilated. After painting the right half of the rat with the peel juice of Tahiti lemon, they were exposed to sunlight for eight minutes under general anesthesia. The left side was used as the control and exposed to sunlight only. Biopsies were performed immediately after photoinduction and one and two hours later, and the tissue was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: No histological changes were seen on the control side. Immediately after induction, vacuolization in keratinocytes was observed. After one hour, desmosomal changes were also observed in addition to vacuolization. Keratin filaments were not attached to the desmosomal plaque. Free desmosomes and membrane ruptures were also seen. At two hours after induction, similar changes were found, and granular degeneration of keratin was also observed. DISCUSSION: The interaction of sunlight and psoralens generates a photoproduct that damages keratinocyte proteins, leading to keratinocyte necrosis and blister formation. CONCLUSIONS: Transmission electron microscopy can detect vacuolization, lesions of the membrane, and desmosomes in the first two hours after experimental induction of phytophotodermatitis.

  1. The influence of the edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beam propagation in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelli, N.; Balakin, A.A.; Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the electron cyclotron (EC) wave beam propagation in the presence of edge density fluctuations by means of a quasi-optical code [Balakin A. A. et al, Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 065003] is presented. The effects of the density fluctuations on the wave beam propagation are estim......A numerical analysis of the electron cyclotron (EC) wave beam propagation in the presence of edge density fluctuations by means of a quasi-optical code [Balakin A. A. et al, Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 065003] is presented. The effects of the density fluctuations on the wave beam propagation...

  2. Density dependence of electron-spin polarization and relaxation in intrinsic GaAs at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, L H; Chen, K; Wen, J H; Lin, W Z; Lai, T S, E-mail: stslts@mail.sysu.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Zhongshan (Sen Yat-Sen) University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510275 (China)

    2009-07-07

    Time-resolved circularly polarized pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the carrier-density dependence of the electron-spin polarization and spin relaxation dynamics in bulk intrinsic GaAs near the bottom of the conduction band. The experimental result shows that the initial degree of the electron-spin polarization is less than 0.5, and both the initial degree of spin polarization and the spin relaxation time decrease with increasing carrier densities. The simulation calculation shows that the band-gap renormalization effect has a significant influence on the initial degree of spin polarization, but it is not the physical origin of the decrease in the electron-spin polarization. Contrarily, the initial degree of spin polarization can be greatly enhanced by the band-gap renormalization effect for carrier densities above 3.5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. In intrinsic GaAs, both the D'yakonov-Perel' and the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanisms play an important role. The Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism becomes stronger with the increase in the carrier density, and becomes dominant at high carrier density.

  3. Density dependence of electron-spin polarization and relaxation in intrinsic GaAs at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, L. H.; Chen, K.; Wen, J. H.; Lin, W. Z.; Lai, T. S.

    2009-07-01

    Time-resolved circularly polarized pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the carrier-density dependence of the electron-spin polarization and spin relaxation dynamics in bulk intrinsic GaAs near the bottom of the conduction band. The experimental result shows that the initial degree of the electron-spin polarization is less than 0.5, and both the initial degree of spin polarization and the spin relaxation time decrease with increasing carrier densities. The simulation calculation shows that the band-gap renormalization effect has a significant influence on the initial degree of spin polarization, but it is not the physical origin of the decrease in the electron-spin polarization. Contrarily, the initial degree of spin polarization can be greatly enhanced by the band-gap renormalization effect for carrier densities above 3.5 × 1017 cm-3. In intrinsic GaAs, both the D'yakonov-Perel' and the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanisms play an important role. The Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism becomes stronger with the increase in the carrier density, and becomes dominant at high carrier density.

  4. Electron density variability of nighttime D region ionosphere in Vietnamese and Japanese sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Le Minh; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Thu, Nguyen Ngoc; Ha, Tran Quoc

    2017-06-01

    Recording tweek atmospherics on geomagnetically quiet days in 2014 at Tay Nguyen University (TNU) (12.65°N, 108.02°E), Vietnam, and at Kagoshima (KAG) (31.48°N, 130.72°E), Japan, we investigated the nighttime electron density variability of the D region ionosphere between the equatorial-low-latitude Vietnamese and the low- to middle-latitude Japanese sectors. We estimated the reflection height and electron density of the D region ionosphere using the first-order mode cutoff frequency of tweek atmospherics. The results observed at both stations show that the mean electron density at the reflection height during winter season was higher than that during summer and equinox seasons. The electron density observed at TNU gradually decreased from 20:15 to 4:15 LT from winter to equinox and to summer. The electron density observed at KAG increased from 20:20 to 4:20 LT during summer and winter seasons. The mean electron density during 2014 observed at TNU (25.0 cm-3) was higher by 2.1 cm-3 than that observed at KAG (22.9 cm-3). During 2014, the nighttime electron density variations show a moderate positive correlation with the sunspot number but show weak to no correlation with the galactic cosmic rays. We suggest that the seasonal variations in the nighttime electron density could be significantly caused by the enhancement of geocoronal hydrogen Lyman α intensity and seasonal variation of nitric oxide density in the lower ionosphere.

  5. Electron number density profiles derived from radio occultation on the CASSIOPE spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shume, Esayas B.; Vergados, Panagiotis; Komjathy, Attila; Langley, Richard B.; Durgonics, Tibor

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents electron number density profiles derived from high-resolution Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations performed using the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe payload on the high inclination CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE) spacecraft. We have developed and applied a novel inverse Abel transform algorithm on high rate RO total electron content measurements performed along GPS to CASSIOPE radio links to recover electron density profiles. The high-resolution density profiles inferred from the CASSIOPE RO are (1) in very good agreement with density profiles estimated from ionosonde data, measured over stations nearby to the latitude and longitude of the RO tangent points; (2) in good agreement with density profiles inferred from GPS RO measured by the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC); and (3) in general agreement with density profiles estimated using the International Reference Ionosphere climatological model. Using both CASSIOPE and COSMIC RO observations, we identify, for the first time, that there exist differences in the characteristics of the electron number density profiles retrieved over landmasses and oceans. The density profiles over oceans exhibit widespread values and scale heights compared to density profiles over landmasses. We provide an explanation for the ocean-landmass discrepancy in terms of the unique wave coupling mechanisms operating over oceans and landmasses.

  6. Measurement of the electron and ion temperatures by the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on joint Texas experimental tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Wang, S. Y.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610200 (China); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    An x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been developed on joint Texas experimental tokamak for the measurement of electron and ion temperatures from the K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. A two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter has been applied to detect the spectra. The electron and ion temperatures have been obtained from the Voigt fitting with the spectra of helium-like argon ions. The profiles of electron and ion temperatures show the dependence on electron density in ohmic plasmas.

  7. Topology Zero: Advancing Theory and Experimentation for Power Electronics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchino, Federico

    For decades, power electronics education has been based on the fundamentals of three basic topologies: buck, boost, and buck-boost. This thesis presents the analytical framework for the Topology Zero, a general circuit topology that integrates the basic topologies and provides significant insight into the behaviour of converters. As demonstrated, many topologies are just particular cases of the Topology Zero, an important contribution towards the understanding, integration, and conceptualization of topologies. The investigation includes steady-state, small-signal, and frequency response analysis. The Topology Zero is physically implemented as an educational system. Experimental results are presented to show control applications and power losses analysis using the educational system. The steady-state and dynamic analyses of the Topology Zero provide profuse proof of its suitability as an integrative topology, and of its ability to be indirectly controlled. As well, the implementation of the Topology Zero within an experimentation system is explained and application examples are provided.

  8. An experimental and theoretical investigation into the electronically excited states of para-benzoquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. B.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Mendes, M.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Ingólfsson, O.; Lima, M. A. P.; Brunger, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    We report on a combination of experimental and theoretical investigations into the structure of electronically excited para-benzoquinone (pBQ). Here synchrotron photoabsorption measurements are reported over the 4.0-10.8 eV range. The higher resolution obtained reveals previously unresolved pBQ spectral features. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used to interpret the spectrum and resolve discrepancies relating to the interpretation of the Rydberg progressions. Electron-impact energy loss experiments are also reported. These are combined with elastic electron scattering cross section calculations performed within the framework of the independent atom model-screening corrected additivity rule plus interference (IAM-SCAR + I) method to derive differential cross sections for electronic excitation of key spectral bands. A generalized oscillator strength analysis is also performed, with the obtained results demonstrating that a cohesive and reliable quantum chemical structure and cross section framework has been established. Within this context, we also discuss some issues associated with the development of a minimal orbital basis for the single configuration interaction strategy to be used for our high-level low-energy electron scattering calculations that will be carried out as a subsequent step in this joint experimental and theoretical investigation.

  9. An experimental and theoretical investigation into the excited electronic states of phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B.; Chiari, L. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, UFJF, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); and others

    2014-08-21

    We present experimental electron-energy loss spectra (EELS) that were measured at impact energies of 20 and 30 eV and at angles of 90° and 10°, respectively, with energy resolution ∼70 meV. EELS for 250 eV incident electron energy over a range of angles between 3° and 50° have also been measured at a moderate energy resolution (∼0.9 eV). The latter spectra were used to derive differential cross sections and generalised oscillator strengths (GOS) for the dipole-allowed electronic transitions, through normalization to data for elastic electron scattering from benzene. Theoretical calculations were performed using time-dependent density functional theory and single-excitation configuration interaction methods. These calculations were used to assign the experimentally measured spectra. Calculated optical oscillator strengths were also compared to those derived from the GOS data. This provides the first investigation of all singlet and triplet excited electronic states of phenol up to the first ionization potential.

  10. Seasonal and solar activity variability of D-region electron density at 69°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Werner; Latteck, Ralph; Friedrich, Martin; Wakabayashi, Makato; Rapp, Markus

    2011-06-01

    A narrow beam Doppler radar operating at 3.17 MHz and installed close to the Andøya Rocket Range in Andenes, Norway, (69.3°N, 16.0°E) has been providing electron densities in the lower ionosphere since summer 2003. The experiment utilizes partial reflection of ordinary and extraordinary component waves from scatterers in the altitude range 50-95 km to estimate electron densities from differential absorption and differential phase measurements. These ground-based observations are in good agreement with concurrent rocket-borne radio wave propagation measurements at Andenes. Results of the diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities and the response of D-region electron densities to solar activity storms are presented.

  11. CASSINI RSS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES EDP1 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the complete collection of the published Cassini radio occultation electron density profiles of the Titan ionosphere as of September 2008.

  12. A simple and straightforward expression for curling probe electron density diagnosis in reactive plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Ali; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Hotta, Masaya; Nakamura, Keiji

    2017-04-01

    Active plasma resonance spectroscopy (APRS) refers to the family of plasma diagnostic methods which utilize the ability of plasmas to resonate at frequencies close to the plasma frequency. APRS operates by exciting the plasma with a weak RF signal by means of a small electric probe. The response of the plasma is recorded by a network analyzer (NA). A mathematical model is applied to derive characteristics like the electron density and the electron temperature. The curling probe is a promising realization of APRS. The curling probe is well-qualified for the local measurement of the electron density in reactive plasmas. This spiral probe resonates in plasma at a larger density dependent frequency than the plasma frequency. This manuscript represents a simple and straightforward expression relating this resonance frequency to the electron density of the plasma. A good agreement is observed between the proposed expression and the results obtained from previous studies and numerical simulations.

  13. Imaging Near-Earth Electron Densities Using Thomson Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-15

    telescopes (left and right squares). In these simulated images, we have assumed an input aperture diameter of 23.5 cm and a pixel plate scale of 270...diameter of 23.8 cm and a pixel plate scale of 120 km. The inner field of view begins near 320 km in altitude, which Imaging Near-Earth Electron...LFM) Global MHD Magnetospheric Simulation Code,” J. Atmos. Sol. Terres . Phys. 66, 1333. Meier, R.R., 1991. “Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and Remote

  14. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Shen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne and temperature (Te observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than −0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere, which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne–Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple

  15. The mechanical, electronic and optical properties of KH under high pressure: a density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyou, An; Feng, Geng; Weiyi, Ren; Hui, Yang; Ziqi, He; Feiyu, Wang; Tixian, Zeng

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical, electronic and optical properties of KH under high pressure have been studied using the generalized gradient approximation and Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerh of hybrid method within density functional theory. Based on the usual condition of equal enthalpies, high pressure phase transition of KH from B 1 to B 2 was confirmed, is about 4.1 GPa, and normalized volume collapse ΔV P /V 0 is about 11.09%. The calculated equilibrium structural parameters and elastic modulus are in excellent agreement with the experimental and other theoretical results. At ground states, B 1 KH is elastic stable, but B 2 KH is unstable. C 11 and c‧ are the main factors, which cause the structural phase transition under the pressures. The band structures and density of states of KH were calculated and analyzed in detail. Valance bands are local and conduction bands are continuous. The VBs mainly originate from K 3s, 3p and H 1s states, and the CBs consist of K 3s, 3p states, some hybridized levels are found between K 3s and 3p states. Mulliken population analysis of KH indicate that the charge populations of H 1s and K 3p states are very obvious but K 3s states are relatively weak, the charge transfers are from K to H. The linear response optical properties of KH were emphatically predicted combing with the band structures and frequency-dependent and dielectric function ε(ω).

  16. Static and Dynamic Electronic (Hyperpolarizabilities of Dimethylnaphthalene Isomers: Characterization of Spatial Contributions by Density Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Alparone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Static and frequency-dependent electronic (hyperpolarizabilities of the dimethylnaphthalene (DMN isomers were computed in vacuum using the Coulomb-attenuating Density Functional Theory method. The nonlinear optical Second Harmonic Generation (SHG and Electro-Optical Pockels Effect (EOPE were investigated at the characteristic Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 1064 nm. The response electric properties especially the longitudinal polarizability, polarizability anisotropy, and first-order hyperpolarizability are significantly affected by the position of the methyl groups. The SHG and EOPE techniques can be potentially useful to discriminate the ,-DMN isomers (2,6-DMN < 2,7-DMN < 2,3-DMN as well as the ,-DMN isomers (1,5-DMN < 1,4-DMN < 1,8-DMN. The (hyperpolarizability differences among the investigated DMNs were elucidated through density analysis calculations. The predicted polarizabilities exhibit good linear relationships with the experimental first-order biomass-normalized rate coefficient, a physicochemical property connected to the rates of biodegradation processes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  17. Maximum current density and beam brightness achievable by laser-driven electron sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Filippetto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the extension to different electron beam aspect ratio of the Child-Langmuir law for the maximum achievable current density in electron guns. Using a simple model, we derive quantitative formulas in good agreement with simulation codes. The new scaling laws for the peak current density of temporally long and transversely narrow initial beam distributions can be used to estimate the maximum beam brightness and suggest new paths for injector optimization.

  18. Maximum current density and beam brightness achievable by laser-driven electron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippetto, D.; Musumeci, P.; Zolotorev, M.; Stupakov, G.

    2014-02-01

    This paper discusses the extension to different electron beam aspect ratio of the Child-Langmuir law for the maximum achievable current density in electron guns. Using a simple model, we derive quantitative formulas in good agreement with simulation codes. The new scaling laws for the peak current density of temporally long and transversely narrow initial beam distributions can be used to estimate the maximum beam brightness and suggest new paths for injector optimization.

  19. Multipole electron-density modelling of synchrotron powder diffraction data: the case of diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, H.; Overgaard, J.; Busselez, R.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate structure factors are extracted from synchrotron powder diffraction data measured on crystalline diamond based on a novel multipole model division of overlapping reflection intensities. The approach limits the spherical-atom bias in structure factors extracted from overlapping powder data...... parameter. This directly exposes a correlation between electron density and thermal parameters even for a light atom such as carbon, and it also underlines that in organic systems proper deconvolution of thermal motion is important for obtaining correct static electron densities....

  20. Some new features of electron density irregularities over SHAR during strong spread F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Raizada

    Full Text Available An RH-560 rocket flight was conducted from Sriharikota rocket range (SHAR (14°N, 80°E, dip latitude 5.5°N to study electron density and electric field irregularities during spread F. The rocket was launched at 2130 local time (LT and it attained an apogee of 348 km. Results of electron density fluctuations are presented here. Two extremely sharp layers of very high electron density were observed at 105 and 130 km. The electron density increase in these layers was by a factor of 50 in a vertical extent of 10 km. Large depletions in electron density were observed around 175 and 238 km. Both sharp layers as well as depletions were observed also during the descent. The presence of sharp layers and depletions during the ascent and the descent of the rocket as well as an order of magnitude less electron density, in 150-300 km region during the descent, indicate the presence of strong large-scale horizontal gradients in the electron density. Some of the valley region irregularities (165-178 km, in the intermediate scale size range, observed during this flight, show spectral peaks at 2 km and can be interpreted in terms of the image striation theory suggested by Vickrey et al. The irregularities at 176 km do not exhibit any peak at kilometer scales and appear to be of new type. The growth rate of intermediate scale size irregularities, produced through generalized Rayleigh Taylor instability, was calculated for the 200-330 km altitude, using observed values of electron density gradients and an assumed vertically downward wind of 20 ms-1. These growth rate calculations suggest that the observed irregularities could be produced by the gradient drift instability.

    Key words: Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities - Radio science (ionospheric physics

  1. Some new features of electron density irregularities over SHAR during strong spread F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Raizada

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available An RH-560 rocket flight was conducted from Sriharikota rocket range (SHAR (14°N, 80°E, dip latitude 5.5°N to study electron density and electric field irregularities during spread F. The rocket was launched at 2130 local time (LT and it attained an apogee of 348 km. Results of electron density fluctuations are presented here. Two extremely sharp layers of very high electron density were observed at 105 and 130 km. The electron density increase in these layers was by a factor of 50 in a vertical extent of 10 km. Large depletions in electron density were observed around 175 and 238 km. Both sharp layers as well as depletions were observed also during the descent. The presence of sharp layers and depletions during the ascent and the descent of the rocket as well as an order of magnitude less electron density, in 150-300 km region during the descent, indicate the presence of strong large-scale horizontal gradients in the electron density. Some of the valley region irregularities (165-178 km, in the intermediate scale size range, observed during this flight, show spectral peaks at 2 km and can be interpreted in terms of the image striation theory suggested by Vickrey et al. The irregularities at 176 km do not exhibit any peak at kilometer scales and appear to be of new type. The growth rate of intermediate scale size irregularities, produced through generalized Rayleigh Taylor instability, was calculated for the 200-330 km altitude, using observed values of electron density gradients and an assumed vertically downward wind of 20 ms-1. These growth rate calculations suggest that the observed irregularities could be produced by the gradient drift instability.Key words: Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities - Radio science (ionospheric physics

  2. Simulations of Nanocrystals Under Pressure: Combining Electronic Enthalpy and Linear-Scaling Density-Functional Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Corsini, NR; Greco, A.; Hine, ND; Molteni, C.; Haynes, PD

    2013-01-01

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simula...

  3. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi?Electron Reaction Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Renjie; Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Wu, Feng; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi?electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in?depth understanding of multi?electron chemistries i...

  4. Electron density and temperature measurements in a laser produced carbon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, S.S.; Bindhu, C.V.; Issac, R.C.; Nampoori, V.P.; Vallabhan, C.P. [Laser Division, International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science Technology, Cochin 682 022 (India)

    1997-09-01

    Plasma generated by fundamental radiation from a Nd:YAG laser focused onto a graphite target is studied spectroscopically. Measured line profiles of several ionic species were used to infer electron temperature and density at several sections located in front of the target surface. Line intensities of successive ionization states of carbon were used for electron temperature calculations. Stark broadened profiles of singly ionized species have been utilized for electron density measurements. Electron density as well as electron temperature were studied as functions of laser irradiance and time elapsed after the incidence of laser pulse. The validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium is discussed in light of the results obtained. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Path integrals for electronic densities, reactivity indices, and localization functions in quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Mihai V

    2009-11-10

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr's quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions - all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems.

  6. First-principle calculation of electrons charge density in the diamond ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . It has been found that in each crystal, the total electrons charge density along the [100] and [010] directions are equal, however, the charge densities at a given distance from the center of the cell along [001] and [100] directions are not exactly

  7. Path Integrals for Electronic Densities, Reactivity Indices, and Localization Functions in Quantum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr’s quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions – all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving many-electronic systems.

  8. High energy density plasma science with an ultrarelativistic electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, C.; Blue, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Dodd, E.; Huang, C.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Wang, S.; Hogan, M. J.; O'Connell, C.; Siemann, R.; Watz, D.; Muggli, P.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.

    2002-05-01

    An intense, high-energy electron or positron beam can have focused intensities rivaling those of today's most powerful laser beams. For example, the 5 ps (full-width, half-maximum), 50 GeV beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at 1 kA and focused to a 3 micron rms spot size gives intensities of >1020 W/cm-2 at a repetition rate of >10 Hz. Unlike a ps or fs laser pulse which interacts with the surface of a solid target, the particle beam can readily tunnel through tens of cm of steel. However, the same particle beam can be manipulated quite effectively by a plasma that is a million times less dense than air! This is because of the incredibly strong collective fields induced in the plasma by the Coulomb force of the beam. The collective fields in turn react back onto the beam leading to many clearly observable phenomena. The beam paraticles can be: (1) Deflected leading to focusing, defocusing, or even steering of the beam; (2) undulated causing the emission of spontaneous betatron x-ray radiation and; (3) accelerated or decelerated by the plasma fields. Using the 28.5 GeV electron beam from the SLAC linac a series of experiments have been carried out that demonstrate clearly many of the above mentioned effects. The results can be compared with theoretical predictions and with two-dimensional and three-dimensional, one-to-one, particle-in-cell code simulations. These phenomena may have practical applications in future technologies including optical elements in particle beam lines, synchrotron light sources, and ultrahigh gradient accelerators.

  9. On the exact formulation of multi-configuration density-functional theory: electron density versus orbitals occupation

    CERN Document Server

    Fromager, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The exact formulation of multi-configuration density-functional theory (DFT) is discussed in this work. As an alternative to range-separated methods, where electron correlation effects are split in the coordinate space, the combination of Configuration Interaction methods with orbital occupation functionals is explored at the formal level through the separation of correlation effects in the orbital space. When applied to model Hamiltonians, this approach leads to an exact Site-Occupation Embedding Theory (SOET). An adiabatic connection expression is derived for the complementary bath functional and a comparison with Density Matrix Embedding Theory (DMET) is made. Illustrative results are given for the simple two-site Hubbard model. SOET is then applied to a quantum chemical Hamiltonian, thus leading to an exact Complete Active Space Site-Occupation Functional Theory (CASSOFT) where active electrons are correlated explicitly within the CAS and the remaining contributions to the correlation energy are described...

  10. A method for estimating the temperature in high energy density free electron laser experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principi, Emiliano, E-mail: emiliano.principi@unicam.i [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Camerino via Madonna delle Carceri, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Ferrante, Carino; Filipponi, Adriano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila, Via Vetoio, I-67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Bencivenga, Filippo; D' Amico, Francesco; Masciovecchio, Claudio [Synchrotron ELETTRA, Strada Statale 14-I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Di Cicco, Andrea [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Camerino via Madonna delle Carceri, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); IMPMC, Universite Paris 6, CNRS, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)

    2010-09-21

    Present and forthcoming free electron laser (FEL) large scale facilities deliver high fluence ultrafast soft and hard X-ray pulses able to create and probe warm dense matter (WDM). Proper diagnostic for basic physical quantities, like temperature and density, is necessary, but the short lifetime of the WDM state (few ps) makes their measurements a challenging task. In this work we propose a method to estimate the WDM temperature using the experimental information from a slow temperature pyrometric probe exploiting the properties of the heat diffusion equation. Numerical simulations show that for typical thin foil samples, a temperature measurement with 1-10{mu}s temporal resolution at the distance of about 300-500{mu}m from the beam center contains sufficient information to retrieve the initial spatial temperature distribution with sufficient accuracy providing information on the temperature reached in the WDM regime. The inversion of the experimental information is obtained by means of a Bayesian approach exploiting a Metropolis Monte Carlo numerical procedure. The model and calculations presented in this work provide the theoretical background for the development of a device for temperature diagnostics of the TIMEX end-station at the Fermi-Elettra FEL facility.

  11. Assessment studies on the inversion of satellite to satellite electron content to obtain electron density profiles in the ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hochegger, G P

    2000-01-01

    The electron content data, obtained by satellite-to-satellite occultations of radio signals can lead to height profiles of electron density by discrete inversion. Since there is no possibility to verify such profiles by means of other measurements (practically never measurements at the same time and same location) it was necessary to simulate occultation scenarios by means of an ionosphere model to obtain a large number of comparisons sufficient for investigations on a statistical basis. The obtained electron contents were inverted and compared with electron density height profiles, obtained with the same ionospheric model for the occultation point. The differences between these profiles were investigated (difference between the F2-peak maxima, the height of the maxima, the shape of the topside and bottom side ionosphere). Since simulations were done for chosen locations (250 randomly spread on the globe) for every month and every second hour and for two solar activity levels (HSA and LSA), a whole year was '...

  12. Experimental evidence that ecological effects of an invasive fish are reduced at high densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornis, Matthew S; Carlson, Jedchada; Lehrer-Brey, Gabrielle; Vander Zanden, M Jake

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the relationship between invasive species density and ecological impact is a pressing topic in ecology, with implications for environmental management and policy. Although it is widely assumed that invasive species impact will increase with density, theory suggests interspecific competition may diminish at high densities due to increased intraspecific interactions. To test this theory, we experimentally examined intra- and interspecific interactions between a globally invasive fish, round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), and three native species at different round goby densities in a tributary of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Eighteen 2.25 m(2) enclosures were stocked with native fish species at natural abundances, while round gobies were stocked at three different densities: 0 m(-2), 2.7 m(-2), and 10.7 m(-2). After 52 days, native fish growth rate was significantly reduced in the low density goby treatment, while growth in the high density goby treatment mirrored the goby-free treatment for two of three native species. Invertebrate density and gut content weight of native fishes did not differ among treatments. Conversely, gut content weight and growth of round gobies were lower in the high goby density treatment, suggesting interactions between round gobies and native fishes are mediated by interference competition amongst gobies. Our experiment provides evidence that invasive species effects may diminish at high densities, possibly due to increased intraspecific interactions. This is consistent with some ecological theory, and cautions against the assumption that invasive species at moderate densities have low impact.

  13. X-ray emission from relativistically moving electron density cusps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kando, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nakamura, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Kawase, K.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Fukuda, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Daito, I.; Kameshima, T.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Daido, H.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Ma, J.; Chen, L.-M.; Ragozin, E. N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Osaka University (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperature of the Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries (Japan); Ludwig-Maximilians-University (Germany); and others

    2012-07-11

    We report on novel methods to generate ultra-short, coherent, X-rays using a laserplasma interaction. Nonlinear interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma creates stable, specific structures such as electron cusps. For example, wake waves excited in an underdense plasma by an intense, short-pulse laser become dense and propagate along with the laser pulse. This is called a relativistic flying mirror. The flying mirror can reflect a counter-propagating laser pulse and directly convert it into high-frequency radiation, with a frequency multiplication factor of {approx} 4{gamma}{sup 2} and pulse shortening with the same factor. After the proof-of-principle experiments, we observed that the photon number generated in the flying mirror is close to the theoretical estimate. We present the details of the experiment in which a 9 TW laser pulse focused into a He gas jet generated the Flying Mirror, which partly reflected a 1 TW pulse, giving up to {approx} 10{sup 10} photons, 60 nJ (1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} photons/sr) in the XUV spectral region (12.8-22 nm).

  14. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudur, Madhu Sudhan Reddy; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-07

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm's accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2  ×  10(-4)), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2  ×  10(-6)) and 282 without density

  15. Experimental Measurements of the Density of States for a Granular Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Thibault; O'Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.

    The vibrational density of states relates the structure and dynamics of materials. Several previous experimental studies have measured the density of states in colloidal glasses and identified an abundance of low energy collective excitations that give rise to anomalous behavior for the shear modulus. However, very few measurements of the density of states have been performed for driven granular materials. We report experimental investigations of the vibrational density of states of a quasi-2D uniformly heated granular crystal below the jamming density. We find that over the range of packing fractions we consider particles do not escape from their cages over the timescale of the measurements. We measure the density of states in two ways: from the power spectrum of the velocity autocorrelation function and the eigenvalues of the covariance matrix of particle displacements. We compare the experimental measurements of the density of states to results obtained from similar measurements on 2D and quasi-2D hard sphere simulations. W. M. Keck Foundation Science and Engineering Grant.

  16. Hot-electron-assisted femtochemistry at surfaces: A time-dependent density functional theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Rubio, Angel; Olsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Using time-evolution time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the adiabatic local-density approximation, we study the interactions between single electrons and molecular resonances at surfaces. Our system is a nitrogen molecule adsorbed on a ruthenium surface. The surface is modeled...... at two levels of approximation, first as a simple external potential and later as a 20-atom cluster. We perform a number of calculations on an electron hitting the adsorbed molecule from inside the surface and establish a picture, where the resonance is being probed by the hot electron. This enables us...

  17. A theoretical-electron-density databank using a model of real and virtual spherical atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassour, Ayoub; Domagala, Slawomir; Guillot, Benoit; Leduc, Theo; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2017-08-01

    A database describing the electron density of common chemical groups using combinations of real and virtual spherical atoms is proposed, as an alternative to the multipolar atom modelling of the molecular charge density. Theoretical structure factors were computed from periodic density functional theory calculations on 38 crystal structures of small molecules and the charge density was subsequently refined using a density model based on real spherical atoms and additional dummy charges on the covalent bonds and on electron lone-pair sites. The electron-density parameters of real and dummy atoms present in a similar chemical environment were averaged on all the molecules studied to build a database of transferable spherical atoms. Compared with the now-popular databases of transferable multipolar parameters, the spherical charge modelling needs fewer parameters to describe the molecular electron density and can be more easily incorporated in molecular modelling software for the computation of electrostatic properties. The construction method of the database is described. In order to analyse to what extent this modelling method can be used to derive meaningful molecular properties, it has been applied to the urea molecule and to biotin/streptavidin, a protein/ligand complex.

  18. The nematicity induced d-symmetry charge density wave in electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chung-Pin; Chen, Hong-Yi; Ting, C. S.

    2018-03-01

    The interplay among the nematicity, the stripe spin-density-wave (SDW) order and superconductivity in iron-pnictides is studied in a self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Our calculations have shown that the nematic-order breaks the degeneracy of dxz and dyz orbitals and causes the elliptic Fermi surface near the Γ point in the normal state. In addition, the appearance of the orthorhombic magnetic fluctuations generates two uneven pairs of peaks at ( ± π, 0) and (0, ± π) in its Fourier transformation. All these are comparing favorably with experimental measurements. In the nematic phase, our results indicate that the charge density and its spatial image in the local density of states exhibit a dx2 -y2-like symmetry. Finally, the complete phase diagram is obtained and the nematic phase is found to be in a narrow region close to the SDW transition in the electron-doped iron-pnictide superconductors.

  19. Exploring electron pair behaviour in chemical bonds using the extracule density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proud, Adam J; Mackenzie, Dalton E C K; Pearson, Jason K

    2015-08-21

    We explore explicit electron pair behaviour within the chemical bond (and lone pairs) by calculating the probability distribution for the center-of-mass (extracule) of an electron pair described by single localized orbitals. Using Edmiston-Ruedenberg localized orbitals in a series of 61 chemical systems, we demonstrate the utility of the extracule density as an interpretive tool in chemistry. By accessing localized regions of chemical space we simplify the interpretation of the extracule density and afford a quantum mechanical interpretation of "chemically intuitive" features of electronic structure. Specifically, we describe the localized effects on chemical bonds due to changes in electronegativities of bonded neighbours, bond strain, and non-covalent interactions. We show that the extracule density offers unique insight into electronic structure and allows one to readily quantify the effects of changing the chemical environment.

  20. Diurnal and seasonal Variability of D-Region Electron Densities at 69°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Werner; Rapp, Markus; Latteck, Ralph; Friedrich, Martin

    Electron densities of the lower ionosphere are estimated with the Saura MF Doppler radar since summer 2004. The radar is located near country-regioncountry-regionAndenes, countryregionNorway (69.3° N, 16.0° E) and operates at 3.17 MHz with a peak power of 116 kW. The narrow beam transmitting/receiving antenna consists of 29 crossed half-wave dipoles arranged as a Mills Cross resulting in a beam width of about 7° . Antenna and transceiver system provide high flexibility in beam forming as well as the capability forming beams with left and right circular polarization at alternate pulses. The experiment utilizes partial reflections of ordinary and extraordinary component waves from scatterers in the altitude range 50-90 km to estimate electron number densities from differential absorption (DAE) and differential phase (DPE) measurements. Height profiles are obtained between about 55 km and 90 km with a time resolution of 9 minutes and a height resolution of 1 km. The electron density profiles independently derived from DAE and DPE measurements are in remarkable good agreement. Electron number densities are given if the results of the DAE and DPE experiments are in agreement within a factor of two. We discuss the diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities obtained at Andenes and the response of D-region electron densities to solar activity storms and geomagnetic disturbances. The radar results are compared with previous rocket-borne radio wave propagation measurements at Andenes as well as with recent co-located simultaneous insitu observations using radio wave propagation experiments (differential absorption and Faraday rotation) which showed good agreement between the two techniques. In addition, monthly mean electron densities obtained with the MF radar are compared the recent dedicated auroral-zone, empirical model IMAZ.

  1. Effect of morphology and defect density on electron transfer of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan, E-mail: yanzhang@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Hao, Huilian, E-mail: huilian.hao@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Linlin, E-mail: wlinlin@mail.ustc.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Different morphologies of ERGO on the surface of GCE were prepared via different methods. • The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. • A higher defect density of ERGO accelerates electron transfer rate. • ERGO with more exposed edge planes shows significantly higher electron transfer kinetics. • Both edge planes and defect density contribute to electron transfer of ERGO. - Abstract: Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) is widely used to construct electrochemical sensors. Understanding the electron transfer behavior of ERGO is essential for its electrode material applications. In this paper, different morphologies of ERGO were prepared via two different methods. Compared to ERGO/GCEs prepared by electrochemical reduction of pre-deposited GO, more exposed edge planes of ERGO are observed on the surface of ERGO-GCE that was constructed by electrophoretic deposition of GO. The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. The electron transfer kinetics (k{sup 0}) of GCE with different ERGOs was comparatively investigated. Owing to increased surface areas and decreased defect density, the k{sup 0} values of ERGO/GCE initially increase and then decrease with incrementing of GO mass. When the morphology and surface real areas of ERGO-GCE are the same, an increased defect density induces an accelerated electron transfer rate. k{sup 0} valuesof ERGO-GCEs are about 1 order of magnitude higher than those of ERGO/GCEs due to the difference in the amount of edge planes. This work demonstrates that both defect densities and edge planes of ERGO play crucial roles in electron transfer kinetics.

  2. Experimental electron binding energies for thulium in different matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoyatov, A.Kh., E-mail: inoyatov@jinr.ru [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Physics, National University, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Kovalík, A. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, CZ-25068 Řež near Prague (Czech Republic); Filosofov, D.V. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ryšavý, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, CZ-25068 Řež near Prague (Czech Republic); Perevoshchikov, L.L.; Yushkevich, Yu.V. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Zbořil, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The thulium L, M, N, O, and P subshell electron binding energies determined. • Five different matrices of the radioactive {sup 169}Yb atoms used in the investigation. • The greatest difference of 4.5 ± 0.1 eV in the average observed between the matrices. • The published N{sub 1}, N{sub 3}, and O{sub 2,3} values found to be higher by about 3 eV. • Natural widths of the thulium K, L, M, N, and O subshells also determined. - Abstract: The L{sub 1}, L{sub 2}, L{sub 3}, M{sub 1}, M{sub 2}, N{sub 1}, N{sub 3}, O{sub 1}, O{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and P{sub 1} subshell electron binding energies (related to the Fermi level) in thulium generated by the electron capture decay of radioactive {sup 169}Yb atoms implanted at 30 keV into polycrystalline platinum and aluminum foils and deposited by vacuum evaporation on surfaces of polycrystalline platinum, carbon, and aluminum foils were determined by the internal conversion electron spectroscopy. The greatest differences in the electron binding energies (4.5 ± 0.1 eV in the average without the P{sub 1} shell and 7.0 ± 0.5 eV for the P{sub 1} shell alone) were found between the matrices of the evaporated ytterbium layer on the aluminum foil and the bulk of the high purity polycrystalline platinum. The thulium electron binding energies in the matrices of the evaporated ytterbium layers on both the platinum and carbon foils and in the aluminum bulk were observed to be the same within the experimental uncertainties. The N{sub 1}, N{sub 3}, and O{sub 2,3} electron binding energies most frequently presented in data compilations were found to be higher by about 3 eV. Natural widths of most of the K, L{sub 1}, L{sub 2}, L{sub 3}, M{sub 1}, M{sub 2}, M{sub 3}, N{sub 1}, N{sub 3}, and O{sub 1} subshells in Tm in the investigated matrices were also determined. No significant differences in the natural widths were found among the matrices. The results obtained demonstrate that the physicochemical surrounding of the

  3. A Transmission Electron Microscope Study of Experimentally Shocked Pregraphitic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A transmission electron microscope study of experimental shock metamorphism in natural pre-graphitic carbon simulates the response of the most common natural carbons to increased shock pressure. The d-spacings of this carbon are insensitive to the shock pressure and have no apparent diagnostic value, but progressive comminution occurs in response to increased shock pressure up to 59.6 GPa. The function, P = 869.1 x (size(sub minimum )(exp -0.83), describes the relationship between the minimum root-mean-square subgrain size (nm) and shock pressure (GPa). While a subgrain texture of natural pregraphitic carbons carries little information when pre-shock textures are unknown, this texture may go unnoticed as a shock metamorphic feature.

  4. Factors Influencing Mean Inner Potentials As Studied Using Electron Holography and Density Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennington, Robert S.

    to analyze diffraction effects on the amplitude and the phase. There is relatively good comparison between image simulation and experimental data, but the experimental absorption parameter is found to differ between strongly and weakly diffracting conditions. Density functional theory simulations of the mean...

  5. Experimental and theoretical charge density distribution of the colossal magnetoresistive transition metal sulfide FeCr2S4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Leonardo; Destro, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    The total charge density distribution ρ(r ) of the colossal magnetoresistive transition metal sulfide FeCr2S4 was evaluated through a multipole formalism from a set of structure factors obtained both experimentally, by means of single crystal high-quality x-ray diffraction data collected at T =23K, and theoretically, with an extended-basis unrestricted Hartree-Fock periodic calculation on the experimental geometry. A full topological analysis, followed by the calculation of local energy density values and net atomic charges, was performed using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The experimental and theoretical results were compared. Good agreement was found for the topological properties of the system, as well as for the atomic net charges and the nature of the chemical bonds. An analysis of the electron density ρ(r ), its Laplacian ∇2[ρ(r)], and the total energy density H(r ) at the bond critical points was employed to classify all the interactions that resulted as predominantly closed shell (ionic) in nature. The topological indicators of the bonded interactions for Fe are distinct from those for Cr. The Fe-S bond distances were found to be 0.145Å shorter than the ideal values computed on the basis of Shannon's crystal radii, much shorter than the Cr-S distances with respect to their ideal Shannon lengths. Concomitantly, ρ(r ) and ∣H(r)∣ at the bond critical points are greater for Fe-S interactions, indicating that the local concentration of charge density in the internuclear region is larger for the tetrahedrally coordinated iron than for the octahedrally coordinated chromium. The isosurface in the real space for ∇2[ρ(r)]=0 was plotted for both iron and chromium, pointing out the local zones of valence shell charge concentration and relating them to the partial d-orbital occupancy of the two transition metal atoms.

  6. Measurements of electron cloud density in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron with the microwave transmission method

    CERN Document Server

    Federmann, S; Mahner, E

    2011-01-01

    The electron cloud effect can pose severe performance limitations in high-energy particle accelerators as the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Mitigation techniques such as vacuum chamber thin film coatings with low secondary electron yields (SEY < 1.3) aim to reduce or even suppress this effect. The microwave transmission method, developed and first applied in 2003 at the SPS, measures the integrated electron cloud density over a long section of an accelerator. This paper summarizes the theory and measurement principle and describes the new SPS microwave transmission setup used to study the electron cloud mitigation of amorphous carbon coated SPS dipole vacuum chambers. Comparative results of carbon coated and bare stainless steel dipole vacuum chambers are given for the beam with nominal LHC 25 ns bunch-to-bunch spacing in the SPS and the electron cloud density is derived.

  7. Examining real-time time-dependent density functional theory nonequilibrium simulations for the calculation of electronic stopping power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Dillon C.; Yao, Yi; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-09-01

    In ion irradiation processes, electronic stopping power describes the energy transfer rate from the irradiating ion to the target material's electrons. Due to the scarcity and significant uncertainties in experimental electronic stopping power data for materials beyond simple solids, there has been growing interest in the use of first-principles theory for calculating electronic stopping power. In recent years, advances in high-performance computing have opened the door to fully first-principles nonequilibrium simulations based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). While it has been demonstrated that the RT-TDDFT approach is capable of predicting electronic stopping power for a wide range of condensed matter systems, there has yet to be an exhaustive examination of the physical and numerical approximations involved and their effects on the calculated stopping power. We discuss the results of such a study for crystalline silicon with protons as irradiating ions. We examine the influences of key approximations in RT-TDDFT nonequilibrium simulations on the calculated electronic stopping power, including approximations related to basis sets, finite size effects, exchange-correlation approximation, pseudopotentials, and more. Finally, we propose a simple and efficient correction scheme to account for the contribution from core-electron excitations to the stopping power, as it was found to be significant for large proton velocities.

  8. Experimental demonstration of one-dimensional active plate-type acoustic metamaterial with adaptive programmable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Ahmed; Elsabbagh, Adel; Akl, Wael

    2017-03-01

    A class of active acoustic metamaterials (AMMs) with a fully controllable effective density in real-time is introduced, modeled, and experimentally verified. The density of the developed AMM can be programmed to any value ranging from -100 kg/m3 to 100 kg/m3 passing by near zero density conditions. This is achievable for any frequency between 500 and 1500 Hz. The material consists of clamped piezoelectric diaphragms with air as the background fluid. The dynamics of the diaphragms are controlled by connecting a closed feedback control loop between the piezoelectric layers of the diaphragm. The density of the material is adjustable through an outer adaptive feedback loop that is implemented by the real-time evaluation of the density using the 4-microphone technique. Applications for the new material include programmable active acoustic filters, nonsymmetric acoustic transmission, and programmable acoustic superlens.

  9. A simple image based method for obtaining electron density and atomic number in dual energy CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Qi, Zhihua; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    The extraction of electron density and atomic number information in computed tomography is possible when image values can be sampled using two different effective energies. The foundation for this extraction lies in the ability to express the linear attenuation coefficient using two basis functions that are dependent on electron density and atomic number over the diagnostic energy range used in CT. Material basis functions separate images into clinically familiar quantities such as 'bone' images and 'soft tissue' images. Physically, all basis function choices represent the expression of the linear attenuation coefficient in terms of a photoelectric and a Compton scattering term. The purpose of this work is to develop a simple dual energy decomposition method that requires no a priori knowledge about the energy characteristics of the imaging system. It is shown that the weighted sum of two basis images yields an electron density image where the weights for each basis image are the electron density of that basis image's basis material. Using the electron density image, effective atomic number information can also be obtained. These methods are performed solely in the image domain and require no spectrum or detector energy response information as required by some other dual energy decomposition methods.

  10. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  11. An experimental field study of delayed density dependence in natural populations of Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael K Walsh

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus, a species known to transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses, is primarily a container-inhabiting mosquito. The potential for pathogen transmission by Ae. albopictus has increased our need to understand its ecology and population dynamics. Two parameters that we know little about are the impact of direct density-dependence and delayed density-dependence in the larval stage. The present study uses a manipulative experimental design, under field conditions, to understand the impact of delayed density dependence in a natural population of Ae. albopictus in Raleigh, North Carolina. Twenty liter buckets, divided in half prior to experimentation, placed in the field accumulated rainwater and detritus, providing oviposition and larval production sites for natural populations of Ae. albopictus. Two treatments, a larvae present and larvae absent treatment, were produced in each bucket. After five weeks all larvae were removed from both treatments and the buckets were covered with fine mesh cloth. Equal numbers of first instars were added to both treatments in every bucket. Pupae were collected daily and adults were frozen as they emerged. We found a significant impact of delayed density-dependence on larval survival, development time and adult body size in containers with high larval densities. Our results indicate that delayed density-dependence will have negative impacts on the mosquito population when larval densities are high enough to deplete accessible nutrients faster than the rate of natural food accumulation.

  12. Laser Thomson scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in a hall-effect plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washeleski, Robert L.

    Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) are compact electric propulsion devices with high specific impulse used for a variety of space propulsion applications. HET technology is well developed but the electron properties in the discharge are not completely understood, mainly due to the difficulty involved in performing accurate measurements in the discharge. Measurements of electron temperature and density have been performed using electrostatic probes, but presence of the probes can significantly disrupt thruster operation, and thus alter the electron temperature and density. While fast-probe studies have expanded understanding of HET discharges, a non-invasive method of measuring the electron temperature and density in the plasma is highly desirable. An alternative to electrostatic probes is a non-perturbing laser diagnostic technique that measures Thomson scattering from the plasma. Thomson scattering is the process by which photons are elastically scattered from the free electrons in a plasma. Since the electrons have thermal energy their motion causes a Doppler shift in the scattered photons that is proportional to their velocity. Like electrostatic probes, laser Thomson scattering (LTS) can be used to determine the temperature and density of free electrons in the plasma. Since Thomson scattering measures the electron velocity distribution function directly no assumptions of the plasma conditions are required, allowing accurate measurements in anisotropic and non-Maxwellian plasmas. LTS requires a complicated measurement apparatus, but has the potential to provide accurate, non-perturbing measurements of electron temperature and density in HET discharges. In order to assess the feasibility of LTS diagnostics on HETs non-invasive measurements of electron temperature and density in the near-field plume of a Hall thruster were performed using a custom built laser Thomson scattering diagnostic. Laser measurements were processed using a maximum likelihood estimation method

  13. Creation and diagnosis of a solid-density plasma with an X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinko, S M; Ciricosta, O; Cho, B I; Engelhorn, K; Chung, H-K; Brown, C R D; Burian, T; Chalupský, J; Falcone, R W; Graves, C; Hájková, V; Higginbotham, A; Juha, L; Krzywinski, J; Lee, H J; Messerschmidt, M; Murphy, C D; Ping, Y; Scherz, A; Schlotter, W; Toleikis, S; Turner, J J; Vysin, L; Wang, T; Wu, B; Zastrau, U; Zhu, D; Lee, R W; Heimann, P A; Nagler, B; Wark, J S

    2012-01-25

    Matter with a high energy density (>10(5) joules per cm(3)) is prevalent throughout the Universe, being present in all types of stars and towards the centre of the giant planets; it is also relevant for inertial confinement fusion. Its thermodynamic and transport properties are challenging to measure, requiring the creation of sufficiently long-lived samples at homogeneous temperatures and densities. With the advent of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser, high-intensity radiation (>10(17) watts per cm(2), previously the domain of optical lasers) can be produced at X-ray wavelengths. The interaction of single atoms with such intense X-rays has recently been investigated. An understanding of the contrasting case of intense X-ray interaction with dense systems is important from a fundamental viewpoint and for applications. Here we report the experimental creation of a solid-density plasma at temperatures in excess of 10(6) kelvin on inertial-confinement timescales using an X-ray free-electron laser. We discuss the pertinent physics of the intense X-ray-matter interactions, and illustrate the importance of electron-ion collisions. Detailed simulations of the interaction process conducted with a radiative-collisional code show good qualitative agreement with the experimental results. We obtain insights into the evolution of the charge state distribution of the system, the electron density and temperature, and the timescales of collisional processes. Our results should inform future high-intensity X-ray experiments involving dense samples, such as X-ray diffractive imaging of biological systems, material science investigations, and the study of matter in extreme conditions.

  14. Spatial profiles of electron and metastable atom densities in positive polarity fast ionization waves sustained in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weatherford, Brandon R., E-mail: brweathe@gmail.com, E-mail: zax@esi-group.com, E-mail: evbarna@sandia.gov, E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Barnat, E. V., E-mail: brweathe@gmail.com, E-mail: zax@esi-group.com, E-mail: evbarna@sandia.gov, E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1423 (United States); Xiong, Zhongmin, E-mail: brweathe@gmail.com, E-mail: zax@esi-group.com, E-mail: evbarna@sandia.gov, E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu; Kushner, Mark J., E-mail: brweathe@gmail.com, E-mail: zax@esi-group.com, E-mail: evbarna@sandia.gov, E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122, USA. (United States)

    2014-09-14

    Fast ionization waves (FIWs), often generated with high voltage pulses over nanosecond timescales, are able to produce large volumes of ions and excited states at moderate pressures. The mechanisms of FIW propagation were experimentally and computationally investigated to provide insights into the manner in which these large volumes are excited. The two-dimensional structure of electron and metastable densities produced by short-pulse FIWs sustained in helium were measured using laser-induced fluorescence and laser collision-induced fluorescence diagnostics for times of 100–120 ns after the pulse, as the pressure was varied from 1 to 20 Torr. A trend of center-peaked to volume-filling to wall-peaked electron density profiles was observed as the pressure was increased. Instantaneous FIW velocities, obtained from plasma-induced emission, ranged from 0.1 to 3×10⁹cm s⁻¹, depending on distance from the high voltage electrode and pressure. Predictions from two-dimensional modeling of the propagation of a single FIW correlated well with the experimental trends in electron density profiles and wave velocity. Results from the model show that the maximum ionization rate occurs in the wavefront, and the discharge continues to propagate forward after the removal of high voltage from the powered electrode due to the potential energy stored in the space charge. As the pressure is varied, the radial distribution of the ionization rate is shaped by changes in the electron mean free path, and subsequent localized electric field enhancement at the walls or on the centerline of the discharge.

  15. Electron density and temperature diagnostics in laser-induced hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, G.; Parigger, C. G.

    2017-02-01

    Laser-induced optical breakdown is achieved by using Q-switched, Nd:YAG radiation focused into ultra-high-purity (UHP) hydrogen gas at a pressure of 1.08 ± 0.03 × 105 Pa inside a cell. The plasma emission spectra are dispersed by a Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and detected with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD). Stark-broadened hydrogen Balmer series H α and Hβ line profiles are used as a spectroscopic tool for the determination of electron density and excitation temperature. Spatial variation of electron density and temperature at 0.40 µs are extracted from the recorded intensities of H α and Hβ lines. Temporal variations of electron density and excitation temperature are also presented for the time delay range of 0.15 µs to 1.4 µs.

  16. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  17. Electron density increases due to Lightning activity as deduced from LWPC code and VLF signal perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samir, Nait Amor; Bouderba, Yasmina

    VLF signal perturbations in association with thunderstorm activity appear as changes in the signal amplitude and phase. Several papers reported on the characteristics of thus perturbations and their connection to the lightning strokes amplitude and polarity. In this contribution, we quantified the electrons density increases due to lightning activity by the use of the LWPC code and VLF signal perturbations parameters. The method is similar to what people did in studying the solar eruptions effect. the results showed that the reference height (h') decreased to lower altitudes (between 70 and 80 km). From the LWPC code results the maximum of the electron density was then deduced. Therefore, a numerical simulation of the atmospheric species times dependences was performed to study the recovery times of the electrons density at different heights. The results showed that the recovery time last for several minutes and explain the observation of long recovery Early signal perturbations.

  18. Time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems interacting with cavity photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokatly, I V

    2013-06-07

    Time-dependent (current) density functional theory for many-electron systems strongly coupled to quantized electromagnetic modes of a microcavity is proposed. It is shown that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic (current) density and the expectation values of photonic coordinates. The Kohn-Sham system is constructed, which allows us to calculate the above basic variables by solving self-consistent equations for noninteracting particles. We suggest possible approximations for the exchange-correlation potentials and discuss implications of this approach for the theory of open quantum systems. In particular we show that it naturally leads to time-dependent density functional theory for systems coupled to the Caldeira-Leggett bath.

  19. Spatial distribution of electrons near the Fermi level in the metallic LaB6 through accurate X-ray charge density study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Hidetaka; Nishibori, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    Charge densities of iso-structural metal hexaborides, a transparent metal LaB6 and a semiconductor BaB6, have been determined using the d > 0.22 Å ultra-high resolution synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction data by a multipole refinement and a maximum entropy method (MEM). The quality of the experimental charge densities was evaluated by comparison with theoretical charge densities. The strong inter-octahedral and relatively weak intra-octahedral boron-boron bonds were observed in the charge densities. A difference of valence charge densities between LaB6 and BaB6 was calculated to reveal a small difference between isostructural metal and semiconductor. The weak electron lobes distributed around the inter B6 octahedral bond were observed in the difference density. We found the electron lobes are the conductive π-electrons in LaB6 from the comparison with the theoretical valence charge density. We successfully observed a spatial distribution of electrons near the Fermi level from the X-ray charge density study of the series of iso-structural solids.

  20. Plasma density transition trapping as a possible high-brightness electron beam source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Thompson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma density transition trapping is a recently proposed self-injection scheme for plasma wakefield accelerators. This technique uses a sharp downward plasma density transition to trap and accelerate background plasma electrons in a plasma wakefield. This paper examines the quality of electron beams captured using this scheme in terms of emittance, energy spread, and brightness. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that these parameters can be optimized by manipulating the plasma density profile. We also develop, and support with simulations, a set of scaling laws that predicts how the brightness of transition trapping beams scales with the plasma density of the system. These scaling laws indicate that transition trapping can produce beams with brightness ≥5×10^{14}   A/(mrad^{2}. A proof-of-principle transition trapping experiment is planned for the near future. The proposed experiment is described in detail.

  1. Electron density and temperature determination in a Tokamak plasma using light scattering; Determinacion de la densidad y temperatura electronicas en un Tokamak mediante difusion luminosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Navarro Gomerz, A.; Zurro Hernandez, B.

    1976-07-01

    A theoretical foundation review for light scattering by plasmas is presented. Furthermore, we have included a review of the experimental methods for electron density and temperature measurements, with spatial and time resolution, in a Tokamak plasma using spectral analysis of the scattered radiation. (Author) 13 refs.

  2. Determination of effective atomic number and electron density of heavy metal oxide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A. M.; El-Khayatt, A. M.; Akkurt, I.

    2016-03-01

    The effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron density (Neff) of eight heavy metal oxide (HMO) glasses have been determined using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP for the energy range of 10 keV-10 MeV. The interpolation method was employed to extract Zeff and Neff values from the simulation and that calculated with the help of XCOM program. Comparisons are also made with predictions from the Auto-Zeff software in the same energy region. Wherever possible, the simulated values of Zeff and Neff are compared with experimental data. In general, a very good agreement was noticed. It was found that the Zeff and Neff vary with photon energy and do not have extended intermediate regions where Compton scattering is truly dominating; only dips slightly above ∼1.5 MeV were recorded. Zeff and Neff are found to increase with PbO and Bi2O3 contents. It was found that the Zeff value rather than the Neff value is a better indicator for PbO and/or Bi2O3 contents.

  3. Experimental evidence that density dependence strongly influences plant invasions through fragmented landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2018-01-20

    Populations of range expanding species encounter patches of both favorable and unfavorable habitat as they spread across landscapes. Theory shows that increasing patchiness slows the spread of populations modeled with continuously varying population density when dispersal is not influence by the environment or individual behavior. However, as is found in uniformly favorable landscapes, spread remains driven by fecundity and dispersal from low density individuals at the invasion front. In contrast, when modeled populations are composed of discrete individuals, patchiness causes populations to build up to high density before dispersing past unsuitable habitat, introducing an important influence of density dependence on spread velocity. To test the hypothesized interaction between habitat patchiness and density dependence, we simultaneously manipulated these factors in a greenhouse system of annual plants spreading through replicated experimental landscapes. We found that increasing the size of gaps and amplifying the strength of density dependence both slowed spread velocity, but contrary to predictions, the effect of amplified density dependence was similar across all landscape types. Our results demonstrate that the discrete nature of individuals in spreading populations has a strong influence on how both landscape patchiness and density dependence influence spread through demographic and dispersal stochasticity. Both finiteness and landscape structure should be critical components to theoretical predictions of future spread for range expanding native species or invasive species colonizing new habitat. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. Natural dye extracted from karkadah and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells: experimental and density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, S M; Soliman, K A

    2016-02-01

    This work presents an experimental and theoretical study of cyanidin natural dye as a sensitizer for ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells. ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using ammonia and oxalic acid as a capping agent. The calculated average size of the synthesized ZnO with different capping agents was found to be 32.1 nm. Electronic properties of cyanidin and delphinidin dye were studied using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT with a B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level. By comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data, the cyanidin dye can be used as a sensitizer in dye-sensitized solar cells. An efficiency of 0.006% under an AM-1.5 illumination at 100  mW/cm(2) was attained. The influence of dye adsorption time on the solar cell performance is discussed.

  5. Structural, electronic, mechanical and quantum transport of ultrathin gold nanowire: A density functional approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariwala, P. H.; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2017-06-01

    We have scrutinized the gold (Au) nanowires with distinct cross-section with 1-10 Au atoms for each unit cell by density-functional approach and performed first-principles computation. Here, we have investigated structural, electronic, transport and mechanical characteristic of Au nanowires. The structural characteristic of cubic bulk and nanowires of Au are very diverse from each other. The electronic density of state (DOS) and band structures of different formations express that all the nanowires are very good conductor in nature. The figure of conduction channels leans on number of atoms for each unit cell, diameter and structure of nanowires. We also inspect that the electronic thermal conductivities dependency on the temperature and we found that all the considered AuNWs have low conductivity than that of the bulk Au. Our results show that AuNWs have potential application in electronic devices like nanoelectro-mechanical systems (NEMS).

  6. Feasibility Studies of the Two Filters Method in TJ-II for Electron Temperature Measurements in High Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baiao, D.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Varandas, C.

    2009-07-01

    The TJ-II plasma soft X-ray emission was studied in order to establish an adequate setup for an electron temperature diagnostic suitable for high density, with spatial and temporal resolutions, based on the two-filters method. The preliminary experimental results reported were obtained with two diagnostics (an X-ray PHA based on a Ge detector and a tomography system) already installed in TJ-II stellarator. These results lead to the conclusion that the two-filters method was a suitable option for an electron temperature diagnostic for high-density plasmas in TJ-II. We present the design and fi rst results obtained with a prototype for the measurement of electron temperature in TJ-II plasmas heated with energetic neutral beams. This system consists in two AXUV20A detectors which measure the soft X-ray plasma emissivity trough beryllium filters of different thickness. From the two-filters technique it is possible to estimate the electron temperature. The analyses carried out allowed concluding which filter thicknesses are most suited for TJ-II plasmas, and enhanced the need of a computer code to simulate signals and plasma compositions. (Author) 7 refs.

  7. Dynamics of the spatial electron density distribution of EUV-induced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Osorio, E. A.; Banine, V. Y.

    2015-11-01

    We studied the temporal evolution of the electron density distribution in a low pressure pulsed plasma induced by high energy extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons using microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy (MCRS). In principle, MCRS only provides space averaged information about the electron density. However, we demonstrate here the possibility to obtain spatial information by combining multiple resonant modes. It is shown that EUV-induced plasmas, albeit being a rather exotic plasma, can be explained by known plasma physical laws and processes. Two stages of plasma behaviour are observed: first the electron density distribution contracts, after which it expands. It is shown that the contraction is due to cooling of the electrons. The moment when the density distribution starts to expand is related to the inertia of the ions. After tens of microseconds, the electrons reached the wall of the cavity. The speed of this expansion is dependent on the gas pressure and can be divided into two regimes. It is shown that the acoustic dominated regime the expansion speed is independent of the gas pressure and that in the diffusion dominated regime the expansion depends reciprocal on the gas pressure.

  8. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi‐Electron Reaction Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi‐electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in‐depth understanding of multi‐electron chemistries in terms of the charge transfer mechanisms occuring during their electrochemical processes is necessary and urgent for the modification of secondary battery materials and development of secondary battery systems. In this Review, multi‐electron chemistry for high energy density electrode materials and the corresponding secondary battery systems are discussed. Specifically, four battery systems based on multi‐electron reactions are classified in this review: lithium‐ and sodium‐ion batteries based on monovalent cations; rechargeable batteries based on the insertion of polyvalent cations beyond those of alkali metals; metal–air batteries, and Li–S batteries. It is noted that challenges still exist in the development of multi‐electron chemistries that must be overcome to meet the energy density requirements of different battery systems, and much effort has more effort to be devoted to this. PMID:27840796

  9. Advanced High Energy Density Secondary Batteries with Multi-Electron Reaction Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renjie; Luo, Rui; Huang, Yongxin; Wu, Feng; Li, Li

    2016-10-01

    Secondary batteries have become important for smart grid and electric vehicle applications, and massive effort has been dedicated to optimizing the current generation and improving their energy density. Multi-electron chemistry has paved a new path for the breaking of the barriers that exist in traditional battery research and applications, and provided new ideas for developing new battery systems that meet energy density requirements. An in-depth understanding of multi-electron chemistries in terms of the charge transfer mechanisms occuring during their electrochemical processes is necessary and urgent for the modification of secondary battery materials and development of secondary battery systems. In this Review, multi-electron chemistry for high energy density electrode materials and the corresponding secondary battery systems are discussed. Specifically, four battery systems based on multi-electron reactions are classified in this review: lithium- and sodium-ion batteries based on monovalent cations; rechargeable batteries based on the insertion of polyvalent cations beyond those of alkali metals; metal-air batteries, and Li-S batteries. It is noted that challenges still exist in the development of multi-electron chemistries that must be overcome to meet the energy density requirements of different battery systems, and much effort has more effort to be devoted to this.

  10. Electronic Properties of Antiperovskite Materials from State-of-the-Art Density Functional Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal, M.; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Ahmad, Rashid; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    We present a review on the research developments on the theoretical electronic properties of the antiperovskite materials. The antiperovskite materials have perovskite type structure with the positions of cations and anions interchanged. The electronic structures are used to explain different physical properties of materials; therefore it is crucial to understand band structures and densities of states of materials for their effective use in technology. The theoretical results of ...

  11. Development and application of diagnostic instrumentation for measurement of electron density and conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, L.E.

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of this contract was to assemble and demonstrate in the laboratory a Faraday rotation system for measurement of electron density and conductivity, with the intent to produce a system suitable for diagnostic support of the development of pulsed, space-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power systems. Two system configurations were tested: (1) a rotating polarizer and (2) a beam splitting polarizer. Due to the short path length plasma produced in the laboratory flame, the long wavelength 496 {mu}m methyl fluoride laser line was used and only the more sensitive rotating polarizer configuration was used for the demonstration experiments. Electron number densities from 2 {times} 10{sup 19} to 9 {times} 10{sup 19} were measured with good agreement to statistical equilibrium (Saha) calculations using emission absorption-measured flame temperatures and neutral seed atom number seed atom nuclear densities. The electron collision frequencies were measured by transmission measurements. Combining these two measurements gave measured electron conductivities of between 4 and 12 mohs/m. These results compared reasonably well with those found with an electron collision frequency model combined with chemical equilibrium calculations and the emission absorption measurements. Ellipticity measurements of electron collision frequency were not possible due to the short path length of the laboratory plasma. 46 refs., 25 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. One-electron reduced density matrices of strongly correlated harmonium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2015-03-21

    Explicit asymptotic expressions are derived for the reduced one-electron density matrices (the 1-matrices) of strongly correlated two- and three-electron harmonium atoms in the ground and first excited states. These expressions, which are valid at the limit of small confinement strength ω, yield electron densities and kinetic energies in agreement with the published values. In addition, they reveal the ω(5/6) asymptotic scaling of the exchange components of the electron-electron repulsion energies that differs from the ω(2/3) scaling of their Coulomb and correlation counterparts. The natural orbitals of the totally symmetric ground state of the two-electron harmonium atom are found to possess collective occupancies that follow a mixed power/Gaussian dependence on the angular momentum in variance with the simple power-law prediction of Hill's asymptotics. Providing rigorous constraints on energies as functionals of 1-matrices, these results are expected to facilitate development of approximate implementations of the density matrix functional theory and ensure their proper description of strongly correlated systems.

  13. Absolute experimental cross sections for the electron impact ionization of rubidium. Technical summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.W.; Feeney, R.K.

    1980-03-31

    The absolute cross sections for the double, triple, and quadruple ionization of Rb/sup +/ ions by electron impact have been measured from below their respective thresholds to approximately 3000 eV. This determination has been accomplished using a crossed beam facility in which monoenergetic beams of ions and electrons are caused to intersect at right angles in a well-defined collision volume. Multiply charged, product ions born as a result of the electron impact are deflected into their respective detectors by cascaded electrostatic analyzers. The multiply charged beam current component is measured by means of a vibrating reed electrometer operating in the rate-of-charge mode. The required singly charged rubidium ions are produced in a thermionic ion source and pass through a series of focusing, collimating and deflecting structures before entering the interaction region. A thermionically generated, rectangular electron beam intercepts the target ions in a spatially designated collision volume. Just prior to entering this interaction region the two beams can be made to pass through a movable slit scanner which determines their spatial profiles. The various charged particle currents, energies and beam current density distributions represent the experimental data from which the desired absolute cross sections have been determined. The results obtained with this technique are compared with available theoretical predictions of the appropriate cross sections.

  14. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. 2: Experimental support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    The microscopic characteristics of the Coulomb cross section show that there are three natural subpopulations for plasma electrons: the subthermals with local kinetic energy E kT sub c; the transthermals with kT sub c E 7 kT sub c and the extrathermals E 7 kT sub c. Data from three experimental groups on three different spacecraft in the interplanetary medium over a radial range are presented to support the five interrelations projected between solar wind electron properties and changes in the interplanetary medium: (1) subthermals respond primarily to local changes (compression and rarefactions) in stream dynamics; (2) the extrathermal fraction of the ambient electron density should be anti-correlated with the asymptotic bulk speed; (3) the extrathermal "temperature" should be anti-correlated with the local wind speed at 1 AU; (4) the heat flux carried by electrons should be anti-correlated with the local bulk speed; and (5) the extrathermal differential 'temperature' should be nearly independent of radius within 1 AU.

  15. Probing the electron density in HiPIMS plasmas by target inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecimovic, Ante; Held, Julian; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Breilmann, Wolfgang; Maszl, Christian; von Keudell, Achim

    2017-12-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is a versatile technology to deposit thin films with superior properties. During HiPIMS, the power is applied in short pulses of the order of 100 μs at power densities of kW cm-2 to a magnetron target creating a torus shaped dynamic high density plasma. This plasma torus is not homogeneous, but individual ionization zones become visible, which rotate along the torus with velocities of 10 km s-1 . Up to now, however, any direct measurement of the electron density inside these rotating ionization zones is missing. Here, we probe the electron density by measuring the target current locally by using small inserts embedded in an aluminium target facing the plasma torus. By applying simple sheath theory, a plasma density of the order of 1019 m-3 at the sheath edge can be inferred. The plasma density increases with increasing target current. In addition, the dynamics of the local target current variation is consistent with the dynamics of the traveling ionization zone causing a modulation of the local current density by 25%.

  16. Relationships between electron density, height and sub-peak ionospheric thickness in the night equatorial ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. W. Lynn

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The development and decay of the southern equatorial anomaly night-time peak in electron density as seen at a number of ionosonde reflection points extending from New Guinea and Indonesia into northern Australia was examined in terms of the characteristic rise and fall in height associated with the sunset ionisation-drift vortex at the magnetic equator. The observations relate to measurements made in November 1997. Following sunset, the ionospheric profile was observed to narrow as the maximum electron density increased during a fall in height that took the peak of the layer at Vanimo and Sumedang down to some 240 km. The fall was followed by a strong rise in which the electron density sub-peak profile expanded from a slab width (as given by POLAN of 20 km to over 100km with no corresponding change in peak electron density. The post-sunset equatorial fall in height and associated changes in profile density and thickness continued to be seen with diminishing amplitude and increasing local time delay in moving from the anomaly peak at Vanimo to the southernmost site of observation at Townsville. Secondary events on a lesser scale sometimes occurred later in the night and may provide evidence of the multiple vortices suggested by Kudeki and Bhattacharyya (1999. Doppler measurements of vertical velocity as seen at Sumedang in Java are compared with the observed changes in electron density profile in the post-sunset period. The normal post-sunset variation in ionospheric parameters was disrupted on the night of 7 November, the night before a negative ionospheric storm was observed.

  17. Ultraviolet Thomson Scattering from Two-Plasmon-Decay Driven Electron Plasma Waves at Quarter-Critical Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, R. K.; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Myatt, J. F.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2013-10-01

    Thomson scattering (TS) was used to probe electron plasma waves (EPW's) driven by the two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability near quarter-critical density. TPD-driven EPW's were observed at densities consistent with the common-wave TPD model. Five laser beams (λ3ω = 351nm) produced 400- μm-diam (FWHM) laser spots with overlapped intensities up to 3 ×1014W/cm2 . A 263-nm TS beam was used to probe densities ranging from 0.18 to 0.26 nc, where nc is the critical density for 351-nm light. The experimental geometry was chosen to match the five-beam TPD common wave k vector. The TS spectrum shows a large amplitude, narrow (~1.6-nm FHWM) feature centered around 423.4 nm. This wavelength corresponds to scattering from EPW's with a normalized wave vector k / k3 ω = 1 . 3 , a density of ne/nc = 0.243, and a temperature of Te = 2 keV. This is consistent with the predicted values given by the dispersion relations and TPD maximum growth hyperbola. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Mechanisms of the electron density depletion in the SAR arc region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the measurements of electron density and temperature and the integral airglow intensity at 630 nm in the SAR arc region and slightly south of this (obtained by the Isis 2 spacecraft during the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm, with the model results obtained using the time dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth\\'s ionosphere and plasmasphere. The explicit expression in the third Enskog approximation for the electron thermal conductivity coefficient in the multicomponent mixture of ionized gases and a simplified calculation method for this coefficient presents an opportunity to calculate more exactly the electron temperature and density and 630 nm emission within SAR arc region are used in the model. Collisions between N2 and hot thermal electrons in the SAR arc region produce vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules. It appears that the loss rate of O+(4S due to reactions with the vibrationally excited nitrogen is enough to explain electron density depression by a factor of two at F-region heights and the topside ionosphere density variations within the SAR arc if the erosion of plasma within geomagnetic field tubes, during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm and subsequent filling of geomagnetic tubes during the recovery phase, are considered. To explain the disagreement by a factor 1.5 between the observed and modeled SAR arc electron densities an additional plasma drift velocity ~–30 m s–1 in the ion continuity equations is needed during the recovery phase. This additional plasma drift velocity is likely caused by the transition from convecting to corotating flux tubes on the equatorward wall of the trough. The electron densities and temperatures and 630 nm integral intensity at the SAR arc and slightly south of this region as measured for the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm were correctly described by the model without perpendicular electric fields. Within this model framework the effect of the

  19. Mechanisms of the electron density depletion in the SAR arc region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    Full Text Available This study compares the measurements of electron density and temperature and the integral airglow intensity at 630 nm in the SAR arc region and slightly south of this (obtained by the Isis 2 spacecraft during the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm, with the model results obtained using the time dependent one-dimensional mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere. The explicit expression in the third Enskog approximation for the electron thermal conductivity coefficient in the multicomponent mixture of ionized gases and a simplified calculation method for this coefficient presents an opportunity to calculate more exactly the electron temperature and density and 630 nm emission within SAR arc region are used in the model. Collisions between N2 and hot thermal electrons in the SAR arc region produce vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules. It appears that the loss rate of O+(4S due to reactions with the vibrationally excited nitrogen is enough to explain electron density depression by a factor of two at F-region heights and the topside ionosphere density variations within the SAR arc if the erosion of plasma within geomagnetic field tubes, during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm and subsequent filling of geomagnetic tubes during the recovery phase, are considered. To explain the disagreement by a factor 1.5 between the observed and modeled SAR arc electron densities an additional plasma drift velocity ~–30 m s–1 in the ion continuity equations is needed during the recovery phase. This additional plasma drift velocity is likely caused by the transition from convecting to corotating flux tubes on the equatorward wall of the trough. The electron densities and temperatures and 630 nm integral intensity at the SAR arc and slightly south of this region as measured for the 18 December 1971 magnetic storm were correctly described by the model without perpendicular electric fields

  20. Experimental evidence for density-dependent responses to mortality of snake-necked turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordham, Damien A; Georges, Arthur; Brook, Barry W

    2009-03-01

    Density-dependent compensation has rarely been demonstrated in long-lived vertebrates in highly variable environments, such as the wet-dry tropics, where complex factors impact on vital rates. We used an experimental manipulation of population density in six replicated wild populations of the northern snake-necked turtle (Chelodina rugosa). We show that this species can rebound rapidly following reductions in density, and so is resilient to harvest and predation by pigs. Remarkably, in some populations, turtle abundance took as little as 1 year to recover from a strong negative perturbation (>50% experimental population reduction) in adult density. This was achieved through an increase in hatchling recruitment and survival into larger size classes. Our manipulative experiments, viewed concomitantly with previous experimental and correlative research, challenge the general perceptions that freshwater turtles universally are highly susceptible to any form of off-take and that high sub-adult and adult survival is crucial for achieving long-term population stability in freshwater turtles generally. In the case of C. rugosa, such generalities would produce overly cautious prescriptions for sustainable management.

  1. Size dependent electronic properties of silicon quantum dots-An analysis with hybrid, screened hybrid and local density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, D.; Wang, X.; Lomakin, V.; Boag, A.; Jain, M.; Natan, A.

    2017-12-01

    We use an efficient projection scheme for the Fock operator to analyze the size dependence of silicon quantum dots (QDs) electronic properties. We compare the behavior of hybrid, screened hybrid and local density functionals as a function of the dot size up to ∼800 silicon atoms and volume of up to ∼20 nm3. This allows comparing the calculations of hybrid and screened hybrid functionals to experimental results over a wide range of QD sizes. We demonstrate the size dependent behavior of the band gap, density of states, ionization potential and HOMO level shift after ionization. We also demonstrate how the use of Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) can further accelerate such calculations.

  2. Consistent Atomic Geometries and Electronic Structure of Five Phases of Potassium Niobate from Density-Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform a comprehensive theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of potassium niobate (KNbO3 in the cubic, tetragonal, orthorhombic, monoclinic, and rhombohedral phase, based on density-functional theory. The influence of different parametrizations of the exchange-correlation functional on the investigated properties is analyzed in detail, and the results are compared to available experimental data. We argue that the PBEsol and AM05 generalized gradient approximations as well as the RTPSS meta-generalized gradient approximation yield consistently accurate structural data for both the external and internal degrees of freedom and are overall superior to the local-density approximation or other conventional generalized gradient approximations for the structural characterization of KNbO3. Band-structure calculations using a HSE-type hybrid functional further indicate significant near degeneracies of band-edge states in all phases which are expected to be relevant for the optical response of the material.

  3. Electron acceleration by a radially polarized laser pulse during ionization of low density gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwar Pal Singh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration of electrons by a radially polarized intense laser pulse has been studied. The axial electric field of the laser is responsible for electron acceleration. The axial electric field increases with decreasing laser spot size; however, the laser pulse gets defocused sooner for smaller values and the electrons do not experience high electric field for long, reducing the energy they can reach. The electron remains confined in the electric field of the laser for longer and the electron energy peaks for the normalized laser spot size nearly equal to the normalized laser intensity parameter. Electron energy peaks for initial laser phase ϕ_{0}=π due to accelerating laser phase and decreases with transverse initial position of the electrons. The energy and angle of the emittance spectrum of the electrons generated during ionization of krypton and argon at low densities have been obtained and a right choice of laser parameters has been suggested to obtain high energy quasimonoenergetic collimated electron beams. It has been found that argon is more suitable than krypton to obtain high energy electron beams due to higher ionization potential of inner shells for the former.

  4. Density of one-particle states for 2-D electron gas in magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubrovskyi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The density of states of a particle in a 2-D area is independent both of the energy and form of the area only at the region of large values of energy. If energy is small, the density of states in the rectangular potential well essentially depends on the form of the area. If the bottom of the potential well has a potential relief, it can define the small eigenvalues as the discrete levels. In this case, dimensions and form of the area would not have any importance. If the conservation of zero value of the angular momentum is taken into account, the effective one-particle Hamiltonian for the 2-D electron gas in the magnetic field in the circle is the Hamiltonian with the parabolic potential and the reflecting bounds. It is supposed that in the square, the Hamiltonian has the same view. The 2-D density of states in the square can be computed as the convolution of 1-D densities. The density of one-particle states for 2-D electron gas in the magnetic field is obtained. It consists of three regions. There is a discrete spectrum at the smallest energy. In the intervening region the density of states is the sum of the piecewise continuous function and the density of the discrete spectrum. At great energies, the density of states is a continuous function. The Fermi energy dependence on the magnetic field is obtained when the field is small and the Fermi energy is located in the region of continuous spectrum. The Fermi energy oscillates and in the average it increases proportionally to the square of the magnetic induction. Total energy of electron gas in magnetic field also oscillates and increases when the magnetic field increases monotonously.

  5. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams production in a sharp density transition

    CERN Document Server

    Fourmaux, S; Lassonde, P; Corde, S; Lebrun, G; Malka, V; Rousse, A; Kieffer, J C; 10.1063/1.4752114

    2012-01-01

    Using a laser plasma accelerator, experiments with a 80 TW and 30 fs laser pulse demonstrated quasi-monoenergetic electron spectra with maximum energy over 0.4 GeV. This is achieved using a supersonic He gas jet and a sharp density ramp generated by a high intensity laser crossing pre-pulse focused 3 ns before the main laser pulse. By adjusting this crossing pre-pulse position inside the gas jet, among the laser shots with electron injection more than 40% can produce quasi-monoenergetic spectra. This could become a relatively straight forward technique to control laser wakefield electron beams parameters.

  6. Low-latitude Model Electron Density Profiles using the IRI and CCIR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... electron density profiles under different solar-geophysical conditions are highlighted. The need for additional ionosonde stations in the African sector in order to incorporate the results of studies on equatorial anomaly into the models is emphasized. Nigeria Journal of Pure and Applied Physics VOLUME 1, AUGUST 2000, ...

  7. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Men

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned twice with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively. The data were decomposed into projections of the two basis material coefficients according to the model set up earlier. The two sets of decomposed projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images of the basis material coefficients. Then, the images of electron densities were calculated with these CBCT images. Results. The difference between the calculated and theoretical values was within 2% and the correlation coefficient of them was about 1.0. The dual energy imaging method obtained more accurate electron density values and reduced the beam hardening artifacts obviously. Conclusion. A novel dual energy CBCT imaging method to calculate the electron densities was developed. It can acquire more accurate values and provide a platform potentially for dose calculation.

  8. Quantum electrodynamical time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanehpour, Mehdi; Tokatly, Ilya; Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group; ETSF Scientific Development Centre Team

    2015-03-01

    We present a rigorous formulation of the time-dependent density functional theory for interacting lattice electrons strongly coupled to cavity photons. We start with an example of one particle on a Hubbard dimer coupled to a single photonic mode, which is equivalent to the single mode spin-boson model or the quantum Rabi model. For this system we prove that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic density and the expectation value of the photonic coordinate, provided the initial state and the density satisfy a set of well defined conditions. Then we generalize the formalism to many interacting electrons on a lattice coupled to multiple photonic modes and prove the general mapping theorem. We also show that for a system evolving from the ground state of a lattice Hamiltonian any density with a continuous second time derivative is locally v-representable. Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Grant No. FIS2013-46159-C3-1-P), Grupos Consolidados UPV/EHU del Gobierno Vasco (Grant No. IT578-13), COST Actions CM1204 (XLIC) and MP1306 (EUSpec).

  9. Density functional study of AgScO 2: Electronic and optical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... Electronic properties deal with energy bands and density of states (DOSs), while optical properties describe refractive index and absorption coefficient.The energy bands are interpreted in terms of DOSs. The computed value of band gap is in agreement with that reported in the literature. Our results predict ...

  10. On the definition of the effectively unpaired electron density matrix: A similarity measure approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Bochicchio, Roberto C.; Lain, Luis; Torre, Alicia

    2006-09-01

    The mathematical concepts of similarity and distance in metric spaces are used to relate Takatsuka et al. and Head-Gordon definitions of the effectively unpaired electron density matrix. This approach opens the possibility of new suitable definitions of this quantity to given purposes.

  11. High-order ionospheric effects on electron density estimation from Fengyun-3C GPS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junhai; Jin, Shuanggen

    2017-03-01

    GPS radio occultation can estimate ionospheric electron density and total electron content (TEC) with high spatial resolution, e.g., China's recent Fengyun-3C GPS radio occultation. However, high-order ionospheric delays are normally ignored. In this paper, the high-order ionospheric effects on electron density estimation from the Fengyun-3C GPS radio occultation data are estimated and investigated using the NeQuick2 ionosphere model and the IGRF12 (International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 12th generation) geomagnetic model. Results show that the high-order ionospheric delays have large effects on electron density estimation with up to 800 el cm-3, which should be corrected in high-precision ionospheric density estimation and applications. The second-order ionospheric effects are more significant, particularly at 250-300 km, while third-order ionospheric effects are much smaller. Furthermore, the high-order ionospheric effects are related to the location, the local time, the radio occultation azimuth and the solar activity. The large high-order ionospheric effects are found in the low-latitude area and in the daytime as well as during strong solar activities. The second-order ionospheric effects have a maximum positive value when the radio occultation azimuth is around 0-20°, and a maximum negative value when the radio occultation azimuth is around -180 to -160°. Moreover, the geomagnetic storm also affects the high-order ionospheric delay, which should be carefully corrected.

  12. Studies on effective atomic number, electron density and kerma for some fatty acids and carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), the effective electron density, N-el, and kerma have been calculated for some fatty acids and carbohydrates for photon interaction in the extended energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV using an accurate database of photon-interaction cross sections and the WinXCo...

  13. YUP.SCX: coaxing atomic models into medium resolution electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Robert K-Z; Devkota, Batsal; Harvey, Stephen C

    2008-08-01

    The structures of large macromolecular complexes in different functional states can be determined by cryo-electron microscopy, which yields electron density maps of low to intermediate resolutions. The maps can be combined with high-resolution atomic structures of components of the complex, to produce a model for the complex that is more accurate than the formal resolution of the map. To this end, methods have been developed to dock atomic models into density maps rigidly or flexibly, and to refine a docked model so as to optimize the fit of the atomic model into the map. We have developed a new refinement method called YUP.SCX. The electron density map is converted into a component of the potential energy function to which terms for stereochemical restraints and volume exclusion are added. The potential energy function is then minimized (using simulated annealing) to yield a stereochemically-restrained atomic structure that fits into the electron density map optimally. We used this procedure to construct an atomic model of the 70S ribosome in the pre-accommodation state. Although some atoms are displaced by as much as 33A, they divide themselves into nearly rigid fragments along natural boundaries with smooth transitions between the fragments.

  14. Corrections to the density-functional theory electronic spectrum: Copper phthalocyanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez, Hector; Jelinek, P.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    A method for improving the electronic spectrum of standard Density-Functional Theory (DFT) calculations (i.e., LDA or GGA approximations) is presented, and its application is discussed for the case of the copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule. The method is based on a treatment of exchange...

  15. Electronic and magnetic properties of spiral spin-density-wave states in transition-metal chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, M.; Ruiz-Díaz, P.; Pastor, G. M.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of one-dimensional (1D) 3 d transition-metal nanowires are investigated in the framework of density functional theory. The relative stability of collinear and noncollinear (NC) ground-state magnetic orders in V, Mn, and Fe monoatomic chains is quantified by computing the frozen-magnon dispersion relation Δ E (q ⃗) as a function of the spin-density-wave vector q ⃗. The dependence on the local environment of the atoms is analyzed by varying systematically the lattice parameter a of the chains. Electron correlation effects are explored by comparing local spin-density and generalized-gradient approximations to the exchange and correlation functional. Results are given for Δ E (q ⃗) , the local magnetic moments μ⃗i at atom i , the magnetization-vector density m ⃗(r ⃗) , and the local electronic density of states ρi σ(ɛ ) . The frozen-magnon dispersion relations are analyzed from a local perspective. Effective exchange interactions Ji j between the local magnetic moments μ⃗i and μ⃗j are derived by fitting the ab initio Δ E (q ⃗) to a classical 1D Heisenberg model. The dominant competing interactions Ji j at the origin of the NC magnetic order are identified. The interplay between the various Ji j is revealed as a function of a in the framework of the corresponding magnetic phase diagrams.

  16. A new interferometry-based electron density fluctuation diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, C. P.; Irby, J. H.; Murray, R.; White, A. E.; Pace, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    The two-color interferometry diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has been upgraded to measure fluctuations in the electron density and density gradient for turbulence and transport studies. Diagnostic features and capabilities are described. In differential mode, fast phase demodulation electronics detect the relative phase change between ten adjacent, radially-separated (ΔR = 1.2 cm, adjustable), vertical-viewing chords, which allows for measurement of the line-integrated electron density gradient. The system can be configured to detect the absolute phase shift of each chord by comparison to a local oscillator, measuring the line-integrated density. Each chord is sensitive to density fluctuations with kR < 20.3 cm-1 and is digitized at up to 10 MS/s, resolving aspects of ion temperature gradient-driven modes and other long-wavelength turbulence. Data from C-Mod discharges is presented, including observations of the quasi-coherent mode in enhanced D-alpha H-mode plasmas and the weakly coherent mode in I-mode.

  17. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  18. Density functional theory investigation of the electronic structure and defect chemistry of Sr1-xKxFeO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritzmann, Andrew M.; Dieterich, Johannes M.; Carter, Emily A.

    2016-07-27

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) efficiently generate electricity, but high operating temperatures (T op > 800 °C) limit their utility. Reducing T op requires mixed ion–electron conducting (MIEC) cathode materials. Density functional theory is used here to investigate the role of potassium substitutions in the MIEC material Sr1-x K x FeO3 (SKFO). We predict that such substitutions are endothermic. SrFeO3 and SKFO have nearly identical metallic electronic structures. Oxygen vacancy formation energies decrease by ~0.2 eV when x K increases from 0 to 0.0625. SKFO is a promising SOFC MIEC cathode material; however, further experimental investigations must assess its long-term stability at the desired operating temperatures.

  19. Pairing and unpairing electron densities in organic systems: Two-electron three center through space and through bonds interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobayan, Rosana M.; Bochicchio, Roberto C.

    2014-05-01

    Two-electron three-center bonding interactions in organic ions like methonium (CH5+), ethonium (C2H7+), and protonated alkanes n-C4H_{11}+ isomers (butonium cations) are described and characterized within the theoretical framework of the topological analysis of the electron density decomposition into its effectively paired and unpaired contributions. These interactions manifest in some of this type of systems as a concentration of unpaired electron cloud around the bond paths, in contrast to the well known paradigmatic boron hydrids in which it is not only concentrated close to the atomic nucleus and the bond paths but out of them and over the region defined by the involved atoms as a whole. This result permits to propose an attempt of classification for these interactions based in such manifestations. In the first type, it is called as interactions through bonds and in the second type as interactions through space type.

  20. Theoretical estimation of the electron affinity for quinone derivatives by means of density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimullina, L. R.; Nafikova, E. P.; Asfandiarov, N. L.; Chizhov, Yu. V.; Baibulova, G. Sh.; Zhdanov, E. R.; Gadiev, R. M.

    2015-03-01

    A number of compounds related to quinone derivatives is investigated by means of density functional theory in the B3LYP/6-31G(d) mode. Vertical electron affinity E va and/or electron affinity E a for the investigated compounds are known from experiments. The correlation between the calculated energies of π* molecular orbitals with the E va values measured via electron transmission spectroscopy is determined with a coefficient of 0.96. It is established that theoretical values of the adiabatic electron affinity, calculated as the difference between the total energies of a neutral molecule and a radical anion, correlate with E a values determined from electron transfer experiments with a correlation coefficient of 0.996.

  1. Density functional study of AgScO_2: Electronic and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamu, K. C.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Vyas, Rishi; Priolkar, K. R.

    2017-07-01

    This paper focusses on the electronic and optical properties of scandium-based silver delafossite (AgScO_2) semiconductor. The density functional theory (DFT) in the framework of full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) scheme has been used for the present calculations with local density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Electronic properties deal with energy bands and density of states (DOSs), while optical properties describe refractive index and absorption coefficient. The energy bands are interpreted in terms of DOSs. The computed value of band gap is in agreement with that reported in the literature. Our results predict AgScO_2 as indirect band-gap semiconductor. Our calculated value of the refractive index in zero frequency limits is 2.42. The absorption coefficient predicts the applicability of AgScO_2 in solar cells and flat panel liquid crystal display as a transparent top window layer.

  2. International Workshop on Electronic Density Functional Theory : Recent Progress and New Directions

    CERN Document Server

    Vignale, Giovanni; Das, Mukunda

    1998-01-01

    This book is an outcome of the International Workshop on Electronic Density Functional Theory, held at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia, in July 1996. Density functional theory, standing as it does at the boundary between the disciplines of physics, chemistry, and materials science, is a great mixer. Invited experts from North America, Europe, and Australia mingled with students from several disciplines, rapidly taking up the informal style for which Australia is famous. A list of participants is given at the end of the book. Density functional theory (DFT) is a subtle approach to the very difficult problem of predicting the behavior of many interacting particles. A major application is the study of many-electron systems. This was the workshop theme, embracing inter alia computational chemistry and condensed matter physics. DFT circumvents the more conceptually straightforward (but more computationally intensive) approach in which one solves the many-body Schrodinger equation. It relies instead on r...

  3. Characteristics of temporal evolution of particle density and electron temperature in helicon discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiong; Cheng, Mousen; Guo, Dawei; Wang, Moge; Li, Xiaokang

    2017-10-01

    On the basis of considering electrochemical reactions and collision relations in detail, a direct numerical simulation model of a helicon plasma discharge with three-dimensional two-fluid equations was employed to study the characteristics of the temporal evolution of particle density and electron temperature. With the assumption of weak ionization, the Maxwell equations coupled with the plasma parameters were directly solved in the whole computational domain. All of the partial differential equations were solved by the finite element solver in COMSOL MultiphysicsTM with a fully coupled method. In this work, the numerical cases were calculated with an Ar working medium and a Shoji-type antenna. The numerical results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of temporal evolution of the electron and ground atom density, which can be explained by the ion pumping effect. The evolution of the electron temperature is controlled by two schemes: electromagnetic wave heating and particle collision cooling. The high RF power results in a high peak electron temperature while the high gas pressure leads to a low steady temperature. In addition, an OES experiment using nine Ar I lines was conducted using a modified CR model to verify the validity of the results by simulation, showing that the trends of temporal evolution of electron density and temperature are well consistent with the numerically simulated ones.

  4. Laser-wakefield acceleration of electron beams in a low density plasma channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. A. Ibbotson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of quasimonoenergetic electron beams, with energies greater than 500 MeV, in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by 2.5 J, 80 fs laser pulses guided in a low density plasma channel, is investigated. The laser energy required to achieve electron injection is found to depend strongly on the quality of the input laser focal spot. Simulations show that, although the matched spot size of the plasma channel is greater than the self-focused spot size, the channel assists relativistic self-focusing and enables electron injection to occur at lower plasma densities and laser powers than would be possible without a waveguide.

  5. Reduction of electron density in a plasma by injection of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodha, M. S.; Evans, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    In this paper, the authors have investigated the physics of various processes relevant to the reduction of electron density in a plasma by addition of water droplets; two processes have in particular been analyzed in some detail, viz, the electron attachment to charged dielectric droplets and the emission of negative ions by vaporization from these droplets. The results of these analyses have been applied to a study of the kinetics of reduction of electron density and charging of droplets in an initially overionized plasma, after addition of water droplets. A number of simplifying assumptions including uniform size and charge on droplets and negligible change in the radius of the droplet due to evaporation have been made.

  6. High-spatial-resolution electron density measurement by Langmuir probe for multi-point observations using tiny spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, H.; Røed, K.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Trondsen, E.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Miloch, W. J.; Moen, J. I.

    2017-11-01

    A method for evaluating electron density using a single fixed-bias Langmuir probe is presented. The technique allows for high-spatio-temporal resolution electron density measurements, which can be effectively carried out by tiny spacecraft for multi-point observations in the ionosphere. The results are compared with the multi-needle Langmuir probe system, which is a scientific instrument developed at the University of Oslo comprising four fixed-bias cylindrical probes that allow small-scale plasma density structures to be characterized in the ionosphere. The technique proposed in this paper can comply with the requirements of future small-sized spacecraft, where the cost-effectiveness, limited space available on the craft, low power consumption and capacity for data-links need to be addressed. The first experimental results in both the plasma laboratory and space confirm the efficiency of the new approach. Moreover, detailed analyses on two challenging issues when deploying the DC Langmuir probe on a tiny spacecraft, which are the limited conductive area of the spacecraft and probe surface contamination, are presented in the paper. It is demonstrated that the limited conductive area, depending on applications, can either be of no concern for the experiment or can be resolved by mitigation methods. Surface contamination has a small impact on the performance of the developed probe.

  7. Comparative study on extinction process of gas-blasted air and CO2 arc discharge using two-dimensional electron density imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Kumada, Akiko; Ikeda, Hisatoshi; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Murai, Kosuke; Tanaka, Yasunori; Shinkai, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    Shack-Hartmann type laser wavefront sensors were applied to gas-blasted arc discharges under current-zero phases, generated in a 50 mm-long interelectrode gap confined by a gas flow nozzle, in order to conduct a systematic comparison of electron density decaying processes for two kinds of arc-quenching gas media: air and \\text{C}{{\\text{O}}2} . The experimental results for the air and \\text{C}{{\\text{O}}2} arc plasmas showed that the electron densities and arc diameters became thinner toward the nozzle-throat inlet due to a stronger convection loss in the arc radial direction. In addition, \\text{C}{{\\text{O}}2} had a shorter electron density decaying time constant than air, which could be caused by convection loss and turbulent flow of \\text{C}{{\\text{O}}2} stronger than air.

  8. Experimental Infection of Taenia saginata eggs in Bali Cattle: Distribution and Density of Cysticercus bovis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyoman Sadra Dharmawan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to observe the development, distribution, and infection density ofTaenia saginata metacestodes in Bali cattle. Three Bali cattle were experimentally infected with T. saginataeggs which were collected from taeniasis patients. The experimental animal was inoculated with : i1000,00 T. saginata; ii 500,000 eggs; and iii 1,000,000 eggs, respectivelly 100,000 (cattle 1, 500,000(cattle 2, and 1,000,000 (cattle 3 T. saginata eggs, respectively. To observe the development of cysticerci,all cattle were slaughtered at 24 weeks post infection. To observe their distribution and density, slicingwas done to the cattle?s tissues. The study results showed that cysts were found distributed to all muscletissues and some visceral organs such as heart, diaphragm, lungs, and kidney of the cattle infected with100,000 and 500,000 T. saginata eggs. Density of the cyst was in the range of 11 to 95 cysts per 100 gramsof tissue. The highest density was noted in the heart (58/100 grams and in diaphragm (55/100 grams.This study has confirmed that T. saginata eggs derived from taeniasis patient in Bali, if infected to Balicattle can develop and spread to all muscle tissues and some visceral organs. From this study it wasconcluded that it is necessary to include the heart in the meat inspection at slaughter house for possibilityof T. saginata cyst infection.$?

  9. Vertical and longitudinal electron density structures of equatorial E- and F-regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Brahmanandam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available From global soundings of ionospheric electron density made with FORMOSAT 3/COSMIC satellites for September 2006–August 2009, day-night variations in vertical and longitudinal structures of the electron densities in equatorial E- and F-regions for different seasons are investigated for the first time. The results reveal that the wavenumber-3 and wavenumber-4 patterns dominated the nighttime (22:00–04:00 LT F-region longitudinal structures in solstice and in equinox seasons, respectively. In daytime (08:00–18:00 LT F-region, the wavenumber-4 patterns governed the longitudinal structures in the September equinox and December solstice, and wavenumber-3 in March equinox and June solstice respectively. A comparison of the daytime and nighttime longitudinal electron density structures indicates that they are approximately 180° out of phase with each other. It is believed that this out of phase relation is very likely the result of the opposite phase relation between daytime and nighttime nonmigrating diurnal tidal winds that modulate background E-region dynamo electric field at different places, leading to the day-night change in the locations of the equatorial plasma fountains that are responsible for the formation of the F-region longitudinal structures. Further, a good consistency between the locations of the density structures in the same seasons of the different years for both daytime and nighttime epochs has been noticed indicating that the source mechanism for these structures could be the same.

  10. Electron density measurement of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma using dispersion interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2017-10-01

    Medical applications of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasmas have recently been attracting a great deal of attention, where many types of plasma sources have been developed to meet the purposes. For example, plasma-activated medium (PAM), which is now being studied for cancer treatment, has been produced by irradiating non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma with ultrahigh electron density to a culture medium. Meanwhile, in order to measure electron density in magnetic confinement plasmas, a CO2 laser dispersion interferometer has been developed and installed on the Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. The dispersion interferometer has advantages that the measurement is insensitive to mechanical vibrations and changes in neutral gas density. Taking advantage of these properties, we applied the dispersion interferometer to electron density diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasmas produced by the NU-Global HUMAP-WSAP-50 device, which is used for producing PAM. This study was supported by the Grant of Joint Research by the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS).

  11. Temporal variation of the electron density in afterglow of high-density CF_4, C_4F_8, and CF_4--H2 plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, K.; Kadota, K.

    1998-10-01

    The kinetics of electrons in electronegative plasmas is greatly affected by dissociative attachment to neutral molecules, which is a major process for the formation of negative ions. In fluorocarbon plasmas, negative fluorine ions (F^-) are produced by electron attachment to various reaction products as well as the parent gas. In the present work, we have measured the temporal variation of the electron density in the afterglow of high-density CF_4, C_4F_8, and CF_4--H2 plasmas. A conventional microwave interferometer at 35 GHz was adopted for the measurement. The electron loss frequency was evaluated from the temporal variation of the electron density which was calculated from the interferometry signal digitized with a high sampling rate of 100 MHz. In CF4 plasmas, the variation of the electron loss frequency roughly corresponded to that of the neutral radical densities. In C_4F8 plasmas, the electron loss frequency was higher for the discharge condition with lower dissociation degree. These results indicates that reaction products play important roles for the production of F^- in CF4 plasmas, while in C_4F8 plasmas, the production of F^- is governed by the parent gas. No correlations were found between the electron loss frequency and the F atom density in CF_4--H2 plasmas, which suggests that the production of F^- from F2 is nearly negligible.

  12. Comparative Study on Extinction Process of Gas-Blasted Air and CO2 Arc Discharge Using Two-Dimensional Electron Density Imaging Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Kamiya, Tomoki; Matsuoka, Shigeyasu; Kumada, Akiko; Ikeda, Hisatoshi; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Murai, Kosuke; Tanaka, Yasunori; Shinkai, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Systematic comparison of the electron density images for various kinds of arc-quenching gas media inside high-voltage circuit breakers is a promising method for the effective search and development of SF6-alternative gases. However, electron density imaging over the decaying arcs around the nozzle throat of the circuit breakers is extremely difficult by using the conventional arc generation setup and localized type sensing systems, due to the nozzle opaqueness and spatiotemporal instability of long-gap arc discharges around current zero. Here, we achieved two-dimensional electron density imaging over the decaying arcs around the nozzle throat first in the world, by a combination of the development of a unique gas flow nozzle integrating a cubic quartz cell and the single-shot recordings using Shack-Hartmann sensors. Shack-Hartmann sensors were applied to gas-blasted air and CO2 arc discharges under current-zero phases after sudden switch-off of stationary arc currents. These experimental results showed that the electron densities and arc diameters took the minimums in the upper stream nozzle regions with the maximum blasting gas speeds. In addition, CO2 had a shorter electron density decaying time constant than air, which is consistent with the previous theoretical studies on higher interruption performance of CO2 compared with air.

  13. Coupled electron-hole bilayer graphene sheets: Superfluidity, Charge Density Waves, and Coupled Wigner Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarenia, Mohammad; Peeters, Francois; Neilson, David

    The juxtaposition of superconducting and charge density wave (CDW) phases that is often observed in connection with High-Temperature Superconductors, is attracting considerable attention. In these systems, the crystal lattice provides a polarizable background, needed to drive the CDW phase. We report on a different system that exhibits the association of superfluid and CDW phases, but in which the polarizable background is uniform. Our system consists of two coupled two-dimensional bilayers of graphene, one bilayer containing electrons and the other holes interacting through the long range Coulomb interaction. To account for the inter-layer correlation energy accurately, we introduce a new approach which is based on the random phase approximation at high densities and interpolation between the weakly- and strongly-interacting regimes. We determine the zero temperature phase diagram in which the two control parameters are the equal electron and hole densities and the thickness of the insulating barrier separating the two bilayers. We find in addition to an electron-hole superfluid and a one-dimensional CDW phases that there exist also a coupled electron-hole Wigner crystal. The structure of the crystal background plays no role in determining the phase diagram. This work was supported by the Flemish Science Foundation (FWO).

  14. Time-dependent quantum many-body systems. Linear response, electronic transport, and reduced density matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, H.

    2007-05-15

    In part I of this work we present a double-pole approximation (DPA) to the response equations of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The double-pole approximation provides an exact description of systems with two strongly coupled excitations which are isolated from the rest of the spectrum. In contrast to the traditional single-pole approximation of TDDFT the DPA also yields corrections to the Kohn-Sham oscillator strengths. We also demonstrate how to invert the double-pole solution which allows us to predict matrix elements of the exchange-correlation kernel f{sub xc} from experimental input. We attempt some first steps towards a time-dependent generalization of reduced density matrix functional theory (RDMFT). In part II we derive equations of motion for natural orbitals and occupation numbers. Using the equation of motion for the occupation numbers we show that an adiabatic extension of presently known ground-state functionals of static RDMFT always leads to occupation numbers which are constant in time. From the stationary conditions of the equations of motion for the N-body correlations (correlated parts of the N-body matrices) we derive a new class of ground-state functionals which can be used in static RDMFT. Applications are presented for a one-dimensional model system where the time-dependent many-body Schroedinger equation can be propagated numerically. We use optimal control theory to find optimized laser pulses for transitions in a model for atomic Helium. From the numerically exact correlated wavefunction we extract the exact time evolution of natural orbitals and occupation numbers for (i) laser-driven Helium and (ii) electron-ion scattering. Part III of this work considers time-dependent quantum transport within TDDFT. We present an algorithm for the calculation of extended eigenstates of single-particle Hamiltonians which is especially tailored to a finite-difference discretization of the Schroedinger equation. We consider the

  15. The effect of longitudinal density gradient on electron plasma wake field acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, David

    2016-01-01

    3-, 2- and 1-dimensional, particle-in-cell, fully electromagnetic simulations of electron plasma wake field acceleration in the blow out regime are presented. Earlier results are extended by (i) studying the effect of longitudinal density gradient; (ii) avoiding use of co-moving simulation box; (iii) inclusion of ion motion; and (iv) studying fully electromagnetic plasma wake fields. It is established that injecting driving and trailing electron bunches into a positive density gradient of ten-fold increasing density over 10 cm long Lithium vapor plasma, results in spatially more compact and three times larger, compared to the uniform density case, electric fields (-6.4 x 10^{10} V/m), leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 24.4 GeV (starting from initial 20.4 GeV), with an energy transfer efficiencies from leading to trailing bunch of 75 percent. In the uniform density case -2.5 x 10^{10} V/m wake is created leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 22.4 GeV, with an energy transfer eff...

  16. Variations of topside ionospheric electron density near the dawn terminator in relation to geomagnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Chen, Chien-Han; Wang, Kaiti

    2017-11-01

    A statistical study to determine the influence of geomagnetic disturbances on the ionosphere across the dawn terminator at subauroral and middle latitudes is performed, based on the vertical electron density profiles measured by the GPS Occultation Experiment aboard the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites from August 2006 to July 2009. Three ranges of solar zenith angles are adopted to characterize transitions between the pre- and post-dawn ionosphere. Results indicate opposing plasma density effects at the darkened and sunlit locations between 50° and 65° magnetic latitude (λm). The darkened topside ionosphere features density increases associated with geomagnetic activity, while density reductions mark its sunlit counterpart. The average electron peak density in the F2 region can increase by up to 44% in the darkened ionosphere and decrease by up to 20% in the sunlit ionosphere as Kp changes from 0-1 to 4-5. In the λm = 55°-65° range, the dominant contributors to the density perturbation are auroral electron precipitation for the darkened region and enhanced penetration electric fields for the sunlit region, with the transition occurring across the terminator local times. Dominance shifts first to electric fields at 50°-55°, then to aurora-induced neutral wind at 45°-50°, suggesting that during disturbed times electric fields seldom penetrate below λm = 50°. Findings presented in this statistical study should contribute to the study of space weather and the understanding of non-local influences of geomagnetic disturbances on topside dynamics.

  17. Density Functional Reactivity Theory Characterizes Charge Separation Propensity in Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shubin [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Ess, Daniel H. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Schauer, Cynthia [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2011-04-20

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions occur in many biological and artificial solar energy conversion processes. In these reactions the electron is often transferred to a site distant to the proton acceptor site. In this work, we employ the dual descriptor and the electrophilic Fukui function from density functional reactivity theory (DFRT) to characterize the propensity for an electron to be transferred to a site other than the proton acceptor site. The electrophilic regions of hydrogen bond or van der Waal reactant complexes were examined using these DFRT descriptors to determine the region of space to which the electron is most likely to be transferred. This analysis shows that in PCET reactions the electrophilic region of the reactant complex does not include the proton acceptor site.

  18. Validation of COSMIC radio occultation electron density profiles by incoherent scatter radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 is a joint US/Taiwan radio occultation mission consisting of six identical micro-satellites. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric RO measurements. FS3/COSMIC data can make a positive impact on global ionosphere study providing essential information about height electron density distribu-tion. For correct using of the RO electron density profiles for geophysical analysis, modeling and other applications it is necessary to make validation of these data with electron density distributions obtained by another measurement techniques such as proven ground based facili-ties -ionosondes and IS radars. In fact as the ionosondes provide no direct information on the profile above the maximum electron density and the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC RO measurements can make an important contribution to the investigation of the topside part of the ionosphere. IS radars provide information about the whole electron density profile, so we can estimate the agreement of topside parts between two independent measurements. To validate the reliability of COS-MIC data we have used the ionospheric electron density profiles derived from IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6N, 36.3E, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7N, 117.8E). The Kharkiv radar is a sole incoherent scatter facility on the middle latitudes of Eu-ropean region. The radar operates with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power 2.0 MW. The Kharkiv IS radar is able to determine the heights-temporal distribution of ionosphere parameters in height range of 70-1500 km. At the ionosphere in-vestigation by incoherent scatter method there are directly measured the power spectrum (or autocorrelation function) of scattered signal. With using of rather complex procedure of the received signal processing it is possible to estimate the

  19. The response of PAG density to dose: a model and experimental investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilts, M [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency - Vancouver Centre, Vancouver BC (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Jirasek, A [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Duzenli, C [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency - Vancouver Centre, Vancouver BC (Canada)

    2004-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a promising method of extracting three-dimensional (3D) dose information from polymer gel dosimeters. CT gel dosimetry has many practical advantages: ease of use, relatively low cost and accessibility to cancer hospitals and has been shown to have clinical potential. However, a primary disadvantage remains poor dose resolution due in part to the low sensitivity of CT contrast to dose. This CT contrast is the result of a small density change that occurs on polymerization and advanced understanding of this density change is required in order to optimize gel sensitivity to CT. This work proposes a simple model that describes the radiation induced density change in polyacrylamide gel (PAG) as a function of polymer yield and an intrinsic density change that occurs, independent of polymer yield, on polymerization. Using this model in combination with experimental CT and Raman spectroscopy work, several fundamental properties of the PAG density response to dose are discovered. The result is a valuable framework on which to focus future developments of more sensitive CT polymer gel dosimetry systems.

  20. Line Shape Modeling for the Diagnostic of the Electron Density in a Corona Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Rosato

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of spectra observed in a corona discharge designed for the study of dielectrics in electrical engineering. The medium is a gas of helium and the discharge was performed at the vicinity of a tip electrode under high voltage. The shape of helium lines is dominated by the Stark broadening due to the plasma microfield. Using a computer simulation method, we examine the sensitivity of the He 492 nm line shape to the electron density. Our results indicate the possibility of a density diagnostic based on passive spectroscopy. The influence of collisional broadening due to interactions between the emitters and neutrals is discussed.

  1. The Kinetic Energy of Hydrocarbons as a Function of Electron Density and Convolutional Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a convolutional neural network trained to reproduce the Kohn-Sham kinetic energy of hydrocarbons from electron density. The output of the network is used as a non-local correction to the conventional local and semi-local kinetic functionals. We show that this approximation qualitatively reproduces Kohn-Sham potential energy surfaces when used with conventional exchange correlation functionals. Numerical noise inherited from the non-linearity of the neural network is identified as the major challenge for the model. Finally we examine the features in the density learned by the neural network to anticipate the prospects of generalizing these models.

  2. Modelling coronal electron density and temperature profiles based on solar magnetic field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Dal Lago, A.; Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Stekel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The density and temperature profiles in the solar corona are complex to describe, the observational diagnostics is not easy. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct the evolution of the electron density and temperature in the solar corona based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated from Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) based on magnetic field from both observational synoptic charts and a magnetic flux transport model. We use an emission model based on the ionization equilibrium and coronal abundances from CHIANTI atomic database 8.0. The preliminary results are discussed in details.

  3. Spatial and temporal variations of electron temperatures and densities from EUV-emitting lithium plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, R W; Harilal, S S; Polek, M; Hassanein, A

    2011-07-01

    Planar slabs of pure Li were irradiated with 1.064 nm, 6 ns Nd:YAG laser pulses. Determination of plasma densities at both the earliest times of plasma formation and near the target surface was performed using Nomarski interferometry. The plasma parameters at later times were evaluated using optical emission spectroscopy. The space- and time-dependent electron densities and temperatures of the plasma were determined from their Stark broadening and the relative intensities of the spectral lines, respectively. The advantages and disadvantages of both of these techniques are evaluated and discussed.

  4. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-07-28

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  5. Classification and assessment of retrieved electron density maps in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is one of the techniques used to visualize structures of non-crystalline particles of micrometer to submicrometer size from materials and biological science. In the structural analysis of CXDI, the electron density map of a sample particle can theoretically be reconstructed from a diffraction pattern by using phase-retrieval (PR) algorithms. However, in practice, the reconstruction is difficult because diffraction patterns are affected by Poisson noise and miss data in small-angle regions due to the beam stop and the saturation of detector pixels. In contrast to X-ray protein crystallography, in which the phases of diffracted waves are experimentally estimated, phase retrieval in CXDI relies entirely on the computational procedure driven by the PR algorithms. Thus, objective criteria and methods to assess the accuracy of retrieved electron density maps are necessary in addition to conventional parameters monitoring the convergence of PR calculations. Here, a data analysis scheme, named ASURA, is proposed which selects the most probable electron density maps from a set of maps retrieved from 1000 different random seeds for a diffraction pattern. Each electron density map composed of J pixels is expressed as a point in a J-dimensional space. Principal component analysis is applied to describe characteristics in the distribution of the maps in the J-dimensional space. When the distribution is characterized by a small number of principal components, the distribution is classified using the k-means clustering method. The classified maps are evaluated by several parameters to assess the quality of the maps. Using the proposed scheme, structure analysis of a diffraction pattern from a non-crystalline particle is conducted in two stages: estimation of the overall shape and determination of the fine structure inside the support shape. In each stage, the most accurate and probable density maps are objectively selected. The validity

  6. Current densities due to electron-hole puddles in graphene flakes at the charge neutrality point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Leandro; Lewenkopf, Caio

    2014-03-01

    Graphene flakes show a typical conductivity minimum of about e2 / h , almost independent of sample mobility, at the charge neutrality point. This is at odds with the notion that as the mobility increases, and graphene becomes more ballistic, its density of states (DOS) and conductivity at the charge neutrality point should vanish. The observed conductivity minimum is often attributed to the presence of electron-hole charge puddles, that give rise to an effective local-dependent chemical potential. In this way, the local chemical potential fluctuates creating p and n-doped regions and the electronic transport is facilitated by Klein tunneling through the p and n-doped domains. Although very attractive, there is little quantitative support for this this picture. We revisit this problem and analyze the transport properties using a self-consistent recursive Green's functions technique with spin resolution that includes the electronic interaction modeled by a mean field Hubbard term. We calculate electronic current densities between neighboring carbon sites near the p-n interface and relate the electronic propagation to the puddles charge, size and shapes.

  7. Ground-state properties and density response of quasi-one-dimensional electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosti, Daniele; Pederiva, Francesco; Lipparini, Enrico; Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1998-06-01

    Ground-state properties of the quasi-one-dimensional electron gas in a quantum wire are calculated in the random-phase approximation (RPA), the ladder approximation, and the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjölander approximation. Numerical results are given for the exchange-correlation energy and the compressibility as a function of the electron density and the width of the wire. The dielectric response of the system has been calculated in the local field approximation and compared with the RPA result.

  8. The charger transfer electronic coupling in diabatic perspective: A multi-state density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinwei; Qu, Zexing; Gao, Jiali

    2018-01-01

    The multi-state density functional theory (MSDFT) provides a convenient way to estimate electronic coupling of charge transfer processes based on a diabatic representation. Its performance has been benchmarked against the HAB11 database with a mean unsigned error (MUE) of 17 meV between MSDFT and ab initio methods. The small difference may be attributed to different representations, diabatic from MSDFT and adiabatic from ab initio calculations. In this discussion, we conclude that MSDFT provides a general and efficient way to estimate the electronic coupling for charge-transfer rate calculations based on the Marcus-Hush model.

  9. Communication: Reduced density matrices in molecular systems: Grand-canonical electron states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochicchio, Roberto C., E-mail: rboc@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Miranda-Quintana, Ramón A. [Laboratory of Computational and Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Havana, Zapata e G y Mazón, 10400 Havana (Cuba); Rial, Diego [Departamento de Matemática, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and IMAS, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-11-21

    Grand-canonical like descriptions of many electron atomic and molecular open systems which are characterized by a non-integer number of electrons are presented. Their associated reduced density matrices (RDMs) are obtained by introducing the contracting mapping for this type of distributions. It is shown that there is loss of information when connecting RDMs of different order by partial contractions. The energy convexity property of these systems simplifies the description. Consequently, this formulation opens the possibility to a new look for chemical descriptors such as chemical potential and reactivity among others. Examples are presented to discuss the theoretical aspects of this work.

  10. Communication: Reduced density matrices in molecular systems: Grand-canonical electron states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Roberto C.; Miranda-Quintana, Ramón A.; Rial, Diego

    2013-11-01

    Grand-canonical like descriptions of many electron atomic and molecular open systems which are characterized by a non-integer number of electrons are presented. Their associated reduced density matrices (RDMs) are obtained by introducing the contracting mapping for this type of distributions. It is shown that there is loss of information when connecting RDMs of different order by partial contractions. The energy convexity property of these systems simplifies the description. Consequently, this formulation opens the possibility to a new look for chemical descriptors such as chemical potential and reactivity among others. Examples are presented to discuss the theoretical aspects of this work.

  11. Electronic Structure of the d Bent-metallocene Cp(2)VCl(2): A Photoelectron and Density Functional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranswick, Matthew A; Gruhn, Nadine E; Enemark, John H; Lichtenberger, Dennis L

    2008-04-15

    The Cp(2)VCl(2) molecule is a prototype for bent metallocene complexes with a single electron in the metal d shell, but experimental measure of the binding energy of the d electron by photoelectron spectroscopy eluded early attempts due to apparent decomposition in the spectrometer to Cp(2)VCl. With improved instrumentation, the amount of decomposition is reduced and subtraction of ionization intensity due to Cp(2)VCl from the Cp(2)VCl(2)/Cp(2)VCl mixed spectrum yields the Cp(2)VCl(2) spectrum exclusively. The measured ionization energies provide well-defined benchmarks for electronic structure calculations. Density functional calculations support the spectral interpretations and agree well with the ionization energy of the d(1) electron and the energies of the higher positive ion states of Cp(2)VCl(2). The calculations also account well for the trends to the other Group V bent metallocene dichlorides Cp(2)NbCl(2) and Cp(2)TaCl(2). The first ionization energy of Cp(2)VCl(2) is considerably greater than the first ionization energies of the second- and third-row transition metal analogues.

  12. Ab initio density functional theory study on the atomic and electronic structure of GaP/Si(001) heterointerfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanyuk, O.; Supplie, O.; Susi, T.; May, M. M.; Hannappel, T.

    2016-10-01

    The atomic and electronic band structures of GaP/Si(001) heterointerfaces were investigated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. Relative total energies of abrupt interfaces and mixed interfaces with Si substitutional sites within a few GaP layers were derived. It was found that Si diffusion into GaP layers above the first interface layer is energetically unfavorable. An interface with Si/Ga substitution sites in the first layer above the Si substrate is energetically the most stable one in thermodynamic equilibrium. The electronic band structure of the epitaxial GaP/Si(001) heterostructure terminated by the (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction consists of surface and interface electronic states in the common band gap of two semiconductors. The dispersion of the states is anisotropic and differs for the abrupt Si-Ga, Si-P, and mixed interfaces. Ga 2 p , P 2 p , and Si 2 p core-level binding-energy shifts were computed for the abrupt and the lowest-energy heterointerface structures. Negative and positive core-level shifts due to heterovalent bonds at the interface are predicted for the abrupt Si-Ga and Si-P interfaces, respectively. The distinct features in the heterointerface electronic structure and in the core-level shifts open new perspectives in the experimental characterization of buried polar-on-nonpolar semiconductor heterointerfaces.

  13. Electron Density from Balmer Series Hydrogen Lines and Ionization Temperatures in Inductively Coupled Argon Plasma Supplied by Aerosol and Volatile Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Borkowska-Burnecka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electron density and ionization temperatures were measured for inductively coupled argon plasma at atmospheric pressure. Different sample introduction systems were investigated. Samples containing Sn, Hg, Mg, and Fe and acidified with hydrochloric or acetic acids were introduced into plasma in the form of aerosol, gaseous mixture produced in the reaction of these solutions with NaBH4 and the mixture of the aerosol and chemically generated gases. The electron densities measured from Hα, Hβ, Hγ, and Hδ lines on the base of Stark broadening were compared. The study of the H Balmer series line profiles showed that the ne values from Hγ and Hδ were well consistent with those obtained from Hβ which was considered as a common standard line for spectroscopic measurement of electron density. The ne values varied from 0.56·1015 to 1.32·1015 cm−3 and were the highest at loading mixture of chemically generated gases. The ionization temperatures of plasma, determined on the base of the Saha approach from ion-to-atom line intensity ratios, were lower for Sn and Hg (6500–7200 K than those from Fe and Mg lines (7000–7800 K. The Sn II/Sn I and Hg II/Hg I, Fe II/Fe I, and Mg II/Mg I intensity ratios and the electron densities (ne were dependent on experimental conditions of plasma generation. Experimental and theoretically calculated ionization degrees were compared.

  14. Changes of the electron density distribution during MHD activity in CHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltwish, H. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute for Experimental Physics, Bochum (Germany); Tanaka, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Density oscillations induced by MHD activities were observed in NBI heated plasmas on CHS by using an HCN laser interferometer. The accompanied changes of the density profiles were also observed. The oscillations are composition of m=0 sawteeth like crash and m=2 sinusoidal oscillations as a post courser of the crash. Possible models of the oscillation structure are examined in order to explain experimental data of the interferometer. Rotating plasma core, which is hollow profile and keeps constant elongation of the flux surface can explain amplitude and phase distribution of the sinusoidal oscillation. (author)

  15. Communication: Hilbert-space partitioning of the molecular one-electron density matrix with orthogonal projectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfleteren, Diederik; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick; Ayers, Paul W; Waroquier, Michel

    2010-12-21

    A double-atom partitioning of the molecular one-electron density matrix is used to describe atoms and bonds. All calculations are performed in Hilbert space. The concept of atomic weight functions (familiar from Hirshfeld analysis of the electron density) is extended to atomic weight matrices. These are constructed to be orthogonal projection operators on atomic subspaces, which has significant advantages in the interpretation of the bond contributions. In close analogy to the iterative Hirshfeld procedure, self-consistency is built in at the level of atomic charges and occupancies. The method is applied to a test set of about 67 molecules, representing various types of chemical binding. A close correlation is observed between the atomic charges and the Hirshfeld-I atomic charges.

  16. Fragment transition density method to calculate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voityuk, Alexander A., E-mail: alexander.voityuk@icrea.cat [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08010 Barcelona, Spain and Institut de Química Computacional i Catàlisi (IQCC), Universitat de Girona 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2014-06-28

    A general approach, the Fragment Transition Density (FTD) scheme, is introduced to estimate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer in a molecular system. Within this method, the excitation energies and transition densities of the system are used to derive the coupling matrix element. The scheme allows one to treat systems where exciton donor and acceptor are close together and their exchange interaction and orbital overlap are significant. The FTD method can be applied in combination with any quantum mechanical approach to treat excited states of general nature including single-, double-, and higher excitations. Using FTD approach, we derive excitonic couplings for several systems computed with the CIS, TD DFT and MS-CASPT2 methods. In particular, it is shown that the estimated coupling values in DNA π-stacks are strongly affected by the short-range electronic interaction of adjacent nucleobases.

  17. Deducing fast electron density changes in randomly orientated uncrystallized biomolecules in a pump-probe experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, K; Schwander, P; Schmidt, M; Saldin, D K

    2014-07-17

    We propose a method for deducing time-resolved structural changes in uncrystallized biomolecules in solution. The method relies on measuring the angular correlations of the intensities, when averaged over a large number of diffraction patterns from randomly oriented biomolecules in solution in a liquid solvent. The experiment is somewhat like a pump-probe version of an experiment on small angle X-ray scattering, except that the data expected by the algorithm are not just the radial variation of the averaged intensities. The differences of these correlation functions as measured from a photoexcited and dark structure enable the direct calculation of the difference electron density with a knowledge of only the dark structure. We exploit a linear relation we derive between the difference in these correlation functions and the difference electron density, applicable for small structural changes.

  18. From Metal Cluster to Metal Nanowire: A Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Band Structure Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:We investigate a theoretical model of molecular metalwire constructed from linear polynuclear metal complexes. In particular we study the linear Crn metal complex and Cr molecular metalwire. The electron density distributions of the model nanowire and the linear Crn metal complexes, with n = 3, 5, and 7, are calculated by employing CRYSTAL98 package with topological analysis. The preliminary results indicate that the bonding types between any two neighboring Cr are all the same, namely the polarized open-shell interaction. The pattern of electron density distribution in metal complexes resembles that of the model Cr nanowire as the number of metal ions increases. The conductivity of the model Cr nanowire is also tested by performing the band structure calculation.

  19. Temporal Behavior of the Ionospheric Electron Density at Low Latitudes: First Glimpse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerloev, J. W.; Humberset, B. K.; Gonzalez, S. A.; Garnett Marques Brum, C.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we address the spatiotemporal characteristics of the electron density at 150 km altitude in the low latitude ionosphere above the Arecibo Observatory. We utilize a new pointing mode that allows us to probe the same volume in the ionosphere for a continuous period of approximately 25 min. or more. The ISR profiles have 150 m range resolution and samples have a 10-second time resolution; we probed 60 individual regions uniformly spaced in local times and covering the full 24 hours. For each time series we determine the total derivative of the electron density using a narrow Hanning bandpass filter that allow us to determine the variability at different frequencies. This is done for each of the 60 local time regions. We further compare to widely used static statistical models and test their underlying assumption: Dynamics can be ignored.

  20. Measurements of electron density irregularities in the ionosphere of Jupiter by Pioneer 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, R.; Yang, F.-C.

    1976-01-01

    It is demonstrated that when the frequency spectrum of log amplitude fluctuations is used, the radio-occultation experiment is a powerful tool for detecting, identifying, and studying ionospheric irregularities. Analysis of Pioneer 10 radio-occultation measurements reveals that the Jovian ionosphere possesses electron-density irregularities which are very similar to those found in the earth's ionosphere. This is the first time such irregularities have been found in a planetary ionosphere other than that of the earth. The Pioneer 10 results indicate that the spatial wave-number spectrum of the electron-density irregularities is close to the Kolmogorov spectrum and that the outer scale size is greater than the Fresnel size (6.15 km). This type of spectrum suggests that the irregularities are probably produced by the turbulent dissipation of irregularities larger than the outer scale size.

  1. textbf{Tomography of Ionosphere electron density and its abnormity analysis during Wenchuan earthquake }

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoya; Xing, Nan

    2010-05-01

    A multiple-arc method and Kriging interpolation are applied to obtain VTEC as well as DCB using ground-based GPS data. Given by the time variation characteristics of VTEC and DCB, VTEC is calculated every 30 minutes as local variables, and DCB is calculated every day as global variables. Kriging method, taking the spatial information of VTEC into account, is useful to make VTEC more precise and stable. Meanwhile, based on 3-variable spline basis function, we expand electron density into a linear combination of a set of grid points. Tomography of Ionosphere electron density is made by MART. The results show the coherence with CHAMP occultation results. We applied these two ways to process the ground-based GPS data of Yangzi River Triangle Region in May, 2008 when the shocking earthquake happened in Wenchuan. A simple statistic analysis reveals the response of ionosphere to the earthquake and also the abnormal signal occurred before the earthquake.

  2. Density changes in shear bands of a metallic glass determined by correlative analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rösner, Harald, E-mail: rosner@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Peterlechner, Martin [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Kübel, Christian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Nanotechnology (INT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Schmidt, Vitalij [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Wilde, Gerhard [Institut für Materialphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Density changes between sheared zones and their surrounding amorphous matrix as a result of plastic deformation in a cold-rolled metallic glass (melt-spun Al{sub 88}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}) were determined using high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector intensities supplemented by electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and nano-beam diffraction analyses. Sheared zones or shear bands were observed as regions of bright or dark contrast arising from a higher or lower density relative to the matrix. Moreover, abrupt contrast changes from bright to dark and vice versa were found within individual shear bands. We associate the decrease in density mainly with an enhanced free volume in the shear bands and the increase in density with concomitant changes of the mass. This interpretation is further supported by changes in the zero loss and Plasmon signal originating from such sites. The limits of this new approach are discussed. - Highlights: • We describe a novel approach for measuring densities in shear bands of metallic glasses. • The linear relation of the dark-field intensity I/I{sub 0} and the mass thickness ρt was used. • Individual shear bands showed abrupt contrast changes from bright to dark and vice versa. • Density changes ranging from about −10% to +6% were found for such shear bands. • Mixtures of amorphous/medium range ordered domains were found within the shear bands.

  3. Local and global properties of eigenfunctions and one-electron densities of Coulombic Schrödinger operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Maria; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We review recent results by the authors on the regularity of molecular eigenfunctions ψ and their corresponding one-electron densities ρ, as well as of the spherically averaged one-electron atomic density ρ. Furthermore, we prove an exponentially decreasing lower bound for ρ in the case when the ...

  4. Correlated magnetic impurities in a superconductor: electron density profiles and robustness of superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, P D; Dugaev, V K; Vieira, V R; Araújo, M A N

    2010-01-20

    The insertion of magnetic impurities in a conventional superconductor leads to various effects. In this work we show that the electron density is affected by the spins (considered as classical) both locally and globally. The charge accumulation is solved self-consistently. This affects the transport properties along magnetic domain walls. Also, we show that superconductivity is more robust if the spin locations are not random but correlated. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd

  5. Variability in the Fl and F2 region electron density during a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the variation in the F1 and F2 region electron density during a geomagnetic activity, at East Asian mid-latitude stations. In this analysis, we have employed D(foF1) and D(foF2) representing deviation of the critical frequency for the F1 and F2 ionospheric regions respectively. The F1 region appears to ...

  6. Electronic properties and charge density of BexZn1−xTe alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mater. Sci., Vol. 34, No. 3, June 2011, pp. 499–506. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Electronic properties and charge density of BexZn1−xTe alloys. C B SWARNKAR†, U PALIWAL, N N PATEL‡ and K B JOSHI. ∗. Department of Physics, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313 001, India. †Department of Physics, S.G.G. Govt.

  7. Tracing the Fingerprint of Chemical Bonds within the Electron Densities of Hydrocarbons: A Comparative Analysis of the Optimized and the Promolecule Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvani, Zahra Alimohammadi; Shahbazian, Shant; Zahedi, Mansour

    2016-10-18

    The equivalence of the molecular graphs emerging from the comparative analysis of the optimized and the promolecule electron densities in two hundred and twenty five unsubstituted hydrocarbons was recently demonstrated [Keyvani et al. Chem. Eur. J. 2016, 22, 5003]. Thus, the molecular graph of an optimized molecular electron density is not shaped by the formation of the C-H and C-C bonds. In the present study, to trace the fingerprint of the C-H and C-C bonds in the electron densities of the same set of hydrocarbons, the amount of electron density and its Laplacian at the (3, -1) critical points associated with these bonds are derived from both optimized and promolecule densities, and compared in a newly proposed comparative analysis. The analysis not only conforms to the qualitative picture of the electron density build up between two atoms upon formation of a bond in between, but also quantifies the resulting accumulation of the electron density at the (3, -1) critical points. The comparative analysis also reveals a unified mode of density accumulation in the case of 2318 studied C-H bonds, but various modes of density accumulation are observed in the case of 1509 studied C-C bonds and they are classified into four groups. The four emerging groups do not always conform to the traditional classification based on the bond orders. Furthermore, four C-C bonds described as exotic bonds in previous studies, for example the inverted C-C bond in 1,1,1-propellane, are naturally distinguished from the analysis. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Correlation energy, correlated electron density, and exchange-correlation potential in some spherically confined atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2016-12-05

    We report correlation energies, electron densities, and exchange-correlation potentials obtained from configuration interaction and density functional calculations on spherically confined He, Be, Be(2+) , and Ne atoms. The variation of the correlation energy with the confinement radius Rc is relatively small for the He, Be(2+) , and Ne systems. Curiously, the Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) functional works well for weak confinements but fails completely for small Rc . However, in the neutral beryllium atom the CI correlation energy increases markedly with decreasing Rc . This effect is less pronounced at the density-functional theory level. The LYP functional performs very well for the unconfined Be atom, but fails badly for small Rc . The standard exchange-correlation potentials exhibit significant deviation from the "exact" potential obtained by inversion of Kohn-Sham equation. The LYP correlation potential behaves erratically at strong confinements. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. HF produced ionospheric electron density irregularities diagnosed by UHF radio star scintillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, A.; Gordon, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Three observations of radio star intensity fluctuations at UHF are reported for HF ionospheric modification experiments carried out at the Arecibo Observatory. Two observations at 430 MHz and one at 1400 MHz suggest that the the thin phase screen theory is a good approximation to the observed power spectra. It is noted, however, that the theory has to be extended to include antenna filtering. This type of filtering is important for UHF radio star scintillations since the antenna usually has a narrow beamwidth. HF power densities of less than 37 microwatts/sq m incident on the ionosphere give rise to electron density irregularities larger than 13% of the ambient density (at 260 km) having scale sizes of approximately 510 m perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. The irregularities are found to form within 20-25 s after the HF power is turned on. The drift velocities of the irregularities can be estimated from the observed power spectra.

  10. Retrieval of Electron Density Profile for KOMPSAT-5 GPS Radio Occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Kyoung Lee

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The AOPOD (Atmosphere Occultation and Precision Orbit Determination system, the secondary payload of KOMPSAT (KOrea Multi-Purpose SATellite-5 scheduled to be launched in 2010, shall provide GPS radio occultation data. In this paper, we simulated the GPS radio occultation characteristic of KOMPSAT-5 and retrieved electron density profiles using KROPS (KASI Radio Occultation Processing Software. The electron density retrieved from CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload GPS radio occultation data on June 20, 2004 was compared with IRI (International Reference Ionosphere - 2001, PLP (Planar Langmuir Probe, and ionosonde measurements. When the result was compared with ionosonde measurements, the discrepancies were 5 km on the F_2 peak height (hmF_2 and 3×10^{10} el/m^3 on the electron density of the F_2 peak height (NmF_2. By comparing with the Langmuir Probe measurements of CHAMP satellite (PLP, both agrees with 1.6×10^{11} el/m^3 at the height of 365.6 km.

  11. Polyquant CT: direct electron and mass density reconstruction from a single polyenergetic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jonathan H.; Perelli, Alessandro; Nailon, William H.; Davies, Mike E.

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying material mass and electron density from computed tomography (CT) reconstructions can be highly valuable in certain medical practices, such as radiation therapy planning. However, uniquely parameterising the x-ray attenuation in terms of mass or electron density is an ill-posed problem when a single polyenergetic source is used with a spectrally indiscriminate detector. Existing approaches to single source polyenergetic modelling often impose consistency with a physical model, such as water-bone or photoelectric-Compton decompositions, which will either require detailed prior segmentation or restrictive energy dependencies, and may require further calibration to the quantity of interest. In this work, we introduce a data centric approach to fitting the attenuation with piecewise-linear functions directly to mass or electron density, and present a segmentation-free statistical reconstruction algorithm for exploiting it, with the same order of complexity as other iterative methods. We show how this allows both higher accuracy in attenuation modelling, and demonstrate its superior quantitative imaging, with numerical chest and metal implant data, and validate it with real cone-beam CT measurements.

  12. Influence of richness and seeding density on invasion resistance in experimental tallgrass prairie restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Kristine T.; Allen, Craig R.; Helzer, Christopher J.; Wedin, David A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, agricultural producers and non-governmental organizations and agencies have restored thousands of hectares of cropland to grassland in the Great Plains of the United States. However, little is known about the relationships between richness and seeding density in these restorations and resistance to invasive plant species. We assessed the effects of richness and seeding density on resistance to invasive and other unseeded plant species in experimental tallgrass prairie plots in central Nebraska. In 2006, twenty-four 55 m × 55 m plots were planted with six replicates in each of four treatments: high richness (97 species typically planted by The Nature Conservancy), at low and high seeding densities, and low richness (15 species representing a typical Conservation Reserve Program mix, CP25), at low and high seeding densities. There was a significant negative relationship between richness and basal cover of unseeded perennial forbs/legumes and unseeded perennial/annual grasses, abundance of bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare), and the number of inflorescences removed from smooth brome (Bromus inermis) transplants. Invasion resistance may have been higher in the high richness treatments because of the characteristics of the dominant species in these plots or because of greater interspecific competition for limiting resources among forbs/legumes with neighboring plants belonging to the same functional group. Seeding density was not important in affecting invasion resistance, except in the cover of unseeded grasses. Increasing seed mix richness may be more effective than increasing the seeding density for decreasing invasion by unseeded perennial species, bull thistle, and smooth brome.

  13. Estimation of dislocation density from precession electron diffraction data using the Nye tensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, A C; Weinberger, C R; Taheri, M L

    2015-06-01

    The Nye tensor offers a means to estimate the geometrically necessary dislocation density of a crystalline sample based on measurements of the orientation changes within individual crystal grains. In this paper, the Nye tensor theory is applied to precession electron diffraction automated crystallographic orientation mapping (PED-ACOM) data acquired using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The resulting dislocation density values are mapped in order to visualize the dislocation structures present in a quantitative manner. These density maps are compared with other related methods of approximating local strain dependencies in dislocation-based microstructural transitions from orientation data. The effect of acquisition parameters on density measurements is examined. By decreasing the step size and spot size during data acquisition, an increasing fraction of the dislocation content becomes accessible. Finally, the method described herein is applied to the measurement of dislocation emission during in situ annealing of Cu in TEM in order to demonstrate the utility of the technique for characterizing microstructural dynamics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Two-dimensional electron density measurement of pulsed positive primary streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Aono, Kaiho; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2017-05-01

    Elucidating the electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is critical for achieving a systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species. Using Shack-Hartmann-type laser wavefront sensors with a temporal resolution of 2 ns, we carried out single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurements for positive primary streamers generated in a 13 mm air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density over the positive primary streamers decayed from 1015 to {{10}14}\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} during the propagation. The decay time constant of the electron density in the primary streamer channels was estimated to be  ˜2 ns. The distribution widths of the electron density were in good agreement with those of the light emission, typically ranging from 0.8 to 1.5 mm.

  15. Plasma Wave and Electron Density Structure Observed in the Cusp with a Dual-Rocket Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, C. A.; Labelle, J. W.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S.; Cairns, I.

    2008-12-01

    The Twin Rockets to Investigate Cusp Electrodynamics (TRICE) were launched on December 10, 2007, from Andoya Research Range in Andenes, Norway, into the active cusp. Both payloads traveled north over Svalbard, with one payload reaching an apogee of ~1100 km, and the other reaching ~600 km. The payloads were separated by 100-400 km during the main portion of the flight. Both payloads included waveform receivers with 5 MHz bandwidth. These recorded several distinct types of auroral waves including whistler mode waves below ~1000 kHz and Langmuir-upper hybrid waves at 300-3000 kHz for several hundred km. Both payloads concurrently encountered a distinct period of Langmuir turbulence. Clearly defined wave cutoffs provide measurements of electron density and reveal significant density structure with density enhancements having amplitudes up to 100 percent and scale sizes from meters to tens of kilometers. Analysis of the inferred density profiles using windowed Fourier Transforms or Lomb-Scargle periodograms generates dynamic spectra of the density, which provide estimates of the spectral composition of the density irregularities for time intervals sufficiently short that the stationarity of the spectra can be investigated. The large-scale structures through which the two payloads propagated were measured by both the EISCAT and SuperDARN radars as well as by all-sky cameras operated at Longyearbyen and Ny-Alesund on Svalbard. Using this data when available, comparison of the density irregularity waveforms and spectra from the two flights is studied in relation to spatial and altitude variations of the turbulence. This examination of wave and density structures and the large scale formations with which they are associated will add to the understanding of the large scale electrodynamics of the cusp region.

  16. Experimental and density functional study of Mn doped Bi2Te3 topological insulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghasemi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a nanoscale structural and density functional study of the Mn doped 3D topological insulator Bi2Te3. X-ray absorption near edge structure shows that Mn has valency of nominally 2+. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS shows that Mn is a substitutional dopant of Bi and Te and also resides in the van der Waals gap between the quintuple layers of Bi2Te3. Combination of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and EELS shows that Mn substitution of Te occurs in film regions with increased Mn concentration. First-principles calculations show that the Mn dopants favor octahedral sites and are ferromagnetically coupled.

  17. Experimental observation of electron bounce resonance through electron energy distribution measurement in a finite size inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Seuli [Department of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chang, Yoon-Min; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Deuk-Chul [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The electron bounce resonance was experimentally investigated in a low pressure planar inductively coupled plasma. The electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) were measured at different chamber heights and the energy diffusion coefficients were calculated by the kinetic model. It is found that the EEPFs begin to flatten at the first electron bounce resonance condition, and the plateau shifts to a higher electron energy as the chamber height increases. The plateau which indicates strong electron heating corresponds not only to the electron bounce resonance condition but also to the peaks of the first component of the energy diffusion coefficients. As a result, the plateau formation in the EEPFs is mainly due to the electron bounce resonance in a finite inductive discharge.

  18. Numerical and Experimental Studies of Transient Natural Convection with Density Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Satoru; Ishiguro, Tatsuji; Kuwahara, Kunio

    1996-11-01

    In beer manufacturing process, we cool beer in storage tank down from 8 to -1 ^circC. The understanding of cooling process is very important for designing a fermentation tank. In this paper, flow and temperature distribution in a rectangular enclosure was studied. The unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations were integrated by using the multi-directional third-order upwind finite difference method(MUFDM). A parabolic density-temperature relationship was assumed in water which has the maximum density at 3.98 ^circC. Cooling down from 8 to 0 ^circC of water in 10 cm cubical enclosure (Ra=10^7) was numerically done by keeping a vertical side wall at 0 ^circC. Vortex was caused by density inversion of water which was cooled bellow 4 ^circC, and it rose near the cold wall and reached water surface after 33 min from the start of cooling. Finally, cooling proceeded from upper surface. At the aim of verifing the accuracy of the numerical result, temperature distribution under the same condition was experimentally visualized using temperature sensitive liquid crystal. The results will be presented by using video movie. Comparison between the computation and the experiment showed that the present direct simulation based on the MUFDM was powerful tool for the understanding of the natural convection with density inversion and the application of cooling phenomenon to the design of beer storage tanks.

  19. Two-electron Rabi oscillations in real-time time-dependent density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habenicht, Bradley F; Tani, Noriyuki P; Provorse, Makenzie R; Isborn, Christine M

    2014-11-14

    We investigate the Rabi oscillations of electrons excited by an applied electric field in several simple molecular systems using time-dependent configuration interaction (TDCI) and real-time time-dependent density-functional theory (RT-TDDFT) dynamics. While the TDCI simulations exhibit the expected single-electron Rabi oscillations at a single resonant electric field frequency, Rabi oscillations in the RT-TDDFT simulations are a two-electron process. The existence of two-electron Rabi oscillations is determined both by full population inversion between field-free molecular orbitals and the behavior of the instantaneous dipole moment during the simulations. Furthermore, the Rabi oscillations in RT-TDDFT are subject to an intensity threshold of the electric field, below which Rabi oscillations do not occur and above which the two-electron Rabi oscillations occur at a broad range of frequencies. It is also shown that at field intensities near the threshold intensity, the field frequency predicted to induce Rabi oscillations by linear response TDDFT only produces detuned Rabi oscillations. Instead, the field frequency that yields the full two-electron population inversion and Rabi oscillation behavior is shown to be the average of single-electron transition frequencies from the ground S0 state and the doubly-excited S2 state. The behavior of the two-electron Rabi oscillations is rationalized via two possible models. The first model is a multi-photon process that results from the electric field interacting with the three level system such that three level Rabi oscillations may occur. The second model suggests that the mean-field nature of RT-TDDFT induces paired electron propagation.

  20. Experimental investigations into visual and electronic tooth color measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzmann, Anja; Treichel, Anja; Langforth, Gabriele; Gedrange, Tomasz; Welk, Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The present study aimed to examine the validity of the visual color assessment and an electronic tooth color measurement system by means of Shade Inspector™ in comparison with a gold standard. Additionally, reproducibility of electronic measurements was demonstrated by means of two reference systems. Ceramic specimens of two thicknesses (h=1.6 mm, h=2.6 mm) were used. Three experienced dental technicians using the VITAPAN Classical(®) color scale carried out all visual tests. Validity of the visual assessment and the electronic measurements was confirmed separately for both thicknesses by means of lightness and hue of the VITAPAN Classical(®) color scale. Reproducibility of electronic measurements was confirmed by means of the VITAPAN Classical(®) and 3D-Master(®). The 3D-Master(®) data were calculated according to lightness, hue and chroma. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used in assessing validity/reproducibility for lightness and chroma, Kappa statistics were used for hue. A level ≥0.75 was pre-established for ICC and ≥0.60 for the Kappa index. RESULTS OF VISUAL COLOR ASSESSMENT: Validity for lightness was good for both thicknesses; agreement rates for hue were inconsistent. ELECTRONIC MEASUREMENT: Validity for lightness was fair to good, hue values were below 0.60. Reproducibility of lightness was good to very good for both reference systems. Hue values (VITAPAN Classical(®)) for 1.6 mm test specimens were upside, for 2.6 mm below 0.60, Kappa values for 3D-Master(®) were ≥0.60 for all measurements, reproducibility of chroma was very good. Validity was better for visual than for electronic color assessment. Reproducibility of the electronic device by means of the Shade Inspector™ was given for the VITAPAN Classical(®) and 3D-Master(®) systems.

  1. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  2. Electronic structure of SnF{sub 3}: An example of valence skipper which forms charge density wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, I., E-mail: i.hase@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Yanagisawa, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Kawashima, K. [IMRA Material R& D Co., LTD., Kariya, Aichi 448-0032 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We calculated the electronic structure of SnF{sub 3} and BaBiO{sub 3} from first principles. • As for SnF{sub 3}, charge-density-wave (CDW) is found, which agrees with the experiment. • As for BaBiO{sub 3}, CDW is not found, contrary to the experiment. • We conclude that the CDW is hard in SnF{sub 3} and is soft in BaBiO{sub 3}. - Abstract: In the present study we calculated the electronic structure of the valence skipping compound SnF{sub 3} and BaBiO{sub 3} from first-principles. We confirmed that the charge-density-wave (CDW) is formed in SnF{sub 3}, and the Sn atoms in two crystallographic different sites take the valence Sn{sup 2+} and Sn{sup 4+}. Structure optimization study reveals that this CDW is stable, though the atomic position is slightly different from the experimental data. This behavior is in contrast with the case of BaBiO{sub 3}, where the structure optimization leads to the uniform state, which means that two Bi sites are equivalent. The CDW state is hard in SnF{sub 3}, which means that the CDW gap is large enough and it is difficult to melt this CDW order.

  3. A precision control method for plasma electron density and Faraday rotation angle measurement on HL-2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Tongyu; Ding, Baogang; Li, Yonggao; Zhou, Yan; Yin, Zejie

    2017-07-01

    The precision of plasma electron density and Faraday rotation angle measurement is a key indicator for far-infrared laser interferometer/polarimeter plasma diagnosis. To improve the precision, a new multi-channel high signal-to-noise ratio HCOOH interferometer/polarimeter has been developed on the HL-2A tokamak. It has a higher level requirement for phase demodulation precision. This paper introduces an improved real-time fast Fourier transform algorithm based on the field programmable gate array, which significantly improves the precision. We also apply a real-time error monitoring module (REMM) and a stable error inhibiting module (SEIM) for precision control to deal with the weak signal. We test the interferometer/polarimeter system with this improved precision control method in plasma discharge experiments and simulation experiments. The experimental results confirm that the plasma electron density precision is better than 1/3600 fringe and the Faraday rotation angle measurement precision is better than 1/900 fringe, while the temporal resolution is 80 ns. This performance can fully meet the requirements of HL-2A.

  4. Experimental and theoretical studies of picosecond laser interactions with electronic materials-laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Samuel S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Lasers having picosecond and shorter pulse duration are receiving much attention due to their capabilities for direct-write micromachining on many materials with minimal substrate damage. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of laser ablation processes, particularly the creation of plasmas that often shield the target and reduce the material processing efficiency at nanosecond time scales. However, a considerable challenge that still remains is the understanding of the underlying mechanisms during picosecond laser interactions with electronic solids. In this work we first study picosecond laser-induced electron emission from semiconductor surfaces. A theoretical model was set up based on carrier transport inside the semiconductor material during picosecond laser-semiconductor interactions. We demonstrate that nonequilibrium carrier dynamics plays a significant role for picosecond, as well as short nanosecond, laser induced electron emission from semiconductors. Photoelectric effect is found to be responsible for electron emission at low incident laser fluences, whereas thermionic emission is dominant at higher fluences. We have also performed experimental and theoretical studies on the formation and subsequent evolution of plasmas during laser-metal interactions at the picosecond time scale. Using picosecond time-resolved shadowgrams ahd interferograms, a novel type of plasma is observed, which has an electron density on the order of 1020cm-3.The origin of this picosecond plasma is attributed to gas breakdown, which is caused by laser-induced electron emission fi-om the target surface. After the laser pulse is completed, the longitudinal expansion of the plasma is suppressed. This suppression is found to result from an electric field above the target that prevents, after laser irradiation, fbrther movement of the electrons inside the plasma. Measurements of lateral plasma expansion indicate that the picosecond plasma may absorb

  5. Experimental apparatus for measurement of density of supercooled water at high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peukert Pavel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic behavior of supercooled water (metastable fluid water existing transiently below the equilibrium freezing point at high pressures was subject to many recent theoretical studies. Some of them assume that a second critical point of water exists, related to two liquid phases of supercooled water: the low-density liquid and the high-density liquid. To test these theories, an original experimental cryogenic apparatus is being developed. The volume changes are measured optically in custom-treated fused-silica capillary tubes. The capillaries are placed in a metal vessel designed for pressures up to 200 MPa. The vessel is connected to a circulation thermostat enabling a rapid change of temperature to prevent freezing. A new high-vacuum device was developed for degassing of the ultrapure water sample and filling it into the measuring capillaries. The experiments will contribute to fundamental understanding of the anomalous behavior of water and to applications in meteorology, aerospace engineering, cryobiology etc.

  6. Weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy for quantitative dislocation density measurement in steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenta; Shimodaira, Masaki; Toyama, Takeshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Milan, Konstantinovic J; Gerard, Robert; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate dislocations induced by neutron irradiation, we developed a weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy (WB-STEM) system by installing a novel beam selector, an annular detector, a high-speed CCD camera and an imaging filter in the camera chamber of a spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The capabilities of the WB-STEM with respect to wide-view imaging, real-time diffraction monitoring and multi-contrast imaging are demonstrated using typical reactor pressure vessel steel that had been used in an European nuclear reactor for 30 years as a surveillance test piece with a fluence of 1.09 × 1020 neutrons cm-2. The quantitatively measured size distribution (average loop size = 3.6 ± 2.1 nm), number density of the dislocation loops (3.6 × 1022 m-3) and dislocation density (7.8 × 1013 m m-3) were carefully compared with the values obtained via conventional weak-beam transmission electron microscopy studies. In addition, cluster analysis using atom probe tomography (APT) further demonstrated the potential of the WB-STEM for correlative electron tomography/APT experiments. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Counterintuitive electron localisation from density-functional theory with polarisable solvent models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Stephen G., E-mail: sdale@ucmerced.edu [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Johnson, Erin R., E-mail: erin.johnson@dal.ca [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, 6274 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2015-11-14

    Exploration of the solvated electron phenomena using density-functional theory (DFT) generally results in prediction of a localised electron within an induced solvent cavity. However, it is well known that DFT favours highly delocalised charges, rendering the localisation of a solvated electron unexpected. We explore the origins of this counterintuitive behaviour using a model Kevan-structure system. When a polarisable-continuum solvent model is included, it forces electron localisation by introducing a strong energetic bias that favours integer charges. This results in the formation of a large energetic barrier for charge-hopping and can cause the self-consistent field to become trapped in local minima thus converging to stable solutions that are higher in energy than the ground electronic state. Finally, since the bias towards integer charges is caused by the polarisable continuum, these findings will also apply to other classical polarisation corrections, as in combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. The implications for systems beyond the solvated electron, including cationic DNA bases, are discussed.

  8. High-quality stable electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration in high density plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-quality, stable electron beams are produced from self-injected laser wakefield acceleration using the interaction of moderate 3 TW, 45 fs duration Ti:sapphire laser pulses with high density (>5×10^{19}   cm^{−3} helium gas jet plasma. The electron beam has virtually background-free quasimonoenergetic distribution with energy 35.6_{−2.5}^{+3.9}  MeV, charge 3.8_{−1.2}^{+2.8}  pC, divergence and pointing variation ∼10  mrad. The stable and high quality of the electron beam opens an easy way for applications of the laser wakefield accelerator in the future, particularly due to the widespread availability of sub-10 TW class lasers with a number of laser plasma laboratories around the world.

  9. Generation of neutral and high-density electron-positron pair plasmas in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, G; Poder, K; Cole, J M; Schumaker, W; Di Piazza, A; Reville, B; Dzelzainis, T; Doria, D; Gizzi, L A; Grittani, G; Kar, S; Keitel, C H; Krushelnick, K; Kuschel, S; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z; Shukla, N; Silva, L O; Symes, D; Thomas, A G R; Vargas, M; Vieira, J; Zepf, M

    2015-04-23

    Electron-positron pair plasmas represent a unique state of matter, whereby there exists an intrinsic and complete symmetry between negatively charged (matter) and positively charged (antimatter) particles. These plasmas play a fundamental role in the dynamics of ultra-massive astrophysical objects and are believed to be associated with the emission of ultra-bright gamma-ray bursts. Despite extensive theoretical modelling, our knowledge of this state of matter is still speculative, owing to the extreme difficulty in recreating neutral matter-antimatter plasmas in the laboratory. Here we show that, by using a compact laser-driven setup, ion-free electron-positron plasmas with unique characteristics can be produced. Their charge neutrality (same amount of matter and antimatter), high-density and small divergence finally open up the possibility of studying electron-positron plasmas in controlled laboratory experiments.

  10. The study of dynamics of electrons in the presence of large current densities; Etude de la dynamique des electrons en presence de fortes densites de courant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G

    2007-11-15

    The runaway electron effect is considered in different fields: nuclear fusion, or the heating of the solar corona. In this thesis, we are interested in runaway electrons in the ionosphere. We consider the issue of electrons moving through an ionospheric gas of positive ions and neutrals under the influence of a parallel electric field. We develop a kinetic model of collisions including electrons/electrons, electrons/ions and electrons/neutrals collisions. We use a Fokker-Planck approach to describe binary collisions between charged particles with a long-range interaction. A computational example is given illustrating the approach to equilibrium and the impact of the different terms. Then, a static electric field is applied in a new sample run. In this run, the electrons move in the z direction, parallel to the electric field. The first results show that all the electron distribution functions are non-Maxwellian. Furthermore, runaway electrons can carry a significant part of the total current density up to 20% of the total current density. Nevertheless, we note that the divergence free of the current density is not conserved. We introduce major changes in order to take into account the variation of the different moments of the ion distribution functions. We observe that the electron distribution functions are still non-Maxwellian. Runaway electrons are created and carry the current density. The core distribution stay at rest. As these electrons undergo less collisions, they increase the plasma conductivity. We make a parametric study. We fit the electron distribution function by two Maxwellian. We show that the time to reach the maximal current density is a key point. Thus, when we increase this time, we modify the temperatures. The current density plays a primary role. When the current density increases, all the moments of the distributions increase: electron density and mean velocity of the suprathermal distribution and the electron temperature of the core and

  11. Experimental setup for energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscopy (EFSCEM) in a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, P; Behan, G; Kirkland, A I; Nellist, P D, E-mail: peng.wang@materials.ox.ac.u [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) is a new imaging mode in electron microscopy. Spherical aberration corrected electron microscope instruments fitted with two aberration correctors can be used in this mode which provides improved depth resolution and selectivity compared to optical sectioning in a conventional scanning transmission geometry. In this article, we consider a confocal optical configuration for SCEM using inelastically scattered electrons. We lay out the necessary steps for achieving this new operational mode in a double aberration-corrected instrument with uncorrected chromatic aberration and present preliminary experimental results in such mode.

  12. On the error in the nucleus-centered multipolar expansion of molecular electron density and its topology: A direct-space computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, J. Robert; Koritsanszky, Tibor

    2017-05-01

    The convergence of nucleus-centered multipolar expansion of the quantum-chemical electron density (QC-ED), gradient, and Laplacian is investigated in terms of numerical radial functions derived by projecting stockholder atoms onto real spherical harmonics at each center. The partial sums of this exact one-center expansion are compared with the corresponding Hansen-Coppens pseudoatom (HC-PA) formalism [Hansen, N. K. and Coppens, P., "Testing aspherical atom refinements on small-molecule data sets," Acta Crystallogr., Sect. A 34, 909-921 (1978)] commonly utilized in experimental electron density studies. It is found that the latter model, due to its inadequate radial part, lacks pointwise convergence and fails to reproduce the local topology of the target QC-ED even at a high-order expansion. The significance of the quantitative agreement often found between HC-PA-based (quadrupolar-level) experimental and extended-basis QC-EDs can thus be challenged.

  13. Predicting the Oxygen-Binding Properties of Platinum Nanoparticle Ensembles by Combining High-Precision Electron Microscopy and Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Jolyon; Jones, Lewys; Varambhia, Aakash; MacArthur, Katherine E; Ozkaya, Dogan; Sarwar, Misbah; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Nellist, Peter D

    2017-07-12

    Many studies of heterogeneous catalysis, both experimental and computational, make use of idealized structures such as extended surfaces or regular polyhedral nanoparticles. This simplification neglects the morphological diversity in real commercial oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts used in fuel-cell cathodes. Here we introduce an approach that combines 3D nanoparticle structures obtained from high-throughput high-precision electron microscopy with density functional theory. Discrepancies between experimental observations and cuboctahedral/truncated-octahedral particles are revealed and discussed using a range of widely used descriptors, such as electron-density, d-band centers, and generalized coordination numbers. We use this new approach to determine the optimum particle size for which both detrimental surface roughness and particle shape effects are minimized.

  14. Spatially separated charge densities of electrons and holes in organic-inorganic halide perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan; Liang, Chunjun, E-mail: chjliang@bjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Huimin; You, Fangtian; He, Zhiqun, E-mail: chjliang@bjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhang, Chunxiu [Information Recording Materials Lab, Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, Beijing 102600 (China)

    2015-02-21

    Solution-processable methylammonium lead trihalide perovskites exhibit remarkable high-absorption and low-loss properties for solar energy conversion. Calculation from density functional theory indicates the presence of non-equivalent halogen atoms in the unit cell because of the specific orientation of the organic cation. Considering the 〈100〉 orientation as an example, I{sub 1}, one of the halogen atoms, differs from the other iodine atoms (I{sub 2} and I{sub 3}) in terms of its interaction with the organic cation. The valance-band-maximum (VBM) and conduction-band-minimum (CBM) states are derived mainly from 5p orbital of I{sub 1} atom and 6p orbital of Pb atom, respectively. The spatially separated charge densities of the electrons and holes justify the low recombination rate of the pure iodide perovskite. Chlorine substitution further strengthens the unique position of the I{sub 1} atom, leading to more localized charge density around the I{sub 1} atom and less charge density around the other atoms at the VBM state. The less overlap of charge densities between the VBM and CBM states explains the relatively lower carrier recombination rate of the iodine-chlorine mixed perovskite. Chlorine substitution significantly reduces the effective mass at a direction perpendicular to the Pb-Cl bond and organic axis, enhancing the carrier transport property of the mixed perovskite in this direction.

  15. The 10 sheath-accelerated electrons and ions. [atmospheric models of plasma sheaths and ionospheric electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawhan, S. D.

    1975-01-01

    A model is presented that suggests that plasma sheaths form between the ionospheric plasma moving with Io and the ambient plasma corotating with Jupiter. Potentials across these sheaths could be as high as 580 kV which is the motional emf across Io's ionosphere. Electrons and ions can be accelerated across these sheaths. The sheaths may exist at the top of the Io ionosphere with characteristic thicknesses of 1/4 kilometers. The model is consistent with the Pioneer observations of 0.15 MeV electrons at the inner edge of Io's L-shell and the enhanced number density of low-energy protons at the outer edge. Ion sputtering of the Io surface is discussed and may explain the presence of atomic hydrogen and sodium in the vicinity of Io. Also these accelerated particles may be important to the formation of the Io ionosphere. High electron flux which may lead to decametric radio emissions, Jovian atmospheric heating and optical and X-ray emissions is also discussed.

  16. Pairing and unpairing electron densities in organic systems: Two-electron three center through space and through bonds interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobayan, Rosana M., E-mail: rmlb@exa.unne.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Naturales y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, 3400, Corrientes (Argentina); Bochicchio, Roberto C., E-mail: rboc@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, and IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-05-07

    Two-electron three-center bonding interactions in organic ions like methonium (CH{sub 5}{sup +}), ethonium (C{sub 2}H{sub 7}{sup +}), and protonated alkanes n−C{sub 4}H{sub 11}{sup +} isomers (butonium cations) are described and characterized within the theoretical framework of the topological analysis of the electron density decomposition into its effectively paired and unpaired contributions. These interactions manifest in some of this type of systems as a concentration of unpaired electron cloud around the bond paths, in contrast to the well known paradigmatic boron hydrids in which it is not only concentrated close to the atomic nucleus and the bond paths but out of them and over the region defined by the involved atoms as a whole. This result permits to propose an attempt of classification for these interactions based in such manifestations. In the first type, it is called as interactions through bonds and in the second type as interactions through space type.

  17. Conformational, electronic, and spectroscopic characterization of isophthalic acid (monomer and dimer structures) experimentally and by DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardak, F.; Karaca, C.; Bilgili, S.; Atac, A.; Mavis, T.; Asiri, A. M.; Karabacak, M.; Kose, E.

    2016-08-01

    Isophthalic acid (C6H4(CO2H)2) is a noteworthy organic compound widely used in coating and synthesis of resins and the production of commercially important polymers such as drink plastic bottles. The effects of isophthalic acid (IPA) on human health, toxicology, and biodegradability are the main focus of many researchers. Because structural and spectroscopic investigation of molecules provides a deep understanding of interactional behaviors of compounds, this study stands for exploring those features. Therefore, the spectroscopic, structural, electronic, and thermodynamical properties of IPA were thoroughly studied in this work experimentally using UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR, FT-IR, FT-Raman and theoretically via DFT and TD-DFT calculations. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum in water was taken in the region 200-400 nm. The NMR chemical shifts (1H and 13C) were recorded in DMSO solution. The infrared and Raman spectra of the solid IPA were recorded in the range of 4000-400 cm- 1 and 3500-50 cm- 1, respectively. DFT and TD-DFT calculations were performed at the level of B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) in determination of geometrical structure, electronic structure analysis and normal mode. The 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were estimated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method was used to determine the total energy distribution (TED) to assign the vibrational modes accurately. Weak interactions such as hydrogen bonding and Van der Walls were analyzed via reduced density gradient (RDG) analysis in monomeric and dimeric forms. Furthermore, the excitation energies, density of state (DOS) diagram, thermodynamical properties, molecular electro-static potential (MEP), and nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were obtained.

  18. The Experimental Demonstration of the Optimized Electrical Probe Memory for Ultra-High Density Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Gong, Sidi; Yang, Cihui; Wen, Jing

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical model has been previously proposed to optimize the structure of the electrical probe memory system, whereby the optimal thickness and resistivity of DLC capping layer and TiN under layer are predicted to be 2 nm, 0.01 Ωm, and 40 nm, 2×10-7 Ωm,respectively However, there is no experimental evidence to show that such a media stack can be fabricated in reality by the time of writing and few patents regarding this intriguing topic have been reviewed and cited. In order to realize this optimized design experimentally, the thickness dependent resistivity for both DLC and TiN film are assessed, from which it is not possible to obtain a media stack with exactly the same properties as the optimized design. Therefore, the previously proposed architecture is re-optimized using the measured properties values, and the capability of using the modified memory architecture to provide ultra-high density, high data rate, and low energy consumption is demonstrated. The results show that it is difficult to experimentally attain an electrical probe memory with exactly the same properties values as the optimized counterpart. An optimized electrical probe memory structure that includes a DLC capping layer and TiN under layer was previously proposed according to a parametric approach, while the practicality of realizing such a media stack experimentally has not bee investigated. In order to assess its practical feasibility, we first measured the electrical resistivities of DLC and TiN films for different thicknesses. In this case, for the purpose of optimizing the memory system with appropriate, but more physically realistic properties values, we re-designed the architecture using the measured properties, and the modified system is able to provide ultra-high density, large data rate, and low energy consumption. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Experimental Study of Electronic States at Metal-Dielectric Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-23

    metal smoke mixed with an alkali halide and pressed into pellets’’ , 12 was not determined, e.g. with an electron microscope. Thus, the available data do...modeled as due to a lytic solution of a metil -rich cermet wicrostructure 10 A thick A1,0 3 surface laver. Above this frequency cosistinq of rectangular

  20. Harmonic analysis of the ionospheric electron densities retrieved from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC radio occultation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, S.; Safari, A.; Sharifi, M.; Sam Khaniani, A.

    2011-12-01

    In order to investigate regular variations of the ionosphere, the least-squares harmonic estimation is applied to the time series of ionospheric electron densities in the region of Iran derived from about five years of Global Positioning System Radio Occultation (GPS RO) observations by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites. Although the obtained results are slightly different from the expected ones due to the low horizontal resolution of RO measurements, high vertical resolution of the observations enables us to detect not only the Total Electron Content (TEC) variations, but also periodic patterns of electron densities in different altitudes of the ionosphere. Dominant diurnal and annual signals, together with their Fourier series decompositions, and also periods close to 27 days are obtained, which is consistent with the previous analyses on TEC. In the equatorial anomaly band, the annual component is weaker than its Fourier decomposition periods. In particular, the semiannual period dominates the annual component, which is probably due to the effect of geomagnetic field. By the investigation of the frequencies at different local times, the semiannual signal is more significant than the annual one in the daytime, while the annual frequency is dominant at night. By the detection of the phases of the components, it is revealed that the annual signal has its maximum in summer at high altitudes, and in winter at lower altitudes. This suggests the effect of neutral compositions in the lower atmosphere. Further, the semiannual component peaks around equinox during the day, while its maximum mostly occurs in solstice at night. Since RO measurements can be used to derive TEC along the signal path between a GPS satellite and a receiver, study on the potentiality of using these observations for the prediction of electron densities and its application to the ionospheric correction of the single frequency receivers is suggested.

  1. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Orlandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy. In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al(99∶Si(1 and tungsten (W wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  2. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, G. L.; Heimgartner, P.; Ischebeck, R.; Loch, C. Ozkan; Trovati, S.; Valitutti, P.; Schlott, V.; Ferianis, M.; Penco, G.

    2016-09-01

    SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL) driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs) will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH) and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al (99 )∶Si (1 ) and tungsten (W) wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  3. A theoretical study of diurnal shift in reflection height of VLF waves using IRI electron density model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavi Latha, T.; Peddi Naidu, P.; Madhusudhana Rao, D. N.; Indira Devi, M.

    2012-11-01

    Electron density profiles for the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2001 and 2007 models have been utilized in evaluating the D-region conductivity parameter in earth ionosphere wave guide calculations. The day to night shift in reflection height of very low frequency (VLF) waves has been calculated using D-region conductivities derived from IRI models and the results are compared with those obtained from phase variation measurements of VLF transmissions from Rugby (England) made at Visakhapatnam (India). The values derived from the models are found to be much lower than those obtained from the experimental measurements. The values derived from the IRI models are in good agreement with those obtained from exponential conductivity model.

  4. Electron densities by the maximum entropy method (MEM) for various types of prior densities: a case study on three amino acids and a tripeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathapa, Siriyara Jagannatha; Mondal, Swastik; van Smaalen, Sander

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic model densities according to Mondal et al. [(2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 568-581] are presented for independent atom models (IAM), IAMs after high-order refinements (IAM-HO), invariom (INV) models and multipole (MP) models of α-glycine, DL-serine, L-alanine and Ala-Tyr-Ala at T ≃ 20 K. Each dynamic model density is used as prior in the calculation of electron density according to the maximum entropy method (MEM). We show that at the bond-critical points (BCPs) of covalent C-C and C-N bonds the IAM-HO and INV priors produce reliable MEM density maps, including reliable values for the density and its Laplacian. The agreement between these MEM density maps and dynamic MP density maps is less good for polar C-O bonds, which is explained by the large spread of values of topological descriptors of C-O bonds in static MP densities. The density and Laplacian at BCPs of hydrogen bonds have similar values in MEM density maps obtained with all four kinds of prior densities. This feature is related to the smaller spatial variation of the densities in these regions, as expressed by small magnitudes of the Laplacians and the densities. It is concluded that the use of the IAM-HO prior instead of the IAM prior leads to improved MEM density maps. This observation shows interesting parallels to MP refinements, where the use of the IAM-HO as an initial model is the accepted procedure for solving MP parameters. A deconvolution of thermal motion and static density that is better than the deconvolution of the IAM appears to be necessary in order to arrive at the best MP models as well as at the best MEM densities.

  5. A theoretical and (e,2e) experimental investigation into the complete valence electronic structure of (1.1.1) propellane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adcock, W.; Clark, C.I. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); Brunger, M.J.; McCarthy, I.E. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA (Australia). School of Physical Sciences; Michalewicz, M.T. [CSIRO, Carlton, VIC (Australia). Division of Information Technology; Von Niessen, W. [Technische Univ., Braunschweig (Germany). Institute fur Physikalische and Theoretische Chemie; Weigold, E. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Inst. of Advanced Studies; Winkler, D.A. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Clayton, VIC (Australia). Div. of Chemical Physics

    1996-08-01

    The first comprehensive electronic structural study of the complete valence shell of [1.1.1] propellane is reported. Binding energy spectra were measured in the energy regime 3.5-46.5 eV over a range of different target electron momentum so that individual orbital momentum profiles could also be determined. These binding energy spectra were collected using an energy dispersive multichannel electron momentum spectrometer at a total energy of 1000 eV, with a coincidence energy resolution of 1.38 eV and a momentum resolution of about 0.1 a.u. The experimental orbital electron momentum profiles are compared with those calculated in the plane wave impulse approximation (PWIA) using both a triple zeta plus polarisation level SCF wavefunction and a further 13 basis sets as calculated using Density Functional Theory (DFT). A critical comparison between the experimental an theoretical momentum distributions (MDs) allows to determine the optimum wavefunction for [1.1.1]propellane. In general, the level of agreement between the experimental and theoretical MDs for the optimum wavefunction for all of the respective valence orbitals was very good. The determination of this wavefunction then allowed to derive the chemically interesting molecular properties of [1.1.1]propellane. These include infrared spectra, bond lengths, bond orders, electron densities and many others. A summary of these results and a comparison of them with the previous results of other workers is presented with the level of agreement typically being good. In particular, the existence of the C1-C3 bridging bond with a bond order of 0.70 was confirmed. 59 refs., 4 tabs., 11 figs.

  6. Directed high-power THz radiation from transverse laser wakefield excited in an electron density filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, Serge; Englesbe, Alexander; Elle, Jennifer; Domonkos, Matthew; Schmitt-Sody, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    A tightly focused femtosecond, weakly relativistic laser pulse partially ionizes the ambient gas, creating a string (a ``filament'') of electron density, locally reducing the nonlinear index and compensating for the self-focusing effect caused by bound electrons. While maintaining the filament over many Rayleigh lengths, the pulse drives inside it a three-dimensional (3D) wave of charge separation - the plasma wake. If the pulse waist size is much smaller than the Langmuir wavelength, electron current in the wake is mostly transverse. Electrons, driven by the wake across the sharp radial boundary of the filament, lose coherence within 2-3 periods of wakefield oscillations, and the wake decays. The laser pulse is thus accompanied by a short-lived, almost aperiodic electron current coupled to the sharp index gradient. The comprehensive 3D hydrodynamic model shows that this structure emits a broad-band THz radiation, with the highest power emitted in the near-forward direction. The THz radiation pattern contains information on wake currents surrounding the laser pulse, thus serving as an all-optical diagnostic tool. The results are tested in cylindrical and full 3D PIC simulations using codes WAKE and EPOCH.

  7. Scalable Sub-micron Patterning of Organic Materials Toward High Density Soft Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaekyun; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Jaehyun; Jo, Sangho; Kang, Jingu; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Lee, Woobin; Hwang, Chahwan; Moon, Juhyuk; Yang, Lin; Kim, Yun-Hi; Noh, Yong-Young; Jaung, Jae Yun; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2015-09-28

    The success of silicon based high density integrated circuits ignited explosive expansion of microelectronics. Although the inorganic semiconductors have shown superior carrier mobilities for conventional high speed switching devices, the emergence of unconventional applications, such as flexible electronics, highly sensitive photosensors, large area sensor array, and tailored optoelectronics, brought intensive research on next generation electronic materials. The rationally designed multifunctional soft electronic materials, organic and carbon-based semiconductors, are demonstrated with low-cost solution process, exceptional mechanical stability, and on-demand optoelectronic properties. Unfortunately, the industrial implementation of the soft electronic materials has been hindered due to lack of scalable fine-patterning methods. In this report, we demonstrated facile general route for high throughput sub-micron patterning of soft materials, using spatially selective deep-ultraviolet irradiation. For organic and carbon-based materials, the highly energetic photons (e.g. deep-ultraviolet rays) enable direct photo-conversion from conducting/semiconducting to insulating state through molecular dissociation and disordering with spatial resolution down to a sub-μm-scale. The successful demonstration of organic semiconductor circuitry promise our result proliferate industrial adoption of soft materials for next generation electronics.

  8. Recoverable Wire-Shaped Supercapacitors with Ultrahigh Volumetric Energy Density for Multifunctional Portable and Wearable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Minjie; Yang, Cheng; Song, Xuefeng; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Lian

    2017-05-24

    Wire-shaped supercapacitors (SCs) based on shape memory materials are of considerable interest for next-generation portable and wearable electronics. However, the bottleneck in this field is how to develop the devices with excellent electrochemical performance while well-maintaining recoverability and flexibility. Herein, a unique asymmetric electrode concept is put forward to fabricate smart wire-shaped SCs with ultrahigh energy density, which is realized by using porous carbon dodecahedra coated on NiTi alloy wire and flexible graphene fiber as yarn electrodes. Notably, the wire-shaped SCs not only exhibit high flexibility that can be readily woven into real clothing but also represent the available recoverable ability. When irreversible plastic deformations happen, the deformed shape of the devices can automatically resume the initial predesigned shape in a warm environment (about 35 °C). More importantly, the wire-shaped SCs act as efficient energy storage devices, which display high volumetric energy density (8.9 mWh/cm(3)), volumetric power density (1080 mW/cm(3)), strong durability in multiple mechanical states, and steady electrochemical behavior after repeated shape recovery processes. Considering their relative facile fabrication technology and excellent electrochemical performance, this asymmetric electrode strategy produced smart wire-shaped supercapacitors desirable for multifunctional portable and wearable electronics.

  9. The effect of density fluctuations on electron cyclotron beam broadening and implications for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snicker, A.; Poli, E.; Maj, O.; Guidi, L.; Köhn, A.; Weber, H.; Conway, G.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2018-01-01

    We present state-of-the-art computations of propagation and absorption of electron cyclotron waves, retaining the effects of scattering due to electron density fluctuations. In ITER, injected microwaves are foreseen to suppress neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by driving current at the q=2 and q=3/2 resonant surfaces. Scattering of the beam can spoil the good localization of the absorption and thus impair NTM control capabilities. A novel tool, the WKBeam code, has been employed here in order to investigate this issue. The code is a Monte Carlo solver for the wave kinetic equation and retains diffraction, full axisymmetric tokamak geometry, determination of the absorption profile and an integral form of the scattering operator which describes the effects of turbulent density fluctuations within the limits of the Born scattering approximation. The approach has been benchmarked against the paraxial WKB code TORBEAM and the full-wave code IPF-FDMC. In particular, the Born approximation is found to be valid for ITER parameters. In this paper, we show that the radiative transport of EC beams due to wave scattering in ITER is diffusive unlike in present experiments, thus causing up to a factor of 2–4 broadening in the absorption profile. However, the broadening depends strongly on the turbulence model assumed for the density fluctuations, which still has large uncertainties.

  10. Analysis of local dislocation densities in cold-rolled alloy 690 using transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Tae-Young; Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Service failure of alloy 690 in NPP has not been reported. However, some research groups reported that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) occurred in severely cold-rolled alloy 690. Transgranular craking was also reported in coll-rolled alloy 690 with a banded structure. In order to understand the effect of cold rolling on the cracking of alloy 690, many research groups have focused on the local strain and the cracked carbide induced by cold-rolling, by using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been widely used to characterize structural materials because this technique has superior spatial resolution and allows for the analysis of crystallographic and chemical information. The aim of the present study is to understand the mechanism of the abnormally high crack growth rate (CGR) in cold-rolled alloy 690 with a banded structure. The local dislocation density was measured by TEM to confirm the effects of local strain on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of alloy 690 with a banded structure. The effects of intragranular carbides on the SCC were also evaluated in this study. The local dislocation densities were directly measured using TEM to understand the effect of local strain on the SCC of Ni-based alloy 690 with a banded structure. The dislocation densities in the interior of the grains sharply increased in highly cold-rolled specimens due to intragranular carbide, which acted as a dislocation source.

  11. Experimental phasing with SHELXC/D/E: combining chain tracing with density modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrick, George M

    2010-04-01

    The programs SHELXC, SHELXD and SHELXE are designed to provide simple, robust and efficient experimental phasing of macromolecules by the SAD, MAD, SIR, SIRAS and RIP methods and are particularly suitable for use in automated structure-solution pipelines. This paper gives a general account of experimental phasing using these programs and describes the extension of iterative density modification in SHELXE by the inclusion of automated protein main-chain tracing. This gives a good indication as to whether the structure has been solved and enables interpretable maps to be obtained from poorer starting phases. The autotracing algorithm starts with the location of possible seven-residue alpha-helices and common tripeptides. After extension of these fragments in both directions, various criteria are used to decide whether to accept or reject the resulting poly-Ala traces. Noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) is applied to the traced fragments, not to the density. Further features are the use of a 'no-go' map to prevent the traces from passing through heavy atoms or symmetry elements and a splicing technique to combine the best parts of traces (including those generated by NCS) that partly overlap.

  12. Reconstructing Regional Ionospheric Electron Density: A Combined Spherical Slepian Function and Empirical Orthogonal Function Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaneh, Saeed; Forootan, Ehsan

    2017-11-01

    The computerized ionospheric tomography is a method for imaging the Earth's ionosphere using a sounding technique and computing the slant total electron content (STEC) values from data of the global positioning system (GPS). The most common approach for ionospheric tomography is the voxel-based model, in which (1) the ionosphere is divided into voxels, (2) the STEC is then measured along (many) satellite signal paths, and finally (3) an inversion procedure is applied to reconstruct the electron density distribution of the ionosphere. In this study, a computationally efficient approach is introduced, which improves the inversion procedure of step 3. Our proposed method combines the empirical orthogonal function and the spherical Slepian base functions to describe the vertical and horizontal distribution of electron density, respectively. Thus, it can be applied on regional and global case studies. Numerical application is demonstrated using the ground-based GPS data over South America. Our results are validated against ionospheric tomography obtained from the constellation observing system for meteorology, ionosphere, and climate (COSMIC) observations and the global ionosphere map estimated by international centers, as well as by comparison with STEC derived from independent GPS stations. Using the proposed approach, we find that while using 30 GPS measurements in South America, one can achieve comparable accuracy with those from COSMIC data within the reported accuracy (1 × 1011 el/cm3) of the product. Comparisons with real observations of two GPS stations indicate an absolute difference is less than 2 TECU (where 1 total electron content unit, TECU, is 1016 electrons/m2).

  13. Tracking motor units longitudinally across experimental sessions with high‐density surface electromyography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez‐Valdes, E.; Negro, F.; Laine, C. M.; Falla, D.; Mayer, F.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Classic motor unit (MU) recording and analysis methods do not allow the same MUs to be tracked across different experimental sessions, and therefore, there is limited experimental evidence on the adjustments in MU properties following training or during the progression of neuromuscular disorders.We propose a new processing method to track the same MUs across experimental sessions (separated by weeks) by using high‐density surface electromyography.The application of the proposed method in two experiments showed that individual MUs can be identified reliably in measurements separated by weeks and that changes in properties of the tracked MUs across experimental sessions can be identified with high sensitivity.These results indicate that the behaviour and properties of the same MUs can be monitored across multiple testing sessions.The proposed method opens new possibilities in the understanding of adjustments in motor unit properties due to training interventions or the progression of pathologies. Abstract A new method is proposed for tracking individual motor units (MUs) across multiple experimental sessions on different days. The technique is based on a novel decomposition approach for high‐density surface electromyography and was tested with two experimental studies for reliability and sensitivity. Experiment I (reliability): ten participants performed isometric knee extensions at 10, 30, 50 and 70% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force in three sessions, each separated by 1 week. Experiment II (sensitivity): seven participants performed 2 weeks of endurance training (cycling) and were tested pre–post intervention during isometric knee extensions at 10 and 30% MVC. The reliability (Experiment I) and sensitivity (Experiment II) of the measured MU properties were compared for the MUs tracked across sessions, with respect to all MUs identified in each session. In Experiment I, on average 38.3% and 40.1% of the identified MUs could be

  14. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction; Messungen transienter Elektronendichteverteilungen durch Femtosekunden-Roentgenbeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-05-02

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  15. First assimilations of COSMIC radio occultation data into the Electron Density Assimilative Model (EDAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Angling

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ground based measurements of slant total electron content (TEC can be assimilated into ionospheric models to produce 3-D representations of ionospheric electron density. The Electron Density Assimilative Model (EDAM has been developed for this purpose. Previous tests using EDAM and ground based data have demonstrated that the information on the vertical structure of the ionosphere is limited in this type of data. The launch of the COSMIC satellite constellation provides the opportunity to use radio occultation data which has more vertical information. EDAM assimilations have been run for three time periods representing quiet, moderate and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. For each run, three data sets have been ingested – only ground based data, only COSMIC data and both ground based and COSMIC data. The results from this preliminary study show that both ground and space based data are capable of improving the representation of the vertical structure of the ionosphere. However, the analysis is limited by the incomplete deployment of the COSMIC constellation and the use of auto-scaled ionosonde data. The first of these can be addressed by repeating this type of study once full deployment has been achieved. The latter requires the manual scaling of ionosonde data; ideally an agreed data set would be scaled and made available to the community to facilitate comparative testing of assimilative models.

  16. Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The imaging of fast-moving electron-density structures in the polar cap presents a unique set of challenges that are not encountered in other ionospheric imaging problems. GPS observations of total electron content in the polar cap are sparse compared to other regions in the Northern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the slow relative motion of the satellites across the sky complicates the problem since the velocity of the plasma can be large in comparison and traditional approaches could result in image blurring. This paper presents a Kalman-filter based method that incorporates a forward projection of the solution based on a model plasma drift velocity field. This is the first time that the plasma motion, rather than just integrations of electron density, has been used in an ionospheric imaging algorithm. The motion is derived from the Weimer model of the electric field. It is shown that this novel approach to the implementation of a Kalman filter provides a detailed view of the polar cap ionosphere under severe storm conditions. A case study is given for the October 2003 Halloween storm where verification is provided by incoherent scatter radars.

  17. Pressure-Dependent Electronic and Transport Properties of Bulk Platinum Oxide by Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansara, Shivam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh; Nekrasov, Kirill A.; Kichigina, Natalia V.

    2018-02-01

    The structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of bulk platinum oxide (PtO) at compressive pressures in the interval from 0 GPa to 35 GPa are investigated using the density functional theory. The calculated electronic band structure of PtO shows poor metallicity at very low density of states on the Fermi level. However, the hybrid pseudopotential calculation yielded 0.78 eV and 1.30 eV direct band and indirect gap, respectively. Importantly, our results predict that PtO has a direct band gap within the framework of HSE06, and it prefers equally zero magnetic order at different pressures. In the Raman spectra, peaks are slightly shifted towards higher frequency with the decrease in pressure. We have also calculated the thermoelectric properties, namely the electronic thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity, with respect to temperature and thermodynamic properties such as entropy, specific heat at constant volume, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy with respect to pressure. The result shows that PtO is a promising candidate for use as a catalyst, in sensors, as a photo-cathode in water electrolysis, for thermal decomposition of inorganic salt and fuel cells.

  18. Controlling Side Chain Density of Electron Donating Polymers for Improving VOC in Polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Cho, C. H.; Kang, H.; Yoon, S. C.

    2012-02-01

    The ability to tune the LUMO/HOMO levels of electroactive materials in active layer of polymer solar cells is critical in controlling their optical and electrochemical properties because the HOMO and LUMO offsets between the polymer donor and the electron acceptor strongly affect charge separation and the open circuit voltage (VOC) of a solar cell. Here, we developed two series of electroactive materials for improving VOC in polymer solar cells. First, we enable facile control over the number of solubilizing groups ultimately tethered to the fullerene by tuning the molar ratio between reactants from 1:1 to 1:3, thus producing o-xylenyl C60 mono-, bis-, and tris-adducts (OXCMA, OXCBA, and OXCTA) as electron acceptors with different LUMO levels. As the number of solubilizing groups increased, VOC values of the P3HT-based BHJ solar cells increased from 0.63, 0.83, to 0.98 V. Second, we present a series of novel poly[3-(4-n-octyl)phenylthiophene] (POPT) derivatives (POPT, POPTT, and POTQT) as electron donors with different side-chain density. As a result of lower HOMO levels by decrease in the side-chain density of the polymers, the devices consisting of POPT, POPTT, and POPQT with PCBM showed increased VOC values of 0.58, 0.63, and 0.75 V, respectively.

  19. Pressure-Dependent Electronic and Transport Properties of Bulk Platinum Oxide by Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansara, Shivam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh; Nekrasov, Kirill A.; Kichigina, Natalia V.

    2017-11-01

    The structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of bulk platinum oxide (PtO) at compressive pressures in the interval from 0 GPa to 35 GPa are investigated using the density functional theory. The calculated electronic band structure of PtO shows poor metallicity at very low density of states on the Fermi level. However, the hybrid pseudopotential calculation yielded 0.78 eV and 1.30 eV direct band and indirect gap, respectively. Importantly, our results predict that PtO has a direct band gap within the framework of HSE06, and it prefers equally zero magnetic order at different pressures. In the Raman spectra, peaks are slightly shifted towards higher frequency with the decrease in pressure. We have also calculated the thermoelectric properties, namely the electronic thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity, with respect to temperature and thermodynamic properties such as entropy, specific heat at constant volume, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy with respect to pressure. The result shows that PtO is a promising candidate for use as a catalyst, in sensors, as a photo-cathode in water electrolysis, for thermal decomposition of inorganic salt and fuel cells.

  20. Charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics for simulation of condensed phase electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2009-08-14

    We present a plane-wave basis set implementation of charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics (CDFT-MD) for simulation of electron transfer reactions in condensed phase systems. Following the earlier work of Wu and Van Voorhis [Phys. Rev. A 72, 024502 (2005)], the density functional is minimized under the constraint that the charge difference between donor and acceptor is equal to a given value. The classical ion dynamics is propagated on the Born-Oppenheimer surface of the charge constrained state. We investigate the dependence of the constrained energy and of the energy gap on the definition of the charge and present expressions for the constraint forces. The method is applied to the Ru2+-Ru3+ electron self-exchange reaction in aqueous solution. Sampling the vertical energy gap along CDFT-MD trajectories and correcting for finite size effects, a reorganization free energy of 1.6 eV is obtained. This is 0.1-0.2 eV lower than a previous estimate based on a continuum model for solvation. The smaller value for the reorganization free energy can be explained by the fact that the Ru-O distances of the divalent and trivalent Ru hexahydrates are predicted to be more similar in the electron transfer complex than for the separated aqua ions.

  1. Topside ionospheric vertical electron density profile reconstruction using GPS and ionosonde data: possibilities for South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sibanda

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful empirical modeling of the topside ionosphere relies on the availability of good quality measured data. The Alouette, ISIS and Intercosmos-19 satellite missions provided large amounts of topside sounder data, but with limited coverage of relevant geophysical conditions (e.g., geographic location, diurnal, seasonal and solar activity by each individual mission. Recently, methods for inferring the electron density distribution in the topside ionosphere from Global Positioning System (GPS-based total electron content (TEC measurements have been developed. This study is focused on the modeling efforts in South Africa and presents the implementation of a technique for reconstructing the topside ionospheric electron density (Ne using a combination of GPS-TEC and ionosonde measurements and empirically obtained Upper Transition Height (UTH. The technique produces reasonable profiles as determined by the global models already in operation. With the added advantage that the constructed profiles are tied to reliable measured GPS-TEC and the empirically determined upper transition height, the technique offers a higher level of confidence in the resulting Ne profiles.

  2. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damián A., E-mail: damian@qi.fcen.uba.ar, E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, Buenos Aires (C1428EHA) (Argentina); Oviedo, M. Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G. [Departamento de Matemática y Física, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, INFIQC, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Lebrero, Mariano C. González, E-mail: damian@qi.fcen.uba.ar, E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas, IQUIFIB, CONICET (Argentina)

    2014-04-28

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  3. Topological Properties of Chemical Bonds from Static and Dynamic Electron Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannatha Prathapa, Siriyara; Held, Jeanette; van Smaalen, Sander

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic and static electron densities (EDs) based on the independent spherical atom model (IAM) and multipole (MP) models of crambin were successfully computed, holding no series-termination effects. The densities are compared to EDs of small biological molecules at diverse temperatures. It is outlined that proteins exhibit an intrinsic flexibility, present as frozen disorder at 100 K, in contrast to small molecules. The flexibility of the proteins is reflected by atomic displacement parameters (B-factors), which are considerably larger than for small molecules at 298 K. Thus, an optimal deconvolution of deformation density and thermal motion is not guaranteed, which prevents a free refinement of MP parameters but allows an application of transferable, fixed MP parameters. The analysis of the topological properties, such as the density at bond critical points (BCPs) and the Laplacian, reveals systematic differences between static and dynamic EDs. Zero-point-vibrations, yet present in dynamic EDs at low temperature, affect but marginally the EDs of small molecules. The zero-point-vibrations cause a smearing of the ED, which becomes more pronounced with increasing temperature. Topological properties, primarily the Laplacian, of covalent bonds appear to be more sensitive to effects by temperature and the polarity of the bonds. However, dynamic EDs at ca. 20 K based on MP models provide a good characterization of chemical bonding. Both the density at BCPs and the Laplacian of hydrogen bonds constitute similar values from static and dynamic EDs for all studied temperatures. Deformation densities demonstrate the necessity of the employment of MP parameters in order to comprise the nature of covalent bonds. The character of hydrogen bonds can be roughly pictured by IAM, whereas MP parameters are recommended for a classification of hydrogen bonds beyond a solely interpretation of topological properties.

  4. Behavior of Parameters of Nighttime Electron Density Enhancements of the Ionospheric F2 Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovets, Artur; Gordienko, Galina

    2017-04-01

    There is known a wide class of disturbances of the F2-layer of the ionosphere, which are superimposed on the regular diurnal variations of the electron density. Different types of disturbances are characterized by different mechanisms of their generation. Traveling ionospheric disturbances appear to be the most characteristic features of the inhomogeneous structure of the ionosphere. Another type of ionospheric disturbances presents the nighttime electron density enhancements in the ionospheric F2- layer maximum (NmF2). This type of irregularities is described in numerous papers. There is a concept that, in spite of the various mechanisms of ionospheric disturbances generation a response of F2-layer parameters exhibits similar features associated with the upward lift and the simultaneous expansion of the layer and then its subsequent downward movement, including layer compression, which results in the formation of the electron density peak in the layer maximum at the moment of greatest compression. The aim of this study is a verification of this concept on the example of disturbances related with the nighttime electron density enhancements, and the definition of precise quantitative relationships between the variations of different F2-layer parameters for such disturbances. By using the data of the ionospheric vertical sounding in Almaty, (76° 55'E, 43°15'N) during 2001-2012, analysis of the behavior the F2-layer parameters during the night electron density enhancements was carried out within framework of a single concept of effects of various types of ionospheric plasma perturbations in variations of height and half-thickness of the F2-layer, accompanied by increasing and decreasing NmF2 at moments of maximum compression and expansion of the layer. For a quantitative analysis of the parameters of nighttime enhancements we have selected 20 nights characterized by low magnetic activity (Dst> - 50 nT) and evident manifestations of the nighttime electron density

  5. PIC-simulation of the electron beam interaction with modulated density plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendeev, E. A.; Dudnikova, G. I.; Efimova, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the processes of electromagnetic radiation generation as a result of the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with hydrogen and argon plasma are studied on the basis of numerical modeling by the particle-in-cells method (PIC). Series of numerical experiments for different background plasma parameters, beam and magnetic field have been performed using modern computer systems with massively parallel architecture. Estimates of the radiation efficiency for both the initially homogeneous plasma and for longitudinal density modulation are obtained. It is shown that the change in the plasma density due to the development of the modulation instability makes it possible to increase substantially the power of the generated sub-THz radiation. The parameters used in numerical experiments correspond to the conditions of laboratory experiments on GOL-3 facility (BINP SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia).

  6. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  7. Intermolecular Interactions in Crystalline Theobromine as Reflected in Electron Deformation Density and (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzková, Kateřina; Babinský, Martin; Novosadová, Lucie; Marek, Radek

    2013-06-11

    An understanding of the role of intermolecular interactions in crystal formation is essential to control the generation of diverse crystalline forms which is an important concern for pharmaceutical industry. Very recently, we reported a new approach to interpret the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonding, redistribution of electron density in the system, and NMR chemical shifts (Babinský et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 497). Here, we employ this approach to characterize a full set of crystal interactions in a sample of anhydrous theobromine as reflected in (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs). The important intermolecular contacts are identified by comparing the DFT-calculated NMR CSTs for an isolated theobromine molecule and for clusters composed of several molecules as selected from the available X-ray diffraction data. Furthermore, electron deformation density (EDD) and shielding deformation density (SDD) in the proximity of the nuclei involved in the proposed interactions are calculated and visualized. In addition to the recently reported observations for hydrogen bonding, we focus here particularly on the stacking interactions. Although the principal relations between the EDD and CST for hydrogen bonding (HB) and stacking interactions are similar, the real-space consequences are rather different. Whereas the C-H···X hydrogen bonding influences predominantly and significantly the in-plane principal component of the (13)C CST perpendicular to the HB path and the C═O···H hydrogen bonding modulates both in-plane components of the carbonyl (13)C CST, the stacking modulates the out-of-plane electron density resulting in weak deshielding (2-8 ppm) of both in-plane principal components of the CST and weak shielding (∼ 5 ppm) of the out-of-plane component. The hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions may add to or subtract from one another to produce total values observed experimentally. On the example of theobromine, we demonstrate

  8. Computed tomography as a source of electron density information for radiation treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skrzynski, Witold; Slusarczyk-Kacprzyk, Wioletta; Bulski, Wojciech [Medical Physics Dept., Center of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Zielinska-Dabrowska, Sylwia; Wachowicz, Marta; Kukolowicz, Pawel F. [Medical Physics Dept., Holycross Cancer Center, Kielce (Poland)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) systems of various designs as a source of electron density ({rho}{sub el}) data for treatment planning of radiation therapy. Material and methods: dependence of CT numbers on relative electron density of tissue-equivalent materials (HU-{rho}{sub el} relationship) was measured for several general-purpose CT systems (single-slice, multislice, wide-bore multislice), for radiotherapy simulators with a single-slice CT and kV CBCT (cone-beam CT) options, as well as for linear accelerators with kV and MV CBCT systems. Electron density phantoms of four sizes were used. Measurement data were compared with the standard HU-{rho}{sub el} relationships predefined in two commercial treatment-planning systems (TPS). Results: the HU-{rho}{sub el} relationships obtained with all of the general-purpose CT scanners operating at voltages close to 120 kV were very similar to each other and close to those predefined in TPS. Some dependency of HU values on tube voltage was observed for bone-equivalent materials. For a given tube voltage, differences in results obtained for different phantoms were larger than those obtained for different CT scanners. For radiotherapy simulators and for kV CBCT systems, the information on {rho}{sub el} was much less precise because of poor uniformity of images. For MV CBCT, the results were significantly different than for kV systems due to the differing energy spectrum of the beam. Conclusion: the HU-{rho}{sub el} relationships predefined in TPS can be used for general-purpose CT systems operating at voltages close to 120 kV. For nontypical imaging systems (e.g., CBCT), the relationship can be significantly different and, therefore, it should always be measured and carefully analyzed before using CT data for treatment planning. (orig.)

  9. Response of the ionospheric electron density to different types of seismic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. He

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The electron density data recorded by the Langmuir Probe Instrument (ISL, Instrument Sonde de Langmuir onboard the DEMETER satellite have been collected for nearly 4 yr (during 2006–2009 to perform a statistical analysis. During this time, more than 7000 earthquakes with a magnitude larger than or equal to 5.0 occurred all over the world. For the statistical studies, all these events have been divided into various categories on the basis of the seismic information, including Southern or Northern Hemisphere earthquakes, inland or sea earthquakes, earthquakes at different magnitude levels, earthquakes at different depth levels, isolated events and all events. To distinguish the pre-earthquake anomalies from the possible ionospheric anomalies related to the geomagnetic activity, the data were filtered with the Kp index. The statistical results obviously show that the electron density increases close to the epicentres both in the Northern and the Southern Hemisphere, but the position of the anomaly is slightly shifted to the north in the Northern Hemisphere and to the south in the Southern Hemisphere. The electron density related to both inland and sea earthquakes presents an anomaly approximately close to the epicentres, but the anomaly for sea earthquakes is more significant than for inland earthquakes. The intensity of the anomalies is enhanced when the magnitude increases and is reduced when the depth increases. A similar anomaly can also be seen in the statistical results concerning the isolated earthquakes. All these statistical results can help to better understand the preparation process of the earthquakes and their influence up to the ionospheric levels.

  10. The electronic structure of TiCl: ligand field versus density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focsa, C.; Bencheikh, M.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    1998-07-01

    The electronic structures of titanium chloride and its cation have been analysed by means of both ligand field (LFT) and density functional (DFT) theories. Despite the discrepancy between the DFT and LFT concerning the assignment of the ground state of 0953-4075/31/13/006/img6, an overall agreement is seen for TiCl. The observed 0953-4075/31/13/006/img7 ground state is found to result from our calculated 0953-4075/31/13/006/img8 ground state by a 0953-4075/31/13/006/img9 ionization process with an energy of 0953-4075/31/13/006/img10.

  11. Spatial and temporal features of density-dependent contaminant transport: experimental investigation and numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoia, Andrea; Latrille, Christelle; Beccantini, Alberto; Cartadale, Alain

    2009-10-13

    We investigate the spatial and temporal features of variable-density contaminant plumes migration in porous materials. Our analysis is supported by novel experimental results concerning concentration profiles inside a vertical column setup that has been conceived at CEA to this aim. The experimental method relies on X-ray spectrometry, which allows determining solute profiles as a function of time at several positions along the column. The salient outcomes of the measurements are elucidated, with focus on miscible fluids in homogeneous saturated media. The role of the injected solution molarity is evidenced. As molarity increases, the solutes plume transport progressively deviates from the usual Fickian behavior, and pollutants distribution becomes skewed in the direction dictated by gravity. By resorting to a finite elements approach, we numerically solve the nonlinear equations that rule the pollutants migration: a good agreement is found between the simulated profiles and the experimental data. At high molarity, a strong dependence on initial conditions is found. Finally, we qualitatively explore the (unstable) interfacial dynamics between the dense contaminant plume and the lighter resident fluid that saturates the column, and detail its evolution for finite-duration contaminant injections.

  12. Threading dislocation density characterization in III-V photovoltaic materials by electron channeling contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaung, Kevin Nay; Kirnstoetter, Stefan; Faucher, Joseph; Gerger, Andy; Lochtefeld, Anthony; Barnett, Allen; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2016-11-01

    Accurate and rapid threading dislocation density (TDD) characterization of III-V photovoltaic materials using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is demonstrated. TDDs measured using ECCI showed close agreement with those from electron beam-induced current mapping (EBIC) and defect selective etching (DSE). ECCI is shown to be well-suited for measuring TDD values over a range of 5×106-5×108 cm-2. ECCI can distinguish individual dislocations in clusters closer than 0.2 μm, highlighting its excellent spatial resolution compared to DSE and EBIC. Taken together, ECCI is shown to be a versatile and complementary method to rapidly quantify TDD in III-V solar cells.

  13. Investigation of Multiconfigurational Short-Range Density Functional Theory for Electronic Excitations in Organic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubert, Mickaël; Hedegård, Erik D.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2016-01-01

    -srDFT for a selected benchmark set of electronic excitations of organic molecules, covering the most common types of organic chromophores. This investigation confirms the expectation that the MC-srDFT method is accurate for a broad range of excitations and comparable to accurate wave function methods such as CASPT2......Computational methods that can accurately and effectively predict all types of electronic excitations for any molecular system are missing in the toolbox of the computational chemist. Although various Kohn-Sham density-functional methods (KS-DFT) fulfill this aim in some cases, they become...... and double excitations have been promising, it is nevertheless important that the accuracy of MC-srDFT is at least comparable to the best KS-DFT methods also for organic molecules that are typically of single-reference character. In this paper we therefore systematically investigate the performance of MC...

  14. Approximation of charge-deposition density in thin slabs irradiated by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Alouani-Bibi, F; Rogov, Y V; Tabata, T

    2000-01-01

    Charge-deposition distributions in thin slabs irradiated by plane-parallel electron beams are studied. The slabs considered are made of elements with atomic numbers ranging from 4 to 79. The slab thicknesses are from 0.5 to 50 mg/cm sup 2 , and the electron beam energies are from 1 to 10 MeV. Using a new Monte Carlo method (called the trajectory translation method), data on the charge-deposition density have been obtained. Theoretical analysis of these data has been performed. Based on this analysis, a semiempirical model that describes charge-deposition distributions in thin slabs has been developed. The results obtained by the semiempirical model have been compared with those obtained by the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code and show moderate agreement.

  15. Modelling of the electron density height profiles in the mid-latitude ionospheric D-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Mukhtarov

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A new mid-latitude D-region (50-105 km model of the electron density is presented obtained on the basis of a full wave theory and by a trial-and-error inversion method. Daytime (at different solar zenith angles absorption measurements by A3-technique made in Bulgaria yielded data with the aid of which the seasonal and diurnal courses of the Ne(h-profiles were derived. Special attention is drawn to the event diurnal asymmetry, or uneven formation of the ionosphere as a function of insulation. The latter is probably connected with the influence of the diurnal fluctuations in the local temperature on the chemistry involved in the electron loss rate, as well as the diurnal variations of the main ionizing agent (NO in the D-region. That is why the Ne(h-profiles in the midlatitude D-region are modelled separately for morning and afternoon hours.

  16. Analysis of vibrational, structural, and electronic properties of rivastigmine by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, O.; Sinha, L.; Misra, N.; Narayan, V.; Kumar, N.; Kumar, A.

    2010-09-01

    The present work deals with the structural, electronic, and vibrational analysis of rivastigmine. Rivastigmine, an antidementia medicament, is credited with significant therapeutic effects on the cognitive, functional, and behavioural problems that are commonly associated with Alzheimer’s dementia. For rivastigmine, a number of minimum energy conformations are possible. The geometry of twelve possible conformers has been analyzed and the most stable conformer was further optimized at a higher basis set. The electronic properties and vibrational frequencies were then calculated using a density functional theory at the B3LYP level with the 6-311+G(d, p) basis set. The different molecular surfaces have also been drawn to understand the activity of the molecule. A narrower frontier orbital energy gap in rivastigmine makes it softer and more reactive than water and dimethylfuran. The calculated value of the dipole moment is 2.58 debye.

  17. Variable-density thinning for parks and reserves: An experimental case study at Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher R. Keyes; Thomas E. Perry; Jesse F. Plummer

    2010-01-01

    Variable-density thinning is emerging as a valuable tool for the silvicultural promotion of old-growth conditions in second-growth forests of the Pacific Coast. This paper reports on an experimental variable-density thinning prescription applied between 2006 and 2007 at north coastal California’s Humboldt Redwoods State Park. The prescription strategy relied on known...

  18. Electron and Negative Ion Densities in C(2)F(6) and CHF(3) Containing Inductively Coupled Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEBNER,GREGORY A.; MILLER,PAUL A.

    1999-12-07

    Electron and negative ion densities have been measured in inductively coupled discharges containing C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and CHF{sub 3}. Line integrated electron density was determined using a microwave interferometer, negative ion densities were inferred using laser photodetachment spectroscopy, and electron temperature was determined using a Langmuir probe. For the range of induction powers, pressures and bias power investigated, the electron density peaked at 9 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} (line-integrated) or approximately 9 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The negative ion density peaked at approximately 1.3 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. A maximum in the negative ion density as a function of induction coil power was observed. The maximum is attributed to a power dependent change in the density of one or more of the potential negative ion precursor species since the electron temperature did not depend strongly on power. The variation of photodetachment with laser wavelength indicated that the dominant negative ion was F{sup -}. Measurement of the decay of the negative ion density in the afterglow of a pulse modulated discharge was used to determine the ion-ion recombination rate for CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and CHF{sub 3} discharges.

  19. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  20. Radiation-driven m  =  2 island formation and dynamics near density limit in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak ohmic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liqing; Duan, Yanmin; Chen, Kaiyun; Zhao, Hailin; Luo, Zhenping; Zheng, Zhen; Liu, Yong; Liu, Haiqing; Chen, Yingjie; Yi, Yuan; Hu, Liqun; Du, Hongfei; Shi, Tonghui

    2017-12-01

    A radiation-driven m  =  2 island was observed in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) ohmic plasma, near the density limit. The mode onset occurs when the the ohmic heating input is less than the radiative cooling loss, which agrees with the mode onset behavior of the thermo-resistive model. The evolution of the equilibrium during the mode process was obtained using the ONETWO transport code, with inputs comprising the experimental electron temperature and density profiles. A large m  =  2 island can drive an m  =  1 sideband mode, which leads to an internal crash that appears as a large change in temperature that occurs not only in the q  =  2 region but also in the core.

  1. An Electron Microscopic and Radioautographic Study on Experimental Kernicterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-chin; Wang, Chiu-hua; Tsan, Kun-Wu; Chen, Yin-cheng

    1971-01-01

    Response of the neurons to bilirubin in asphyxiated newborn rabbits was studied in vivo with the use of the electron microscope and radioautographic technics. A morphologic basis for the mode of intraneuronal bilirubin movement in kernicterus has been established. The absorbed bilirubin had ready access to the Golgi complex from the dendrite through the neurotubules by a mechanism of centripetal dendroplasmic flow. The endoplasmic reticulum provided a subcellular canalicular system for the directed passage from the Golgi complex to the nuclear membrane. Proximodistal flow of bilirubin in the axoplasm caused spotty destruction of axons. The release of waste products from the affected neurons toward the capillaries is very likely an effect of reverse transastroglial transport. ImagesFig 7Fig 8Fig 13Fig 14Fig 3Fig 4Fig 1Fig 2Fig 5Fig 6Fig 11Fig 12Fig 9Fig 10Fig 15Fig 16 PMID:4104148

  2. Calculation of induced current densities for humans by magnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Om P.; Kang, Gang

    2001-11-01

    This paper illustrates the use of the impedance method to calculate the electric fields and current densities induced in millimetre resolution anatomic models of the human body, namely an adult and 10- and 5-year-old children, for exposure to nonuniform magnetic fields typical of two assumed but representative electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices at 1 and 30 kHz, respectively. The devices assumed for the calculations are a solenoid type magnetic deactivator used at store checkouts and a pass-by panel-type EAS system consisting of two overlapping rectangular current-carrying coils used at entry and exit from a store. The impedance method code is modified to obtain induced current densities averaged over a cross section of 1 cm2 perpendicular to the direction of induced currents. This is done to compare the peak current densities with the limits or the basic restrictions given in the ICNIRP safety guidelines. Because of the stronger magnetic fields at lower heights for both the assumed devices, the peak 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the CNS tissues such as the brain and the spinal cord are increasingly larger for smaller models and are the highest for the model of the 5-year-old child. For both the EAS devices, the maximum 1 cm2 area-averaged current densities for the brain of the model of the adult are lower than the ICNIRP safety guideline, but may approach or exceed the ICNIRP basic restrictions for models of 10- and 5-year-old children if sufficiently strong magnetic fields are used.

  3. Measurement of electron density and electron temperature of a cascaded arc plasma using laser Thomson scattering compared to an optical emission spectroscopic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, WANG; Cong, LI; Jielin, SHI; Xingwei, WU; Hongbin, DING

    2017-11-01

    As advanced linear plasma sources, cascaded arc plasma devices have been used to generate steady plasma with high electron density, high particle flux and low electron temperature. To measure electron density and electron temperature of the plasma device accurately, a laser Thomson scattering (LTS) system, which is generally recognized as the most precise plasma diagnostic method, has been established in our lab in Dalian University of Technology. The electron density has been measured successfully in the region of 4.5 × 1019 m-3 to 7.1 × 1020 m-3 and electron temperature in the region of 0.18 eV to 0.58 eV. For comparison, an optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system was established as well. The results showed that the electron excitation temperature (configuration temperature) measured by OES is significantly higher than the electron temperature (kinetic electron temperature) measured by LTS by up to 40% in the given discharge conditions. The results indicate that the cascaded arc plasma is recombining plasma and it is not in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This leads to significant error using OES when characterizing the electron temperature in a non-LTE plasma.

  4. Effective electron-phonon coupling in the Hubbard-Holstein model in presence of strong correlations and density fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citro, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno and CNISM, Unita di ricerca di Salerno, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: citro@sa.infn.it; Cojocaru, S.; Marinaro, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E.R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno and CNISM, Unita di ricerca di Salerno, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy)

    2007-09-01

    We study the Hubbard-Holstein model in the strong coupling regime and discuss the role of electron-electron correlations, doping and phonon frequency (isotope substitution) on the effective electron-phonon coupling. A comparison with recent dynamical mean field (DMF) studies and connection with recent experimental findings in cuprate superconductors is also discussed.

  5. Quantum electrodynamical time-dependent density-functional theory for many-electron systems on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanehpour, M.; Tokatly, I. V.

    2014-11-01

    We present a rigorous formulation of the time-dependent density-functional theory for interacting lattice electrons strongly coupled to cavity photons. We start with an example of one particle on a Hubbard dimer coupled to a single photonic mode, which is equivalent to the single mode spin-boson model or the quantum Rabi model. For this system we prove that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic density and the expectation value of the photonic coordinate, provided the initial state and the density satisfy a set of well defined conditions. Then we generalize the formalism to many interacting electrons on a lattice coupled to multiple photonic modes and prove the general mapping theorem. We also show that for a system evolving from the ground state of a lattice Hamiltonian any density with a continuous second time derivative is locally v representable.

  6. Electron Density Profile Data Contains Virtual Height/Frequency Pairs from a Profile or Profiles (Composite Months) of Ionograms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Electron Density Profile, N(h), data set contains both individual profiles and composite months. The data consist of virtual height/frequency pairs from a...

  7. Influence of the electron density on the characteristics of terahertz waves generated under laser–cluster interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, A. A., E-mail: frolov@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    A theory of generation of terahertz radiation under laser–cluster interaction, developed earlier for an overdense cluster plasma [A. A. Frolov, Plasma Phys. Rep. 42. 637 (2016)], is generalized for the case of arbitrary electron density. The spectral composition of radiation is shown to substantially depend on the density of free electrons in the cluster. For an underdense cluster plasma, there is a sharp peak in the terahertz spectrum at the frequency of the quadrupole mode of a plasma sphere. As the electron density increases to supercritical values, this spectral line vanishes and a broad maximum at the frequency comparable with the reciprocal of the laser pulse duration appears in the spectrum. The dependence of the total energy of terahertz radiation on the density of free electrons is analyzed. The radiation yield is shown to increase significantly under resonance conditions, when the laser frequency is close to the eigenfrequency of the dipole or quadrupole mode of a plasma sphere.

  8. Increasing positive ion number densities below the peak of ion-electron pair production in Titan's ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigren, E.; Galand, M. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Shebanits, O.; Wahlund, J.-E. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, P.O. Box 537, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Geppert, W. D. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Lavvas, P. [Groupe de Spectrométrie Moléculaire et Atmosphérique, Université Reims Champagne-Ardenne, UMR 7331, F-51687 Reims (France); Vuitton, V. [Institut de Planétologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), UJF-Grenoble/CNRS-INSU, UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Yelle, R. V., E-mail: erik.vigren@irfu.se [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We combine derived ion-electron pair formation rates with Cassini Radio Plasma Wave Science Langmuir Probe measurements of electron and positive ion number densities in Titan's sunlit ionosphere. We show that positive ion number densities in Titan's sunlit ionosphere can increase toward significantly lower altitudes than the peak of ion-electron pair formation despite that the effective ion-electron recombination coefficient increases. This is explained by the increased mixing ratios of negative ions, which are formed by electron attachment to neutrals. While such a process acts as a sink for free electrons, the positive ions become longer-lived as the rate coefficients for ion-anion neutralization reactions are smaller than those for ion-electron dissociative recombination reactions.

  9. Spin-orbit interaction in a two-dimensional electron gas in a InAs/AlSb quantum well with gate-controlled electron density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, J.P.; Wees, B.J. van; Kuipers, J.J.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Borghs, G.

    1998-01-01

    We present experiments on the tuning of the spin-orbit interaction in a two-dimensional electron gas in an asymmetric InAs/AlSb quantum well using a gate. The observed dependence of the spin splitting energy on the electron density can be attributed solely to the change in the Fermi wave vector. The

  10. Density-matrix simulation of small surface codes under current and projected experimental noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T. E.; Tarasinski, B.; DiCarlo, L.

    2017-09-01

    We present a density-matrix simulation of the quantum memory and computing performance of the distance-3 logical qubit Surface-17, following a recently proposed quantum circuit and using experimental error parameters for transmon qubits in a planar circuit QED architecture. We use this simulation to optimize components of the QEC scheme (e.g., trading off stabilizer measurement infidelity for reduced cycle time) and to investigate the benefits of feedback harnessing the fundamental asymmetry of relaxation-dominated error in the constituent transmons. A lower-order approximate calculation extends these predictions to the distance-5 Surface-49. These results clearly indicate error rates below the fault-tolerance threshold of the surface code, and the potential for Surface-17 to perform beyond the break-even point of quantum memory. However, Surface-49 is required to surpass the break-even point of computation at state-of-the-art qubit relaxation times and readout speeds.

  11. Assimilation of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC electron density profiles into a coupled Thermosphere/Ionosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I.-Te; Matsuo, Tomoko; Richmond, Arthur D.; Tiger Liu, Jann-Yeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents our effort to assimilate FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) GPS Occultation Experiment observations into the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) by means of ensemble Kalman filtering (EnKF). The F3/C EDP are combined with the TIE-GCM simulations by EnKF algorithms implemented in the NCAR Data Assimilation Research Testbed open-source community facility to compute the expected value of electron density, which is 'the best' estimate of the current ionospheric state. Assimilation analyses obtained with real F3/C electron density profiles during geomagnetic quiet time and disturbed period are further compared with independent ground-based observations and global ionospheric map as well as the F3/C profiles themselves. The comparison shows the improvement of the primary ionospheric parameters such as NmF2 and hmF2 and further display some small scale physical meaning structures which might either generally ionospheric features or storm effects. Nevertheless some unrealistic signatures appearing in the results and high rejection rates of observations due to the applied outlier threshold and quality control are also found in the assimilation experiments. These features are additionally analyzed to identify and correct the model biases in the future.

  12. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  13. Extension of electron cyclotron heating at ASDEX Upgrade with respect to high density operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Martin; Stober, Jörg; Herrmann, Albrecht; Kasparek, Walter; Leuterer, Fritz; Monaco, Francesco; Petzold, Bernhard; Plaum, Burkhard; Vorbrugg, Stefan; Wagner, Dietmar; Zohm, Hartmut

    2017-10-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade electron cyclotron resonance heating operates at 105 GHz and 140 GHz with flexible launching geometry and polarization. In 2016 four Gyrotrons with 10 sec pulse length and output power close to 1 MW per unit were available. The system is presently being extended to eight similar units in total. High heating power and high plasma density operation will be a part of the future ASDEX Upgrade experiment program. For the electron cyclotron resonance heating, an O-2 mode scheme is proposed, which is compatible with the expected high plasma densities. It may, however, suffer from incomplete single-pass absorption. The situation can be improved significantly by installing holographic mirrors on the inner column, which allow for a second pass of the unabsorbed fraction of the millimetre wave beam. Since the beam path in the plasma is subject to refraction, the beam position on the holographic mirror has to be controlled. Thermocouples built into the mirror surface are used for this purpose. As a protective measure, the tiles of the heat shield on the inner column were modified in order to increase the shielding against unabsorbed millimetre wave power.

  14. Extension of electron cyclotron heating at ASDEX Upgrade with respect to high density operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schubert Martin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ASDEX Upgrade electron cyclotron resonance heating operates at 105 GHz and 140 GHz with flexible launching geometry and polarization. In 2016 four Gyrotrons with 10 sec pulse length and output power close to 1 MW per unit were available. The system is presently being extended to eight similar units in total. High heating power and high plasma density operation will be a part of the future ASDEX Upgrade experiment program. For the electron cyclotron resonance heating, an O-2 mode scheme is proposed, which is compatible with the expected high plasma densities. It may, however, suffer from incomplete single-pass absorption. The situation can be improved significantly by installing holographic mirrors on the inner column, which allow for a second pass of the unabsorbed fraction of the millimetre wave beam. Since the beam path in the plasma is subject to refraction, the beam position on the holographic mirror has to be controlled. Thermocouples built into the mirror surface are used for this purpose. As a protective measure, the tiles of the heat shield on the inner column were modified in order to increase the shielding against unabsorbed millimetre wave power.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Charging Properties of Interstellar Type Silica Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging processes in astrophysical and planetary environments. Incident low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grains, leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available classical theoretical models for calculations of SEE yields are generally applicable for neutral, planar, or bulk surfaces. These models, however, are not valid for calculations of the electron impact charging properties of electrostatically charged micron/submicron-size dust grains in astrophysical environments. Rigorous quantum mechanical models are not yet available, and the SEE yields have to be determined experimentally for development of more accurate models for charging of individual dust grains. At the present time, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly for low energy electron impact. The experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated carried out by us in a unique facility at NASA-MSFC, based on an electrodynamic balance, indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (Abbas et al, 2010, 2012). In this paper, we discuss SEE charging properties of individual micron-size silica microspheres that are believed to be analogs of a class of interstellar dust grains. The measurements indicate charging of the 0.2m silica particles when exposed to 25 eV electron beams and discharging when exposed to higher energy electron beams. Relatively large size silica particles (5.2-6.82m) generally discharge to lower equilibrium potentials at both electron energies

  16. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS OF TOWER CONSTRUCTION TILT USING ELECTRONIC TACHEOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Mikhailov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern tendencies for assessment of high-rise building deformation state presuppose creation of automated and regular monitoring while using highly-accurate space positioning systems (GPS-systems, a robotic electronic tacheometer, highlyaccurate inclinators (Leica Nivel210/Nivel220-model with measuring accuracy of tilt angle up to 0.09 s, Geomos software complex (Leica Geosystems. Automated system for deformation monitoring requires significant time and material expenditures, special training of specialists so simpler methods and criteria for assessment of building deformation state are also considered as rather actual for this purpose.There are more than ten conventional methods for determining building tilt. All these methods are based on angular measurements from the fixed base while using highly-accurate theodolites. The methods are rather labor-consuming and they do not provide operational efficiency and accuracy in measurements. Introduction of electronic tacheometers with large radius of refractorless measurements of distances has made it possible to calculate coordinates on the building surface with high accuracy and at various sections (heights that results in possibility to obtain 3D model of the building surface. Leica TCRA1201 tacheometer has been set at the good visibility point of a tower construction, device orientation and plane coordinates of the temporary point have been determined with the purpose to assess a tilt value of an exhaust stack having 150 meter height. Then 3D coordinates of six points on the building surface have been measured for every stack section. After that these points have been projected on the horizontal plane. LISCAD PLUS software complex has been used for processing and interpretation of geodetic data.The proposed method permits to obtain data for determination value and direction of a tower construction tilt, immediately carry out in-situ measurements and obtain final results in the automatic mode of

  17. Electron Temperature and Density in Local Helicity Injection and High betat Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, David J.

    Tokamak startup in a spherical torus (ST) and an ST-based fusion nuclear science facility can greatly benefit from using non-inductive methods. The Pegasus Toroidal Experiment has developed a non-inductive startup technique using local helicity injection (LHI). Electron temperature, T e(r), and density, ne( r), profiles during LHI are unknown. These profiles are critical for understanding both the physics of the injection and relaxation mechanisms, as well as for extrapolating this technique to larger devices. A new Thomson scattering system has been designed, installed, and used to characterize Te(r, t) and ne(r, t) during LHI. The diagnostic leverages new technology in image intensified CCD cameras, high-efficiency diffraction gratings, and reliable Nd:YAG lasers. Custom systems for stray light mitigation, fast shuttering, and precision timing have been developed and implemented. The overall system provides a low-maintenance, economic, and effective means to explore novel physics regimes in Pegasus. Electron temperature and density profiles during LHI have been measured for the first time. Results indicate Te(r) peaked in the core of plasmas, and sustained while plasmas are coupled to injection drive. Electron densities also peak near the core of the tokamak, up to local values of n e ˜ 1.5 x 1019 m -3. A comparison of Te( r, t) has been made between discharges with dominant drive voltage from induction versus helicity injection. In both cases Te ( r, t) profiles remain peaked, with values for Te ,max > 150 eV in dominantly helicity-driven plasmas using high-field side LHI. Sustained values of betat ˜ 100% have been demonstrated in a tokamak for the first time. Plasmas are created and driven entirely non-solenoidally, and exhibit MHD stability. Measured temperature and density profiles are used to constrain magnetic equilibrium reconstructions, which calculate 80% ramp-down. For a continued decrease in the toroidal field these plasmas disrupt near the ideal MHD

  18. A global scale picture of ionospheric peak electron density changes during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vickal V.; Parkinson, Murray L.

    2017-04-01

    Changes in ionospheric plasma densities can affect society more than ever because of our increasing reliance on communication, surveillance, navigation, and timing technology. Models struggle to predict changes in ionospheric densities at nearly all temporal and spatial scales, especially during geomagnetic storms. Here we combine a 50 year (1965-2015) geomagnetic disturbance storm time (Dst) index with plasma density measurements from a worldwide network of 132 vertical incidence ionosondes to develop a picture of global scale changes in peak plasma density due to geomagnetic storms. Vertical incidence ionosondes provide measurements of the critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer (foF2), a direct measure of the peak electron density (NmF2) of the ionosphere. By dissecting the NmF2 perturbations with respect to the local time at storm onset, season, and storm intensity, it is found that (i) the storm-associated depletions (negative storm effects) and enhancements (positive storm effects) are driven by different but related physical mechanisms, and (ii) the depletion mechanism tends to dominate over the enhancement mechanism. The negative storm effects, which are detrimental to HF radio links, are found to start immediately after geomagnetic storm onset in the nightside high-latitude ionosphere. The depletions in the dayside high-latitude ionosphere are delayed by a few hours. The equatorward expansion of negative storm effects is found to be regulated by storm intensity (farthest equatorward and deepest during intense storms), season (largest in summer), and time of day (generally deeper on the nightside). In contrast, positive storm effects typically occur on the dayside midlatitude and low-latitude ionospheric regions when the storms are in the main phase, regardless of the season. Closer to the magnetic equator, moderate density enhancements last up to 40 h during the recovery phase of equinox storms, regardless of the local time. Strikingly, high

  19. Ionospheric electron density perturbations during the 7-10 March 2012 geomagnetic storm period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belehaki, Anna; Kutiev, Ivan; Marinov, Pencho; Tsagouri, Ioanna; Koutroumbas, Kostas; Elias, Panagiotis

    2017-02-01

    From 7 to 10 March 2012 a series of magnetospheric disturbances caused perturbations in the ionospheric electron density. Analyzing the interplanetary causes in each phase of this disturbed period, in comparison with the total electron content (TEC) disturbances, we have concluded that the interplanetary solar wind controls largely the ionospheric response. An interplanetary shock detected at 0328UT on 7 March caused the formation of prompt penetrating electric fields in the dayside that transported plasma from the near-equatorial region to higher in attitudes and latitudes forming a giant plasma fountain which is part of the so-called dayside ionospheric super-fountain. The super-fountain produces an increase in TEC which is the dominant effect at middle latitude, masking the effect of the negative storm. Simultaneously, inspecting the TEC maps, we found evidence for a turbulence in TEC propagating southward probably caused by large scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs) linked to auroral electrojet intensification. On 8 March, a magnetospheric sudden impulse at 1130UT accompanied with strong pulsations in all interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) components and with northward Bz component during the growth phase of the storm. These conditions triggered a pronounced directly driven substorm phase during which we observe LSTID. However, the analysis of DMSP satellite observations, provided with strong evidence for Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) formation that erode travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID) signatures. The overall result of these mechanisms can be detected in maps of de-trended TEC, but it is difficult to identify separately each of the sources of the observed perturbations, i.e. auroral electrojet activity and LSTIDs, super-fountain and SAPS. In order to assess the capability of the ionospheric profiler called Topside Sounder Model - assisted Digisonde (TaD model) to detect such perturbations in the electron density, electron

  20. Comment on ?Characterizing unpaired electrons from one-particle density matrix? 6M. Head-Gordon, Chem. Phys. Lett. 372 (2003) 508?5119

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, R. C.; Torre, A.; Lain, L.

    2003-10-01

    A recent theoretical study published in this journal has proposed a new definition of the unpaired electron density in molecular systems. This comment attempts to clarify the difference between the concept reported there and that of 'effectively' unpaired electron density.

  1. Experimental Study Of Terrestrial Electron Anti-neutrinos With Kamland

    CERN Document Server

    Tolich, N R

    2005-01-01

    The analysis presented here uses Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) to measure the rate of electron anti-neutrinos, ne&d1;' s , produced from terrestrial 238U and 212Th. 238U and 212Th are thought to be the main heat source driving mantle convection in the Earth, which in turn is responsible for plate tectonics. The total terrestrial 238U and 212Th content has been estimated from Earth models and rock samples from a very small fraction of the Earth. Until now there have been no direct measurements. Since ne&d1;' s have an exceedingly small cross section, they propagate undisturbed in the Earth interior, and their measurement near the Earth surface can be used to gain information on their sources. Based on a total of (2.63 ± 0.19) × 1031 target proton-years (0.506 kton- years), the 90% confidence interval for the total number of terrestrial 238U and 212Th ne&d1;' s detected is 4 to 40. This is consistent with the best models of terrestrial 23...

  2. Signal acquisition and scale calibration for beam power density distribution of electron beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yong; Li, Hongqiang; Shen, Chunlong; Guo, Shun; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Kehong

    2017-06-01

    The power density distribution of electron beam welding (EBW) is a key factor to reflect the beam quality. The beam quality test system was designed for the actual beam power density distribution of high-voltage EBW. After the analysis of characteristics and phase relationship between the deflection control signal and the acquisition signal, the Post-Trigger mode was proposed for the signal acquisition meanwhile the same external clock source was shared by the control signal and the sampling clock. The power density distribution of beam cross-section was reconstructed using one-dimensional signal that was processed by median filtering, twice signal segmentation and spatial scale calibration. The diameter of beam cross-section was defined by amplitude method and integral method respectively. The measured diameter of integral definition is bigger than that of amplitude definition, but for the ideal distribution the former is smaller than the latter. The measured distribution without symmetrical shape is not concentrated compared to Gaussian distribution.

  3. Supersonic helium beam diagnostic for fluctuation measurements of electron temperature and density at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruezi, U.; Stoschus, H.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    A supersonic helium beam diagnostic, based on the line-ratio technique for high resolution electron density and temperature measurements in the plasma edge (r/a > 0.9) was designed, built, and optimised at TEXTOR (Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research). The supersonic injection system, based on the Campargue skimmer-nozzle concept, was developed and optimised in order to provide both a high neutral helium beam density of n{sub 0}= 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} and a low beam divergence of {+-}1 Degree-Sign simultaneously, achieving a poloidal resolution of {Delta}{sub poloidal}= 9 mm. The setup utilises a newly developed dead volume free piezo valve for operation in a high magnetic field environment of up to 2 T with a maximum repetition rate of 80 Hz. Gas injections are realised for a duration of 120 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz (duty cycle 1/3). In combination with a high sensitivity detection system, consisting of three 32 multi-channel photomultipliers (PMTs), measurements of edge electron temperature and density with a radial resolution of {Delta}{sub radial}= 2 mm and a maximum temporal resolution of {Delta}t Asymptotically-Equal-To 2 {mu}s (470 kHz) are possible for the first time. The diagnostic setup at TEXTOR is presented. The newly developed injection system and its theoretical bases are discussed. The applicability of the stationary collisional-radiative model as basis of the line-ratio technique is shown. Finally, an example of a fluctuation analysis demonstrating the unique high temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of this new diagnostic is presented.

  4. TEMPERATURE AND ELECTRON DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF A CANDLE-FLAME-SHAPED FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidoni, S. E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/CUA, Code 674, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Yoshimura, K. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Plowman, J. E., E-mail: silvina.e.guidoni@nasa.gov [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Candle-flame-shaped flares are archetypical structures that provide indirect evidence of magnetic reconnection. A flare resembling Tsuneta's famous 1992 candle-flame flare occurred on 2011 January 28; we present its temperature and electron density diagnostics. This flare was observed with Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager, resulting in high-resolution, broad temperature coverage, and stereoscopic views of this iconic structure. The high-temperature images reveal a brightening that grows in size to form a tower-like structure at the top of the posteruption flare arcade, a feature that has been observed in other long-duration events. Despite the extensive work on the standard reconnection scenario, there is no complete agreement among models regarding the nature of this high-intensity elongated structure. Electron density maps reveal that reconnected loops that are successively connected at their tops to the tower develop a density asymmetry of about a factor of two between the two legs, giving the appearance of ''half-loops''. We calculate average temperatures with a new fast differential emission measure (DEM) method that uses SDO/AIA data and analyze the heating and cooling of salient features of the flare. Using STEREO observations, we show that the tower and the half-loop brightenings are not a line-of-sight projection effect of the type studied by Forbes and Acton. This conclusion opens the door for physics-based explanations of these puzzling, recurrent solar flare features, previously attributed to projection effects. We corroborate the results of our DEM analysis by comparing them with temperature analyses from Hinode/XRT.

  5. Study of electron densities of normal and neoplastic human breast tissues by Compton scattering using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C. [Departamento de Fisica-Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Fisica-Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto-Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Electron densities of 33 samples of normal (adipose and fibroglangular) and neoplastic (benign and malignant) human breast tissues were determined through Compton scattering data using a monochromatic synchrotron radiation source and an energy dispersive detector. The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of the samples. Adipose tissue exhibits the lowest values of electron density whereas malignant tissue the highest. The relationship with their histology was discussed. Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron density of normal and neoplastic breast tissues was measured using Compton scattering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monochromatic synchrotron radiation was used to obtain the Compton scattering data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The area of Compton peaks was used to determine the electron densities of samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose tissue shows the lowest electron density values whereas the malignant tissue the highest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with previous results showed differences smaller than 4%.

  6. Density functional study of structural and electronic properties of Al{sub n}@C{sub 60}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhiman, Shobhna, E-mail: s-dhiman@hotmail.com [Department of Applied Science, PEC, University of Technology, Chandigarh-160012 (India); Kumar, Ranjan; Dharamvir, Keya [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Fullerene derivatives have been shown to make contributions in many types of applications. Ab initio investigation of structural and electronic properties of aluminum doped endohedral fullerene has been performed using numerical atomic orbital density functional theory. We have obtained ground state structures for Al{sub n}@C{sub 60} (n=1–10). Which shows that C{sub 60} molecule can accommodate maximum of nine aluminum atoms, for n > 9 the cage eventually break. Encapsulated large number of aluminum atoms leads to deformation of cage with diameter varies from 7.16Å to 7.95Å. Binding energy/Al atom is found to increase till n = 4 and after that it decreases with the number of Al atoms with a sudden increase for n=10 due to breakage of C{sub 60} cage and electronic affinity first increases till n=4 then it decreases up to n=9 with a sharp increase for n=10. Ionization potential also first increases and then decreases. Homo-Lumo gap decreases till n=3 with a sharp increase for n=4, after that it shows an oscillatory nature. The results obtained are consistent with available theoretical and experimental results. The ab-initio calculations were performed using SIESTA code with generalized gradient approximation (GGA)

  7. Polymer ring resonators for high density photonic and electronic-photonic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haishan

    2009-12-01

    Electrical interconnect based on the copper wires will be the bottleneck for the future performance improvement of multi-core CPUs. Chip scale optical interconnect based on high density photonic and electronic-photonic integration is one of the feasible solutions. Ring resonators are promising photonic components serving as building blocks. High density integration of ring resonators is also important for high throughput lab-on-a-chip biosensors and opto-microwave integrated circuits. Polymer materials are compatible with most semiconductor fabrication processes. Polymers can be easily doped with rare earth ions, quantum dots etc. to make active optical devices. Especially, over several hundreds pm/V electro-optic (EO) coefficients and femtosecond scale response time of EO polymers enables photonic devices with sub 1V to millivolt drive voltages and terahertz bandwidth. This dissertation describes several technologies about design, simulation, fabrication, integration with electronic circuits and fiber optics of polymer ring resonators, and demonstrates three application examples of polymer ring resonators in communications and biochemical sensing. First the Beam Propagation Method (BPM) and the matrix analysis are combined to provide a fast circuit level simulation and design procedure of polymer ring resonators. Several low cost fabrication techniques based on electron beam irradiation effects on EO polymers are introduced. For the practical electronicphotonic integration, a hybrid integration scheme of EO polymer waveguide devices with Si integrated circuits is developed. One application is an all-dielectric RF sensor or receiver with sensitivity of 100 V/m and theoretical bandwidth over 100 GHz. This device is based on a novel structure with polymer ring resonator directly coupled to a side polished optical fiber. The other two examples are biochemical sensors based on multi-slot waveguide and ring resonator reflector structures.

  8. A non-tomographic method for imaging the global ionospheric electron density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunini, C.; Meza, A.; Azpilicueta, F.; Schmidt, M.; Nava, B.; Coïson, P.; Radicella, S.

    There are today a variety of approaches for processing dual-frequency GPS observations and to produce global ionospheric maps of TEC. The majority of these researches use ground-based GPS observations from the worldwide tracking network of the International GPS Service. While ground-based ionospheric maps represent a big advance for ionosphere weather, the radial geometry of the ground-based observations limits their capability for providing information on the vertical electron distribution. This limitation can be removed by the introduction of horizontal cuts through the ionosphere, affordable by space-born GPS receivers flying on low-Earth orbiting satellites (e.g. GPS-Met, CHAMP, GRACE, SAC-C). Several empirical models are currently used to describe the electron density distribution in the ionosphere. Among them, the NeQuick model is being used by the ESA EGNOS project for assessment analysis and has been proposed for single-frequency operation in the Galileo project. NeQuick is mostly droved by the two parameters NmF2 and hmF2, whose values are usually computed as function of position and time, using the CCIR climatologic database. Since the CCIR provides monthly averaged values, so significant day-to-day deviations between the actual and predicted TEC can be expected. Therefore, it seems suitable to determine appropriate corrections for the CCIR values in order to better fit the observed TEC. In this contribution we present a non-tomographic method for 3-D imaging of the global electron density distribution that uses the NeQuick model and two-dimensional spherical wavelet expansions for representing the spatial variability of the driving parameters of NeQuick. The coefficients of the wavelet series are computable from TEC observations using parameter estimation methods.

  9. Electronic structure of the substitutional vacancy in graphene: density-functional and Green's function studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, B. R. K.; Sherafati, M.; Popović, Z. S.; Satpathy, S.

    2012-08-01

    We study the electronic structure of graphene with a single substitutional vacancy using a combination of the density-functional, tight-binding and impurity Green's function approaches. Density-functional studies are performed with the all-electron spin-polarized linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method. The three sp2σ dangling bonds adjacent to the vacancy introduce localized states (Vσ) in the mid-gap region, which split due to the crystal field and a Jahn-Teller distortion, while the pzπ states introduce a sharp resonance state (Vπ) in the band structure. For a planar structure, symmetry strictly forbids hybridization between the σ and the π states, so that these bands are clearly identifiable in the calculated band structure. As to the magnetic moment of the vacancy, the Hund's rule coupling aligns the spins of the four localized Vσ1↑↓, Vσ2↑ and Vπ↑ electrons, resulting in an S = 1 state, with a magnetic moment of 2μB, which is reduced by about 0.3μB due to the anti-ferromagnetic spin polarization of the π band itinerant states in the vicinity of the vacancy. This results in the net magnetic moment of 1.7μB. Using the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, we reproduce the well-known ˜1/r decay of the localized Vπ wave function with distance, and in addition, find an interference term coming from the two Dirac points, previously unnoticed in the literature. The long-range nature of the Vπ wave function is a unique feature of the graphene vacancy and we suggest that this may be one of the reasons for the widely varying relaxed structures and magnetic moments reported from the supercell band calculations in the literature.

  10. Accurate prediction of the electronic properties of low-dimensional graphene derivatives using a screened hybrid density functional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Veronica; Hod, Oded; Peralta, Juan E; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2011-04-19

    Over the last several years, low-dimensional graphene derivatives, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, have played a central role in the pursuit of a plausible carbon-based nanotechnology. Their electronic properties can be either metallic or semiconducting depending purely on morphology, but predicting their electronic behavior has proven challenging. The combination of experimental efforts with modeling of these nanometer-scale structures has been instrumental in gaining insight into their physical and chemical properties and the processes involved at these scales. Particularly, approximations based on density functional theory have emerged as a successful computational tool for predicting the electronic structure of these materials. In this Account, we review our efforts in modeling graphitic nanostructures from first principles with hybrid density functionals, namely the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) screened exchange hybrid and the hybrid meta-generalized functional of Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria (TPSSh). These functionals provide a powerful tool for quantitatively studying structure-property relations and the effects of external perturbations such as chemical substitutions, electric and magnetic fields, and mechanical deformations on the electronic and magnetic properties of these low-dimensional carbon materials. We show how HSE and TPSSh successfully predict the electronic properties of these materials, providing a good description of their band structure and density of states, their work function, and their magnetic ordering in the cases in which magnetism arises. Moreover, these approximations are capable of successfully predicting optical transitions (first and higher order) in both metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes of various chiralities and diameters with impressive accuracy. This versatility includes the correct prediction of the trigonal warping splitting in metallic nanotubes. The results predicted

  11. Investigation of electron-beam welding in wrought Inconel 706--experimental and numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro, Paolo [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella S. Nicola, 3 I-36100 Vicenza (Italy)]. E-mail: ferro@gest.unipd.it; Zambon, Andrea [DIMEG, University of Padova, Via Marzolo, 9 I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonollo, Franco [Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Stradella S. Nicola, 3 I-36100 Vicenza (Italy)

    2005-02-15

    Electron-beam welding (EBW) is commonly employed in the aeroengine industry for the welding of high integrity components, fabricated from high-strength superalloys. For such applications, it is important to predict distortions and residual stresses induced by the process. Melt run trials have been carried out on nickel-base superalloy Inconel 706 plates using the EBW technique in order to analyse the effects of welding parameters on geometrical characteristics and microstructure of the bead. Butt-welded plates have been then investigated by means of tensile tests, microstructural analysis, and X-ray diffraction measurements. A finite element model of the process has been set up using an uncoupled thermal-mechanical analysis. The heat source was modelled using a superimposition of a spherical and a conical shape heat source with Gaussian power density distribution in order to reproduce the nail shape of the fusion zone (FZ). The parameters of the source were chosen so that the model would match with experimentally determined weld pool shape and temperatures, measured with thermocouples. Subsequently, the thermal analysis was used to drive the non-linear mechanical analysis. The predicted residual stresses were then compared with X-ray diffraction measurements. It was found that the correct thermal and residual stresses prediction is influenced by the shape of the fusion zone, the highest thermal tensile stress arising under the nailhead of the fusion zone where microfissuring can be observed.

  12. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: Experimental observations and possible mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Su, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Egerton, R.F. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Konno, M. [Hitachi High Technologies Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Wu, L.; Ciston, J.; Wall, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Zhu, Y., E-mail: zhu@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. -- Research highlights: {yields} Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in an aberration-corrected electron microscope. {yields} High-resolution secondary electron imaging mechanism. {yields} Image contrast quantification and as functions of imaging conditions. {yields} Simultaneous acquisition of atomic images from surface and bulk.

  13. Generating high brightness electron beams using density down ramp injection in nonlinear plasma wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalichaouch, Thamine; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Yu, Peicheng; An, Weiming; Joshi, Chan; Zhang, Chaojie; Mori, Warren; Li, Fei; Lu, Wei; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    In the past few decades, there has been much progress in theory, simulation, and experiment towards using Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) and Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) as the basis for designing and building compact x-ray free-electron-lasers (XFEL) as well as a next generation linear collider. Recently, ionization injection and density downramp injection have been proposed and demonstrated as controllable injection schemes for generating high quality relativistic electron beams. We present the concepts and full 3D simulation results using OSIRIS which show that downramp injection can generate electron beams with unprecedented brightnesses. However, full-3D simulations of plasma-based acceleration can be computationally intensive, sometimes taking millions of cpu-hours. Due to the near azimuthal symmetry in PWFA and LWFA, quasi-3D simulations using a cylindrical geometry are computationally more efficient than 3D Cartesian simulations since only the first few harmonics are needed in ϕ to capture the 3D physics of most problems. We also present results from the quasi-3D approach on downramp injection and compare the results against full 3D simulations. Work supported by NSF and DOE.

  14. Electronic structure of oxygen-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbons: A hybrid density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin

    2010-06-01

    The size-dependent electronic structure of oxygen-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbons is investigated using standard density functional theory (DFT) with an exchange-correlation functional of the generalized gradient approximation form as well as hybrid DFT calculations with two different exchange-correlation functionals. Hybrid DFT calculations, which typically provide more accurate band gaps than standard DFT, are found to predict semiconducting behavior in oxygen-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbons; this is in distinct contrast to standard DFT with (semi)local exchange-correlation functionals, which have been widely employed in previous studies and shown to predict metallic behavior. (Semi)local exchange-correlation functionals employed in standard DFT calculations cause unphysical delocalization of lone pairs from the oxygen atoms due to self-interaction errors and lead to metallic behavior. Hybrid DFT calculations do not suffer from this spurious effect and produce a clear size-dependent band gap. Appreciable fundamental band gaps (˜1eV) are found for the smallest ribbons (two zigzag rows); the band gap decreases rapidly with increasing ribbon width, resulting eventually in a zero band-gap semiconductor at about 4-5 zigzag rows. This finding could have useful implications for molecular electronics, in particular, since oxygen-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbons are thermodynamically stable unlike their hydrogenated counterparts. More generally, through a concrete example, this study suggests caution when employing (semi)local functionals in DFT studies of functionalized graphene/graphene derivatives when the functional groups contain electron lone pairs.

  15. Density functional investigation of structural, electronic and optical properties of Ge-doped ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ying-bo; Dai, Ying; Yang, Kesong; Zhang, Zhenkui; Wei, Wei; Guo, Meng; Huang, Baibiao

    2011-10-01

    Recent experiments reported fascinating phenomenon of photoluminescence (PL) blueshift in Ge-doped ZnO. To understand it, we examined the structural, electronic and optical properties of Ge-doped ZnO (ZnO:Ge) systematically by means of density functional theory calculations. Our results show that Ge atoms tend to cluster in heavily doped ZnO. Ge clusters can limit the conductivity of doped ZnO but reinforce the near-band-edge emission. The substitutional Ge for Zn leads to Fermi level pinning in the conduction band, which indicates Ge-doped ZnO is of n-type conductivity character. It is found that the delocalized Ge 4s states hybridize with conduction band bottom, and is dominant in the region near the Fermi level, suggesting that Ge-4s states provides major free carriers in ZnO:Ge crystal. The observed blueshift of PL in Ge-doped ZnO originates from the electron transition energy from the valence band to the empty levels above Fermi level larger than the gap of undoped ZnO. The electron transition between the gap states induced by oxygen vacancy and conduction band minimum may be the origin of the new PL peak at 590 nm.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes with Tailored Density of Electronic States for Electrochemical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yingpan; Hu, Huifang; Feng, Miao; Zhan, Hongbing

    2015-11-25

    The density of electronic states (DOS) is an intrinsic electronic property that works conclusively in the electrochemistry of carbon materials. However, seldom has it been reported how the DOS at the Fermi level influences the electrochemical activity. In this work, we synthesized partially and fully unzipped carbon nanotubes by longitudinally unzipping pristine carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We then studied the electrochemical activity and biosensitivity of carbon materials by means of the CNTs and their derivatives to elucidate the effect of the DOS on their electrochemical performances. Tailoring of the DOS for the CNT derivatives could be conveniently realized by varying the sp(2)/sp(3) ratio (i.e., graphite concentration) through manipulating the oxidative unzipping degree. Despite the diverse electron transfer mechanisms and influence factors of the four investigated redox probes (IrCl6(2-), [Fe(CN)6](3-), Fe(3+), and ascorbic acid), the CNT derivatives exhibited consistent kinetic behaviors, wherein CNTs with a high DOS showed superior electrochemical response compared with partially and fully unzipped carbon nanotubes. For biological detection, the CNTs could simultaneously distinguish ascorbic acid, dopamine, and uric acid, while the three CNT derivatives could all differentiate phenethylamine and epinephrine existed in the newborn calf serum. Moreover, the three CNT derivatives all presented wide linear detection ranges with high sensitivities for dopamine, phenethylamine, and epinephrine.

  17. Commensurate and incommensurate spin-density waves in heavy electron systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schlottmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The nesting of the Fermi surfaces of an electron and a hole pocket separated by a nesting vector Q and the interaction between electrons gives rise to itinerant antiferromagnetism. The order can gradually be suppressed by mismatching the nesting and a quantum critical point (QCP is obtained as the Néel temperature tends to zero. The transfer of pairs of electrons between the pockets can lead to a superconducting dome above the QCP (if Q is commensurate with the lattice, i.e. equal to G/2. If the vector Q is not commensurate with the lattice there are eight possible phases: commensurate and incommensurate spin and charge density waves and four superconductivity phases, two of them with modulated order parameter of the FFLO type. The renormalization group equations are studied and numerically integrated. A re-entrant SDW phase (either commensurate or incommensurate is obtained as a function of the mismatch of the Fermi surfaces and the magnitude of |Q − G/2|.

  18. Electronic and Optical Properties of Small Hydrogenated Silicon Quantum Dots Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mus-’ab Anas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic study of the absorption spectrum of various sizes of small hydrogenated silicon quantum dots of quasi-spherical symmetry using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT. In this study, real-time and real-space implementation of TDDFT involving full propagation of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations were used. The experimental results for SiH4 and Si5H12 showed good agreement with other earlier calculations and experimental data. Then these calculations were extended to study larger hydrogenated silicon quantum dots with diameter up to 1.6 nm. It was found that, for small quantum dots, the absorption spectrum is atomic-like while, for relatively larger (1.6 nm structure, it shows bulk-like behavior with continuous plateau with noticeable peak. This paper also studied the absorption coefficient of silicon quantum dots as a function of their size. Precisely, the dependence of dot size on the absorption threshold is elucidated. It was found that the silicon quantum dots exhibit direct transition of electron from HOMO to LUMO states; hence this theoretical contribution can be very valuable in discerning the microscopic processes for the future realization of optoelectronic devices.

  19. Robust Estimation of Electron Density From Anatomic Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain Using a Unifying Multi-Atlas Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Shangjie [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Process Measurement and Control, School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States); Hara, Wendy; Wang, Lei; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States); Li, Ruijiang, E-mail: rli2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a reliable method to estimate electron density based on anatomic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Methods and Materials: We proposed a unifying multi-atlas approach for electron density estimation based on standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. First, a composite atlas was constructed through a voxelwise matching process using multiple atlases, with the goal of mitigating effects of inherent anatomic variations between patients. Next we computed for each voxel 2 kinds of conditional probabilities: (1) electron density given its image intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR images; and (2) electron density given its spatial location in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration. These were combined into a unifying posterior probability density function using the Bayesian formalism, which provided the optimal estimates for electron density. We evaluated the method on 10 patients using leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for detecting different tissue types were performed. Results: The proposed method significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute Hounsfield unit error of 119, compared with 140 and 144 (P<.0001) using conventional T1-weighted intensity and geometry-based approaches, respectively. For detection of bony anatomy, the proposed method achieved an 89% area under the curve, 86% sensitivity, 88% specificity, and 90% accuracy, which improved upon intensity and geometry-based approaches (area under the curve: 79% and 80%, respectively). Conclusion: The proposed multi-atlas approach provides robust electron density estimation and bone detection based on anatomic MRI. If validated on a larger population, our work could enable the use of MRI as a primary modality for radiation treatment planning.

  20. Experimental optimization of the 6-dimentional electron beam emittance at the NSLS SDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, H. J.; Murphy, J. B.; Shen, Y.; Tang, C. X.; Wang, X. J.

    2011-08-01

    Experimental optimization of the 6-dimensional electron beam emittance generated by a Magnesium (Mg) photocathode RF gun is presented in this report. A new electron beam optimization algorithm for a low charge (<100 pC) beam was experimentally demonstrated; where the electron beam velocity bunching inside the RF gun plays a critical role, and the transverse emittance as a function of the laser-RF timing jitter was experimentally characterized for the first time. A 20 pC electron beam was optimized to have a normalized slice emittance of 0.15 mm mrad and a longitudinal projected emittance of 3.9 ps keV. Furthermore, the upper limit of the measured thermal emittance—0.5 mm mrad per mm of the rms laser size, is about 50% lower than the theoretical prediction for a Mg cathode (Qian et al., 2010) [1].

  1. Calculated ionization rates, ion densities, and airglow emission rates due to precipitating electrons in the nightside ionosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, S. A.; Kim, J.; Nagy, A. F.; Keller, C. N.; Verigin, M. I.; Gringauz, K. I.; Shutte, N. M.; Szego, K.; Kiraly, P.

    1992-01-01

    The calculations presented in this paper clearly establish that the electron fluxes measured by the HARP instrument, carried on board Phobos 2, could cause significant electron impact ionization and excitation in the nightside atmosphere of Mars, if these electrons actually do precipitate. The calculated peak electron densities were found to be about a factor of 2 larger than the mean observed nightside densities, indicating that if a significant fraction of the measured electrons actually precipitate, they could be the dominant mechanism responsible for maintaining the nightside ionosphere. The calculated zenith column emission rates of the O I 5577-A and 6300-A and CO Cameron band emissions, due to electron impact and dissociative recombination mechanisms, were found to be significant.

  2. A Comparative Study of Collagen Matrix Density Effect on Endothelial Sprout Formation Using Experimental and Computational Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Mohammadaliha, Negar; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Bauer, Amy L

    2016-04-01

    A thorough understanding of determining factors in angiogenesis is a necessary step to control the development of new blood vessels. Extracellular matrix density is known to have a significant influence on cellular behaviors and consequently can regulate vessel formation. The utilization of experimental platforms in combination with numerical models can be a powerful method to explore the mechanisms of new capillary sprout formation. In this study, using an integrative method, the interplay between the matrix density and angiogenesis was investigated. Owing the fact that the extracellular matrix density is a global parameter that can affect other parameters such as pore size, stiffness, cell-matrix adhesion and cross-linking, deeper understanding of the most important biomechanical or biochemical properties of the ECM causing changes in sprout morphogenesis is crucial. Here, we implemented both computational and experimental methods to analyze the mechanisms responsible for the influence of ECM density on the sprout formation that is difficult to be investigated comprehensively using each of these single methods. For this purpose, we first utilized an innovative approach to quantify the correspondence of the simulated collagen fibril density to the collagen density in the experimental part. Comparing the results of the experimental study and computational model led to some considerable achievements. First, we verified the results of the computational model using the experimental results. Then, we reported parameters such as the ratio of proliferating cells to migrating cells that was difficult to obtain from experimental study. Finally, this integrative system led to gain an understanding of the possible mechanisms responsible for the effect of ECM density on angiogenesis. The results showed that stable and long sprouts were observed at an intermediate collagen matrix density of 1.2 and 1.9 mg/ml due to a balance between the number of migrating and proliferating

  3. Experimental evidence for density-dependent reproduction in a cooperatively breeding passerine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Lyanne; Tinbergen, Joost M.; Both, Christiaan; Bristol, Rachel; Richardson, David S.; Komdeur, Jan; Sauer, J.R.

    Temporal variation in survival, fecundity, and dispersal rates is associated with density-dependent and density-independent processes. Stable natural populations are expected to be regulated by density-dependent factors. However, detecting this by investigating natural variation in density is

  4. Experimental Measurements of the Secondary Electron Yield in the Experimental Measurement of the Secondary Electron Yield in the PEP-II Particle Accelerator Beam Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Collet, G.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Markiewicz, T.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; /SLAC; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

    2010-08-25

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of the positron Damping Ring (DR) of future Linear Colliders (LC) such as ILC and CLIC. To test a series of promising possible electron cloud mitigation techniques as surface coatings and grooves, in the Positron Low Energy Ring (LER) of the PEP-II accelerator, we have installed several test vacuum chambers including (i) a special chamber to monitor the variation of the secondary electron yield of technical surface materials and coatings under the effect of ion, electron and photon conditioning in situ in the beam line; (ii) chambers with grooves in a straight magnetic-free section; and (iii) coated chambers in a dedicated newly installed 4-magnet chicane to study mitigations in a magnetic field region. In this paper, we describe the ongoing R&D effort to mitigate the electron cloud effect for the LC damping ring, focusing on the first experimental area and on results of the reduction of the secondary electron yield due to in situ conditioning.

  5. Stationary Conditions of the Electron Density Along the Reaction Path: Connection with Conceptual DFT and Information Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Carlos A; Squitieri, Emilio; Franco, Hector J; Rincon, Luis C

    2017-01-26

    The Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) formalism has been used to investigate the influence of the stationary behavior of the electron density (ρ(r⃗;s)) along a minimum energy path on the corresponding stationary conditions observed in the total potential energy of the reactive system, information theory measures (Shannon information entropy and Onicescu information energy), and chemical reactivity indexes (the chemical hardness). The theoretical treatment presented in this work, combined with DFT calculations on 3 different test reactions: Ḣ' + H 2 , Ḣ' + CH 4 and H - + CH 4 , suggest that for any reactive system, properties that can be cast as a functional of the electron density, must exhibit stationary points along the IRC path modulated by the corresponding stationary behavior of the electron density.

  6. Improvements in the order, isotropy and electron density of glypican-1 crystals by controlled dehydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awad, Wael [Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Svensson Birkedal, Gabriel [Lund University, Biomedical Center A13, 221 84 Lund (Sweden); Thunnissen, Marjolein M. G. M. [Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lund University, Box 188, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Mani, Katrin [Lund University, Biomedical Center A13, 221 84 Lund (Sweden); Logan, Derek T., E-mail: derek.logan@biochemistry.lu.se [Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2013-12-01

    The anisotropy of crystals of glypican-1 was significantly reduced by controlled dehydration using the HC1 device, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure. The use of controlled dehydration for improvement of protein crystal diffraction quality is increasing in popularity, although there are still relatively few documented examples of success. A study has been carried out to establish whether controlled dehydration could be used to improve the anisotropy of crystals of the core protein of the human proteoglycan glypican-1. Crystals were subjected to controlled dehydration using the HC1 device. The optimal protocol for dehydration was developed by careful investigation of the following parameters: dehydration rate, final relative humidity and total incubation time T{sub inc}. Of these, the most important was shown to be T{sub inc}. After dehydration using the optimal protocol the crystals showed significantly reduced anisotropy and improved electron density, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure.

  7. Characteristics of recycled and electron beam irradiated high density polyethylene samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Jessica R.; Gabriel, Leandro; Geraldo, Aurea B.C.; Moura, Eduardo, E-mail: jrcardoso@ipen.br, E-mail: lgabriell@gmail.com, E-mail: ageraldo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Polymers modification by irradiation is a well-known process that allows degradation and cross-linking in concurrent events; this last is expected when an increase of mechanical properties is required. Actually, the interest of recycling and reuse of polymeric material is linked to the increase of plastics ending up in waste streams. Therefore, these both irradiation and recycling process may be conducted to allow a new use to this material that would be discarded by an improvement of its mechanical properties. In this work, the High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) matrix has been recycled five times from original substrate. The electron beam irradiation process was applied from 50 kGy to 200 kGy in both original and recycled samples; in this way, mechanical properties and thermal characteristics were evaluated. The results of applied process and material characterization are discussed. (author)

  8. Transmission of electromagnetic waves through a two-layer plasma structure with spatially nonuniform electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denysenko, I B; Ivko, S; Smolyakov, A; Azarenkov, N A

    2012-11-01

    Transmission of a p-polarized electromagnetic wave through a two-layer plasma structure with spatially nonuniform distributions of electron density in the layers is studied. The case, when the electromagnetic wave is obliquely incident on the structure and is evanescent in both plasma layers, is considered. The conditions for total transparency of the two-layer structure are found for the thin slab case and when the plasma inhomogeneity is weak. It is shown that the transmission coefficient of the p-polarized wave can be about unity, even if the plasma inhomogeneity is large. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity on transparency of the structure are more important if the slabs are thick, comparing with the case of thin layers.

  9. Diffuse scattering provides material parameters and electron density profiles of biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yufeng; Nagle, John F

    2004-04-01

    Fully hydrated stacks of DOPC lipid bilayer membranes generate large diffuse x-ray scattering that corrupts the Bragg peak intensities that are used in conventional biophysical structural analysis, but the diffuse scattering actually contains more information. Using an efficient algorithm for fitting extensive regions of diffuse data to classical smectic liquid crystalline theory we first obtain the compressional modulus B= 10(13) erg/ cm(4), which involves interactions between membranes, and the bending modulus K(c) =8x 10(-13) erg of the membranes. The membrane form factor F ( q(z) ) is then obtained for most values of q(z) up to 0.8 A(-1). The electron density profile rho(z) is obtained by fitting models to F( q(z) ). Constraining the models to conform to other measurements provides structural quantities such as area A=72.1+/-0.5 A(2) per lipid at the interface.

  10. eRDF Analyser: An interactive GUI for electron reduced density function analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaki Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available eRDF Analyser is an interactive MATLAB GUI for reduced density function (RDF or pair distribution function (PDF analysis of amorphous and polycrystalline materials to study their local structure. It is developed as an integrated tool with an easy-to-use interface that offers a streamlined approach to extract RDF from electron diffraction data without the need for external routines. The software incorporates recent developments in scattering factor parameterisation and an automated fitting routine for the atomic scattering curve. It also features an automated optimisation routine for determination of the position of the centre of diffraction patterns recorded using both central and off-centre locations of the incident beam. It is available in both open source code (MATLAB m-file and executable form.

  11. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  12. eRDF Analyser: An interactive GUI for electron reduced density function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Janaki; Borisenko, Konstantin B.; Chou, Yu-Jen; Kirkland, Angus I.

    eRDF Analyser is an interactive MATLAB GUI for reduced density function (RDF) or pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of amorphous and polycrystalline materials to study their local structure. It is developed as an integrated tool with an easy-to-use interface that offers a streamlined approach to extract RDF from electron diffraction data without the need for external routines. The software incorporates recent developments in scattering factor parameterisation and an automated fitting routine for the atomic scattering curve. It also features an automated optimisation routine for determination of the position of the centre of diffraction patterns recorded using both central and off-centre locations of the incident beam. It is available in both open source code (MATLAB m-file) and executable form.

  13. Trap density of GeNx/Ge interface fabricated by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yukio; Otani, Yohei; Toyota, Hiroshi; Ono, Toshiro

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated GeNx/Ge interface properties using Si3N4(7 nm)/GeNx(2 nm)/Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor structures fabricated by the plasma nitridation of Ge substrates using an electron-cyclotron-resonance-generated nitrogen plasma. The interface trap density (Dit) measured by the conductance method is found to be distributed symmetrically in the Ge band gap with a minimum Dit value lower than 3 × 1011 cm-2eV-1 near the midgap. This result may lead to the development of processes for the fabrication of p- and n-Ge Schottky-barrier (SB) source/drain metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors using chemically and thermally robust GeNx dielectrics as interlayers for SB source/drain contacts and high-κ gate dielectrics.

  14. Large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations using an enriched finite element basis

    CERN Document Server

    Kanungo, Bikash

    2016-01-01

    We present a computationally efficient approach to perform large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations by enriching the classical finite element basis with compactly supported atom-centered numerical basis functions that are constructed from the solution of the Kohn-Sham (KS) problem for single atoms. We term these numerical basis functions as enrichment functions, and the resultant basis as the enriched finite element basis. The enrichment functions are compactly supported through the use of smooth cutoff functions, which enhances the conditioning and maintains the locality of the basis. The integrals involved in the evaluation of the discrete KS Hamiltonian and overlap matrix in the enriched finite element basis are computed using an adaptive quadrature grid based on the characteristics of enrichment functions. Further, we propose an efficient scheme to invert the overlap matrix by using a block-wise matrix inversion in conjunction with special reduced-order quadrature rules to transform...

  15. Seasonal dependence of the longitudinal variations of nighttime ionospheric electron density and equivalent winds at southern midlatitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Luan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been indicated that the observed Weddell Sea anomaly (WSA appeared to be an extreme manifestation of the longitudinal variations in the Southern Hemisphere, since the WSA is characterized by greater evening electron density than the daytime density in the region near the Weddell Sea. In the present study, the longitudinal variations of the nighttime F2-layer peak electron density at southern midlatitudes are analyzed using the observations of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC satellites between 2006 and 2008. It is found that significant longitudinal difference (> 150% relative to the minimum density at each local time prevails in all seasons, although the WSA phenomenon is only evident in summer under this solar minimum condition. Another interesting feature is that in summer, the maximum longitudinal differences occur around midnight (~ 23:00–00:00 LT rather than in the evening (19:00–21:00 LT in the evening, when the most prominent electron density enhancement occurs for the WSA phenomenon. Thus the seasonal–local time patterns of the electron density longitudinal variations during nighttime at southern midlatitudes cannot be simply explained in terms of the WSA. Meanwhile, the variations of the geomagnetic configuration and the equivalent magnetic meridional winds/upward plasma drifts are analyzed to explore their contributions to the longitudinal variations of the nighttime electron density. The maximum longitudinal differences are associated with the strongest wind-induced vertical plasma drifts after 21:00 LT in the Western Hemisphere. Besides the magnetic declination–zonal wind effects, the geographic meridional winds and the magnetic inclination also have significant effects on the upward plasma drifts and the resultant electron density.

  16. Experimental Examination of Intraspecific Density-Dependent Competition during the Breeding Period in Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Martin, Tara G.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density estimates of wild monarch populations to model the strength of density dependence during the breeding season. Egg laying rates did not change with density but larvae at high densities were smaller, had lower survival, and weighed less as adults compared to lower densities. Using mean larval densities from field surveys resulted in conservative estimates of density-dependent population reduction that varied between breeding regions and different phases of the breeding season. Our results suggest the highest levels of population reduction due to density-dependent intraspecific competition occur early in the breeding season in the southern portion of the breeding range. However, we also found that the strength of density dependence could be almost five times higher depending on how many life-stages were used as part of field estimates. Our study is the first to link experimental results of a density-dependent reduction in vital rates to observed monarch densities in the wild and show that the effects of density dependent competition in monarchs varies across space and time, providing valuable information for developing robust, year-round population models in this migratory organism. PMID:22984614

  17. Experimental examination of intraspecific density-dependent competition during the breeding period in monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D T Tyler Flockhart

    Full Text Available A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density estimates of wild monarch populations to model the strength of density dependence during the breeding season. Egg laying rates did not change with density but larvae at high densities were smaller, had lower survival, and weighed less as adults compared to lower densities. Using mean larval densities from field surveys resulted in conservative estimates of density-dependent population reduction that varied between breeding regions and different phases of the breeding season. Our results suggest the highest levels of population reduction due to density-dependent intraspecific competition occur early in the breeding season in the southern portion of the breeding range. However, we also found that the strength of density dependence could be almost five times higher depending on how many life-stages were used as part of field estimates. Our study is the first to link experimental results of a density-dependent reduction in vital rates to observed monarch densities in the wild and show that the effects of density dependent competition in monarchs varies across space and time, providing valuable information for developing robust, year-round population models in this migratory organism.

  18. Spatial distribution of charged particles along the ion-optical axis in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources. Experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panitzsch, Lauri

    2013-02-08

    The experimental determination of the spatial distribution of charged particles along the ion-optical axis in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) defines the focus of this thesis. The spatial distributions of different ion species were obtained in the object plane of the bending magnet ({approx}45 cm downstream from the plasma electrode) and in the plane of the plasma electrode itself, both in high spatial resolution. The results show that each of the different ion species forms a bloated, triangular structure in the aperture of the plasma electrode. The geometry and the orientation of these structures are defined by the superposition of the radial and axial magnetic fields. The radial extent of each structure is defined by the charge of the ion. Higher charge states occupy smaller, more concentrated structures. The total current density increases towards the center of the plasma electrode. The circular and star-like structures that can be observed in the beam profiles of strongly focused, extracted ion beams are each dominated by ions of a single charge state. In addition, the spatially resolved current density distribution of charged particles in the plasma chamber that impinge on the plasma electrode was determined, differentiating between ions and electrons. The experimental results of this work show that the electrons of the plasma are strongly connected to the magnetic field lines in the source and thus spatially well confined in a triangular-like structure. The intensity of the electrons increases towards the center of the plasma electrode and the plasma chamber, as well. These electrons are surrounded by a spatially far less confined and less intense ion population. All the findings mentioned above were already predicted in parts by simulations of different groups. However, the results presented within this thesis represent the first (and by now only) direct experimental verification of those predictions and are qualitatively transferable to

  19. Biomolecular Force Field Parameterization via Atoms-in-Molecule Electron Density Partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Daniel J; Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Payne, Mike C; Jorgensen, William L

    2016-05-10

    Molecular mechanics force fields, which are commonly used in biomolecular modeling and computer-aided drug design, typically treat nonbonded interactions using a limited library of empirical parameters that are developed for small molecules. This approach does not account for polarization in larger molecules or proteins, and the parametrization process is labor-intensive. Using linear-scaling density functional theory and atoms-in-molecule electron density partitioning, environment-specific charges and Lennard-Jones parameters are derived directly from quantum mechanical calculations for use in biomolecular modeling of organic and biomolecular systems. The proposed methods significantly reduce the number of empirical parameters needed to construct molecular mechanics force fields, naturally include polarization effects in charge and Lennard-Jones parameters, and scale well to systems comprised of thousands of atoms, including proteins. The feasibility and benefits of this approach are demonstrated by computing free energies of hydration, properties of pure liquids, and the relative binding free energies of indole and benzofuran to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme.

  20. High-speed digital holography for neutral gas and electron density imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstedt, E. M., E-mail: egranstedt@gmail.com [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Thomas, C. E. [Third Dimension Technologies, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Baylor, L. R.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An instrument was developed using digital holographic reconstruction of the wavefront from a CO{sub 2} laser imaged on a high-speed commercial IR camera. An acousto-optic modulator is used to generate 1–25 μs pulses from a continuous-wave CO{sub 2} laser, both to limit the average power at the detector and also to freeze motion from sub-interframe time scales. Extensive effort was made to characterize and eliminate noise from vibrations and second-surface reflections. Mismatch of the reference and object beam curvature initially contributed substantially to vibrational noise, but was mitigated through careful positioning of identical imaging lenses. Vibrational mode amplitudes were successfully reduced to ≲1 nm for frequencies ≳50 Hz, and the inter-frame noise across the 128 × 128 pixel window which is typically used is ≲2.5 nm. To demonstrate the capabilities of the system, a piezo-electric valve and a reducing-expanding nozzle were used to generate a super-sonic gas jet which was imaged with high spatial resolution (better than 0.8 lp/mm) at high speed. Abel inversions were performed on the phase images to produce 2-D images of localized gas density. This system could also be used for high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of plasma electron density or surface deformations.

  1. Anomalous electron density events in the quiet summer ionosphere at solar minimum over Millstone Hill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlo

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the observed behavior of the F region ionosphere over Millstone Hill with calculations from the IZMIRAN model for solar minimum for the geomagnetically quiet period 23-25 June 1986, when anomalously low values of hmF2(<200 km were observed. We found that these low values of hmF2 (seen as a G condition on ionograms exist in the ionosphere due to a decrease of production rates of oxygen ions resulting from low values of atomic oxygen density. Results show that determination of a G condition using incoherent scatter radar data is sensitive both to the true concentration of O+ relative to the molecular ions, and to the ion composition model assumed in the data reduction process. The increase in the O++ N 2 loss rate due to vibrationally excited N2 produces a reduction in NmF2 of typically 5-10% , but as large as 15% , bringing the model and data into better agreement. The effect of vibrationally excited NO+ ions on electron densities is negligible.Key words. Ionosphere (Ion chemistry and composition; Ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; Mid-latitude ionosphere.

  2. Vibrational analysis, electronic structure and nonlinear optical properties of Levofloxacin by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, Sethu; Rajalakshmi, K.; Kumaresan, Subramanian

    2013-08-01

    The Fourier transform (FT-IR) spectrum of Levofloxacin was recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and a complete vibrational assignment of fundamental vibrational modes of the molecule was carried out using density functional method. The observed fundamental modes have been compared with the harmonic vibrational frequencies computed using DFT (B3LYP) method by employing 6-31 G (d, p) basis sets. The most stable geometry of the molecule under investigation has been determined from the potential energy scan. The first-order hyperpolarizability (βo) and other related properties (μ, αo) of Levofloxacin are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) on a finite field approach. UV-vis spectrum of the molecule was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by DFT using 6-31 G (d, p) basis sets. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show that, the charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The other molecular properties like molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), Mulliken population analysis and thermodynamic properties of the title molecule have been calculated.

  3. Structures of discoidal high density lipoproteins: a combined computational-experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Feifei; Jones, Martin K; Chen, Jianguo; Patterson, James C; Catte, Andrea; Jerome, W Gray; Li, Ling; Segrest, Jere P

    2010-02-12

    Conversion of discoidal phospholipid (PL)-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) to spheroidal cholesteryl ester-rich HDL is a central step in reverse cholesterol transport. A detailed understanding of this process and the atheroprotective role of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) requires knowledge of the structure and dynamics of these various particles. This study, combining computation with experimentation, illuminates structural features of apoA-I allowing it to incorporate varying amounts of PL. Molecular dynamics simulated annealing of PL-rich HDL models containing unesterified cholesterol results in double belt structures with the same general saddle-shaped conformation of both our previous molecular dynamics simulations at 310 K and the x-ray structure of lipid-free apoA-I. Conversion from a discoidal to a saddle-shaped particle involves loss of helicity and formation of loops in opposing antiparallel parts of the double belt. During surface expansion caused by the temperature-jump step, the curved palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer surfaces approach planarity. Relaxation back into saddle-shaped structures after cool down and equilibration further supports the saddle-shaped particle model. Our kinetic analyses of reconstituted particles demonstrate that PL-rich particles exist in discrete sizes corresponding to local energetic minima. Agreement of experimental and computational determinations of particle size/shape and apoA-I helicity provide additional support for the saddle-shaped particle model. Truncation experiments combined with simulations suggest that the N-terminal proline-rich domain of apoA-I influences the stability of PL-rich HDL particles. We propose that apoA-I incorporates increasing PL in the form of minimal surface bilayers through the incremental unwinding of an initially twisted saddle-shaped apoA-I double belt structure.

  4. Oxide heterostructures for high density 2D electron gases on GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblum, Lior; Faucher, Joseph; Morales-Acosta, Mayra D.; Lee, Minjoo L.; Ahn, Charles H.; Walker, Frederick J.

    2018-01-01

    2D electron gases (2DEGs) that form at oxide interfaces provide a rich testbed of phenomena for condensed matter research, with emerging implementations in devices. Integrating such oxide systems with semiconductors advances these interesting phenomena toward technological applications. This approach further opens prospects of new functionalities arising from the potential to couple the 2DEG carriers with the semiconductor. In this work, we demonstrate the first integration of oxide 2DEGs with a direct bandgap III-V semiconductor. The growth and structural characteristics of (001) GdTiO3-SrTiO3 (GTO-STO) heterostructures on (001) GaAs are described. Analysis of the magnetotransport data yields a high electron density of ˜2 × 1014 cm-2 per GTO-STO interface, and points to the oxide interface as the source of the carriers. The effect of structure and defects on the transport properties is discussed within the context of the growth conditions and their limitations. These results provide a route for integrating oxide 2DEGs and other functional oxides with GaAs toward future device prospects and integration schemes.

  5. Analytical nuclear derivatives for the parametric two-electron reduced density matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Andrew J. S.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2017-10-01

    Efficient and accurate nuclear gradients are essential to performing molecular optimizations. Here for the first time we present analytical nuclear gradients for the parametric two-electron reduced-density-matrix method (p2-RDM), which uses the 2-RDM as the primary variable in calculations in lieu of the many-electron wavefunction. While numerical gradients require six energy evaluations for each atom, analytical gradients require only a single calculation for each geometry sampled. We present benchmark p2-RDM geometry optimizations that show analytical gradients reduce CPU times by as much as 80%, even for small molecules. We also use p2-RDM to evaluate the bond length alternation (BLA), or the difference in length between adjacent single and double bonds, of trans-polyacetylene (PA). We find that the BLA in the extrapolated limit to be 0.080 Å, in agreement with experiment and closely mirroring the prediction of the more expensive coupled-cluster with single and double excitations with perturbative triples (CCSD(T)).

  6. PMSE strength during enhanced D region electron densities: Faraday rotation and absorption effects at VHF frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Jorge L.; Röttger, Jürgen; Rapp, Markus

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we study the effects of absorption and Faraday rotation on measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). We found that such effects can produce significant reduction of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when the D region electron densities (Ne) are enhanced, and VHF radar systems with linearly polarized antennas are used. In particular we study the expected effects during the strong solar proton event (SPE) of July 2000, also known as the Bastille day flare event. During this event, a strong anti-correlation between the PMSE SNR and the D-region Ne was found over three VHF radar sites at high latitudes: Andøya, Kiruna, and Svalbard. This anti-correlation has been explained (a) in terms of transport effects due to strong electric fields associated to the SPE and (b) due to a limited amount of aerosol particles as compared to the amount of D-region electrons. Our calculations using the Ne profiles used by previous researchers explain most, if not all, of the observed SNR reduction in both time (around the SPE peak) and altitude. This systematic effect, particularly the Faraday rotation, should be recognized and tested, and possibly avoided (e.g., using circular polarization), in future observations during the incoming solar maximum period, to contribute to the understanding of PMSE during enhanced D region Ne.

  7. A density functional theory investigation of the electronic structure and spin moments of magnetite

    KAUST Repository

    Noh, Junghyun

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations on magnetite, Fe3O4, which has been recently considered as electrode in the emerging field of organic spintronics. Given the nature of the potential applications, we evaluated the magnetite room-temperature cubic phase in terms of structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. We considered GGA (PBE), GGA + U (PBE + U), and range-separated hybrid (HSE06 and HSE(15%)) functionals. Calculations using HSE06 and HSE(15%) functionals underline the impact that inclusion of exact exchange has on the electronic structure. While the modulation of the band gap with exact exchange has been seen in numerous situations, the dramatic change in the valence band nature and states near the Fermi level has major implications for even a qualitative interpretation of the DFT results. We find that HSE06 leads to highly localized states below the Fermi level while HSE(15%) and PBE + U result in delocalized states around the Fermi level. The significant differences in local magnetic moments and atomic charges indicate that describing room-temperature bulk materials, surfaces and interfaces may require different functionals than their low-temperature counterparts.

  8. Electronic structures of one-dimensional poly-fused selenophene radical cations: density functional theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kawabata et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid density functional theory (DFT calculations have been carried out for neutral and radical cation species of a fused selenophene oligomer, denoted by Se(n, where n represents the number of selenophene rings in the oligomer, to elucidate the electronic structures at ground and low-lying excited states. A polymer of fused selenophene was also investigated using one-dimensional periodic boundary conditions (PBC for comparison. It was found that the reorganization energy of a radical cation of Se(n from a vertical hole trapping point to its relaxed structure is significantly small. Also, the reorganization energy decreased gradually with increasing n, indicating that Se(n has an effective intramolecular hole transport property. It was found that the radical cation species of Se(n has a low-energy band in the near-IR region, which is strongly correlated to hole conductivity. The relationship between the electronic states and intramolecular hole conductivity was discussed on the basis of theoretical calculations.

  9. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...

  10. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  11. Electron emission yield for low energy electrons: Monte Carlo simulation and experimental comparison for Al, Ag, and Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierron, J.; Inguimbert, C.; Belhaj, M.; Gineste, T.; Puech, J.; Raine, M.

    2017-06-01

    The electron emission under electron impact between 10 eV and 2 keV is investigated with a Monte Carlo (MC) code in aluminum, silver, and silicon. The code is based on the complex dielectric function theory to describe the inelastic scattering and uses the Mott's model of partial waves to describe the elastic scattering. It takes into account both volume and surface plasmon excitations. The simulation results are compared with the experimental measurements of electron emission yields (EEY) and energy spectra of low energy electrons performed in ultrahigh vacuum on Ar-etched bulk samples. Our MC simulations at low energy are found to be in fairly good agreement with our experimental measurements. The peaks corresponding to the surface plasmon, the volume plasmon and its multiples and to the Auger transitions appear clearly on the energy loss spectra of aluminum, silver, and silicon. The simulated EEY are also in fairly good agreement with our measurements and with data from the literature. The EEY at normal incidence is studied for secondary and backscattered electrons. A focus is made for the EEY below 50 eV where a fairly good agreement is found with Bronstein and Fraiman's measurements on vacuum evaporated samples. Below 2 keV, for silver and aluminum, the total EEY is given for different angles of incidence θ. Some discrepancies are observed between our experimental measurements and our MC simulations for high angles of incidence. These discrepancies can be attributed to the modeling of surface plasmon excitations, surface oxidation, or roughness that occur during the Ar-etching process.

  12. CALCULATION-EXPERIMENTAL METHOD OF RESEARCH IN A METALLIC CONDUCTOR WITH THE PULSE CURRENT OF ELECTRONIC WAVEPACKAGES AND DE BROGLIE ELECTRONIC HALF-WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of calculation-experimental method for a discovery and study of electronic wavepackages (EWP and of de Broglie electronic half-waves in a metallic conductor with the pulse axial-flow current of high density. Methodology. Theoretical bases of the electrical engineering, bases of quantum physics, electrophysics bases of technique of high voltage and large pulsecurrents, and also bases of technique of measuring of permanent and variable electric value. Results. On the basis of generalization of results of research of features of the longitudinal wave periodic distributing of negatively charged transmitters of electric current of conductivity in the thin round continuous zincked steel wire offered and approved in the conditions of high-voltage laboratory method for a discovery and direct determination in him of geometrical parameters of «hot» and «cold» longitudinal areas quantized periodic longitudinal EWP and accordingly the mediated determination of values of the quantized lengths formative their de Broglie electronic half-waves. It is shown that results of close quantum mechanical calculations of EWP and quantized lengths λenz/2 of longitudinal de Broglie half-waves for the probed wire long l0 well comport with the results of the executed high temperature experiments on the powerful high-voltage generator of homopolar large pulse current of millisecond duration. Originality. First calculation-experimental a way the important for the theory of electricity fact of existence is set in a round metallic explorer with the impulsive axial-flow current of the quantized coherent de Broglie electronic half-waves, amplitudes of which at the quantum number of n=1,3,9 correspond the middles of «hot» longitudinal areas of EWP. Calculation quantum mechanical correlation of type of λenz/2=l0/n got experimental confirmation, in obedience to which on length of l0 conductor the integer of quantized electronic half-waves is always laid

  13. Electrons as probes of dynamics in molecules and clusters: A contribution from Time Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wopperer, P.; Dinh, P. M.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Suraud, E.

    2015-02-01

    There are various ways to analyze the dynamical response of clusters and molecules to electromagnetic perturbations. Particularly rich information can be obtained from measuring the properties of electrons emitted in the course of the excitation dynamics. Such an analysis of electron signals covers observables such as total ionization, Photo-Electron Spectra (PES), Photoelectron Angular Distributions (PAD), and ideally combined PES/PAD. It has a long history in molecular physics and was increasingly used in cluster physics as well. Recent progress in the design of new light sources (high intensity, high frequency, ultra short pulses) opens new possibilities for measurements and thus has renewed the interest on these observables, especially for the analysis of various dynamical scenarios, well beyond a simple access to electronic density of states. This, in turn, has motivated many theoretical investigations of the dynamics of electronic emission for molecules and clusters up to such a complex and interesting system as C60. A theoretical tool of choice is here Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) propagated in real time and on a spatial grid, and augmented by a Self-Interaction Correction (SIC). This provides a pertinent, robust, and efficient description of electronic emission including the detailed pattern of PES and PAD. A direct comparison between experiments and well founded elaborate microscopic theories is thus readily possible, at variance with more demanding observables such as for example fragmentation or dissociation cross sections. The purpose of this paper is to describe the theoretical tools developed on the basis of real-time and real-space TDDFT and to address in a realistic manner the analysis of electronic emission following irradiation of clusters and molecules by various laser pulses. After a general introduction, we shall present in a second part the available experimental results motivating such studies, starting from the simplest

  14. Investigation of the causes of the longitudinal variation of the electron density in the Weddell Sea Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P. G.; Meier, R. R.; Chen, Shih-Ping; Drob, D. P.; Dandenault, P.

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates and quantifies the causes of the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA), a region near the tip of South America extending from approximately 30° to 120°W geographic longitude and 50° to 75°S geographic latitude at solar minimum between 2007 and 2010. This region is unusual because the midnight peak electron density exceeds the midday peak electron density in summer. This study is far more quantitative than previous studies because, unlike other models, it assimilates selected data parameters to constrain a physical model in order to investigate other aspects of the data. It is shown that the commonly accepted explanation that the WSA is related to the magnetic field declination and inclination effects on the neutral wind does not explain the longitudinal variation of the electron density. Rather, longitudinal changes in the neutral winds and neutral densities are the most likely explanation for the WSA. These longitudinal wind and density changes are attributed to the varying latitudinal distance from the auroral zone energy input. No contributions from the plasmasphere or other sources are required. Furthermore, it is shown that a widely used empirical thermosphere density model overestimates the longitudinal changes in the WSA region.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryThis paper investigates and quantifies the causes of the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA), a region near the tip of South America extending from approximately 30° to 120°W geographic longitude and 50° to 75°S geographic latitude at solar minimum between 2007 and 2010. This region is unusual because the midnight peak electron density exceeds the midday peak electron density in summer. This study is far more quantitative than previous studies because, unlike other models, it assimilates selected data parameters to constrain a physical model in order to investigate other aspects of the data. It is shown that the commonly accepted explanation that the WSA is related to the

  15. D-region electron densities obtained by differential absorption and phase measurements with a 3-MHz-Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Friedrich, M.; Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.; Engler, N.; Holdsworth, D.

    2005-08-01

    A Doppler radar at 3.17 MHz has been installed close to the Andøya Rocket Range as part of the ALOMAR observatory at Andenes, Norway (69.3°N, 16.0°E) in summer 2002 to improve the ground based capabilities for measurements of small scale features and electron number densities in the mesosphere. The main feature of the new radar is the transmitting/receiving antenna which is arranged as a Mills Cross of 29 crossed half-wave dipoles with a minimum beam width of about 7°. The modular transceiver system provides high flexibility in beam forming and pointing as well as in switching of the polarisation between ordinary and extraordinary mode on transmission and reception. Doppler winds and electron number densities can be measured between about 55 km and 90 km with a time resolution of 9 minutes. The electron number density profiles derived with differential absorption (DAE) and differential phase (DPE) measurements are in remarkable good agreement. We discuss the diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities obtained at Andenes in 2004/2005, the response of D-region electron densities to geomagnetic disturbances and solar proton events. The results are compared with rocket measurements from Andenes and with observations from EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø.

  16. UV-Vis optoelectronic properties of α-SnWO4: A comparative experimental and density functional theory based study

    KAUST Repository

    Ziani, Ahmed

    2015-09-03

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the optoelectronic properties of α-SnWO4 for UV-Vis excitation. The experimentally measured values for thin films were systematically compared with high-accuracy density functional theory and density functional perturbation theory using the HSE06 functional. The α-SnWO4 material shows an indirect bandgap of 1.52 eV with high absorption coefficient in the visible-light range (>2 × 105 cm−1). The results show relatively high dielectric constant (>30) and weak diffusion properties (large effective masses) of excited carriers.

  17. Density function theory study on structures and electronic properties of 2Meq2AlOPh and its derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yanju; Liu, Xiaocun; Fu, Gang; Chen, Ying; Wang, Fengxiang; Zhao, Junqing

    2015-07-01

    Structures and electronic properties of 2Meq2AlOC6H4R (R=CN, Cl, H, OMe, NMe2) have been studied in the scheme of density function theory with the B3LYP and the 6-31G (d) basis set. The substitutions of the electron-withdrawing groups (CN, Cl) increase the band gap while the substitutions of the electron-donating groups (OMe, NMe2) decrease the gap. The substitutions of electron-withdrawing groups enhance the electron injection ability. In addition, the vertical ionization energies (IEV), the vertical electronic affinities (EAV) and reorganization energies of 2Meq2AlOPh and its derivatives are calculated in the work. All complexes are better electron transport materials.

  18. Evaporation of carbon using electrons of a high density plasma; Evaporacion de carbono usando los electrones de un plasma de alta densidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhl, S.; Camps, E.; Escobar A, L.; Garcia E, J.L.; Olea, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, C.P. 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The high density plasmas are used frequently in the preparation of thin films or surface modification, for example to nitridation. In these processes, are used mainly the ions and the neutrals which compose the plasma. However, the electrons present in the plasma are not used, except in the case of chemical reactions induced by collisions, although the electron bombardment usually get hot the work piece. Through the adequate polarization of a conductor material, it is possible to extract electrons from a high density plasma at low pressure, that could be gotten the evaporation of this material. As result of the interaction between the plasma and the electron flux with the vapor produced, this last will be ionized. In this work, it is reported the use of this novelty arrangement to prepare carbon thin films using a high density argon plasma and a high purity graphite bar as material to evaporate. It has been used substrates outside plasma and immersed in the plasma. Also it has been reported the plasma characteristics (temperature and electron density, energy and ions flux), parameters of the deposit process (deposit rate and ion/neutral rate) as well as the properties of the films obtained (IR absorption spectra and UV/Vis, elemental analysis, hardness and refractive index). (Author)

  19. Gaussian Mixture Density based Analytical Model of Noise Induced Variation in Key Parameter of Electronically Tunable Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawid Banchuin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the Gaussian mixture density based analytical model of variation in key parameter of electronically tunable device has been originally proposed. The proposed model is applicable to any electronically tunable device with its tuning variable has been affected by any kind of noise with arbitrary parameters. It has been found from the verification by using different electronically tunable device based empirical distributions and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests that this novel model is very accurate. So, it has been found to be a convenient mathematical tool for the analysis and design of various electronically tunable device based circuits.

  20. Experimental characterization of a space charge induced modulation in high-brightness electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Shaftan

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the experimental investigation of a collective effect driving strong modulation in the longitudinal phase space of a high-brightness electron beam. The measured beam energy spectrum was analyzed in order to reveal the main parameters of modulation. The experimental results were compared with a model of space-charge oscillations in the beam longitudinal phase space. The measurements and analysis allowed us to determine the range of the parameters of the observed effect on the modulation dynamics and illustrate its potential impact on short-wavelength free-electron laser performance.

  1. Experimental studies and modelling of high radiation and high density plasmas in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casali, Livia

    2015-11-24

    Fusion plasmas contain impurities, either intrinsic originating from the wall, or injected willfully with the aim of reducing power loads on machine components by converting heat flux into radiation. The understanding and the prediction of the effects of these impurities and their radiation on plasma performances is crucial in order to retain good confinement. In addition, it is important to understand the impact of pellet injection on plasma performance since this technique allows higher core densities which are required to maximise the fusion power. This thesis contributes to these efforts through both experimental investigations and modelling. Experiments were conducted at ASDEX Upgrade which has a full-W wall. Impurity seeding was applied to H-modes by injecting nitrogen and also medium-Z impurities such as Kr and Ar to assess the impact of both edge and central radiation on confinement. A database of about 25 discharges has been collected and analysed. A wide range of plasma parameters was achieved up to ITER relevant values such as high Greenwald and high radiation fractions. Transport analyses taking into account the radiation distribution reveal that edge localised radiation losses do not significantly impact confinement as long as the H-mode pedestal is sustained. N seeding induces higher pedestal pressure which is propagated to the core via profile stiffness. Central radiation must be limited and controlled to avoid confinement degradation. This requires reliable control of the impurity concentration but also possibilities to act on the ELM frequency which must be kept high enough to avoid an irreversible impurity accumulation in the centre and the consequent radiation collapse. The key role of the f{sub ELM} is confirmed also by the analysis of N+He discharges. Non-coronal effects affect the radiation of low-Z impurities at the plasma edge. Due to the radial transport, the steep temperature gradients and the ELM flush out, a local equilibrium cannot be

  2. PMSE observations with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars: Ice particles and their effect on ambient electron densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Rapp, Markus

    2013-11-01

    It is now well understood that the occurrence of PMSE is closely connected to the presence of ice particles. These ice particles modify the ambient electron density by electron attachment which occasionally leads to large electron density depletions which have also been called ‘biteouts’. There has been some debate in the literature regarding the relative depth of such depletions which is usually expressed by the parameter Λ=|ZA|NA/ne. Here, |ZA|NA is the charge number density of ice particles and ne is the electron density. In this paper, we present, for the first time, the statistical distribution of Λ using measurements with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars. Based on 25 h of simultaneous observations, we derived a total of 757 Λ values based on 15 min of data each. In each of these cases, PMSE were observed with the EISCAT VHF-radar but not with the UHF-radar and the UHF-measurement were hence used to determine the electron density profile. From these 757 cases, there are 699 cases with Λ⪡1, and only 33 cases with Λ>0.5 (21 cases with Λ>1). A correlation analysis of Λ versus PMSE volume reflectivities further reveals that there is no strong dependence between the two parameters. This is in accordance with current PMSE-theory based on turbulence in combination with a large Schmidt-number. The maxima of Λ from each profile show a negative relationship with the undisturbed electron densities deduced at the same altitudes. This reveals that the variability of Λ mainly depends on the variability of the electron densities. In addition, variations of aerosol number densities may also play a role. Although part of the observations were conducted during the HF heating experiments, the so-called overshoot effects did not significantly bias our statistical results. In order to avoid missing biteouts because of a superposition of coherent and incoherent scatter in the UHF-data, we finally calculated spectral parameters n by applying a simple fit to auto

  3. A method for 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x-rays with application to mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Uytven, Eric [National Research Council Institute for Biodiagnostics, 435 Ellice Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 1Y6 (Canada); Pistorius, Stephen [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3A 1R9 (Canada); Gordon, Richard [Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada)], E-mail: eric.vanuytven@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: Stephen.Pistorius@cancercare.mb.ca, E-mail: gordonr@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2008-10-07

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal, heterogeneous tissue. In this work, we examine the potential of single scattered photon electron density imaging in a mammographic environment. Simulating a low-energy (<20 keV) scanning pencil beam, we have developed an algorithm capable of producing 3D electron density images from a single projection. We have tested the algorithm by imaging parts of a simulated mammographic accreditation phantom containing lesions of various sizes. The results indicate that the group of imaged lesions differ significantly from background breast tissue (p < 0.005), confirming that electron density imaging may be a useful diagnostic test for the presence of breast cancer.

  4. Stockholder projector analysis: a Hilbert-space partitioning of the molecular one-electron density matrix with orthogonal projectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfleteren, Diederik; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick; Ayers, Paul W; Waroquier, Michel

    2012-01-07

    A previously introduced partitioning of the molecular one-electron density matrix over atoms and bonds [D. Vanfleteren et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 231103 (2010)] is investigated in detail. Orthogonal projection operators are used to define atomic subspaces, as in Natural Population Analysis. The orthogonal projection operators are constructed with a recursive scheme. These operators are chemically relevant and obey a stockholder principle, familiar from the Hirshfeld-I partitioning of the electron density. The stockholder principle is extended to density matrices, where the orthogonal projectors are considered to be atomic fractions of the summed contributions. All calculations are performed as matrix manipulations in one-electron Hilbert space. Mathematical proofs and numerical evidence concerning this recursive scheme are provided in the present paper. The advantages associated with the use of these stockholder projection operators are examined with respect to covalent bond orders, bond polarization, and transferability.

  5. Influence of plasma density on the generation of 100's MeV electrons via Direct Laser Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Amina; Batson, T.; Arefiev, A. V.; Chen, H.; Craxton, R. S.; Davies, A.; Froula, D. H.; Haberberger, D.; Jansen, O.; Krushelnick, K.; Nilson, P. M.; Theobald, W.; Wang, T.; Williams, G. J.; Willingale, L.

    2017-10-01

    The role of plasma density and quasi-static fields in the acceleration of electrons to many times the ponderomotive energies (exceeding 400 MeV) by high-energy, picosecond duration laser pulses via Direct Laser Acceleration (DLA) from underdense CH plasma was investigated. Experiments using the OMEGA EP laser facility and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the EPOCH code were performed. The existence of an optimal plasma density for the generation of high-energy, low-divergence electron beams is demonstrated. The role of quasi-static channel fields on electron energy enhancement, beam pointing and divergence elucidate the mechanisms and action of DLA at different plasma densities. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-FOA-0001109.

  6. Ionospheric electron density irregularities observed by satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, low-low Doppler tracking link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, R. D.; Grossi, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    A low-low, satellite-to-satellite, dual-frequency, Doppler tracking experiment was performed. The data are analyzed here for irregularities in electron density at the altitude of 212 km. The differential Doppler data with the relative motion term removed are integrated to obtain a representation of the electron density variation along the satellite path. Well-known large-scale features such as the equatorial geomagnetic anomaly and day/night ionization level differences are clearly observed in the integrated data. The larger crest of the morning geomagnetic anomaly is seen to occur in the southern (winter) hemisphere in agreement with previous observations. In addition, a sharp peak in the electron density at the day-to-night transition point is observed in two consecutive revolutions. This effect may be due to the previously postulated atmospheric shock wave generated by supersonic motion of the terminator.

  7. Radio science electron density profiles of lunar ionosphere based on the service module of circumlunar return and reentry spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Han, S.; Ping, J.; Tang, G.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-09-01

    The existence of lunar ionosphere has been under debate for a long time. Radio occultation experiments had been performed by both Luna 19/22 and SELENE missions and electron column density of lunar ionosphere was provided. The Apollo 14 mission also acquired the electron density with in situ measurements. But the results of these missions don't well-matched. In order to explore the lunar ionosphere, radio occultation with the service module of Chinese circumlunar return and reentry spacecraft has been performing. One coherent S-band and X-band radio signals were recorded by China deep space stations, and local correlation was adopted to compute carrier phases of both signals. Based on the above work, the electron density profiles of lunar ionosphere was obtained and analyzed.

  8. Atomic-accuracy models from 4.5-Å cryo-electron microscopy data with density-guided iterative local refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, Frank; Song, Yifan; Li, Xueming; Brunner, Matthias J; Xu, Chunfu; Conticello, Vincent; Egelman, Edward; Marlovits, Thomas; Cheng, Yifan; Baker, David

    2015-04-01

    We describe a general approach for refining protein structure models on the basis of cryo-electron microscopy maps with near-atomic resolution. The method integrates Monte Carlo sampling with local density-guided optimization, Rosetta all-atom refinement and real-space B-factor fitting. In tests on experimental maps of three different systems with 4.5-Å resolution or better, the method consistently produced models with atomic-level accuracy largely independently of starting-model quality, and it outperformed the molecular dynamics-based MDFF method. Cross-validated model quality statistics correlated with model accuracy over the three test systems.

  9. PFISR GPS tracking mode for researching high-latitude ionospheric electron density gradients associated with GPS scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, D. C.; Palo, S. E.; Pilinski, M.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Hampton, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Ionospheric behavior in the high-latitudes can significantly impact Ultra High Frequency (UHF) signals in the 300 MHz to 3 GHz band, resulting in degradation of Global Positioning System (GPS) position solutions and satellite communications interruptions. To address these operational concerns, a need arises to identify and understand the ionospheric structure that leads to disturbed conditions in the Arctic. Structures in the high-latitude ionosphere are known to change on the order of seconds or less, can be decameters to kilometers in scale, and elongate across magnetic field lines at auroral latitudes. Nominal operations at Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) give temporal resolution on the order of minutes, and range resolution on the order of tens of kilometers, while specialized GPS receivers available for ionospheric sensing have a 100Hz observation sampling rate. One of these, ASTRA's Connected Autonomous Space Environment Sensor (CASES) is used for this study. We have developed a new GPS scintillation tracking mode for PFISR to address open scientific questions regarding temporal and spatial electron density gradients. The mode will be described, a number of experimental campaigns will be analyzed, and results and lessons learned will be presented.

  10. Desmopressin improves intestinal functional capillary density and decreases leukocyte activation in experimental endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafa, K; Lehmann, C; Wagner, L; Drzymulski, I; Wegner, A; Pavlovic, D

    2015-01-01

    Blood flow to the intestine is decreased in sepsis in favor of vital organs resulting in ischemic damage of the gut mucosa. Once the mucosa is damaged, increased translocation of intestinal bacteria to the systemic circulation may occur. This in turn aggravates the inflammatory response contributing to the development of multi-organ failure. Desmopressin is a synthetic analog of vasopressin, an anti-diuretic hormone which has been shown to induce vasodilation and is thought to be implicated in immunomodulation. In this study, we investigate the effects of desmopressin on the intestinal microcirculation during sepsis in an experimental endotoxemia model in rats using intravital microscopy. In addition, we investigate the effects of desmopressin on systemic inflammation. Forty Lewis rats were subdivided into four groups, where rats received intravenous saline (control), desmopressin (1μg/kg/ml), lipopolysaccharide (5mg/kg) or lipopolysaccharide followed by desmopressin. Inflammatory response was assessed by quantifying the number of temporary and firmly adherent leukocytes in submucosal venules. Capillary perfusion was determined by assessing the number of functional, non-functional and dysfunctional capillaries in the intestinal wall layers (muscularis longitudinalis, muscularis circularis and mucosa). Additionally, inflammatory cytokine levels were determined by multiplex assays. The number of firmly adhering leukocytes in V1 venules of rats receiving lipopolysaccharide and treated with desmopressin was significantly reduced compared to lipopolysaccharide only group (LPS: 259±25.7 vs. LPS+DDAVP: 203±17.2; n/mm(2); pdesmopressin treatment improved impaired intestinal microcirculation by improving functional capillary density following lipopolysaccharide administration in all examined layers of the intestinal wall. We also observed a significant decrease in TNF-α levels in rats which received desmopressin in endotoxemia compared to untreated rats (LPS: 383±64

  11. Pnicogen bonds: a theoretical study based on the Laplacian of electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, K; Mahmoodabadi, N

    2013-12-05

    Although, most of the authors classify the pnicogen bonds as σ-hole bonding, there are some evidence that show they do not require any positive electrostatic potential around interacting molecules. In this work, the Laplacian of electron density is used to study pnicogen bonds in different dimer and trimer complexes. It is shown that the noncovalent P···P, P···N, and N···N bonds can be categorized as lump-hole interactions; a region of charge depletion and excess kinetics energy (hole) in the valence shell charge concentration (VSCC) of pnicogen atom combines with a region of charge concentration and excess potential energy (lump) in the VSCC of another molecule and form a pnicogen bond. In fact, since the full quantum potential (according to the local statement of virial theorem) has been used in the definition of the Laplacian, the lump-hole concept is more useful than the σ-hole in which the electrostatic part of potential is only considered. It is shown that the existence of hole in the VSCC of pnicogen atom is responsible for formation and (in the absence of other interactions) geometry of pnicogen bonded complexes. Because there is (at least) one hole in their VSCC, the pnicogen atoms in PH3, PH2F, H2C═PH, H2C═PF, and NH2F can engage in direct pnicogen-pnicogen interactions. However, the VSCC of nitrogen atom in the NH3 is devoid of hole and hence cannot act as an electron acceptor in pnicogen-bonded complexes.

  12. Electronic states of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers: Extreme-ultra violet excited photoelectron spectroscopy observations and density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo [Research Institute for Innovation in Sustainable Chemistry, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Sasaki, Fumio; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ishitsuka, Tomoaki; Tomie, Toshihisa [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ootsuka, Teruhisa [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Watanabe, Shuji [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 1-4-12, Kojirakawa, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Shimoi, Yukihiro [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu [Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2013-02-28

    We have investigated electronic states in the valence electron bands for the thin films of three thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) compounds, 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)thiophene (BP1T), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)benzene (AC5), and 1,4-bis{l_brace}5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]thiophen-2-yl{r_brace}benzene (AC5-CF{sub 3}), by using extreme-UV excited photoelectron spectroscopy (EUPS). By comparing both EUPS spectra and secondary electron spectra between AC5 and AC5-CF{sub 3}, we confirm that CF{sub 3} substitution to AC5 deepens valence states by 2 eV, and increases the ionization energy by 3 eV. From the cut-off positions of secondary electron spectra, the work functions of AC5, AC5-CF{sub 3}, and BP1T are evaluated to be 3.8 eV, 4.8 eV, and 4.0 eV, respectively. We calculate molecular orbital (MO) energy levels by the density functional theory and compare results of calculations with those of experiments. Densities of states obtained by broadening MO levels well explain the overall features of experimental EUPS spectra of three TPCOs.

  13. Small scale density variations of electrons and charged particles in the vicinity of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present small scale variations of electron number densities and particle charge number densities measured in situ in the presence of polar mesosphere summer echoes. It turns out that the small scale fluctuations of electrons and negatively charged particles show a strong anticorrelation down to the smallest scales observed. Comparing these small scale structures with the simultaneously measured radar signal to noise profile, we find that the radar profile is well described by the power spectral density of both electrons and charged particles at the radar half wavelength (=the Bragg scale. Finally, we consider the shape of the power spectra of the observed plasma fluctuations and find that both charged particles and electrons show spectra that can be explained in terms of either neutral air turbulence acting on the distribution of a low diffusivity tracer or the fossil remnants of a formerly active turbulent region. All these results are consistent with the theoretical ideas by Rapp and Lübken (2003 suggesting that PMSE can be explained by a combination of active and fossil neutral air turbulence acting on the large and heavy charged aerosol particles which are subsequently mirrored in the electron number density distribution that becomes visible to a VHF radar when small scale fluctuations are present.

  14. Density functional investigations of the properties and thermochemistry of UF6 and UF5 using valence-electron and all-electron approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Enrique R; Martin, Richard L; Hay, P Jeffrey; Peralta, Juan E; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2004-08-01

    The structural properties and thermochemistry of UF6 and UF5 have been investigated using both Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) approximations. Within the latter approach, the local spin-density approximation, the generalized gradient approximation, and hybrid density functionals were considered. To describe the uranium atom we employed small-core (60 electrons) and large-core (78 electrons) relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs), as well as the all-electron approximation based on the two-component third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. For structu