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Sample records for experimental bioluminescence tomography

  1. Experimental Study on Bioluminescence Tomography with Multimodality Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Lv

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the influence of a priori information on the nonuniqueness problem of bioluminescence tomography (BLT, the multimodality imaging fusion based BLT experiment is performed by multiview noncontact detection mode, which incorporates the anatomical information obtained by the microCT scanner and the background optical properties based on diffuse reflectance measurements. In the reconstruction procedure, the utilization of adaptive finite element methods (FEMs and a priori permissible source region refines the reconstructed results and improves numerical robustness and efficiency. The comparison between the absence and employment of a priori information shows that multimodality imaging fusion is essential to quantitative BLT reconstruction.

  2. Image reconstruction for bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming; Wang, Ge

    2004-10-01

    Motivated by bioluminescent imaging needs for studies on gene therapy and other applications in the mouse models, a bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system is being developed by our group. While the forward imaging model is described by the diffusion approximation, BLT is the inverse problem to recover an internal bioluminescent source distribution subject to Cauchy data for the diffusion equation. This inverse source problem is ill-posed and does not yield the unique solution in the general case. The uniqueness problem under practical constraints was recently studied by our group. It was found that all the inverse source solutions can be expressed as the unique minimal energy source solution plus a nonradiating source. We demonstrate that the minimal energy source solution is not physically favorable for bioluminescence tomography, although the minimal energy constraint is utilized in other applications. To find a physically meaningful unique solution, adequate prior knowledge must be utilized. Here we propose two iterative approaches in this work. The first one is a variant of the well-known EM algorithm. The second one is based on the Landweber scheme. Either of the methods is suitable for incorporating knowledge-based constraints. We discuss several issues related to the implementation of these methods, including the initial guess and stopping criteria. Also, we report our numerical simulation results to demonstrate the feasibility of bioluminescence tomography.

  3. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

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    Feng Jinchao; Qin Chenghu; Jia Kebin; Han Dong; Liu Kai; Zhu Shouping; Yang Xin; Tian Jie [Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China); College of Electronic Information and Control Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China); Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China) and School of Life Sciences and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l{sub 2} data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used

  4. Sparse reconstruction for quantitative bioluminescence tomography based on the incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaowei; Liang, Jimin; Wang, Xiaorui; Yu, Jingjing; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Xiaodong; Hou, Yanbin; Chen, Duofang; Liu, Fang; Tian, Jie

    2010-11-22

    In this paper, we present an incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient (IVTCG) method for bioluminescence tomography (BLT). Considering the sparse characteristic of the light source and insufficient surface measurement in the BLT scenarios, we combine a sparseness-inducing (ℓ1 norm) regularization term with a quadratic error term in the IVTCG-based framework for solving the inverse problem. By limiting the number of variables updated at each iterative and combining a variable splitting strategy to find the search direction more efficiently, it obtains fast and stable source reconstruction, even without a priori information of the permissible source region and multispectral measurements. Numerical experiments on a mouse atlas validate the effectiveness of the method. In vivo mouse experimental results further indicate its potential for a practical BLT system.

  5. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J [Signal and Image Processing Institute, Department of Electrical Engineering-Systems, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Darvas, Felix [Signal and Image Processing Institute, Department of Electrical Engineering-Systems, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Bading, James R [Department of Radiology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Moats, Rex A [Department of Radiology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Conti, Peter S [Department of Radiology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Smith, Desmond J [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cherry, Simon R [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Leahy, Richard M [Signal and Image Processing Institute, Department of Electrical Engineering-Systems, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)

    2005-12-07

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour.

  6. Algorithm for localized adaptive diffuse optical tomography and its application in bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Mohamed A.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2014-04-01

    A reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography based on diffusion theory and finite element method is described. The algorithm reconstructs the optical properties in a permissible domain or region-of-interest to reduce the number of unknowns. The algorithm can be used to reconstruct optical properties for a segmented object (where a CT-scan or MRI is available) or a non-segmented object. For the latter, an adaptive segmentation algorithm merges contiguous regions with similar optical properties thereby reducing the number of unknowns. In calculating the Jacobian matrix the algorithm uses an efficient direct method so the required time is comparable to that needed for a single forward calculation. The reconstructed optical properties using segmented, non-segmented, and adaptively segmented 3D mouse anatomy (MOBY) are used to perform bioluminescence tomography (BLT) for two simulated internal sources. The BLT results suggest that the accuracy of reconstruction of total source power obtained without the segmentation provided by an auxiliary imaging method such as x-ray CT is comparable to that obtained when using perfect segmentation.

  7. Fast in vivo bioluminescence tomography using a novel pure optical imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence tomography (BLT is a novel optical molecular imaging technique that advanced the conventional planar bioluminescence imaging (BLI into a quantifiable three-dimensional (3D approach in preclinical living animal studies in oncology. In order to solve the inverse problem and reconstruct tumor lesions inside animal body accurately, the prior structural information is commonly obtained from X-ray computed tomography (CT. This strategy requires a complicated hybrid imaging system, extensive post imaging analysis and involvement of ionizing radiation. Moreover, the overall robustness highly depends on the fusion accuracy between the optical and structural information. Here, we present a pure optical bioluminescence tomographic (POBT system and a novel BLT workflow based on multi-view projection acquisition and 3D surface reconstruction. This method can reconstruct the 3D surface of an imaging subject based on a sparse set of planar white-light and bioluminescent images, so that the prior structural information can be offered for 3D tumor lesion reconstruction without the involvement of CT. The performance of this novel technique was evaluated through the comparison with a conventional dual-modality tomographic (DMT system and a commercialized optical imaging system (IVIS Spectrum using three breast cancer xenografts. The results revealed that the new technique offered comparable in vivo tomographic accuracy with the DMT system (P>0.05 in much shorter data analysis time. It also offered significantly better accuracy comparing with the IVIS system (P<0.04 without sacrificing too much time.

  8. Evaluation of the anti-neoplastic effect of sorafenib on liver cancer through bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qian; Ye, Jinzuo; Du, Yang; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most important leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of sorafenib on hepatocellular carcinoma through bioluminescence tomography (BLT) based on Micro-CT/BLT multi-modal system. Initially, the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2-Red-FLuc, which was transfected with luciferase gene, was cultured. And then, the orthotopic liver tumor mouse model was established on 4 5 weeks old athymic male Balb/c nude mice by inoculating the HepG2-Red-FLuc cell suspension into the liver lobe under isoflurane anesthesia. 15 20 days after tumor cells implantation, the mice were divided into two groups including the sorafenib treatment group and the control group. The mice in the treatment group were treated with sorafenib with dosage of 62 mg/kg/day by oral gavage for continuous 14 days, and the mice in the control group were treated with sterile water at equal volume. The tumor growth and drug treatment efficacy were dynamically monitored through BLT. The results in this study showed that the growth of liver cancer can be dynamically monitored from very early stage, and also the sorafenib treatment efficacy can be reliably and objectively assessed using BLT imaging method. Our experimental result demonstrated sorafenib can inhibit the tumor growth effectively. BLT enabled the non-invasive and reliable assessment of anti-neoplastic drug efficacy on liver cancer.

  9. An Experimental-Numerical Study of Small Scale Flow Interaction with Bioluminescent Plankton

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Latz, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Numerical and experimental approaches were used to investigate the effects of quantified flow stimuli on bioluminescence sUmulatidn at the small length and time scales appropriate for individual plankton...

  10. A fast reconstruction algorithm for bioluminescence tomography based on smoothed l0 norm regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaowei; Yu, Jingjing; Geng, Guohua; Guo, Hongbo

    2013-10-01

    As an important optical molecular imaging technique, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) offers an inexpensive and sensitive means for non-invasively imaging a variety of physiological and pathological activities at cellular and molecular levels in living small animals. The key problem of BLT is to recover the distribution of the internal bioluminescence sources from limited measurements on the surface. Considering the sparsity of the light source distribution, we directly formulate the inverse problem of BLT into an l0-norm minimization model and present a smoothed l0-norm (SL0) based reconstruction algorithm. By approximating the discontinuous l0 norm with a suitable continuous function, the SL0 norm method solves the problem of intractable computational load of the minimal l0 search as well as high sensitivity of l0-norm to noise. Numerical experiments on a mouse atlas demonstrate that the proposed SL0 norm based reconstruction method can obtain whole domain reconstruction without any a priori knowledge of the source permissible region, yielding almost the same reconstruction results to those of l1 norm methods.

  11. Multi-projection bioluminescence tomography guided system for small animal radiation research platform (SARRP)

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    Zhang, Bin; Iordachita, Iulian; Wong, John W.; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin

    2016-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is limited in guiding irradiation for soft tissue targets. As a complementary imaging modality, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides strong soft tissue contrast. We developed a dual-use BLT system which consists of an optical assembly, a mobile cart and an independent mouse bed. The system is motorized which can easily dock onto an independent mouse bed operating as a standalone system for longitudinal bioluminescence imaging (BLI)/BLT studies and also dock onto the SARRP for on-line radiation guidance. Our initial tests for the system demonstrate that (i) the imaging depth is 28 mm, (ii) the optical background is sufficiently low and uniform, (iii) the non-uniform response of the optical imaging can be corrected by the flat field correction, and (iv) the imaging acquisition speed was improved by an average of 3.7 times faster than our previous systems. We also presented a geometry calibration procedure to map the planar BLIs acquired at multi-projections onto the surface of the CBCT image. The CBCT is required to generate the mesh for BLT reconstruction and used for treatment planning and radiation delivery. Feasibility study of the geometry calibration was performed on a manual-docking prototype. The mean and maximum mapping accuracy is 0.3 and 0.6 mm. The performance of the proposed motorized dual-use system is expected to be superior to that of the manual-docking prototype because of the mechanism stability. We anticipate the dual-use system as a highly efficient and cost-effective platform to facilitate optical imaging for preclinical radiation research.

  12. Second-Generation Triple Reporter for Bioluminescence, Micro–Positron Emission Tomography, and Fluorescence Imaging

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    Aparna H. Kesarwala

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence, positron emission tomography (PET, and fluorescence modalities are currently available for noninvasive imaging in vivo, each with its own merits. To exploit the combined strengths of each and facilitate multimodality imaging, we engineered a dual-reporter construct in which firefly luciferase (FLuc and a 12–amino acid nonstructural linker were fused in frame to the N-terminus of a mutant herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (mNLS-SR39TK kinetically enhanced for positron emission tomography (PET. Furthermore, a triple-reporter construct was developed in which monster green fluorescent protein (MGFP, a recently available enhanced fluorescent protein, was introduced into the fusion vector downstream of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES to allow analysis by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry without compromising the specific activities of the upstream fusion components. FLuc bioluminescence was measured with a cooled charge-coupled device camera and mNLS-SR39TK activity by 9-[4-[18F]fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl butyl guanine (18F-FHBG microPET or 3H-penciclovir net accumulation. Importantly, HeLa cells transiently transfected with the FLuc-mNLS-SR39TK-IRES-MGFP triple reporter retained the same specific activities of the FLuc-mNLS-SR39TK heteroenzyme and the individual unfused enzymes with no change in protein half-lives. The presence of the IRES-MGFP modestly decreased upstream heteroprotein expression. In living mice, somatic gene transfer of a ubiquitin promoter-driven FLuc-mNLS-SR39TK-IRES-MGFP plasmid showed a > 1,000-fold increase in liver photon flux and a > 2-fold increase in liver retention of 18F-FHBG by microPET compared with mice treated with control plasmid. Multifocal hepatocellular fluorescence was readily observed by standard confocal microscopy. This second-generation triple reporter incorporating enhanced components enables bioluminescence, PET, and fluorescence imaging of cells and living animals.

  13. L{sub 1/2} regularization based numerical method for effective reconstruction of bioluminescence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueli, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn; Yang, Defu; Zhang, Qitan; Liang, Jimin, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Engineering Research Center of Molecular and Neuro Imaging, Ministry of Education (China)

    2014-05-14

    Even though bioluminescence tomography (BLT) exhibits significant potential and wide applications in macroscopic imaging of small animals in vivo, the inverse reconstruction is still a tough problem that has plagued researchers in a related area. The ill-posedness of inverse reconstruction arises from insufficient measurements and modeling errors, so that the inverse reconstruction cannot be solved directly. In this study, an l{sub 1/2} regularization based numerical method was developed for effective reconstruction of BLT. In the method, the inverse reconstruction of BLT was constrained into an l{sub 1/2} regularization problem, and then the weighted interior-point algorithm (WIPA) was applied to solve the problem through transforming it into obtaining the solution of a series of l{sub 1} regularizers. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method were demonstrated with numerical simulations on a digital mouse. Stability verification experiments further illustrated the robustness of the proposed method for different levels of Gaussian noise.

  14. Systematic study of target localization for bioluminescence tomography guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jingjing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Shaanxi 710119 (China); Zhang, Bin; Reyes, Juvenal; Wong, John W.; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin, E-mail: kwang27@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Iordachita, Iulian I. [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Lu, Zhihao [Department of Oncology and Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Key laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research, Department of GI Oncology, Peking University, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing 100142 (China); Brock, Malcolm V. [Department of Oncology and Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Patterson, Michael S. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To overcome the limitation of CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT) in guiding radiation for soft tissue targets, the authors developed a spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system for the small animal radiation research platform. The authors systematically assessed the performance of the BLT system in terms of target localization and the ability to resolve two neighboring sources in simulations, tissue-mimicking phantom, and in vivo environments. Methods: Multispectral measurements acquired in a single projection were used for the BLT reconstruction. The incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient algorithm with an iterative permissible region shrinking strategy was employed as the optimization scheme to reconstruct source distributions. Simulation studies were conducted for single spherical sources with sizes from 0.5 to 3 mm radius at depth of 3–12 mm. The same configuration was also applied for the double source simulation with source separations varying from 3 to 9 mm. Experiments were performed in a standalone BLT/CBCT system. Two self-illuminated sources with 3 and 4.7 mm separations placed inside a tissue-mimicking phantom were chosen as the test cases. Live mice implanted with single-source at 6 and 9 mm depth, two sources at 3 and 5 mm separation at depth of 5 mm, or three sources in the abdomen were also used to illustrate the localization capability of the BLT system for multiple targets in vivo. Results: For simulation study, approximate 1 mm accuracy can be achieved at localizing center of mass (CoM) for single-source and grouped CoM for double source cases. For the case of 1.5 mm radius source, a common tumor size used in preclinical study, their simulation shows that for all the source separations considered, except for the 3 mm separation at 9 and 12 mm depth, the two neighboring sources can be resolved at depths from 3 to 12 mm. Phantom experiments illustrated that 2D bioluminescence imaging failed to distinguish two sources

  15. SU-E-T-20: A Novel Hybrid CBCT, Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Tomography System for Preclinical Radiation Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B; Eslami, S; Iordachita, I [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yang, Y [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Patterson, M [Hamilton Regional Cancer Ctr., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Wong, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, K [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A novel standalone bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT) system equipped with high resolution CBCT has been built in our group. In this work, we present the system calibration method and validate our system in both phantom and in vivo environment. Methods: The CBCT is acquired by rotating the animal stage while keeping the x-ray source and detector panel static. The optical signal is reflected by the 3-mirror system to a multispectral filter set and then delivered to the CCD camera with f/1.4 lens mounted. Nine fibers passing through the stage and in contact with the mouse skin serve as the light sources for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and FT. The anatomical information and optical properties acquired from the CBCT and DOT, respectively, are used as the priori information to improve the BLT/FT reconstruction accuracy. Flat field correction for the optical system was acquired at multiple wavelengths. A home-built phantom is used to register the optical and CBCT coordinates. An absolute calibration relating the CCD photon counts rate to the light fluence rate emitted at animal surface was developed to quantify the bioluminescence power or fluorophore concentration. Results: An optical inhomogeneous phantom with 2 light sources (3mm separation) imbedded is used to test the system. The optical signal is mapped onto the mesh generated from CBCT for optical reconstruction. Our preliminary results show that the center of mass can be reconstructed within 2.8mm accuracy. A live mouse with the light source imbedded is also used to validate our system. Liver or lung metastatic luminescence tumor model will be used for further testing. Conclusion: This hybrid system transforms preclinical research to a level that even sub-palpable volume of cells can be imaged rapidly and non-invasively, which largely extends the scope of radiobiological research. The research is supported by the NCI grant R01CA158100-01.

  16. Hybrid Multilevel Sparse Reconstruction for a Whole Domain Bioluminescence Tomography Using Adaptive Finite Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative reconstruction of bioluminescent sources from boundary measurements is a challenging ill-posed inverse problem owing to the high degree of absorption and scattering of light through tissue. We present a hybrid multilevel reconstruction scheme by combining the ability of sparse regularization with the advantage of adaptive finite element method. In view of the characteristics of different discretization levels, two different inversion algorithms are employed on the initial coarse mesh and the succeeding ones to strike a balance between stability and efficiency. Numerical experiment results with a digital mouse model demonstrate that the proposed scheme can accurately localize and quantify source distribution while maintaining reconstruction stability and computational economy. The effectiveness of this hybrid reconstruction scheme is further confirmed with in vivo experiments.

  17. Bioluminescence and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macrophage Homing to Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Miyama

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage infiltration is a prominent feature of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA progression. We used a combined imaging approach with bioluminescence (BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to study macrophage homing and accumulation in experimental AAA disease. Murine AAAs were created via intra-aortic infusion of porcine pancreatic elastase. Mice were imaged over 14 days after injection of prepared peritoneal macrophages. For BLI, macrophages were from transgenic mice expressing luciferase. For MRI, macrophages were labeled with iron oxide particles. Macrophage accumulation during aneurysm progression was observed by in situ BLI and by in vivo 7T MRI. Mice were sacrificed after imaging for histologic analysis. In situ BLI (n = 32 demonstrated high signal in the AAA by days 7 and 14, which correlated significantly with macrophage number and aortic diameter. In vivo 7T MRI (n = 13 at day 14 demonstrated T2* signal loss in the AAA and not in sham mice. Immunohistochemistry and Prussian blue staining confirmed the presence of injected macrophages in the AAA. BLI and MRI provide complementary approaches to track macrophage homing and accumulation in experimental AAAs. Similar dual imaging strategies may aid the study of AAA biology and the evaluation of novel therapies.

  18. Hybrid radiosity-SP{sub 3} equation based bioluminescence tomography reconstruction for turbid medium with low- and non-scattering regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueli, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn; Zhang, Qitan; Yang, Defu; Liang, Jimin, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2014-01-14

    To provide an ideal solution for a specific problem of gastric cancer detection in which low-scattering regions simultaneously existed with both the non- and high-scattering regions, a novel hybrid radiosity-SP{sub 3} equation based reconstruction algorithm for bioluminescence tomography was proposed in this paper. In the algorithm, the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SP{sub 3}) was combined with the radiosity equation to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues, which provided acceptable accuracy for the turbid medium with both low- and non-scattering regions. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated with digital mouse based simulations and a gastric cancer-bearing mouse based in situ experiment. Primary results demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of the proposed algorithm for the turbid medium with low- and non-scattering regions.

  19. SU-C-303-04: Evaluation of On- and Off-Line Bioluminescence Tomography System for Focal Irradiation Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B; Wang, K; Reyes, J; Tran, P; Wong, J [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Iordachita, I [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We have developed offline and on-board bioluminescence tomography(BLT) systems for the small animal radiation research platform(SARRP) for radiation guidance of soft tissue targets. We investigated the effectiveness of offline BLT guidance. Methods: CBCT is equipped on both the offline BLT system and SARRP that are 10 ft. apart. To evaluate the setup error during animal transport between the two systems, we implanted a luminescence source in the abdomen of anesthetized mice. Five mice were studied. After CBCT was acquired on both systems, source centers and correlation coefficients were calculated. CBCT was also used to generate object mesh for BLT reconstruction. To assess target localization, we compared the localization of the luminescence source based on (1)on-board SARRP BLT and CBCT, (2)offline BLT and CBCT, and (3)offline BLT and SARRP CBCT. The 3rd comparison examines if an offline BLT system can be used to guide radiation when there is minimal target contrast in CBCT. Results: Our CBCT results show the offset of the light source center can be maintained within 0.2 mm during animal transport. The center of mass(CoM) of the light source reconstructed by the offline BLT has an offset of 1.0 ± 0.4 mm from the ‘true’ CoM as derived from the SARRP CBCT. The results compare well with the offset of 1.0 ± 0.2 mm using on-line BLT. Conclusion: With CBCT information provided by the SARRP and effective animal immobilization during transport, these findings support the use of offline BLT in close vicinity for accurate soft tissue target localization for irradiation. However, the disadvantage of the off-line system is reduced efficiency as care is required to maintain stable animal transport. We envisage a dual use system where the on-board arrangement allows convenient access to CBCT and avoids disturbance of animal setup. The off-line capability would support standalone longitudinal imaging studies. The work is supported by NIH R01CA158100 and Xstrahl

  20. Experimentally exploring compressed sensing quantum tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, A.; Riofrío, C. A.; McCutcheon, W.; Roth, I.; Bell, B. A.; McMillan, A.; Tame, M. S.; Rarity, J. G.; Eisert, J.

    2017-06-01

    In the light of the progress in quantum technologies, the task of verifying the correct functioning of processes and obtaining accurate tomographic information about quantum states becomes increasingly important. Compressed sensing, a machinery derived from the theory of signal processing, has emerged as a feasible tool to perform robust and significantly more resource-economical quantum state tomography for intermediate-sized quantum systems. In this work, we provide a comprehensive analysis of compressed sensing tomography in the regime in which tomographically complete data is available with reliable statistics from experimental observations of a multi-mode photonic architecture. Due to the fact that the data is known with high statistical significance, we are in a position to systematically explore the quality of reconstruction depending on the number of employed measurement settings, randomly selected from the complete set of data, and on different model assumptions. We present and test a complete prescription to perform efficient compressed sensing and are able to reliably use notions of model selection and cross validation to account for experimental imperfections and finite counting statistics. Thus, we establish compressed sensing as an effective tool for quantum state tomography, specifically suited for photonic systems.

  1. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

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    Allen, Michael S. (Knoxville, TN); Rakesh, Gupta (New Delhi, IN); Gary, Sayler S. (Blaine, TN)

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  2. Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates: Evidence that the Adaptive Value of Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates is Concentration Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Karen A; Widder, Edith A

    2017-03-01

    Three major hypotheses have been proposed to explain why dinoflagellate bioluminescence deters copepod grazing: startle response, aposematic warning, and burglar alarm. These hypotheses propose dinoflagellate bioluminescence (A) startles predatory copepods, (B) warns potential predators of toxicity, and (C) draws the attention of higher order visual predators to the copepod's location. While the burglar alarm is the most commonly accepted hypothesis, it requires a high concentration of bioluminescent dinoflagellates to be effective, meaning the bioluminescence selective advantage at lower, more commonly observed, dinoflagellate concentrations may result from another function (e.g. startle response or aposematic warning). Therefore, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate copepod grazing (Acartia tonsa) on bioluminescent dinoflagellates (during bioluminescent and nonbioluminescent phases, corresponding to night and day, respectively) at different concentrations (10, 1000, and 3000 cells mL-1 ), on toxic (Pyrodinium bahamense var. bahamense) and nontoxic (Lingulodinium polyedrum) bioluminescent dinoflagellates, and in the presence of nonluminescent diatoms (Thalassiosira eccentrica). Changes in copepod ingestion rates, clearance rates, and feeding preferences as a result of these experimental factors, particularly during the mixed trails with nonluminescent diatoms, indicate there is a concentration threshold at which the burglar alarm becomes effective and below which dinoflagellate bioluminescence functions as an aposematic warning. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  3. Multimodal Imaging of Integrin Receptor-Positive Tumors by Bioluminescence, Fluorescence, Gamma Scintigraphy, and Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Using a Cyclic RGD Peptide Labeled with a Near-Infrared Fluorescent Dye and a Radionuclide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Barry Edwards

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Integrins, particularly the αvβ3 heterodimers, play important roles in tumor-induced angiogenesis and invasiveness. To image the expression pattern of the αvβ3 integrin in tumors through a multimodality imaging paradigm, we prepared a cyclic RGDyK peptide analogue (LS308 bearing a tetraazamacrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N′, N″, N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA and a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR fluorescent dye cypate. The αvβ3 integrin binding affinity and the internalization properties of LS308 mediated by the αvβ3 integrin in 4t1luc cells were investigated by receptor binding assay and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. The in vivo distribution of 111In-labeled LS308 in a 4t1luc tumor-bearing mouse model was studied by fluorescence, bioluminescence, planar gamma, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. The results show that LS308 has high affinity for αvβ3 integrin and internalized preferentially via the αvβ3 integrin-mediated endocytosis in 4t1luc cells. We also found that LS308 selectively accumulated in αvβ3-positve tumors in a receptor-specific manner and was visualized by the four imaging methods. Whereas the endogenous bioluminescence imaging identified the ensemble of the tumor tissue, the fluorescence and SPECT methods with the exogenous contrast agent LS308 reported the local expression of αvβ3 integrin. Thus, the multimodal imaging approach could provide important complementary diagnostic information for monitoring the efficacy of new antiangiogenic drugs.

  4. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cussatlegras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performed with different types of flows in a Couette shearing apparatus. All of them converge to the conclusion that stationary homogeneous laminar shear does not trigger massive bioluminescence, but that acceleration and shear are both necessary to stimulate together an intense bioluminescence response. The distribution of the experimental bioluminescence thresholds is finally calculated from the light emission response for the Pyrocystis noctiluca species.

  5. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging for Longitudinal Monitoring of Inflammation in Animal Models of Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, Michal B; Wilson, Leslie; Van Gelder, Russell N; Pepple, Kathryn L

    2017-03-01

    We develop a quantitative bioluminescence assay for in vivo longitudinal monitoring of inflammation in animal models of uveitis. Three models of experimental uveitis were induced in C57BL/6 albino mice: primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU), endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU), and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Intraperitoneal injection of luminol sodium salt, which emits light when oxidized, provided the bioluminescence substrate. Bioluminescence images were captured by a PerkinElmer In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS) Spectrum and total bioluminescence was analyzed using Living Image software. Bioluminescence on day zero was compared to bioluminescence on the day of peak inflammation for each model. Longitudinal bioluminescence imaging was performed in EIU and EAU. In the presence of luminol, intraocular inflammation generates detectable bioluminescence in three mouse models of uveitis. Peak bioluminescence in inflamed PMU eyes (1.46 × 105 photons/second [p/s]) was significantly increased over baseline (1.47 × 104 p/s, P = 0.01). Peak bioluminescence in inflamed EIU eyes (3.18 × 104 p/s) also was significantly increased over baseline (1.09 × 104 p/s, P = 0.04), and returned to near baseline levels by 48 hours. In EAU, there was a nonsignificant increase in bioluminescence at peak inflammation. In vivo bioluminescence may be used as a noninvasive, quantitative measure of intraocular inflammation in animal models of uveitis. Primed mycobacterial uveitis and EIU are both acute models with robust anterior inflammation and demonstrated significant changes in bioluminescence corresponding with peak inflammation. Experimental autoimmune uveitis is a more indolent posterior uveitis and generated a more modest bioluminescent signal. In vivo imaging system bioluminescence is a nonlethal, quantifiable assay that can be used for monitoring inflammation in animal models of uveitis.

  6. Reconstructing promoter activity from Lux bioluminescent reporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudassar Iqbal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial Lux system is used as a gene expression reporter. It is fast, sensitive and non-destructive, enabling high frequency measurements. Originally developed for bacterial cells, it has also been adapted for eukaryotic cells, and can be used for whole cell biosensors, or in real time with live animals without the need for euthanasia. However, correct interpretation of bioluminescent data is limited: the bioluminescence is different from gene expression because of nonlinear molecular and enzyme dynamics of the Lux system. We have developed a computational approach that, for the first time, allows users of Lux assays to infer gene transcription levels from the light output. This approach is based upon a new mathematical model for Lux activity, that includes the actions of LuxAB, LuxEC and Fre, with improved mechanisms for all reactions, as well as synthesis and turn-over of Lux proteins. The model is calibrated with new experimental data for the LuxAB and Fre reactions from Photorhabdus luminescens-the source of modern Lux reporters-while literature data has been used for LuxEC. Importantly, the data show clear evidence for previously unreported product inhibition for the LuxAB reaction. Model simulations show that predicted bioluminescent profiles can be very different from changes in gene expression, with transient peaks of light output, very similar to light output seen in some experimental data sets. By incorporating the calibrated model into a Bayesian inference scheme, we can reverse engineer promoter activity from the bioluminescence. We show examples where a decrease in bioluminescence would be better interpreted as a switching off of the promoter, or where an increase in bioluminescence would be better interpreted as a longer period of gene expression. This approach could benefit all users of Lux technology.

  7. Experimental adaptive quantum tomography of two-qubit states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struchalin, G. I.; Pogorelov, I. A.; Straupe, S. S.; Kravtsov, K. S.; Radchenko, I. V.; Kulik, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental realization of adaptive Bayesian quantum state tomography for two-qubit states. Our implementation is based on the adaptive experimental design strategy proposed in the work by Huszár and Houlsby [F. Huszár and N. M. T. Houlsby, Phys. Rev. A 85, 052120 (2012)., 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.052120] and provides an optimal measurement approach in terms of the information gain. We address the practical questions which one faces in any experimental application: the influence of technical noise and the behavior of the tomographic algorithm for an easy-to-implement class of factorized measurements. In an experiment with polarization states of entangled photon pairs, we observe a lower instrumental noise floor and superior reconstruction accuracy for nearly pure states of the adaptive protocol compared to a nonadaptive protocol. At the same time, we show that for the mixed states, the restriction to factorized measurements results in no advantage for adaptive measurements, so general measurements have to be used.

  8. U-SPECT-BioFluo : An integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosterom, M.N.; Kreuger, R.; Buckle, T.; Mahn, W.A.; Bunschoten, A.; Josephson, L.; Van Leeuwen, F.W.B.; Beekman, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a

  9. EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVES IN A MUTUALISM OF SEPIOLID SQUID AND BIOLUMINESCENT BACTERIA: COMBINED USAGE OF MICROBIAL EXPERIMENTAL EVOLUTION AND TEMPORAL POPULATION GENETICS

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, W.; Punke, E. B.; Nishiguchi, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    The symbiosis between marine bioluminescent Vibrio bacteria and the sepiolid squid Euprymna is a model for studying animal–bacterial Interactions. Vibrio symbionts native to particular Euprymna species are competitively dominant, capable of outcompeting foreign Vibrio strains from other Euprymna host species. Despite competitive dominance, secondary colonization events by invading nonnative Vibrio fischeri have occurred. Competitive dominance can be offset through superior nonnative numbers a...

  10. Software-defined Radio Based Wireless Tomography: Experimental Demonstration and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonior, Jason D [ORNL; Hu, Zhen [Tennessee Technological University; Guo, Terry N. [Tennessee Technological University; Qiu, Robert C. [Tennessee Technological University; Browning, James P. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Wicks, Michael C. [University of Dayton Research Institute

    2015-01-01

    This letter presents an experimental demonstration of software-defined-radio-based wireless tomography using computer-hosted radio devices called Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP). This experimental brief follows our vision and previous theoretical study of wireless tomography that combines wireless communication and RF tomography to provide a novel approach to remote sensing. Automatic data acquisition is performed inside an RF anechoic chamber. Semidefinite relaxation is used for phase retrieval, and the Born iterative method is utilized for imaging the target. Experimental results are presented, validating our vision of wireless tomography.

  11. Experimental investigation of liquid chromatography columns by means of computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrath, D.U.; Lottes, F.; Vu, Duc Thuong

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of packed chromatographic columns was investigated experimentally by means of computed tomography (CT) techniques. The measurements were carried out by monitoring tracer fronts in situ inside the chromatographic columns. The experimental results were fitted using the equilibrium...

  12. Bubble stimulation efficiency of dinoflagellate bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Latz, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence, a common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, is stimulated by flow agitation. Although bubbles are anecdotally known to be stimulatory, the process has never been experimentally investigated. This study quantified the flash response of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum to stimulation by bubbles rising through still seawater. Cells were stimulated by isolated bubbles of 0.3-3 mm radii rising at their terminal velocity, and also by bubble clouds containing bubbles of 0.06-10 mm radii for different air flow rates. Stimulation efficiency, the proportion of cells producing a flash within the volume of water swept out by a rising bubble, decreased with decreasing bubble radius for radii less than approximately 1 mm. Bubbles smaller than a critical radius in the range 0.275-0.325 mm did not stimulate a flash response. The fraction of cells stimulated by bubble clouds was proportional to the volume of air in the bubble cloud, with lower stimulation levels observed for clouds with smaller bubbles. An empirical model for bubble cloud stimulation based on the isolated bubble observations successfully reproduced the observed stimulation by bubble clouds for low air flow rates. High air flow rates stimulated more light emission than expected, presumably because of additional fluid shear stress associated with collective buoyancy effects generated by the high air fraction bubble cloud. These results are relevant to bioluminescence stimulation by bubbles in two-phase flows, such as in ship wakes, breaking waves, and sparged bioreactors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Sparsity reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography: An experimental evaluation

    KAUST Repository

    Gehre, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the potential of sparsity constraints in the electrical impedance tomography (EIT) inverse problem of inferring the distributed conductivity based on boundary potential measurements. In sparsity reconstruction, inhomogeneities of the conductivity are a priori assumed to be sparse with respect to a certain basis. This prior information is incorporated into a Tikhonov-type functional by including a sparsity-promoting ℓ1-penalty term. The functional is minimized with an iterative soft shrinkage-type algorithm. In this paper, the feasibility of the sparsity reconstruction approach is evaluated by experimental data from water tank measurements. The reconstructions are computed both with sparsity constraints and with a more conventional smoothness regularization approach. The results verify that the adoption of ℓ1-type constraints can enhance the quality of EIT reconstructions: in most of the test cases the reconstructions with sparsity constraints are both qualitatively and quantitatively more feasible than that with the smoothness constraint. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Technical Advance: Function and efficacy of an {alpha}4-integrin antagonist using bioluminescence imaging to detect leukocyte trafficking in murine experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Carola T; Moloney, Gerard; Macsharry, John; Haynes, Andrea; Faivre, Emilie; Quinlan, Aoife; McLean, Peter G; Lee, Kevin; O'Mahony, Liam; Shanahan, Fergus; Melgar, Silvia; Nally, Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    Leukocyte trafficking is a therapeutic target in IBD. The integrins α₄β and α₄β₁ regulate leukocyte migration into tissues and lymphoid organs. Current strategies rely on biologics, such as mAb, to inhibit leukocyte recruitment. Here we show the in vivo therapeutic effects of a small molecule α4-integrin antagonist (GSK223618A) in a leukocyte-trafficking model and a murine model of colitis. Leukocytes isolated from MLNs of transgenic β-actin-luc+ mice were injected i.v. into recipients with DSS-induced colitis. Recipient mice were orally gavaged with vehicle or an α₄-integrin antagonist 1 h pre-adoptive transfer, followed by bioluminescence whole body and ex vivo organ imaging 4 h post-transfer. To confirm its therapeutic effect, the α₄-integrin antagonist was given orally twice daily for 6 days to mice with DSS-induced colitis, starting on Day 3. Clinical, macroscopic, and histological signs of inflammation were assessed and gene-expression profiles analyzed. Using bioluminescence imaging, we tracked and quantified leukocyte migration to the inflamed gut and demonstrated its inhibition by a small molecule α₄-integrin antagonist. Additionally, the therapeutic effect of the antagonist was confirmed in DSS-induced colitis in terms of clinical, macroscopic, and histological signs of inflammation. Gene expression analysis suggested enhancement of tissue healing in compound-treated animals. Inhibition of leukocyte trafficking using small molecule integrin antagonists is a promising alternative to large molecule biologics. Furthermore, in vivo bioluminescence imaging is a valuable strategy for preclinical evaluation of potential therapeutics that target leukocyte trafficking in inflammatory diseases.

  15. Electrical impedance tomography compared with thoracic computed tomography during a slow inflation maneuver in experimental models of lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigge, Hermann; Zinserling, Jörg; Muders, Thomas; Varelmann, Dirk; Günther, Ulf; von der Groeben, Cornelius; Magnusson, Anders; Hedenstierna, Göran; Putensen, Christian

    2008-03-01

    To determine the validity of functional electric impedance tomography to monitor regional ventilation distribution in experimental acute lung injury, and to develop a simple electric impedance tomography index detecting alveolar recruitment. Randomized prospective experimental study. Academic research laboratory. Sixteen anesthetized, tracheotomized, and mechanically ventilated pigs. Acute lung injury was induced either by acid aspiration (direct acute lung injury) or by abdominal hypertension plus oleic acid injection (indirect acute lung injury) in ten pigs. Six pigs with normal lungs were studied as a control group and with endotracheal suction-related atelectasis. After 4 hrs of mechanical ventilation, a slow inflation was performed. During slow inflation, simultaneous measurements of regional ventilation by electric impedance tomography and dynamic computed tomography were highly correlated in quadrants of a transversal thoracic plane (r2 = .63-.88, p Electric impedance tomography indexes to detect alveolar recruitment were determined by mathematical curve analysis of regional impedance time curves. Empirical tests of different methods revealed that regional ventilation delay, that is, time delay of regional impedance time curve to reach a threshold, correlated well with recruited volume as measured by CT (r2 = .63). Correlation coefficients in subgroups were r2 = .71 and r2 = .48 in pigs with normal lungs with and without closed suction related atelectasis and r2 = .79 in pigs subject to indirect acute lung injury, respectively, whereas no significant correlation was found in pigs undergoing direct acute lung injury. Electric impedance tomography allows assessment of regional ventilation distribution and recruitment in experimental models of direct and indirect acute lung injury as well as normal lungs. Except for pigs with direct acute lung injury, regional ventilation delay determined during a slow inflation from impedance time curves appears to be a simple

  16. Experimental Study of Optimal Measurements for Quantum State Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Martinez, H.; Lysne, N. K.; Baldwin, C. H.; Kalev, A.; Deutsch, I. H.; Jessen, P. S.

    2017-10-01

    Quantum tomography is a critically important tool to evaluate quantum hardware, making it essential to develop optimized measurement strategies that are both accurate and efficient. We compare a variety of strategies using nearly pure test states. Those that are informationally complete for all states are found to be accurate and reliable even in the presence of errors in the measurements themselves, while those designed to be complete only for pure states are far more efficient but highly sensitive to such errors. Our results highlight the unavoidable trade-offs inherent in quantum tomography.

  17. EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVES IN A MUTUALISM OF SEPIOLID SQUID AND BIOLUMINESCENT BACTERIA: COMBINED USAGE OF MICROBIAL EXPERIMENTAL EVOLUTION AND TEMPORAL POPULATION GENETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, W.; Punke, E. B.; Nishiguchi, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    The symbiosis between marine bioluminescent Vibrio bacteria and the sepiolid squid Euprymna is a model for studying animal–bacterial Interactions. Vibrio symbionts native to particular Euprymna species are competitively dominant, capable of outcompeting foreign Vibrio strains from other Euprymna host species. Despite competitive dominance, secondary colonization events by invading nonnative Vibrio fischeri have occurred. Competitive dominance can be offset through superior nonnative numbers and advantage of early start host colonization by nonnatives, granting nonnative vibrios an opportunity to establish beachheads in foreign Euprymna hosts. Here, we show that nonnative V. fischeri are capable of rapid adaptation to novel sepiolid squid hosts by serially passaging V. fischeri JRM200 (native to Hawaiian Euprymna scolopes) lines through the novel Australian squid host E. tasmanica for 500 generations. These experiments were complemented by a temporal population genetics survey of V. fischeri, collected from E. tasmanica over a decade, which provided a perspective from the natural history of V. fischeri evolution over 15,000–20,000 generations in E. tasmanica. No symbiont anagenic evolution within squids was observed, as competitive dominance does not purge V. fischeri genetic diversity through time. Instead, abiotic factors affecting abundance of V. fischeri variants in the planktonic phase sustain temporal symbiont diversity, a property itself of ecological constraints imposed by V. fischeri host adaptation. PMID:22519773

  18. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  19. Experimental determination of the segregation process using computer tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Beckmann

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modelling methods such as DEM and CFD are increasingly used for developing high efficient combine cleaning systems. For this purpose it is necessary to verify the complex segregation and separation processes in the combine cleaning system. One way is to determine the segregation and separation function using 3D computer tomography (CT. This method makes it possible to visualize and analyse the movement behaviour of the components of the mixture during the segregation and separation process as well as the derivation of descriptive process parameters. A mechanically excited miniature test rig was designed and built at the company CLAAS Selbstfahrende Erntemaschinen GmbH to achieve this aim. The investigations were carried out at the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS. Through the evaluation of the recorded images the segregation process is described visually. A more detailed analysis enabled the development of segregation and separation function based on the different densities of grain and material other than grain.

  20. Engineering Bioluminescent Proteins: Expanding their Analytical Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been observed in nature since the dawn of time, but now, scientists are harnessing it for analytical applications. Laura Rowe, Emre Dikici, and Sylvia Daunert of the University of Kentucky describe the origins of bioluminescent proteins and explore their uses in the modern chemistry laboratory. The cover features spectra of bioluminescent light superimposed on an image of jellyfish, which are a common source of bioluminescent proteins. Images courtesy of Emre Dikici and Sh...

  1. Magnetospheric Radio Tomography: Observables, Algorithms, and Experimental Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported research towards developing magnetospheric electron density and magnetic field remote sensing techniques via multistatic radio propagation and tomographic image reconstruction. This work was motivated by the need to better develop the basic technique of magnetospheric radio tomography, which holds substantial promise as a technology uniquely capable of imaging magnetic field and electron density in the magnetosphere on large scales with rapid cadence. Such images would provide an unprecedented and needed view into magnetospheric processes. By highlighting the systems-level interconnectedness of different regions, our understanding of space weather processes and ability to predict them would be dramatically enhanced. Three peer-reviewed publications and 5 conference presentations have resulted from this work, which supported 1 PhD student and 1 postdoctoral researcher. One more paper is in progress and will be submitted shortly. Because the main results of this research have been published or are soon to be published in refereed journal articles listed in the reference section of this document, we provide here an overview of the research and accomplishments without describing all of the details that are contained in the articles.

  2. Passive RF Tomography: Signal Processing and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    SIGNAL PROCESSING AND EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical Engineering Graduate...Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Electrical Engineering Thang M. Tran, B.S.E.E Civilian Student, USAF... Peebles , Radar Principles , New York: Wiley-Interscience, 1998. [15] R. Nitzberg, Radar signal processing and adaptive systems, Boston: Artech House

  3. Circular polarization observed in bioluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnberg, Hans; Meijer, E.W.; Hummelen, J.C.; Dekkers, H.P.J.M.; Schippers, P.H.; Carlson, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    While investigating circular polarization in luminescence, and having found it in chemiluminescence, we have studied bioluminescence because it is such a widespread and dramatic natural phenomenon. We report here that left and right lanterns of live larvae of the fireflies, Photuris lucicrescens and

  4. Phase-contrast tomography of sciatic nerves: image quality and experimental parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpperwien, M.; Krenkel, M.; Ruhwedel, T.; Möbius, W.; Pacureanu, A.; Cloetens, P.; Salditt, T.

    2017-06-01

    We present propagation-based phase-contrast tomography of mouse sciatic nerves stained with osmium, leading to an enhanced contrast in the myelin sheath around the axons, in order to visualize the threedimensional (3D) structure of the nerve. We compare different experimental parameters and show that contrast and resolution are high enough to identify single axons in the nerve, including characteristic functional structures such as Schmidt-Lanterman incisures.

  5. Simulation and Experimental Investigation on the AE Tomography to Improve AE Source Location in the Concrete Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE tomography, which is based on the time-travel tomography with AE events as its signal sources, is a new visualization tool for inspecting and locating the internal damages in the structures. In this paper, AE tomography is applied to examine a man-made damage in a typical heterogeneous concrete structure to validate its effectiveness. Firstly, the finite element (ABAQUS/Explicit simulation model of the concrete structure with one damaged circle in its center is built, and the simulated AE signals are obtained to establish the AE tomography. The results show that the damaged circle in the created model can be visualized clearly with the AE tomography in its original location. Secondly, the concrete specimen based on the FE model is fabricated, and the pencil lead break (PLB signal is taken as the exciting source for AE tomography. It is shown that the experimental results have good consistency with the FE simulation results, which also verifies the feasibility of the finite element model for AE tomography. Finally, the damage source location based on AE tomography is compared with the traditional time of arrival (TOA location method, and the better location accuracy is obtained with the AE tomography. The research results indicate that AE tomography has great potential in the application of structure damage detection.

  6. Experimental demonstration of real-time adaptive one-qubit quantum-state tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qi; Li, Li; Xiang, Xiao; Xiang, Guo-Yong; Li, Chuang-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-01-01

    Quantum-state tomography plays a pivotal role in quantum computation and information processing. To improve the accuracy in estimating an unknown state, carefully designed measurement schemes, such as adopting an adaptive strategy, are necessarily needed, which have gained great interest recently. In this work, based on the proposal of Sugiyama et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 052107 (2012)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.052107, we experimentally realize an adaptive quantum-state tomography for one qubit in an optical system. Since this scheme gives an analytical solution to the optimal measurement basis problem, our experiment is updated in real time and the infidelity between the real state and the estimated state is tracked with the detected photons. We observe an almost 1 /N scaling rule of averaged infidelity against the overall number of photons, N , in our experiment, which outperforms 1 /√{N } of nonadaptive schemes.

  7. Bioluminescence Tomography–Guided Radiation Therapy for Preclinical Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin, E-mail: kwang27@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yu, Jingjing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Shaanxi (China); Eslami, Sohrab; Iordachita, Iulian [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Reyes, Juvenal; Malek, Reem [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Oncology and Urology, Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Patterson, Michael S. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Wong, John W. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: In preclinical radiation research, it is challenging to localize soft tissue targets based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. As a more effective method to localize soft tissue targets, we developed an online bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system for small-animal radiation research platform (SARRP). We demonstrated BLT-guided radiation therapy and validated targeting accuracy based on a newly developed reconstruction algorithm. Methods and Materials: The BLT system was designed to dock with the SARRP for image acquisition and to be detached before radiation delivery. A 3-mirror system was devised to reflect the bioluminescence emitted from the subject to a stationary charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Multispectral BLT and the incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient method with a permissible region shrinking strategy were used as the optimization scheme to reconstruct bioluminescent source distributions. To validate BLT targeting accuracy, a small cylindrical light source with high CBCT contrast was placed in a phantom and also in the abdomen of a mouse carcass. The center of mass (CoM) of the source was recovered from BLT and used to guide radiation delivery. The accuracy of the BLT-guided targeting was validated with films and compared with the CBCT-guided delivery. In vivo experiments were conducted to demonstrate BLT localization capability for various source geometries. Results: Online BLT was able to recover the CoM of the embedded light source with an average accuracy of 1 mm compared to that with CBCT localization. Differences between BLT- and CBCT-guided irradiation shown on the films were consistent with the source localization revealed in the BLT and CBCT images. In vivo results demonstrated that our BLT system could potentially be applied for multiple targets and tumors. Conclusions: The online BLT/CBCT/SARRP system provides an effective solution for soft tissue targeting, particularly for small, nonpalpable, or

  8. Three-dimensional multi bioluminescent sources reconstruction based on adaptive finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xibo; Tian, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xing; Xue, Zhenwen; Dong, Di; Han, Dong

    2011-03-01

    Among many optical molecular imaging modalities, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has more and more wide application in tumor detection and evaluation of pharmacodynamics, toxicity, pharmacokinetics because of its noninvasive molecular and cellular level detection ability, high sensitivity and low cost in comparison with other imaging technologies. However, BLI can not present the accurate location and intensity of the inner bioluminescence sources such as in the bone, liver or lung etc. Bioluminescent tomography (BLT) shows its advantage in determining the bioluminescence source distribution inside a small animal or phantom. Considering the deficiency of two-dimensional imaging modality, we developed three-dimensional tomography to reconstruct the information of the bioluminescence source distribution in transgenic mOC-Luc mice bone with the boundary measured data. In this paper, to study the osteocalcin (OC) accumulation in transgenic mOC-Luc mice bone, a BLT reconstruction method based on multilevel adaptive finite element (FEM) algorithm was used for localizing and quantifying multi bioluminescence sources. Optical and anatomical information of the tissues are incorporated as a priori knowledge in this method, which can reduce the ill-posedness of BLT. The data was acquired by the dual modality BLT and Micro CT prototype system that was developed by us. Through temperature control and absolute intensity calibration, a relative accurate intensity can be calculated. The location of the OC accumulation was reconstructed, which was coherent with the principle of bone differentiation. This result also was testified by ex vivo experiment in the black 96-plate well using the BLI system and the chemiluminescence apparatus.

  9. An elegant technique for ex vivo imaging in experimental research—Optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tschernig, T.; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an elegant technology for imaging of tissues and organs and has been established for clinical use for around a decade. Thus, it is used in vivo but can also serve as a valuable ex vivo imaging tool in experimental research. Here, a brief overview is given...... with a focus on an ex vivo application of OCT. Image and video examples of freshly obtained murine lungs are included. The main advantage of OCT for ex vivo analysis is the non-contact, non-invasive, and non-destructive fast acquisition of a three-dimensional data set with micrometer-resolution....

  10. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuits (BBICs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L.; Sayler, Gary S.; Nivens, David; Ripp, Steve; Paulus, Michael J.; Jellison, Gerald E.

    1998-07-01

    As the workhorse of the integrated circuit (IC) industry, the capabilities of CMOS have been expanded well beyond the original applications. The full spectrum of analog circuits from switched-capacitor filters to microwave circuit blocks, and from general-purpose operational amplifiers to sub- nanosecond analog timing circuits for nuclear physics experiments have been implemented in CMOS. This technology has also made in-roads into the growing area of monolithic sensors with devices such as active-pixel sensors and other electro-optical detection devices. While many of the processes used for MEMS fabrication are not compatible with the CMOS IC process, depositing a sensor material onto a previously fabricated CMOS circuit can create a very useful category of sensors. In this work we report a chemical sensor composed of bioluminescent bioreporters (genetically engineered bacteria) deposited onto a micro-luminometer fabricated in a standard CMOS IC process. The bioreporter used for this work emitted 490-nm light when exposed to toluene. This luminescence was detected by the micro- luminometer giving an indication of the concentration of toluene. Other bioluminescent bioreporters sensitive to explosives, mercury, and other organic chemicals and heavy metals have been reported. These could be incorporated (individually or in combination) with the micro-luminometer reported here to form a variety of chemical sensors.

  11. Bioluminescence and Its Impact on Bioanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel; Dikici, Emre; Ensor, Mark; Daunert, Sylvia

    2011-07-01

    There is an increasing need for versatile yet sensitive labels, posed by the demands for low detection in bioanalysis. Bioluminescent proteins have many desirable characteristics, including the ability to be detected at extremely low concentrations; no background interference from autofluorescent compounds present in samples; and compatibility with many miniaturized platforms, such as lab-on-a-chip and lab-on-a-CD systems. Bioluminescent proteins have found a plethora of analytical applications in intracellular monitoring, genetic regulation and detection, immuno- and binding assays, and whole-cell biosensors, among others. As new bioluminescent organisms are discovered and new bioluminescence proteins are characterized, use of these proteins will continue to dramatically improve our understanding of molecular and cellular events, as well as their applications for detection of environmental and biomedical samples.

  12. Engineering bioluminescent proteins: expanding their analytical potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Laura; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia

    2009-11-01

    Bioluminescent proteins are used in a plethora of analytical methods, from ultrasensitive assay development to the in vivo imaging of cellular processes. This article reviews the most pertinent current bioluminescent-protein-based technologies and suggests the future direction of this vein of research. (To listen to a podcast about this feature, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html .).

  13. Same temporal niche, opposite rhythmicity: two closely related bioluminescent insects with opposite bioluminesce propensity rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, David J; Rodgers, Essie M; Amir, Ami F; Clarke, Arthur K

    2012-12-01

    Arachnocampa species, commonly called glowworms, are flies whose larvae use light to attract prey. Here we compare rhythmicity in two of the nine described species: the Tasmanian species, Arachnocampa tasmaniensis, which inhabits caves and wet forest, and the eastern Australian mainland species, A. flava, primarily found in subtropical rainforest. Both species show the same nocturnal glowing pattern in external (epigean) environments and the same inhibition of bioluminescence by light and both species show circadian regulation of bioluminescence. We find that the underlying circadian bioluminescence propensity rhythm (BPR) of the two species peaks at opposite phases of the day:night cycle. Larvae of A. flava, placed in constant darkness in the laboratory, bioluminesce during the subjective scotophase, typical of nocturnal animals, whereas A. tasmaniensis shows the opposite tendency, bioluminescing most intensely during the subjective photophase. In A. tasmaniensis, which are exposed to natural day:night cycles, light exposure during the day overrides the high bioluminescence propensity through negative masking and leads to a release of bioluminescence after dusk when the BPR is on the wane. A consequence is that A. tasmaniensis is able to start glowing at any phase of the light:dark cycle as soon as masking by light is released, whereas A. flava is locked into nocturnal bioluminescence. We suggest that the paradoxical BPR of A. tasmaniensis is an adaptation for living in the cave environment. Observations of bioluminescence in colonies of A. tasmaniensis located in the transition from a cave mouth to the dark zone show that glowing is inhibited by light exposure but a peak bioluminescence follows immediately after "dusk" at their location. The substantial difference in the circadian regulation of bioluminescence between the two species probably reflects adaptation to the cave (hypogean) habitat in A. tasmaniensis and the forest (epigean) habitat in A. flava.

  14. Marine Bioluminescence: Measurement by a Classical Light Sensor and Related Foraging Behavior of a Deep Diving Predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacquié-Garcia, Jade; Mallefet, Jérôme; Bailleul, Frédéric; Picard, Baptiste; Guinet, Christophe

    2017-10-01

    Bioluminescence is produced by a broad range of organisms for defense, predation or communication purposes. Southern elephant seal (SES) vision is adapted to low-intensity light with a peak sensitivity, matching the wavelength emitted by myctophid species, one of the main preys of female SES. A total of 11 satellite-tracked female SESs were equipped with a time-depth-light 3D accelerometer (TDR10-X) to assess whether bioluminescence could be used by SESs to locate their prey. Firstly, we demonstrated experimentally that the TDR10-X light sensor was sensitive enough to detect natural bioluminescence; however, we highlighted a low-distance detection of the sensor. Then, we linked the number of prey capture attempts (PCAs), assessed from accelerometer data, with the number of detected bioluminescence events. PCA was positively related to bioluminescence, which provides strong support that bioluminescence is involved in predator-prey interactions for these species. However, the limitations of the sensor did not allow us to discern whether bioluminescence (i) provided remote indication of the biological richness of the area to SES, (ii) was emitted as a mechanic reaction or (iii) was emitted as a defense mechanism in response to SES behavior. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  15. Organ hierarchy during low blood flow on-pump: a randomized experimental positron emission tomography study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Sisse Anette; Kjærgaard, Benedict; Frøkiær, Jørgen

    knowledge this is the first study investigating organ hierarchy with dynamic PET-CT during profound systemic ischemia due to suboptimal blood flows during normothermic CPB. References 1. Murphy JM, Hessel II EA, Groom RC. Optimal perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass: an Evidence-based approach. Anesth......].The purpose of this animal study is to investigate the organ hierarchy of brain, liver, kidney and muscle at normal and low blood flows by using dynamic positron tomography (PET-CT) during CPB. Methods CPB at different blood flows will be investigated in an experimental model of six 70 kg pigs...... will be measured with dynamic PET-CT before CPB and during the different blood flows. Systemic oxygen consumption will be estimated by measurement of mixed venous saturation and lactate, and regional muscle oxygen saturation (tSO2) with near infrared spectroscopy at the lower limb. Result: Preliminary data...

  16. Experimental measurement of time-dependent photon scatter for diffuse optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valim, Niksa; Brock, James; Niedre, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Time-resolved measurement of early arriving photons through diffusive media has been shown to effectively reduce the high degree of light scatter in biological tissue. However, the experimentally achievable reduction in photon scatter and the impact of time-gated detection on instrument noise performance is not well understood. We measure time-dependent photon density sensitivity functions (PDSFs) between a pulsed laser source and a photomultiplier tube operating in time-correlated single-photon-counting mode. Our data show that with our system, measurement of early arriving photons reduces the full width half maximum of PDSFs on average by about 40 to 60% versus quasicontinuous wave photons over a range of experimental conditions similar to those encountered in small animal tomography, corresponding to a 64 to 84% reduction in PDSF volume. Factoring in noise considerations, the optimal operating point of our instrument is determined to be about the 10% point on the rising edge of the transmitted intensity curve. Time-dependent Monte Carlo simulations and the time-resolved diffusion approximation are used to model photon propagation and are evaluated for agreement with experimental data.

  17. Experimental investigation of the diffusion coefficients in porous media by application of X-ray computer tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhelezny, Petr; Shapiro, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    The present work describes a new experimental method that makes it possible to investigate diffusion coefficients in a porous medium. The method is based on application of X-ray computed tomography (CT). The general applicability of this method for the determination of diffusion coefficients...

  18. Experimental validation of L-shell x-ray fluorescence computed tomography imaging: phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the current advances in nanoscience, molecular biochemistry, and x-ray detector technology, x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) has been considered for molecular imaging of probes containing high atomic number elements, such as gold nanoparticles. The commonly used XFCT imaging performed with K-shell x rays appears to have insufficient imaging sensitivity to detect the low gold concentrations observed in small animal studies. Low energy fluorescence L-shell x rays have exhibited higher signal-to-background ratio and appeared as a promising XFCT mode with greatly enhanced sensitivity. The aim of this work was to experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of L-shell XFCT imaging and to assess its achievable sensitivity. We built an experimental L-shell XFCT imaging system consisting of a miniature x-ray tube and two spectrometers, a silicon drift detector (SDD), and a CdTe detector placed at [Formula: see text] with respect to the excitation beam. We imaged a 28-mm-diameter water phantom with 4-mm-diameter Eppendorf tubes containing gold solutions with concentrations of 0.06 to 0.1% Au. While all Au vials were detectable in the SDD L-shell XFCT image, none of the vials were visible in the CdTe L-shell XFCT image. The detectability limit of the presented L-shell XFCT SDD imaging setup was 0.007% Au, a concentration observed in small animal studies.

  19. Experimental verification of contrast mechanism in Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Tae; Oh, Tong In; Woo, Eung Je

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) aims to produce cross-sectional images of a conductivity distribution inside the human body with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. Injecting currents into an imaging object at different directions, we measure induced internal magnetic flux densities using an MRI scanner. Conductivity images are reconstructed based on the relation between the induced magnetic flux density and conductivity. Though there have been theoretical and experimental MREIT studies to explain and validate its imaging method, understanding the contrast mechanism in MREIT could be difficult due to the complexity in associated mathematical expressions. In this paper, we explain the contrast mechanism by performing and analyzing a series of imaging experiments of stable conductivity phantoms. Placing a thin and hollow cylinder with holes around its side inside a saline tank, we could construct a conductivity phantom with a stable conductivity contrast between two regions inside and outside the cylinder. Images of induced magnetic flux densities show ramp structures of which slopes are determined by conductivity contrasts. From the experimental results, we summarize the contrast mechanism in MREIT for better designs of MREIT pulse sequences and data processing methods.

  20. Experimental Validation of a Fast Forward Model for Guided Wave Tomography of Pipe Elbows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brath, Alex J; Simonetti, Francesco; Nagy, Peter B; Instanes, Geir

    2017-05-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave tomography (GWT) methods for the detection of corrosion and erosion damage in straight pipe sections are now well advanced. However, successful application of GWT to pipe bends has not yet been demonstrated due to the computational burden associated with the complex forward model required to simulate guided wave propagation through the bend. In a previous paper [Brath et al., IEEE Trans. Ultrason., Ferroelectr., Freq. Control, vol. 61, pp. 815-829, 2014], we have shown that the speed of the forward model can be increased by replacing the 3-D pipe bend with a 2-D rectangular domain in which guided wave propagation is formulated based on an artificially inhomogeneous and elliptically anisotropic (INELAN) acoustic model. This paper provides further experimental validation of the INLEAN model by studying the traveltime shifts caused by the introduction of shallow defects on the elbow of a pipe bend. Comparison between experiments and simulations confirms that a defect can be modeled as a phase velocity perturbation to the INLEAN velocity field with accuracy that is within the experimental error of the measurements. In addition, it is found that the sensitivity of traveltime measurements to the presence of damage decreases as the damage position moves from the interior side of the bend (intrados) to the exterior one (extrados). This effect is due to the nonuniform ray coverage obtainable when transmitting the guided wave signals with one ring array of sources on one side of the elbow and receiving with a second array on the other side.

  1. Nanostructured bioluminescent sensor for rapidly detecting thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longyan; Bao, Yige; Denstedt, John; Zhang, Jin

    2016-03-15

    Thrombin plays a key role in thrombosis and hemostasis. The abnormal level of thrombin in body fluids may lead to different diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, glomerulonephritis, etc. Detection of thrombin level in blood and/or urine is one of important methods for medical diagnosis. Here, a bioluminescent sensor is developed for non-invasively and rapidly detecting thrombin in urine. The sensor is assembled through conjugating gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and a recombinant protein containing Renilla luciferase (pRluc) by a peptide, which is thrombin specific substrate. The luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescence can be quenched by peptide-conjugating Au NPs. In the presence of thrombin, the short peptide conjugating luciferase and Au NPs is digested and cut off, which results in the recovery of bioluminescence due to the release of luciferase from Au NPs. The bioluminescence intensity at 470 nm is observed, and increases with increasing concentration of thrombin. The bioluminescence intensity of this designed sensor is significantly recovered when the thrombin digestion time lasts for 10 min. In addition, a similar linear relationship between luminescence intensity and the concentration of thrombin is found in the range of 8 nM to 8 μM in both buffer and human urine spiked samples. The limit of detection is as low as 80 pM. It is anticipated that our nanosensor could be a promising tool for clinical diagnosis of thrombin in human urine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed.

  3. Mechanical ventilation guided by electrical impedance tomography in experimental acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Gerhard K; Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Rettig, Jordan S; Vargas, Sara O; Smallwood, Craig D; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Vitali, Sally H; Zurakowski, David; Arnold, John H

    2013-05-01

    To utilize real-time electrical impedance tomography to guide lung protective ventilation in an animal model of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Prospective animal study. Animal research center. Twelve Yorkshire swine (15 kg). Lung injury was induced with saline lavage and augmented using large tidal volumes. The control group (n = 6) was ventilated using ARDSnet guidelines, and the electrical impedance tomography-guided group (n = 6) was ventilated using guidance with real-time electrical impedance tomography lung imaging. Regional electrical impedance tomography-derived compliance was used to maximize the recruitment of dependent lung and minimize overdistension of nondependent lung areas. Tidal volume was 6 mL/kg in both groups. Computed tomography was performed in a subset of animals to define the anatomic correlates of electrical impedance tomography imaging (n = 5). Interleukin-8 was quantified in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples. Sections of dependent and nondependent regions of the lung were fixed in formalin for histopathologic analysis. Positive end-expiratory pressure levels were higher in the electrical impedance tomography-guided group (14.3 cm H₂O vs. 8.6 cm H₂O; p electrical impedance tomography-guided group (6.9 mL/cm H₂O vs. 4.7 mL/cm H₂O; p = 0.013). Regional electrical impedance tomography-derived compliance of the most dependent lung region was increased in the electrical impedance tomography group (1.78 mL/cm H₂O vs. 0.99 mL/cm H₂O; p = 0.001). Pao₂/FIO₂ ratio was higher and oxygenation index was lower in the electrical impedance tomography-guided group (Pao₂/FIO₂: 388 mm Hg vs. 113 mm Hg, p electrical impedance tomography-guided group (HMEIT 42% samples vs. HMCONTROL 67% samples, p electrical impedance tomography and computed tomography were ± 16%. Electrical impedance tomography-guided ventilation resulted in improved respiratory mechanics, improved gas exchange, and reduced histologic evidence of ventilator

  4. Contactless inductive flow tomography: basic principles and first applications in the experimental modelling of continuous casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, F.; Eckert, S.; Ratajczak, M.; Timmel, K.; Wondrak, T.

    2016-07-01

    Contactless inductive flow tomography (CIFT) aims at reconstructing the flow structure of a liquid metal from the magnetic fields measured at various positions outside the fluid body which are induced by the flow under the influence of one or multiple applied magnetic fields. We recap the basic mathematical principles of CIFT and the results of an experiment in which the propeller-driven three-dimensional flow in a cylindrical had been reconstructed. We also summarize the recent activities to utilize CIFT in various problems connected with the experimental simulation of the continuous casting process. These include flow reconstructions in single-phase and two-phase flow problems in the Mini-LIMMCAST model of slab-casting, studies of the specific effects of an electromagnetic stirrer attached to the Submerged Entry Nozzle (SEN), as well as first successful applications of CIFT on the background of a strong electromagnetic brake field. We conclude by discussing some remaining obstacles for the deployment of CIFT in a real caster.

  5. Optical coherence tomography study of experimental anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and histologic confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joyce K; Stanford, Madison P; Shariati, Mohammad A; Dalal, Roopa; Liao, Yaping Joyce

    2013-09-05

    The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system, and interruption of this pathway due to ischemia typically results in optic atrophy and loss of retinal ganglion cells. In this study, we assessed in vivo retinal changes following murine anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and compared these anatomic measurements to that of histology. We induced ischemia at the optic disc via laser-activated photochemical thrombosis, performed serial SD-OCT and manual segmentation of the retinal layers to measure the ganglion cell complex (GCC) and total retinal thickness, and correlated these measurements with that of histology. There was impaired perfusion and leakage at the optic disc on fluorescein angiography immediately after AION and severe swelling and distortion of the peripapillary retina on day-1. We used SD-OCT to quantify the changes in retinal thickness following experimental AION, which revealed significant thickening of the GCC on day-1 after ischemia followed by gradual thinning that plateaued by week-3. Thickness of the peripapillary sensory retina was also increased on day-1 and thinned chronically. This pattern of acute retinal swelling and chronic thinning on SD-OCT correlated well with changes seen in histology and corresponded to loss of retinal ganglion layer cells after ischemia. This was a serial SD-OCT quantification of acute and chronic changes following experimental AION, which revealed changes in the GCC similar to that of human AION, but over a time frame of weeks rather than months.

  6. Non-invasive monitoring of central blood pressure by electrical impedance tomography: first experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Santos, Arnoldo; Tusman, Gerardo; Sipmann, Fernando Suárez; Bohm, Stephan H

    2011-04-01

    There is a strong clinical demand for devices allowing continuous non-invasive monitoring of central blood pressure (BP). In the state of the art a new family of techniques providing BP surrogates based on the measurement of the so-called pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been proposed, eliminating the need for inflation cuffs. PWV is defined as the velocity at which pressure pulses propagate along the arterial wall. However, no technique to assess PWV within central arteries in a fully unsupervised manner has been proposed so far. In this pilot study, we provide first experimental evidence that electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is capable of measuring pressure pulses directly within the descending aorta. To obtain a wide range of BP values, we administrated noradrenalin and nitroglycerine to an anesthetized pig under mechanical ventilation. An arterial line was inserted into the ascending aorta for measuring reference BP. EIT images were generated from 32 impedance electrodes placed around the chest at the level of the axilla. Regions of Interest (ROI) such as the descending aorta and the lungs were automatically identified by a novel time-based processing algorithm as the respective EIT pixels representing these structures. The correct positions of these ROIs were confirmed by bolus injections of highly conductive concentrated saline into the right heart and into the ascending aorta. Aortic pulse transit time (PTT) values were determined as the delay between the opening of the aortic valve (obtained from arterial line) and the arrival of pressure pulses at the aortic ROI within the EIT plane. For 11 experimental conditions, with mean BP ranging from 73 to 141 mmHg, strongly significant correlation (r = -0.97, P invasive surrogate of central BP.

  7. Bacterial bioluminescence onset and quenching: a dynamical model for a quorum sensing-mediated property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Side, Domenico Delle; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Pennetta, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro; Di Salvo, Marco; Talà, Adelfia; Chechkin, Aleksei; Seno, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    We present an effective dynamical model for the onset of bacterial bioluminescence, one of the most studied quorum sensing-mediated traits. Our model is built upon simple equations that describe the growth of the bacterial colony, the production and accumulation of autoinducer signal molecules, their sensing within bacterial cells, and the ensuing quorum activation mechanism that triggers bioluminescent emission. The model is directly tested to quantitatively reproduce the experimental distributions of photon emission times, previously measured for bacterial colonies of Vibrio jasicida, a luminescent bacterium belonging to the Harveyi clade, growing in a highly drying environment. A distinctive and novel feature of the proposed model is bioluminescence ‘quenching’ after a given time elapsed from activation. Using an advanced fitting procedure based on the simulated annealing algorithm, we are able to infer from the experimental observations the biochemical parameters used in the model. Such parameters are in good agreement with the literature data. As a further result, we find that, at least in our experimental conditions, light emission in bioluminescent bacteria appears to originate from a subtle balance between colony growth and quorum activation due to autoinducers diffusion, with the two phenomena occurring on the same time scale. This finding is consistent with a negative feedback mechanism previously reported for Vibrio harveyi.

  8. Bioluminescent bioreporter sensing of foodborne toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, Amanda C.; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Histamine is the primary etiological agent in the foodborne disease scombrotoxicosis, one of the most common food toxicities related to fish consumption. Procedures for detecting histamine in fish products are available, but are often too expensive or too complex for routine use. As an alternative, a bacterial bioluminescent bioreporter has been constructed to develop a biosensor system that autonomously responds to low levels of histamine. The bioreporter contains a promoterless Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon (luxCDABE) fused with the Vibrio anguillarum angR regulatory gene promoter of the anguibactin biosynthetic operon. The bioreporter emitted 1.46 times more bioluminescence than background, 30 minutes after the addition of 100mM histamine. However, specificity was not optimal, as this biosensor generated significant bioluminescence in the presence of L-proline and L-histidine. As a means towards improving histamine specificity, the promoter region of a histamine oxidase gene from Arthrobacter globiformis was cloned upstream of the promotorless lux operon from Photorhabdus luminescens. This recently constructed whole-cell, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter is currently being tested for optimal performance in the presence of histamine in order to provide a rapid, simple, and inexpensive model sensor for the detection of foodborne toxins.

  9. Bioluminescent hydrocarbonclastic bacteria of the Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of three petroleum hydrocarbons (Mobil SAE 40 Engine Oil, Diesel and Bonny light Crude Oil) by four bioluminescent bacteria (Vibrio harveyi, V. fisheri, Photobacterium leiognathi and P. Phosphoreum isolated from the Bonny estuary in the Niger Delta, Nigeria was investigated. Microbial utilization was monitored ...

  10. Bioluminescence emissions of the firefly Luciola praeusta ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    [Barua A G, Hazarika S, Saikia N M and Baruah G D 2009 Bioluminescence emissions of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874(Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae); J. Biosci. 34 287–292]. Keywords. Firefly; emission spectrum; FWHM; time-resolved spectrum; pulse width; pulse duration. Abbreviations used: ...

  11. Bioluminescent hydrocarbonclastic bacteria of the Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-02-19

    Feb 19, 2007 ... (1995) used the luminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum as a sensitive marker for monitoring the toxicity of coke plants. Lange and Lange (1997) have discussed exhaustively the use of bioluminescence as a marker in the detection of environmental contaminations in water and waste water systems.

  12. Bioluminescence as a light source for photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huanxiang; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Shu

    2013-11-25

    The luminol bioluminescence system containing luminol, hydrogen peroxide and HRP was used as a potential substitute light source of sunlight for the photosynthesis of plants, in which the electron flow of the photosynthesis process was proven using chloroplasts isolated from spinach leaves.

  13. A Table-Based Random Sampling Simulation for Bioluminescence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available As a popular simulation of photon propagation in turbid media, the main problem of Monte Carlo (MC method is its cumbersome computation. In this work a table-based random sampling simulation (TBRS is proposed. The key idea of TBRS is to simplify multisteps of scattering to a single-step process, through randomly table querying, thus greatly reducing the computing complexity of the conventional MC algorithm and expediting the computation. The TBRS simulation is a fast algorithm of the conventional MC simulation of photon propagation. It retained the merits of flexibility and accuracy of conventional MC method and adapted well to complex geometric media and various source shapes. Both MC simulations were conducted in a homogeneous medium in our work. Also, we present a reconstructing approach to estimate the position of the fluorescent source based on the trial-and-error theory as a validation of the TBRS algorithm. Good agreement is found between the conventional MC simulation and the TBRS simulation.

  14. Experimental measurement of oil-water two-phase flow by data fusion of electrical tomography sensors and venturi tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinyan; Deng, Yuchi; Zhang, Maomao; Yu, Peining; Li, Yi

    2017-09-01

    Oil-water two-phase flows are commonly found in the production processes of the petroleum industry. Accurate online measurement of flow rates is crucial to ensure the safety and efficiency of oil exploration and production. A research team from Tsinghua University has developed an experimental apparatus for multiphase flow measurement based on an electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor, an electrical resistance tomography (ERT) sensor, and a venturi tube. This work presents the phase fraction and flow rate measurements of oil-water two-phase flows based on the developed apparatus. Full-range phase fraction can be obtained by the combination of the ECT sensor and the ERT sensor. By data fusion of differential pressures measured by venturi tube and the phase fraction, the total flow rate and single-phase flow rate can be calculated. Dynamic experiments were conducted on the multiphase flow loop in horizontal and vertical pipelines and at various flow rates.

  15. Experimental demonstration of efficient quantum state tomography of matrix product states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Hou, Zhibo; Xiang, Guo-Yong; Han, Yong-Jian; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-04-17

    Quantum state tomography is a key technology for fully determining a quantum state. Unfortunately, standard quantum state tomography is intractable for general many-body quantum states, because the number of measurements and the post-processing time increase exponentially with the size of the system. However, for the matrix product states (MPSs), there exists an efficient method using linearly scaled local measurements and polynomially scaled post-processing times. In this study, we demonstrate the validity of the method in practice by reconstructing a four-photon MPS from its local two- or three-photon reduced-density matrices with the presence of statistical errors and systematical errors in experiment.

  16. Aequorin variants with improved bioluminescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikici, E; Qu, X; Rowe, L; Millner, L; Logue, C; Deo, S K; Ensor, M; Daunert, S

    2009-04-01

    The photoprotein aequorin has been widely used as a bioluminescent label in immunoassays, for the determination of calcium concentrations in vivo, and as a reporter in cellular imaging. It is composed of apoaequorin (189 amino acid residues), the imidazopyrazine chromophore coelenterazine and molecular oxygen. The emission characteristics of aequorin can be changed by rational design of the protein to introduce mutations in its structure, as well as by substituting different coelenterazine analogues to yield semi-synthetic aequorins. Variants of aequorin were created by mutating residues His16, Met19, Tyr82, Trp86, Trp108, Phe113 and Tyr132. Forty-two aequorin mutants were prepared and combined with 10 different coelenterazine analogues in a search for proteins with different emission wavelengths, altered decay kinetics and improved stability. This spectral tuning strategy resulted in semi-synthetic photoprotein mutants with significantly altered bioluminescent properties.

  17. Cloning and characterization of new bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Ballou, Byron T.; Dagnal, Erich; Bryan, Bruce

    1999-07-01

    Over the past two years Prolume has undertaken a comprehensive program to clone luciferases and associated 'green fluorescent proteins' (GFPs) from marine animals that use coelenterazine as the luciferin. To data we have cloned several bioluminescent proteins, including two novel copepod luciferases and two anthozoan GFPs. These four proteins have sequences that differ greatly form previously cloned analogous proteins; the sequence diversity apparently is due to independent evolutionary origins and unusual evolutionary constraints. Thus coelenterazine-based bioluminescent systems may also manifest a variety of useful properties. We discuss form this taxonomic perspective the initial biochemical and spectral characterization of our cloned proteins. Emphasis is placed on the anthozoan luciferase-GFP systems, whose efficient resonance energy transfer has elicited much current interest.

  18. A Symposium on Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    in marine Vibrio . (25 min) B.L. Bassler (US) • The Vibrio fischeri LuxR-LuxI system, a model for quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria. (20 min...The Euprymna scolopes/ Vibrio fischeri symbiosis. The squid says: Margaret McFall-Ngai (US) The bacterium responds: Edward Ruby (US) MIXER: Meigs...Education Co-chairs: S. Albrecht (Germany) and J.D. Andrade (US) • Transformation experiment using bioluminescence genes of Vibrio fischeri as a

  19. Bacterial bioluminescence as a bioassay for mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, I E; Porter, J K

    1982-01-01

    The use of bacterial bioluminescence as a toxicological assay for mycotoxins was tested with rubratoxin B, zearalenone, penicillic acid, citrinin, ochratoxin A, PR-toxin, aflatoxin B1, and patulin. The concentrations of mycotoxins causing 50% light reduction (EC50) in Photobacterium phosphoreum were determined immediately and at 5 h after reconstitution of the bacteria from a freeze-dried state. Generally, less toxins were required to obtain an EC50 at 5 h. The effects of the above mycotoxins on bioluminescence were determined after 5, 10, 15, and 20 min of incubation with the bacterial suspensions. The concentration of rubratoxin B necessary to elicit an EC50 increased with time, whereas the concentration of citrinin, penicillic acid, patulin, and PR-toxin necessary decreased with time. There was very little change in the concentration of zearalenone, aflatoxin B1, and ochratoxin A required to elicit an EC50 with time. The bacterial bioluminescence assay was most sensitive to patulin and least sensitive to rubratoxin B. PMID:7181501

  20. Reproducibility of multi-slice spiral computed tomography scans: An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, Marcel; Venema, Henk W.; Hartman, Joris; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.

    2004-01-01

    In multi-slice spiral computed tomography (CT) images interpolation artifacts are present. The relationship between the x-ray tube rotation angle and these artifacts is demonstrated. A head phantom was repeatedly scanned with a four-slice CT scanner at different pitch values. Two scans, made with

  1. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  2. Transformation Experiment Using Bioluminescence Genes of "Vibrio fischeri."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slock, James

    1995-01-01

    Bioluminescence transformation experiments show students the excitement and power of recombinant DNA technology. This laboratory experiment utilizes two plasmids of "Vibrio fischeri" in a transformation experiment. (LZ)

  3. Improved Reconstruction Quality of Bioluminescent Images by Combining SP3 Equations and Bregman Iteration Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence tomography (BLT has a great potential to provide a powerful tool for tumor detection, monitoring tumor therapy progress, and drug development; developing new reconstruction algorithms will advance the technique to practical applications. In the paper, we propose a BLT reconstruction algorithm by combining SP3 equations and Bregman iteration method to improve the quality of reconstructed sources. The numerical results for homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms are very encouraging and give significant improvement over the algorithms without the use of SP3 equations and Bregman iteration method.

  4. Time-angle ocean acoustic tomography using sensitivity kernels: Numerical and experimental inversion results

    OpenAIRE

    Aulanier, Florian; Nicolas, Barbara; Roux, Philippe; Brossier, Romain; Mars, Jerome,

    2013-01-01

    International audience; In shallow water acoustic tomography, broadband mid-frequency acoustic waves (1 to 5 kHz) follow multiple ray-like paths to travel through the ocean. Travel-time (TT) variations associated to these raypaths are classically used to estimate sound speed perturbations of the water column using the ray theory. In this shallow water environment, source and receiver arrays, combined with adapted array processing, provide the measurement of directions-of-arrival (DOA) and dir...

  5. Experimental investigation of surface determination process on multi-material components for dimensional computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges de Oliveira, Fabrício; Stolfi, Alessandro; Bartscher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of measuring multi-material components, while assessing inner and outer features simultaneously makes X-ray computed tomography (CT) the latest evolution in the field of coordinate measurement systems (CMSs). However, the difficulty in selecting suitable scanning parameters and su...... analyses were carried out to perform in-material measurements on the assemblies. This work discusses the different approaches based on real CT scans, and aims to provide advice on the segmentation process for multi-material measurements....

  6. Orbit Tomography: A Method for Determining the Population of Individual Fast-ion Orbits from Experimental Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2017-10-01

    Due to the complicated nature of the fast-ion distribution function, diagnostic velocity-space weight functions are used to analyze experimental data. In a technique known as Velocity-space Tomography (VST), velocity-space weight functions are combined with experimental measurements to create a system of linear equations that can be solved. However, VST (which by definition ignores spatial dependencies) is restricted, both by the accuracy of its forward model and also by the availability of spatially overlapping diagnostics. In this work we extend velocity-space weight functions to a full 6D generalized coordinate system and then show how to reduce them to a 3D orbit-space without loss of generality using an action-angle formulation. Furthermore, we show how diagnostic orbit-weight functions can be used to infer the full fast-ion distribution function, i.e. Orbit Tomography. Examples of orbit weights functions for different diagnostics and reconstructions of fast-ion distributions are shown for DIII-D experiments. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  7. The effect of temporal impulse response on experimental reduction of photon scatter in time-resolved diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valim, Niksa; Brock, James; Leeser, Miriam; Niedre, Mark

    2013-01-01

    New fast detector technology has driven significant renewed interest in time-resolved measurement of early photons in improving imaging resolution in diffuse optical tomography and fluorescence mediated tomography in recent years. In practice, selection of early photons results in significantly narrower instrument photon density sensitivity functions (PDSFs) than the continuous wave case, resulting in a better conditioned reconstruction problem. In this work, we studied the quantitative impact of the instrument temporal impulse response function (TIRF) on experimental PDSFs in tissue mimicking optical phantoms. We used a multimode fiber dispersion method to vary the system TIRF over a range of representative literature values. Substantial disagreement in PDSF width--by up to 40%--was observed between experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) models of photon propagation over the range of TIRFs studied. On average, PDSFs were broadened by about 0.3 mm at the center plane of the 2 cm wide imaging chamber per 100 ps of the instrument TIRF at early times. Further, this broadening was comparable on both the source and detector sides. Results were confirmed by convolution of instrument TIRFs with MC simulations. These data also underscore the importance of correcting imaging PDSFs for the instrument TIRF when performing tomographic image reconstruction to ensure accurate data-model agreement.

  8. Nanostructured biosensor using bioluminescence quenching technique for glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Longyan; Chen, Longyi; Dotzert, Michelle; Melling, C W James; Zhang, Jin

    2017-08-22

    Most methods for monitoring glucose level require an external energy source which may limit their application, particularly in vivo test. Bioluminescence technique offers an alternative way to provide emission light without external energy source by using bioluminescent proteins found from firefly or marine vertebrates and invertebrates. For quick and non-invasive detection of glucose, we herein developed a nanostructured biosensor by applying the bioluminescence technique. Luciferase bioluminescence protein (Rluc) is conjugated with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). The bioluminescence intensity of Rluc can be quenched by 8 ± 3 nm gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) when Au NPs covalently bind to β-CD. In the presence of glucose, Au NPs are replaced and leave far from Rluc through a competitive reaction, which results in the restored bioluminescence intensity of Rluc. A linear relationship is observed between the restored bioluminescence intensity and the logarithmic glucose concentration in the range of 1-100 µM. In addition, the selectivity of this designed sensor has been evaluated. The performance of the senor for determination of the concentration of glucose in the blood of diabetic rats is studied for comparison with that of the concentration of glucose in aqueous. This study demonstrates the design of a bioluminescence sensor for quickly detecting the concentration of glucose sensitively.

  9. Experimental study of beam hardening artifacts in photon counting breast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Del Guerra, A. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Lanconelli, N. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Lauria, A.; Mettivier, G. [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Naples (Italy); Montesi, M.C. [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: montesi@na.infn.it; Panetta, D. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Pani, R. [Dip. di Medicina Sperimentale, Univ. La Sapienza and INFN, Rome (Italy); Quattrocchi, M.G. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Randaccio, P. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Cagliari and INFN, Cagliari (Italy); Rosso, V. [Dip. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Russo, P. [Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli Federico II and INFN, Naples (Italy)

    2007-10-21

    We are implementing an X-ray breast Computed Tomography (CT) system on the gantry of a dedicated single photon emission tomography system for breast Tc-99 imaging. For the breast CT system we investigated the relevance of the beam hardening artifact. We studied the use of a single photon counting silicon pixel detector (0.3 mm thick, 256x256 pixel, 55{mu}m pitch, bump-bonded to the Medipix2 photon counting readout chip) as detector unit in our X-ray CT system. We evaluated the beam hardening 'cupping' artifact using homogeneous PMMA slabs and phantoms up to 14 cm in diameter, used as uncompressed breast tissue phantoms, imaged with a tungsten anode tube at 80 kVp with 4.2 mm Al filtration. For beam hardening evaluation we used a bimodal energy model. The CT data show a 'cupping' artifact going from 4% (4-cm thick material) to 18% (14-cm thick material). This huge artifacts is influenced by the low detection efficiency and the charge sharing effect of the silicon pixel detector.

  10. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsi, Attila; Howe, Kevin; Kirkpatrick, Tasha B; Wills, Robert; Bailey, R Hartford; Lawrence, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler production continuum were transformed with the broad host range plasmid pAKlux1, and a chicken skin attachment model was developed. Results Salmonella strains carrying pAKlux1 constitutively expressed the luxCDABE operon and were therefore detectable using bioluminescence. Strains were characterized in terms of bioluminescence properties and plasmid stability. To assess the usefulness of bioluminescent Salmonella strains in food safety studies, we developed an attachment model using chicken skin. The effect of washing on attachment of Salmonella strains to chicken skin was tested using bioluminescent strains, which revealed the attachment properties of each strain. Conclusion This study demonstrated that bioluminescence is a sensitive and effective tool to detect Salmonella on food products in real-time. Bioluminescence imaging is a promising technology that can be utilized to evaluate new food safety measures for reducing Salmonella contamination on food products. PMID:18211715

  11. Statistical optimization of bioluminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum KCTC2852.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B; Lee, J; Shin, D; Kim, E

    2001-01-01

    In this study, media optimization by statistically designed experiments stimulated an increase in the intensity and stability of bioluminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum KCTC 2852 during continuous cultivation. The Plackett-Burman design method selected two components (NaCl, yeast extract) among nine components of the seawater complete (SC) medium. The response-surface design method calculated the optimum concentration of NaCl (31.1 g/l) and yeast extract (5.1 g/l). In the optimized medium, bioluminescence per cell increased twofold. During continuous cultivation in a stirred tank reactor, bioluminescence decreased rapidly in the SC medium, whereas the optimized medium could maintain bioluminescence for more than 80 h, resulting in an increased bioluminescence. Upon contact with 0.1 ppm Hg2+, a sharp decrease in bioluminescence was observed, which was reproducible in the measuring chamber. This shows the possibility that P. phosphoreum could be cultivated continuously with enhanced bioluminescence stability and that on-line water toxicity could be monitored continuously.

  12. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey R Hartford

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler production continuum were transformed with the broad host range plasmid pAKlux1, and a chicken skin attachment model was developed. Results Salmonella strains carrying pAKlux1 constitutively expressed the luxCDABE operon and were therefore detectable using bioluminescence. Strains were characterized in terms of bioluminescence properties and plasmid stability. To assess the usefulness of bioluminescent Salmonella strains in food safety studies, we developed an attachment model using chicken skin. The effect of washing on attachment of Salmonella strains to chicken skin was tested using bioluminescent strains, which revealed the attachment properties of each strain. Conclusion This study demonstrated that bioluminescence is a sensitive and effective tool to detect Salmonella on food products in real-time. Bioluminescence imaging is a promising technology that can be utilized to evaluate new food safety measures for reducing Salmonella contamination on food products.

  13. Is bioluminescent turbulence an example of self-organized critically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David; Cronise, Raymond

    1994-06-01

    When mechanically stimulated by flow, some marine cells react by flashing blue light or bioluminescing. The flash response give a relatively non-invasive measure of turbulent behavior which lends itself readily and quantitatively to statistical models of fluid structure. We report substantial agreement between a series of experiments performed using stimulated light from the bioluminescence of seawater flowing through a glass pipe and theoretical predictions based on models proposed for describing a self-organized critical phenomenon. In this way, bioluminescent turbulent flow can be taken as a natural and potentially robust example connecting long-held scaling problems in turbulence to recent thinking on fractals and self-organized critically.

  14. Determination of the vertical electron-density profile in ionospheric tomography: experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of the vertical electron-density profile is a fundamental problem in ionospheric tomography. Lack of near-horizontal ray paths limits the information available on the vertical profile, so that the resultant image of electron density is biased in a horizontal sense. The vertical profile is of great importance as it affects the authenticity of the entire tomographic image. A new method is described whereby the vertical profile is selected using relative total-electron-content measurements. The new reconstruction process has been developed from modelling studies. A range of background ionospheres, representing many possible peak heights, scale heights and electron densities are formed from a Chapman profile on the bottomside with a range of topside profiles. The iterative reconstruction process is performed on all of these background ionospheres and a numerical selection criterion employed to select the final image. The resulting tomographic images show excellent agreement in electron density when compared with independent verification provided by the EISCAT radar.

  15. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Computed Tomography of Chemiluminescence for Hydrogen-Air Premixed Laminar Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography of chemiluminescence (CTC is a promising technique for combustion diagnostics, providing instantaneous 3D information of flame structures, especially in harsh circumstance. This work focuses on assessing the feasibility of CTC and investigating structures of hydrogen-air premixed laminar flames using CTC. A numerical phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of the reconstruction algorithm. A well-designed burner was used to generate stable hydrogen-air premixed laminar flames. The OH⁎ chemiluminescence intensity field reconstructed from 37 views using CTC was compared to the OH⁎ chemiluminescence distributions recorded directly by a single ICCD camera from the side view. The flame structures in different flow velocities and equivalence ratios were analyzed using the reconstructions. The results show that the CTC technique can effectively indicate real distributions of the flame chemiluminescence. The height of the flame becomes larger with increasing flow velocities, whereas it decreases with increasing equivalence ratios (no larger than 1. The increasing flow velocities gradually lift the flame reaction zones. A critical cone angle of 4.76 degrees is obtained to avoid blow-off. These results set up a foundation for next studies and the methods can be further developed to reconstruct 3D structures of flames.

  16. Quantitative assessment of early experimental diabetes in rats using dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, Kenya [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Faculty of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 1-7 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: murase@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kitamura, Akihiro; Tachibana, Atsushi; Kusakabe, Yoshinori; Matsuura, Risa; Miyazaki, Shohei [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Faculty of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 1-7 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the time course of changes of the renal volume and function in the early phase of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats using dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT). Methods: The DCE-CT studies were performed in 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 for control and n = 18 for STZ-treated group) on days 0, 4, 7, 11, and 14 using a multi-detector row CT. The rats of an STZ-treated group were given intraperitoneally 65 mg/kg body weight of STZ on day 0, and were divided into two groups based on the blood glucose concentration on day 4 being less than 300 mg/dL [STZ-treated group (L), n = 8] or greater than 300 mg/dL [STZ-treated group (G), n = 10]. The contrast clearance per unit renal volume (K{sub 1}) was estimated from the DCE-CT data using the Patlak model. The renal volume (V{sub CT}) was calculated by manually delineating the kidney on the contrast-enhanced CT image. The contrast clearance of the entire kidney (K) was obtained by K{sub 1} x V{sub CT}. Results: V{sub CT} in the STZ-treated group was significantly enlarged on day 4 compared to that on day 0 and continued until day 14. Although there were no significant changes in the time course of K{sub 1} in all groups, K in the STZ-treated groups (L) and (G) significantly increased on days 7 and 4, respectively, and continued until day 14, suggesting that hyperfiltration occurs in parallel with renal volume enlargement. Conclusion: The present method appears useful for quantitatively evaluating the time course of STZ-induced diabetes in rats, because it allows repeated and simultaneous evaluation of renal morphology and function.

  17. BIOLUMINESCENCE: TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY BEYOND THE UNIVERSITY WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Jesus de Almeida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of video in teaching and learning processes provides a challenging environment, able to stimulate the intellect and facilitate understanding in life science studies. Videos can be of extraordinary importance in education and dissemination of knowledge, contributing to greater learning, but is rarely used and exploited properly, especially for teaching biochemistry. Biochemistry is considered complex because it involves many molecular structures and processes, especially considering the number of events and molecules involved in the metabolism. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to introduce biochemistry for the students of basic education using the theme "Light, Science and Life" in a playful and fun way. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A video about bioluminescence was designed and prepared aiming to use it as a support for learning biochemistry by students of basic education of public schools located in Salvador, Bahia. In order to prepare the video, undergraduate students initially revised the literature in order to acquire proper knowledge, and along with their teacher advisor worked the elaboration of texts, textbook and questionnaire and applied at school. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Analysis the qualitative results of the experiment on the preparation and use of the video about "Bioluminescence" focused mainly on the content of biochemistry linked to theme Light, Science and Life, and demonstrated the importance of such work in the teaching-learning process. The dynamics used allowed greater interaction between students and teacher, and the teaching of biochemistry in a fun way beyond the university walls. CONCLUSION: The teaching through recreational resources, e.g. videos and other educational strategies that foster learning should be encouraged from basic education, always bearing in order to transmit through these teaching methods the main concepts covered in biochemistry.

  18. An alteration in the lateral geniculate nucleus of experimental glaucoma monkeys: in vivo positron emission tomography imaging of glial activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamitsu Shimazawa

    Full Text Available We examined lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN degeneration as an indicator for possible diagnosis of glaucoma in experimental glaucoma monkeys using positron emission tomography (PET. Chronic intraocular pressure (IOP elevation was induced by laser trabeculoplasty in the left eyes of 5 cynomolgus monkeys. Glial cell activation was detected by PET imaging with [(11C]PK11195, a PET ligand for peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR, before and at 4 weeks after laser treatment (moderate glaucoma stage. At mild, moderate, and advanced experimental glaucoma stages (classified by histological changes based on the extent of axonal loss, brains were stained with cresyl violet, or antibodies against PBR, Iba-1 (a microglial marker, and GFAP (an activated astrocyte marker. In laser-treated eyes, IOP was persistently elevated throughout all observation periods. PET imaging showed increased [(11C]PK11195 binding potential in the bilateral LGN at 4 weeks after laser treatment; the increase in the ipsilateral LGN was statistically significant (P<0.05, n = 4. Immunostaining showed bilateral activations of microglia and astrocytes in LGN layers receiving input from the laser-treated eye. PBR-positive cells were observed in LGN layers receiving input from laser-treated eye at all experimental glaucoma stages including the mild glaucoma stage and their localization coincided with Iba-1 positive microglia and GFAP-positive astrocytes. These data suggest that glial activation occurs in the LGN at a mild glaucoma stage, and that the LGN degeneration could be detected by a PET imaging with [(11C]PK11195 during the moderate experimental glaucoma stage after unilateral ocular hypertension. Therefore, activated glial markers such as PBR in the LGN may be useful in noninvasive molecular imaging for diagnosis of glaucoma.

  19. The development of an x-ray computerized tomography (CT) experimental system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, G.N.; Kijek, M.M.; Millar, J.J. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes a prototype experimental CT system that has been recently developed at Applied Physics, RMIT/ Physics, La Trobe UCNV. The system incorporates the scanning mode of the first generation CAT-scanner and is designed to perform the scanning of small objects. A microcomputer is used to control the scanning motions and data collection. The performance of the system was examined by scanning a ball-point pen. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  20. An experimental demonstration of a new type of proton computed tomography using a novel silicon tracking detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J T; Poludniowski, G; Price, T; Waltham, C; Allport, P P; Casse, G L; Esposito, M; Evans, P M; Green, S; Manger, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Symons, J; Allinson, N M

    2016-11-01

    Radiography and tomography using proton beams promise benefit to image guidance and treatment planning for proton therapy. A novel proton tracking detector is described and experimental demonstrations at a therapy facility are reported. A new type of proton CT reconstructing relative "scattering power" rather than "stopping power" is also demonstrated. Notably, this new type of imaging does not require the measurement of the residual energies of the protons. A large area, silicon microstrip tracker with high spatial and temporal resolution has been developed by the Proton Radiotherapy Verification and Dosimetry Applications consortium and commissioned using beams of protons at iThemba LABS, Medical Radiation Department, South Africa. The tracker comprises twelve planes of silicon developed using technology from high energy physics with each plane having an active area of ∼10 × 10 cm segmented into 2048 microstrips. The tracker is organized into four separate units each containing three detectors at 60° to one another creating an x-u-v coordinate system. Pairs of tracking units are used to reconstruct vertices for protons entering and exiting a phantom containing tissue equivalent inserts. By measuring the position and direction of each proton before and after the phantom, the nonlinear path for each proton through an object can be reconstructed. Experimental results are reported for tracking the path of protons with initial energies of 125 and 191 MeV. A spherical phantom of 75 mm diameter was imaged by positioning it between the entrance and exit detectors of the tracker. Positions and directions of individual protons were used to create angular distributions and 2D fluence maps of the beam. These results were acquired for 36 equally spaced projections spanning 180°, allowing, for the first time, an experimental CT image based upon the relative scattering power of protons to be reconstructed. Successful tracking of protons through a thick target (phantom) has

  1. Shedding light on bioluminescence regulation in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashiro, Tim; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-06-01

    The bioluminescence emitted by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a particularly striking result of individual microbial cells co-ordinating a group behaviour. The genes responsible for light production are principally regulated by the LuxR-LuxI quorum-sensing system. In addition to LuxR-LuxI, numerous other genetic elements and environmental conditions control bioluminescence production. Efforts to mathematically model the LuxR-LuxI system are providing insight into the dynamics of this autoinduction behaviour. The Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes forms a natural symbiosis with V. fischeri, and utilizes the symbiont-derived bioluminescence for certain nocturnal behaviours, such as counterillumination. Recent work suggests that the tissue with which V. fischeri associates not only can detect bioluminescence but may also use this light to monitor the V. fischeri population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Symplectin evolved from multiple duplications in bioluminescent squid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Warren R.; Christianson, Lynne M.; Haddock, Steven H.D.

    2017-01-01

    The squid Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis, formerly Symplectoteuthis oualaniensis, generates light using the luciferin coelenterazine and a unique enzyme, symplectin. Genetic information is limited for bioluminescent cephalopod species, so many proteins, including symplectin, occur in public databases...... functioning is conserved across essentially all members of the protein family, even those unlikely to be used for bioluminescence. Conversely, active site residues involved in pantetheinase catalysis are also conserved across essentially all of these proteins, suggesting that symplectin may have multiple...

  3. Biological water quality monitoring using chemiluminescent and bioluminescent techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Automated chemiluminescence and bioluminescence sensors were developed for the continuous monitoring of microbial levels in water supplies. The optimal chemical procedures were determined for the chemiluminescence system to achieve maximum sensitivity. By using hydrogen peroxide, reaction rate differentiation, ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), and carbon monoxide pretreatments, factors which cause interference were eliminated and specificity of the reaction for living and dead bacteria was greatly increased. By employing existing technology with some modifications, a sensitive and specific bioluminescent system was developed.

  4. Mutagenesis and Characterization Studies to Develop Novel Bioluminescent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    Quantitative bioluminescence imaging of transgene expression in vivo, Anal. Biochem. 355 (2006) 90-94. [16] K. Hakkila, M. Maksimow, M. Karp, M. Virta...reporter, Anal. Biochem. 330 (2004) 52-57. [19] K. Maehana, H. Tani, T. Kamidate, On-chip genotoxic bioassay based on bioluminescence reporter system...comparison of the GUS, LUC and GFP reporter system for gene expression studies in plants , Plant Biology 5 (2003) 103-115. [22] S. Gelmini, P. Pinzani, M

  5. Bioluminescence imaging of Chlamydia muridarum ascending infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Campbell

    Full Text Available Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms.

  6. Experimental evaluation of dual multiple aperture devices for fluence field modulated x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, A. J.; Gang, G.; Levinson, R.; Zbijewski, W.; Kawamoto, S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.

    2017-03-01

    Acquisition of CT images with comparable diagnostic power can potentially be achieved with lower radiation exposure than the current standard of care through the adoption of hardware-based fluence-field modulation (e.g. dynamic bowtie filters). While modern CT scanners employ elements such as static bowtie filters and tube-current modulation, such solutions are limited in the fluence patterns that they can achieve, and thus are limited in their ability to adapt to broad classes of patient morphology. Fluence-field modulation also enables new applications such as region-of-interest imaging, task specific imaging, reducing measurement noise or improving image quality. The work presented in this paper leverages a novel fluence modulation strategy that uses "Multiple Aperture Devices" (MADs) which are, in essence, binary filters, blocking or passing x-rays on a fine scale. Utilizing two MAD devices in series provides the capability of generating a large number of fluence patterns via small relative motions between the MAD filters. We present the first experimental evaluation of fluence-field modulation using a dual-MAD system, and demonstrate the efficacy of this technique with a characterization of achievable fluence patterns and an investigation of experimental projection data.

  7. Optimizing experimental parameters for the projection requirement in HAADF-STEM tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aveyard, R., E-mail: r.a.aveyard@tudelft.nl [Department of Imaging Physics, Delft University of Technology, 2628CJ Delft (Netherlands); Zhong, Z.; Batenburg, K.J. [Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rieger, B., E-mail: b.rieger@tudelft.nl [Department of Imaging Physics, Delft University of Technology, 2628CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The extent to which HAADF-STEM meets the projection requirement has been studied. • Multislice simulations used to model beam propagation and study signal linearity. • Propagation in crystalline and amorphous materials considered. • Optimal experimental set-up for the projection requirement is discussed. - Abstract: Tomographic reconstruction algorithms offer a means by which a tilt-series of transmission images can be combined to yield a three dimensional model of the specimen. Conventional reconstruction algorithms assume that the measured signal is a linear projection of some property, typically the density, of the material. Here we report the use of multislice simulations to investigate the extent to which this assumption is met in HAADF-STEM imaging. The use of simulations allows for a systematic survey of a range of materials and microscope parameters to inform optimal experimental design. Using this approach it is demonstrated that the imaging of amorphous materials is in good agreement with the projection assumption in most cases. Images of crystalline specimens taken along zone-axes are found to be poorly suited for conventional linear reconstruction algorithms due to channelling effects which produce enhanced intensities compared with off-axis images, and poor compliance with the projection requirement. Off-axis images are found to be suitable for reconstruction, though they do not strictly meet the linearity requirement in most cases. It is demonstrated that microscope parameters can be selected to yield improved compliance with the projection requirement.

  8. Comparison of cone-beam computed tomography and ultrasonography on experimental bone lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Sung; Park, Cheol Woo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the diagnostic ability of ultrasonography in detection of bone defects and new bone formation. Experimental bony defects were prepared on the parietal bone samples acquired from 3.5 kg New Zealand male rabbits. The defects were evaluated using ultrasonography and CBCT, and examined histologically at interval of 1, 3, 6, and 8 weeks. Ultrasonograph demonstrated hyperechogenicity in the defect area at 3 weeks and broadened hyperechogenicity from the margin of bone defect at 6 and 8 weeks due to new bone formation. On the CBCT images, new bone formation was first observed at 3 weeks around the margin of the defect, and showed gradually increase at 6 and 8 weeks. Histologic findings revealed existence of the fibroblasts and fibrous connective tissue with abundant capillary vessels only at 1 week, but osteoid tissue and newly formed trabecular bone at 3 weeks. Bone remodeling in the defect area was observed at 6 weeks and increased calcification and dense trabecular bone formation was observed at 8 weeks. Ultrasonograph proved to be a very useful diagnostic tool in detecting the bony defect and new bone formation. Additionally, ultrasonography provided valuable information regarding the blood supply around the defect area.

  9. Reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with an iterative reconstruction method from experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinguo; Zhao, Zhiqin; Song, Jian; Chen, Guoping; Nie, Zaiping; Liu, Qing-Huo

    2015-05-01

    An iterative reconstruction method has been previously reported by the authors of this paper. However, the iterative reconstruction method was demonstrated by solely using the numerical simulations. It is essential to apply the iterative reconstruction method to practice conditions. The objective of this work is to validate the capability of the iterative reconstruction method for reducing the effects of acoustic heterogeneity with the experimental data in microwave induced thermoacoustic tomography. Most existing reconstruction methods need to combine the ultrasonic measurement technology to quantitatively measure the velocity distribution of heterogeneity, which increases the system complexity. Different to existing reconstruction methods, the iterative reconstruction method combines time reversal mirror technique, fast marching method, and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to iteratively estimate the velocity distribution of heterogeneous tissue by solely using the measured data. Then, the estimated velocity distribution is used subsequently to reconstruct the highly accurate image of microwave absorption distribution. Experiments that a target placed in an acoustic heterogeneous environment are performed to validate the iterative reconstruction method. By using the estimated velocity distribution, the target in an acoustic heterogeneous environment can be reconstructed with better shape and higher image contrast than targets that are reconstructed with a homogeneous velocity distribution. The distortions caused by the acoustic heterogeneity can be efficiently corrected by utilizing the velocity distribution estimated by the iterative reconstruction method. The advantage of the iterative reconstruction method over the existing correction methods is that it is successful in improving the quality of the image of microwave absorption distribution without increasing the system complexity.

  10. Bioluminescence tracking of alginate micro-encapsulated cell transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiernan, Aubrey R; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2017-02-01

    Cell-based therapies to treat loss-of-function hormonal disorders such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease are routinely coupled with encapsulation strategies, but an understanding of when and why grafts fail in vivo is lacking. Consequently, investigators cannot clearly define the key factors that influence graft success. Although bioluminescence is a popular method to track the survival of free cells transplanted in preclinical models, little is known of the ability to use bioluminescence for real-time tracking of microencapsulated cells. Furthermore, the impact that dynamic imaging distances may have, due to freely-floating microcapsules in vivo, on cell survival monitoring is unknown. This work addresses these questions by applying bioluminescence to a pancreatic substitute based on microencapsulated cells. Recombinant insulin-secreting cells were transduced with a luciferase lentivirus and microencapsulated in Ba(2+) crosslinked alginate for in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro quantitative bioluminescence monitoring was possible and viable microencapsulated cells were followed in real time under both normoxic and anoxic conditions. Although in vivo dispersion of freely-floating microcapsules in the peritoneal cavity limited the analysis to a qualitative bioluminescence evaluation, signals consistently four orders of magnitude above background were clear indicators of temporal cell survival. Strong agreement between in vivo and in vitro cell proliferation over time was discovered by making direct bioluminescence comparisons between explanted microcapsules and parallel in vitro cultures. Broader application of this bioluminescence approach to retrievable transplants, in supplement to currently used end-point physiological tests, could improve understanding and accelerate development of cell-based therapies for critical clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A bioluminescence assay for aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Sarah J; Valley, Michael P; Kotraiah, Vinayaka; Vidugiriene, Jolanta; Zhou, Wenhui; Bernad, Laurent; Osterman, Jean; Kimball, Joshua J; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Cali, James J

    2013-03-15

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family of enzymes is critical for cell survival and adaptation to cellular and environmental stress. These enzymes are of interest as therapeutic targets and as biomarkers of stem cells. This article describes a novel, homogeneous bioluminescence assay to study the activity of the ALDH enzymes. The assay is based on a proluciferin-aldehyde substrate that is recognized and utilized by multiple ALDH enzyme isoforms to generate luciferin. A detection reagent is added to inactivate ALDH and generate light from the luciferin product. The luminescent signal is dependent on the ALDH enzyme concentration and the incubation time in the ALDH reaction; moreover, the luminescent signal generated with the detection reagent is stable for greater than 2 h. This assay provides many advantages over standard NADH fluorescence assays. It is more sensitive and the signal stability provided allows convenient assay setup in batch mode-based high-throughput screens. The assay also shows an accurate pharmacological response for a common ALDH inhibitor and is robust, with a large assay window (S/B=64) and Z'=0.75. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial Bioluminescence: Spectral Study of the Emitters in the In Vivo Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matheson, I.B.C.; Lee, J.; Muller, F.

    1981-01-01

    Transient fluorescent species are observed in the bioluminescent reactions of three reduced flavin mononucleotides with aliphatic aldehydes and oxygen, catalyzed by bacterial luciferase. In each case the fluorescence spectral distribution is similar to that of the bioluminescence but is readily

  13. Thoughts on the diversity of convergent evolution of bioluminescence on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldenmaier, Hans E.; Oliveira, Anderson G.; Stevani, Cassius V.

    2012-10-01

    The widespread independent evolution of analogous bioluminescent systems is one of the most impressive and diverse examples of convergent evolution on earth. There are roughly 30 extant bioluminescent systems that have evolved independently on Earth, with each system likely having unique enzymes responsible for catalysing the bioluminescent reaction. Bioluminescence is a chemical reaction involving a luciferin molecule and a luciferase or photoprotein that results in the emission of light. Some independent systems utilize the same luciferin, such as the use of tetrapyrrolic compounds by krill and dinoflagellates, and the wide use of coelenterazine by marine organisms, while the enzymes involved are unique. One common thread among all the different bioluminescent systems is the requirement of molecular oxygen. Bioluminescence is found in most forms of life, especially marine organisms. Bioluminescence in known to benefit the organism by: attraction, repulsion, communication, camouflage, and illumination. The marine ecosystem is significantly affected by bioluminescence, the only light found in the pelagic zone and below is from bioluminescent organisms. Transgenic bioluminescent organisms have revolutionized molecular research, medicine and the biotechnology industry. The use of bioluminescence in studying molecular pathways and disease allows for non-invasive and real-time analysis. Bioluminescence-based assays have been developed for several analytes by coupling luminescence to many enzyme-catalysed reactions.

  14. Influence of antibiotic pressure on bacterial bioluminescence, with emphasis on Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daghighi, Seyedmojtaba; Sjollema, Jelmer; Harapanahalli, Akshay; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is used for longitudinal evaluation of bacteria in live animals. Clear relations exist between bacterial numbers and their bioluminescence. However, bioluminescence images of Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, S. aureus Xen36 and Escherichia coli Xen14 grown on tryptone soy agar in

  15. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines.

  16. Glowing Worms: Biological, Chemical, and Functional Diversity of Bioluminescent Annelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdes, Aida; Gruber, David F

    2017-07-01

    Bioluminescence, the ability to produce light by living organisms, has evolved independently in numerous lineages across the tree of life. Luminous forms are found in a wide range of taxonomic groups from bacteria to vertebrates, although the great majority of bioluminescent organisms are marine taxa. Within the phylum Annelida, bioluminescence is widespread, present in at least 98 terrestrial and marine species that represent 45 genera distributed in thirteen lineages of clitellates and polychaetes. The ecological diversity of luminous annelids is unparalleled, with species occupying a great variety of habitats including both terrestrial and marine ecosystems, from coastal waters to the deep-sea, in benthic and pelagic habitats from polar to tropical regions. This great taxonomic and ecological diversity is matched by the wide array of bioluminescent colors-including yellow light, which is very rare among marine taxa-different emission wavelengths even between species of the same genus, and varying patterns, chemical reactions and kinetics. This diversity of bioluminescence colors and patterns suggests that light production in annelids might be involved in a variety of different functions, including defensive mechanisms like sacrificial lures or aposematic signals, and intraspecific communication systems. In this review, we explore the world of luminous annelids, particularly focusing on the current knowledge regarding their taxonomic and ecological diversity and discussing the putative functions and chemistries of their bioluminescent systems. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Bioluminescent Mycena species from São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardin, Dennis E; Capelari, Marina; Stevani, Cassius

    2007-01-01

    Six species of bioluminescent agarics are described and illustrated from a single site in primary Atlantic Forest habitat in the Parque Estadual Turistico do Alto Ribeira, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. These include two new taxa of Mycena, viz. M. asterina and M. lucentipes. Luminescence in Mycena fera, M. singeri and M. discobasis is reported for the first time. In addition an undeterminable luminescent Mycena species is described and additional specimens of Gerronema viridilucens are documented. An accounting of known bioluminescent species of Mycena and a discussion of why they luminesce are presented.

  18. RF Tomography in Free Space: Experimental Validation of the Forward Model and an Inversion Algorithm Based on the Algebraic Reconstruction Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Picco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio-frequency tomography was originally proposed to image underground cavities. Its flexible forward model can be used in free-space by choosing an appropriate dyadic Green's function and can be translated in the microwave domain. Experimental data are used to validate a novel inversion scheme, based on the algebraic reconstruction technique. The proposed method is improved by introducing physical bounds on the solution returned. As a result, the images of the dielectric permittivity profiles obtained are superior in quality to the ones obtained using classical regularization approaches such as the truncated singular value decomposition. The results from three experimental case studies are presented and discussed.

  19. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors Bactérias bioluminescentes: os genes lux como biosensores ambientais

    OpenAIRE

    Vânia da Silva Nunes-Halldorson; Norma Letícia Duran

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  20. The Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW) Potential of Bioluminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Jamaica, West Indies (Seliger et al., 1962). In either case, the bioluminescent dinofla.ilate, Pyrodinium bahamense , was the dominant organism. On the...reported by Biggley et al. (1969) that in artificial culture, the dinoflagellates Pyrodinlum bAhamense and Pyrocystis lunula produce a continuous low

  1. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Tsuji, Osahiko [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hanyu, Aki [Division of Biochemistry, The Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okada, Seiji [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yasuda, Akimasa [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Fukano, Takashi [Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akazawa, Chihiro [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakamura, Masaya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Imamura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Medicine for Pathogenesis, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, The Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Yumi [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Okano, Hirotaka James, E-mail: hjokano@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Division of Regenerative Medicine Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 150-8461 (Japan); and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  2. Unanimous Model for Describing the Fast Bioluminescence Kinetics of Ca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eremeeva, Elena V.; Bartsev, Sergey I.; Berkel, van Willem J.H.; Vysotski, Eugene S.

    2017-01-01

    Upon binding their metal ion cofactors, Ca2+-regulated photoproteins display a rapid increase of light signal, which reaches its peak within milliseconds. In the present study, we investigate bioluminescence kinetics of the entire photoprotein family. All five recombinant hydromedusan Ca2+-regulated

  3. Smartphone-based low light detection for bioluminescence application

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report a smartphone-based device and associated imaging-processing algorithm to maximize the sensitivity of standard smartphone cameras, that can detect the presence of single-digit pW of radiant flux intensity. The proposed hardware and software, called bioluminescent-based analyte quantitation ...

  4. Establishment of human cell lines showing circadian rhythms of bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Aki; Shimada, Hiroko; Numazawa, Kahori; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Ikeda, Masaaki; Kawashima, Minae; Kato, Nobumasa; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Ebisawa, Takashi

    2008-11-28

    We have established human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines stably expressing the luciferase gene, driven by the human Bmal1 promoter, to obtain human-derived cells that show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence after dexamethasone treatment. The average circadian period of bioluminescence for the obtained clones was 24.07+/-0.48 h. Lithium (10 mM) in the medium significantly lengthened the circadian period of bioluminescence, which is consistent with previous reports, while 2 mM or 5 mM lithium had no effect. This is the first report on the establishment of human-derived cell lines that proliferate infinitely and show circadian rhythms of bioluminescence, and also the first to investigate the effects of low-dose lithium on the circadian rhythms of human-derived cells in vitro. The established cells will be useful for various in vitro studies of human circadian rhythms and for the development of new therapies for human disorders related to circadian rhythm disturbances.

  5. Quantum-dot-decorated robust transductable bioluminescent nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juanjuan; Yu, Changming; Pan, Daocheng; Li, Jianmin; Chen, Wei; Yan, Ming; Segura, Tatiana; Lu, Yunfeng

    2010-09-22

    Bioluminescence, due to its high sensitivity, has been exploited in various analytical and imaging applications. In this work, we report a highly stable, cell-transductable, and wavelength-tunable bioluminescence system achieved with an elegant and simple design. Using aqueous in situ polymerization on a bioluminescent enzyme anchored with polymerizable vinyl groups, we obtained nanosized core-shell nanocapsules with the enzyme as the core and a cross-linked thin polymer net as the shell. These nanocapsules possess greatly enhanced stability, retained bioactivity, and a readily engineered surface. In particular, by incorporating polymerizable amines in the polymerization, we endowed the nanocapsules with efficient cell-transduction and sufficient conjugation sites for follow-up modification. Following in situ polymerization, decorating the polymer shell with fluorescent quantum dots allowed us to access a continuous tunable wavelength, which extends the application of such bioluminescent nanocapsules, especially in deep tissue. In addition, the unique core-shell structure and adequate conjugation sites on surface enabled us to maximize the BRET efficiency by adjusting the QD/enzyme conjugation ratio.

  6. Semi-automated Image Processing for Preclinical Bioluminescent Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavine, Nikolai V; McColl, Roderick W

    Bioluminescent imaging is a valuable noninvasive technique for investigating tumor dynamics and specific biological molecular events in living animals to better understand the effects of human disease in animal models. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a strategy behind automated methods for bioluminescence image processing from the data acquisition to obtaining 3D images. In order to optimize this procedure a semi-automated image processing approach with multi-modality image handling environment was developed. To identify a bioluminescent source location and strength we used the light flux detected on the surface of the imaged object by CCD cameras. For phantom calibration tests and object surface reconstruction we used MLEM algorithm. For internal bioluminescent sources we used the diffusion approximation with balancing the internal and external intensities on the boundary of the media and then determined an initial order approximation for the photon fluence we subsequently applied a novel iterative deconvolution method to obtain the final reconstruction result. We find that the reconstruction techniques successfully used the depth-dependent light transport approach and semi-automated image processing to provide a realistic 3D model of the lung tumor. Our image processing software can optimize and decrease the time of the volumetric imaging and quantitative assessment. The data obtained from light phantom and lung mouse tumor images demonstrate the utility of the image reconstruction algorithms and semi-automated approach for bioluminescent image processing procedure. We suggest that the developed image processing approach can be applied to preclinical imaging studies: characteristics of tumor growth, identify metastases, and potentially determine the effectiveness of cancer treatment.

  7. BLProt: Prediction of bioluminescent proteins based on support vector machine and relieff feature selection

    KAUST Repository

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar

    2011-08-17

    Background: Bioluminescence is a process in which light is emitted by a living organism. Most creatures that emit light are sea creatures, but some insects, plants, fungi etc, also emit light. The biotechnological application of bioluminescence has become routine and is considered essential for many medical and general technological advances. Identification of bioluminescent proteins is more challenging due to their poor similarity in sequence. So far, no specific method has been reported to identify bioluminescent proteins from primary sequence.Results: In this paper, we propose a novel predictive method that uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM) and physicochemical properties to predict bioluminescent proteins. BLProt was trained using a dataset consisting of 300 bioluminescent proteins and 300 non-bioluminescent proteins, and evaluated by an independent set of 141 bioluminescent proteins and 18202 non-bioluminescent proteins. To identify the most prominent features, we carried out feature selection with three different filter approaches, ReliefF, infogain, and mRMR. We selected five different feature subsets by decreasing the number of features, and the performance of each feature subset was evaluated.Conclusion: BLProt achieves 80% accuracy from training (5 fold cross-validations) and 80.06% accuracy from testing. The performance of BLProt was compared with BLAST and HMM. High prediction accuracy and successful prediction of hypothetical proteins suggests that BLProt can be a useful approach to identify bioluminescent proteins from sequence information, irrespective of their sequence similarity. 2011 Kandaswamy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. Uptake kinetics and biodistribution of C-14-D-luciferin-a radiolabeled substrate for the firefly luciferase catalyzed bioluminescence reaction : impact on bioluminescence based reporter gene imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Frank; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Bhaumik, Srabani; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Firefly luciferase catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of D-luciferin to oxyluciferin in the presence of cofactors, producing bioluminescence. This reaction is used in optical bioluminescence-based molecular imaging approaches to detect the expression of the firefly luciferase reporter

  9. Turbocharging Quantum Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gamble, John King [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nielsen, Erik [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scholten, Travis L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rudinger, Kenneth Michael [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Quantum tomography is used to characterize quantum operations implemented in quantum information processing (QIP) hardware. Traditionally, state tomography has been used to characterize the quantum state prepared in an initialization procedure, while quantum process tomography is used to characterize dynamical operations on a QIP system. As such, tomography is critical to the development of QIP hardware (since it is necessary both for debugging and validating as-built devices, and its results are used to influence the next generation of devices). But tomography suffers from several critical drawbacks. In this report, we present new research that resolves several of these flaws. We describe a new form of tomography called gate set tomography (GST), which unifies state and process tomography, avoids prior methods critical reliance on precalibrated operations that are not generally available, and can achieve unprecedented accuracies. We report on theory and experimental development of adaptive tomography protocols that achieve far higher fidelity in state reconstruction than non-adaptive methods. Finally, we present a new theoretical and experimental analysis of process tomography on multispin systems, and demonstrate how to more effectively detect and characterize quantum noise using carefully tailored ensembles of input states.

  10. Monitoring Bloom Dynamics of a Common Coastal Bioluminescent Ctenophore

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    described herein for detection of a toxic variety of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate Pyrodinium bahamense . REFERENCES Davis, J.W., Thosteson, E.D...3 Monitoring changes in mesozooplankton abundance and species composition has been considered to be critical for identifying ecological ...red, far-red and white light. Marine Ecology Progress Series 350:291-298. [published, refereed] Suntsov, A.V., E.A. Widder and T.T. Sutton (2008

  11. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey R Hartford; Wills Robert; Kirkpatrick Tasha B; Howe Kevin; Karsi Attila; Lawrence Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler pro...

  12. Development of a bioluminescent nitroreductase probe for preclinical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Vorobyeva, Anzhelika G.; Michael Stanton; Aurélien Godinat; Kjetil B Lund; Karateev, Grigory G.; Francis, Kevin P.; Elizabeth Allen; Gelovani, Juri G; Emmet McCormack; Mark Tangney; Dubikovskaya, Elena A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial nitroreductases (NTRs) have been widely utilized in the development of novel antibiotics, degradation of pollutants, and gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) of cancer that reached clinical trials. In case of GDEPT, since NTR is not naturally present in mammalian cells, the prodrug is activated selectively in NTR-transformed cancer cells, allowing high efficiency treatment of tumors. Currently, no bioluminescent probes exist for sensitive, non-invasive imaging of NTR express...

  13. Real-time bioluminescence imaging of glycans on live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Allison S; Dubikovskaya, Elena A; Rush, Jason S; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2010-06-30

    Cell-surface glycans are attractive targets for molecule imaging due to their reflection of cellular processes associated with development and disease progression. In this paper, we describe the design, synthesis, and biological application of a new phosphine probe for real-time imaging of cell-surface glycans using bioluminescence. To accomplish this goal, we took advantage of the bioorthogonal chemical reporter technique. This strategy uses a two-step labeling procedure in which an unnatural sugar analogue containing a functional handle is (1) incorporated into sugar-bearing proteins via the cell's own biosynthetic machinery and then (2) detected with an exogenously added probe. We designed phosphine-luciferin reagent 1 to activate bioluminescence in response to Staudinger ligation with azide-labeled glycans. We chose to use a phosphine probe because, despite their slow reaction kinetics, they remain the best-performing reagents for tagging azidosugars in mice. Given the sensitivity and negligible background provided by bioluminescence imaging (BLI), we reasoned that 1 might be able to overcome some of the limitations encountered with fluorescent phosphine probes. In this work, we synthesized the first phosphine-luciferin probe for use in real-time BLI and demonstrated that azide-labeled cell-surface glycans can be imaged with 1 using concentrations as low as single digit nanomolar and times as little as 5 min, a feat that cannot be matched by any previous fluorescent phosphine probes. Even though we have only demonstrated its use in visualizing glycans, it can be envisioned that this probe could also be used for bioluminescence imaging of any azide-containing biomolecule, such as proteins and lipids, since azides have been previously incorporated into these molecules. The phosphine-luciferin probe is therefore poised for many applications in real-time imaging in cells and whole animals. These studies are currently in progress in our laboratory.

  14. Diel Bioluminescence in Heterotrophic and Photosynthetic Marine Dinoflagellates in an Arctic Fjord

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellates, Pyrodinium bahamense , Gonyaulax palyedra, and SPyrocystis tun ula. Journal of General Physiology, 54, 96-122...Observations ’Ind mcasurements of planktonic bioluminescence in and around a milkv sea. Journal of I xpjerimental Marine’ Biology and Ecology , 119, 55-RI1...parameters fiini a Norwegian fjord Marine Ecology Progress Series, 55, 217-227. I~apta, . & ose , JJ 1984. Observations of bioluminescence in manne

  15. Detection of organic compounds with whole-cell bioluminescent bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Smartt, Abby; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Natural and manmade organic chemicals are widely deposited across a diverse range of ecosystems including air, surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soil, sediment, and marine environments. Some organic compounds, despite their industrial values, are toxic to living organisms and pose significant health risks to humans and wildlife. Detection and monitoring of these organic pollutants in environmental matrices therefore is of great interest and need for remediation and health risk assessment. Although these detections have traditionally been performed using analytical chemical approaches that offer highly sensitive and specific identification of target compounds, these methods require specialized equipment and trained operators, and fail to describe potential bioavailable effects on living organisms. Alternatively, the integration of bioluminescent systems into whole-cell bioreporters presents a new capacity for organic compound detection. These bioreporters are constructed by incorporating reporter genes into catabolic or signaling pathways that are present within living cells and emit a bioluminescent signal that can be detected upon exposure to target chemicals. Although relatively less specific compared to analytical methods, bioluminescent bioassays are more cost-effective, more rapid, can be scaled to higher throughput, and can be designed to report not only the presence but also the bioavailability of target substances. This chapter reviews available bacterial and eukaryotic whole-cell bioreporters for sensing organic pollutants and their applications in a variety of sample matrices.

  16. Triple Bioluminescence Imaging for In Vivo Monitoring of Cellular Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey A Maguire

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence imaging (BLI has shown to be crucial for monitoring in vivo biological processes. So far, only dual bioluminescence imaging using firefly (Fluc and Renilla or Gaussia (Gluc luciferase has been achieved due to the lack of availability of other efficiently expressed luciferases using different substrates. Here, we characterized a codon-optimized luciferase from Vargula hilgendorfii (Vluc as a reporter for mammalian gene expression. We showed that Vluc can be multiplexed with Gluc and Fluc for sequential imaging of three distinct cellular phenomena in the same biological system using vargulin, coelenterazine, and D-luciferin substrates, respectively. We applied this triple imaging system to monitor the effect of soluble tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL delivered using an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV on brain tumors in mice. Vluc imaging showed efficient sTRAIL gene delivery to the brain, while Fluc imaging revealed a robust antiglioma therapy. Further, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation in response to sTRAIL binding to glioma cells death receptors was monitored by Gluc imaging. This work is the first demonstration of trimodal in vivo bioluminescence imaging and will have a broad applicability in many different fields including immunology, oncology, virology, and neuroscience.

  17. Bioluminescent magnetic nanoparticles as potential imaging agents for mammalian spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Erick S; Feugang, Jean M; Willard, Scott T; Ryan, Peter L; Walters, Keisha B

    2016-03-17

    Nanoparticles have emerged as key materials for developing applications in nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, bioimaging and theranostics. Existing bioimaging technologies include bioluminescent resonance energy transfer-conjugated quantum dots (BRET-QDs). Despite the current use of BRET-QDs for bioimaging, there are strong concerns about QD nanocomposites containing cadmium which exhibits potential cellular toxicity. In this study, bioluminescent composites comprised of magnetic nanoparticles and firefly luciferase (Photinus pyralis) are examined as potential light-emitting agents for imaging, detection, and tracking mammalian spermatozoa. Characterization was carried out using infrared spectroscopy, TEM and cryo-TEM imaging, and ζ-potential measurements to demonstrate the successful preparation of these nanocomposites. Binding interactions between the synthesized nanoparticles and spermatozoon were characterized using confocal and atomic/magnetic force microscopy. Bioluminescence imaging and UV-visible-NIR microscopy results showed light emission from sperm samples incubated with the firefly luciferase-modified nanoparticles. Therefore, these newly synthesized luciferase-modified magnetic nanoparticles show promise as substitutes for QD labeling, and can potentially also be used for in vivo manipulation and tracking, as well as MRI techniques. These preliminary data indicate that luciferase-magnetic nanoparticle composites can potentially be used for spermatozoa detection and imaging. Their magnetic properties add additional functionality to allow for manipulation, sorting, or tracking of cells using magnetic techniques.

  18. In vitro and in vivo bioluminescent quantification of viable stem cells in engineered constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Oudina, Karim; Bourguignon, Marianne; Delpierre, Laetitia; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Bensidhoum, Morad; Arnaud, Eric; Petite, Herve

    2010-06-01

    Bioluminescent quantification of viable cells inside three-dimensional porous scaffolds was performed in vitro and in vivo. The assay quantified the bioluminescence of murine stem (C3H10T1/2) cells tagged with the luciferase gene reporter and distributed inside scaffolds of either soft, translucent, AN69 polymeric hydrogel or hard, opaque, coral ceramic materials. Quantitative evaluation of bioluminescence emitted from tagged cells adhering to these scaffolds was performed in situ using either cell lysates and a luminometer or intact cells and a bioluminescence imaging system. Despite attenuation of the signal when compared to cells alone, the bioluminescence correlated with the number of cells (up to 1.5 x 10(5)) present on each material scaffold tested, both in vitro and noninvasively in vivo (subcutaneous implants in the mouse model). The noninvasive bioluminescence measurement technique proved to be comparable to the cell-destructive bioluminescence measurement technique. Monitoring the kinetics of luciferase expression via bioluminescence enabled real-time assessment of cell survival and proliferation on the scaffolds tested over prolonged (up to 59 days) periods of time. This novel, sensitive, easy, fast-to-implement, quantitative bioluminescence assay has great, though untapped, potential for screening and determining noninvasively the presence of viable cells on biomaterial constructs in the tissue engineering and tissue regeneration fields.

  19. Investigation of Processes and Factors Regulating the Generation, Maintenance and Breakdown of Bioluminescent Thin Layers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Widder, Edith

    2001-01-01

    .... Katz's submersible holographic camera mounted on the upper work platform. Thin layers were located using real-time sensor feedback from intensified video recordings of stimulated bioluminescence...

  20. Visible light induced ocular delayed bioluminescence as a possible origin of negative afterimage

    CERN Document Server

    Bokkon, I; Wang, C; Dai, J; Salari, V; Grass, F; Antal, I

    2011-01-01

    The delayed luminescence of biological tissues is an ultraweak reemission of absorbed photons after exposure to external monochromatic or white light illumination. Recently, Wang, B\\'okkon, Dai and Antal (Brain Res. 2011) presented the first experimental proof of the existence of spontaneous ultraweak biophoton emission and visible light induced delayed ultraweak photon emission from in vitro freshly isolated rat's whole eye, lens, vitreous humor and retina. Here, we suggest that the photobiophysical source of negative afterimage can also occur within the eye by delayed bioluminescent photons. In other words, when we stare at a colored (or white) image for few seconds, external photons can induce excited electronic states within different parts of the eye that is followed by a delayed reemission of absorbed photons for several seconds. Finally, these reemitted photons can be absorbed by nonbleached photoreceptors that produce a negative afterimage. Although this suggests the photobiophysical source of negativ...

  1. Trans-rectal ultrasound-coupled near-infrared optical tomography of the prostate, part II: experimental demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhen; Piao, Daqing; Xu, Guan; Ritchey, Jerry W; Holyoak, G Reed; Bartels, Kenneth E; Bunting, Charles F; Slobodov, Gennady; Krasinski, Jerzy S

    2008-10-27

    We demonstrate trans-rectal optical tomography of the prostate using an endo-rectal near-infrared (NIR) applicator integrated with a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe. The endo-rectal NIR applicator incorporated a design presented in our previously reported work. A continuous-wave NIR optical tomography system is combined with a commercial US scanner to form the dual-modality imager. Sagittal transrectal imaging is performed concurrently by endo-rectal NIR and TRUS. The TRUS ensures accurate positioning of the NIR applicator as well as guides NIR image reconstruction using the spatial prior of the target. The use of a condom, which is standard for TRUS, is found to have minimal effect on trans-rectal NIR imaging. Tests on avian tissues validates that NIR imaging can recover the absorption contrast of a target, and its accuracy is improved when the TRUS spatial prior is incorporated. Trans-rectal NIR/US imaging of a healthy canine prostate in situ is reported.

  2. Experimental study of mechanisms of sand production using X-ray computerized tomography; Estudo experimental dos mecanismos da producao de areia empregando tomografia computadorizada de raios X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Janaina B.; Vargas Junior, Euripedes [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil; Barroso, Emilio V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Campos, Elisabete; Goncalves, Clemente; Tavares, Andre [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    During productive phase of the well, many times there is simultaneous production of the solid particles detached from matrix of the reservoir rock. This phenomenon receives the name of the sand production. In this case stress and flow conditions around of the well are fundamental factors for deflagration of the process. Stress concentration in the wall of the well lead to the loss of cohesion between grains arising, consequently, a granular material region susceptible for dragging by seepage forces derived from fluid flow. The objective of this work was to perform sand production tests in Rio Bonito and synthetic sandstone samples using real-time X-Ray Computerized Tomography. The tests investigated the initial and the evolution of failure at the cavity wall of samples. These are initial stages of the sand production process. The analysis of the CT-scans obtained during tests allowed the visualization of breakouts and collapses of the wells. From studies more details were possible estimate the sand production and produce 3-D images of the propagation of the failure. (author)

  3. Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Dinoflagellates at San Clemente Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    capacity (Sweeney 1971). Laboratory investigations have also shown that increased irradiance elevates photosynthesis with consequent increased... artificial seawater media for periods of up to 37 days, mean bioluminescence decreased by almost a factor of 10 when compared to cells after 5-13...Oceanic Measurements and Laboratory Applications 44 observed the photosynthesis -irradiance relation to bioluminescence capacity. That is, cells

  4. Red-Shifted Firefly Luciferase Optimized for Candida albicans In vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Dorsaz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen causing life-threatening diseases in immuno-compromised patients. The efficacy of current drugs to combat C. albicans infections is limited, as these infections have a 40–60% mortality rate. There is a real need for novel therapeutic approaches, but such advances require a detailed knowledge of C. albicans and its in vivo pathogenesis. Additionally, any novel antifungal drugs against C. albicans infections will need to be tested for their in vivo efficacy over time. Fungal pathogenesis and drug-mediated resolution studies can both be evaluated using non-invasive in vivo imaging technologies. In the work presented here, we used a codon-optimized firefly luciferase reporter system for detecting C. albicans in mice. We adapted the firefly luciferase in order to improve its maximum emission intensity in the red light range (600–700 nm as well as to improve its thermostability in mice. All non-invasive in vivo imaging of experimental animals was performed with a multimodal imaging system able to detect luminescent reporters and capture both reflectance and X-ray images. The modified firefly luciferase expressed in C. albicans (Mut2 was found to significantly increase the sensitivity of bioluminescence imaging (BLI in systemic infections as compared to unmodified luciferase (Mut0. The same modified bioluminescence reporter system was used in an oropharyngeal candidiasis model. In both animal models, fungal loads could be correlated to the intensity of emitted light. Antifungal treatment efficacies were also evaluated on the basis of BLI signal intensity. In conclusion, BLI with a red-shifted firefly luciferase was found to be a powerful tool for testing the fate of C. albicans in various mice infection models.

  5. Bioluminescence inhibition assay for the detection of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasley Hamorsky, Krystal; Ensor, C Mark; Dikici, Emre; Pasini, Patrizia; Bachas, Leonidas; Daunert, Sylvia

    2012-09-18

    Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) are an important class of contaminants that mainly originate from polychlorinated biphenyl metabolism. They may conceivably be as dangerous and persistent as the parent compounds; most prominently, OH-PCBs are endocrine disruptors. Due to increasing evidence of the presence of OH-PCBs in the environment and in living organisms, including humans, and of their toxicity, methods of detection for OH-PCBs are needed in the environmental and medical fields. Herein, we describe the development and optimization of a protein-based inhibition assay for the quantification of OH-PCBs. Specifically, the photoprotein aequorin was utilized for the detection of OH-PCBs. We hypothesized that OH-PCBs interact with aequorin, and we established that OH-PCBs actually inhibit the bioluminescence of aequorin in a dose-dependent manner. We took advantage of this phenomenon to develop an assay that is capable of detecting a wide variety of OH-PCBs with a range of detection limits, the best detection limit being 11 nM for the compound 2-hydroxy-2',3,4',5',6-pentachorobiphenyl. The viability of this system for the screening of OH-PCBs in spiked biological and environmental samples was also established. We envision the implementation of this novel bioluminescence inhibition assay as a rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective method for monitoring OH-PCBs. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time aequorin has been employed to detect an analyte by the inhibition of its bioluminescence reaction. Hence, this strategy may prove to be a general approach for the development of a new generation of protein-based inhibition assays.

  6. Positron emission tomography and gene therapy: basic concepts and experimental approaches for in vivo gene expression imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, Iván; Boán, JoséF; Martí-Climent, Josep M; Sangro, Bruno; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Prieto, Jesús; Richter, José A

    2004-01-01

    More than two decades of intense research have allowed gene therapy to move from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where its use for the treatment of human pathologies has been considerably increased in the last years. However, many crucial questions remain to be solved in this challenging field. In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) by combination of the appropriate PET reporter gene and PET reporter probe could provide invaluable qualitative and quantitative information to answer multiple unsolved questions about gene therapy. PET imaging could be used to define parameters not available by other techniques that are of substantial interest not only for the proper understanding of the gene therapy process, but also for its future development and clinical application in humans. This review focuses on the molecular biology basis of gene therapy and molecular imaging, describing the fundamentals of in vivo gene expression imaging by PET, and the application of PET to gene therapy, as a technology that can be used in many different ways. It could be applied to avoid invasive procedures for gene therapy monitoring; accurately diagnose the pathology for better planning of the most adequate therapeutic approach; as treatment evaluation to image the functional effects of gene therapy at the biochemical level; as a quantitative noninvasive way to monitor the location, magnitude and persistence of gene expression over time; and would also help to a better understanding of vector biology and pharmacology devoted to the development of safer and more efficient vectors.

  7. Using Positron Emission Tomography with [18F]FDG to Predict Tumor Behavior in Experimental Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M. Burt

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between FDG uptake as determined by positron emission tomography (PET imaging and rates of tumor growth, cellular GLUT1 transporter density, and the activities of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase in a solid tumor implant model. Five different human colorectal xenografts of different growth properties were implanted in athymic rats and evaluated by dynamic 18F-FDG-PET. The phosphorylating and dephosphorylating activities of the key glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase, were measured in these tumor types by spectrophotometric assays and the expression of GLUT1 glucose transporter protein was determined by immunohistochemistry. Correlations among FDG accumulation, hexokinase activity, and tumor doubling time are reported in these colon xenografts. The results indicate that the activity of tumor hexokinase may be a marker of tumor growth rate that can be determined by 18F-FDG-PET imaging. PET scanning may not only be a useful tool for staging patients for extent of disease, but may provide important prognostic information concerning the proliferative rates of malignancies.

  8. Assessing laser-tissue damage with bioluminescent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Gerald J; Opalenik, Susan R; Beckham, Joshua T; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Jansen, E Duco

    2006-01-01

    Effective medical laser procedures are achieved by selecting laser parameters that minimize undesirable tissue damage. Traditionally, human subjects, animal models, and monolayer cell cultures have been used to study wound healing, tissue damage, and cellular effects of laser radiation. Each of these models has significant limitations, and consequently, a novel skin model is needed. To this end, a highly reproducible human skin model that enables noninvasive and longitudinal studies of gene expression was sought. In this study, we present an organotypic raft model (engineered skin) used in combination with bioluminescent imaging (BLI) techniques. The efficacy of the raft model was validated and characterized by investigating the role of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as a sensitive marker of thermal damage. The raft model consists of human cells incorporated into an extracellular matrix. The raft cultures were transfected with an adenovirus containing a murine hsp70 promoter driving transcription of luciferase. The model enables quantitative analysis of spatiotemporal expression of proteins using BLI. Thermal stress was induced on the raft cultures by means of a constant temperature water bath or with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (lambda=10.6 microm, 0.679 to 2.262 Wcm2, cw, unfocused Gaussian beam, omegaL=4.5 mm, 1 min exposure). The bioluminescence was monitored noninvasively with an IVIS 100 Bioluminescent Imaging System. BLI indicated that peak hsp70 expression occurs 4 to 12 h after exposure to thermal stress. A minimum irradiance of 0.679 Wcm2 activated the hsp70 response, and a higher irradiance of 2.262 Wcm2 was associated with a severe reduction in hsp70 response due to tissue ablation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hsp70 mRNA levels increased with prolonged heating exposures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent protein assays confirmed that luciferase was an accurate surrogate for hsp70 intracellular protein levels. Hematoxylin

  9. Micro-modulated luminescence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Imaging depth of optical microscopy has been fundamentally limited to millimeter or sub-millimeter due to light scattering. X-ray microscopy can resolve spatial details of few microns deeply inside a sample but the contrast resolution is still inadequate to depict heterogeneous features at cellular or sub-cellular levels. To enhance and enrich biological contrast at large imaging depth, various nanoparticles are introduced and become essential to basic research and molecular medicine. Nanoparticles can be functionalized as imaging probes, similar to fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins. LiGa5O8:Cr3+ nanoparticles were recently synthesized to facilitate luminescence energy storage with x-ray pre-excitation and the subsequently stimulated luminescence emission by visible/near-infrared (NIR) light. In this paper, we suggest a micro-modulated luminescence tomography (MLT) approach to quantify a nanophosphor distribution in a thick biological sample with high resolution. Our numerical simulation studies demonst...

  10. Novel experimental technique for 3D investigation of high-speed cavitating diesel fuel flows by X-ray micro computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, M.; Mitroglou, N.; Santini, M.; Gavaises, M.

    2017-03-01

    An experimental technique for the estimation of the temporal-averaged vapour volume fraction within high-speed cavitating flow orifices is presented. The scientific instrument is designed to employ X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) as a quantitative 3D measuring technique applied to custom designed, large-scale, orifice-type flow channels made from Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK). The attenuation of the ionising electromagnetic radiation by the fluid under examination depends on its local density; the transmitted radiation through the cavitation volume is compared to the incident radiation, and combination of radiographies from sufficient number of angles leads to the reconstruction of attenuation coefficients versus the spatial position. This results to a 3D volume fraction distribution measurement of the developing multiphase flow. The experimental results obtained are compared against the high speed shadowgraph visualisation images obtained in an optically transparent nozzle with identical injection geometry; comparison between the temporal mean image and the microCT reconstruction shows excellent agreement. At the same time, the real 3D internal channel geometry (possibly eroded) has been measured and compared to the nominal manufacturing CAD drawing of the test nozzle.

  11. Aequorin fusion proteins as bioluminescent tracers for competitive immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirasoli, Mara; Michelini, Elisa; Deo, Sapna K.; Dikici, Emre; Roda, Aldo; Daunert, Sylvia

    2004-06-01

    The use of bio- and chemiluminescence for the development of quantitative binding assays offers undoubted advantages over other detection systems, such as spectrophotometry, fluorescence, or radioactivity. Indeed, bio- and chemiluminescence detection provides similar, or even better, sensitivity and detectability than radioisotopes, while avoiding the problems of health hazards, waste disposal, and instability associated with the use of radioisotopes. Among bioluminescent labels, the calcium-activated photoprotein aequorin, originally isolated from Aequorea victoria and today available as a recombinant product, is characterized by very high detectability, down to attomole levels. It has been used as a bioluminescent label for developing a variety of highly sensitive immunoassays, using various analyte-aequorin conjugation strategies. When the analyte is a protein or a peptide, genetic engineering techniques can be used to produce protein fusions where the analyte is in-frame fused with aequorin, thus producing homogeneous one-to-one conjugation products, available in virtually unlimited amount. Various assays were developed using this strategy: a short review of the most interesting applications is presented, as well as the cloning, purification and initial characterization of an endothelin-1-aequorin conjugate suitable for developing a competitive immunoassay for endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, involved in hypertension.

  12. Smartphone-based low light detection for bioluminescence application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Huisung; Jung, Youngkee; Doh, Iyll-Joon; Lozano-Mahecha, Roxana Andrea; Applegate, Bruce; Bae, Euiwon

    2017-01-01

    We report a smartphone-based device and associated imaging-processing algorithm to maximize the sensitivity of standard smartphone cameras, that can detect the presence of single-digit pW of radiant flux intensity. The proposed hardware and software, called bioluminescent-based analyte quantitation by smartphone (BAQS), provides an opportunity for onsite analysis and quantitation of luminescent signals from biological and non-biological sensing elements which emit photons in response to an analyte. A simple cradle that houses the smartphone, sample tube, and collection lens supports the measuring platform, while noise reduction by ensemble averaging simultaneously lowers the background and enhances the signal from emitted photons. Five different types of smartphones, both Android and iOS devices, were tested, and the top two candidates were used to evaluate luminescence from the bioluminescent reporter Pseudomonas fluorescens M3A. The best results were achieved by OnePlus One (android), which was able to detect luminescence from ~106 CFU/mL of the bio-reporter, which corresponds to ~107 photons/s with 180 seconds of integration time.

  13. [ATP pool and bioluminescence in psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekserova, L É; Alenina, K A; Efremenko, E N; Mazhul', M M; Piskunova, N F; Ismailov, A D

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence activity and ATP pool were investigated in the culture of psychrophilic bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum collected-from the exponential and stationary growth phases, as well as immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel. In liquid culture, ATP pool remained at an almost a constant level throughout the luminescence cycle (over 100 h). The ATP pool in the stationary-phase and PVA-immobilizedl cells remained constant throughout their incubation in the medium (over 200 h) and in 3% NaCl solution (over 100 h): Quantitative assessment of integral photon yield and ATP pool indicated that bioluminescence decay in growing or stationary cells was not caused by limitation by the energy substrates of the luciferase reaction. Kinetic and quantitative parameters of emission activity and ATP pool excluded the possibility of formation of the aldehyde substrate for luciferase via reduction of the relevant fatty acids in NADPH and ATP-dependent reductase reaction and its oxidation in the monooxygenase reaction. Our results indicate that the aliphatic aldehyde is not utilized in the process of light emission.

  14. Symplectin evolved from multiple duplications in bioluminescent squid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren R. Francis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The squid Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis, formerly Symplectoteuthis oualaniensis, generates light using the luciferin coelenterazine and a unique enzyme, symplectin. Genetic information is limited for bioluminescent cephalopod species, so many proteins, including symplectin, occur in public databases only as sequence isolates with few identifiable homologs. As the distribution of the symplectin/pantetheinase protein family in Metazoa remains mostly unexplored, we have sequenced the transcriptomes of four additional luminous squid, and make use of publicly available but unanalyzed data of other cephalopods, to examine the occurrence and evolution of this protein family. While the majority of spiralians have one or two copies of this protein family, four well-supported groups of proteins are found in cephalopods, one of which corresponds to symplectin. A cysteine that is critical for symplectin functioning is conserved across essentially all members of the protein family, even those unlikely to be used for bioluminescence. Conversely, active site residues involved in pantetheinase catalysis are also conserved across essentially all of these proteins, suggesting that symplectin may have multiple functions including hydrolase activity, and that the evolution of the luminous phenotype required other changes in the protein outside of the main binding pocket.

  15. Real-time bioluminescence imaging of mixed mycobacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MiHee Chang

    Full Text Available Molecular analysis of infectious processes in bacteria normally involves construction of isogenic mutants that can then be compared to wild type in an animal model. Pathogenesis and antimicrobial studies are complicated by variability between animals and the need to sacrifice individual animals at specific time points. Live animal imaging allows real-time analysis of infections without the need to sacrifice animals, allowing quantitative data to be collected at multiple time points in all organs simultaneously. However, imaging has not previously allowed simultaneous imaging of both mutant and wild type strains of mycobacteria in the same animal. We address this problem by using both firefly (Photinus pyralis and click beetle (Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus red luciferases, which emit distinct bioluminescent spectra, allowing simultaneous imaging of two different mycobacterial strains during infection. We also demonstrate that these same bioluminescence reporters can be used to evaluate therapeutic efficacy in real-time, greatly facilitating our ability to screen novel antibiotics as they are developed. Due to the slow growth rate of mycobacteria, novel imaging technologies are a pressing need, since they can they can impact the rate of development of new therapeutics as well as improving our understanding of virulence mechanisms and the evaluation of novel vaccine candidates.

  16. Random mutagenesis of Luciola mingrelica firefly luciferase. Mutant enzymes with bioluminescence spectra showing low pH sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koksharov, M I; Ugarova, N N

    2008-08-01

    Most firefly luciferases demonstrate a strong pH-dependence of bioluminescence spectra. Gene region encoding first 225 residues of Luciola mingrelica luciferase was subjected to random mutagenesis, and four mutants with altered pH-sensitivity of bioluminescence spectra were isolated. F16L substitution showed distinctly lower pH-dependence of bioluminescence spectra, and Y35N,H and F16L/A40S substitutions resulted in the enzymes with bioluminescence spectra virtually independent from pH in the range of 6.0-7.8. The structural explanation is proposed for the effect of mutations on pH-sensitivity of bioluminescence spectra.

  17. Adaptive quantum tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straupe, S. S.

    2016-10-01

    We provide a review of the experimental and theoretical research in the field of quantum tomography with an emphasis on recently developed adaptive protocols. Several statistical frameworks for adaptive experimental design are discussed. We argue in favor of the Bayesian approach, highlighting both its advantages for a statistical reconstruction of unknown quantum states and processes, and utility for adaptive experimental design. The discussion is supported by an analysis of several recent experimental implementations and numerical recipes.

  18. Quantification of bioluminescence from the surface to the deep sea demonstrates its predominance as an ecological trait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Séverine; Haddock, Steven H. D.

    2017-04-01

    The capability of animals to emit light, called bioluminescence, is considered to be a major factor in ecological interactions. Because it occurs across diverse taxa, measurements of bioluminescence can be powerful to detect and quantify organisms in the ocean. In this study, 17 years of video observations were recorded by remotely operated vehicles during surveys off the California Coast, from the surface down to 3,900 m depth. More than 350,000 observations are classified for their bioluminescence capability based on literature descriptions. The organisms represented 553 phylogenetic concepts (species, genera or families, at the most precise taxonomic level defined from the images), distributed within 13 broader taxonomic categories. The importance of bioluminescent marine taxa is highlighted in the water column, as we showed that 76% of the observed individuals have bioluminescence capability. More than 97% of Cnidarians were bioluminescent, and 9 of the 13 taxonomic categories were found to be bioluminescent dominant. The percentage of bioluminescent animals is remarkably uniform over depth. Moreover, the proportion of bioluminescent and non-bioluminescent animals within taxonomic groups changes with depth for Ctenophora, Scyphozoa, Chaetognatha, and Crustacea. Given these results, bioluminescence has to be considered an important ecological trait from the surface to the deep-sea.

  19. Foraging in the darkness of the Southern Ocean: influence of bioluminescence on a deep diving predator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Vacquié-Garcia

    Full Text Available How non-echolocating deep diving marine predators locate their prey while foraging remains mostly unknown. Female southern elephant seals (SES (Mirounga leonina have vision adapted to low intensity light with a peak sensitivity at 485 nm. This matches the wavelength of bioluminescence produced by a large range of marine organisms including myctophid fish, SES's main prey. In this study, we investigated whether bioluminescence provides an accurate estimate of prey occurrence for SES. To do so, four SES were satellite-tracked during their post-breeding foraging trip and were equipped with Time-Depth-Recorders that also recorded light levels every two seconds. A total of 3386 dives were processed through a light-treatment model that detected light events higher than ambient level, i.e. bioluminescence events. The number of bioluminescence events was related to an index of foraging intensity for SES dives deep enough to avoid the influence of natural ambient light. The occurrence of bioluminescence was found to be negatively related to depth both at night and day. Foraging intensity was also positively related to bioluminescence both during day and night. This result suggests that bioluminescence likely provides SES with valuable indications of prey occurrence and might be a key element in predator-prey interactions in deep-dark marine environments.

  20. Light emission miracle in the sea and preeminent applications of bioluminescence in recent new biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Sana; Homaei, Ahmad; Hemmati, Roohullah; Khajeh, Khosro

    2017-07-01

    Bioluminescence is referred to the light emission by a living organism due to a specific biochemical reaction. This interesting feature of the organisms could highly influences behavioral and ecosystem dynamics. Luminescence, mostly observed in marine species, is generally higher in deep-living genera than in benthic or shallow organisms. However, among creatures living in land, fireflies, beetles, springtails and fungi have shown some bioluminescent activities. Classically, the emission of light is catalyzed by luciferase from a substrate. Interestingly, light-emitting organisms are more abundant and widespread in marine than terrestrial environments. Novel tools derived from understanding bioluminescent reactions have led to countless valuable applications in modern biotechnology and biochemical engineering. Here, we overview some main properties bioluminescence in marine organism from bacteria to fishes following the latest advances and new discoveries of state-of-the-art bioluminescent tools in molecular biology, bioluminescent bioassays and imaging. The overview showed available and wide biotechnological tools of bioluminescence take advantage of its high detectability, high sensitive, low toxic and quantum efficiency which make wide usage as reporter of many biological functions in different fields, such as studying bacterial pathogens, ecotoxicology, food toxicity, tracking cells of interest in vivo, protein-protein interactions, gene expression and circadian rhythms. With the recent invention of luminescent reporters, future possibilities for the development of additional reporter applications are promising. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quorum sensing influences Vibrio harveyi growth rates in a manner not fully accounted for by the marker effect of bioluminescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeena E Nackerdien

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy.The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh strains altered in quorum sensing on the one hand, and bioluminescence on the other. By hypothesis, growth rate is energy limited: mutants deficient in quorum sensing grow faster because wild type quorum sensing unleashes bioluminescence and bioluminescence diverts energy. Findings reported here confirm a role for bioluminescence in limiting Vh growth rate, at least under the conditions tested. However, the results argue that the bioluminescence is insufficient to explain the relationship of growth rate and quorum sensing in Vh. A Vh mutant null for all genes encoding the bioluminescence pathway grew faster than wild type but not as fast as null mutants in quorum sensing. Vh quorum sensing mutants showed altered growth rates that do not always rank with their relative increase or decrease in bioluminescence. In addition, the cell-free culture fluids of a rapidly growing Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp strain increased the growth rate of wild type Vh without significantly altering Vh's bioluminescence. The same cell-free culture fluid increased the bioluminescence of Vh quorum mutants.The effect of quorum sensing on Vh growth rate can be either positive or negative and includes both bioluminescence-dependent and independent components. Bioluminescence tends to slow growth rate but not enough to account for the effects of quorum sensing on growth rate.

  2. Development of a bioluminescence assay for aldehyde pheromones of insects : II. Analysis of pheromone glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, G G; Slessor, K N; Szittner, R B; Morse, D; Meighen, E A

    1982-06-01

    Pheromone levels in the glands of individual female moths of the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana), the western spruce budworm (C. occidentalis), the navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella), and the corn earworm (Heliothis zea) were quantitively measured by means of a new bacterial bioluminescence assay specific for aldehydes. The sensitivity and rapidity of the bioluminescent assay enabled studies to be conducted on the dependence of the pheromone levels in the spruce budworm on age and the effect of photoperiod on the pheromone levels in the corn earworm. The bioluminescence assay provides a rapid and sensitive approach for studying aldehyde pheromone levels and their regulation in insects.

  3. Ultraweak bioluminescence dynamics and singlet oxygen correlations during injury repair in sweet potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossu, Marius; Ma, Lun; Chen, Wei

    2011-03-01

    Ultraweak bioluminescence at the level of hundreds of photons per second per square centimeter after cutting injury of sweet potato was investigated. A small emission peak immediate after cutting and a later and higher peak were observed. Selective singlet oxygen inhibitors and sensors have been use to study the contribution of singlet oxygen during the curing process, demonstrating increased presence of singlet oxygen during and after the late bioemission peak. It was confirmed that singlet oxygen has direct contribution to ultraweak bioluminescence but also induces the formation of other exited luminescent species that are responsible for the recorded bioluminescence.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  5. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenhagen, Jason Alan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca2+ imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca2+ signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K+ and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol

  6. Measurement of density distribution of a cracking catalyst in experimental riser with a sampling procedure for gamma ray tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, C.C. [Department of Nuclear Energy, Federal University of Pernambuco - UFPE, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, CDU 50740-540 Recife, PE (Brazil)], E-mail: ccd@ufpe.br; Melo, S.B.; Oliveira, E.F.; Simoes, F.P.M.; Santos, M.G. dos [Informatic Center CIN, Federal University of Pernambuco - UFPE, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, CDU 50740-540 Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, V.A. dos [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Pernambuco - UNICAP, Rua do Principe 526, Boa Vista, 50050-900 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-03-15

    By scanning a riser the number of the gamma ray trajectories and the beam width involve temporal, spatial and density resolutions as they are closely correlated parameters. Therefore, evaluation of parameters and their interaction quantification, certainly, are required in the imaging process. Measuring the density distribution of the catalyst from the FCC - fluid cracking catalytic process in an experimental riser in single beam tomographic system, density resolution is evaluated and correlated with spatial resolution. The beam width {delta}s inside riser is measured and a criterion for determining spatial resolution is proposed. Experiments are carried out to demonstrate resolution effects of three {delta}s values: 3.30 x 10{sup -3}, 6.20 x 10{sup -3} and 12.00 x 10{sup -3} m. The gamma beam profile is modeled and a sampling rate according to Nyquist criterion is analyzed. The 4.3%, 8.1% and 15.6% ratios of {delta}s/R to internal riser radius are correlated to counting time in the sampling procedure. Results are discussed by comparison with values from literature.

  7. Measurement of density distribution of a cracking catalyst in experimental riser with a sampling procedure for gamma ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, C. C.; Melo, S. B.; Oliveira, E. F.; Simões, F. P. M.; dos Santos, M. G.; dos Santos, V. A.

    2008-03-01

    By scanning a riser the number of the gamma ray trajectories and the beam width involve temporal, spatial and density resolutions as they are closely correlated parameters. Therefore, evaluation of parameters and their interaction quantification, certainly, are required in the imaging process. Measuring the density distribution of the catalyst from the FCC - fluid cracking catalytic process in an experimental riser in single beam tomographic system, density resolution is evaluated and correlated with spatial resolution. The beam width Δs inside riser is measured and a criterion for determining spatial resolution is proposed. Experiments are carried out to demonstrate resolution effects of three Δs values: 3.30 × 10-3, 6.20 × 10-3 and 12.00 × 10-3 m. The gamma beam profile is modeled and a sampling rate according to Nyquist criterion is analyzed. The 4.3%, 8.1% and 15.6% ratios of Δs/R to internal riser radius are correlated to counting time in the sampling procedure. Results are discussed by comparison with values from literature.

  8. Experimental verification of stopping-power prediction from single- and dual-energy computed tomography in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhler, Christian; Russ, Tom; Wohlfahrt, Patrick; Elter, Alina; Runz, Armin; Richter, Christian; Greilich, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    An experimental setup for consecutive measurement of ion and x-ray absorption in tissue or other materials is introduced. With this setup using a 3D-printed sample container, the reference stopping-power ratio (SPR) of materials can be measured with an uncertainty of below 0.1%. A total of 65 porcine and bovine tissue samples were prepared for measurement, comprising five samples each of 13 tissue types representing about 80% of the total body mass (three different muscle and fatty tissues, liver, kidney, brain, heart, blood, lung and bone). Using a standard stoichiometric calibration for single-energy CT (SECT) as well as a state-of-the-art dual-energy CT (DECT) approach, SPR was predicted for all tissues and then compared to the measured reference. With the SECT approach, the SPRs of all tissues were predicted with a mean error of (‑0.84  ±  0.12)% and a mean absolute error of (1.27  ±  0.12)%. In contrast, the DECT-based SPR predictions were overall consistent with the measured reference with a mean error of (‑0.02  ±  0.15)% and a mean absolute error of (0.10  ±  0.15)%. Thus, in this study, the potential of DECT to decrease range uncertainty could be confirmed in biological tissue.

  9. Copper toxicity to bioluminescent Nitrosomonas europaea in soil is explained by the free metal ion activity in pore water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ore, S; Mertens, J; Brandt, K K; Smolders, E

    2010-12-01

    The terrestrial biotic ligand model (BLM) for metal toxicity in soil postulates that metal toxicity depends on the free metal ion activity in solution and on ions competing for metal sorption to the biotic ligand. Unequivocal evidence for the BLM assumptions is most difficult to obtain for native soil microorganisms because the abiotic and biotic compartments cannot be experimentally separated. Here, we report copper (Cu) toxicity to a bioluminescent Nitrosomonas europaea reporter strain that was used in a solid phase-contact assay and in corresponding soil extracts and artificial soil solutions. The Cu(2+) ion activities that halve bioluminescence (EC50) in artificial solutions ranged 10(-5) to 10(-7) M and increased with increasing activities of H(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) according to the BLM concept. The solution based Cu(2+) EC50 values of N. europaea in six contaminated soils ranged 2 × 10(-6) to 2 × 10(-9) M and these thresholds for both solid phase or soil extract based assays were well predicted by the ion competition model fitted to artificial solution data. In addition, solution based Cu(2+) EC50 of the solid phase-contact assay were never smaller than corresponding values in soil extracts suggesting no additional solid phase toxic route. By restricting the analysis to the same added species, we show that the Cu(2+) in solution represents the toxic species to this bacterium.

  10. Transfection efficiency of normal and cancer cell lines and monitoring of promoter activity by single-cell bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibe, Tomohisa; Torisawa, Aya; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Kawakami, Koji

    2014-02-01

    The bioluminescence system (luciferase reporter assay system) is widely used to study gene expression, signal transduction and other cellular activities. Although transfection of reporter plasmid DNA to mammalian cell lines is an indispensable experimental step, the transfection efficiency of DNA varies among cell lines, and several cell lines are not suitable for this type of assay because of the low transfection efficiency. In this study, we confirm the transfection efficiency of reporter DNA to several cancer and normal cell lines after transient transfection by single-cell imaging. Luminescence images could be obtained from living single cells after transient transfection, and the calculated transfection efficiency of this method was similar to that of the conventional reporter assay using a luminometer. We attempted to measure the activity of the Bip promoter under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions using both high and low transfection efficiency cells for plasmid DNA at the single-cell level, and observed activation of this promoter even in cells with the lowest transfection efficiency. These results show that bioluminescence imaging of single cells is a powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression based on a reporter assay using limited samples such as clinical specimens or cells from primary culture, and could provide additional information compared with the conventional assay. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurav Z. K. Sajib

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  12. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr; Woo, Eung Je, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447 (Korea, Republic of); Kyung, Eun Jung [Department of Pharmacology, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Bum [Department of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh In [Department of Mathematics, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  13. Bioluminescence immunoassay for angiotensin II using aequorin as a label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaoge; Deo, Sapna K; Dikici, Emre; Ensor, Mark; Poon, Michael; Daunert, Sylvia

    2007-12-15

    Angiotensin II is a biologically active component of the renin-angiotensin system. High levels of angiotensin II may be responsible for hypertension and heart failure because they increase systemic vascular resistance, arterial pressure, and sodium and fluid retention. Therefore, it is important to monitor angiotensin II levels for the treatment of hypertension and heart diseases. The goal of this work was to develop a bioluminescence immunoassay using aequorin as a label to measure angiotensin II levels in human plasma. This method utilizes a genetically engineered fusion protein between angiotensin II and aequorin. For that, the C terminus of angiotensin II was fused to the N terminus of apoaequorin using molecular biology techniques. A heterogeneous immunoassay was then developed for the determination of angiotensin II. A detection limit of 1 pg/mL was obtained with the optimized assay, allowing for the determination of angiotensin II at physiological levels in human plasma.

  14. Luminol-based bioluminescence imaging of mouse mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshetaiwi, Hamad S; Balivada, Sivasai; Shrestha, Tej B; Pyle, Marla; Basel, Matthew T; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2013-10-05

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant circulating blood leukocytes. They are part of the innate immune system and provide a first line of defense by migrating toward areas of inflammation in response to chemical signals released from the site. Some solid tumors, such as breast cancer, also cause recruitment and activation of PMNs and release of myeloperoxidase. In this study, we demonstrate that administration of luminol to mice that have been transplanted with 4T1 mammary tumor cells permits the detection of myeloperoxidase activity, and consequently, the location of the tumor. Luminol allowed detection of activated PMNs only two days after cancer cell transplantation, even though tumors were not yet palpable. In conclusion, luminol-bioluminescence imaging (BLI) can provide a pathway towards detection of solid tumors at an early stage in preclinical tumor models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Real-Time Bioluminescent Tracking of Cellular Population Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, Dan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL; Xu, Tingting [ORNL; Ripp, Steven Anthony [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods.

  16. Real-time bioluminescent tracking of cellular population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Cellular population dynamics are routinely monitored across many diverse fields for a variety of purposes. In general, these dynamics are assayed either through the direct counting of cellular aliquots followed by extrapolation to the total population size, or through the monitoring of signal intensity from any number of externally stimulated reporter proteins. While both viable methods, here we describe a novel technique that allows for the automated, non-destructive tracking of cellular population dynamics in real-time. This method, which relies on the detection of a continuous bioluminescent signal produced through expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette, provides a low cost, low time-intensive means for generating additional data compared to alternative methods.

  17. Development of a Bioluminescent Nitroreductase Probe for Preclinical Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzhelika G Vorobyeva

    Full Text Available Bacterial nitroreductases (NTRs have been widely utilized in the development of novel antibiotics, degradation of pollutants, and gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT of cancer that reached clinical trials. In case of GDEPT, since NTR is not naturally present in mammalian cells, the prodrug is activated selectively in NTR-transformed cancer cells, allowing high efficiency treatment of tumors. Currently, no bioluminescent probes exist for sensitive, non-invasive imaging of NTR expression. We therefore developed a "NTR caged luciferin" (NCL probe that is selectively reduced by NTR, producing light proportional to the NTR activity. Here we report successful application of this probe for imaging of NTR in vitro, in bacteria and cancer cells, as well as in vivo in mouse models of bacterial infection and NTR-expressing tumor xenografts. This novel tool should significantly accelerate the development of cancer therapy approaches based on GDEPT and other fields where NTR expression is important.

  18. Development of a Bioluminescent Nitroreductase Probe for Preclinical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyeva, Anzhelika G; Stanton, Michael; Godinat, Aurélien; Lund, Kjetil B; Karateev, Grigory G; Francis, Kevin P; Allen, Elizabeth; Gelovani, Juri G; McCormack, Emmet; Tangney, Mark; Dubikovskaya, Elena A

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial nitroreductases (NTRs) have been widely utilized in the development of novel antibiotics, degradation of pollutants, and gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) of cancer that reached clinical trials. In case of GDEPT, since NTR is not naturally present in mammalian cells, the prodrug is activated selectively in NTR-transformed cancer cells, allowing high efficiency treatment of tumors. Currently, no bioluminescent probes exist for sensitive, non-invasive imaging of NTR expression. We therefore developed a "NTR caged luciferin" (NCL) probe that is selectively reduced by NTR, producing light proportional to the NTR activity. Here we report successful application of this probe for imaging of NTR in vitro, in bacteria and cancer cells, as well as in vivo in mouse models of bacterial infection and NTR-expressing tumor xenografts. This novel tool should significantly accelerate the development of cancer therapy approaches based on GDEPT and other fields where NTR expression is important.

  19. Enhanced beetle luciferase for high-resolution bioluminescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Nakajima

    Full Text Available We developed an enhanced green-emitting luciferase (ELuc to be used as a bioluminescence imaging (BLI probe. ELuc exhibits a light signal in mammalian cells that is over 10-fold stronger than that of the firefly luciferase (FLuc, which is the most widely used luciferase reporter gene. We showed that ELuc produces a strong light signal in primary cells and tissues and that it enables the visualization of gene expression with high temporal resolution at the single-cell level. Moreover, we successfully imaged the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of importin alpha by fusing ELuc at the intracellular level. These results demonstrate that the use of ELuc allows a BLI spatiotemporal resolution far greater than that provided by FLuc.

  20. Detection of dichloromethane with a bioluminescent (lux) bacterial bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Nicholas; Hawkins, Shawn A; Jegier, Patricia; Menn, Fu-Min; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research effort was to develop an autonomous, inducible, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter for the real-time detection of dichloromethane. Dichloromethane (DCM), also known as methylene chloride, is a volatile organic compound and one of the most commonly used halogenated solvents in the U.S., with applications ranging from grease and paint stripping to aerosol propellants and pharmaceutical tablet coatings. Predictably, it is released into the environment where it contaminates air and water resources. Due to its classification as a probable human carcinogen, hepatic toxin, and central nervous system effector, DCM must be carefully monitored and controlled. Methods for DCM detection usually rely on analytical techniques such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and capillary gas chromatography or photoacoustic environmental monitors, all of which require trained personnel and/or expensive equipment. To complement conventional monitoring practices, we have created a bioreporter for the self-directed detection of DCM by taking advantage of the evolutionary adaptation of bacteria to recognize and metabolize chemical agents. This bioreporter, Methylobacterium extorquens DCM( lux ), was engineered to contain a bioluminescent luxCDABE gene cassette derived from Photorhabdus luminescens fused downstream to the dcm dehalogenase operon, which causes the organism to generate visible light when exposed to DCM. We have demonstrated detection limits down to 1.0 ppm under vapor phase exposures and 0.1 ppm under liquid phase exposures with response times of 2.3 and 1.3 h, respectively, and with specificity towards DCM under relevant industrial environmental monitoring conditions.

  1. Adaptive quantum tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Straupe, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    We provide a review of the experimental and theoretical research in the field of quantum tomography with an emphasis on recently developed adaptive protocols. Several statistical frameworks for adaptive experimental design are discussed. We argue in favor of the Bayesian approach, highlighting both its advantages for a statistical reconstruction of unknown quantum states and processes, and utility for adaptive experimental design. The discussion is supported by an analysis of several recent e...

  2. Submersible Data (Dive Trackpoints) for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the Johnson Sea Link II during sixteen dives of the "Bioluminescence 2009" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and...

  3. Submersible Data (Dive Waypoints) for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data and information collected by the submersible Johnson Sea-Link II at waypoints along its track during seventeen dives of the 2009 "Bioluminescence" expedition...

  4. Bacterial bioluminescence response to long-term exposure to reverse osmosis treated effluents from dye industries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, J.; Manikandan, B.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Francis, K.X.; ManiMurali, R.; Vethamony, P.

    chemical composition sampled from various dye industries. Bioluminescent bacteria were cultured in the RO reject samples, at different concentrations, and their growth rate and luminescence was measured for 24 h. The RO reject samples caused sublethal...

  5. Stimulable and spontaneous bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellates, Pyrodinium bahamense, Gonyaulax polyedra, and Pyrocystis lunula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggley, W H; Swift, E; Buchanan, R J; Seliger, H H

    1969-07-01

    P. bahamense, G. polyedra, and P. lunula exhibit interspecies differences in stimulable and spontaneous bioluminescence. For each species the total number of photons that can be emitted upon mechanical stimulation is a constant, regardless of the time during scotophase at which stimulation occurs. Ratios of stimulable bioluminescence per organism during scotophase and photophase are as high as 950:1 for laboratory cultures and have been observed as high as 4000: 1 for natural populations of P. bahamense. Spontaneous emission in darkness shows flashing as well as low-level continuous emission. Natural populations of P. bahamense, placed in darkness during natural photophase, exhibit a dual character to their stimulable bioluminescence. Mechanical stimulation techniques are described for rapid and reproducible stimulation of bioluminescence.

  6. Bioluminescent luciferase-modified magnetic nanoparticles as potential imaging agents for mammalian spermatozoa detection and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Nanoparticles have emerged as key materials for developing applications in nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, bioimaging and theranostics. Existing bioimaging technologies include bioluminescent resonance energy transfer-conjugated quantum dots (BRET-QDs). Despite the current use of BRET-Q...

  7. Ship Sensor Observations for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly measurements made by selected ship sensors on the R/V Seward Johnson during the "Bioluminescence 2009" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and...

  8. Ship track for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ship track of the R/V Seward Johnson during the "Bioluminescence 2009" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of...

  9. Dive Activities for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about dive activities were recorded by personnel during the "Bioluminescence 2009" expedition, July 20 through 31, 2009. Additional information was...

  10. Rapid Analysis of Eukaryotic Bioluminescence to Assess Potential Groundwater Contamination Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacariah L. Hildenbrand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present data using a bioluminescent dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis lunula, in a toxicological bioassay to rapidly assess potential instances of groundwater contamination associated with natural gas extraction. P. lunula bioluminescence can be quantified using spectrophotometry as a measurement of organismal viability, with normal bioluminescent output declining with increasing concentration(s of aqueous toxicants. Glutaraldehyde and hydrochloric acid (HCl, components used in hydraulic fracturing and shale acidization, triggered significant toxicological responses in as little as 4 h. Conversely, P. lunula was not affected by the presence of arsenic, selenium, barium, and strontium, naturally occurring heavy metal ions potentially associated with unconventional drilling activities. If exogenous compounds, such as glutaraldehyde and HCl, are thought to have been introduced into groundwater, quantification of P. lunula bioluminescence after exposure to water samples can serve as a cost-effective detection and risk assessment tool to rapidly assess the impact of putative contamination events attributed to unconventional drilling activity.

  11. Bacterial bioluminescence response to long-term exposure to reverse osmosis treated effluents from dye industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, J; Manikandan, B; Shirodkar, P V; Francis, K X; Mani Murali, R; Vethamony, P

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial bioluminescence assay is one of the novel means for toxicity detection. The bioluminescence response of 2 marine bioluminescent bacteria was tested upon their long-term exposure to 9 different reverse osmosis (RO) rejects with varying chemical composition sampled from various dye industries. Bioluminescent bacteria were cultured in the RO reject samples, at different concentrations, and their growth rate and luminescence was measured for 24 h. The RO reject samples caused sublethal effects upon exposure and retarded the growth of bacteria, confirming their toxic nature. Further, continuation of the exposure showed that the initial luminescence, though reduced, recovered and increased beyond the control cultures irrespective of cell density, and finally decreased once again. The present study emphasizes the need of evolving a long-term exposure assay and shows that the method followed in this study is suitable to evaluate the toxicants that exert delayed toxicity, using lower concentrations of toxicants as well as coloured samples.

  12. [Analysis of the dynamics of bioluminescence intensity of luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, A V; Gromozova, E N; Gretsky, I A

    2015-01-01

    This contribution presents the results of analysis of the dynamics of the bioluminescence of luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum IMV B-7071 under optimal conditions of their growth. A quasi-harmonic nature of the bacterial bioluminescence dynamics was detected. The observed periods of these changes have similar values compared with those in the earlier defined periods of changes in physicochemical properties of water. The relationship between biorhythms and a quasi-harmonic nature of changes in physicochemical properties of water is discussed.

  13. ATP-Bioluminescence as a method to evaluated microbiological quality of UHT milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Cunha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available New approaches are needed to quickly indicate possible contamination of UHT milk, among them the technique of ATP-Bioluminescence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the results of culture methods with the results of ATP-Bioluminescence technique of 102 UHT whole milk samples incubated at 48, 72, and 168 hours. UHT milk samples were analyzed for the presence of mesophilic and psychrotrophic aerobic microorganisms using Plate Count Agar (PCA, Brain-Heart Infusion (BHI media and PetrifilmTM Aerobic Count (AC plates. The ATP-Bioluminescence technique was applied through the Microbial Luminescent Screening (MLS system. Significant correlations were found between counts of aerobic mesophilic microorganisms on PCA, PetrifilmTM AC, BHI and results of ATP bioluminescence technique (P≤0.05. The ATP-Bioluminescence technique had higher correlation with counting method in PCA than BHI media. At lower pass/fail limits of Relative Light Units (60, 50, 45 and 40 RLU, the number of samples identified as positive increased and statistically agreed with aerobic mesophilic microorganism counts (P>0.05. For the dairy industry, the ATP-Bioluminescence technique may become an important tool that assists the official methods to quickly monitor the microbiological quality of UHT milk though this will likely require a threshold below 150 RLU.

  14. ATP bioluminescence rapid detection of total viable count in soy sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shou-Lei; Miao, Su-Na; Deng, Shao-Ya; Zou, Min-Juan; Zhong, Fo-Sheng; Huang, Wen-Biao; Pan, Si-Yi; Wang, Qing-Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence rapid determination method may be useful for enumerating the total viable count (TVC) in soy sauce, as it has been previously used in food and beverages for sanitation with good precision. However, many factors interfere with the correlation between total aerobic plate counts and ATP bioluminescence. This study investigated these interfering factors, including ingredients of soy sauce and bacteria at different physiological stages. Using the ATP bioluminescence method, TVC was obtained within 4 h, compared to 48 h required for the conventional aerobic plate count (APC) method. Our results also indicated a high correlation coefficient (r = 0.90) between total aerobic plate counts and ATP bioluminescence after filtration and resuscitation with special medium. The limit of quantification of the novel detection method is 100 CFU/mL; there is a good linear correlation between the bioluminescence intensity and TVC in soy sauce in the range 1 × 10(2) -3 × 10(4) CFU/mL and even wider. The method employed a luminescence recorder (Tristar LB-941) and 96-well plates and could analyse 50-100 samples simultaneously at low cost. In this study, we evaluated and eliminated the interfering factors and made the ATP bioluminescence rapid method available for enumerating TVC in soy sauce. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Increased bioassay sensitivity of bioactive molecule discovery using metal-enhanced bioluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golberg, Karina, E-mail: karingo@bgu.ac.il; Elbaz, Amit [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering (Israel); McNeil, Ronald [The Institute of Fluorescence, University of Maryland Baltimore County (United States); Kushmaro, Ariel [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering (Israel); Geddes, Chris D. [The Institute of Fluorescence, University of Maryland Baltimore County (United States); Marks, Robert S., E-mail: rsmarks@bgu.ac.il [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering (Israel)

    2014-12-15

    We report the use of bioluminescence signal enhancement via proximity to deposited silver nanoparticles for bioactive compound discovery. This approach employs a whole-cell bioreporter harboring a plasmid-borne fusion of a specific promoter incorporated with a bioluminescence reporter gene. The silver deposition process was first optimized to provide optimal nanoparticle size in the reaction time dependence with fluorescein. The use of silver deposition of 350 nm particles enabled the doubling of the bioluminescent signal amplitude by the bacterial bioreporter when compared to an untouched non-silver-deposited microtiter plate surface. This recording is carried out in the less optimal but necessary far-field distance. SEM micrographs provided a visualization of the proximity of the bioreporter to the silver nanoparticles. The electromagnetic field distributions around the nanoparticles were simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain, further suggesting a re-excitation of non-chemically excited bioluminescence in addition to metal-enhanced bioluminescence. The possibility of an antiseptic silver effect caused by such a close proximity was eliminated disregarded by the dynamic growth curves of the bioreporter strains as seen using viability staining. As a highly attractive biotechnology tool, this silver deposition technique, coupled with whole-cell sensing, enables increased bioluminescence sensitivity, making it especially useful for cases in which reporter luminescence signals are very weak.

  16. A Real-Time Non-invasive Auto-bioluminescent Urinary Bladder Cancer Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bincy Anu; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2017-02-01

    The study was to develop an auto-bioluminescent urinary bladder cancer (UBC) xenograft animal model for pre-clinical research. The study used a humanized, bacteria-originated lux reporter system consisting of six (luxCDABEfrp) genes to express components required for producing bioluminescent signals in human UBC J82, J82-Ras, and SW780 cells without exogenous substrates. Immune-deficient nude mice were inoculated with Lux-expressing UBC cells to develop auto-bioluminescent xenograft tumors that were monitored by imaging and physical examination. Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent J82-Lux, J82-Ras-Lux, and SW780-Lux cell lines were established. Xenograft tumors derived from tumorigenic Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent J82-Ras-Lux cells allowed a serial, non-invasive, real-time monitoring by imaging of tumor development prior to the presence of palpable tumors in animals. Using Lux-expressing auto-bioluminescent tumorigenic cells enabled us to monitor the entire course of xenograft tumor development through tumor cell implantation, adaptation, and growth to visible/palpable tumors in animals.

  17. Bioluminescent virion shells: new tools for quantitation of AAV vector dynamics in cells and live animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokan, A; Johnson, J S; Li, C; Samulski, R J

    2008-12-01

    Current technologies for visualizing infectious pathways of viruses rely on fluorescent labeling of capsid proteins by chemical conjugation or genetic manipulation. For noninvasive in vivo imaging of such agents in mammalian tissue, we engineered bioluminescent Gaussia luciferase-tagged Adeno-associated viral (gLuc/AAV) vectors. The enzyme was incorporated into recombinant AAV serotypes 1, 2 and 8 capsids by fusing to the N-terminus of the VP2 capsid subunit to yield bioluminescent virion shells. The gLuc/AAV vectors were used to quantify kinetics of cell-surface-binding by AAV2 capsids in vitro. Bioluminescent virion shells displayed an exponential decrease in luminescent signal following cellular uptake in vitro. A similar trend was observed following intramuscular injection in vivo, although the rate of decline in bioluminescent signal varied markedly between AAV serotypes. gLuc/AAV1 and gLuc/AAV8 vectors displayed rapid decrease in bioluminescent signal to background levels within 30 min, whereas the signal from gLuc/AAV2 vectors persisted for over 2 h. Bioluminescent virion shells might be particularly useful in quantifying dynamics of viral vector uptake in cells and peripheral tissues in live animals.

  18. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  19. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors Bactérias bioluminescentes: os genes lux como biosensores ambientais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia da Silva Nunes-Halldorson

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in environmental studies, with special emphasis on the Microtox toxicity bioassay. Also, the general ecological significance of bioluminescence will be addressed.Bactérias que emitem bioluminescência são amplamente distribuídas em ambientes naturais. Ao longo dos anos vários pesquisadores vêm estudando a fisiologia, bioquímica e controle genético da bioluminescência. Essas descobertas têm revolucionado a Área de Microbiologia Ambiental através da utilização dos genes lux como biosensores em estudos ambientais. Esta revisão examinará a cronologia de descobertas científicas da bioluminescência bacteriana e as aplicações atuais em estudos ambientais, salientando a utilização do teste de toxicidade Microtox. A significância ecológica da bioluminescência será também examinada.

  20. EF-hand Ca 2+-binding bioluminescent proteins: effects of mutations and alternative divalent cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Laura; Ensor, Mark; Daunert, Sylvia

    2007-02-01

    Bioluminescent photoproteins, such as aequorin and obelin, are proteins that emit light upon binding calcium. Aequorin and obelin contain four EF-hand domains arranged into a globular structure. The loop region of these EF-hand domains binds calcium by coordinating it in a pentagonal bipyramidal structure with oxygen atoms. The binding of calcium to these EF-hands causes a slight conformational change in the protein, which leads to the oxidation of the internally sequestered chromophore, coelenterazine, producing coelenteramide and CO II. The excited coelenteramide then relaxes radiatively, emitting bioluminescence at 471 nm in aequorin or 491 nm in obelin. Although calcium is the traditional, and generally the most powerful, triggering ligand in this bioluminescence reaction, alternative di- and trivalent cations can also bind to the EF-hand loops and stimulate luminescence. Species capable of this cross-reactivity include: Cd 2+, Ba 2+, Mn 2+, Sr 2+, Mg 2+, and several lanthanides. Magnesium is also known to modulate the bioluminescence of wild-type aequorin, increase its stability, and decrease its aggregation tendency. Both wild-type aequorin and wild-type obelin contain several cysteine residues, aequorin has three and obelin has five. It is believed that these cysteine residues play an important, but as of yet unknown, role in the bioluminescence of these proteins, since mutating most of these residues causes significant loss in bioluminescent activity. In order to explore whether or not these cysteine residues contributed to the specificity of the EF-hand domains for cations we generated four aequorin and obelin mutants and observed their luminescent intensity and decay kinetics by stimulation with calcium, barium, and magnesium. It was found that the cysteine mutations do appear to alter the effects that alternative divalent cations have on the bioluminescence of both aequorin and obelin.

  1. Bioluminescence Imaging of Period1 Gene Expression in Utero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera T. Saxena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of real-time reporters has accelerated our understanding of gene expression in vivo. This study examined the feasibility of a luciferase-based reporter to image spatiotemporal changes in fetal gene expression in utero. We chose to monitor Period1 (Per1 because it is expressed broadly in the body and plays a role in circadian rhythmicity. Using rats carrying a Per1::luc transgene, we repetitively imaged fetuses in utero throughout gestation. We found that bioluminescence was specific to transgenic pups, increased dramatically on embryonic day 10 (10 days after successful mating, and continued to increase logarithmically until birth. Diurnal fluctuations in Per1 expression were apparent several days prior to birth. These results demonstrate the feasibility of in utero imaging of mammalian gene expression, tracking of fetal gene expression from the same litter, and early detection of mammalian clock gene expression. We conclude that luciferase-based reporters can provide a sensitive, noninvasive measure of in utero gene expression.

  2. Screening of potentially hormonally active chemicals using bioluminescent yeast bioreporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanseverino, John; Eldridge, Melanie L; Layton, Alice C; Easter, James P; Yarbrough, Jason; Schultz, Terry Wayne; Sayler, Gary S

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioluminescent bioreporter assays were developed previously to assess a chemical's estrogenic or androgenic disrupting potential. S. cerevisiae BLYES, S. cerevisiae BLYAS, S. cerevisiae BLYR, were used to assess their reproducibility and utility in screening 68, 69, and 71 chemicals for estrogenic, androgenic, and toxic effects, respectively. EC(50) values were 6.3 +/- 2.4 x 10(-10)M (n = 18) and 1.1 +/- 0.5 x 10(-8)M (n = 13) for BLYES and BLYAS, using 17beta-estradiol and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone over concentration ranges of 2.5 x 10(-12) through 1.0 x 10(-6)M, respectively. Based on analysis of replicate standard curves and comparison to background controls, a set of quantitative rules have been formulated to interpret data and determine if a chemical is potentially hormonally active, toxic, both, or neither. The results demonstrated that these assays are applicable for Tier I chemical screening in Environmental Protection Agency's Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Program as well as for monitoring endocrine-disrupting activity of unknown chemicals in water.

  3. Computer-aided photometric analysis of dynamic digital bioluminescent images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Zbigniew; Bembnista, T.; Floryszak-Wieczorek, J.; Domanski, Marek; Slawinski, Janusz

    2003-04-01

    The paper deals with photometric and morphologic analysis of bioluminescent images obtained by registration of light radiated directly from some plant objects. Registration of images obtained from ultra-weak light sources by the single photon counting (SPC) technique is the subject of this work. The radiation is registered by use of a 16-bit charge coupled device (CCD) camera "Night Owl" together with WinLight EG&G Berthold software. Additional application-specific software has been developed in order to deal with objects that are changing during the exposition time. Advantages of the elaborated set of easy configurable tools named FCT for a computer-aided photometric and morphologic analysis of numerous series of quantitatively imperfect chemiluminescent images are described. Instructions are given how to use these tools and exemplified with several algorithms for the transformation of images library. Using the proposed FCT set, automatic photometric and morphologic analysis of the information hidden within series of chemiluminescent images reflecting defensive processes in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd) leaves affected by a pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is revealed.

  4. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H-89 attenuates the bioluminescence signal produced by Renilla Luciferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie J Herbst

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigations into the regulation and functional roles of kinases such as cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA increasingly rely on cellular assays. Currently, there are a number of bioluminescence-based assays, for example reporter gene assays, that allow the study of the regulation, activity, and functional effects of PKA in the cellular context. Additionally there are continuing efforts to engineer improved biosensors that are capable of detecting real-time PKA signaling dynamics in cells. These cell-based assays are often utilized to test the involvement of PKA-dependent processes by using H-89, a reversible competitive inhibitor of PKA.We present here data to show that H-89, in addition to being a competitive PKA inhibitor, attenuates the bioluminescence signal produced by Renilla luciferase (RLuc variants in a population of cells and also in single cells. Using 10 microM of luciferase substrate and 10 microM H-89, we observed that the signal from RLuc and RLuc8, an eight-point mutation variant of RLuc, in cells was reduced to 50% (+/-15% and 54% (+/-14% of controls exposed to the vehicle alone, respectively. In vitro, we showed that H-89 decreased the RLuc8 bioluminescence signal but did not compete with coelenterazine-h for the RLuc8 active site, and also did not affect the activity of Firefly luciferase. By contrast, another competitive inhibitor of PKA, KT5720, did not affect the activity of RLuc8.The identification and characterization of the adverse effect of H-89 on RLuc signal will help deconvolute data previously generated from RLuc-based assays looking at the functional effects of PKA signaling. In addition, for the current application and future development of bioluminscence assays, KT5720 is identified as a more suitable PKA inhibitor to be used in conjunction with RLuc-based assays. These principal findings also provide an important lesson to fully consider all of the potential effects of experimental conditions on a cell

  5. Bioluminescence DNA hybridization assay for Plasmodium falciparum based on the photoprotein aequorin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doleman, Leslie; Davies, Logan; Rowe, Laura; Moschou, Elizabeth A; Deo, Sapna; Daunert, Sylvia

    2007-06-01

    A bioluminescence DNA hybridization assay for the detection of Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly species of malaria, using the photoprotein aequorin as a bioluminescent label has been developed. The current gold standard for the detection of malaria is light microscopy, which can detect down to approximately 50 parasites/microL of blood, but has low-throughput, high costs, and requires high skill, which limit the applicability of the method, especially in the developing regions where malaria detection is mostly needed. The utilization of aequorin as a bioluminescence label offers the advantages of high signal-to-noise ratio and reliable detection down to attomole levels, allowing for the development of highly sensitive and miniaturized high-throughput bioluminescence assays. Herein, we developed a DNA hybridization assay for the detection of P. falciparum based on the competition between the target DNA and the signal generating DNA streptavidin-aequorin for hybridization with the probe DNA. This bioluminescence hybridization assay demonstrated a detection limit of 3 pg/microL and was employed for the detection of target DNA in standard and spiked human serum samples. The DNA hybridization assay was developed in a microplate format without the need for sample PCR amplification, showing the potential suitability of this method in the parallel analysis of samples by low-trained personnel, such as that typically encountered in developing regions.

  6. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) in a mammalian cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan M; Patterson, Stacey S; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S

    2010-08-27

    The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2)) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2) supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  7. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M; Webb, James D; Price, Sarah L; Ripp, Steven A; Sayler, Gary S

    2013-05-29

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety.

  8. Quantitative Comparison of the Sensitivity of Detection of Fluorescent and Bioluminescent Reporters in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Troy

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent and fluorescent reporters are finding increased use in optical molecular imaging in small animals. In the work presented here, issues related to the sensitivity of in vivo detection are examined for standard reporters. A high-sensitivity imaging system that can detect steady-state emission from both bioluminescent and fluorescent reporters is described. The instrument is absolutely calibrated so that animal images can be analyzed in physical units of radiance allowing more quantitative comparisons to be performed. Background emission from mouse tissue, called autoluminescence and autofluorescence, is measured and found to be an important limitation to detection sensitivity of reporters. Measurements of dual-labeled (bioluminescent/fluorescent reporter systems, including PC-3M-luc/DsRed2-1 and HeLa-luc/PKH26, are shown. The results indicate that although fluorescent signals are generally brighter than bioluminescent signals, the very low autoluminescent levels usually results in superior signal to background ratios for bioluminescent imaging, particularly compared with fluorescent imaging in the green to red part of the spectrum. Fluorescence detection sensitivity improves in the far-red to near-infrared, provided the animals are fed a low-chlorophyll diet to reduce autofluorescence in the intestinal region. The use of blue-shifted excitation filters is explored as a method to subtract out tissue autofluorescence and improve the sensitivity of fluorescent imaging.

  9. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux in a mammalian cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M Close

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase (lux gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo.Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2 was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background.The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  10. PCR-based detection of bioluminescent microbial populations in Tyrrhenian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Gabriela; De Luca, Massimo; Denaro, Renata; La Cono, Violetta; Smedile, Francesco; Scarfì, Simona; De Domenico, Emilio; De Domenico, Maria; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2009-05-01

    The present study is focused on the development of a cultivation-independent molecular approach for specific detection of bioluminescent bacteria within microbial communities by direct amplification of luxA gene from environmental DNA. A new set of primers, specifically targeting free-living bioluminescent bacteria, was designed on the base of l uxA sequences available from the public database. Meso- and bathypelagic seawater samples were collected from two stations in Tyrrhenian Sea at the depths of 500 and 2750 m. The same seawater samples also were used to isolate bioluminescent bacteria that were further subjected to luxA and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PCR products obtained by amplification with designed primers were cloned, and the phylogenetic affiliation of 40 clones was determined. All of them were clustered into three groups, only distantly related to the Photobacterium phosphoreum and Photobacterium kishitanii clades. The half of all clones formed a tight monophyletic clade, while the rest of clones were organized in "compartment"-specific, meso- and bathypelagic ecotypes. No matches with luxA gene sequences of four bioluminescent strains, isolated from the same seawater samples, were observed. These findings indicate that the PCR-based approach developed in present manuscript, allowed us to detect the novel, "yet to be cultivated" lineages of bioluminescent bacteria, which are likely specific for distinct warm bathypelagic realms of Mediterranean Sea.

  11. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-05-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety.

  12. Comparison of Acute Toxicity of Algal Metabolites Using Bioluminescence Inhibition Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansa Jeswani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are reported to degrade hazardous compounds. However, algae, especially cyanobacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites which may be toxic to flora, fauna and human beings. The aim of this study was selection of an appropriate algal culture for biological treatment of biomass gasification wastewater based on acute toxicity considerations. The three algae that were selected were Spirulina sp., Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium. Acute toxicity of the metabolites produced by these algal cultures was tested at the end of log phase using the standard bioluminescence inhibition assay based on Vibrio fischeri NRRLB 11174. Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium dominated by cyanobacteria such as Phormidium, Chroococcus and Oscillatoria did not release much toxic metabolites at the end of log phase and caused only about 20% inhibition in bioluminescence. In comparison, Spirulina sp. released toxic metabolites and caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition at 3/5 times dilution of the culture supernatant (EC50.

  13. Four new bioluminescent taxa of Mycena sect. Calodontes from Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Audrey L C; Tan, Yee-Shin; Desjardin, Dennis E; Musa, Md Yusoff; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2014-01-01

    Three new species and one new variety of bioluminescent Mycena collected from Peninsular Malaysia are described herein. All new species belong to Mycena sect. Calodontes in what is known as the Mycena pura complex. Comprehensive descriptions, photographs, illustrations and comparisons with phenetically similar species are provided. Molecular sequences data from the nuclear internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2, including the 5.8S rRNA) were used to infer relationships within sect. Calodontes. Axenic cultures were obtained to provide data on culture morphology. This is the first published photographic documentation of bioluminescent basidiomes of members of Mycena sect. Calodontes. Also, this addition brings the total known bioluminescent fungi to 77 species. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  14. Regulated bioluminescence as a tool for bioremediation process monitoring and control of bacterial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S.; Heitzer, Armin; Digrazia, Philip M.

    1991-01-01

    An effective on-line monitoring technique for toxic waste bioremediation using bioluminescent microorganisms has shown great potential for the description and optimization of biological processes. The lux genes of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri are used by this species to produce visible light. The lux genes can be genetically fused to the control region of a catabolic gene, with the result that bioluminescence is produced whenever the catabolic gene is induced. Thus the detection of light from a sample indicates that genetic expression from a specific gene is occurring. This technique was used to monitor biodegradation of specific contaminants from waste sites. For these studies, fusions between the lux genes and the operons for naphthalene and toluene/xylene degradation were constructed. Strains carrying one of these fusions respond sensitively and specifically to target substrates. Bioluminescence from these cultures can be rapidly measured in a nondestructive and noninvasive manner. The potential for this technique in this and other biological systems is discussed.

  15. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  16. Photon hunting in the twilight zone: visual features of mesopelagic bioluminescent sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Partridge, Julian C; Hart, Nathan S; Garza-Gisholt, Eduardo; Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Mallefet, Jérôme; Collin, Shaun P

    2014-01-01

    The mesopelagic zone is a visual scene continuum in which organisms have developed various strategies to optimize photon capture. Here, we used light microscopy, stereology-assisted retinal topographic mapping, spectrophotometry and microspectrophotometry to investigate the visual ecology of deep-sea bioluminescent sharks [four etmopterid species (Etmopterus lucifer, E. splendidus, E. spinax and Trigonognathus kabeyai) and one dalatiid species (Squaliolus aliae)]. We highlighted a novel structure, a translucent area present in the upper eye orbit of Etmopteridae, which might be part of a reference system for counterillumination adjustment or acts as a spectral filter for camouflage breaking, as well as several ocular specialisations such as aphakic gaps and semicircular tapeta previously unknown in elasmobranchs. All species showed pure rod hexagonal mosaics with a high topographic diversity. Retinal specialisations, formed by shallow cell density gradients, may aid in prey detection and reflect lifestyle differences; pelagic species display areae centrales while benthopelagic and benthic species display wide and narrow horizontal streaks, respectively. One species (E. lucifer) displays two areae within its horizontal streak that likely allows detection of conspecifics' elongated bioluminescent flank markings. Ganglion cell topography reveals less variation with all species showing a temporal area for acute frontal binocular vision. This area is dorsally extended in T. kabeyai, allowing this species to adjust the strike of its peculiar jaws in the ventro-frontal visual field. Etmopterus lucifer showed an additional nasal area matching a high rod density area. Peak spectral sensitivities of the rod visual pigments (λmax) fall within the range 484-491 nm, allowing these sharks to detect a high proportion of photons present in their habitat. Comparisons with previously published data reveal ocular differences between bioluminescent and non-bioluminescent deep

  17. Tracking Bioluminescent ETEC during In vivo BALB/c Mouse Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo E. Rodea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC is a leading cause of diarrhea worldwide. Adhesion to the human intestinal tract is crucial for colonization. ETEC adhesive structures have been extensively studied; however, colonization dynamics remain uncharacterized. The aim of this study was to track bioluminescent ETEC during in vivo infection. The promoter region of dnaK was fused with the luc gene, resulting in the pRMkluc vector. E. coli K-12 and ETEC FMU073332 strains were electroporated with pRMkluc. E. coli K-12 pRMkluc was bioluminescent; in contrast, the E. coli K-12 control strain did not emit bioluminescence. The highest light emission was measured at 1.9 OD600 (9 h and quantified over time. The signal was detected starting at time 0 and up to 12 h. Streptomycin-treated BALB/c mice were orogastrically inoculated with either ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc or E. coli K-12 pRMkluc (control, and bacterial colonization was determined by measuring bacterial shedding in the feces. ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc shedding started and stopped after inoculation of the control strain, indicating that mouse intestinal colonization by ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc lasted longer than colonization by the control. The bioluminescence signal of ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc was captured starting at the time of inoculation until 12 h after inoculation. The bioluminescent signal emitted by ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc in the proximal mouse ileum was located, and the control signal was identified in the cecum. The detection of maximal light emission and bioluminescence duration allowed us to follow ETEC during in vivo infection. ETEC showed an enhanced colonization and tropism in the mouse intestine compared with those in the control strain. Here, we report the first study of ETEC colonization in the mouse intestine accompanied by in vivo imaging.

  18. Tracking Bioluminescent ETEC during In vivo BALB/c Mouse Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodea, Gerardo E.; Montiel-Infante, Francisco X.; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Ochoa, Sara A.; Espinosa-Mazariego, Karina; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a leading cause of diarrhea worldwide. Adhesion to the human intestinal tract is crucial for colonization. ETEC adhesive structures have been extensively studied; however, colonization dynamics remain uncharacterized. The aim of this study was to track bioluminescent ETEC during in vivo infection. The promoter region of dnaK was fused with the luc gene, resulting in the pRMkluc vector. E. coli K-12 and ETEC FMU073332 strains were electroporated with pRMkluc. E. coli K-12 pRMkluc was bioluminescent; in contrast, the E. coli K-12 control strain did not emit bioluminescence. The highest light emission was measured at 1.9 OD600 (9 h) and quantified over time. The signal was detected starting at time 0 and up to 12 h. Streptomycin-treated BALB/c mice were orogastrically inoculated with either ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc or E. coli K-12 pRMkluc (control), and bacterial colonization was determined by measuring bacterial shedding in the feces. ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc shedding started and stopped after inoculation of the control strain, indicating that mouse intestinal colonization by ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc lasted longer than colonization by the control. The bioluminescence signal of ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc was captured starting at the time of inoculation until 12 h after inoculation. The bioluminescent signal emitted by ETEC FMU073332 pRMkluc in the proximal mouse ileum was located, and the control signal was identified in the cecum. The detection of maximal light emission and bioluminescence duration allowed us to follow ETEC during in vivo infection. ETEC showed an enhanced colonization and tropism in the mouse intestine compared with those in the control strain. Here, we report the first study of ETEC colonization in the mouse intestine accompanied by in vivo imaging. PMID:28560186

  19. Photon hunting in the twilight zone: visual features of mesopelagic bioluminescent sharks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien M Claes

    Full Text Available The mesopelagic zone is a visual scene continuum in which organisms have developed various strategies to optimize photon capture. Here, we used light microscopy, stereology-assisted retinal topographic mapping, spectrophotometry and microspectrophotometry to investigate the visual ecology of deep-sea bioluminescent sharks [four etmopterid species (Etmopterus lucifer, E. splendidus, E. spinax and Trigonognathus kabeyai and one dalatiid species (Squaliolus aliae]. We highlighted a novel structure, a translucent area present in the upper eye orbit of Etmopteridae, which might be part of a reference system for counterillumination adjustment or acts as a spectral filter for camouflage breaking, as well as several ocular specialisations such as aphakic gaps and semicircular tapeta previously unknown in elasmobranchs. All species showed pure rod hexagonal mosaics with a high topographic diversity. Retinal specialisations, formed by shallow cell density gradients, may aid in prey detection and reflect lifestyle differences; pelagic species display areae centrales while benthopelagic and benthic species display wide and narrow horizontal streaks, respectively. One species (E. lucifer displays two areae within its horizontal streak that likely allows detection of conspecifics' elongated bioluminescent flank markings. Ganglion cell topography reveals less variation with all species showing a temporal area for acute frontal binocular vision. This area is dorsally extended in T. kabeyai, allowing this species to adjust the strike of its peculiar jaws in the ventro-frontal visual field. Etmopterus lucifer showed an additional nasal area matching a high rod density area. Peak spectral sensitivities of the rod visual pigments (λmax fall within the range 484-491 nm, allowing these sharks to detect a high proportion of photons present in their habitat. Comparisons with previously published data reveal ocular differences between bioluminescent and non-bioluminescent

  20. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  1. Molecular phylogeny of Neotropical bioluminescent beetles (Coleoptera: Elateroidea) in southern and central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, D T; Arnoldi, F G C; Rosa, S P; Viviani, V R

    2014-08-01

    Bioluminescence in beetles is found mainly in the Elateroidea superfamily (Elateridae, Lampyridae and Phengodidae). The Neotropical region accounts for the richest diversity of bioluminescent species in the world with about 500 described species, most occurring in the Amazon, Atlantic rainforest and Cerrado (savanna) ecosystems in Brazil. The origin and evolution of bioluminescence, as well as the taxonomic status of several Neotropical taxa in these families remains unclear. In order to contribute to a better understanding of the phylogeny and evolution of bioluminescent Elateroidea we sequenced and analyzed sequences of mitochondrial NADH2 and the nuclear 28S genes and of the cloned luciferase sequences of Brazilian species belonging to the following genera: (Lampyridae) Macrolampis, Photuris, Amydetes, Bicellonycha, Aspisoma, Lucidota, Cratomorphus; (Elateridae) Conoderus, Pyrophorus, Hapsodrilus, Pyrearinus, Fulgeochlizus; and (Phengodidae) Pseudophengodes, Phrixothrix, Euryopa and Brasilocerus. Our study supports a closer phylogenetic relationship between Elateridae and Phengodidae as other molecular studies, in contrast with previous morphologic and molecular studies that clustered Lampyridae/Phengodidae. Molecular data also supported division of the Phengodinae subfamily into the tribes Phengodini and Mastinocerini. The position of the genus Amydetes supports the status of the Amydetinae as a subfamily. The genus Euryopa is included in the Mastinocerini tribe within the Phengodinae/Phengodidae. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Total evidence phylogeny and the evolution of adult bioluminescence in fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gavin J; Branham, Marc A; Whiting, Michael F; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-02-01

    Fireflies are some of the most captivating organisms on the planet. They have a rich history as subjects of scientific study, especially in relation to their bioluminescent behavior. Yet, the phylogenetic relationships of fireflies are still poorly understood. Here, we present the first total evidence approach to reconstruct lampyrid phylogeny using both a molecular matrix from six loci and an extensive morphological matrix. Using this phylogeny we test the hypothesis that adult bioluminescence evolved after the origin of the firefly clade. The ancestral state of adult bioluminescence is recovered as non-bioluminescent with one to six gains and five to ten subsequent losses. The monophyly of the family, as well as the subfamilies is also tested. Ototretinae, Cyphonocerinae, Luciolinae (incl. Pristolycus), Amydetinae, "cheguevarinae" sensu Jeng 2008, and Photurinae are highly supported as monophyletic. With the exception of four taxa, Lampyrinae is also recovered as monophyletic with high support. Based on phylogenetic and morphological data Lamprohiza, Phausis, and Lamprigera are transferred to Lampyridae incertae sedis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Validity of bioluminescence measurements for noninvasive in vivo imaging of tumor load in small animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, Clara P. W.; Overmeer, Renée M.; Niers, Tatjana M. H.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Richel, Dick J.; Buckle, Tessa; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; van Tellingen, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    A relatively new strategy to longitudinally monitor tumor load in intact animals and the effects of therapy is noninvasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI). The validity of BLI for quantitative assessment of tumor load in small animals is critically evaluated in the present review. Cancer cells are

  4. Long Term Dinoflagellate Bioluminescence, Chlorophyll, And Their Environmental Correlates In Southern California Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Buchanan, R.J., Seliger, H.H. (1969). Stimulable and spontaneous bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellates, Pyrodinium bahamense , Gonyaulax...1961). Relative iron requirement of some coastal and off-shore plankton algae. Ecology 42: 444-446. Schwing, F.B., O’Farrell, M., Steger, J

  5. Autonomously bioluminescent mammalian cells for continuous and real-time monitoring of cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M; Webb, James D; Ripp, Steven A; Sayler, Gary S

    2013-10-28

    Mammalian cell-based in vitro assays have been widely employed as alternatives to animal testing for toxicological studies but have been limited due to the high monetary and time costs of parallel sample preparation that are necessitated due to the destructive nature of firefly luciferase-based screening methods. This video describes the utilization of autonomously bioluminescent mammalian cells, which do not require the destructive addition of a luciferin substrate, as an inexpensive and facile method for monitoring the cytotoxic effects of a compound of interest. Mammalian cells stably expressing the full bacterial bioluminescence (luxCDABEfrp) gene cassette autonomously produce an optical signal that peaks at 490 nm without the addition of an expensive and possibly interfering luciferin substrate, excitation by an external energy source, or destruction of the sample that is traditionally performed during optical imaging procedures. This independence from external stimulation places the burden for maintaining the bioluminescent reaction solely on the cell, meaning that the resultant signal is only detected during active metabolism. This characteristic makes the lux-expressing cell line an excellent candidate for use as a biosentinel against cytotoxic effects because changes in bioluminescent production are indicative of adverse effects on cellular growth and metabolism. Similarly, the autonomous nature and lack of required sample destruction permits repeated imaging of the same sample in real-time throughout the period of toxicant exposure and can be performed across multiple samples using existing imaging equipment in an automated fashion.

  6. Expression of VEGFR-2 during Liver Regeneration after Partial Hepatectomy in a Bioluminescence Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizai, Patrick Hamid; Bertram, Lea; Kroy, Daniela; Kummer, Julia; Andert, Anne; Neumann, Ulf Peter; Ulmer, Tom Florian; Fragoulis, Athanassious

    2017-10-26

    Liver regeneration requires the formation of new blood vessels. Endothelial cell proliferation is stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR-2. The aim of this study was to investigate VEGFR-2 expression in vivo during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PHx). Transgenic VEGFR-2-luc mice were used in which the luciferase reporter gene was under control of the VEGFR-2 promoter. Following 2/3 PHx, the mice underwent in vivo bioluminescence imaging until the 14th postoperative day. Additionally, liver tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, in vitro luminescence assays, and quantitative RT-PCR. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed a significant increase in VEGFR-2 promoter activity after PHx. Maximum signal was recorded on the 3rd day; 8 days postoperatively the signal intensity decreased significantly. On the 14th day, bioluminescence signal reached almost baseline levels. Immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR, and in vitro luminescence confirmed a significant increase on the 3rd day following resection. The mRNA expression of VEGFR-2 was significantly higher on day 3 than preoperatively as well as on day 8. In vivo bioluminescence imaging with transgenic VEGFR-2-luc mice is feasible and provides a convenient model for noninvasively studying VEGFR-2 expression during liver regeneration. This may facilitate further experiments with modulation of angiogenesis by different substances. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Integrated visualization of multi-angle bioluminescence imaging and micro CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, P.; Dijkstra, J.; Botha, C.P.; Post, F.H.; Kaijzel, E.; Que, I.; Löwik, C.W.G.M.; Reiber, J.H.C.; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores new methods to visualize and fuse multi-2D bioluminescence imaging (BLI) data with structural imaging modalities such as micro CT and MR. A geometric, back-projection-based 3D reconstruction for superficial lesions from multi-2D BLI data is presented, enabling a coarse estimate

  8. Bioluminescence ATP Monitoring for the Routine Assessment of Food Contact Surface Cleanliness in a University Canteen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Osimani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP bioluminescence monitoring and traditional microbiological analyses (viable counting of total mesophilic aerobes, coliforms and Escherichia coli were used to evaluate the effectiveness of Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP at a university canteen which uses a HACCP-based approach. To that end, 10 cleaning control points (CPs, including food contact surfaces at risk of contamination from product residues or microbial growth, were analysed during an 8-month monitoring period. Arbitrary acceptability limits were set for both microbial loads and ATP bioluminescence readings. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.99 between the means of ATP bioluminescence readings and the viable counts of total mesophilic aerobes was seen, thus revealing a strong association of these parameters with the level of surface contamination. Among CPs, the raw meat and multi-purpose chopping boards showed the highest criticalities. Although ATP bioluminescence technology cannot substitute traditional microbiological analyses for the determination of microbial load on food contact surfaces, it has proved to be a powerful tool for the real time monitoring of surface cleanliness at mass catering plants, for verify the correct application of SSOP, and hence for their implementation/revision in the case of poor hygiene.

  9. The antibacterial activity of Virkon measured by colony growth and bioluminescence of lux recombinant Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A J; Holah, J T; Denyer, S P; Stewart, G S

    1992-08-01

    Concentration exponents for the broad spectrum antimicrobial Virkon were determined for Listeria monocytogenes using both plate counts and bioluminescence measurements; the values of 3.15 and 2.6 indicate a close equivalence between these two measurement procedures. Virkon is an effective biocide for L. monocytogenes at the manufacturer's in-use concentration of 1%.

  10. Polyphyly of non-bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri sharing a lux-locus deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, M S; Preheim, S P; Polz, M F; Ruby, E G

    2012-03-01

    This study reports the first description and molecular characterization of naturally occurring, non-bioluminescent strains of Vibrio fischeri. These 'dark' V. fischeri strains remained non-bioluminescent even after treatment with both autoinducer and aldehyde, substrate additions that typically maximize light production in dim strains of luminous bacteria. Surprisingly, the entire lux locus (eight genes) was absent in over 97% of these dark V. fischeri strains. Although these strains were all collected from a Massachusetts (USA) estuary in 2007, phylogenetic reconstructions allowed us to reject the hypothesis that these newly described non-bioluminescent strains exhibit monophyly within the V. fischeri clade. These dark strains exhibited a competitive disadvantage against native bioluminescent strains when colonizing the light organ of the model V. fischeri host, the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes. Significantly, we believe that the data collected in this study may suggest the first observation of a functional, parallel locus-deletion event among independent lineages of a non-pathogenic bacterial species. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Monitoring the Response of Hyperbilirubinemia in the Mouse Brain by In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Manni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased levels of unconjugated bilirubin are neurotoxic, but the mechanism leading to neurological damage has not been completely elucidated. Innovative strategies of investigation are needed to more precisely define this pathological process. By longitudinal in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we noninvasively visualized the brain response to hyperbilirubinemia in the MITO-Luc mouse, in which light emission is restricted to the regions of active cell proliferation. We assessed that acute hyperbilirubinemia promotes bioluminescence in the brain region, indicating an increment in the cell proliferation rate. Immunohistochemical detection in brain sections of cells positive for both luciferase and the microglial marker allograft inflammatory factor 1 suggests proliferation of microglial cells. In addition, we demonstrated that brain induction of bioluminescence was altered by pharmacological displacement of bilirubin from its albumin binding sites and by modulation of the blood–brain barrier permeability, all pivotal factors in the development of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction. We also determined that treatment with minocycline, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, or administration of bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody, blunts bilirubin-induced bioluminescence. Overall the study supports the use of the MITO-Luc mouse as a valuable tool for the rapid response monitoring of drugs aiming at preventing acute bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction.

  12. Luciferase-Rose Bengal conjugates for singlet oxygen generation by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghoon; Jo, HyeongChan; Jeon, Mijeong; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2017-04-20

    Conjugates of Rose Bengal and Renilla luciferase generated singlet oxygen upon binding with coelenterazine via bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). Since the applications of conventional PDT have been limited to superficial lesions due to the limited light penetration in tissue, BRET activated PDT which does not require external light illumination may overcome the limitations of conventional PDT.

  13. Click beetle luciferase mutant and near infrared naphthyl-luciferins for improved bioluminescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Hall (Mary P.); C.C. Woodroofe (Carolyn C.); M.G. Wood (Monika G.); I. Que (Ivo); M. van 't Root (Moniek); Y. Ridwan (Yanto); C. Shi (Ce); T.A. Kirkland (Thomas A.); L.P. Encell (Lance P.); K.V. Wood (Keith V.); C.W.G.M. Löwik (Clemens); L. Mezzanotte (Laura)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractThe sensitivity of bioluminescence imaging in animals is primarily dependent on the amount of photons emitted by the luciferase enzyme at wavelengths greater than 620 nm where tissue penetration is high. This area of work has been dominated by firefly luciferase and its substrate,

  14. Use of bioluminescence for detection of genetically engineered microorganisms released into the environment. [Xanthomonas campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J.J.; Dane, F.; Geiger, D.; Kloepper, J.W. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The persistence and movement of strain JS414 of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which was genetically engineered to bioluminesce, were monitored during a limited field introduction. Bioluminescence and traditional dilution plate counts were determined. Strain JS414 was applied to cabbage plants and surrounding soil by mist inoculation, by wound inoculation, by scattering infested debris among plants, and by incorporating bacteria into the soil. Bioluminescent X. campestris pv. campestris was detected in plant samples and in the rhizosphere up to 6 weeks after inoculation. Movement to uninoculated plants was detected on one occasion, but movement from the immediate release area was not detected. Strain JS414 was detected in soil samples beneath mist- and wound-inoculated plants only at intentionally infested locations and in aerial samples only on the day of inoculation. The authors bioluminescence methods proved to be as sensitive as plating methods for detecting the genetically engineered microorganisms in environmental samples. Their results demonstrate that transgenic incorporation of the luxCDABE operon provides a non-labor-intensive, sensitive detection method for monitoring genetically engineered microorganisms in nature.

  15. Use of bioluminescence for detection of genetically engineered microorganisms released into the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J J; Dane, F; Geiger, D; Kloepper, J W

    1992-01-01

    The persistence and movement of strain JS414 of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which was genetically engineered to bioluminesce, were monitored during a limited field introduction. Bioluminescence and traditional dilution plate counts were determined. Strain JS414 was applied to cabbage plants and surrounding soil by mist inoculation, by wound inoculation, by scattering infested debris among plants, and by incorporating bacteria into the soil. Bioluminescent X. campestris pv. campestris was detected in plant samples and in the rhizosphere up to 6 weeks after inoculation. Movement to uninoculated plants was detected on one occasion, but movement from the immediate release area was not detected. Strain JS414 was detected in soil samples beneath mist- and wound-inoculated plants only at intentionally infested locations and in aerial samples only on the day of inoculation. Our bioluminescence methods proved to be as sensitive as plating methods for detecting the genetically engineered microorganisms in environmental samples. Our results demonstrate that transgenic incorporation of the luxCDABE operon provides a non-labor-intensive, sensitive detection method for monitoring genetically engineered microorganisms in nature.

  16. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging for the Study of Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli in Mice▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, M.-L.; Thomas, L.; Goussard, S.; Branchini, B. R.; Grillot-Courvalin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is emerging as a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of infections in living animals. However, since luciferases are oxygenases, it has been suggested that the requirement for oxygen may limit the use of BLI in anaerobic environments, such as the lumen of the gut. Strains of Escherichia coli harboring the genes for either the bacterial luciferase from Photorhabdus luminescens or the PpyRE-TS and PpyGR-TS firefly luciferase mutants of Photinus pyralis (red and green thermostable P. pyralis luciferase mutants, respectively) have been engineered and used to monitor intestinal colonization in the streptomycin-treated mouse model. There was excellent correlation between the bioluminescence signal measured in the feces (R2 = 0.98) or transcutaneously in the abdominal region of whole animals (R2 = 0.99) and the CFU counts in the feces of bacteria harboring the luxABCDE operon. Stability in vivo of the bioluminescence signal was achieved by constructing plasmid pAT881(pGB2ΩPamiluxABCDE), which allowed long-term monitoring of intestinal colonization without the need for antibiotic selection for plasmid maintenance. Levels of intestinal colonization by various strains of E. coli could be compared directly by simple recording of the bioluminescence signal in living animals. The difference in spectra of light emission of the PpyRE-TS and PpyGR-TS firefly luciferase mutants and dual bioluminescence detection allowed direct in vitro and in vivo quantification of two bacterial populations by measurement of red and green emitted signals and thus monitoring of the two populations simultaneously. This system offers a simple and direct method to study in vitro and in vivo competition between mutants and the parental strain. BLI is a useful tool to study intestinal colonization. PMID:19880653

  17. In vivo bioluminescence imaging for the study of intestinal colonization by Escherichia coli in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, M-L; Thomas, L; Goussard, S; Branchini, B R; Grillot-Courvalin, C

    2010-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is emerging as a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of infections in living animals. However, since luciferases are oxygenases, it has been suggested that the requirement for oxygen may limit the use of BLI in anaerobic environments, such as the lumen of the gut. Strains of Escherichia coli harboring the genes for either the bacterial luciferase from Photorhabdus luminescens or the PpyRE-TS and PpyGR-TS firefly luciferase mutants of Photinus pyralis (red and green thermostable P. pyralis luciferase mutants, respectively) have been engineered and used to monitor intestinal colonization in the streptomycin-treated mouse model. There was excellent correlation between the bioluminescence signal measured in the feces (R2=0.98) or transcutaneously in the abdominal region of whole animals (R2=0.99) and the CFU counts in the feces of bacteria harboring the luxABCDE operon. Stability in vivo of the bioluminescence signal was achieved by constructing plasmid pAT881(pGB2OmegaPamiluxABCDE), which allowed long-term monitoring of intestinal colonization without the need for antibiotic selection for plasmid maintenance. Levels of intestinal colonization by various strains of E. coli could be compared directly by simple recording of the bioluminescence signal in living animals. The difference in spectra of light emission of the PpyRE-TS and PpyGR-TS firefly luciferase mutants and dual bioluminescence detection allowed direct in vitro and in vivo quantification of two bacterial populations by measurement of red and green emitted signals and thus monitoring of the two populations simultaneously. This system offers a simple and direct method to study in vitro and in vivo competition between mutants and the parental strain. BLI is a useful tool to study intestinal colonization.

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  19. A Trp53fl/flPtenfl/fl mouse model of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma mediated by adeno-Cre injection and in vivo bioluminescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa R Buchakjian

    Full Text Available Genetic mouse models of soft tissue sarcoma provide critical insights into disease pathophysiology, which are oftentimes unable to be extracted from human tumor samples or xenograft models. In this study we describe a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma mediated by adenoviral-Cre recombinase injection into Trp53fl/fl/Ptenfl/fl lox-stop-lox luciferase mice. Injection of adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase, either subcutaneously or intramuscularly in two experimental groups, results in viral infection and gene recombination with 100% penetrance within the first 24 hours following injection. Luciferase expression measured by real-time bioluminescence imaging increases over time, with an initial robust increase following viral injection, followed by a steady rise over the next several weeks as primary tumors develop and grow. Intramuscular injections were more commonly associated with evidence of systemic viral distribution than subcutaneous injections. All mice developed soft tissue sarcomas at the primary injection site, with histological examination identifying 93% of tumors as invasive pleomorphic sarcomas based on microscopic morphology and immunohistochemical expression of sarcoma markers. A lymphocytic infiltrate was present in 64% of the sarcomas in this immunocompetent model and 71% of tumors expressed PD-L1. This is the first report of a viral-Cre mediated Trp53/Pten mouse model of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. The bioluminescence imaging feature, along with high penetrance of the model and its immunological characteristics, makes it suited for pre-clinical studies of soft tissue sarcoma.

  20. Modulating the bioluminescence emission of photoproteins by in vivo site-directed incorporation of non-natural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Laura; Ensor, Mark; Mehl, Ryan; Daunert, Sylvia

    2010-05-21

    The in vivo incorporation of non-natural amino acids into specific sites within proteins has become an extremely powerful tool for bio- and protein chemists in recent years. One avenue that has yet to be explored, however, is whether or not the incorporation of non-natural amino acids can tune the color of light emitted by bioluminescent proteins, whose light emission mechanisms are more complex and less well understood than their fluorescent counterparts. Bioluminescent proteins are becoming increasingly important in a variety of research fields, such as in situ imaging and the study of protein-protein interactions in vivo, and an increased spectral variety of bioluminescent reporters is needed for further progress. Thus, herein we report the first successful spectral shifting (44 nm) of a bioluminescent protein, aequorin, via the site-specific incorporation of several non-natural amino acids into an integral amino acid position within the aequorin structure in vivo.

  1. Ship track for Islands in the Stream 2002 - Pharmaceutical Discovery, Vision, and Bioluminescence - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ship track of the R/V Seward Johnson during the 2002 "Islands in the Stream - Pharmaceutical Discovery, Vision, and Bioluminescence" expedition sponsored by the...

  2. Mechanisms of energy conversion and transfer in bioluminescence. Progress report, August 15, 1976--November 14, 1977. [Renilla (anthozoa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cormier, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: isolation of luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Renilla; chemical properties and chemical reactions of luciferase and GFP; and analogy of energy transfer in bioluminescence to energy transfer in photosynthesis. (HLW)

  3. The Repetitive Detection of Toluene with Bioluminescence Bioreporter Pseudomonas putida TVA8 Encapsulated in Silica Hydrogel on an Optical Fiber.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuncová, Gabriela; Ishizaki, Takayuki; Solovyev, Andrey; Trögl, J.; Ripp, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2016), s. 467 ISSN 1996-1944 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bioluminescent biosensor * silica gel * encapsulation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.654, year: 2016

  4. Experimental Investigation Of Segregation Of Carbon Atoms Due To Sub-Zero Cryogenic Treatment In Cold Work Tool Steel By Mechanical Spectroscopy And Atom Probe Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present mechanical spectroscopy of cold work tool steel subjected to sub-zero cryogenic soaking treatment to reveal the carbon segregation and the subsequent carbides refinement. The maximum of Snoek-Köster (SK peak height was obtained in the sample subjected to soaking 1h at −130°C cryogenic treatment. The SK peak height is reduced with prolonging the soaking time. The results indicate that an increase in the height of SK peak is connected with an increase in dislocation density and the number of segregated carbon atoms in the vicinity of dislocations or twin planes after martensite transformation at −130°C which is confirmed by corresponding TEM and atom probe tomography measurement. Hence, it is suggested that the isothermal martensite, formed during the cryogenic soaking treatment decreases (APT the height of SK peak.

  5. Modulating the bioluminescence emission of photoproteins by in vivo site-directed incorporation of non-natural amino acids

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Laura; Ensor, Mark; Mehl, Ryan; Daunert, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    The in vivo incorporation of non-natural amino acids into specific sites within proteins has become an extremely powerful tool for bio- and protein chemists in recent years. One avenue that has yet to be explored however, is whether or not the incorporation of non-natural amino acids can tune the color of light emitted by bioluminescent proteins, whose light emission mechanisms are more complex and less well understood than their fluorescent counterparts. Bioluminescent proteins are becoming ...

  6. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging as an alternative to bioluminescent bacteria to monitor biomaterial-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjaski, Nina; Suri, Shalu; Valle, Jaione; Lehman, Susan M; Lasa, Iñigo; Prieto, María Auxiliadora; García, Andrés J

    2014-07-01

    Biomaterial-associated infection is one of the most common complications related to the implantation of any biomedical device. Several in vivo imaging platforms have emerged as powerful diagnostic tools to longitudinally monitor biomaterial-associated infections in small animal models. In this study, we directly compared two imaging approaches: bacteria engineered to produce luciferase to generate bioluminescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) imaging of the inflammatory response associated with the infected implant. We performed longitudinal imaging of bioluminescence associated with bacteria strains expressing plasmid-integrated luciferase driven by different promoters or a strain with the luciferase gene integrated into the chromosome. These luminescent strains provided an adequate signal for acute (0-4 days) monitoring of the infection, but the bioluminescence signal decreased over time and leveled off at 7 days post-implantation. This loss in the bioluminescence signal was attributed to changes in the metabolic activity of the bacteria. In contrast, near-infrared fluorescence imaging of ROS associated with inflammation to the implant provided sensitive and dose-dependent signals of biomaterial-associated bacteria. ROS imaging exhibited higher sensitivity than the bioluminescence imaging and was independent of the bacteria strain. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of inflammatory responses represents a powerful alternative to bioluminescence imaging for monitoring biomaterial-associated bacterial infections. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Luciferin Amides Enable in Vivo Bioluminescence Detection of Endogenous Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofford, David M; Adams, Spencer T; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Reddy, Gadarla Randheer; Miller, Stephen C

    2015-07-15

    Firefly luciferase is homologous to fatty acyl-CoA synthetases. We hypothesized that the firefly luciferase substrate d-luciferin and its analogs are fatty acid mimics that are ideally suited to probe the chemistry of enzymes that release fatty acid products. Here, we synthesized luciferin amides and found that these molecules are hydrolyzed to substrates for firefly luciferase by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In the presence of luciferase, these molecules enable highly sensitive and selective bioluminescent detection of FAAH activity in vitro, in live cells, and in vivo. The potency and tissue distribution of FAAH inhibitors can be imaged in live mice, and luciferin amides serve as exemplary reagents for greatly improved bioluminescence imaging in FAAH-expressing tissues such as the brain.

  8. Development of a chemiluminescent and bioluminescent system for the detection of bacteria in wastewater effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Automated chemiluminescent and bioluminescent sensors were developed for continuous monitoring of microbial levels in wastewater effluent. Development of the chemiluminescent system included optimization of reagent concentrations as well as two new techniques which will allow for increased sensitivity and specificity. The optimal reagent concentrations are 0.0025 M luminol and 0.0125 M sodium perborate in 0.75N sodium hydroxide before addition of sample. The methods developed to increase specificity include (1) extraction of porphyrins from bacteria collected in a filter using 0.1N NaOH - 50 percent Ethanol, and (2) use of the specific reaction rate characteristics for the different luminol catalysts. Since reaction times are different for each catalyst, the reaction can be made specific for bacteria by measuring only the light emission from the particular reaction time zone specific for bacteria. Developments of the bioluminescent firefly luciferase system were in the area of flow system design.

  9. Parameters for Predicting Red Tides of Bioluminescent Dinoflagellates: Meterological Events and Frontal Water Circulation Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    consistent with sequence Ilb, and in Ria de Ares y Betanzos, on the north coast, with IIIb. c. Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum (NW Borneo). The...dinoflagellate species, Pyrodinium bahamense Plate, (recently re-named P. bahamense var. bahamense to differentiate it from the bioluminescent, toxic...Indo-Pacific species P. bahamense var. compressum ), is dominant ill]. Red tides with surface concentrations > 107 cells L-1 are produced by reverse

  10. Bioluminescence imaging of β cells and intrahepatic insulin gene activity under normal and pathological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokio Katsumata

    Full Text Available In diabetes research, bioluminescence imaging (BLI has been applied in studies of β-cell impairment, development, and islet transplantation. To develop a mouse model that enables noninvasive imaging of β cells, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mouse in which a mouse 200-kbp genomic fragment comprising the insulin I gene drives luciferase expression (Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mouse. BLI of mice was performed using the IVIS Spectrum system after intraperitoneal injection of luciferin, and the bioluminescence signal from the pancreatic region analyzed. When compared with MIP-Luc-VU mice [FVB/N-Tg(Ins1-lucVUPwrs/J] expressing luciferase under the control of the 9.2-kbp mouse insulin I promoter (MIP, the bioluminescence emission from Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice was enhanced approximately 4-fold. Streptozotocin-treated Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice developed severe diabetes concomitant with a sharp decline in the BLI signal intensity in the pancreas. Conversely, mice fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed an increase in the signal, reflecting a decrease or increase in the β-cell mass. Although the bioluminescence intensity of the islets correlated well with the number of isolated islets in vitro, the intensity obtained from a living mouse in vivo did not necessarily reflect an absolute quantification of the β-cell mass under pathological conditions. On the other hand, adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of β-cell-related transcription factors in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice generated luminescence from the hepatic region for more than 1 week. These results demonstrate that BLI in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice provides a noninvasive method of imaging islet β cells and extrapancreatic activity of the insulin gene in the liver under normal and pathological conditions.

  11. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tamburini

    Full Text Available The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  12. Effects of fullerene derivatives on bioluminescence and application for protease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junping; Guan, Mirong; Li, Fengyun; Zhang, Zhiping; Wang, Chunru; Shu, Chunying; Wei, Hongping; Zhang, Xian-En

    2012-11-18

    The effects of two C(60) derivatives: C(60)[C(COOH)(2)](3) and C(60)(NH(2))(x)(OH)(y), have been investigated on the bioluminescence of humanized Gaussia luciferase (hGluc) for the first time. Utilizing the dual properties of carboxyl C(60) with luminescence quenching and free radicals scavenging, a novel BRET system was constructed for protease detection with high sensitivity.

  13. Melatonin Entrains PER2::LUC Bioluminescence Circadian Rhythm in the Mouse Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Kenkichi; Davidson, Alec J; Tosini, Gianluca

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have reported the presence of a circadian rhythm in PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC) bioluminescence in mouse photoreceptors, retina, RPE, and cornea. Melatonin (MLT) modulates many physiological functions in the eye and it is believed to be one of the key circadian signals within the eye. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of the PER2::LUC circadian rhythm in mouse cornea and to determine the role played by MLT. Corneas were obtained from PER2::LUC mice and cultured to measure bioluminescence rhythmicity in isolated tissue using a Lumicycle or CCD camera. To determine the time-dependent resetting of the corneal circadian clocks in response to MLT or IIK7 (a melatonin type 2 receptor, MT2, agonist) was added to the cultured corneas at different times of the day. We also defined the location of the MT2 receptor within different corneal layers using immunohistochemistry. A long-lasting bioluminescence rhythm was recorded from cultured PER2::LUC cornea and PER2::LUC signal was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. MLT administration in the early night delayed the cornea rhythm, whereas administration of MLT at late night to early morning advanced the cornea rhythm. Treatment with IIK7 mimicked the MLT phase-shifting effect. Consistent with these results, MT2 immunoreactivity was localized to the corneal epithelium and endothelium. Our work demonstrates that MLT entrains the PER2::LUC bioluminescence rhythm in the cornea. Our data indicate that the cornea may represent a model to study the molecular mechanisms by which MLT affects the circadian clock.

  14. Quantum Yield Determination Based on Photon Number Measurement, Protocols for Firefly Bioluminescence Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum yield (QY), which is defined as the probability of photon production by a single bio/chemiluminescence reaction, is an important factor to characterize luminescence light intensity emitted diffusively from the reaction solution mixture. Here, methods to measure number of photons to determine QY according to the techniques of national radiometry standards are described. As an example, experiments using firefly bioluminescence reactions are introduced.

  15. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer methods to study G protein-coupled receptor-receptor tyrosine kinase heteroreceptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Flajolet, Marc; Agnati, Luigi F; Greengard, Paul; Fuxe, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can form heteroreceptor complexes. In these complexes, the signaling from each interacting protomer is modulated to produce an integrated and therefore novel response upon agonist(s) activation. In the GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes, GPCRs can activate RTK in the absence of added growth factor through the use of RTK signaling molecules. This integrative phenomenon is reciprocal and can place also RTK signaling downstream of GPCR. Formation of either stable or transient complexes by these two important classes of membrane receptors is involved in regulating all aspects of receptor function, from ligand binding to signal transduction, trafficking, desensitization, and downregulation among others. Functional phenomena can be modulated with conformation-specific inhibitors that stabilize defined GPCR states to abrogate both GPCR agonist- and growth factor-stimulated cell responses or by means of small interfering heteroreceptor complex interface peptides. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology has emerged as a powerful method to study the structure of heteroreceptor complexes closely associated with the study of receptor-receptor interactions in such complexes. In this chapter, we provide an overview of different BRET(2) assays that can be used to study the structure of GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes and their functions. Various experimental designs for optimization of these experiments are also described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of bioluminescent imaging for noninvasive monitoring of colorectal cancer progression in the liver and its response to immunogene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Aparicio Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioluminescent imaging (BLI is based on the detection of light emitted by living cells expressing a luciferase gene. Stable transfection of luciferase in cancer cells and their inoculation into permissive animals allows the noninvasive monitorization of tumor progression inside internal organs. We have applied this technology for the development of a murine model of colorectal cancer involving the liver, with the aim of improving the pre-clinical evaluation of new anticancer therapies. Results A murine colon cancer cell line stably transfected with the luciferase gene (MC38Luc1 retains tumorigenicity in immunocompetent C57BL/6 animals. Intrahepatic inoculation of MC38Luc1 causes progressive liver infiltration that can be monitored by BLI. Compared with ultrasonography (US, BLI is more sensitive, but accurate estimation of tumor mass is impaired in advanced stages. We applied BLI to evaluate the efficacy of an immunogene therapy approach based on the liver-specific expression of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12. Individualized quantification of light emission was able to determine the extent and duration of antitumor responses and to predict long-term disease-free survival. Conclusion We show that BLI is a rapid, convenient and safe technique for the individual monitorization of tumor progression in the liver. Evaluation of experimental treatments with complex mechanisms of action such as immunotherapy is possible using this technology.

  17. A two-hour antibiotic susceptibility test by ATP-bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; García-Loygorri Jordán de Urries, María Cristina; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Purificación; Simarro Grande, María; Orduña Domingo, Antonio; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) in Clinical Microbiology laboratories is still time-consuming, and most procedures take 24h to yield results. In this study, a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test using ATP-bioluminescence has been developed. The design of method was performed using five ATCC collection strains of known susceptibility. This procedure was then validated against standard commercial methods on 10 strains of enterococci, 10 staphylococci, 10 non-fermenting gram negative bacilli, and 13 Enterobacteriaceae from patients. The agreement obtained in the sensitivity between the ATP-bioluminescence method and commercial methods (E-test, MicroScan and VITEK2) was 100%. In summary, the preliminary results obtained in this work show that the ATP-bioluminescence method could provide a fast and reliable AST in two hours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  18. Design and development of high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer efficiency hybrid-imaging constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Kovalski, Letícia; Broyles, David; Hunt, Eric A; Daftarian, Pirouz; Dikici, Emre; Daunert, Sylvia; Deo, Sapna K

    2016-04-01

    Here we describe the design and construction of an imaging construct with high bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) efficiency that is composed of multiple quantum dots (QDs; λem = 655 nm) self-assembled onto a bioluminescent protein, Renilla luciferase (Rluc). This is facilitated by the streptavidin-biotin interaction, allowing the facile formation of a hybrid-imaging construct (HIC) comprising up to six QDs (acceptor) grafted onto a light-emitting Rluc (donor) core. The resulting assembly of multiple acceptors surrounding a donor permits this construct to exhibit high resonance energy transfer efficiency (∼64.8%). The HIC was characterized using fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. To demonstrate the application of our construct, a generation-5 (G5) polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) nanocarrier was loaded with our HIC for in vitro and in vivo imaging. We envision that this design of multiple acceptors and bioluminescent donor will lead to the development of new BRET-based systems useful in sensing, imaging, and other bioanalytical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors Influencing Quantification of in Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging: Application to Assessment of Pancreatic Islet Transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Virostko

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine and characterize factors influencing in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI and apply them to the specific application of imaging transplanted pancreatic islets. Noninvasive quantitative assessment of transplanted pancreatic islets poses a formidable challenge. Murine pancreatic islets expressing firefly luciferase were transplanted under the renal capsule or into the portal vein of nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiency mice and the bioluminescence was quantified with a cooled charge coupled device camera and digital photon image analysis. The important, but often neglected, effects of wound healing, mouse positioning, and transplantation site on bioluminescence measurements were investigated by imaging a constant emission, isotropic light-emitting bead (λ = 600 implanted at the renal or hepatic site. The renal beads emitted nearly four times more light than hepatic beads with a smaller spot size, indicating that light absorption and scatter are greatly influenced by the transplant site and must be accounted for in BLI measurements. Detected luminescence decreased with increasing angle between the mouse surface normal and optical axis. By defining imaging parameters such as postsurgical effects, animal positioning, and light attenuation as a function of transplant site, this study develops BLI as a useful imaging modality for quantitative assessment of islets post-transplantation.

  20. Remote sensing of microbial volatile organic compounds with a bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Steven A.; Daumer, Kathleen A.; Garland, Jay L.; Simpson, Michael L.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-03-01

    As a means towards advanced, early-warning detection of microbial growth in enclosed structures, we have constructed a bioluminescent bioreporter for the detection of the microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) p-cymene. MVOCs are produced as metabolic by-products of bacteria and fungi and are detectable before any visible signs of microbial growth appear, thereby serving as very early indicators of potential biocontamination problems. The bioreporter, designated Pseudomonas putida UT93, contains a Vibrio fischeri luxCDABE gene fusion to a p-cymene/p-cumate inducible promoter. Exposure of strain UT93 to p-cymene from approximately 0.02 to 850 ppm produced self-generated bioluminescence in less than 1.5 hours. The bioreporter was also interfaced with an integrated circuit microluminometer to create a miniaturized hybrid sensor for remote monitoring of p-cymene signatures. This bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit (BBIC) device was capable of detecting fungal presence within approximately 3.5 hours of initial exposure to Penicillium roqueforti.

  1. Bioluminescent enzyme inhibition-based assay to predict the potential toxicity of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esimbekova, Elena N; Nemtseva, Elena V; Bezrukikh, Anna E; Jukova, Galina V; Lisitsa, Albert E; Lonshakova-Mukina, Viktoriya I; Rimatskaya, Nadezhda V; Sutormin, Oleg S; Kratasyuk, Valentina A

    2017-12-01

    A bioluminescent enzyme inhibition-based assay was applied to predict the potential toxicity of carbon nanomaterials (CNM) presented by single- and multi-walled nanotubes (SWCNT and MWCNT) and aqueous solutions of hydrated fullerene С60 (C60HyFn). This assay specifically detects the influence of substances on parameters of the soluble or immobilised coupled enzyme system of luminescent bacteria: NAD(P)Н:FMN-oxidoreductase+luciferase (Red+Luc). A protocol based on the optical properties of CNM for correcting the results of the bioluminescent assay was also developed. It was shown that the inhibitory activity of CNM on Red+Luc decreased in the following order: MWCNT>SWCNT>C60HyFn. The soluble enzyme system Red+Luc had high sensitivity to MWCNT and SWCNT, with values of the inhibition parameter IC50 equal to 0.012 and 0.16mg/L, respectively. The immobilised enzyme system was more vulnerable to C60HyFn than its soluble form, with an IC50 equal to 1.4mg/L. Due to its technical simplicity, rapid response time and high sensitivity, this bioluminescent method has the potential to be developed as a general enzyme inhibition-based assay for a wide variety of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An ebCMOS camera system for marine bioluminescence observation: The LuSEApher prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominjon, A., E-mail: a.dominjon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Ageron, M. [CNRS/IN2P3, Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Marseille, F-13288 (France); Barbier, R. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Lyon F-69003 (France); Billault, M.; Brunner, J. [CNRS/IN2P3, Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Marseille, F-13288 (France); Cajgfinger, T. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Lyon F-69003 (France); Calabria, P. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Chabanat, E. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Lyon F-69003 (France); Chaize, D.; Doan, Q.T.; Guerin, C.; Houles, J.; Vagneron, L. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France)

    2012-12-11

    The ebCMOS camera, called LuSEApher, is a marine bioluminescence recorder device adapted to extreme low light level. This prototype is based on the skeleton of the LUSIPHER camera system originally developed for fluorescence imaging. It has been installed at 2500 m depth off the Mediterranean shore on the site of the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The LuSEApher camera is mounted on the Instrumented Interface Module connected to the ANTARES network for environmental science purposes (European Seas Observatory Network). The LuSEApher is a self-triggered photo detection system with photon counting ability. The presentation of the device is given and its performances such as the single photon reconstruction, noise performances and trigger strategy are presented. The first recorded movies of bioluminescence are analyzed. To our knowledge, those types of events have never been obtained with such a sensitivity and such a frame rate. We believe that this camera concept could open a new window on bioluminescence studies in the deep sea.

  3. Distribution of bioluminescent fungi across old-growth and secondary tropical rain forest in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Seas-Carvajal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most research on bioluminescent fungi is concentrated on their taxonomic relationships, while the basics of their natural history and ecological relationships are poorly understood. In this study, we compared the distribution of bioluminescent fungi between old-growth and secondary forest as related to four different soil types at the tropical rainforest of La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. The study was conducted during the wet season of 2009. Bioluminescent fungi were sought following eight different transects distributed evenly in old-growth and secondary forests across four different soil types, covering an area of 9 420m². We found fungi in four different substrates: litter, fallen branches, dead trunks, and roots, for a total of 61 samples. Correspondence analysis showed that the occurrence of fungi and soil types were related (inertia=0.21, p=0.071. We found a significant relationship between the presence of fungi and the distribution of soil types (X²=18.89, df=9, p=0.026. We found only three samples with fruiting bodies, two of which had Mycena and the other had one fungus of the order Xylariales (possibly Hypoxylon sp., Kretzschmariella sp., Xylaria sp.. Future work will concentrate on exploring other aspects of their ecology, such as their dispersal and substrate preference. This information will facilitate field identification and will foster more research on the distribution, seasonality, reproductive phenology and ecological requirements of this group of Fungi.

  4. Distribution of bioluminescent fungi across old-growth and secondary tropical rain forest in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seas-Carvajal, Carolina; Avalos, Gerardo

    2013-06-01

    Most research on bioluminescent fungi is concentrated on their taxonomic relationships, while the basics of their natural history and ecological relationships are poorly understood. In this study, we compared the distribution of bioluminescent fungi between old-growth and secondary forest as related to four different soil types at the tropical rainforest of La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. The study was conducted during the wet season of 2009. Bioluminescent fungi were sought following eight different transects distributed evenly in old-growth and secondary forests across four different soil types, covering an area of 9 420m2. We found fungi in four different substrates: litter, fallen branches, dead trunks, and roots, for a total of 61 samples. Correspondence analysis showed that the occurrence of fungi and soil types were related (inertia = 0.21, p = 0.071). We found a significant relationship between the presence of fungi and the distribution of soil types (X2 = 18.89, df = 9, p = 0.026). We found only three samples with fruiting bodies, two of which had Mycena and the other had one fungus of the order Xylariales (possibly Hypoxylon sp., Kretzschmariella sp., Xylaria sp.). Future work will concentrate on exploring other aspects of their ecology, such as their dispersal and substrate preference. This information will facilitate field identification and will foster more research on the distribution, seasonality, reproductive phenology and ecological requirements of this group of Fungi.

  5. Characterization of an anthraquinone fluor from the bioluminescent, pelagic polychaete Tomopteris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Warren R; Powers, Meghan L; Haddock, Steven H D

    2014-12-01

    Tomopteris is a cosmopolitan genus of polychaetes. Many species produce yellow luminescence in the parapodia when stimulated. Yellow bioluminescence is rare in the ocean, and the components of this luminescent reaction have not been identified. Only a brief description, half a century ago, noted fluorescence in the parapodia with a remarkably similar spectrum to the bioluminescence, which suggested that it may be the luciferin or terminal light-emitter. Here, we report the isolation of the fluorescent yellow-orange pigment found in the luminous exudate and in the body of the animals. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the mass to be 270 m/z with a molecular formula of C(15)H(10)O(5), which ultimately was shown to be aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone previously found in plants. We speculate that aloe-emodin could be a factor for resonant-energy transfer or the oxyluciferin for Tomopteris bioluminescence. © 2014 The Authors. Luminescence published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Quantitative and Dynamic Imaging of ATM Kinase Activity by Bioluminescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyati, Shyam; Young, Grant; Ross, Brian Dale; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA damage response, including DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events facilitating DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. Traditionally, protein kinases have been analyzed in vitro using biochemical methods (kinase assays using purified proteins or immunological assays) requiring a large number of cells and cell lysis. Genetically encoded biosensors based on optical molecular imaging such as fluorescence or bioluminescence have been developed to enable interrogation of kinase activities in live cells with a high signal to background. We have genetically engineered a hybrid protein whose bioluminescent activity is dependent on the ATM-mediated phosphorylation of a substrate. The engineered protein consists of the split luciferase-based protein complementation pair with a CHK2 (a substrate for ATM kinase activity) target sequence and a phospho-serine/threonine-binding domain, FHA2, derived from yeast Rad53. Phosphorylation of the serine residue within the target sequence by ATM would lead to its interaction with the phospho-serine-binding domain, thereby preventing complementation of the split luciferase pair and loss of reporter activity. Bioluminescence imaging of reporter-expressing cells in cultured plates or as mouse xenografts provides a quantitative surrogate for ATM kinase activity and therefore the cellular DNA damage response in a noninvasive, dynamic fashion.

  7. Bioluminescent imaging: a critical tool in pre-clinical oncology research.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Karen

    2010-02-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a non-invasive imaging modality widely used in the field of pre-clinical oncology research. Imaging of small animal tumour models using BLI involves the generation of light by luciferase-expressing cells in the animal following administration of substrate. This light may be imaged using an external detector. The technique allows a variety of tumour-associated properties to be visualized dynamically in living models. The increasing use of BLI as a small-animal imaging modality has led to advances in the development of xenogeneic, orthotopic, and genetically engineered animal models expressing luciferase genes. This review aims to provide insight into the principles of BLI and its applications in cancer research. Many studies to assess tumour growth and development, as well as efficacy of candidate therapeutics, have been performed using BLI. More recently, advances have also been made using bioluminescent imaging in studies of protein-protein interactions, genetic screening, cell-cycle regulators, and spontaneous cancer development. Such novel studies highlight the versatility and potential of bioluminescent imaging in future oncological research.

  8. Integrating printed microfluidics with silicon photomultipliers for miniaturised and highly sensitive ATP bioluminescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, M F; Libertino, S; Turner, A P F; Filippini, D; Mak, W C

    2018-01-15

    Bioluminescence has been widely used for important biosensing applications such as the measurement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy unit in biological systems and an indicator of vital processes. The current technology for detection is mainly based on large equipment such as readers and imaging systems, which require intensive and time-consuming procedures. A miniaturised bioluminescence sensing system, which would allow sensitive and continuous monitoring of ATP, with an integrated and low-cost disposable microfluidic chamber for handling of biological samples, is highly desirable. Here, we report the design, fabrication and testing of 3D printed microfluidics chips coupled with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) for high sensitive real-time ATP detection. The 3D microfluidic chip reduces reactant consumption and facilitates solution delivery close to the SiPM to increase the detection efficiency. Our system detects ATP with a limit of detection (LoD) of 8nM and an analytical dynamic range between 15nM and 1µM, showing a stability error of 3%, and a reproducibility error below of 20%. We demonstrate the dynamic monitoring of ATP in a continuous-flow system exhibiting a fast response time, ~4s, and a full recovery to the baseline level within 17s. Moreover, the SiPM-based bioluminescence sensing system shows a similar analytical dynamic range for ATP detection to that of a full-size PerkinElmer laboratory luminescence reader. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sustained accurate recording of intracellular acidification in living tissues with a photo-controllable bioluminescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Mitsuru; Haga, Sanae; Takakura, Hideo; Ozaki, Michitaka; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of an intracellular acidic environment plays a pivotal role in biological processes and functions. However, spatiotemporal analysis of the acidification in complex tissues of living subjects persists as an important challenge. We developed a photo-inactivatable bioluminescent indicator, based on a combination of luciferase-fragment complementation and a photoreaction of a light, oxygen, and voltage domain from Avena sativa Phototropin1 (LOV2), to visualize temporally dynamic acidification in living tissue samples. Bioluminescence of the indicator diminished upon light irradiation and it recovered gradually in the dark state thereafter. The recovery rate was remarkably sensitive to pH changes but unsusceptible to fluctuation of luciferin or ATP concentrations. Bioluminescence imaging, taken as an index of the recovery rates, enabled long-time recording of acidification in apoptotic and autophagous processes in a cell population and an ischemic condition in living mice. This technology using the indicator is widely applicable to sense organelle-specific acidic changes in target biological tissues. PMID:23690604

  10. N-Alkylated 6'-aminoluciferins are bioluminescent substrates for Ultra-Glo and QuantiLum luciferase: new potential scaffolds for bioluminescent assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroofe, Carolyn C; Shultz, John W; Wood, Monika G; Osterman, Jean; Cali, James J; Daily, William J; Meisenheimer, Poncho L; Klaubert, Dieter H

    2008-09-30

    A set of 6'-alkylated aminoluciferins are shown to be bioluminescent substrates for Ultra-Glo and QuantiLum luciferases. These studies demonstrate that both the engineered and wild-type firefly luciferases tolerate much greater steric bulk at the 6' position of luciferin than has been previously reported. The nature of the alkyl substituent strongly affects the strength of the bioluminescent signal, which varies widely based on size, shape, and charge. Several compounds were observed to generate more light than the corresponding unsubstituted 6'-aminoluciferin. Determination of Michaelis-Menten constants for the substrates with Ultra-Glo indicated that the variation arises primarily from differences in V max, ranging from 1.33 x 10 (4) to 332 x 10 (4) relative light units, but in some cases K m (0.73-10.8 microM) also plays a role. Molecular modeling results suggest that interactions of the side chain with a hydrogen-bonding network at the base of the luciferin binding pocket may influence substrate-enzyme binding.

  11. A multi-channel bioluminescent bacterial biosensor for the on-line detection of metals and toxicity. Part I: design and optimization of bioluminescent bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Thomas; Durand, Marie-Jose; Jouanneau, Sulivan; Thouand, Gerald [UMR CNRS 6144 GEPEA, CBAC, Nantes University, PRES UNAM, Campus de la Courtaisiere-IUT, La Roche-sur-Yon cedex (France); Dion, Michel [UMR CNRS 6204, Nantes University, PRES UNAM, Biotechnologie, Biocatalyse, Bioregulation, 2, Rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes cedex 3 (France); Pernetti, Mimma; Poncelet, Denis [ONIRIS-ENITIAA, UMR CNRS GEPEA, Rue de la Geraudiere, BP 82225, Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2011-05-15

    This study describes the construction of inducible bioluminescent strains via genetic engineering along with their characterization and optimization in the detection of heavy metals. Firstly, a preliminary comparative study enabled us to select a suitable carbon substrate from pyruvate, glucose, citrate, diluted Luria-Bertani, and acetate. The latter carbon source provided the best induction ratios for comparison. Results showed that the three constructed inducible strains, Escherichia coli DH1 pBzntlux, pBarslux, and pBcoplux, were usable when conducting a bioassay after a 14-h overnight culture at 30 C. Utilizing these sensors gave a range of 12 detected heavy metals including several cross-detections. Detection limits for each metal were often close to and sometimes lower than the European standards for water pollution. Finally, in order to maintain sensitive bacteria within the future biosensor-measuring cell, the agarose immobilization matrix was compared to polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Agarose was selected because the detection limits of the bioluminescent strains were not affected, in contrast to PVA. Specific detection and cross-detection ranges determined in this study will form the basis of a multiple metals detection system by the new multi-channel Lumisens3 biosensor. (orig.)

  12. Local tissue reaction after injection of contrast media on gastric wall of mouse: experimental study for application of contrast media to computed tomography lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sun-Hwi; Kim, Hyung-Ho; Park, Do Joong; Jee, Ye-Seob; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2012-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) lymphography is a simple technique of sentinel node navigation but tissue reaction after injection of contrast media has not been reported yet. NINETY MICE USED IN THIS STUDY WERE DIVIDED INTO THREE GROUPS: lipiodol, iopamidol, and normal saline. The test compounds were given by submucosal injection to the gastric wall of anesthetized mice. The specimens were subjected to histopathological examination. The mean grades of acute inflammatory response after iopamidol and lipiodol injection were significantly higher than control group. However, there was no significant difference between iopamidol and lipiodol injection. The mean grade of chronic inflammatory response and fibrosis showed no differences between groups. The presence or absence of fibrinoid necrosis and mesothelial hyperplasia showed no statistical differences at each time point between groups. The foam cell, which is similar to human signet ring cell carcinoma, were not identified in normal saline and iopamidol group, but were detected by postoperative day 7 in lipiodol group. We conclude that iopamidol and lipiodol when used as a contrast media of CT lymphography is an available material for preoperative sentinel node navigation surgery for gastric cancer with an acceptable incidence of pathological alterations in a mouse model. Our results are potentially useful to clinical (human) application.

  13. Comparative analysis of gingival phenotype in animal and human experimental models using optical coherence tomography in a non-invasive approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Fernandes, Luana O.; Melo, Luciana S. A.; Feitosa, Daniela S.; Cimões, Renata; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2015-06-01

    Imaging methods are widely used in diagnostic and among the diversity of modalities, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is nowadays commercially available and considered the most innovative technique used for imaging applications, in both medical and non-medical applications. In this study, we exploit the OCT technique in the oral cavity for identification and differentiation between free and attached gingiva, as well as determining the gingival phenotype, an important factor to determination of periodontal prognosis in patients. For the animal studies, five porcine jaws were analyzed using a Swept Source SS-OCT system operating at 1325nm and stereomicroscope, as gold pattern. The SSOCT at 1325nm was chosen due to the longer central wavelength, that allows to deeper penetration imaging, and the faster image acquisition, an essential factor for clinical setting. For the patient studies, a total of 30 males and female were examined using the SS-OCT at 1325nm and computer controlled periodontal probing. 2D and 3D images of tooth/gingiva interface were performed, and quantitative measurements of the gingival sulcus could be noninvasively obtained. Through the image analysis of the animals jaws, it was possible to quantify the free gingiva and the attached gingiva, the calculus deposition over teeth surface and also the subgingival calculus. For the patient's studies, we demonstrated that the gingival phenotype could be measured without the periodontal probe introduction at the gingival sulcus, confirming that OCT can be potentially useful in clinic for direct observation and quantification of gingival phenotype in a non-invasive approach.

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a ... the Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  15. What Orthopaedic Operating Room Surfaces Are Contaminated With Bioburden? A Study Using the ATP Bioluminescence Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Raveesh Daniel; Bowen, Thomas R

    2017-07-01

    Contaminated operating room surfaces can increase the risk of orthopaedic infections, particularly after procedures in which hardware implantation and instrumentation are used. The question arises as to how surgeons can measure surface cleanliness to detect increased levels of bioburden. This study aims to highlight the utility of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence technology as a novel technique in detecting the degree of contamination within the sterile operating room environment. What orthopaedic operating room surfaces are contaminated with bioburden? When energy is required for cellular work, ATP breaks down into adenosine biphosphate (ADP) and phosphate (P) and in that process releases energy. This process is inherent to all living things and can be detected as light emission with the use of bioluminescence assays. On a given day, six different orthopaedic surgery operating rooms (two adult reconstruction, two trauma, two spine) were tested before surgery with an ATP bioluminescence assay kit. All of the cases were considered clean surgery without infection, and this included the previously performed cases in each sampled room. These rooms had been cleaned and prepped for surgery but the patients had not been physically brought into the room. A total of 13 different surfaces were sampled once in each room: the operating room (OR) preparation table (both pre- and postdraping), OR light handles, Bovie machine buttons, supply closet countertops, the inside of the Bair Hugger™ hose, Bair Hugger™ buttons, right side of the OR table headboard, tourniquet machine buttons, the Clark-socket attachment, and patient positioners used for total hip and spine positioning. The relative light units (RLUs) obtained from each sample were recorded and data were compiled and averaged for analysis. These values were compared with previously published ATP benchmark values of 250 to 500 RLUs to define cleanliness in both the hospital and restaurant industries. All

  16. Systematic calibration of an integrated x-ray and optical tomography system for preclinical radiation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yidong, E-mail: yidongyang@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33136 (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Wong, John W. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Eslami, Sohrab; Iordachita, Iulian I. [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Patterson, Michael S. [Juravinski Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S4K1 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guided small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) has been developed for focal tumor irradiation, allowing laboratory researchers to test basic biological hypotheses that can modify radiotherapy outcomes in ways that were not feasible previously. CBCT provides excellent bone to soft tissue contrast, but is incapable of differentiating tumors from surrounding soft tissue. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT), in contrast, allows direct visualization of even subpalpable tumors and quantitative evaluation of tumor response. Integration of BLT with CBCT offers complementary image information, with CBCT delineating anatomic structures and BLT differentiating luminescent tumors. This study is to develop a systematic method to calibrate an integrated CBCT and BLT imaging system which can be adopted onboard the SARRP to guide focal tumor irradiation. Methods: The integrated imaging system consists of CBCT, diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and BLT. The anatomy acquired from CBCT and optical properties acquired from DOT serve as a priori information for the subsequent BLT reconstruction. Phantoms were designed and procedures were developed to calibrate the CBCT, DOT/BLT, and the entire integrated system. Geometrical calibration was performed to calibrate the CBCT system. Flat field correction was performed to correct the nonuniform response of the optical imaging system. Absolute emittance calibration was performed to convert the camera readout to the emittance at the phantom or animal surface, which enabled the direct reconstruction of the bioluminescence source strength. Phantom and mouse imaging were performed to validate the calibration. Results: All calibration procedures were successfully performed. Both CBCT of a thin wire and a euthanized mouse revealed no spatial artifact, validating the accuracy of the CBCT calibration. The absolute emittance calibration was validated with a 650 nm laser source, resulting in a 3

  17. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Dunn, Anne K; Stabb, Eric V

    2010-05-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated the repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and P(arcA)-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends the characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background.

  18. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Dunn, Anne K.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and ParcA-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background. PMID:20298504

  19. Experimental approach for the uncertainty assessment of 3D complex geometry dimensional measurements using computed tomography at the mm and sub-mm scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez, Roberto; Torralba, Marta; Yagüe-Fabra, José A.

    2017-01-01

    experimentally by using several calibrated reference artefacts. The main advantage of the presented method is that a previous calibration of the component by a more accurate Coordinate Measuring System (CMS) is not needed. In fact, such CMS would still hold all the typical limitations of optical and tactile...... with the component’s calibration and the micro manufacturing tolerances to demonstrate the suitability of the presented CT calibration procedure. The 2U/T ratios resulting from the validation workpiece are, respectively, 0.27 (VDI) and 0.35 (MPE), by assuring tolerances in the range of ± 20–30 µm. For the dental...... file, the EN analysis is favorable in the majority of the cases (70.4%) and 2U/T is equal to 0.31 for sub-mm measurands (L

  20. A genetic screen for bioluminescence genes in the fungus Armillaria mellea, through the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated random insertional mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioluminescence is reported from 71 saprobic species of fungi from four, distant lineages in the order Agaricales. Analyses of the fungal luminescent chemistry shows that all four lineages share a functionally conserved substrate and luciferase, indicating that the bioluminescent pathway is likely c...

  1. In vivo monitoring of fetoplacental Vegfr2 gene activity in a murine pregnancy model using a Vegfr2-luc reporter gene and bioluminescent imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rude Brian J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2 plays a pivotal role in angiogenesis by eliciting vascular endothelial cell growth when bound to VEGF, a powerful pro-angiogenic ligand. While Vegf and Vegfr2 are expressed throughout gestation, the latter third of gestation in mice is characterized by a marked increase in fetoplacental angiogenesis. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of monitoring fetoplacental Vegfr2 gene activity non-invasively using a Vegfr2-luc reporter transgenic mouse and bioluminescent imaging. Methods Imaging parameters were optimized using two wild-type (WT females, bearing Vegfr2-luc fetuses. Then, seven WT females, bred to Vegfr2-luc males, were imaged from gestational day (GD 12 to 18 to determine the usefulness of the Vegfr2-luc mouse as a model for studying fetoplacental Vegfr2 activity during pregnancy. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR of Vegfr2 was also performed on whole fetoplacental units during this time. Additionally, resultant neonates were imaged at postnatal day (PND 7, 14 and 21 to monitor Vegfr2 activity during post-natal development. Results Fetoplacental Vegfr2 gene activity was detected as light emissions beginning on GD 12 of gestation and increased throughout the imaging period (P Conclusions In utero fetoplacental Vegfr2 gene activity was monitored longitudinally in a quantitative manner using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescent imaging during the latter third of gestation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the Vegfr2-luc mouse to monitor late gestation fetoplacental angiogenic activity under normal and experimental conditions. Additionally, neonatal Vegfr2 gene activity was monitored for three weeks postpartum, allowing continuous monitoring of Vegfr2 activity during the latter third of gestation and postnatal development within the same animals.

  2. [Determination of minimal concentrations of biocorrosion inhibitors by a bioluminescence method in relation to bacteria, participating in biocorrosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremenko, E N; Azizov, R E; Makhlis, T A; Abbasov, V M; Varfolomeev, S D

    2005-01-01

    By using a bioluminescence ATP assay, we have determined the minimal concentrations of some biocorrosion inhibitors (Katon, Khazar, VFIKS-82, Nitro-1, Kaspii-2, and Kaspii-4) suppressing most common microbial corrosion agents: Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The cell titers determined by the bioluminescence method, including not only dividing cells but also their dormant living counterparts, are two- to sixfold greater than the values determined microbiologically. It is shown that the bioluminescence method can be applied to determination of cell titers in samples of oil-field waters in the presence of iron ions (up to 260 mM) and iron sulfide (to 186 mg/l) and in the absence or presence of biocidal corrosion inhibitors.

  3. In vivo bioluminescence imaging of Burkholderia mallei respiratory infection and treatment in the mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane eMassey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent imaging (BLI technology is a powerful tool for monitoring infectious disease progression and treatment approaches. BLI is particularly useful for tracking fastidious intracellular pathogens that might be difficult to recover from certain organs. Burkholderia mallei, the causative agent of glanders, is a facultative intracellular pathogen and has been classified by the CDC as a Category B select agent due to its highly infectious nature and potential use as a biological weapon. Very little is known regarding pathogenesis or treatment of glanders. We investigated the use of bioluminescent reporter constructs to monitor the dynamics of infection as well as the efficacy of therapeutics for B. mallei in real time. A stable luminescent reporter B. mallei strain was created using the pUTmini-Tn5::luxKm2 plasmid and used to monitor glanders in the BALB/c murine model. Mice were infected via the intranasal route with 5x103 bacteria and monitored by BLI at 24, 48 and 72 h. We verified that our reporter construct maintained similar virulence and growth kinetics compared to wild-type B. mallei and confirmed that it maintains luminescent stability in the presence or absence of antibiotic selection. The luminescent signal was initially seen in the lungs, and progressed to the liver and spleen over the course of infection. We demonstrated that antibiotic treatment 24 h post-infection resulted in reduction of bioluminescence that can be attributed to decreased bacterial burden in target organs. These findings suggest that BLI can be used to monitor disease progression and efficacy of therapeutics during glanders infections. Finally, we report an alternative method to mini-Tn5::luxKm2 transposon using mini-Tn7-lux elements that insert site-specifically at known genomic attachment sites and that can also be used to tag bacteria.

  4. An enhanced bioluminescence-based Annexin V probe for apoptosis detection in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Trajen; Dau, Peter; Duffort, Stephanie; Daftarian, Pirouz; Joshi, Pratibha M; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2017-05-25

    The process of controlled cellular death known as apoptosis has an important central role not only in normal homeostatic maintenance of tissues, but also in numerous diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative, autoimmune, and cardiovascular diseases. As a result, new technologies with the capability to selectively detect apoptotic cells represent a central focus of research for the study of these conditions. We have developed a new biosensor for the detection of apoptotic cells, incorporating the targeted selectivity for apoptotic cells from Annexin V with the sensitivity of bioluminescence signal generation from a serum-stable mutant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc8). Our data presents a complete characterization of the structural and biochemical properties of this new Annexin-Renilla fusion protein (ArFP) construct, as well as a validation of its ability to detect apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, this work represents the first report of a bioluminescent Annexin V apoptosis sensor utilized in vivo. With this new construct, we examine apoptosis within disease-relevant animal models of surgery-induced ischemia/reperfusion, corneal injury, and retinal cell death as a model of age-related macular degeneration. In each of these experiments, we demonstrate successful application of the ArFP construct for detection and bioluminescence imaging of apoptosis within each disease or treatment model. ArFP represents an important new tool in the continuously growing kit of technologies for apoptosis detection, and our results from both in vitro and in vivo experiments suggest a diverse range of potential clinically relevant applications including cancer therapeutic screening and efficacy analysis, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease detection, and the monitoring of any number of other conditions in which apoptosis has a central role.

  5. Novel bioluminescent quantitative detection of nucleic acid amplification in real-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandelman, Olga A; Church, Vicki L; Moore, Cathy A; Kiddle, Guy; Carne, Christopher A; Parmar, Surendra; Jalal, Hamid; Tisi, Laurence C; Murray, James A H

    2010-11-30

    The real-time monitoring of polynucleotide amplification is at the core of most molecular assays. This conventionally relies on fluorescent detection of the amplicon produced, requiring complex and costly hardware, often restricting it to specialised laboratories. Here we report the first real-time, closed-tube luminescent reporter system for nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs) enabling the progress of amplification to be continuously monitored using simple light measuring equipment. The Bioluminescent Assay in Real-Time (BART) continuously reports through bioluminescent output the exponential increase of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) produced during the isothermal amplification of a specific nucleic acid target. BART relies on the coupled conversion of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) produced stoichiometrically during nucleic acid synthesis to ATP by the enzyme ATP sulfurylase, and can therefore be coupled to a wide range of isothermal NAATs. During nucleic acid amplification, enzymatic conversion of PPi released during DNA synthesis into ATP is continuously monitored through the bioluminescence generated by thermostable firefly luciferase. The assay shows a unique kinetic signature for nucleic acid amplifications with a readily identifiable light output peak, whose timing is proportional to the concentration of original target nucleic acid. This allows qualitative and quantitative analysis of specific targets, and readily differentiates between negative and positive samples. Since quantitation in BART is based on determination of time-to-peak rather than absolute intensity of light emission, complex or highly sensitive light detectors are not required. The combined chemistries of the BART reporter and amplification require only a constant temperature maintained by a heating block and are shown to be robust in the analysis of clinical samples. Since monitoring the BART reaction requires only a simple light detector, the iNAAT-BART combination is ideal

  6. Novel bioluminescent quantitative detection of nucleic acid amplification in real-time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Gandelman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The real-time monitoring of polynucleotide amplification is at the core of most molecular assays. This conventionally relies on fluorescent detection of the amplicon produced, requiring complex and costly hardware, often restricting it to specialised laboratories. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the first real-time, closed-tube luminescent reporter system for nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs enabling the progress of amplification to be continuously monitored using simple light measuring equipment. The Bioluminescent Assay in Real-Time (BART continuously reports through bioluminescent output the exponential increase of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi produced during the isothermal amplification of a specific nucleic acid target. BART relies on the coupled conversion of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi produced stoichiometrically during nucleic acid synthesis to ATP by the enzyme ATP sulfurylase, and can therefore be coupled to a wide range of isothermal NAATs. During nucleic acid amplification, enzymatic conversion of PPi released during DNA synthesis into ATP is continuously monitored through the bioluminescence generated by thermostable firefly luciferase. The assay shows a unique kinetic signature for nucleic acid amplifications with a readily identifiable light output peak, whose timing is proportional to the concentration of original target nucleic acid. This allows qualitative and quantitative analysis of specific targets, and readily differentiates between negative and positive samples. Since quantitation in BART is based on determination of time-to-peak rather than absolute intensity of light emission, complex or highly sensitive light detectors are not required. CONCLUSIONS: The combined chemistries of the BART reporter and amplification require only a constant temperature maintained by a heating block and are shown to be robust in the analysis of clinical samples. Since monitoring the BART reaction requires only a

  7. Organization and comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes of bioluminescent Elateroidea (Coleoptera: Polyphaga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Danilo T; Mitani, Yasuo; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Viviani, Vadim R

    2016-07-25

    Mitochondrial genome organization in the Elateroidea superfamily (Coleoptera), which include the main families of bioluminescent beetles, has been poorly studied and lacking information about Phengodidae family. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of Neotropical Lampyridae (Bicellonycha lividipennis), Phengodidae (Brasilocerus sp.2 and Phrixothrix hirtus) and Elateridae (Pyrearinus termitilluminans, Hapsodrilus ignifer and Teslasena femoralis). All species had a typical insect mitochondrial genome except for the following: in the elaterid T. femoralis genome there is a non-coding region between NADH2 and tRNA-Trp; in the phengodids Brasilocerus sp.2 and P. hirtus genomes we did not find the tRNA-Ile and tRNA-Gln. The P. hirtus genome showed a ~1.6kb non-coding region, the rearrangement of tRNA-Tyr, a new tRNA-Leu copy, and several regions with higher AT contents. Phylogenetics analysis using Bayesian and ML models indicated that the Phengodidae+Rhagophthalmidae are closely related to Lampyridae family, and included Drilus flavescens (Drilidae) as an internal clade within Elateridae. This is the first report that compares the mitochondrial genomes organization of the three main families of bioluminescent Elateroidea, including the first Neotropical Lampyridae and Phengodidae. The losses of tRNAs, and translocation and duplication events found in Phengodidae mt genomes, mainly in P. hirtus, may indicate different evolutionary rates in these mitochondrial genomes. The mitophylogenomics analysis indicates the monophyly of the three bioluminescent families and a closer relationship between Lampyridae and Phengodidae/Rhagophthalmidae, in contrast with previous molecular analysis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Longitudinal noninvasive monitoring of transcription factor activation in cardiovascular regulatory nuclei using bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeffrey R; Infanger, David W; Braga, Valdir A; Zhang, Yulong; Sharma, Ram V; Engelhardt, John F; Davisson, Robin L

    2008-04-22

    The ability to monitor transcription factor (TF) activation in the central nervous system (CNS) has the potential to provide novel information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying a wide range of neurobiological processes. However, traditional biochemical assays limit the mapping of TF activity to select time points. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has emerged as an attractive technology for visualizing internal molecular events in the same animal over time. Here, we evaluated the utility of BLI, in combination with virally mediated delivery of reporter constructs to cardiovascular nuclei, for monitoring of TF activity in these discrete brain regions. Following viral gene transfer of NF-kappaB-driven luciferase reporter to the subfornical organ (SFO), BLI enabled daily measurements of baseline TF activity in the same animal for 1 mo. Importantly, systemic endotoxin, a stimulator of NF-kappaB activity, induced dramatic and dose-dependent increases in NF-kappaB-dependent bioluminescence in the SFO up to 30 days after gene transfer. Cotreatment with a dominant-negative IkappaBalpha mutant significantly prevented endotoxin-dependent NF-kappaB activation, confirming the specificity of the bioluminescence signal. NF-kappaB-dependent luminescence signals were also stable and inducible 1 mo following delivery of luciferase reporter construct to the paraventricular nucleus or rostral ventrolateral medulla. Lastly, using targeted adenoviral delivery of an AP-1 responsive luciferase reporter, we showed similar baseline and endotoxin-induced AP-1 activity in these same brain regions as with NF-kappaB reporters. These results demonstrate that BLI, in combination with virally mediated gene transfer, is a powerful method for longitudinal monitoring and quantification of TF activity in targeted CNS nuclei in vivo.

  9. Effect of chemical cleaning agents and commercial sanitizers on ATP bioluminescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, T A; Russell, S M; Fletcher, D L

    1999-01-01

    Nine chemical cleaning agents at three concentrations were studied to determine the effect on ATP bioluminescence measurements from pure ATP (PATP) and ATP from chicken exudate (CJATP). The nine commercial cleaning and sanitizing chemicals were concentrated foaming acid (FA), acid sanitizer (AS), iodine cleaner-disinfectant (ZI), alkaline cleaner-degreaser (PC), chlorinated alkaline cleaner (CA), chlorinated sanitizer (CS), quaternary ammonium (QA), antibiofilm agent (AB), and acidic peroxygen sanitizer (HP). Effect was reported as a percent change from the log10 relative light unit (LRLU) measurements of the control groups. All cleaners and sanitizers were tested at one-tenth of the manufacturer's recommended level (MRL), MRL, and two times MRL. FA, PC, and CA at all three concentrations significantly decreased PATP and CJATP LRLU. AS decreased PATP and CJATP LRLU at 200 and 400 ppm quaternary ammonium. ZI decreased PATP LRLU at MRL or greater, while CJATP LRLU were decreased by all concentrations of ZI tested. CS decreased PATP LRLU in a dose-dependent manner; however, for CJATP, LRLU decreased slightly at the two lower concentrations but were not affected by 1,200 ppm CS. QA at MRL or above for PATP or at all concentrations for CJATP significantly increased LRLU. AB decreased LRLU at all concentrations tested for PATP or at MRL or greater for CJATP. HPA at MRL or greater for PATP or at all concentrations for CJATP significantly reduced LRLU. These results demonstrate that commercial sanitizers and cleansers may squelch or increase LRLU measurements when the chemical comes into direct contact with the ATP bioluminescence reagents. Hence, when using ATP bioluminescence as a means of determining sanitary quality of food-processing equipment, it is essential to consider the type and concentration of chemical cleaner or sanitizer being used on the equipment prior to testing.

  10. In vivo bioluminescence imaging using orthotopic xenografts towards patient's derived-xenograft Medulloblastoma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Ferrucci, Veronica; DE Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is a cerebellar neoplasia of the central nervous system. Four molecular subgrups have been identified (MBWNT, MBSHH, MBgroup3 and MBgroup4) with distinct genetics and clinical outcome. Among these, MBgroup3-4 are highly metastatic with the worst prognosis. The current standard therapy includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Thus, specific treatments adapted to cure those different molecular subgroups are needed. The use of orthotopic xenograft models, together with the non-invasive in vivo biolumiscence imaging (BLI) technology, is emerging during preclinical studies to test novel therapeutics for medulloblastoma treatment. Orthotopic MB xenografts were performed by injection of Daoy-luc cells, that had been previously infected with lentiviral particles to stably express luciferase gene, into the fourth right ventricle of the cerebellum of ten nude mice. For the implantation, specific stereotactic coordinates were used. Seven days after the implantation the mice were imaged by acquisitions of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using IVIS 3D Illumina Imaging System (Xenogen). Tumor growth was evaluated by quantifying the bioluminescence signals using the integrated fluxes of photons within each area of interest using the Living Images Software Package 3.2 (Xenogen-Perkin Elmer). Finally, histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumorigenic cells into the cerebellum of the mice. We describe a method to use the in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) showing the potential to be used to investigate the potential antitumorigenic effects of a drug for in vivo medulloblastoma treatment. We also discuss other studies in which this technology has been applied to obtain a more comprehensive knowledge of medulloblastoma using orthotopic xenograft mouse models. There is a need to develop patient's derived-xenograft (PDX) model systems to test novel drugs for medulloblastoma treatment within each molecular sub

  11. In vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Burkholderia mallei Respiratory Infection and Treatment in the Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Shane; Johnston, Katie; Mott, Tiffany M; Judy, Barbara M; Kvitko, Brian H; Schweizer, Herbert P; Estes, D Mark; Torres, Alfredo G

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) technology is a powerful tool for monitoring infectious disease progression and treatment approaches. BLI is particularly useful for tracking fastidious intracellular pathogens that might be difficult to recover from certain organs. Burkholderia mallei, the causative agent of glanders, is a facultative intracellular pathogen and has been classified by the CDC as a Category B select agent due to its highly infectious nature and potential use as a biological weapon. Very little is known regarding pathogenesis or treatment of glanders. We investigated the use of bioluminescent reporter constructs to monitor the dynamics of infection as well as the efficacy of therapeutics for B. mallei in real-time. A stable luminescent reporter B. mallei strain was created using the pUTmini-Tn5::luxKm2 plasmid and used to monitor glanders in the BALB/c murine model. Mice were infected via the intranasal route with 5 × 10(3) bacteria and monitored by BLI at 24, 48, and 72 h. We verified that our reporter construct maintained similar virulence and growth kinetics compared to wild-type B. mallei and confirmed that it maintains luminescent stability in the presence or absence of antibiotic selection. The luminescent signal was initially seen in the lungs, and progressed to the liver and spleen over the course of infection. We demonstrated that antibiotic treatment 24 h post-infection resulted in reduction of bioluminescence that can be attributed to decreased bacterial burden in target organs. These findings suggest that BLI can be used to monitor disease progression and efficacy of therapeutics during glanders infections. Finally, we report an alternative method to mini-Tn5::luxKm2 transposon using mini-Tn7-lux elements that insert site-specifically at known genomic attachment sites and that can also be used to tag bacteria.

  12. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI: Noninvasive Visualization and Interrogation of Biological Processes in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Ripp

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI is increasingly being utilized as a method for modern biological research. This process, which involves the noninvasive interrogation of living animals using light emitted from luciferase-expressing bioreporter cells, has been applied to study a wide range of biomolecular functions such as gene function, drug discovery and development, cellular trafficking, protein-protein interactions, and especially tumorigenesis, cancer treatment, and disease progression. This article will review the various bioreporter/biosensor integrations of BLI and discuss how BLI is being applied towards a new visual understanding of biological processes within the living organism.

  13. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI): Noninvasive Visualization and Interrogation of Biological Processes in Living Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan M.; Xu, Tingting; Sayler, Gary S.; Ripp, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is increasingly being utilized as a method for modern biological research. This process, which involves the noninvasive interrogation of living animals using light emitted from luciferase-expressing bioreporter cells, has been applied to study a wide range of biomolecular functions such as gene function, drug discovery and development, cellular trafficking, protein-protein interactions, and especially tumorigenesis, cancer treatment, and disease progression. This article will review the various bioreporter/biosensor integrations of BLI and discuss how BLI is being applied towards a new visual understanding of biological processes within the living organism. PMID:22346573

  14. Novel peptide chemistry in terrestrial animals: natural luciferin analogues from the bioluminescent earthworm Fridericia heliota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinnyi, Maxim A; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Petushkov, Valentin N; Kaskova, Zinaida M; Rodionova, Natalja S; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Baranov, Mikhail S; Mineev, Konstantin S; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2015-03-02

    We report isolation and structure elucidation of AsLn5, AsLn7, AsLn11 and AsLn12: novel luciferin analogs from the bioluminescent earthworm Fridericia heliota. They were found to be highly unusual modified peptides, comprising either of the two tyrosine-derived chromophores, CompX or CompY and a set of amino acids, including threonine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, homoarginine, and unsymmetrical N,N-dimethylarginine. These natural compounds represent a unique peptide chemistry found in terrestrial animals and rise novel questions concerning their biosynthetic origin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Measurement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in single red blood cells using the firefly bioluminescent reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostuk, R.K.; Muhs, A.G.; Kirkpatrick, F.H.; Gabel, C.W.

    1977-01-01

    A unique optical instrument is described which uses the firefly bioluminscent reaction to measure adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in single red blood cells. The method allows chemical content level to be associated with individual cell features. The optical instrument consists of a phase contrast microscope to view cells, a pulsed argon-ion laser to rupture the cell membrane, and a photon counting system to measure the bioluminescent yield. The technique has been calibrated against a standard ATP measurement using bulk analysis methods. The ATP loss mechanism for blood cells in a controlled depletion experiment was also investigated.

  16. Effect of Iron Fe (II and Fe (III in a Binary System Evaluated Bioluminescent Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sorokina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of iron ions Fe2+ and Fe3+ on the bioluminescent recombinant strain of Escherichia coli in a single-component and binary system. Found that for the bacteria E. coli Fe3+ ions are more toxic than Fe2+. Under the combined effect of iron toxicity increases, the percentage of luminescence quenching increases, but the value is much less than the sum of the indicator for the Fe2+ and Fe3+. The biological effect of insertion of iron is not proportional to their content in the mixture.

  17. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence for hygiene testing of rubber liners and tubes on dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, Ida Clemensson; Lundh, Åse; Sjaunja, Kerstin Svennersten; Cederholm, Marika

    2017-12-28

    Prevention of biofilm formation in milking equipment is important to ensure good hygiene quality of raw milk. Key factors to achieving good results are a successful cleaning procedure and a method to check the cleanliness of milking equipment surfaces. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence is a fast and easy method for investigating bacterial contamination of surfaces. However, previous studies on the potential of ATP bioluminescence to assess the hygiene status of milking equipment have been hampered by lack of a validated test procedure. The aim of this work was therefore to establish a test procedure for assessing the cleanliness of milking equipment using ATP bioluminescence, and apply the method on-farm to study the hygiene status of aging rubber material in milking equipment. In developing the test procedure, the effects of sampling location in tubes and liners, sampling of dry versus wet barrels, milking point in the parlor, and acid or alkali detergent on ATP values were investigated. The results showed that, to obtain reproducible results, replicate sampling from the same milking points in the parlor is important. For milk tubes, samples should preferably be taken from the milk meter side, for liners on the inside of the barrel. For best results, sampling should be performed after use of alkali detergent. No beneficial effect was observed of sampling dry liner barrels, so sampling in the standardized test procedure is performed directly after cleaning. The standardized test procedure was used on 3 different commercial farms and sampling was initiated after replacement of old rubber parts. On one of the farms, additional sampling was performed to evaluate total bacteria count and determine the association with ATP level. The results suggest that, provided an efficient cleaning procedure is used, the hygiene quality of milking equipment can be maintained during the recommended lifetime of the rubberware. However, due to occasional variation in cleaning

  18. Bioluminescence Microscopy as a Method to Measure Single Cell Androgen Receptor Activity Heterogeneous Responses to Antiandrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pallavi; Neveu, Bertrand; Velot, Lauriane; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-09-28

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is well-documented. Therefore, techniques to monitor single cell heterogeneous responses to treatment are needed. We developed a highly translational and quantitative bioluminescence microscopy method to measure single cell androgen receptor (AR) activity modulation by antiandrogens from fluid biopsies. We showed that this assay can detect heterogeneous cellular response to drug treatment and that the sum of single cell AR activity can mirror the response in the whole cell population. This method may thus be used to monitor heterogeneous dynamic treatment responses in cancer cells.

  19. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    OpenAIRE

    Byers, D M

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from [1-14C]myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit p...

  20. Longitudinal Bioluminescent Quantification of Three Dimensional Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Michael K; Schiemann, William P

    2013-12-05

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture systems is widely accepted as representing a more physiologically relevant means to propagate mammary epithelial and breast cancer cells. However, 3D cultures systems are plagued by several experimental and technical limitations as compared to their traditional 2D counterparts. For instance, quantifying the growth of mammary epithelial or breast cancer organoids longitudinally is particularly troublesome using standard [3H]thymidine or MTT assay systems, or using computer-assisted area calculations. Likewise, the nature of the multicellular aggregates and organoids formed by breast cancer cells under 3D conditions precludes efficient recovery of the cells from 3D matrices, an event that is time consuming and leads to spurious results. The assay described here utilizes stable expression of firefly luciferase as means to quantify the longitudinal outgrowth of cells propagated within a 3D matrices. The major advantages of this technique include its high-throughput nature and ability to longitudinally track single wells over a defined period of time, thereby decreasing the costs associated with assay performance. Finally, this technique can be readily combined with drug treatments and/or genetic manipulations to assay their effects on the growth of 3D organoids.

  1. Expression of a humanized viral 2A-mediated lux operon efficiently generates autonomous bioluminescence in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S; Close, Dan M

    2014-01-01

    Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux) cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines. The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations. Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines tested without the induction of cytotoxicity. This

  2. Expression of a humanized viral 2A-mediated lux operon efficiently generates autonomous bioluminescence in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Xu

    Full Text Available Expression of autonomous bioluminescence from human cells was previously reported to be impossible, suggesting that all bioluminescent-based mammalian reporter systems must therefore require application of a potentially influential chemical substrate. While this was disproven when the bacterial luciferase (lux cassette was demonstrated to function in a human cell, its expression required multiple genetic constructs, was functional in only a single cell type, and generated a significantly reduced signal compared to substrate-requiring systems. Here we investigate the use of a humanized, viral 2A-linked lux genetic architecture for the efficient introduction of an autobioluminescent phenotype across a variety of human cell lines.The lux cassette was codon optimized and assembled into a synthetic human expression operon using viral 2A elements as linker regions. Human kidney, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer cell lines were both transiently and stably transfected with the humanized operon and the resulting autobioluminescent phenotype was evaluated using common imaging instrumentation. Autobioluminescent cells were screened for cytotoxic effects resulting from lux expression and their utility as bioreporters was evaluated through the demonstration of repeated monitoring of single populations over a prolonged period using both a modified E-SCREEN assay for estrogen detection and a classical cytotoxic compound detection assay for the antibiotic Zeocin. Furthermore, the use of self-directed bioluminescent initiation in response to target detection was assessed to determine its amenability towards deployment as fully autonomous sensors. In all cases, bioluminescent measurements were supported with traditional genetic and transcriptomic evaluations.Our results demonstrate that the viral 2A-linked, humanized lux genetic architecture successfully produced autobioluminescent phenotypes in all cell lines tested without the induction of cytotoxicity

  3. Characterization of G-protein coupled receptor kinase interaction with the neurokinin-1 receptor using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Holliday, Nicholas D; Hansen, Jakob L

    2007-01-01

    To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase-inactive muta......To analyze the interaction between the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), we performed bioluminescence resonance energy transfer(2) (BRET(2)) measurements between the family A NK-1 receptor and GRK2 and GRK5 as well as their respective kinase...

  4. Screening for antibacterial activity in 72 species of wood-colonizing fungi by the Vibrio fisheri bioluminescence method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrimec, Maja Berden; Zrimec, Alexis; Slanc, Petra; Kac, Javor; Kreft, Samo

    2004-01-01

    Resistance of pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics leads scientists to discover new antibacterial drugs. Ninety samples of wood-colonizing fungi were cultivated on agar plates, and their extracts tested for antibacterial activity using the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence test. Two fungi species, Serpula lacrymans and Nectria vilior, were found to be a potential new source of thermostable antibiotics. Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence test was found to be a useful method for antibacterial activity screening from the samples of natural origin. Copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co.

  5. Experimental measurement of the scatter fraction in skull and body CT for teams 64- slice computed tomography; Medida experimental de la fraccion de dispersion TC en craneo y cuerpo para equipo de tomografia computarizada de 64 cortes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, G.; Haro, G.; Herrador, M.

    2011-07-01

    Different formalisms for the calculation of shielding in Cf equipment, the proposed document 147 of NCRP are widely accepted. Of the three methods mentioned in the protocol, two involve the use of two independent factor a of equipment, called scatter fraction CT in skull and body. Interestingly, the experimental measurement of the same, especially in those models following the publication of the document, which are also coincides with the highest number of detector channels and overall a greater radiation beam in the z axis.

  6. Effect of enhanced Renilla luciferase and fluorescent protein variants on the Foerster distance of Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacres, Helen, E-mail: helen.dacres@csiro.au [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Michie, Michelle; Wang, Jian [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia); Pfleger, Kevin D.G. [Laboratory for Molecular Endocrinology-GPCRs, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) and Centre for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Trowell, Stephen C. [CSIRO Food Futures Flagship and Ecosystem Sciences, Canberra (Australia)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First experimental determination of Foerster distance (R{sub 0}) for enhanced BRET systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of brighter BRET components RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components substantially increased (25%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 1} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using brighter BRET components marginally increased (2-9%) R{sub 0} of the BRET{sup 2} system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brighter BRET components improve the different weaknesses of BRET{sup 1} and BRET{sup 2} systems. -- Abstract: Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is an important tool for monitoring macromolecular interactions and is useful as a transduction technique for biosensor development. Foerster distance (R{sub 0}), the intermolecular separation characterized by 50% of the maximum possible energy transfer, is a critical BRET parameter. R{sub 0} provides a means of linking measured changes in BRET ratio to a physical dimension scale and allows estimation of the range of distances that can be measured by any donor-acceptor pair. The sensitivity of BRET assays has recently been improved by introduction of new BRET components, RLuc2, RLuc8 and Venus with improved quantum yields, stability and brightness. We determined R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 1} systems incorporating novel RLuc variants RLuc2 or RLuc8, in combination with Venus, as 5.68 or 5.55 nm respectively. These values were approximately 25% higher than the R{sub 0} of the original BRET{sup 1} system. R{sub 0} for BRET{sup 2} systems combining green fluorescent proteins (GFP{sup 2}) with RLuc2 or RLuc8 variants was 7.67 or 8.15 nm, i.e. only 2-9% greater than the original BRET{sup 2} system despite being {approx}30-fold brighter.

  7. Bioluminescence Imaging Enhances Analysis of Drug Responses in a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Pediatric ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Luke; Richmond, Jennifer; Evans, Kathryn; Carol, Hernan; Jing, Duohui; Kurmasheva, Raushan T; Billups, Catherine A; Houghton, Peter J; Smith, Malcolm A; Lock, Richard B

    2017-07-15

    Purpose: Robust preclinical models of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are essential in prioritizing promising therapies for clinical assessment in high-risk patients. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of ALL provide a clinically relevant platform for assessing novel drugs, with efficacy generally assessed by enumerating circulating human lymphoblasts in mouse peripheral blood (PB) as an indicator of disease burden. While allowing indirect measurement of disease burden in real time, this technique cannot assess treatment effects on internal reservoirs of disease. We explore benefits of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to evaluate drug responses in ALL PDXs, compared with PB monitoring. BLI-based thresholds of drug response are also explored.Experimental Design: ALL PDXs were lentivirally transduced to stably express luciferase and green fluorescent protein. In vivo PDX responses to an induction-type regimen of vincristine, dexamethasone, and L-asparaginase were assessed by BLI and PB. Residual disease at day 28 after treatment initiation was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of major organs. BLI and PB were subsequently used to evaluate efficacy of the Bcl-2 inhibitor venetoclax.Results: BLI considerably accelerated and enhanced detection of leukemia burden compared with PB and identified sites of residual disease during treatment in a quantitative manner, highlighting limitations in current PB-based scoring criteria. Using BLI alongside enumeration of human lymphoblasts in PB and bone marrow, we were able to redefine response criteria analogous to the clinical setting.Conclusions: BLI substantially improves the stringency of preclinical drug testing in pediatric ALL PDXs, which will likely be important in prioritizing effective agents for clinical assessment. Clin Cancer Res; 23(14); 3744-55. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. ATP bioluminescence method: tool for rapid screening of organic and microbial contaminants on deteriorated mural paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unković, Nikola; Ljaljević Grbić, Milica; Stupar, Miloš; Vukojević, Jelena; Subakov-Simić, Gordana; Jelikić, Aleksa; Stanojević, Dragan

    2015-11-24

    The extent of the microbial contamination of the seventeenth-century wall paintings in the nave of the old Church of the Holy Ascension (Veliki Krčimir, Serbia) was evaluated via newly implemented ATP bioluminescence method, and traditional cultivation-based method, utilising commercially available dip slides. To assess the validity of ATP, as a biomarker for rapid detection of mural surface contamination, obtained zones of cleanliness values, in range from 1.0 to 5.3, were compared to documented total microbial counts, ranging between seven and 247 CFU/cm 2 . Small coefficients of determination, 0.0106-0.0385, suggest poor correlation between microbial counts and surface ATP levels; however, zones of cleanliness values are of great help in determining the high points of contamination, aka 'hotspots', which should be given special attention during sampling and investigation using other methods. In addition, various aspects of the possible implementation of the ATP bioluminescence method in an integrated system of wall painting conservation are discussed.

  9. Association of bioluminescent bacteria from blue swimmer crab Portunus pelagicus (Linneaus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnavenkataraman Govindasamy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To screen the bioluminescent bacteria from Portunus pelagicus (P. pelagicus at Thondi coast, Palk Strait, Bay of Bengal, India. Methods: Physico-chemical parameter including atmospheric and surfacewater temperature, pH, salinity and dissolved oxygen were analyzed. The population of bioluminescent bacterium was screened in ambient water and blue swimmer crab of P. pelagicus (muscle, gill, hemolymph, shell and colony forming unit (CFU was calculated. Result: Atmospheric and surface water temperatures varied from 26.1 and 27.3 °C to 33.4 and 32.6 °C, respectively; salinity varied from 28.4% to 34.3%, pH varied from 7.6 to 8.6, and dissolved oxygen varied from 4.8 to 6.9 O2 ml/l. In addition, the maximum CFU value was identified (12.63 x104 CFU/ml during postmonsoon season and the minimum level (1.09 x104 CFU/ml identified during summer season. Further, based on the phenotypic characterizations the isolated strain were identified as Vibrio harveyi (V. harveyi. Conclusions: It is concluded from that the incidence of V. harveyi infections was frequently identified with edible crab of P. pelagicus, throughout the study periods in different seasons.

  10. Detection of Antibodies in Blood Plasma Using Bioluminescent Sensor Proteins and a Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Remco; den Hartog, Ilona; Zijlema, Stefan E; Thijssen, Vito; van der Beelen, Stan H E; Merkx, Maarten

    2016-04-19

    Antibody detection is of fundamental importance in many diagnostic and bioanalytical assays, yet current detection techniques tend to be laborious and/or expensive. We present a new sensor platform (LUMABS) based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) that allows detection of antibodies directly in solution using a smartphone as the sole piece of equipment. LUMABS are single-protein sensors that consist of the blue-light emitting luciferase NanoLuc connected via a semiflexible linker to the green fluorescent acceptor protein mNeonGreen, which are kept close together using helper domains. Binding of an antibody to epitope sequences flanking the linker disrupts the interaction between the helper domains, resulting in a large decrease in BRET efficiency. The resulting change in color of the emitted light from green-blue to blue can be detected directly in blood plasma, even at picomolar concentrations of antibody. Moreover, the modular architecture of LUMABS allows changing of target specificity by simple exchange of epitope sequences, as demonstrated here for antibodies against HIV1-p17, hemagglutinin (HA), and dengue virus type I. The combination of sensitive ratiometric bioluminescent detection and the intrinsic modularity of the LUMABS design provides an attractive generic platform for point-of-care antibody detection that avoids the complex liquid handling steps associated with conventional immunoassays.

  11. UV and arsenate toxicity: a specific and sensitive yeast bioluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhrat, Anya; Eltzov, Evgeni; Finkelstein, Yishay; Marks, Robert S; Raveh, Dina

    2011-06-01

    We describe a Saccharomyces cerevisiae bioluminescence assay for UV and arsenate in which bacterial luciferase genes are regulated by the promoter of the yeast gene, UFO1. UFO1 encodes the F-box subunit of the Skp1–Cdc53–F-box protein ubiquitin ligase complex and is induced by DNA damage and by arsenate. We engineered the UFO1 promoter into an existing yeast bioreporter that employs human genes for detection of steroid hormone-disrupting compounds in water bodies. Our analysis indicates that use of an endogenous yeast promoter in different mutant backgrounds allows discrimination between different environmental signals. The UFO1-engineered yeast give a robust bioluminescence response to UVB and can be used for evaluating UV protective sunscreens. They are also effective in detecting extremely low concentrations of arsenate, particularly in pdr5Δ mutants that lack a mechanism to extrude toxic chemicals; however, they do not respond to cadmium or mercury. Combined use of endogenous yeast promoter elements and mutants of stress response pathways may facilitate development of high-specificity yeast bioreporters able to discriminate between closely related chemicals present together in the environment.

  12. Fluorescence and Bioluminescence Imaging of Angiogenesis in Flk1-Nano-lantern Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Jun; Inagaki, Shigenori; Nishie, Tomomi; Sakasai, Tomoki; Tanaka, Junko; Watanabe, Chisato; Mizutani, Ken-Ichi; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Ken; Takara, Kazuhiro; Naito, Hisamichi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Nagai, Takeharu; Takahashi, Satoru; Ema, Masatsugu

    2017-04-20

    Angiogenesis is important for normal development as well as for tumour growth. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying angiogenesis are not fully understood, partly because of the lack of a good animal model for imaging. Here, we report the generation of a novel transgenic (Tg) mouse that expresses a bioluminescent reporter protein, Nano-lantern, under the control of Fetal liver kinase 1 (Flk1). Flk1-Nano-lantern BAC Tg mice recapitulated endogenous Flk1 expression in endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells during development and tumour growth. Importantly, bioluminescence imaging of endothelial cells from the aortic rings of Flk1-Nano-lantern BAC Tg mice enabled us to observe endothelial sprouting for 18 hr without any detectable phototoxicity. Furthermore, Flk1-Nano-lantern BAC Tg mice achieved time-lapse luminescence imaging of tumour angiogenesis in freely moving mice with implanted tumours. Thus, this transgenic mouse line contributes a unique model to study angiogenesis within both physiological and pathological contexts.

  13. Coregulation of lux genes and riboflavin genes in bioluminescent bacteria of Photobacterium phosphoreum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Nack-Do; Lee, Chan Yong

    2004-09-01

    Investigation of the expression of the riboflavin (rib) genes, which are found immediately downstream of luxG in the lux operon in Photobacterium phosphoreum, provides more information relevant to the evolution of bioluminescence, as well as to the regulation of supply of flavin substrate for bacterial bioluminescence reactions. In order to answer the question of whether or not the transcriptions of lux and rib genes are integrated, a transcriptional termination assay was performed with P. phosphoreum DNA, containing the possible stem-loop structures, located in the intergenic region of luxF and luxE (OmegaA), of luxG and ribE (OmegaB), and downstream of ribA (OmegaC). The expression of the CAT (Chloramphenicol Acetyl Transferase) reporter gene was remarkably decreased upon the insertion of the stem-loop structure (OmegaC) into the strong lux promoter and the reporter gene. However, the insertion of the structure (OmegaB) into the intergenic region of the lux and the rib genes caused no significant change in expression from the CAT gene. In addition, the single stranded DNA in the same region was protected by the P. phosphoreum mRNA from the S1 nuclease protection assay. These results suggest that lux genes and rib genes are part of the same operon in P. phosphoreum. Copyright 2004 The Microbiological Society of Korea

  14. Cell-based, bioluminescent assay for monitoring the interaction between PCSK9 and the LDL receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Sarah J; Machleidt, Thomas; Cali, James J; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring the expression of cell-surface receptors, their interaction with extracellular ligands, and their fate upon ligand binding is important for understanding receptor function and developing new therapies. We describe a cell-based method that utilizes bioluminescent protein complementation technology to interrogate binding of a cellular receptor with its extracellular protein ligand, specifically LDL receptor (LDLR) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Purified, full-length tagged PCSK9 is added to assay wells containing cells that stably express LDLR with an extracellular complementary tag. When the tagged PCSK9 binds the receptor, a bright luminescence signal is generated. The interaction is detected at the cell membrane with add-and-read simplicity, no wash steps, and flexibility, allowing data to be collected in endpoint format, kinetically, or with bioluminescent imaging. The assay is flexible, is rapid, and reports accurate biology. It is amenable to 96-well and 384-well formats, and the robustness allows for screening of new drug candidates (Z' = 0.83). The assay reports correct potencies for antibody titrations across a 50%-150% potency range and detects potency changes due to heat stress, suggesting that it may be useful during drug development. This assay technology can be broadly applied when studying other receptors with their extracellular ligands, whether protein or small-molecule binding partners. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Ting, Gann; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/ tk-luc). A good correlation ( R2=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm 3 ( R2=0.907). γ Scintigraphy combined with [ 131I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  16. Development of a Fully Automated Flow Injection Analyzer Implementing Bioluminescent Biosensors for Water Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Georgiou

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of an automated Flow Injection analyzer for water toxicity assessment. The analyzer is validated by assessing the toxicity of heavy metal (Pb2+, Hg2+ and Cu2+ solutions. One hundred μL of a Vibrio fischeri suspension are injected in a carrier solution containing different heavy metal concentrations. Biosensor cells are mixed with the toxic carrier solution in the mixing coil on the way to the detector. Response registered is % inhibition of biosensor bioluminescence due to heavy metal toxicity in comparison to that resulting by injecting the Vibrio fischeri suspension in deionised water. Carrier solutions of mercury showed higher toxicity than the other heavy metals, whereas all metals show concentration related levels of toxicity. The biosensor’s response to carrier solutions of different pHs was tested. Vibrio fischeri’s bioluminescence is promoted in the pH 5–10 range. Experiments indicate that the whole cell biosensor, as applied in the automated fluidic system, responds to various toxic solutions.

  17. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, L.E.; Hoffner, S.E.; Ansehn, S.

    1988-08-01

    Mycobacterial growth was monitored by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP. Cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and of 25 clinical isolates of the same species were exposed to serial dilutions of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. A suppression of ATP, indicating growth inhibition, occurred for susceptible but not resistant strains within 5 to 7 days of incubation. Breakpoint concentrations between susceptibility and resistance were determined by comparing these results with those obtained by reference techniques. Full agreement was found in 99% of the assays with the resistance ratio method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and 98% of the assays were in full agreement with the radiometric system (BACTEC). A main advantage of the bioluminescence method is its rapidity, with results available as fast as with the radiometric system but at a lower cost and without the need for radioactive culture medium. The method provides kinetic data concerning drug effects within available in vivo drug concentrations and has great potential for both rapid routine susceptibility testing and research applications in studies of drug effects on mycobacteria.

  18. Bioluminescence in a complex coastal environment: 1. Temporal dynamics of nighttime water-leaving radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moline, Mark A.; Oliver, Matthew J.; Mobley, Curtis D.; Sundman, Lydia; Bensky, Thomas; Bergmann, Trisha; Bissett, W. Paul; Case, James; Raymond, Erika H.; Schofield, Oscar M. E.

    2007-11-01

    Nighttime water-leaving radiance is a function of the depth-dependent distribution of both the in situ bioluminescence emissions and the absorption and scattering properties of the water. The vertical distributions of these parameters were used as inputs for a modified one-dimensional radiative transfer model to solve for spectral bioluminescence water-leaving radiance from prescribed depths of the water column. Variation in the water-leaving radiance was consistent with local episodic physical forcing events, with tidal forcing, terrestrial runoff, particulate accumulation, and biological responses influencing the shorter timescale dynamics. There was a >90 nm shift in the peak water-leaving radiance from blue (˜474 nm) to green as light propagated to the surface. In addition to clues in ecosystem responses to physical forcing, the temporal dynamics in intensity and spectral quality of water-leaving radiance provide suitable ranges for assessing detection. This may provide the information needed to estimate the depth of internal light sources in the ocean, which is discussed in part 2 of this paper.

  19. Development of a Filtration-Based Bioluminescence Assay for Detection of Microorganisms in Tea Beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Yohei; Igarashi, Toshinori; Harada, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    The market for tea drinks as healthy beverages has been steadily expanding, and ready-to-drink beverages in polyethylene terephthalate bottles have been popular. To more rapidly and accurately test tea beverages bottled in polyethylene terephthalate for microbial contamination, a newly developed filtration device and a washing method with a commercial bioluminescence assay were combined to detect low numbers of bacterial spores, fungal conidia, and ascospores. Washing buffers were formulated with nonionic detergents from the Tween series. Commercially available tea beverages were used to evaluate the filtration capacity of the filtration device, the effect of washing buffers, and the performance of the assay. The assay was tested with serially diluted suspensions of colonies of two bacterial strains, spores of three Bacillus strains, conidia of five fungal strains, and ascospores of four fungal strains. The filtration device enabled filtration of a large sample volume (100 to 500 ml), and the washing buffer significantly decreased the background bioluminescence intensity of tea samples when compared with the no-washing method. Low numbers (1 to 10 CFU/100 ml) of the tested strains of bacteria were detected within 8 to 18 h of cultivation, and fungi were detected within 24 to 48 h. Furthermore, a whole bottle (500 ml) of mixed tea was filtered through the filtration device and microbes were detected. This method could be used for quality control of bottled beverages without preincubation.

  20. Quantum State Tomography via Reduced Density Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tao; Lu, Dawei; Klassen, Joel; Yu, Nengkun; Ji, Zhengfeng; Chen, Jianxin; Ma, Xian; Long, Guilu; Zeng, Bei; Laflamme, Raymond

    2017-01-13

    Quantum state tomography via local measurements is an efficient tool for characterizing quantum states. However, it requires that the original global state be uniquely determined (UD) by its local reduced density matrices (RDMs). In this work, we demonstrate for the first time a class of states that are UD by their RDMs under the assumption that the global state is pure, but fail to be UD in the absence of that assumption. This discovery allows us to classify quantum states according to their UD properties, with the requirement that each class be treated distinctly in the practice of simplifying quantum state tomography. Additionally, we experimentally test the feasibility and stability of performing quantum state tomography via the measurement of local RDMs for each class. These theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the advantages and possible pitfalls of quantum state tomography with local measurements.

  1. Proton computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible.

  2. Bioorthogonal Protein Conjugation: Application to the Development of a Highly Sensitive Bioluminescent Immunoassay for the Detection of Interferon-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutsiopoulou, Angeliki; Hunt, Eric; Broyles, David; Pereira, Christie Ataides; Woodward, Kristen; Dikici, Emre; Kaifer, Angel; Daunert, Sylvia; Deo, Sapna K

    2017-06-21

    Bioorthogonal conjugation eliminates the shortcomings of classical conjugation methods. The conjugation of antibodies to reporter proteins, such as bioluminescent protein, can be controlled with orthogonal conjugation methods. Here we report a bioluminescent immunoassay for the sensitive detection of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) that utilizes orthogonal conjugation of bioluminescent protein, Gaussia luciferase to anti-IFN-γ antibody. The IFN-γ is produced by the immune system and the detection of the IFN-γ is pivotal for the detection of persistent viral and bacterial infections. A bioorthogonal conjugation approach is used to conjugate an anti-IFN-γ antibody with a GLuc mutant containing the N-terminal tyrosine using formylbenzene diazonium hexafluorophosphate reagent (FBDP) in hydrophilic mild pH environment yielding high conjugation efficiency (60%). This reagent is shown to be specific for tyrosine (Tyr) residues. Therefore, conjugation through Tyr was orthogonal and not detrimental to the bioluminescence activity of GLuc. The immunoassay described in this paper is a sandwich type assay and involves a capture and a detection antibody. The assay was validated for its robustness, precision, accuracy, limit of detection, and recovery.

  3. Bioluminescent response of individual dinoflagellate cells to hydrodynamic stress measured with millisecond resolution in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latz, Michael I; Bovard, Michelle; VanDelinder, Virginia; Segre, Enrico; Rohr, Jim; Groisman, Alex

    2008-09-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence serves as a model system for examining mechanosensing by suspended motile unicellular organisms. The response latency, i.e. the delay time between the mechanical stimulus and luminescent response, provides information about the mechanotransduction and signaling process, and must be accurately known for dinoflagellate bioluminescence to be used as a flow visualization tool. This study used a novel microfluidic device to measure the response latency of a large number of individual dinoflagellates with a resolution of a few milliseconds. Suspended cells of several dinoflagellate species approximately 35 microm in diameter were directed through a 200 microm deep channel to a barrier with a 15 microm clearance impassable to the cells. Bioluminescence was stimulated when cells encountered the barrier and experienced an abrupt increase in hydrodynamic drag, and was imaged using high numerical aperture optics and a high-speed low-light video system. The average response latency for Lingulodinium polyedrum strain HJ was 15 ms (N>300 cells) at the three highest flow rates tested, with a minimum latency of 12 ms. Cells produced multiple flashes with an interval as short as 5 ms between individual flashes, suggesting that repeat stimulation involved a subset of the entire intracellular signaling pathway. The mean response latency for the dinoflagellates Pyrodinium bahamense, Alexandrium monilatum and older and newer isolates of L. polyedrum ranged from 15 to 22 ms, similar to the latencies previously determined for larger dinoflagellates with different morphologies, possibly reflecting optimization of dinoflagellate bioluminescence as a rapid anti-predation behavior.

  4. Bioluminescence-Based Method for Measuring Assimilable Organic Carbon in Pretreatment Water for Reverse Osmosis Membrane Desalination ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Lauren A.; Schneider, Orren D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    A bioluminescence-based assimilable organic carbon (AOC) test was developed for determining the biological growth potential of seawater within the reverse osmosis desalination pretreatment process. The test uses Vibrio harveyi, a marine organism that exhibits constitutive luminescence and is nutritionally robust. AOC was measured in both a pilot plant and a full-scale desalination plant pretreatment. PMID:21148685

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Archana [ORNL; Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Williams, Daniel W [ORNL; Smart, Abby E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ripp, Steven Anthony [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of {approx}6.1 Mb sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over 5 genomic islands, a prophage and two plasmids.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Ripp, Steven; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Brown, Steven D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of ∼6.1 Mb of sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over five genomic islands, a prophage, and two plasmids. PMID:21742869

  7. Bioluminescence : the potential of a non-invasive bio-optical imaging technique and improvement of animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, J. W.; van Dam, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescence is an optical imaging technique that exploits the emission of photons at specific wavelengths based on energy-dependent reactions catalysed by luciferases. The technique makes it possible to monitor measure, and track biological processes in living animals. A short review is

  8. Fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using an electrostatic rod-type sampler.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Woon Park

    Full Text Available A culture-based colony counting method is the most widely used analytical technique for monitoring bioaerosols in both indoor and outdoor environments. However, this method requires several days for colony formation. In this study, our goal was fast monitoring (Sampling: 3 min, Detection: < 1 min of indoor bioaerosol concentrations with ATP bioluminescence assay using a bioaerosol sampler. For this purpose, a novel hand-held electrostatic rod-type sampler (110 mm wide, 115 mm long, and 200 mm tall was developed and used with a commercial luminometer, which employs the Adenosine triphosphate (ATP bioluminescence method. The sampler consisted of a wire-rod type charger and a cylindrical collector, and was operated with an applied voltage of 4.5 kV and a sampling flow rate of 150.7 lpm. Its performance was tested using Staphylococcus epidermidis which was aerosolized with an atomizer. Bioaerosol concentrations were measured using ATP bioluminescence method with our sampler and compared with the culture-based method using Andersen cascade impactor under controlled laboratory conditions. Indoor bioaerosol concentrations were also measured using both methods in various indoor environments. A linear correlation was obtained between both methods in lab-tests and field-tests. Our proposed sampler with ATP bioluminescence method may be effective for fast monitoring of indoor bioaerosol concentrations.

  9. Infection routes of Aeromonas salmonicida in rainbow trout monitored in vivo by real-time bioluminescence imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Simona; Kokotovic, Branko; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2017-01-01

    Recent development of imaging tools has facilitated studies of pathogen infections in vivo in real time. This trend can be exemplified by advances in bioluminescence imaging (BLI), an approach that helps to visualize dissemination of pathogens within the same animal over several time points. Here...

  10. The in vitro and in vivo effects of constitutive light expression on a bioluminescent strain of the mouse enteropathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah M. Read

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent reporter genes, such as those from fireflies and bacteria, let researchers use light production as a non-invasive and non-destructive surrogate measure of microbial numbers in a wide variety of environments. As bioluminescence needs microbial metabolites, tagging microorganisms with luciferases means only live metabolically active cells are detected. Despite the wide use of bioluminescent reporter genes, very little is known about the impact of continuous (also called constitutive light expression on tagged bacteria. We have previously made a bioluminescent strain of Citrobacter rodentium, a bacterium which infects laboratory mice in a similar way to how enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC infect humans. In this study, we compared the growth of the bioluminescent C. rodentium strain ICC180 with its non-bioluminescent parent (strain ICC169 in a wide variety of environments. To understand more about the metabolic burden of expressing light, we also compared the growth profiles of the two strains under approximately 2,000 different conditions. We found that constitutive light expression in ICC180 was near-neutral in almost every non-toxic environment tested. However, we also found that the non-bioluminescent parent strain has a competitive advantage over ICC180 during infection of adult mice, although this was not enough for ICC180 to be completely outcompeted. In conclusion, our data suggest that constitutive light expression is not metabolically costly to C. rodentium and supports the view that bioluminescent versions of microbes can be used as a substitute for their non-bioluminescent parents to study bacterial behaviour in a wide variety of environments.

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  12. Myocardial Scar Imaging by Standard Single-Energy and Dual-Energy Late Enhancement Computed Tomography: Comparison to Pathology and Electroanatomical Map in an Experimental Chronic Infarct Porcine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quynh A.; Thai, Wai-ee; Wai, Bryan; Cordaro, Kevin; Cheng, Teresa; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Xiong, Guanglei; Cheung, Jim W.; Altman, Robert; Min, James K.; Singh, Jagmeet P.; Barrett, Conor D.; Danik, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background Myocardial scar is a substrate for ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death. Late enhancement computed tomography (CT) imaging can detect scar, but it remains unclear whether newer late enhancement dual-energy (LE-DECT) acquisition has benefit over standard single-energy late enhancement (LE-CT). Objective We aim to compare late enhancement CT using newer LE-DECT acquisition and single-energy LE-CT acquisitions to pathology and electroanatomical map (EAM) in an experimental chronic myocardial infarction (MI) porcine study. Methods In 8 chronic MI pigs (59±5 kg), we performed dual-source CT, EAM, and pathology. For CT imaging, we performed 3 acquisitions at 10 minutes post-contrast: LE-CT 80 kV, LE-CT 100 kV, and LE-DECT with two post-processing software settings. Results Of the sequences, LE-CT 100 kV provided the best contrast-to-noise ratio (all p≤0.03) and correlation to pathology for scar (ρ=0.88). While LE-DECT overestimated scar (both p=0.02), LE-CT images did not (both p=0.08). On a segment basis (n=136), all CT sequences had high specificity (87–93%) and modest sensitivity (50–67%), with LE-CT 100 kV having the highest specificity of 93% for scar detection compared to pathology and agreement with EAM (κ 0.69). Conclusions Standard single-energy LE-CT, particularly 100kV, matched better to pathology and EAM than dual-energy LE-DECT for scar detection. Larger human trials as well as more technical-based studies that optimize varying different energies with newer hardware and software are warranted. PMID:25977115

  13. Revealing the ability of a novel polysaccharide bioflocculant in bioremediation of heavy metals sensed in a Vibrio bioluminescence reporter assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajayan, Arya; Seghal Kiran, G; Priyadharshini, S; Poulose, Navya; Selvin, Joseph

    2017-09-01

    A bioflocculant-producing bacterial strain, designated MSI021, was isolated from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra and demonstrated 94% flocculation activity in a kaolin clay suspension. MSI021 was identified as Bacillus cereus based on phylogenetic affiliation and biochemical characteristics. The purified extra-cellular bioflocculant was chemically elucidated as a polysaccharide molecule. The polysaccharide bioflocculant was stable under both acidic and alkaline conditions (pH 2.0-10.0) and temperatures up to 100 °C. The purified bioflocculant efficiently nucleated the formation of silver nanoparticles which showed broad spectrum antibacterial activity. The ability of the bioflocculant to remediate heavy metal toxicity was evaluated by measuring the inhibition of bioluminescence expression in Vibrio harveyi. Enrichment of heavy metals such as zinc, mercury and copper at concentrations of 1, 2 and 3 mM in culture media showed significant reduction of bioluminescence in Vibrio, whereas media enriched with heavy metals and bioflocculant showed dose dependent improvement in the expression of bioluminescence. The assay results demonstrated that the polysaccharide bioflocculant effectively mitigates heavy metal toxicity, thereby improving the expression of bioluminescence in Vibrio. This bioluminescence reporter assay can be developed into a high-throughput format to monitor and evaluate of heavy metal toxicity. The findings of this study revealed that a novel polysaccharide bioflocculant produced by a marine B. cereus demonstrated strong flocculating performance and was effective in nucleating the formation antibacterial silver nanoparticles and removing heavy metals. These results suggest that the MSI021 polysaccharide bioflocculant can be used to develop greener waste water treatment systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniell Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun" delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 μm diameter using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs, and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50 at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 μm. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  16. Seasonal variation of deep-sea bioluminescence in the Ionian Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, Jessica, E-mail: j.craig@abdn.ac.u [University of Aberdeen, Oceanlab, Main Street, Newburgh, Aberdeenshire, AB41 6AA (United Kingdom); Jamieson, Alan J.; Bagley, Philip M.; Priede, Imants G. [University of Aberdeen, Oceanlab, Main Street, Newburgh, Aberdeenshire, AB41 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-21

    The ICDeep (Image Intensified Charge Coupled Device for Deep sea research) profiler was used to measure the density of deep bioluminescent animals (BL) through the water column in the east, west and mid-Ionian Sea and in the Algerian Basin. A west to east decrease in BL density was found. Generalized additive modelling was used to investigate seasonal variation in the east and west Ionian Sea (NESTOR and NEMO neutrino telescope sites, respectively) from BL measurements in autumn 2008 and spring 2009. A significant seasonal effect was found in the west Ionian Sea (p<0.001), where a deep autumnal peak in BL density occurred between 500 and 2400 m. No significant seasonal variation in BL density was found in the east Ionian Sea (p=0.07). In both spring and autumn, significant differences in BL density were found through the water column between the east and west Ionian Sea (p<0.001).

  17. The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

  18. Bioluminescence imaging of energy depletion in vascular pathology: patent ductus arteriosus and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Olli; Ekstrand, Matias; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Levin, Max

    2012-04-01

    The artery wall may develop energy depletion due to insufficient nutritional supply. However, until recently it has not been possible to validate this hypothesis because no available technology has allowed assessment of energy metabolism with sufficient spatial resolution. We use high resolution bioluminescence metabolic imaging to study energy metabolism in two mechanistically different vascular pathologies: patent ductus arteriosus and atherosclerosis. Physiological energy depletion in postnatally constricting ductus arteriosus promotes permanent closure. Insufficient ductus energy depletion, common in preterm infants, is associated with persistent patent ductus arteriosus, a condition with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. In contrast, in atherosclerosis, energy depletion in the macrophage-rich lesion core promotes cell death contributing to lesion instability and disease progression. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Quantitative bioluminescence imaging--a method for the detection of metabolite distributions in frozen tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Walenta, Stefan; Schwickert, Georg

    1994-02-01

    A novel technique allows for measurement of metabolite distributions in tissue cryosections at a microscopic level using bioluminescence, single photon imaging, and computerized image analysis. Metabolites, such as ATP, glucose and lactate are registered in absolute concentration units, and the respective images can be correlated with each other and with histological structures by specific algorithms. One striking difference between malignant tumors and normal tissue is the pronounced heterogeneity of metabolite distributions in malignancies contrasted by rather homogeneous patterns obtained in many normal organs. The heterogeneous distribution of metabolites in solid tumors reflects the chaotic organization of the histological architecture and of the microvascular supply in cancerous tissue. Pixel-to-pixel comparison of metabolite distributions measured in cervix cancers of patients revealed a negative linear correlation between glucose and ATP concentrations at identical locations. In contrast, local lactate concentration was positively correlated with ATP.

  20. Analysis of genetically modified organisms by pyrosequencing on a portable photodiode-based bioluminescence sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qinxin; Wei, Guijiang; Zhou, Guohua

    2014-07-01

    A portable bioluminescence analyser for detecting the DNA sequence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) was developed by using a photodiode (PD) array. Pyrosequencing on eight genes (zSSIIb, Bt11 and Bt176 gene of genetically modified maize; Lectin, 35S-CTP4, CP4EPSPS, CaMV35S promoter and NOS terminator of the genetically modified Roundup ready soya) was successfully detected with this instrument. The corresponding limit of detection (LOD) was 0.01% with 35 PCR cycles. The maize and soya available from three different provenances in China were detected. The results indicate that pyrosequencing using the small size of the detector is a simple, inexpensive, and reliable way in a farm/field test of GMO analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Meaning of Interior Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The classic imaging geometry for computed tomography is for collection of un-truncated projections and reconstruction of a global image, with the Fourier transform as the theoretical foundation that is intrinsically non-local. Recently, interior tomography research has led to theoretically exact relationships between localities in the projection and image spaces and practically promising reconstruction algorithms. Initially, interior tomography was developed for x-ray computed tomography. Then, it has been elevated as a general imaging principle. Finally, a novel framework known as omni-tomography is being developed for grand fusion of multiple imaging modalities, allowing tomographic synchrony of diversified features.

  2. Bioluminescence imaging of DNA synthetic phase of cell cycle in living animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hong Chen

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence reporter proteins have been widely used in the development of tools for monitoring biological events in living cells. Currently, some assays like flow cytometry analysis are available for studying DNA synthetic phase (S-phase targeted anti-cancer drug activity in vitro; however, techniques for imaging of in vivo models remain limited. Cyclin A2 is known to promote S-phase entry in mammals. Its expression levels are low during G1-phase, but they increase at the onset of S-phase. Cyclin A2 is degraded during prometaphase by ubiquitin-dependent, proteasome-mediated proteolysis. In this study, we have developed a cyclin A2-luciferase (CYCA-Luc fusion protein targeted for ubiquitin-proteasome dependent degradation, and have evaluated its utility in screening S-phase targeted anti-cancer drugs. Similar to endogenous cyclin A2, CYCA-Luc accumulates during S-phase and is degraded during G2/M-phase. Using Cdc20 siRNA we have demonstrated that Cdc20 can mediate CYCA-Luc degradation. Moreover, using noninvasive bioluminescent imaging, we demonstrated accumulation of CYCA-Luc in response to 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT, an S-phase targeted anti-cancer drug, in human tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. Our results indicate that a CYCA-Luc fusion reporter system can be used to monitor S-phase of cell cycle, and evaluate pharmacological activity of anti-cancer drug HCPT in real time in vitro and in vivo, and is likely to provide an important tool for screening such drugs.

  3. Semisynthetic bioluminescent sensor proteins for direct detection of antibodies and small molecules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Remco; Ludwig, Susann Katrina Julie; van Gerven, Benice C B; Magdalena Estirado, Eva; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-10-17

    Single-step immunoassays that can be performed directly in solution are ideally suited for point-of-care diagnostics. Our group recently developed a new platform of bioluminescent sensor proteins (LUMABS; LUMinescent AntiBody Sensor) that allow antibody detection in blood plasma. Thus far, LUMABS has been limited to the detection of antibodies recognizing natural peptide epitopes. Here, we report the development of semisynthetic LUMABS sensors that recognize non-peptide epitopes. The non-natural amino acid para-azidophenylalanine was introduced at the position of the original antibody-recognition sites as a chemical handle to enable site-specific conjugation of synthetic epitope molecules coupled to a dibenzocylcooctyne moiety via strain-promoted click chemistry. The approach was successfully demonstrated by developing semisynthetic LUMABS sensors for antibodies targeting the small molecules dinitrophenol and creati-nine (DNP-LUMABS and CR-LUMABS) with affinities of 5.8 pM and 1.3 nM, respectively. An important application of these semisynthetic LUMABS is the detection of small molecules using a competition assay format, which is demonstrated here for the detection of creatinine. Using a preassembled complex of CR-LUMABS and an anti-creatinine antibody, the detection of high micromolar concentrations of creatinine was possible both in buffer and 1:1 diluted blood plasma. The use of semisynthetic LUMABS sensors significantly expands the range of antibody targets and enables the application of LUMABS sensors for the ratiometric bioluminescent detection of small molecules using a competitive immunoassay format.

  4. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagozdzon Agnieszka M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. Results A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. Conclusions We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  5. Application of bacterial bioluminescence to assess the efficacy of fast-acting biocides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gareth M; Tonks, Katherine M; Thorn, Robin M S; Reynolds, Darren M

    2011-11-01

    Traditional microbiological techniques are used to provide reliable data on the rate and extent of kill for a range of biocides. However, such techniques provide very limited data regarding the initial rate of kill of fast-acting biocides over very short time domains. This study describes the application of a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli expressing the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon as a whole-cell biosensor. Light emission is linked directly to bacterial metabolism; therefore, by monitoring light output, the impact of fast-acting biocides can be assessed. Electrochemically activated solutions (ECASs), bleach, Virkon, and ethanol were assessed at three concentrations (1%, 10%, 80%) in the presence of organic soiling. Over a 2-s time course, 80% ECAS produced the greatest reduction in light output in the absence of organic load but was strongly inhibited by its presence. Eighty percent ethanol outperformed all tested biocides in the presence of organic soil. Bleach and Virkon produced similar reductions in bioluminescence at matched concentrations within the time course of the assay. It was also demonstrated that the assay can be used to rapidly assess the impact of organic soiling. The use of bioluminescent bacteria as whole-cell bioreporters allows assessment of the relative efficacies of fast-acting biocides within milliseconds of application. The assay can be used to investigate activity over short or extended time domains to confirm complete metabolic inhibition of the bioreporter. Moreover, the assay may enable further elucidation of their mechanism of action by allowing the investigation of activity over time domains precluded by traditional microbiology.

  6. Application of Bacterial Bioluminescence To Assess the Efficacy of Fast-Acting Biocides▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gareth M.; Tonks, Katherine M.; Thorn, Robin M. S.; Reynolds, Darren M.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional microbiological techniques are used to provide reliable data on the rate and extent of kill for a range of biocides. However, such techniques provide very limited data regarding the initial rate of kill of fast-acting biocides over very short time domains. This study describes the application of a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli expressing the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon as a whole-cell biosensor. Light emission is linked directly to bacterial metabolism; therefore, by monitoring light output, the impact of fast-acting biocides can be assessed. Electrochemically activated solutions (ECASs), bleach, Virkon, and ethanol were assessed at three concentrations (1%, 10%, 80%) in the presence of organic soiling. Over a 2-s time course, 80% ECAS produced the greatest reduction in light output in the absence of organic load but was strongly inhibited by its presence. Eighty percent ethanol outperformed all tested biocides in the presence of organic soil. Bleach and Virkon produced similar reductions in bioluminescence at matched concentrations within the time course of the assay. It was also demonstrated that the assay can be used to rapidly assess the impact of organic soiling. The use of bioluminescent bacteria as whole-cell bioreporters allows assessment of the relative efficacies of fast-acting biocides within milliseconds of application. The assay can be used to investigate activity over short or extended time domains to confirm complete metabolic inhibition of the bioreporter. Moreover, the assay may enable further elucidation of their mechanism of action by allowing the investigation of activity over time domains precluded by traditional microbiology. PMID:21876044

  7. Imaging of bubonic plague dynamics by in vivo tracking of bioluminescent Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toan Nham

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis dissemination in a host is usually studied by enumerating bacteria in the tissues of animals sacrificed at different times. This laborious methodology gives only snapshots of the infection, as the infectious process is not synchronized. In this work we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI to follow Y. pestis dissemination during bubonic plague. We first demonstrated that Y. pestis CO92 transformed with pGEN-luxCDABE stably emitted bioluminescence in vitro and in vivo, while retaining full virulence. The light produced from live animals allowed to delineate the infected organs and correlated with bacterial loads, thus validating the BLI tool. We then showed that the first step of the infectious process is a bacterial multiplication at the injection site (linea alba, followed by a colonization of the draining inguinal lymph node(s, and subsequently of the ipsilateral axillary lymph node through a direct connection between the two nodes. A mild bacteremia and an effective filtering of the blood stream by the liver and spleen probably accounted for the early bacterial blood clearance and the simultaneous development of bacterial foci within these organs. The saturation of the filtering capacity of the spleen and liver subsequently led to terminal septicemia. Our results also indicate that secondary lymphoid tissues are the main targets of Y. pestis multiplication and that colonization of other organs occurs essentially at the terminal phase of the disease. Finally, our analysis reveals that the high variability in the kinetics of infection is attributable to the time the bacteria remain confined at the injection site. However, once Y. pestis has reached the draining lymph nodes, the disease progresses extremely rapidly, leading to the invasion of the entire body within two days and to death of the animals. This highlights the extraordinary capacity of Y. pestis to annihilate the host innate immune response.

  8. Imaging of bubonic plague dynamics by in vivo tracking of bioluminescent Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nham, Toan; Filali, Sofia; Danne, Camille; Derbise, Anne; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis dissemination in a host is usually studied by enumerating bacteria in the tissues of animals sacrificed at different times. This laborious methodology gives only snapshots of the infection, as the infectious process is not synchronized. In this work we used in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to follow Y. pestis dissemination during bubonic plague. We first demonstrated that Y. pestis CO92 transformed with pGEN-luxCDABE stably emitted bioluminescence in vitro and in vivo, while retaining full virulence. The light produced from live animals allowed to delineate the infected organs and correlated with bacterial loads, thus validating the BLI tool. We then showed that the first step of the infectious process is a bacterial multiplication at the injection site (linea alba), followed by a colonization of the draining inguinal lymph node(s), and subsequently of the ipsilateral axillary lymph node through a direct connection between the two nodes. A mild bacteremia and an effective filtering of the blood stream by the liver and spleen probably accounted for the early bacterial blood clearance and the simultaneous development of bacterial foci within these organs. The saturation of the filtering capacity of the spleen and liver subsequently led to terminal septicemia. Our results also indicate that secondary lymphoid tissues are the main targets of Y. pestis multiplication and that colonization of other organs occurs essentially at the terminal phase of the disease. Finally, our analysis reveals that the high variability in the kinetics of infection is attributable to the time the bacteria remain confined at the injection site. However, once Y. pestis has reached the draining lymph nodes, the disease progresses extremely rapidly, leading to the invasion of the entire body within two days and to death of the animals. This highlights the extraordinary capacity of Y. pestis to annihilate the host innate immune response.

  9. Video-rate bioluminescence imaging of matrix metalloproteinase-2 secreted from a migrating cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Suzuki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 plays an important role in cancer progression and metastasis. MMP-2 is secreted as a pro-enzyme, which is activated by the membrane-bound proteins, and the polarized distribution of secretory and the membrane-associated MMP-2 has been investigated. However, the real-time visualizations of both MMP-2 secretion from the front edge of a migration cell and its distribution on the cell surface have not been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The method of video-rate bioluminescence imaging was applied to visualize exocytosis of MMP-2 from a living cell using Gaussia luciferase (GLase as a reporter. The luminescence signals of GLase were detected by a high speed electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera (EM-CCD camera with a time resolution within 500 ms per image. The fusion protein of MMP-2 to GLase was expressed in a HeLa cell and exocytosis of MMP-2 was detected in a few seconds along the leading edge of a migrating HeLa cell. The membrane-associated MMP-2 was observed at the specific sites on the bottom side of the cells, suggesting that the sites of MMP-2 secretion are different from that of MMP-2 binding. CONCLUSIONS: We were the first to successfully demonstrate secretory dynamics of MMP-2 and the specific sites for polarized distribution of MMP-2 on the cell surface. The video-rate bioluminescence imaging using GLase is a useful method to investigate distribution and dynamics of secreted proteins on the whole surface of polarized cells in real time.

  10. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, D M

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from [1-14C]myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from [14C]C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from [14C]acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development.

  11. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from (1-14C)myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from (14C)C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from (14C)acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development.

  12. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zagozdzon, Agnieszka M

    2012-05-30

    AbstractBackgroundNumerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study.ResultsA new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal.ConclusionsWe have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and\\/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  13. Reconstruction of an InAs nanowire using geometric tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennington, Robert S.; König, Stefan; Alpers, Andreas

    Geometric tomography and conventional algebraic tomography algorithms are used to reconstruct cross-sections of an InAs nanowire from a tilt series of experimental annular dark-field images. Both algorithms are also applied to a test object to assess what factors affect the reconstruction quality....... When using the present algorithms, geometric tomography is faster, but artifacts in the reconstruction may be difficult to recognize....

  14. Velocity Tomography Imaging Method with Variable Grid spacing/Interval

    OpenAIRE

    Guangnan, Huang; Yang, Liu; Tryggvason, Ari; Guangyi, Hu; Tingen, Fan; Jianhua, Dong

    2013-01-01

    In variable grid spacing tomography the underground velocity distribution is parameterized with model cells of different sizes. This method can simultaneously take into account the spatially varying resolution inherent in most datasets. E.g., due to experimental design or logistic constraints, the shallow and deep subsurface velocity distribution may be very differently determined by the available data. The variable grid spacing tomography and regular grid spacing tomography are similar in mo...

  15. Ultrafast fluorescence relaxation spectroscopy of 6,7-dimethyl-(8-ribityl)-lumazine and riboflavin, free and bound to antenna proteins from bioluminescent bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petushkov, V.N.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Gobets, B.; Mourik, van F.; Lee, J.; Grondelle, van R.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2003-01-01

    The solvation dynamics of interesting bioluminescent chromophores have been determined, using subpicosecond and wavelength-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, in combination with global analysis of the multidimensional data sets. The systems investigated comprise the free ligands

  16. Effect of concentrating and exposing the bioluminescent bacteria to the non-luminescent allo-bacterial extracellular products on their luminescence

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, J.; Priya, G.G.; Kannapiran, E.

    of the physical proximity while artificially concentrating the bioluminescence bacterial cultures and their luminescence in presence of non- luminescent bacterial extra-cellular product were investigated. 3 Materials and Methods Isolation of Bacteria...

  17. Bioluminescence imaging of c-fos gene expression accompanying filial imprinting in the newly hatched chick brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Iikubo, Eiji; Hirose, Naoki; Kitajima, Takaaki; Katagiri, Sachiko; Kawamori, Ai; Fujii-Taira, Ikuko; Matsushima, Toshiya; Homma, Koichi J

    2010-06-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful tool for examining gene expression in living animals. Previously, we reported that exogenous DNA could be successfully delivered into neurons in the newly hatched chick brain using electroporation. Here, we show the in vivo bioluminescence imaging of c-fos promoter activity and its upregulation, which is associated with filial imprinting. The upregulation of c-fos gene expression correlated with both the strength of the chicks' approach activity to the training object and the acquisition of memory. The present technique should be a powerful tool for analyzing the time changes in neural activity of certain brain areas in real-time during memory formation, using brains of living animals.

  18. Quorum Sensing Signal Synthesis May Represent a Selective Advantage Independent of Its Role in Regulation of Bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Chong

    Full Text Available The evolution of biological signalling systems and apparently altruistic or cooperative traits in diverse organisms has required selection against the subversive tendencies of self-interested biological entities. The bacterial signalling and response system known as quorum sensing or Acylated Homoserine Lactone (AHL mediated gene expression is thought to have evolved through kin selection. In this in vitro study on the model quorum sensing bioluminescent marine symbiont Vibrio fischeri, competition and long-term sub culturing experiments suggest that selection for AHL synthesis (encoded by the AHL synthase gene luxI is independent of the quorum sensing regulated phenotype (bioluminescence encoded by luxCDABE. Whilst results support the hypothesis that signal response (AHL binding and transcriptional activation encoded by the luxR gene is maintained through indirect fitness benefits (kin selection, signal synthesis is maintained in the V. fischeri genome over evolutionary time through direct fitness benefits at the individual level from an unknown function.

  19. Quorum Sensing Signal Synthesis May Represent a Selective Advantage Independent of Its Role in Regulation of Bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Grace; Kimyon, Önder; Manefield, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of biological signalling systems and apparently altruistic or cooperative traits in diverse organisms has required selection against the subversive tendencies of self-interested biological entities. The bacterial signalling and response system known as quorum sensing or Acylated Homoserine Lactone (AHL) mediated gene expression is thought to have evolved through kin selection. In this in vitro study on the model quorum sensing bioluminescent marine symbiont Vibrio fischeri, competition and long-term sub culturing experiments suggest that selection for AHL synthesis (encoded by the AHL synthase gene luxI) is independent of the quorum sensing regulated phenotype (bioluminescence encoded by luxCDABE). Whilst results support the hypothesis that signal response (AHL binding and transcriptional activation encoded by the luxR gene) is maintained through indirect fitness benefits (kin selection), signal synthesis is maintained in the V. fischeri genome over evolutionary time through direct fitness benefits at the individual level from an unknown function. PMID:23825662

  20. Draft genome sequence of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading, genetically engineered bioluminescent bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C; Williams, Daniel E; Smartt, Abby E; Ripp, Steven; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Brown, Steven D; Sayler, Gary S

    2011-09-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of ∼6.1 Mb of sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over five genomic islands, a prophage, and two plasmids. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Dual monitoring using {sup 124}I-FIAU and bioluminescence for HSV1-tk suicide gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kwon, H. C. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) is the most common reporter gene and is used in cancer gene therapy with a prodrug nucleoside analog, ganciclovir (GCV). The aim of this study is to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of suicide gene therapy with 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-[{sup 124}I] iodouracil ({sup 124}I - FIAU) and bioluminescence in retrovirally HSV -tk and firefly luciferase transduced hepatoma model. The HSV -tk and firefly luciferase (Luc) was retrovirally transduced and expressed in MCA rat Morris hepatoma cells. Nude mice with subcutaneous tumors, MCA and MCA-TK-Luc, were subjected to GCV treatment (50mg/Kg/d intraperitoneally) for 5 day. PET imaging and biodistribution with ({sup 124}I-FIAU) were performed at before and after initiation of therapy with GCV. Bioluminescent signal was also measured during GCV treatment. Before GCV treatment, no significant difference in tumor volume was found in tumors between MCA and MCA-TK-Luc. After GCV treatment, tumor volume of MCA-TK-Luc markedly reduced compared to that of MCA. In biodistribution study, {sup 124}I-FIAU uptake after GCV therapy significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels (34.8 13.67 %ID/g vs 7.6 2.59 %ID/g) and bioluminescent signal was also significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels. In small animal PET imaging, {sup 124}I-FIAU selectively localized in HSV -tk expressing tumor and the therapeutic efficacy of GCV treatment was evaluated by {sup 124}I-FIAU PET imaging. {sup 124}I-FIAU PET and bioluminescence imaging in HSV-tk suicide gene therapy were effective to evaluate the therapeutic response. {sup 124}I-FIAU may serve as an efficient and selective agent for monitoring of transduced HSV1-tk gene expression in vivo in clinical trials.

  2. EVALUATION OF MONKEYPOX VIRUS INFECTION OF BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS (CYNOMYS LUDOVICIANUS) USING IN VIVO BIOLUMINESCENT IMAGING

    OpenAIRE

    Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Londoño-Navas, Angela M.; Carol U Meteyer; Pussini, Nicola; Juan G Lopera; Osorio, Jorge E; Tonie E Rocke

    2014-01-01

    Monkeypox (MPX) is a re-emerging zoonotic disease that is endemic in Central and West Africa, where it can cause a smallpox-like disease in humans. Despite many epidemiologic and field investigations of MPX, no definitive reservoir species has been identified. Using recombinant viruses expressing the firefly luciferase (luc) gene, we previously demonstrated the suitability of in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to study the pathogenesis of MPX in animal models. Here, we evaluated BLI as a no...

  3. LuxCDABE?Transformed Constitutively Bioluminescent Escherichia coli for Toxicity Screening: Comparison with Naturally Luminous Vibrio fischeri

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kahru; Olesja Bondarenko; Mariliis Sihtmäe; Imbi Kurvet; Angela Ivask

    2011-01-01

    We show that in vitro toxicity assay based on inhibition of the bioluminescence of recombinant Escherichia coli encoding thermostable luciferase from Photorhabdus luminescens is a versatile alternative to Vibrio fischeri MicrotoxTM test. Performance of two luxCDABE-transformed E. coli MC1061 constructs (pDNlux) and (pSLlux) otherwise identical, but having 100-fold different background luminescence was compared with the performance of V. fischeri. The microplate luminometer and a kinetic Flash...

  4. Meaning of Interior Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong

    2013-01-01

    The classic imaging geometry for computed tomography is for collection of un-truncated projections and reconstruction of a global image, with the Fourier transform as the theoretical foundation that is intrinsically non-local. Recently, interior tomography research has led to theoretically exact relationships between localities in the projection and image spaces and practically promising reconstruction algorithms. Initially, interior tomography was developed for x-ray computed tomography. Then, it has been elevated as a general imaging principle. Finally, a novel framework known as “omni-tomography” is being developed for grand fusion of multiple imaging modalities, allowing tomographic synchrony of diversified features. PMID:23912256

  5. Multimodal Imaging Reveals Improvement of Blood Supply to an Artificial Cell Transplant Site Induced by Bioluminescent Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálisová, Andrea; Fábryová, Eva; Jirák, Daniel; Sticová, Eva; Lodererová, Alena; Herynek, Vít; Kříž, Jan; Hájek, Milan

    2017-02-01

    An artificial site for cell or pancreatic islet transplantation can be created using a polymeric scaffold, even though it suffers subcutaneously from improper vascularisation. A sufficient blood supply is crucial for graft survival and function and can be enhanced by transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of syngeneic MSCs on neoangiogenesis and cell engraftment in an artificial site by multimodal imaging. MSCs expressing a gene for luciferase were injected into the artificial subcutaneous site 7 days after scaffold implantation. MRI experiments (anatomical and dynamic contrast-enhanced images) were performed on a 4.7-T scanner using gradient echo sequences. Bioluminescent images were acquired on an IVIS Lumina optical imager. Longitudinal examination was performed for 2 months, and one animal was monitored for 16 months. We confirmed the long-term presence (lasting more than 16 months) of viable donor cells inside the scaffolds using bioluminescence imaging with an optical signal peak appearing on day 3 after MSC implantation. When compared to controls, the tissue perfusion and vessel permeability in the scaffolds were significantly improved at the site with MSCs with a maximal peak on day 9 after MSC transplantation. Our data suggest that the maximal signal obtained by bioluminescence and magnetic resonance imaging from an artificially created site between 3 and 9 days after MSC transplantation can predict the optimal time range for subsequent cellular or tissue transplantation, including pancreatic islets.

  6. Monitoring Disease Progression and Therapeutic Response in a Disseminated Tumor Model for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma by Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarethe Köberle

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Xenograft tumor models are widely studied in cancer research. Our aim was to establish and apply a model for aggressive CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, enabling us to monitor tumor growth and shrinkage in a noninvasive manner. By stably transfecting a luciferase expression vector, we created two bioluminescent human non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines, Jeko1(luci and OCI-Ly3(luci, that are CD20 positive, a prerequisite to studying rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody. To investigate the therapy response in vivo, we established a disseminated xenograft tumor model injecting these cell lines in NOD/SCID mice. We observed a close correlation of bioluminescence intensity and tumor burden, allowing us to monitor therapy response in the living animal. Cyclophosphamide reduced tumor burden in mice injected with either cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Rituximab alone was effective in OCI-Ly3(luci-injected mice and acted additively in combination with cyclophosphamide. In contrast, it improved the therapeutic outcome of Jeko1(luci-injected mice only in combination with cyclophosphamide. We conclude that well-established bioluminescence imaging is a valuable tool in disseminated xenograft tumor models. Our model can be translated to other cell lines and used to examine new therapeutic agents and schedules.

  7. In vivo imaging of hydrogen peroxide production in a murine tumor model with a chemoselective bioluminescent reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Dubikovskaya, Elena A; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Chang, Christopher J

    2010-12-14

    Living organisms produce hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) to kill invading pathogens and for cellular signaling, but aberrant generation of this reactive oxygen species is a hallmark of oxidative stress and inflammation in aging, injury, and disease. The effects of H(2)O(2) on the overall health of living animals remain elusive, in part owing to a dearth of methods for studying this transient small molecule in vivo. Here we report the design, synthesis, and in vivo applications of Peroxy Caged Luciferin-1 (PCL-1), a chemoselective bioluminescent probe for the real-time detection of H(2)O(2) within living animals. PCL-1 is a boronic acid-caged firefly luciferin molecule that selectively reacts with H(2)O(2) to release firefly luciferin, which triggers a bioluminescent response in the presence of firefly luciferase. The high sensitivity and selectivity of PCL-1 for H(2)O(2), combined with the favorable properties of bioluminescence for in vivo imaging, afford a unique technology for real-time detection of basal levels of H(2)O(2) generated in healthy, living mice. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of PCL-1 for monitoring physiological fluctuations in H(2)O(2) levels by directly imaging elevations in H(2)O(2) within testosterone-stimulated tumor xenografts in vivo. The ability to chemoselectively monitor H(2)O(2) fluxes in real time in living animals offers opportunities to dissect H(2)O(2)'s disparate contributions to health, aging, and disease.

  8. Distribution of bioluminescent fungi across old-growth and secondary tropical rain forest in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Seas-Carvajal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most research on bioluminescent fungi is concentrated on their taxonomic relationships, while the basics of their natural history and ecological relationships are poorly understood. In this study, we compared the distribution of bioluminescent fungi between old-growth and secondary forest as related to four different soil types at the tropical rainforest of La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. The study was conducted during the wet season of 2009. Bioluminescent fungi were sought following eight different transects distributed evenly in old-growth and secondary forests across four different soil types, covering an area of 9 420m². We found fungi in four different substrates: litter, fallen branches, dead trunks, and roots, for a total of 61 samples. Correspondence analysis showed that the occurrence of fungi and soil types were related (inertia=0.21, p=0.071. We found a significant relationship between the presence of fungi and the distribution of soil types (X²=18.89, df=9, p=0.026. We found only three samples with fruiting bodies, two of which had Mycena and the other had one fungus of the order Xylariales (possibly Hypoxylon sp., Kretzschmariella sp., Xylaria sp.. Future work will concentrate on exploring other aspects of their ecology, such as their dispersal and substrate preference. This information will facilitate field identification and will foster more research on the distribution, seasonality, reproductive phenology and ecological requirements of this group of Fungi.La mayoría de las investigaciones sobre los hongos bioluminiscentes se ha centrado en relaciones taxonómicas. Los aspectos básicos de la historia natural y relaciones ecológicas de este grupo son poco conocidos. En este estudio, comparamos la distribución de hongos bioluminiscentes entre el bosque primario y el secundario en la Estación Biológica La Selva, Costa Rica en relación con cuatro tipos de suelo. El estudio se realizó durante la estación lluviosa

  9. Adaptive Grid Refinement for Discrete Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van Leeuwen (Tristan); K.J. Batenburg (Joost)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractDiscrete tomography has proven itself as a powerful approach to image reconstruction from limited data. In recent years, algebraic reconstruction methods have been applied successfully to a range of experimental data sets. However, the computational cost of such reconstruction techniques

  10. Adaptive Grid Refinement for Discrete Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, K.Joost; van Leeuwen, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Discrete tomography has proven itself as a powerful approach to image reconstruction from limited data. In recent years, algebraic reconstruction methods have been applied successfully to a range of experimental data sets. However, the computational cost of such reconstruction techniques currently

  11. Photonic Breast Tomography and Tumor Aggressiveness Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Caspase-3. • Drug (PD901) treatment and cell growth curve m easurement for OVCAR5, T24 , and UMUC3 cell lines. • Flow cytometry technique for cell ...spectroscopic approaches for breast tumor detection. The CCNY researchers received training on (i) small animal handling; (ii) Cell culture, bioluminescence...aging techniques, cell culture, bioluminescence assay, Western Blotting, and other key techniques used in cancer research. Rotation I Laboratory

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  13. BarTeL, a Genetically Versatile, Bioluminescent and Granule Neuron Precursor-Targeted Mouse Model for Medulloblastoma.

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    Gregory M Shackleford

    Full Text Available Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and have been divided into four major molecular subgroups. Animal models that mimic the principal molecular aberrations of these subgroups will be important tools for preclinical studies and allow greater understanding of medulloblastoma biology. We report a new transgenic model of medulloblastoma that possesses a unique combination of desirable characteristics including, among others, the ability to incorporate multiple and variable genes of choice and to produce bioluminescent tumors from a limited number of somatic cells within a normal cellular environment. This model, termed BarTeL, utilizes a Barhl1 homeobox gene promoter to target expression of a bicistronic transgene encoding both the avian retroviral receptor TVA and an eGFP-Luciferase fusion protein to neonatal cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP cells, which are cells of origin for the sonic hedgehog (SHH subgroup of human medulloblastomas. The Barhl1 promoter-driven transgene is expressed strongly in mammalian cGNPs and weakly or not at all in mature granule neurons. We efficiently induced bioluminescent medulloblastomas expressing eGFP-luciferase in BarTeL mice by infection of a limited number of somatic cGNPs with avian retroviral vectors encoding the active N-terminal fragment of SHH and a stabilized MYCN mutant. Detection and quantification of the increasing bioluminescence of growing tumors in young BarTeL mice was facilitated by the declining bioluminescence of their uninfected maturing cGNPs. Inclusion of eGFP in the transgene allowed enriched sorting of cGNPs from neonatal cerebella. Use of a single bicistronic avian vector simultaneously expressing both Shh and Mycn oncogenes increased the medulloblastoma incidence and aggressiveness compared to mixed virus infections. Bioluminescent tumors could also be produced by ex vivo transduction of neonatal BarTeL cerebellar cells by avian retroviruses and

  14. BarTeL, a Genetically Versatile, Bioluminescent and Granule Neuron Precursor-Targeted Mouse Model for Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackleford, Gregory M; Shi, Xiang-He; Swanson, Kimberly S; Mahdi, Min Y; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Moats, Rex A

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor and have been divided into four major molecular subgroups. Animal models that mimic the principal molecular aberrations of these subgroups will be important tools for preclinical studies and allow greater understanding of medulloblastoma biology. We report a new transgenic model of medulloblastoma that possesses a unique combination of desirable characteristics including, among others, the ability to incorporate multiple and variable genes of choice and to produce bioluminescent tumors from a limited number of somatic cells within a normal cellular environment. This model, termed BarTeL, utilizes a Barhl1 homeobox gene promoter to target expression of a bicistronic transgene encoding both the avian retroviral receptor TVA and an eGFP-Luciferase fusion protein to neonatal cerebellar granule neuron precursor (cGNP) cells, which are cells of origin for the sonic hedgehog (SHH) subgroup of human medulloblastomas. The Barhl1 promoter-driven transgene is expressed strongly in mammalian cGNPs and weakly or not at all in mature granule neurons. We efficiently induced bioluminescent medulloblastomas expressing eGFP-luciferase in BarTeL mice by infection of a limited number of somatic cGNPs with avian retroviral vectors encoding the active N-terminal fragment of SHH and a stabilized MYCN mutant. Detection and quantification of the increasing bioluminescence of growing tumors in young BarTeL mice was facilitated by the declining bioluminescence of their uninfected maturing cGNPs. Inclusion of eGFP in the transgene allowed enriched sorting of cGNPs from neonatal cerebella. Use of a single bicistronic avian vector simultaneously expressing both Shh and Mycn oncogenes increased the medulloblastoma incidence and aggressiveness compared to mixed virus infections. Bioluminescent tumors could also be produced by ex vivo transduction of neonatal BarTeL cerebellar cells by avian retroviruses and subsequent

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of ... content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT ... Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography ( ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of ...

  19. Tomography of nonclassical states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazrafkan, MR; Man'ko, [No Value

    2003-01-01

    A review of the symplectic tomography method is presented. Superpositions of different types of photon states are considered within the framework of the tomography approach. Such nonclassical photon states as even and odd coherent states, crystallized Schrodinger cat states, and other superposition

  20. In vivo bioluminescence imaging and histopathopathologic analysis reveal distinct roles for resident and recruited immune effector cells in defense against invasive aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwendener Reto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a major cause of infectious morbidity and mortality in immune compromised patients. Studies on the pathogenesis of IA have been limited by the difficulty to monitor disease progression in real-time. For real-time monitoring of the infection, we recently engineered a bioluminescent A. fumigatus strain. Results In this study, we demonstrate that bioluminescence imaging can track the progression of IA at different anatomic locations in a murine model of disease that recapitulates the natural route of infection. To define the temporal and functional requirements of distinct innate immune cellular subsets in host defense against respiratory A. fumigatus infection, we examined the development and progression of IA using bioluminescence imaging and histopathologic analysis in mice with four different types of pharmacologic or numeric defects in innate immune function that target resident and recruited phagocyte subsets. While bioluminescence imaging can track the progression and location of invasive disease in vivo, signals can be attenuated by severe inflammation and associated tissue hypoxia. However, especially under non-inflammatory conditions, such as cyclophosphamide treatment, an increasing bioluminescence signal reflects the increasing biomass of alive fungal cells. Conclusions Imaging studies allowed an in vivo correlation between the onset, peak, and kinetics of hyphal tissue invasion from the lung under conditions of functional or numeric inactivation of phagocytes and sheds light on the germination speed of conidia under the different immunosuppression regimens. Conditions of high inflammation -either mediated by neutrophil influx under corticosteroid treatment or by monocytes recruited during antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils- were associated with rapid conidial germination and caused an early rise in bioluminescence post-infection. In contrast, 80% alveolar macrophage depletion

  1. Measuring cytotoxicity by bioluminescence imaging outperforms the standard chromium-51 release assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mobin A; Lee, Eric; Bachmann, Michael H; Salicioni, Ana Maria; Behrens, Edward M; Kambayashi, Taku; Baldwin, Cynthia L

    2014-01-01

    The chromium-release assay developed in 1968 is still the most commonly used method to measure cytotoxicity by T cells and by natural killer cells. Target cells are loaded in vitro with radioactive chromium and lysis is determined by measuring chromium in the supernatant released by dying cells. Since then, alternative methods have been developed using different markers of target cell viability that do not involve radioactivity. Here, we compared and contrasted a bioluminescence (BLI)-based cytotoxicity assay to the standard radioactive chromium-release assay using an identical set of effector cells and tumor target cells. For this, we stably transduced several human and murine tumor cell lines to express luciferase. When co-cultured with cytotoxic effector cells, highly reproducible decreases in BLI were seen in an effector to target cell dose-dependent manner. When compared to results obtained from the chromium release assay, the performance of the BLI-based assay was superior, because of its robustness, increased signal-to-noise ratio, and faster kinetics. The reduced/delayed detection of cytotoxicity by the chromium release method was attributable to the association of chromium with structural components of the cell, which are released quickly by detergent solubilization but not by hypotonic lysis. We conclude that the (BLI)-based measurement of cytotoxicity offers a superior non-radioactive alternative to the chromium-release assay that is more robust and quicker to perform.

  2. Evaluation of monkeypox virus infection of prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) using in vivo bioluminescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falendysz, Elizabeth A.; Londoño-Navas, Angela M.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Pussini, Nicola; Lopera, Juan G.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2014-01-01

    Monkeypox (MPX) is a re-emerging zoonotic disease that is endemic in Central and West Africa, where it can cause a smallpox-like disease in humans. Despite many epidemiologic and field investigations of MPX, no definitive reservoir species has been identified. Using recombinant viruses expressing the firefly luciferase (luc) gene, we previously demonstrated the suitability of in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to study the pathogenesis of MPX in animal models. Here, we evaluated BLI as a novel approach for tracking MPX virus infection in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). Prairie dogs were affected during a multistate outbreak of MPX in the US in 2003 and have since been used as an animal model of this disease. Our BLI results were compared with PCR and virus isolation from tissues collected postmortem. Virus was easily detected and quantified in skin and superficial tissues by BLI before and during clinical phases, as well as in subclinical secondary cases, but was not reliably detected in deep tissues such as the lung. Although there are limitations to viral detection in larger wild rodent species, BLI can enhance the use of prairie dogs as an animal model of MPX and can be used for the study of infection, disease progression, and transmission in potential wild rodent reservoirs.

  3. Rapid and Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Treatment Response Using In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assessment of orthotopic tumor models in animals utilizes survival as the primary therapeutic end point. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies [1 ]. Using human tumor cell lines constitutively expressing luciferase, the kinetics of tumor growth and response to therapy have been assessed in intraperitoneal [2], subcutaneous, and intravascular [3] cancer models. However, use of this approach for evaluating orthotopic tumor models has not been demonstrated. In this report, the ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth and therapeuticinduced cell kill of orthotopic rat brain tumors derived from 9L gliosarcoma cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (9LLuc was investigated. Intracerebral tumor burden was monitored over time by quantitation of photon emission and tumor volume using a cryogenically cooled CCD camera and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, respectively. There was excellent correlation (r=0.91 between detected photons and tumor volume. A quantitative comparison of tumor cell kill determined from serial MRI volume measurements and BLI photon counts following 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU treatment revealed that both imaging modalities yielded statistically similar cell kill values (P=.951. These results provide direct validation of BLI imaging as a powerful and quantitative tool for the assessment of antineoplastic therapies in living animals.

  4. CD4+ T cell effects on CD8+ T cell location defined using bioluminescence.

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    Mitra Azadniv

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes of the CD8+ class are critical in delivering cytotoxic function and in controlling viral and intracellular infections. These cells are "helped" by T lymphocytes of the CD4+ class, which facilitate their activation, clonal expansion, full differentiation and the persistence of memory. In this study we investigated the impact of CD4+ T cells on the location of CD8+ T cells, using antibody-mediated CD4+ T cell depletion and imaging the antigen-driven redistribution of bioluminescent CD8+ T cells in living mice. We documented that CD4+ T cells influence the biodistribution of CD8+ T cells, favoring their localization to abdominal lymph nodes. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that this was associated with an increase in the expression of specific integrins. The presence of CD4+ T cells at the time of initial CD8+ T cell activation also influences their biodistribution in the memory phase. Based on these results, we propose the model that one of the functions of CD4+ T cell "help" is to program the homing potential of CD8+ T cells.

  5. Functional imaging of interleukin 1 beta expression in inflammatory process using bioluminescence imaging in transgenic mice

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    Liu Zhihui

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β plays an important role in a number of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. To understand the role of IL-1β in disease processes and develop an in vivo screening system for anti-inflammatory drugs, a transgenic mouse line was generated which incorporated the transgene firefly luciferase gene driven by a 4.5-kb fragment of the human IL-1β gene promoter. Luciferase gene expression was monitored in live mice under anesthesia using bioluminescence imaging in a number of inflammatory disease models. Results In a LPS-induced sepsis model, dramatic increase in luciferase activity was observed in the mice. This transgene induction was time dependent and correlated with an increase of endogenous IL-1β mRNA and pro-IL-1β protein levels in the mice. In a zymosan-induced arthritis model and an oxazolone-induced skin hypersensitivity reaction model, luciferase expression was locally induced in the zymosan injected knee joint and in the ear with oxazolone application, respectively. Dexamethasone suppressed the expression of luciferase gene both in the acute sepsis model and in the acute arthritis model. Conclusion Our data suggest that the transgenic mice model could be used to study transcriptional regulation of the IL-1β gene expression in the inflammatory process and evaluation the effect of anti-inflammatory drug in vivo.

  6. Light Emission Requires Exposure to the Atmosphere in Ex Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

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    Yusuke Inoue

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of organs bearing luciferase activity by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is often difficult, and ex vivo imaging of excised organs plays a complementary role. This study investigated the importance of exposure to the atmosphere in ex vivo BLI. Mice were inoculated with murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 transduced with firefly luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL. They were killed following in vivo BLI, and whole-body imaging was done after death and then after intraperitoneal air injection. In addition, the right knee was exposed and imaged before and after the adjacent bones were cut. Extensive light signals were seen on in vivo imaging. The luminescence disappeared after the animal was killed, and air injection restored the light emission from the abdomen only, suggesting a critical role of atmospheric oxygen in luminescence after death. Although no substantial light signal at the right knee was seen before bone cutting, light emission was evident after cutting. In conclusion, in ex vivo BLI, light emission requires exposure to the atmosphere. Bone destruction is required to demonstrate luciferase activity in the bone marrow after death.

  7. Mechanosensitivity of a Rapid Bioluminescence Reporter System Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesson, Benoit; Latz, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Cells are sophisticated integrators of mechanical stimuli that lead to physiological, biochemical, and genetic responses. The bioluminescence of dinoflagellates, alveolate protists that use light emission for predator defense, serves as a rapid noninvasive whole-cell reporter of mechanosensitivity. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the relationship between cell mechanical properties and mechanosensitivity in live cells of the dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula. Cell stiffness was 0.56 MPa, consistent with cells possessing a cell wall. Cell response depended on both the magnitude and velocity of the applied force. At the maximum stimulation velocity of 390 μm s−1, the threshold response occurred at a force of 7.2 μN, resulting in a contact time of 6.1 ms and indentation of 2.1 μm. Cells did not respond to a low stimulation velocity of 20 μm s−1, indicating a velocity dependent response that, based on stress relaxation experiments, was explained by the cell viscoelastic properties. This study demonstrates the use of AFM to study mechanosensitivity in a cell system that responds at fast timescales, and provides insights into how viscoelastic properties affect mechanosensitivity. It also provides a comparison with previous studies using hydrodynamic stimulation, showing the discrepancy in cell response between direct compressive forces using AFM and those within flow fields based on average flow properties. PMID:25809248

  8. Hunting in bioluminescent light: Vision in the nocturnal box jellyfish Copula sivickisi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders eGarm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cubomedusae all have a similar set of six eyes on each of their four rhopalia. Still, there is a great variation in activity patterns with some species being strictly day active while others are strictly night active. Here we have examined the visual ecology of the medusa of the night active Copula sivickisi from Okinawa using optics, morphology, electrophysiology, and behavioural experiments. We found the lenses of both the upper and the lower lens eyes to be image forming but under-focused, resulting in low spatial resolution in the order of 10 – 15 degrees. The photoreceptor physiology is similar in the two lens eyes and they have a single opsin peaking around 460 nm and low temporal resolution with a flicker fusion frequency (fff of 2.5 Hz indicating adaptions to vision in low light intensities. Further, the outer segments have fluid filled swellings, which may concentrate the light in the photoreceptor membrane by total internal reflections, and thus enhance the signal to noise ratio in the eyes. Finally our behavioural experiments confirmed that the animals use vision when hunting. When they are active at night they seek out high prey-concentration by visual attraction to areas with abundant bioluminescent flashes triggered by their prey.

  9. Hunting in Bioluminescent Light: Vision in the Nocturnal Box Jellyfish Copula sivickisi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garm, Anders; Bielecki, Jan; Petie, Ronald; Nilsson, Dan-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Cubomedusae all have a similar set of six eyes on each of their four rhopalia. Still, there is a great variation in activity patterns with some species being strictly day active while others are strictly night active. Here we have examined the visual ecology of the medusa of the night active Copula sivickisi from Okinawa using optics, morphology, electrophysiology, and behavioral experiments. We found the lenses of both the upper and the lower lens eyes to be image forming but under-focused, resulting in low spatial resolution in the order of 10-15°. The photoreceptor physiology is similar in the two lens eyes and they have a single opsin peaking around 460 nm and low temporal resolution with a flicker fusion frequency (fff) of 2.5 Hz indicating adaptions to vision in low light intensities. Further, the outer segments have fluid filled swellings, which may concentrate the light in the photoreceptor membrane by total internal reflections, and thus enhance the signal to noise ratio in the eyes. Finally our behavioral experiments confirmed that the animals use vision when hunting. When they are active at night they seek out high prey-concentration by visual attraction to areas with abundant bioluminescent flashes triggered by their prey.

  10. In vivo bioluminescence imaging of cell differentiation in biomaterials: a platform for scaffold development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagó, Juli R; Aguilar, Elisabeth; Alieva, Maria; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Vila, Olaia F; Claros, Silvia; Andrades, José A; Becerra, José; Rubio, Nuria; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2013-03-01

    In vivo testing is a mandatory last step in scaffold development. Agile longitudinal noninvasive real-time monitoring of stem cell behavior in biomaterials implanted in live animals should facilitate the development of scaffolds for tissue engineering. We report on a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) procedure for simultaneous monitoring of changes in the expression of multiple genes to evaluate scaffold performance in vivo. Adipose tissue-derived stromal mensenchymal cells were dually labeled with Renilla red fluorescent protein and firefly green fluorescent protein chimeric reporters regulated by cytomegalovirus and tissue-specific promoters, respectively. Labeled cells were induced to differentiate in vitro and in vivo, by seeding in demineralized bone matrices (DBMs) and monitored by BLI. Imaging results were validated by RT-polymerase chain reaction and histological procedures. The proposed approach improves molecular imaging and measurement of changes in gene expression of cells implanted in live animals. This procedure, applicable to the simultaneous analysis of multiple genes from cells seeded in DBMs, should facilitate engineering of scaffolds for tissue repair.

  11. Development of an engineered bioluminescent reporter phage for detection of bacterial blight of crucifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, David A; Bull, Carolee T; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassicaceae family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as pepper spot, a much less severe disease caused by the related pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. We have developed a phage-based diagnostic that can both identify and detect the causative agent of bacterial blight and differentiate the two pathogens. A recombinant "light"-tagged reporter phage was generated by integrating bacterial luxAB genes encoding luciferase into the genome of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis phage PBSPCA1. The PBSPCA1::luxAB reporter phage is viable and stable and retains properties similar to those of the wild-type phage. PBSPCA1::luxAB rapidly and sensitively detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis by conferring a bioluminescent signal response to cultured cells. Detection is dependent on cell viability. Other bacterial pathogens of Brassica species such as P. syringae pv. maculicola, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and X. campestris pv. raphani either do not produce a response or produce significantly attenuated signals with the reporter phage. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis on diseased plant specimens, indicating its potential for disease diagnosis.

  12. Relationship between Symptom Development and Actual Sites of Infection in Leaves of Anthurium Inoculated with a Bioluminescent Strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. dieffenbachiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, R; Fukui, H; McElhaney, R; Nelson, S C; Alvarez, A M

    1996-03-01

    The infection process of bacterial blight of anthurium was monitored with a bioluminescent strain of Xanthomonas campestris pv. dieffenbachiae. The relationship between symptom expression on infected leaves (assessed visually) and the extent of bacterial movement within tissues (evaluated by bioluminescence emission) varied among anthurium cultivars. In several cultivars previously considered susceptible on the basis of symptom development alone, bacterial invasion of leaves extended far beyond the visually affected areas. In other cultivars previously considered resistant, bacterial invasion was restricted to areas with visible symptoms. In three cultivars previously considered resistant, leaves were extensively invaded by the bacterium, and yet few or no symptoms were seen on infected leaves. The pathogen was consistently recovered from leaf sections emitting bioluminescence but not from sections emitting no light. At an early stage of infection, no significant differences in the percentages of infected areas as determined by visual assessment were observed in any of the cultivars. However, differences among cultivars were detected by bioluminescence as the disease progressed, because bacterial invasion was not always accompanied by symptom expression. In susceptible cultivars, the advancing border of infection was 5 to 10 cm inward from the margins of the visible symptoms and often reached to the leaf petiole even when symptoms were visible in anthurium cultivars in which a nondestructive method was used to quantify the severity of leaf infection by a bioluminescent pathogen have enabled us to evaluate susceptibility and resistance to bacterial blight accurately. Such evaluations will be of importance in breeding resistant cultivars for disease control.

  13. Cone Beam Micro-CT System for Small Animal Imaging and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouping Zhu

    2009-01-01

    in this paper. Experimental results show that the system is suitable for small animal imaging and is adequate to provide high-resolution anatomic information for bioluminescence tomography to build a dual modality system.

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear ... or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the ...

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... imaging provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

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    Full Text Available ... tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up in shades of gray, and air ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

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    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  8. Comparison of static and microfluidic protease assays using modified bioluminescence resonance energy transfer chemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (F/BRET are two forms of Förster resonance energy transfer, which can be used for optical transduction of biosensors. BRET has several advantages over fluorescence-based technologies because it does not require an external light source. There would be benefits in combining BRET transduction with microfluidics but the low luminance of BRET has made this challenging until now. METHODOLOGY: We used a thrombin bioprobe based on a form of BRET (BRET(H, which uses the BRET(1 substrate, native coelenterazine, with the typical BRET(2 donor and acceptor proteins linked by a thrombin target peptide. The microfluidic assay was carried out in a Y-shaped microfluidic network. The dependence of the BRET(H ratio on the measurement location, flow rate and bioprobe concentration was quantified. Results were compared with the same bioprobe in a static microwell plate assay. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The BRET(H thrombin bioprobe has a lower limit of detection (LOD than previously reported for the equivalent BRET(1-based version but it is substantially brighter than the BRET(2 version. The normalised BRET(H ratio of the bioprobe changed 32% following complete cleavage by thrombin and 31% in the microfluidic format. The LOD for thrombin in the microfluidic format was 27 pM, compared with an LOD of 310 pM, using the same bioprobe in a static microwell assay, and two orders of magnitude lower than reported for other microfluidic chip-based protease assays. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that BRET based microfluidic assays are feasible and that BRET(H provides a useful test bed for optimising BRET-based microfluidics. This approach may be convenient for a wide range of applications requiring sensitive detection and/or quantification of chemical or biological analytes.

  9. Bioluminescence inhibition assays for toxicity screening of wood extractives and biocides in paper mill process waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Anna; Latorre, Anna; Lacorte, Sílvia; Barceló, Damià

    2004-02-01

    The risk associated with wood extractives, biocides, and other additives in pulp and paper mill effluents was evaluated by performing a characterization of process waters and effluents in terms of toxicity and chemical analysis. The individual toxicity of 10 resin acids, two unsaturated fatty acids, and three biocides was estimated by measuring the bioluminescence inhibition with a ToxAlert 100 system. Median effective concentration values (EC50) of 4.3 to 17.9, 1.2 to 1.5, and 0.022 to 0.50 mg/L were obtained, respectively. Mixtures of these three families of compounds showed antagonistic effects. Chemical analysis of process waters was performed by liquid chromatography- and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Biocides such as 2-(thiocyanomethylthio)-benzotiazole (TCMTB) (EC50 = 0.022 mg/L) and 2,2-dibromo-3-nitrilpropionamide (DBNPA) (EC50 = 0.50 mg/L) were the most toxic compounds tested and were detected at concentrations of 16 and 59 microg/L, respectively, in a closed-circuit recycling paper mill. Process waters from kraft pulp mills, printing paper mills, and packing board paper mills showed the highest concentration of resin acids (up to 400 microg/L) and accounted for inhibition percentages up to 100%. Detergent degradation products such as nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP) and the plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA) were also detected in the waters at levels of 0.6 to 10.6, 0.3 to 1.4, and 0.7 to 187 microg/L, respectively. However, once these waters were biologically treated, the concentration of detected organic compounds diminished and the toxicity decreased in most cases to values of inhibition lower than 20%.

  10. Monitoring of endoscope reprocessing with an adenosine triphosphate (ATP bioluminescence method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parohl, Nina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The arising challenges over endoscope reprocessing quality proposes to look for possibilities to measure and control the process of endoscope reprocessing.Aim: The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring endoscope reprocessing with an adenosine triphosphate (ATP based bioluminescence system.Methods: 60 samples of eight gastroscopes have been assessed from routine clinical use in a major university hospital in Germany. Endoscopes have been assessed with an ATP system and microbial cultures at different timepoints during the reprocessing. Findings: After the bedside flush the mean ATP level in relative light units (RLU was 19,437 RLU, after the manual cleaning 667 RLU and after the automated endoscope reprocessor (AER 227 RLU. After the manual cleaning the mean total viable count (TVC per endoscope was 15.3 CFU/10 ml, and after the AER 5.7 CFU/10 ml. Our results show that there are reprocessing cycles which are not able to clean a patient used endoscope.Conclusion: Our data suggest that monitoring of flexible endoscope with ATP can identify a number of different influence factors, like the endoscope condition and the endoscopic procedure, or especially the quality of the bedside flush and manual cleaning before the AER. More process control is one option to identify and improve influence factors to finally increase the overall reprocessing quality, best of all by different methods. ATP measurement seems to be a valid technique that allows an immediate repeat of the manual cleaning if the ATP results after manual cleaning exceed the established cutoff of 200 RLU.

  11. Bacteriophage-amplified bioluminescent sensing of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Steven; Jegier, Patricia; Johnson, Courtney M; Brigati, Jennifer R; Sayler, Gary S

    2008-05-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 remains a continuous public health threat, appearing in meats, water, fruit juices, milk, cheese, and vegetables, where its ingestion at concentrations of perhaps as low as 10 to 100 organisms can result in potent toxin exposure and severe damage to the lining of the intestine. Abdominal pain and diarrhea develop, which in the very young or elderly can progress towards hemolytic uremic syndrome and kidney failure. To assist in the detection of E. coli O157:H7, a recombinant bacteriophage reporter was developed that uses quorum sensing (luxI/luxR) signaling and luxCDABE-based bioluminescent bioreporter sensing to specifically and autonomously respond to O157:H7 serotype E. coli. The bacteriophage reporter, derived from phage PP01, was tested in artificially contaminated foodstuffs including apple juice, tap water, ground beef, and spinach leaf rinsates. In apple juice, detection of E. coli O157:H7 at original inoculums of 1 CFU mL(-1) occurred within approximately 16 h after a 6-h pre-incubation, detection of 1 CFU mL(-1) in tap water occurred within approximately 6.5 h after a 6-h pre-incubation, and detection in spinach leaf rinsates using a real-time Xenogen IVIS imaging system resulted in detection of 1 CFU mL(-1) within approximately 4 h after a 2-h pre-incubation. Detection in ground beef was not successful, however, presumably due to the natural occurrence of quorum sensing autoinducer (N-3-(oxohexanoyl)-L: -homoserine lactone; OHHL), which generated false-positive bioreporter signals in the ground beef samples.

  12. Firefly luciferase-based dynamic bioluminescence imaging: a noninvasive technique to assess tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Amy; Hou, Lewis; Prugpichailers, Tiffany; Dunkel, Jason; Kalani, Maziyar A; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Kalani, M Yashar S; Tse, Victor

    2010-04-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is emerging as a cost-effective, high-throughput, noninvasive, and sensitive imaging modality to monitor cell growth and trafficking. We describe the use of dynamic BLI as a noninvasive method of assessing vessel permeability during brain tumor growth. With the use of stereotactic technique, 10 firefly luciferase-transfected GL26 mouse glioblastoma multiforme cells were injected into the brains of C57BL/6 mice (n = 80). After intraperitoneal injection of D-luciferin (150 mg/kg), serial dynamic BLI was performed at 1-minute intervals (30 seconds exposure) every 2 to 3 days until death of the animals. The maximum intensity was used as an indirect measurement of tumor growth. The adjusted slope of initial intensity (I90/Im) was used as a proxy to monitor the flow rate of blood into the vascular tree. Using a modified Evans blue perfusion protocol, we calculated the relative permeability of the vascular tree at various time points. Daily maximum intensity correlated strongly with tumor volume. At postinjection day 23, histology and BLI demonstrated an exponential growth of the tumor mass. Slopes were calculated to reflect the flow in the vessels feeding the tumor (adjusted slope = I90/Im). The increase in BLI intensity was correlated with a decrease in adjusted slope, reflecting a decrease in the rate of blood flow as tumor volume increased (y = 93.8e-0.49, R2 = 0.63). Examination of calculated slopes revealed a peak in permeability around postinjection day 20 (n = 42, P maximum intensity observed; as angiogenesis progressed, tumor vessel caliber increased dramatically, resulting in sluggish but increased flow. This trend was correlated with Evans blue histology, revealing an increase in Evans blue dye uptake into the tumor, as slope calculated by BLI increases. Dynamic BLI is a practical, noninvasive technique that can semiquantitatively monitor changes in vascular permeability and therefore facilitate the study of tumor angiogenesis in

  13. A portable bioluminescence engineered cell-based biosensor for on-site applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Aldo; Cevenini, Luca; Michelini, Elisa; Branchini, Bruce R

    2011-04-15

    We have developed a portable biosensing device based on genetically engineered bioluminescent (BL) cells. Cells were immobilized on a 4 × 3 multiwell cartridge using a new biocompatible matrix that preserved their vitality. Using a fiber optic taper, the cartridge was placed in direct contact with a cooled CCD sensor to image and quantify the BL signals. Yeast and bacterial cells were engineered to express recognition elements, whose interaction with the analyte led to luciferase expression, via reporter gene technology. Three different biosensors were developed. The first detects androgenic compounds using yeast cells carrying a green-emitting P. pyralis luciferase regulated by the human androgen receptor and a red mutant of the same species as internal vitality control. The second biosensor detects two classes of compounds (androgens and estrogens) using yeast strains engineered to express green-or red-emitting mutant firefly luciferases in response to androgens or estrogens, respectively. The third biosensor detects lactose analogue isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside using two E. coli strains. One strain exploits the lac operon as recognition element for the expression of P. pyralis luciferase. The other strain serves as a vitality control expressing Gaussia princeps luciferase, which requires a different luciferin substrate. The immobilized cells were stable for up to 1 month. The analytes could be detected at nanomolar levels with good precision and accuracy when the specific signal was corrected using the internal vitality control. This portable device can be used for on-site multiplexed bioassays for different compound classes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bioluminescent, Nonlytic, Real-Time Cell Viability Assay and Use in Inhibitor Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Sarah J; Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Cali, James J; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2015-10-01

    Real-time continuous monitoring of cellular processes offers distinct advantages over traditional endpoint assays. A comprehensive representation of the changes occurring in live cells over the entire length of an experiment provides information about the biological status of the cell and informs decisions about the timing of treatments or the use of other functional endpoint assays. We describe a homogeneous, nonlytic, bioluminescent assay that measures cell viability in real time. This time-dependent measurement allowed us to monitor cell health for 72 h from the same test samples, distinguish differential cell growth, and investigate drug mechanism of action by analyzing time- and dose-dependent drug effects. The real-time measurements also allowed us to detect cell death immediately (>75% signal decrease within 15 min of digitonin addition), analyze drug potency versus efficacy, and identify cytostatic versus toxic drug effects. We screened an oncology compound library (Z' = 0.7) and identified compounds with varying activity at different time points (1.6% of the library showed activity within 3 h, whereas 35.4% showed a response by 47 h). The assay compared well with orthogonal endpoint cell viability assays and additionally provided data at multiple time points and the opportunity to multiplex assays on the same cells. To test the advantage of time-dependent measurements to direct optimal timing of downstream applications, we used the real-time cell viability assay to determine the ideal time to measure caspase activity by monitoring the onset of cell death and multiplexing a luminescent caspase activation assay on the same test samples.

  15. Specific expression of bioluminescence reporter gene in cardiomyocyte regulated by tissue specific promoter

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    Nguyen, Vu Hong; Tae, Seong Ho; Le, Nguyen Uyen Chi; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    As the human heart is not capable of regenerating the great numbers of cardiac cells that are lost after myocardial infarction, impaired cardiac function is the inevitable result of ischemic disease. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have gained popularity as a potentially ideal cell candidate for tissue regeneration. In particular, hESCs are capable of cardiac lineage-specific differentiation and confer improvement of cardiac function following transplantation into animal models. Although such data are encouraging, the specific strategy for in vivo and non-invasive detection of differentiated cardiac lineage is still limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established the gene construction in which the optical reporter gene Firefly luciferase was controlled by Myosin Heavy Chain promoter for specific expressing in heart cells. The vector consisting of - MHC promoter and a firefly luciferase coding sequence flanked by full-length bovine growth hormone (BGH) 3'-polyadenylation sequence based on pcDNA3.1- vector backbone. To test the specific transcription of this promoter in g of MHC-Fluc or CMV-Flue (for control) plasmid DNA in myocardial tissue, 20 phosphate-buffered saline was directly injected into mouse myocardium through a midline sternotomy and liver. After 1 week of injection, MHC-Fluc expression was detected from heart region which was observed under cooled CCD camera of in vivo imaging system but not from liver. In control group injected with CMV-Flue, the bioluminescence was detected from all these organs. The expression of Flue under control of Myosin Heavy Chain promoter may become a suitable optical reporter gene for stem cell-derived cardiac lineage differentiation study.

  16. Image Processing for Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Measurement-BRET-Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastagnier, Yan; Moutin, Enora; Hemonnot, Anne-Laure; Perroy, Julie

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of tools now allow live recordings of various signaling pathways and protein-protein interaction dynamics in time and space by ratiometric measurements, such as Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) Imaging. Accurate and reproducible analysis of ratiometric measurements has thus become mandatory to interpret quantitative imaging. In order to fulfill this necessity, we have developed an open source toolset for Fiji-BRET-Analyzer-allowing a systematic analysis, from image processing to ratio quantification. We share this open source solution and a step-by-step tutorial at https://github.com/ychastagnier/BRET-Analyzer. This toolset proposes (1) image background subtraction, (2) image alignment over time, (3) a composite thresholding method of the image used as the denominator of the ratio to refine the precise limits of the sample, (4) pixel by pixel division of the images and efficient distribution of the ratio intensity on a pseudocolor scale, and (5) quantification of the ratio mean intensity and standard variation among pixels in chosen areas. In addition to systematize the analysis process, we show that the BRET-Analyzer allows proper reconstitution and quantification of the ratiometric image in time and space, even from heterogeneous subcellular volumes. Indeed, analyzing twice the same images, we demonstrate that compared to standard analysis BRET-Analyzer precisely define the luminescent specimen limits, enlightening proficient strengths from small and big ensembles over time. For example, we followed and quantified, in live, scaffold proteins interaction dynamics in neuronal sub-cellular compartments including dendritic spines, for half an hour. In conclusion, BRET-Analyzer provides a complete, versatile and efficient toolset for automated reproducible and meaningful image ratio analysis.

  17. Image Processing for Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer Measurement—BRET-Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chastagnier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of tools now allow live recordings of various signaling pathways and protein-protein interaction dynamics in time and space by ratiometric measurements, such as Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET Imaging. Accurate and reproducible analysis of ratiometric measurements has thus become mandatory to interpret quantitative imaging. In order to fulfill this necessity, we have developed an open source toolset for Fiji—BRET-Analyzer—allowing a systematic analysis, from image processing to ratio quantification. We share this open source solution and a step-by-step tutorial at https://github.com/ychastagnier/BRET-Analyzer. This toolset proposes (1 image background subtraction, (2 image alignment over time, (3 a composite thresholding method of the image used as the denominator of the ratio to refine the precise limits of the sample, (4 pixel by pixel division of the images and efficient distribution of the ratio intensity on a pseudocolor scale, and (5 quantification of the ratio mean intensity and standard variation among pixels in chosen areas. In addition to systematize the analysis process, we show that the BRET-Analyzer allows proper reconstitution and quantification of the ratiometric image in time and space, even from heterogeneous subcellular volumes. Indeed, analyzing twice the same images, we demonstrate that compared to standard analysis BRET-Analyzer precisely define the luminescent specimen limits, enlightening proficient strengths from small and big ensembles over time. For example, we followed and quantified, in live, scaffold proteins interaction dynamics in neuronal sub-cellular compartments including dendritic spines, for half an hour. In conclusion, BRET-Analyzer provides a complete, versatile and efficient toolset for automated reproducible and meaningful image ratio analysis.

  18. Usefulness of Adenosinetriphosphate Bioluminescence Assay (ATPmetry) for Monitoring the Reprocessing of Endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batailler, Pierre; Saviuc, Philippe; Picot-Gueraud, Romain; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Mallaret, Marie-Reine

    2015-12-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of an adenosinetriphosphate bioluminescence assay (ATPmetry) to monitor the effectiveness of the reprocessing of endoscopes compared with microbiologic sampling. Diagnostic study. A 2,200-bed teaching hospital performing 5,000 to 6,000 endoscopic procedures annually. All samples from bronchial or gastrointestinal endoscopes whatever the context. Samples for microbiologic analysis and ATPmetry measurements were taken when each endoscope was inspected following reprocessing. Sampling was performed by flushing each endoscope with 300 mL Neutralizing Pharmacopeia Diluent thiosulfate rinsing solution divided equally between the endoscope channels. For each endoscope a series of 3 ATPmetry measurements were made on a vial containing the first jet from each channel and a second series on the whole sample. Of 165 samples from endoscopes, 11 exceeded the acceptability threshold of 25 colony-forming units/endoscope. In the first jet collected, the median (interquartile range) level of ATPmetry was 30.5 (15.3-37.7) relative light units (RLU) for samples with 25 or fewer colony-forming units compared with 37.0 (34.7-39.3) RLU for samples with more than 25 colony-forming units (P=.008). For the whole sample, the median (interquartile range) level of ATPmetry was 24.8 (14.3-36.3) RLU and 36.3 (36.0-38.3) RLU (P=.006), respectively. After adjusting on the batch of cleansing solution used, no difference in ATPmetry values was found between microbiologically acceptable and unacceptable samples. ATPmetry cannot be used as an alternative or complementary approach to microbiologic tests for monitoring the reprocessing of endoscopes in France.

  19. Red fluorescent protein-aequorin fusions as improved bioluminescent Ca2+ reporters in single cells and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Bakayan

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence recording of Ca(2+ signals with the photoprotein aequorin does not require radiative energy input and can be measured with a low background and good temporal resolution. Shifting aequorin emission to longer wavelengths occurs naturally in the jellyfish Aequorea victoria by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET to the green fluorescent protein (GFP. This process has been reproduced in the molecular fusions GFP-aequorin and monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP-aequorin, but the latter showed limited transfer efficiency. Fusions with strong red emission would facilitate the simultaneous imaging of Ca(2+ in various cell compartments. In addition, they would also serve to monitor Ca(2+ in living organisms since red light is able to cross animal tissues with less scattering. In this study, aequorin was fused to orange and various red fluorescent proteins to identify the best acceptor in red emission bands. Tandem-dimer Tomato-aequorin (tdTA showed the highest BRET efficiency (largest energy transfer critical distance R(0 and percentage of counts in the red band of all the fusions studied. In addition, red fluorophore maturation of tdTA within cells was faster than that of other fusions. Light output was sufficient to image ATP-induced Ca(2+ oscillations in single HeLa cells expressing tdTA. Ca(2+ rises caused by depolarization of mouse neuronal cells in primary culture were also recorded, and changes in fine neuronal projections were spatially resolved. Finally, it was also possible to visualize the Ca(2+ activity of HeLa cells injected subcutaneously into mice, and Ca(2+ signals after depositing recombinant tdTA in muscle or the peritoneal cavity. Here we report that tdTA is the brightest red bioluminescent Ca(2+ sensor reported to date and is, therefore, a promising probe to study Ca(2+ dynamics in whole organisms or tissues expressing the transgene.

  20. Bioluminescence-based identification of nisin producers - a rapid and simple screening method for nisinogenic bacteria in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolainen, Nina; Guglielmetti, Simone; Arioli, Stefania; Karp, Matti

    2012-08-17

    We present a simple and rapid method for screening nisin producers that directly identifies nisinogenic bacteria by induction of bioluminescence within the Lactococcus lactis NZ9800lux biosensor strain (Immonen and Karp, 2007, Biosensors and Bioelectronics 22, 1982-7). An overlay of putative nisinogenic colonies with the biosensor strain gives identification results within 1h. Functionality and specificity of the method were verified by screening nisin producers among 144 raw milk colonies and a panel of 91 lactococcal strains. Studies performed on strains and colonies that did not induce bioluminescence but inhibited growth of the biosensor demonstrated that only nisinogenic bacteria can cause induction. Bacteria known to produce bacteriocins other than nisin failed to induce bioluminescence, further verifying the specificity of the assay. We discovered a non-inducing but inhibitory lactococcal strain harboring a modified nisin Z gene, and demonstrated that the source of the inhibitory action is not a non-inducing variant of nisin, but a bacteriocin of lower molecular weight. The concentration of nisin producers in a raw milk sample was 1.3 × 10(2)CFU/ml. We identified from raw milk a total of seven nisin Z producing L. lactis subsp. lactis colonies, which were shown by genetic fingerprinting to belong to three different groups. Among the panel of 91 lactococci, four strains were nisin A producers, and one strain harbored the modified nisin Z gene. The method presented here is robust, cost-effective and simple to perform, and avoids the pitfalls of traditional screening methods by directly specifying the identity of the inhibitory substance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Introduction to Seismic Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Charlotte Anne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-21

    Tomography is a method of obtaining an image of a 3d object by observing the behavior of energy transmissions through the object. The image is obtained by Interrogating the object with Energy sources at a variety of Locations and observing the Object’s effects on the energy at a Variety of sensors. Tomography was first Used to build 3-dimensional Scans through Human bodies. These Are called computed Tomographic (ct) scans.

  2. Ultra-thin titanium nanolayers for plasmon-assisted enhancement of bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsun Su, Yen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chia-Yun; Chang, Chung-Chien [Science and Technology of Accelerator Light Source, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Tu, Sheng-Lung; Shen, Yun-Hwei [Department of Resource Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-05

    Ultra-thin titanium films were deposited via ultra-high vacuum ion beam sputter deposition. Since the asymmetric electric field of the metal foil plane matches the B-band absorption of chlorophyll a, the ultra-thin titanium nanolayers were able to generate surface plasmon resonance, thus enhancing the photoluminescence of chlorophyll a. Because the density of the states of plasmon resonance increases, the enhancement of photoluminescence also rises. Due to the biocompatibility and inexpensiveness of titanium, it can be utilized to enhance the bioluminescence of chloroplast in biological light emitting devices, bio-laser, and biophotonics.

  3. Establishment of cell strains stably-transfected with luciferase gene mediated by retrovirus and their detection with bioluminescence imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-juan WANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To establish cell strains stably transfected with Luciferase gene (Luc2, which was mediated by retrovirus, and explore the relationship between the number of Luc2-positive cells and light flux from bioluminescence imaging system by experiments in vitro and in vivo. Methods  We co-transfected pMX-Luc2 plasmid and pMD.G plasmid into 293T gag-pol cells to get retrovirus expressing Luc2 gene. Stable Luc2 positive cell lines were generated and screened by transduction of Retro-Luc2 in mouse colon cancer cell line CT26, human non-small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446, human colon cancer cell line HT-29, human ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3 and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721, all of them were identified by bioluminescence imaging system. Different numbers of SKOV3-Luc2 cells ranging from 10 to 10000 were plated onto culture dishes. Two xenograft models of ovarian cancer were reproduced by subcutaneous injection of 200μl SKOV3-Luc2 cell suspension with different concentrations (1×107, 5×106, 2.5×106, 1×106, 5×105, 2.5×105, 1×105 and 5×104/ml into 16 sites on the back of 4 nude mice, or intravenous injection of 1×106 or 3 ×106 SKOV3-Luc2 cells into the tail vein. Light flux value of SKOV3-Luc2 cells in dishes and in mice was measured by bioluminescence imaging system. Results  Retro-Luc2 was constructed successfully and expressed Luc2 stably in transduced CT26, NCI-H446, HT-29, SKOV3 and SMMC-7721 cell lines. Light flux was correlated in a linear manner with the number of Luc2-positive cells in dishes and in mice (R2=0.944, β=0.972; R2=0.991, β=0.996; R2=0.351, β=0.628; P < 0.01. Conclusion  Luc2-positive cell lines could be established rapidly and accurately by infecting tumor cells with retrovirus expressing Luc2. The number of Luc2 positive cells is significantly related in a linear manner to light flux from bioluminescence imaging system in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Assessment of an innovative antimicrobial surface disinfectant in the operating room environment using adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brian D; Spencer, Maureen; Rossi, Peter J; Lee, Cheong J; Brown, Kellie R; Malinowski, Michael; Seabrook, Gary R; Edmiston, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Terminal cleaning in the operating room is a critical step in preventing the transmission of health care-associated pathogens. The persistent disinfectant activity of a novel isopropyl alcohol/organofunctional silane solution (ISO) was evaluated in 4 operating rooms after terminal cleaning. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence documented a significant difference (P contamination on IOS-treated surfaces compared with controls. Further studies are warranted to validate the persistent disinfectant activity of ISO within selective health care settings. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Light and vision in the deep-sea benthos: I. Bioluminescence at 500-1000 m depth in the Bahamian islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Sönke; Frank, Tamara M; Haddock, Steven H D; Widder, Edith A; Messing, Charles G

    2012-10-01

    Bioluminescence is common and well studied in mesopelagic species. However, the extent of bioluminescence in benthic sites of similar depths is far less studied, although the relatively large eyes of benthic fish, crustaceans and cephalopods at bathyal depths suggest the presence of significant biogenic light. Using the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible, we collected numerous species of cnidarians, echinoderms, crustaceans, cephalopods and sponges, as well as one annelid from three sites in the northern Bahamas (500-1000 m depth). Using mechanical and chemical stimulation, we tested the collected species for light emission, and photographed and measured the spectra of the emitted light. In addition, in situ intensified video and still photos were taken of different benthic habitats. Surprisingly, bioluminescence in benthic animals at these sites was far less common than in mesopelagic animals from similar depths, with less than 20% of the collected species emitting light. Bioluminescent taxa comprised two species of anemone (Actinaria), a new genus and species of flabellate Parazoanthidae (formerly Gerardia sp.) (Zoanthidea), three sea pens (Pennatulacea), three bamboo corals (Alcyonacea), the chrysogorgiid coral Chrysogorgia desbonni (Alcyonacea), the caridean shrimp Parapandalus sp. and Heterocarpus ensifer (Decapoda), two holothuroids (Elasipodida and Aspidochirota) and the ophiuroid Ophiochiton ternispinus (Ophiurida). Except for the ophiuroid and the two shrimp, which emitted blue light (peak wavelengths 470 and 455 nm), all the species produced greener light than that measured in most mesopelagic taxa, with the emissions of the pennatulaceans being strongly shifted towards longer wavelengths. In situ observations suggested that bioluminescence associated with these sites was due primarily to light emitted by bioluminescent planktonic species as they struck filter feeders that extended into the water column.

  6. Adenosina trifosfato bioluminescência para avaliação da limpeza de superfícies: uma revisão integrativa

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Cristina Oliveira; Roberta El Hariri Viana

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: Identificar na literatura indicações e controvérsias do ATP bioluminescência para avaliação da efetividade da limpeza de superfícies em estabelecimentos de saúde. Método: Revisão integrativa da literatura, entre 2000 e 2012, nas bases de dados MEDLINE, LILACS, Science Direct, SCOPUS e Isi Web of Knowledge. Resultados: Selecionou-se para esta revisão 15 artigos. O ATP bioluminescência foi apontado como importante recurso educacional e método complementar à inspeção visual e às anális...

  7. General baseline toxicity QSAR for nonpolar, polar and ionisable chemicals and their mixtures in the bioluminescence inhibition assay with Aliivibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Beate I; Baumer, Andreas; Bittermann, Kai; Henneberger, Luise; König, Maria; Kühnert, Christin; Klüver, Nils

    2017-03-22

    The Microtox assay, a bioluminescence inhibition assay with the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri, is one of the most popular bioassays for assessing the cytotoxicity of organic chemicals, mixtures and environmental samples. Most environmental chemicals act as baseline toxicants in this short-term screening assay, which is typically run with only 30 min of exposure duration. Numerous Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) exist for the Microtox assay for nonpolar and polar narcosis. However, typical water pollutants, which have highly diverse structures covering a wide range of hydrophobicity and speciation from neutral to anionic and cationic, are often outside the applicability domain of these QSARs. To include all types of environmentally relevant organic pollutants we developed a general baseline toxicity QSAR using liposome-water distribution ratios as descriptors. Previous limitations in availability of experimental liposome-water partition constants were overcome by reliable prediction models based on polyparameter linear free energy relationships for neutral chemicals and the COSMOmic model for charged chemicals. With this QSAR and targeted mixture experiments we could demonstrate that ionisable chemicals fall in the applicability domain. Most investigated water pollutants acted as baseline toxicants in this bioassay, with the few outliers identified as uncouplers or reactive toxicants. The main limitation of the Microtox assay is that chemicals with a high melting point and/or high hydrophobicity were outside of the applicability domain because of their low water solubility. We quantitatively derived a solubility cut-off but also demonstrated with mixture experiments that chemicals inactive on their own can contribute to mixture toxicity, which is highly relevant for complex environmental mixtures, where these chemicals may be present at concentrations below the solubility cut-off.

  8. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer from aequorin to a fluorophore: an artificial jellyfish for applications in multianalyte detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Sapna K; Mirasoli, Mara; Daunert, Sylvia

    2005-04-01

    In nature, the green light emission observed in the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is a result of a non-radiative energy transfer from the excited-state aequorin to the green fluorescent protein. In this work, we have modified the photoprotein aequorin by attaching selected fluorophores at a unique site on the protein. This will allow for in vitro transfer of bioluminescent energy from aequorin to the fluorophore thus creating an "artificial jellyfish". The fluorophores are selected such that the excitation spectrum of the fluorophore overlaps with the emission spectrum of aequorin. By modifying aequorin with different fluorophores, bioluminescent labels with different emission maxima are produced, which will allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes. By examining the X-ray crystal structure of the protein, four different sites for introduction of the unique cysteine residue were evaluated. Two fluorophores with differing emission maxima were attached individually to the mutants through the sulfhydryl group of the cysteine molecule. Two of the fluorophore-labeled mutants showed a peak corresponding to fluorophore emission thus indicating resonance energy transfer from aequorin to the fluorophore.

  9. Bioluminescence Imaging of Colonization and Clearance Dynamics of Brucella Suis Vaccine Strain S2 in Mice and Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiwen; Li, Zhiping; Li, Bo; Chi, Hang; Li, Jiakuan; Fan, Hongchao; Yao, Ruizhi; Li, Qianxue; Dong, Xiaolin; Chen, Man; Qu, Han; Wang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Weicun; Wang, Yutian; Sun, Yu; Sun, Rui; Qian, Jun; Xia, Zhiping

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a plasmid-based lux bio-reporter for use to obtain in vivo images of Brucella suis vaccine strain 2 (B.suis S2) infection with high resolution and good definition. The pBBR-lux (pBBR1MCS-2-lxCDABE) plasmid that carries the luxCDABE operon was introduced into B. suis S2 by electroporation yielding B. suis S2-lux. The spatial and temporal transit of B. suis S2 in mice and guinea pigs was monitored by bioluminescence imaging. The plasmid pBBR-lux is stable in vivo and does not appear to impact the virulence or growth of bacteria. This sensitive luciferase reporter could represent B. suis S2 survival in real time. B. suis S2 mainly colonized the lungs, liver, spleen, and uterus in mice and guinea pigs as demonstrated by bioluminescence imaging. The plasmid-based lux bioreporter strategy can be used to obtain high resolution in vivo images of B. suis S2 infection in mice and guinea pigs.

  10. Separation and structure of the prosthetic group of the blue fluorescence protein from the bioluminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, Prasad; Lee, John

    1979-01-01

    The highly fluorescent prosthetic group of the blue fluorescence protein purified from the bioluminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum has been dissociated and separated from its apoprotein by affinity chromatography on Cibacron Blue-Sepharose. It has been identified as 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1′-D-ribityl)lumazine by several methods of characterization, all of which gave results identical to those for an authentic sample. In neutral solution, absorption maxima are at 407, 275 (shoulder), and 256 nm, with a single fluorescence maximum at 491 nm. The proton magnetic resonance spectrum exhibits a singlet at 2.66 ppm corresponding to the methyl substituted at the 6 position of lumazine and a multiplet centered at 3.85 ppm corresponding to the C-2′-5′ protons of the ribityl group. A Raman spectrum was obtained by the technique of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and the RF values by paper chromatography were determined in four solvent systems. The isolated compound was readily transformed into riboflavin by riboflavin synthetase. Fifty grams (dry weight) of P. phosphoreum contains at least 20 mg of this lumazine derivative, an amount comparable to that found in other microorganisms classified as riboflavin overproducers. The overproduction of this lumazine in this case apparently has to do with its function in the generation of bioluminescence. PMID:16592674

  11. A model system for pathogen detection using a two-component bacteriophage/bioluminescent signal amplification assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Nathan G.; Carroll, Richard J.; Applegate, Bruce M.

    2004-03-01

    Microbial contamination has become a mounting concern the last decade due to an increased emphasis of minimally processed food products specifically produce, and the recognition of foodborne pathogens such as Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. This research investigates a detection approach utilizing bacteriophage pathogen specificity coupled with a bacterial bioluminescent bioreporter utilizing the quorum sensing molecule from Vibrio fischeri, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). The 3-oxo-C6-HSL molecules diffuse out of the target cell after infection and induce bioluminescence from a population of 3-oxo-C6-HSL bioreporters (ROLux). E. coli phage M13, a well-characterized bacteriophage, offers a model system testing the use of bacteriophage for pathogen detection through cell-to-cell communication via a LuxR/3-oxo-C6-HSL system. Simulated temperate phage assays tested functionality of the ROLux reporter and production of 3-oxo-C6-HSL by various test strains. These assays showed detection limits of 102cfu after 24 hours in a varietry of detection formats. Assays incorporating the bacteriophage M13-luxI with the ROLux reporter and a known population of target cells were subsequently developed and have shown consistent detection limits of 105cfu target organisms. Measurable light response from high concentrations of target cells was almost immediate, suggesting an enrichment step to further improve detection limits and reduce assay time.

  12. Establishment of a Real-Time, Quantitative, and Reproducible Mouse Model of Staphylococcus Osteomyelitis Using Bioluminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funao, Haruki; Nagai, Shigenori; Sasaki, Aya; Hoshikawa, Tomoyuki; Aizawa, Mamoru; Okada, Yasunori; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Koyasu, Shigeo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2012-01-01

    Osteomyelitis remains a serious problem in the orthopedic field. There are only a few animal models in which the quantity and distribution of bacteria can be reproducibly traced. Here, we established a real-time quantitative mouse model of osteomyelitis using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) without sacrificing the animals. A bioluminescent strain of Staphylococcus aureus was inoculated into the femurs of mice. The bacterial photon intensity (PI) was then sequentially measured by BLI. Serological and histological analyses of the mice were performed. The mean PI peaked at 3 days, and stable signals were maintained for over 3 months after inoculation. The serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and C-reactive protein were significantly higher in the infected mice than in the control mice on day 7. The serum monocyte chemotactic protein 1 level was also significantly higher in the infected group at 12 h than in the control group. A significantly higher proportion of granulocytes was detected in the peripheral blood of the infected group after day 7. Additionally, both acute and chronic histological manifestations were observed in the infected group. This model is useful for elucidating the pathophysiology of both acute and chronic osteomyelitis and to assess the effects of novel antibiotics or antibacterial implants. PMID:22104103

  13. Adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay for monitoring contamination of the working environment of anaesthetists and cleanliness of the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Tomoko; Tsuchiya, Yuri; Iwakiri, Hiroko; Ozaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Anaesthetists possibly contribute to the spread of infections during anaesthesia. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence assay is an easy-to-perform, on-the-spot assay that provides objective data; therefore, using the LuciPac®Pen and the Lumitester PD-20®System, we assessed contamination of the working environment of anaesthetists before and after surgery as well as their hands at the time of each procedure during induction and extubation. Similarly, cleanliness of the operating room was evaluated using this assay to determine whether it is useful to assess the effectiveness of the routine cleaning protocols followed after surgery. ATP concentrations in the working environment of anaesthetists and their hands increased during surgery. In addition, ATP concentrations within the working environment decreased after routine cleaning with ethanol or accelerated hydrogen peroxide; however, there were no differences in the number of sites with ATP concentrations >500 relative light units before and after cleaning. This method is useful to evaluate contamination of the working environment of anaesthetists; nevertheless, it is prudent to evaluate the effectiveness of routine cleaning protocols because ATP bioluminescence assays are influenced by the use of various disinfectants at varying concentrations.

  14. Firefly Luciferase–Based Dynamic Bioluminescence Imaging: A Noninvasive Technique to Assess Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Amy; Hou, Lewis; Prugpichailers, Tiffany; Dunkel, Jason; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Tse, Victor

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is emerging as a cost-effective, high-throughput, noninvasive, and sensitive imaging modality to monitor cell growth and trafficking. We describe the use of dynamic BLI as a noninvasive method of assessing vessel permeability during brain tumor growth. METHODS With the use of stereotactic technique, 105 firefly luciferase–transfected GL26 mouse glioblastoma multiforme cells were injected into the brains of C57BL/6 mice (n = 80). After intraperitoneal injection of d-luciferin (150 mg/kg), serial dynamic BLI was performed at 1-minute intervals (30 seconds exposure) every 2 to 3 days until death of the animals. The maximum intensity was used as an indirect measurement of tumor growth. The adjusted slope of initial intensity (I90/Im) was used as a proxy to monitor the flow rate of blood into the vascular tree. Using a modified Evans blue perfusion protocol, we calculated the relative permeability of the vascular tree at various time points. RESULTS Daily maximum intensity correlated strongly with tumor volume. At postinjection day 23, histology and BLI demonstrated an exponential growth of the tumor mass. Slopes were calculated to reflect the flow in the vessels feeding the tumor (adjusted slope = I90/Im). The increase in BLI intensity was correlated with a decrease in adjusted slope, reflecting a decrease in the rate of blood flow as tumor volume increased (y = 93.8e−0.49, R2 = 0.63). Examination of calculated slopes revealed a peak in permeability around postinjection day 20 (n = 42, P maximum intensity observed; as angiogenesis progressed, tumor vessel caliber increased dramatically, resulting in sluggish but increased flow. This trend was correlated with Evans blue histology, revealing an increase in Evans blue dye uptake into the tumor, as slope calculated by BLI increases. CONCLUSION Dynamic BLI is a practical, noninvasive technique that can semiquantitatively monitor changes in vascular permeability and therefore

  15. Noninvasive monitoring of placenta-specific transgene expression by bioluminescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujun Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Placental dysfunction underlies numerous complications of pregnancy. A major obstacle to understanding the roles of potential mediators of placental pathology has been the absence of suitable methods for tissue-specific gene manipulation and sensitive assays for studying gene functions in the placentas of intact animals. We describe a sensitive and noninvasive method of repetitively tracking placenta-specific gene expression throughout pregnancy using lentivirus-mediated transduction of optical reporter genes in mouse blastocysts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Zona-free blastocysts were incubated with lentivirus expressing firefly luciferase (Fluc and Tomato fluorescent fusion protein for trophectoderm-specific infection and transplanted into day 3 pseudopregnant recipients (GD3. Animals were examined for Fluc expression by live bioluminescence imaging (BLI at different points during pregnancy, and the placentas were examined for tomato expression in different cell types on GD18. In another set of experiments, blastocysts with maximum photon fluxes in the range of 2.0E+4 to 6.0E+4 p/s/cm(2/sr were transferred. Fluc expression was detectable in all surrogate dams by day 5 of pregnancy by live imaging, and the signal increased dramatically thereafter each day until GD12, reaching a peak at GD16 and maintaining that level through GD18. All of the placentas, but none of the fetuses, analyzed on GD18 by BLI showed different degrees of Fluc expression. However, only placentas of dams transferred with selected blastocysts showed uniform photon distribution with no significant variability of photon intensity among placentas of the same litter. Tomato expression in the placentas was limited to only trophoblast cell lineages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results, for the first time, demonstrate the feasibility of selecting lentivirally-transduced blastocysts for uniform gene expression in all placentas of the same litter and early

  16. Strong electron correlation in the decomposition reaction of dioxetanone with implications for firefly bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Loren; Mazziotti, David A

    2010-10-28

    Dioxetanone, a key component of the bioluminescence of firefly luciferin, is itself a chemiluminescent molecule due to two conical intersections on its decomposition reaction surface. While recent calculations of firefly luciferin have employed four electrons in four active orbitals [(4,4)] for the dioxetanone moiety, a study of dioxetanone [F. Liu et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 6181 (2009)] indicates that a much larger active space is required. Using a variational calculation of the two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) [D. A. Mazziotti, Acc. Chem. Res. 39, 207 (2006)], we present the ground-state potential energy surface as a function of active spaces from (4,4) to (20,17) to determine the number of molecular orbitals required for a correct treatment of the strong electron correlation near the conical intersections. Because the 2-RDM method replaces exponentially scaling diagonalizations with polynomially scaling semidefinite optimizations, we readily computed large (18,15) and (20,17) active spaces that are inaccessible to traditional wave function methods. Convergence of the electron correlation with active-space size was measured with complementary RDM-based metrics, the von Neumann entropy of the one-electron RDM as well as the Frobenius and infinity norms of the cumulant 2-RDM. Results show that the electron correlation is not correctly described until the (14,12) active space with small variations present through the (20,17) space. Specifically, for active spaces smaller than (14,12), we demonstrate that at the first conical intersection, the electron in the σ(∗) orbital of the oxygen-oxygen bond is substantially undercorrelated with the electron of the σ orbital and overcorrelated with the electron of the carbonyl oxygen's p orbital. Based on these results, we estimate that in contrast to previous treatments, an accurate calculation of the strong electron correlation in firefly luciferin requires an active space of 28 electrons in 25 orbitals

  17. A bioluminescent caspase-1 activity assay rapidly monitors inflammasome activation in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Martha; Moehring, Danielle; Muñoz-Planillo, Raúl; Núñez, Gabriel; Callaway, Justin; Ting, Jenny; Scurria, Mike; Ugo, Tim; Bernad, Laurent; Cali, James; Lazar, Dan

    2017-08-01

    Inflammasomes are protein complexes induced by diverse inflammatory stimuli that activate caspase-1, resulting in the processing and release of cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18, and pyroptosis, an immunogenic form of cell death. To provide a homogeneous method for detecting caspase-1 activity, we developed a bioluminescent, plate-based assay that combines a substrate, Z-WEHD-aminoluciferin, with a thermostable luciferase in an optimized lytic reagent added directly to cultured cells. Assay specificity for caspase-1 is conferred by inclusion of a proteasome inhibitor in the lytic reagent and by use of a caspase-1 inhibitor to confirm activity. This approach enables a specific and rapid determination of caspase-1 activation. Caspase-1 activity is stable in the reagent thereby providing assay convenience and flexibility. Using this assay system, caspase-1 activation has been determined in THP-1 cells following treatment with α-hemolysin, LPS, nigericin, gramicidin, MSU, R848, Pam3CSK4, and flagellin. Caspase-1 activation has also been demonstrated in treated J774A.1 mouse macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) from mice, as well as in human primary monocytes. Caspase-1 activity was not detected in treated BMDMs derived from Casp1-/- mice, further confirming the specificity of the assay. Caspase-1 activity can be measured directly in cultured cells using the lytic reagent, or caspase-1 activity released into medium can be monitored by assay of transferred supernatant. The caspase-1 assay can be multiplexed with other assays to monitor additional parameters from the same cells, such as IL-1β release or cell death. The caspase-1 assay in combination with a sensitive real-time monitor of cell death allows one to accurately establish pyroptosis. This assay system provides a rapid, convenient, and flexible method to specifically and quantitatively monitor caspase-1 activation in cells in a plate-based format. This will allow a more efficient and effective

  18. Electrical impedance tomography of electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations.

  19. Electrical impedance tomography of electrolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Meir

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations.

  20. Detección precoz por Tomografía Computada Cuantitativa Multicorte de alteraciones en la densidad mineral ósea, inducidas por una dieta aterogénica, en un modelo experimental en ratas en crecimiento Multislice Quantitative Computed Tomography allozos early detectíon of bone mineral density alterations induced by atherogenic diet in a growing rat experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Joaquín Gubert

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Propósito. Demostrar la utilidad de la tomografía computada cuantitativa multicorte (QCT-MC en la detección precoz de alteraciones en la densidad mineral ósea (DMO mandibular, inducidas por una dieta aterogénica, en un modelo experimental en ratas en crecimiento. Materiales y Métodos. Ratas Wistar macho (n=16 al destete, loteadas por peso en 2 grupos: Control (C y experimental (E; peso promedio inicial sin diferencias significativas (p > 0,05; recibieron a libre demanda: C, dieta stock para roedores y E, dieta aterogénica por 3 semanas. Se monitorearon zoometría (peso y longitud corporales y consumo de dieta (g/100 g rata/día. A las 3 semanas en suero (mg/dL, se evaluó el perfil lipídico-lipoproteico: colesterol total (col-T, triglicéridos (TG, col HDL y noHDL, y la QCT-MC (Philips 64 CT, cuantificado con eFilm Workstation 2.1 de siete zonas mandibulares (ZM: n° 1 a 4, desde forámen mentoniano hacia mandibular; n° 5, proceso coronoide; n° 6, proceso condilar; n° 7, proceso angular. Se realizó análisis estadístico Pearson: correlación entre DMO de cada ZM y valor sérico de col-T (nivel de significación p 0,05. Los coeficientes de correlación (r y respectivos niveles de significación (p mostraron, en cinco de siete ZM, ser significativos: ZM 1: -0,580 (p = 0,019, ZM 2: -0,709 (p = 0,002, ZM 3: -0,635 (p = 0,008, ZM 5: -0.674 (p = 0,004, ZM 6: -0,564 (p = 0,023. Conclusiones. Estos resultados sugieren que la QCT-MC es un método de diagnóstico por imágenes que permite detectar precozmente alteraciones inducidas por una dieta aterogénica en la arquitectura ósea de la mandíbula. La correlación inversa entre la DMO y el col-T indicaría una asociación entre el consumo de una dieta aterogénica y posibles disfunciones témporo-mandibulares.Purpose. To demónstrate the utility of Multislice Quantitative Computed Tomography (MS-QCT in the early detection of mandibular bone mineral density (BMD alterations induced by an

  1. Green-Fluorescent Protein from the Bioluminescent Jellyfish Clytia gregaria Is an Obligate Dimer and Does Not Form a Stable Complex with the Ca2+-Discharged Photoprotein Clytin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malikova, N.P.; Visser, N.V.; Hoek, van A.; Skakun, V.V.; Vysotski, E.S.; Lee, J.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) is the origin of the green bioluminescence color exhibited by several marine hydrozoans and anthozoans. The mechanism is believed to be Fo¨rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) within a luciferase-GFP or photoprotein-GFP complex. As the effect is found in vitro at

  2. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Jin; Song, Eun Hye; Kim, Seol Hwa; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyun [Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, Heongsung (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  3. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ... Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored ...

  5. Laser optoacoustic tomography for medical diagnostics: principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Jacques, Steven L.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1996-04-01

    tomography. The technology allows us to determine directly temperature distributions in tissues and locate tissues volumes with different absorption. To demonstrate principles of TRSDTLA, experiments were conducted in vivo with mice-model for breast cancer using specially designed front-surface transducers- reflectometers. To present advantages and limitation of LOATT, experiments were performed in phantoms made of gel with polystyrene spheres colored with copper sulfate. Our experimental results and theoretical calculations show that TRSDTLA can be applied for non- invasive histology of layered tissues with in-depth resolution of up to 2 microns. TRSDTLA in acoustic reflection mode is promising for diagnostics of skin and ocular diseases. LOATT in acoustic transmission mode can be applied for detection of small tissue volumes with enhanced absorption located inside organs at the depth of up to 10 cm.

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  7. Multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphia" meaning "describing". CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield

  8. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Feng Lin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed.

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  11. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of ...

  13. Geodetic SAR Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Montazeri, Sina; Gisinger, Christoph; Hanssen, R.F.; Bamler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework referred to as 'geodetic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) tomography' that fuses the SAR imaging geodesy and tomographic SAR inversion (TomoSAR) approaches to obtain absolute 3-D positions of a large amount of natural scatterers. The methodology is applied on

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you through a built-in intercom system. With pediatric patients, a parent may be allowed in the room ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you through a built-in intercom system. With pediatric patients, a parent may be allowed in the room ... Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides real-time two- and three-dimensional images of scattering samples with micrometer resolution. Mapping the local reflectivity, OCT visualizes the morphology of the sample, in real time or at video rate. In addition...

  20. Holography and tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This session includes a collection of outlines of pertinent information, diagrams, graphs, electron micrographs, and color photographs pertaining to historical aspects and recent advances in the development of X-ray Gabor Holography. Many of the photographs feature or pertain to instrumentation used in holography, tomography, and cryo-holography.

  1. Optical coherence tomography in conjunction with bronchoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Ascedio Jose; Takimura, Celso Kiyochi; Lemos Neto, Pedro Alves; Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi, E-mail: ascedio@gmail.com [Servico de Endoscopia Respiratoria, Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of and the potential for using optical coherence tomography in conjunction with conventional bronchoscopy in the evaluation of the airways. Methods: This was a pilot study based on an ex vivo experimental model involving three animals: one adult New Zealand rabbit and two Landrace pigs. An optical coherence tomography imaging catheter was inserted through the working channel of a flexible bronchoscope in order to reach the distal trachea of the animals. Images of the walls of the trachea were systematically taken along its entire length, from the distal to the proximal portion. Results: The imaging catheter was easily adapted to the working channel of the bronchoscope. High-resolution images of cross sections of the trachea were taken in real time, precisely delineating microstructures, such as the epithelium, submucosa, and cartilage, as well as the adventitia of the anterior and lateral tracheal walls. The corresponding layers of the epithelium, mucosa, and cartilage were clearly differentiated. The mucosa, submucosa, and trachealis muscle were clearly identified in the posterior wall. Conclusions: It is feasible to use an optical coherence tomography imaging catheter in combination with a flexible bronchoscope. Optical coherence tomography produces high resolution images that reveal the microanatomy of the trachea, including structures that are typically seen only on images produced by conventional histology. (author)

  2. Live imaging of bioluminescent leptospira interrogans in mice reveals renal colonization as a stealth escape from the blood defenses and antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenn Ratet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leptospira (L. interrogans are bacteria responsible for a worldwide reemerging zoonosis. Some animals asymptomatically carry L. interrogans in their kidneys and excrete bacteria in their urine, which contaminates the environment. Humans are infected through skin contact with leptospires and develop mild to severe leptospirosis. Previous attempts to construct fluorescent or bioluminescent leptospires, which would permit in vivo visualization and investigation of host defense mechanisms during infection, have been unsuccessful. Using a firefly luciferase cassette and random transposition tools, we constructed bioluminescent chromosomal transformants in saprophytic and pathogenic leptospires. The kinetics of leptospiral dissemination in mice, after intraperitoneal inoculation with a pathogenic transformant, was tracked by bioluminescence using live imaging. For infective doses of 106 to 107 bacteria, we observed dissemination and exponential growth of leptospires in the blood, followed by apparent clearance of bacteria. However, with 2×108 bacteria, the septicemia led to the death of mice within 3 days post-infection. In surviving mice, one week after infection, pathogenic leptospires reemerged only in the kidneys, where they multiplied and reached a steady state, leading to a sustained chronic renal infection. These experiments reveal that a fraction of the leptospiral population escapes the potent blood defense, and colonizes a defined number of niches in the kidneys, proportional to the infective dose. Antibiotic treatments failed to eradicate leptospires that colonized the kidneys, although they were effective against L. interrogans if administered before or early after infection. To conclude, mice infected with bioluminescent L. interrogans proved to be a novel model to study both acute and chronic leptospirosis, and revealed that, in the kidneys, leptospires are protected from antibiotics. These bioluminescent leptospires represent a

  3. Mitrocomin from the jellyfish Mitrocoma cellularia with deleted C-terminal tyrosine reveals a higher bioluminescence activity compared to wild type photoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burakova, Ludmila P.; Natashin, Pavel V.; Markova, Svetlana V.; Eremeeva, Elena V.; Malikova, Natalia P.; Cheng, Chongyun; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Vysotski, Eugene S.

    2016-09-01

    The full-length cDNA genes encoding five new isoforms of Ca2 +-regulated photoprotein mitrocomin from a small tissue sample of the outer bell margin containing photocytes of only one specimen of the luminous jellyfish Mitrocoma cellularia were cloned, sequenced, and characterized after their expression in Escherichia coli and subsequent purification. The analysis of cDNA nucleotide sequences encoding mitrocomin isoforms allowed suggestion that two isoforms might be the products of two allelic genes differing in one amino acid residue (64R/Q) whereas other isotypes appear as a result of transcriptional mutations. In addition, the crystal structure of mitrocomin was determined at 1.30 Å resolution which expectedly revealed a high similarity with the structures of other hydromedusan photoproteins. Although mitrocomin isoforms reveal a high degree of identity of amino acid sequences, they vary in specific bioluminescence activities. At that, all isotypes displayed the identical bioluminescence spectra (473–474 nm with no shoulder at 400 nm). Fluorescence spectra of Ca2 +-discharged mitrocomins were almost identical to their light emission spectra similar to the case of Ca2 +-discharged aequorin, but different from Ca2 +-discharged obelins and clytin which fluorescence is red-shifted by 25–30 nm from bioluminescence spectra. The main distinction of mitrocomin from other hydromedusan photoproteins is an additional Tyr at the C-terminus. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that this Tyr is not important for bioluminescence because its deletion even increases specific activity and efficiency of apo-mitrocomin conversion into active photoprotein, in contrast to C-terminal Pro of other photoproteins. Since genes in a population generally exist as different isoforms, it makes us anticipate the cloning of even more isoforms of mitrocomin and other hydromedusan photoproteins with different bioluminescence properties.

  4. Non-invasive visualisation of the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis and tumour regression after 213Bi-radioimmunotherapy using bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhorn, H Matthias; Seidl, Christof; Beck, Roswitha; Saur, Dieter; Apostolidis, Christos; Morgenstern, Alfred; Schwaiger, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

    2007-06-01

    Non-invasive imaging of tumour development remains a challenge, especially for tumours in the intraperitoneal cavity. Therefore, the aim of this study was the visualisation of both the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis and tumour regression after radioimmunotherapy with tumour-specific 213Bi-Immunoconjugates, via in vivo bioluminescence imaging of firefly luciferase-transfected cells. Human diffuse-type gastric cancer cells expressing mutant d9-E-cadherin were stably transfected with firefly luciferase (HSC45-M2-luc). For bioluminescence imaging, nude mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 1x10(7) HSC45-M2-luc cells. On days 4 and 8 after tumour cell inoculation, imaging was performed following D-luciferin injection using a cooled CCD camera with an image intensifier unit. For therapy, mice were injected with 2.7 MBq 213Bi-d9MAb targeting d9-E-cadherin on day 8 after tumour cell inoculation. Bioluminescence images were taken every 4 days to monitor tumour development. After i.p. inoculation of HSC45-M2-luc cells into nude mice, development as well as localisation of peritoneal carcinomatosis could be visualised using bioluminescence imaging. Following 213Bi-d9MAb therapy on day 8 after intraperitoneal inoculation of HSC45-M2-luc cells, small tumour nodules were totally eliminated and larger nodules showed a clear reduction in size on day 12 after tumour cell inoculation. Subsequently a recurrence of tumour mass was observed, starting from the remaining tumour spots. By measuring the mean grey level intensity, tumour development over time could be demonstrated. Non-invasive bioluminescence imaging permits visualisation of the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis, localisation of tumour in the intraperitoneal cavity and evaluation of therapeutic success after 213Bi-d9MAb treatment.

  5. TH-C-17A-12: Integrated CBCT and Optical Tomography System On-Board a Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, K; Zhang, B; Eslami, S; Iordachita, I; Wong, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Patterson, M [Hamilton Regional Cancer Ctr., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We present a newly developed on-board optical tomography system for SARRP. Innovative features include the compact design and fast acquisition optical method to perform 3D soft tissue radiation guidance. Because of the on-board feature and the combination of the CBCT, diffusive optical tomography (DOT), bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT), this integrated system is expected to provide more accurate soft tissue guidance than an off-line system as well as highly sensitive functional imaging in preclinical research. Methods: Images are acquired in the order of CBCT, DOT and then BLT/FT, where the SARRP CBCT and DOT are used to provide the anatomical and optical properties information to enhance the subsequent BLT/FT optical reconstruction. The SARRP stage is redesigned to include 9 imbedded optical fibers in contact with the animal's skin. These fibers, connected to a white light lamp or laser, serve as the light sources for the DOT or FT, respectively. A CCD camera with f/1.4 lens and multi-spectral filter set is used as the optical detector and is mounted on a portable cart ready to dock into the SARRP. No radiation is delivered during optical image acquisition. A 3-way mirror system capable of 180 degree rotation around the animal reflects the optical signal to the camera at multiple projection angles. A special black-painted dome covers the stage and provides the light shielding. Results: Spontaneous metastatic bioluminescent liver and lung tumor models will be used to validate the 3D BLT reconstruction. To demonstrate the capability of our FT system, GastroSense750 fluorescence agent will be used to imaging the mouse stomach and intestinal region in 3D. Conclusion: We expect that this integrated CBCT and optical tomography on-board a SARRP will present new research opportunities for pre-clinical radiation research. Supported by NCI RO1-CA 158100.

  6. Cyclic AMP receptor protein regulates pheromone-mediated bioluminescence at multiple levels in Vibrio fischeri ES114.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, Noreen L; Colton, Deanna M; Bose, Jeffrey L; Tumen-Velasquez, Melissa P; Kimbrough, John H; Stabb, Eric V

    2013-11-01

    Bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri ES114 is activated by autoinducer pheromones, and this regulation serves as a model for bacterial cell-cell signaling. As in other bacteria, pheromone concentration increases with cell density; however, pheromone synthesis and perception are also modulated in response to environmental stimuli. Previous studies suggested that expression of the pheromone-dependent bioluminescence activator LuxR is regulated in response to glucose by cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) (P. V. Dunlap and E. P. Greenberg, J. Bacteriol. 164:45-50, 1985; P. V. Dunlap and E. P. Greenberg, J. Bacteriol. 170:4040-4046, 1988; P. V. Dunlap, J. Bacteriol. 171:1199-1202, 1989; and W. F. Friedrich and E. P. Greenberg, Arch. Microbiol. 134:87-91, 1983). Consistent with this model, we found that bioluminescence in V. fischeri ES114 is modulated by glucose and stimulated by cAMP. In addition, a Δcrp mutant was ∼100-fold dimmer than ES114 and did not increase luminescence in response to added cAMP, even though cells lacking crp were still metabolically capable of producing luminescence. We further discovered that CRP regulates not only luxR but also the alternative pheromone synthase gene ainS. We found that His-tagged V. fischeri CRP could bind sequences upstream of both luxR and ainS, supporting bioinformatic predictions of direct regulation at both promoters. Luminescence increased in response to cAMP if either the ainS or luxR system was under native regulation, suggesting cAMP-CRP significantly increases luminescence through both systems. Finally, using transcriptional reporters in transgenic Escherichia coli, we elucidated two additional regulatory connections. First, LuxR-independent basal transcription of the luxI promoter was enhanced by CRP. Second, the effect of CRP on the ainS promoter depended on whether the V. fischeri regulatory gene litR was also introduced. These results suggest an integral role for CRP in pheromone signaling that goes

  7. a Study of the Bioluminescence of Larger Zooplankton and the Effects of Low-Level Light Changes on Their Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keuren, Jeffrey Robert

    A bio-optical study was undertaken to quantify the relationships which exist between counter-illuminating organisms and the downwelling spectral light field in which they exist. The basic hypothesis behind counter-illumination is that the animal emits light using ventrally-oriented photophores to disrupt or eliminate the shadowed area on ventral surfaces. An organism lacking photophores sharply silhouettes against the highly directional downwelling irradiance, whereas by distributing photophores over the ventral surface of the body and closely matching the spectral and intensity characteristics of the downwelling light, this silhouette is obscured. Analysis carried out on changes in vertical distribution patterns in response to low-level intensity changes in ambient surface light suggested that diel migrating organisms begin to shift vertically in the water column when surface scalar irradiance decreased below or increased above 1.0 times10^{-2} muEin m^{-2} sec^ {-1}. Maximum aggregations of organisms, as defined by MOCNESS net sampling or single-frequency acoustic backscatter, appeared to remain within definable in situ blue-green isolume ranges varying less than a factor of ten throughout each night. Comparisons made between organism counter-illumination capacity and modeled in situ downwelling irradiance levels suggested that euphausiids, decapods and myctophids use between 1-10 percent of their maximum counter-illumination capacity to match the ambient downwelling light conditions. Modeling also suggested that up to 40 percent of the maximum measured bioluminescence output is required to match ambient irradiance in the shallower surface zones where aggregations of copepods, potential food sources, were commonly found at night. An optical study to quantify the radiative transfer of bioluminescence from a point source revealed that non -isotropic point sources produce radiance patterns that cannot be simply explained by inverse square losses. Therefore simple

  8. LuxCDABE—Transformed Constitutively Bioluminescent Escherichia coli for Toxicity Screening: Comparison with Naturally Luminous Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kahru

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that in vitro toxicity assay based on inhibition of the bioluminescence of recombinant Escherichia coli encoding thermostable luciferase from Photorhabdus luminescens is a versatile alternative to Vibrio fischeri MicrotoxTM test. Performance of two luxCDABE-transformed E. coli MC1061 constructs (pDNlux and (pSLlux otherwise identical, but having 100-fold different background luminescence was compared with the performance of V. fischeri. The microplate luminometer and a kinetic Flash-Assay test format was used that differently from Microtox test is also applicable for high throughput analysis. Toxic effects (30-s till 30-min EC50 of four heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Hg, Cu and three organic chemicals (aniline, 3,5-dichloroaniline and 3,5-dichlorophenol were studied. Both E. coli strains had comparable sensitivity and the respective 30-min EC50 values highly correlated (log-log R2 = 0.99; p < 0.01 showing that the sensitivity of the recombinant bacteria towards chemicals analyzed did not depend on the bioluminescence level of the recombinant cells. The most toxic chemical for all used bacterial strains (E. coli, V. fischeri was mercury whereas the lowest EC50 values for Hg (0.04–0.05 mg/L and highest EC50 values for aniline (1,300–1,700 mg/L were observed for E. coli strains. Despite of that, toxicity results obtained with both E. coli strains (pSLlux and pDNlux significantly correlated with V. fischeri results (log-log R2 = 0.70/0.75; p < 0.05/0.01. The use of amino acids (0.25% and glucose (0.05%-supplemented M9 medium instead of leucine-supplemented saline significantly (p < 0.05 reduced the apparent toxicity of heavy metals to both E. coli strains up to three orders of magnitude, but had little or no complexing effect on organic compounds. Thus, P. luminescens luxCDABE-transformed E. coli strains can be successfully used for the acute toxicity screening of various types of organic chemicals and heavy metals and can replace V. fischeri in

  9. Avaliação da qualidade microbiológica de bebida láctea e creme de leite UAT por ATP-Bioluminescência Evaluation of microbiological quality of UHT milk drink and UHT milk cream by ATP-Bioluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Cunha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Embora métodos tradicionais sejam utilizados na avaliação microbiológica de produtos UAT, metodologias rápidas, baseadas em ATP-Bioluminescência, têm sido desenvolvidas. Os resultados da aplicação dessa técnica em 54 amostras de bebida láctea UAT achocolatada e 12 de creme de leite UAT foram comparados com os resultados de métodos microbiológicos, utilizando-se diferentes meios de cultura e tempos de incubação das referidas amostras. A técnica de ATP-Bioluminescência foi aplicada por meio do sistema MLS, e os resultados foram expressos em unidades relativas de luz (RLU. Em todos os tempos de incubação - 48, 72 e 168 horas - , as amostras apresentaram contagens baixas de microrganismos mesófilos e psicrotróficos aeróbios quando analisadas em meio PCA, BHI, PetrifilmTM AC e por ATP-Bioluminescência (Although traditional methods are used for the microbiological evaluation of UHT products, rapid methodologies based on ATP-Bioluminescence have been developed. The results of applying this technique in 54 samples of chocolate UHT milk drink and 12 of UHT milk cream were compared with the results of microbiological methods, using different culture media and incubation times for the referred samples. The ATP-Bioluminescence technique was applied through the MLS system and the results were expressed as relative light units (RLU. In all incubation times - 48, 72, and 168 hours - , the samples showed lower counts of mesophilic and psychrotrophic aerobic microorganisms when analyzed using PCA, BHI, PetrifilmTM AC and ATP-Bioluminescence (<150RLU, demonstrating the technique's high specificity. Only one sample of UHT milk cream showed a mesophilic aerobic count above the standard established by Brazilian legislation (<100CFU/mL when analyzed in PCA (260 CFU/mL and PetrifilmTM AC (108CFU/mL at 168 hours. This high count of aerobic mesophilic microorganisms was also detected by the ATP-Bioluminescence (416 RLU technique. The results of

  10. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. The receptor is believed to exist as a homodimer due to covalent and non-covalent interactions between the two amino terminal domains (ATDs). It is well established that agonist binding to family C......-induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations....... Stable and highly receptor-specific BRET signals were obtained in tsA cells transfected with Rluc- and GFP2-tagged CaRs under basal conditions, indicating that CaR is constitutively dimerized. However, the signals were not enhanced by the presence of agonist. These results could indicate that at least...

  11. Microbial availability of mercury: effective detection and organic ligand effect using a whole-cell bioluminescent bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianghua; Oliff, Kathryn; Xu, Tingting; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary; Zhuang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    A luxCDABE-based genetically engineered bacterial bioreporter (Escherichia coli ARL1) was used to detect bioavailable ionic mercury (Hg(II)) and investigate the effects of humic acids and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the bioavailability of mercury in E. c oli. Results showed that the E. c oli ARL1 bioreporter was sensitive to mercury, with a detection limit of Hg(II) of 0.5 µg/L and a linear dose/response relationship up to 2000 µg Hg(II)/L. Humic acids and EDTA decreased the Hg(II)-induced bioluminescent response of strain ARL1, suggesting that the two organic ligands reduced the bioavailability of Hg(II) via complexation with Hg(II). Compared with traditional chemical methods, the use of E. c oli ARL1 is a cost-effective, rapid, and reliable approach for measuring aqueous mercury at very low concentrations and thus has potential for applications in field in situ monitoring.

  12. Biological toxicity of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) against the luxCDABE-based bioluminescent bioreporter Escherichia coli 652T7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liyu; Arnholt, Kelly; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary; Wang, Siqun; Liang, Chenghua; Wang, Jingkuan; Zhuang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological toxicity of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) using the constitutively bioluminescent luxCDABE-based bioreporter Escherichia coli 652T7. The effects of CNCs on E. c oli 652T7 biotoxicity were investigated at different CNC concentrations, reaction times, and IC50 values. CNC toxicity was also compared with and without ultrasonic dispersion to establish dispersibility effects. The results demonstrated that CNCs were not significantly toxic at concentrations at or below 250 mg/L. At concentrations higher than 300 mg/L, toxicity increased linearly as CNC concentrations increased up to 2000 mg/L. IC50 calculations demonstrated an increase in cytotoxicity as CNC exposure times increased, and elevated dispersibility of the CNCs were shown to increase cytotoxicity effects. These results suggest that CNCs can impact microbial populations if elevated concentration thresholds are met.

  13. On-line monitoring of aerobic bioremediation with bioluminescent reporter microbes. Final report, July 1991--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayler, G.S.

    1995-03-01

    A critical issue in the biological characterization of contaminated sites and in the evaluation of relative bioremediation treatment efficiencies is the development of appropriate monitoring methods for the assessment of pollutant bioavailability and microbial in situ activity potential. In nature, pollutants are found dispersed among the solid, liquid and gaseous phases of the complex environments rendering the analytical estimation of their bioavailability and degradation more difficult and irrelevant. Ex situ and extractive analytical techniques have only been misrepresentative of the natural conditions and often resulted in inaccurate estimates of pollutants mass transfer. In this project, the bioluminescent bioreporter bacterium P. Fluorescens HK44 was integrated to an optical device, capable of conducting emitted light, and used as an online biosensor of naphthalene and salicylate. The physiological requirements of the bacteria and the physical limitations of the biosensor were also determined.

  14. A biocompatible "split luciferin" reaction and its application for non-invasive bioluminescent imaging of protease activity in living animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinat, Aurélien; Budin, Ghyslain; Morales, Alma R; Park, Hyo Min; Sanman, Laura E; Bogyo, Matthew; Yu, Allen; Stahl, Andreas; Dubikovskaya, Elena A

    2014-09-09

    The great complexity of many human pathologies, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, requires new tools for studies of biological processes on the whole organism level. The discovery of novel biocompatible reactions has tremendously advanced our understanding of basic biology; however, no efficient tools exist for real-time non-invasive imaging of many human proteases that play very important roles in multiple human disorders. We recently reported that the "split luciferin" biocompatible reaction represents a valuable tool for evaluation of protease activity directly in living animals using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Since BLI is the most sensitive in vivo imaging modality known to date, this method can be widely applied for the evaluation of the activity of multiple proteases, as well as identification of their new peptide-specific substrates. In this unit, we describe several applications of this "split luciferin" reaction for quantification of protease activities in test tube assays and living animals. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Reconstruction of an InAs nanowire using geometric and algebraic tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennington, Robert S.; König, S.; Alpers, A.

    2011-01-01

    Geometric tomography and conventional algebraic tomography algorithms are used to reconstruct cross-sections of an InAs nanowire from a tilt series of experimental annular dark-field images. Both algorithms are also applied to a test object to assess what factors affect the reconstruction quality....... When using the present algorithms, geometric tomography is faster, but artifacts in the reconstruction may be difficult to recognize....

  16. Quantitative imaging of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG in selected histological tissue areas by a novel bioluminescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Fabienne Voelxen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPatients with malignant gliomas have a poor prognosis with average survival of less than one year. Whereas in other tumor entities the characteristics of tumor metabolism are successfully used for therapeutic approaches, such developments are very rare in brain tumors, notably in gliomas. One metabolic feature characteristic of gliomas, in particular diffuse astrocytomas and oligodendroglial tumors, is the variable content of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2HG, a metabolite, which was discovered first in this tumor entity. D2HG is generated in large amounts due to various gain-of–function mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenases IDH-1 and IDH-2. Meanwhile, D2HG has been detected in several other tumor entities including intrahepatic bile-duct cancer, chondrosarcoma, acute myeloid leukemia, and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. D2HG is barely detectable in healthy tissue (< 0.1 mM, but its concentration increases up to 35 mM in malignant tumor tissues. Consequently, the oncometabolite D2HG has gained increasing interest in the field of tumor metabolism. To facilitate its quantitative measurement without loss of spatial resolution at a microscopical level, we have developed a novel bioluminescence assay for determining D2HG in sections of snap-frozen tissue. The assay was verified independently by photometric tests and liquid chromatography / mass spectrometry (LC/MS. The novel technique allows the microscopically resolved determination of D2HG in a concentration range of 0 – 10 µmol/g tissue (wet weight. In combination with the already established bioluminescence imaging techniques for ATP, glucose, pyruvate, and lactate, the novel D2HG assay enables a comparative characterization of the metabolic profile of individual tumors in a further dimension.

  17. A biocompatible in vivo ligation reaction and its application for noninvasive bioluminescent imaging of protease activity in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinat, Aurélien; Park, Hyo Min; Miller, Stephen C; Cheng, Ke; Hanahan, Douglas; Sanman, Laura E; Bogyo, Matthew; Yu, Allen; Nikitin, Gennady F; Stahl, Andreas; Dubikovskaya, Elena A

    2013-05-17

    The discovery of biocompatible reactions had a tremendous impact on chemical biology, allowing the study of numerous biological processes directly in complex systems. However, despite the fact that multiple biocompatible reactions have been developed in the past decade, very few work well in living mice. Here we report that D-cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazoles can selectively react with each other in vivo to generate a luciferin substrate for firefly luciferase. The success of this "split luciferin" ligation reaction has important implications for both in vivo imaging and biocompatible labeling strategies. First, the production of a luciferin substrate can be visualized in a live mouse by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and furthermore allows interrogation of targeted tissues using a "caged" luciferin approach. We therefore applied this reaction to the real-time noninvasive imaging of apoptosis associated with caspase 3/7. Caspase-dependent release of free D-cysteine from the caspase 3/7 peptide substrate Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-D-Cys (DEVD-(D-Cys)) allowed selective reaction with 6-amino-2-cyanobenzothiazole (NH(2)-CBT) in vivo to form 6-amino-D-luciferin with subsequent light emission from luciferase. Importantly, this strategy was found to be superior to the commercially available DEVD-aminoluciferin substrate for imaging of caspase 3/7 activity. Moreover, the split luciferin approach enables the modular construction of bioluminogenic sensors, where either or both reaction partners could be caged to report on multiple biological events. Lastly, the luciferin ligation reaction is 3 orders of magnitude faster than Staudinger ligation, suggesting further applications for both bioluminescence and specific molecular targeting in vivo.

  18. Mathematical Methods in Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Alfred; Natterer, Frank

    1991-01-01

    The conference was devoted to the discussion of present and future techniques in medical imaging, including 3D x-ray CT, ultrasound and diffraction tomography, and biomagnetic ima- ging. The mathematical models, their theoretical aspects and the development of algorithms were treated. The proceedings contains surveys on reconstruction in inverse obstacle scat- tering, inversion in 3D, and constrained least squares pro- blems.Research papers include besides the mentioned imaging techniques presentations on image reconstruction in Hilbert spaces, singular value decompositions, 3D cone beam recon- struction, diffuse tomography, regularization of ill-posed problems, evaluation reconstruction algorithms and applica- tions in non-medical fields. Contents: Theoretical Aspects: J.Boman: Helgason' s support theorem for Radon transforms-a newproof and a generalization -P.Maass: Singular value de- compositions for Radon transforms- W.R.Madych: Image recon- struction in Hilbert space -R.G.Mukhometov: A problem of in- teg...

  19. Self-calibrating quantum state tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brańczyk, A. M.; Mahler, D. H.; Rozema, L. A.; Darabi, A.; Steinberg, A. M.; James, D. F. V.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce and experimentally demonstrate a technique for performing quantum state tomography (QST) on multiple-qubit states despite incomplete knowledge about the unitary operations used to change the measurement basis. Given unitary operations with unknown rotation angles, our method can be used to reconstruct the density matrix of the state up to local \\hat \\sigma _z rotations as well as recover the magnitude of the unknown rotation angle. We demonstrate high-fidelity self-calibrating tomography on polarization-encoded one- and two-photon states. The unknown unitary operations are realized in two ways: using a birefringent polymer sheet—an inexpensive smartphone screen protector—or alternatively a liquid crystal wave plate with a tuneable retardance. We explore how our technique may be adapted for QST of systems such as biological molecules where the magnitude and orientation of the transition dipole moment is not known with high accuracy.

  20. Computed tomography status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansche, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  1. Computerised Axial Tomography (CAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    Tumoral pathology Tumoral pathology provides one of the most valid applications of computerised axial tomography. With this technique, it is possible to... retroperitoneal cavity, while, in the pulmonary field, the results obtained are less decisive. Let us analyse, briefly, the research carried out with CT...the abscesses, are generally of lesser density with respect to the integral parenchyma; also, with abscesses the limits of the tumoral mass are less

  2. Dual-Color Monitoring Overcomes the Limitations of Single Bioluminescent Reporters in Fast-Growing Microbes and Reveals Phase-Dependent Protein Productivity during the Metabolic Rhythms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krishnamoorthy, Archana; Robertson, J Brian

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we show that these problems can be overcome in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously monitoring bioluminescence from two different colors of beetle luciferase, where one color (green...

  3. Mathematics of Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, William Grant

    A review of the applications of the Radon transform is presented, with emphasis on emission computed tomography and transmission computed tomography. The theory of the 2D and 3D Radon transforms, and the effects of attenuation for emission computed tomography are presented. The algebraic iterative methods, their importance and limitations are reviewed. Analytic solutions of the 2D problem the convolution and frequency filtering methods based on linear shift invariant theory, and the solution of the circular harmonic decomposition by integral transform theory--are reviewed. The relation between the invisible kernels, the inverse circular harmonic transform, and the consistency conditions are demonstrated. The discussion and review are extended to the 3D problem-convolution, frequency filtering, spherical harmonic transform solutions, and consistency conditions. The Cormack algorithm based on reconstruction with Zernike polynomials is reviewed. An analogous algorithm and set of reconstruction polynomials is developed for the spherical harmonic transform. The relations between the consistency conditions, boundary conditions and orthogonal basis functions for the 2D projection harmonics are delineated and extended to the 3D case. The equivalence of the inverse circular harmonic transform, the inverse Radon transform, and the inverse Cormack transform is presented. The use of the number of nodes of a projection harmonic as a filter is discussed. Numerical methods for the efficient implementation of angular harmonic algorithms based on orthogonal functions and stable recursion are presented. The derivation of a lower bound for the signal-to-noise ratio of the Cormack algorithm is derived.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of gamma ray tomography for image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Karlos A.N.; Moura, Alex; Dantas, Carlos; Melo, Silvio; Lima, Emerson, E-mail: karlosguedes@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Meric, Ilker [University of Bergen (Norway)

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo simulations of known density and shape object was validate with Gamma Ray Tomography in static experiments. An aluminum half-moon piece placed inside a steel pipe was the MC simulation test object that was also measured by means of gamma ray transmission. Wall effect of the steel pipe due to irradiation geometry in a single pair source-detector tomography was evaluated by comparison with theoretical data. MCNPX code requires a defined geometry to each photon trajectory which practically prevents this usage for tomography reconstruction simulation. The solution was found by writing a program in Delphi language to create input files automation code. Simulations of tomography data by automated MNCPX code were carried out and validated by experimental data. Working in this sequence the produced data needed a databank to be stored. Experimental setup used a Cesium-137 isotopic radioactive source (7.4 × 109 Bq), and NaI(Tl) scintillation detector of (51 × 51) × 10−3 m crystal size coupled to a multichannel analyzer. A stainless steel tubes of 0,154 m internal diameter, 0.014 m thickness wall. The results show that the MCNPX simulation code adapted to automated input file is useful for generating a matrix data M(θ,t), of a computerized gamma ray tomography for any known density and regular shape object. Experimental validation used RMSE from gamma ray paths and from attenuation coefficient data. (author)

  5. In Vivo Diffuse Optical Tomography and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingze Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT are two attractive imaging techniques for in vivo physiological and psychological research. They have distinct advantages such as non-invasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, high sensitivity and longitudinal monitoring. This paper reviews the key components of DOT and FMT. Light propagation model, mathematical reconstruction algorithm, imaging instrumentation and medical applications are included. Future challenges and perspective on optical tomography are discussed.

  6. Multiplanner spine computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. K.; Jeon, H. J.; Hong, K. C.; Chung, K. B.; Suh, W. H. [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The computed tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. Recently, the multiplanar spine CT scan is highly superior than usual axial scan, because of easily demonstrable longitudinal dimension, level of spine and spinal canal. We evaluated 62 cases of spine CT, whom complains of spinal symptoms, from July, 1982 to January, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 45 male and 17 female, ages were from 15 years to 76 years, and sites were 15 cervical spine, 7 thoracic spine, 42 lumbar spine and 21 sacral spine. 2. Sixty two cases of the CT diagnosis were reviewed and shows 19 cases of herniated intervertebral disc, 7 cases of spine fracture, 5 cases of degenerative disease, 4 cases of metastatic cancer, 2 cases of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, 1 case of cord injury and 24 cases of normal. 3. The CT findings of herniated intervertebral disc were protruding disc, obliteration of anterior epidural fat, with or without indentation of dural sac and calcification within posterior disc margin. In cases of trauma, the multiplanar spine CT scan detects more specific extension of the fracture sites, and it is able to demonstrate relationship between fracture fragment and spinal cord, therefore operability can be decided. In case of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, it is easy to demonstrate linear high density along posterior margin of vertebral bodies on sagittal reconstruction scan. 4. The computed tomography is diagnostic in detection of spinal disease. However, multiplanar spine CT is more diagnostic than axial computed tomography such as detecting the longitudinal dimension and demonstration of spinal canal.

  7. Rapid detection of Salmonella in food and feed by coupling loop-mediated isothermal amplification with bioluminescent assay in real-time

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qianru; Domesle, Kelly J; Wang, Fei; Ge, Beilei

    2016-01-01

    Background Salmonella is among the most significant pathogens causing food and feed safety concerns. This study examined the rapid detection of Salmonella in various types of food and feed samples by coupling loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with a novel reporter, bioluminescent assay in real-time (BART). Performance of the LAMP-BART assay was compared to a conventional LAMP and the commercially available 3M Molecular Detection Assay (MDA) Salmonella. Results The LAMP-BART assay ...

  8. A multi-channel bioluminescent bacterial biosensor for the on-line detection of metals and toxicity. Part II: technical development and proof of concept of the biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Thomas; Thouand, Gerald [UMR CNRS 6144 GEPEA, CBAC, Nantes University, PRES UNAM, Campus de la Courtaisiere-IUT, La Roche-sur-Yon cedex (France); Chapeau, Cyrille [Biolumine, Biokar Diagnostic, Rue des Quarante Mines ZAC de Ther-Allonne, Beauvais Cedex (France); Bendria, Loubna; Daniel, Philippe [UMR CNRS 6087 LPEC, Universite du Maine, Av Olivier Messiaen, Le Mans cedex 9 (France); Picart, Pascal [UMR CNRS 6613 IAM-LAUM, Ecole Nationale des Ingenieurs du Mans, Universite du Maine, Le Mans Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-05-15

    This research study deals with the on-line detection of heavy metals and toxicity within the context of environmental pollution monitoring. It describes the construction and the proof of concept of a multi-channel bioluminescent bacterial biosensor in immobilized phase: Lumisens3. This new versatile device, designed for the non-stop analysis of water pollution, enables the insertion of any bioluminescent strains (inducible or constitutive), immobilized in a multi-well removable card. The technical design of Lumisens3 has benefited from both a classical and a robust approach and includes four main parts: (1) a dedicated removable card contains 64 wells, 3 mm in depth, arranged in eight grooves within which bacteria are immobilized, (2) this card is incubated on a Pelletier block with a CCD cooled camera on top for bioluminescence monitoring, (3) a fluidic network feeds the card with the sample to be analyzed and finally (4) a dedicated computer interface, BIOLUX 1.0, controls all the elements of the biosensor, allowing it to operate autonomously. The proof of concept of this biosensor was performed using a set of four bioluminescent bacteria (Escherichia coli DH1 pBzntlux, pBarslux, pBcoplux, and E. coli XL1 pBfiluxCDABE) in the on-line detection of CdCl{sub 2} 0.5 {mu}M and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} 5 {mu}M from an influent. When considering metals individually, the ''fingerprints'' from the biosensor were as expected. However, when metals were mixed together, cross reaction and synergistic effects were detected. This biosensor allowed us to demonstrate the simultaneous on-line cross detection of one or several heavy metals as well as the measurement of the overall toxicity of the sample. (orig.)

  9. A multi-channel bioluminescent bacterial biosensor for the on-line detection of metals and toxicity. Part II: technical development and proof of concept of the biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Thomas; Chapeau, Cyrille; Bendria, Loubna; Picart, Pascal; Daniel, Philippe; Thouand, Gérald

    2011-05-01

    This research study deals with the on-line detection of heavy metals and toxicity within the context of environmental pollution monitoring. It describes the construction and the proof of concept of a multi-channel bioluminescent bacterial biosensor in immobilized phase: Lumisens3. This new versatile device, designed for the non-stop analysis of water pollution, enables the insertion of any bioluminescent strains (inducible or constitutive), immobilized in a multi-well removable card. The technical design of Lumisens3 has benefited from both a classical and a robust approach and includes four main parts: (1) a dedicated removable card contains 64 wells, 3 mm in depth, arranged in eight grooves within which bacteria are immobilized, (2) this card is incubated on a Pelletier block with a CCD cooled camera on top for bioluminescence monitoring, (3) a fluidic network feeds the card with the sample to be analyzed and finally (4) a dedicated computer interface, BIOLUX 1.0, controls all the elements of the biosensor, allowing it to operate autonomously. The proof of concept of this biosensor was performed using a set of four bioluminescent bacteria (Escherichia coli DH1 pBzntlux, pBarslux, pBcoplux, and E. coli XL1 pBfiluxCDABE) in the online detection of CdCl(2) 0.5 μM and As(2)O(3) 5 μM from an influent. When considering metals individually, the "fingerprints" from the biosensor were as expected. However, when metals were mixed together, cross reaction and synergistic effects were detected. This biosensor allowed us to demonstrate the simultaneous on-line cross detection of one or several heavy metals as well as the measurement of the overall toxicity of the sample.

  10. Optimisations and Challenges Involved in the Creation of Various Bioluminescent and Fluorescent Influenza A Virus Strains for In Vitro and In Vivo Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfst, Sander; Bestebroer, Theo M.; Vaes, Vincent P.; van der Hoeven, Barbara; Koster, Abraham J.; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Scott, Dana P.; Gultyaev, Alexander P.; Sorell, Erin M.; de Graaf, Miranda; Bárcena, Montserrat; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Fouchier, Ron A.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent influenza A viruses offer new opportunities to study influenza virus replication, tropism and pathogenesis. To date, several influenza A reporter viruses have been described. These strategies typically focused on a single reporter gene (either bioluminescent or fluorescent) in a single virus backbone. However, whilst bioluminescence is suited to in vivo imaging, fluorescent viruses are more appropriate for microscopy. Therefore, the idea l reporter virus varies depending on the experiment in question, and it is important that any reporter virus strategy can be adapted accordingly. Herein, a strategy was developed to create five different reporter viruses in a single virus backbone. Specifically, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), far-red fluorescent protein (fRFP), near-infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP), Gaussia luciferase (gLUC) and firefly luciferase (fLUC) were inserted into the PA gene segment of A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). This study provides a comprehensive characterisation of the effects of different reporter genes on influenza virus replication and reporter activity. In vivo reporter gene expression, in lung tissues, was only detected for eGFP, fRFP and gLUC expressing viruses. In vitro, the eGFP-expressing virus displayed the best reporter stability and could be used for correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM). This strategy was then used to create eGFP-expressing viruses consisting entirely of pandemic H1N1, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 and H7N9. The HPAI H5N1 eGFP-expressing virus infected mice and reporter gene expression was detected, in lung tissues, in vivo. Thus, this study provides new tools and insights for the creation of bioluminescent and fluorescent influenza A reporter viruses. PMID:26241861

  11. Practical adaptive quantum tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granade, Christopher; Ferrie, Christopher; Flammia, Steven T.

    2017-11-01

    We introduce a fast and accurate heuristic for adaptive tomography that addresses many of the limitations of prior methods. Previous approaches were either too computationally intensive or tailored to handle special cases such as single qubits or pure states. By contrast, our approach combines the efficiency of online optimization with generally applicable and well-motivated data-processing techniques. We numerically demonstrate these advantages in several scenarios including mixed states, higher-dimensional systems, and restricted measurements. http://cgranade.com complete data and source code for this work are available online [1], and can be previewed at https://goo.gl/koiWxR.

  12. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  13. Hyperspectral optical diffraction tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, JaeHwang; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present a novel microscopic technique for measuring wavelength-dependent three-dimensional (3-D) distributions of the refractive indices (RIs) of microscopic samples in the visible wavelengths. Employing 3-D quantitative phase microscopy techniques with a wavelength-swept source, 3-D RI tomograms were obtained in the range of 450 - 700 nm with a spectral resolution of a few nanometers. The capability of the technique was demonstrated by measuring the hyperspectral 3-D RI tomograms of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, and hepatocytes. The results demonstrate the potential for label-free molecular specific 3-D tomography of biological samples.

  14. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  15. Solar Stereoscopy and Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus J. Aschwanden

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We review stereoscopic and tomographic methods used in the solar corona, including ground-based and space-based measurements, using solar rotation or multiple spacecraft vantage points, in particular from the STEREO mission during 2007--2010. Stereoscopic and tomographic observations in the solar corona include large-scale structures, streamers, active regions, coronal loops, loop oscillations, acoustic waves in loops, erupting filaments and prominences, bright points, jets, plumes, flares, CME source regions, and CME-triggered global coronal waves. Applications in the solar interior (helioseismic tomography and reconstruction and tracking of CMEs from the outer corona and into the heliosphere (interplanetary CMEs are not included.

  16. Computerized ionospheric tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austen, J.R.; Raymund, T.D.; Klobuchar, J.A.; Stalker, J.; Liu, C.H.

    1990-05-03

    In this paper the background of computerized tomography (CT) and its application to the ionosphere is reviewed. CT techniques, using only total electron content (TEC) data, can be used to reconstruct a two-dimensional image of the electron density in the ionosphere. The limitations of this technique are discussed and examples showing the limitations and capabilities are presented. Simulation results for two applications are presented: imaging the high latitude trough, and the correction of tracking radar range rate errors. Some possible extensions of the technique are presented.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  18. Genetically modified semisynthetic bioluminescent photoprotein variants: simultaneous dual-analyte assay in a single well employing time resolution of decay kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Laura; Combs, Kelly; Deo, Sapna; Ensor, C; Daunert, Sylvia; Qu, Xiaoge

    2008-11-15

    Progress in the miniaturization and automation of complex analytical processes depends largely on increasing the sensitivity, diversity, and robustness of current labels. Because of their ubiquity and ease of use, fluorescent, enzymatic, and bioluminescent labels are often employed in such miniaturized and multiplexed formats, with each type of label having its own unique advantages and drawbacks. The ultrasensitive detection limits of bioluminescent reporters are especially advantageous when dealing with very small sample volumes and biological fluids. However, bioluminescent reporters currently do not have the multiplexing capability that fluorescent labels do. In an effort to address this limitation, we have developed a method of discriminating two semisynthetic aequorin variants from one another using time resolution. In this work we paired two aequorin conjugates with different coelenterazine analogues and then resolved the two signals from one another using the difference in decay kinetics and half-life times. Utilizing this time-resolution, we then developed a simultaneous, dual-analyte, single well assay for 6-keto-prostaglandin-FI-alpha and angiotensin II, two important cardiovascular molecules.

  19. Effects of Photodynamic Therapy on Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacterial Biofilms by Bioluminescence Imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Silvia C.; Azambuja, Nilton; Fregnani, Eduardo R.; Rodriguez, Helena M.H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Suzuki, Hideo; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to test photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an alternative approach to biofilm disruption on dental hard tissue, We evaluated the effect of methylene blue and a 660 nm diode laser on the viability and architecture of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial biofilms. Materials and methods: Ten human teeth were inoculated with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterococcus faecalis to form 3 day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify and evaluate the bacterial viability, and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) imaging was used to assess architecture and morphology of bacterial biofilm before and after PDT employing methylene blue and 40 mW, 660 nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 300 μm fiber for 240 sec, resulting in a total energy of 9.6 J. The data were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test. Results: The bacterial reduction showed a dose dependence; as the light energy increased, the bioluminescence decreased in both planktonic suspension and in biofilms. The SEM analysis showed a significant reduction of biofilm on the surface. PDT promoted disruption of the biofilm and the number of adherent bacteria was reduced. Conclusions: The photodynamic effect seems to disrupt the biofilm by acting both on bacterial cells and on the extracellular matrix. PMID:23822168

  20. Detection of Salmonella in Foods Using a Reference PN-ISO Method and an Alternative Method Based on Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Coupled with Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarowska, Jolanta; Frej-Mądrzak, Magdalena; Jama-Kmiecik, Agnieszka; Kilian, Anna; Teryks-Wołyniec, Dorota; Choroszy-Król, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella, one of the primary indicators of food safety, is a common cause of food poisoning of an epidemic nature around the world. These microorganisms can colonize the gastrointestinal tract of both people and animals, and next contaminate not only eggs, milk, meat and dairy products, but also vegetables, fruit, grains and even spices. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples using a reference PN-ISO method and an alternative method based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) coupled with bioluminescence. Food samples were obtained in cooperation with the State Sanitary-Epidemiological Station in Wrocław. Dairy products, meat, fish, pastry and confectionery, vegetables, herbs and spices were analyzed. The food samples were examined using a standard culturing method according to PN-ISO 6579:2003 for Salmonella spp. and an alternative method based on the isothermal amplification and bioluminescence phenomenon using the 3M MDS device. In 399 tested food samples in 8 materials, using both the reference and the alternative LAMP-based method, the presence of salmonella was confirmed. The results obtained show the 100% sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the presented alternative, LAMP-based technique compared to the reference PN-ISO method. The alternative method using isothermal amplification and bioluminescence makes it possible to detect Salmonella in foods in a much shorter time than the referential culturing method.