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Sample records for experimental acute respiratory

  1. Respiratory and Systemic Effects of LASSBio596 Plus Surfactant in Experimental Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnatas Dutra Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Exogenous surfactant has been proposed as adjunctive therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but it is inactivated by different factors present in the alveolar space. We hypothesized that co-administration of LASSBio596, a molecule with significant anti-inflammatory properties, and exogenous surfactant could reduce lung inflammation, thus enabling the surfactant to reduce edema and improve lung function, in experimental ARDS. Methods: ARDS was induced by cecal ligation and puncture surgery in BALB/c mice. A sham-operated group was used as control (CTRL. After surgery (6 hours, CTRL and ARDS animals were assigned to receive: (1 sterile saline solution; (2 LASSBio596; (3 exogenous surfactant or (4 LASSBio596 plus exogenous surfactant (n = 22/group. Results: Regardless of exogenous surfactant administration, LASSBio596 improved survival rate and reduced collagen fiber content, total number of cells and neutrophils in PLF and blood, cell apoptosis, protein content in BALF, and urea and creatinine levels. LASSBio596 plus surfactant yielded all of the aforementioned beneficial effects, as well as increased BALF lipid content and reduced surface tension. Conclusion: LASSBio596 exhibited major anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrogenic effects in experimental sepsis-induced ARDS. Its association with surfactant may provide further advantages, potentially by reducing surface tension.

  2. Lung Functional and Biologic Responses to Variable Ventilation in Experimental Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samary, Cynthia S; Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Cintia L; Huhle, Robert; Santos, Raquel S; Ornellas, Debora S; Felix, Nathane S; Capelozzi, Vera L; Schanaider, Alberto; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Rocco, Patricia R M; Silva, Pedro L

    2016-07-01

    The biologic effects of variable ventilation may depend on the etiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome. We compared variable and conventional ventilation in experimental pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome. Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study. University research laboratory. Twenty-four Wistar rats. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide administered intratracheally (pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome, n = 12) or intraperitoneally (extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome, n = 12). After 24 hours, animals were randomly assigned to receive conventional (volume-controlled ventilation, n = 6) or variable ventilation (n = 6). Nonventilated animals (n = 4 per etiology) were used for comparison of diffuse alveolar damage, E-cadherin, and molecular biology variables. Variable ventilation was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated tidal volume values (n = 600; mean tidal volume = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation (normal distribution). After randomization, animals were ventilated for 1 hour and lungs were removed for histology and molecular biology analysis. Variable ventilation improved oxygenation and reduced lung elastance compared with volume-controlled ventilation in both acute respiratory distress syndrome etiologies. In pulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome, but not in extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome, variable ventilation 1) decreased total diffuse alveolar damage (median [interquartile range]: volume-controlled ventilation, 12 [11-17] vs variable ventilation, 9 [8-10]; p ventilation, 21.5 [18.3-23.3] vs variable ventilation, 5.6 [4.6-12.1]; p ventilation, 2.0 [1.3-2.1] vs variable ventilation, 0.7 [0.6-1.4]; p ventilation, 0.3 [0.2-0.5] vs variable ventilation, 0.8 [0.5-1.3]; p ventilation increased vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression (volume

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  4. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARS; Respiratory failure - SARS ... Complications may include: Respiratory failure Liver failure Heart failure ... 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). ...

  5. The Open Lung Approach Improves Pulmonary Vascular Mechanics in an Experimental Model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Arnoldo; Lucchetta, Luca; Monge-Garcia, M Ignacio; Borges, Joao Batista; Tusman, Gerardo; Hedenstierna, Goran; Larsson, Anders; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando

    2017-03-01

    To test whether positive end-expiratory pressure consistent with an open lung approach improves pulmonary vascular mechanics compared with higher or lower positive end-expiratory pressures in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome. Experimental study. Animal research laboratory. Ten pigs, 35 ± 5.2 kg. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was induced combining saline lung lavages with injurious mechanical ventilation. The positive end-expiratory pressure level resulting in highest compliance during a decremental positive end-expiratory pressure trial after lung recruitment was determined. Thereafter, three positive end-expiratory pressure levels were applied in a random order: hyperinflation, 6 cm H2O above; open lung approach, 2 cm H2O above; and collapse, 6 cm H2O below the highest compliance level. High fidelity pressure and flow sensors were placed at the main pulmonary artery for measuring pulmonary artery resistance (Z0), effective arterial elastance, compliance, and reflected pressure waves. After inducing acute respiratory distress syndrome, Z0 and effective arterial elastance increased (from 218 ± 94 to 444 ± 115 dyn.s.cm and from 0.27 ± 0.14 to 0.62 ± 0.22 mm Hg/mL, respectively; p mechanics compared with higher or lower positive end-expiratory pressure settings.

  6. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / ARDS ARDS What Is ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads ... treat ARDS. Other Names Acute lung injury Adult respiratory distress syndrome Increased-permeability pulmonary edema Noncardiac pulmonary ...

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  9. Effects on Pulmonary Vascular Mechanics of Two Different Lung-Protective Ventilation Strategies in an Experimental Model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Arnoldo; Gomez-Peñalver, Eva; Monge-Garcia, M Ignacio; Retamal, Jaime; Borges, João Batista; Tusman, Gerardo; Hedenstierna, Goran; Larsson, Anders; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    To compare the effects of two lung-protective ventilation strategies on pulmonary vascular mechanics in early acute respiratory distress syndrome. Experimental study. University animal research laboratory. Twelve pigs (30.8 ± 2.5 kg). Acute respiratory distress syndrome was induced by repeated lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Thereafter, animals were randomized to 4 hours ventilation according to the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network protocol or to an open lung approach strategy. Pressure and flow sensors placed at the pulmonary artery trunk allowed continuous assessment of pulmonary artery resistance, effective elastance, compliance, and reflected pressure waves. Respiratory mechanics and gas exchange data were collected. Acute respiratory distress syndrome led to pulmonary vascular mechanics deterioration. Four hours after randomization, pulmonary vascular mechanics was similar in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network and open lung approach: resistance (578 ± 252 vs 626 ± 153 dyn.s/cm; p = 0.714), effective elastance, (0.63 ± 0.22 vs 0.58 ± 0.17 mm Hg/mL; p = 0.710), compliance (1.19 ± 0.8 vs 1.50 ± 0.27 mL/mm Hg; p = 0.437), and reflection index (0.36 ± 0.04 vs 0.34 ± 0.09; p = 0.680). Open lung approach as compared to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network was associated with improved dynamic respiratory compliance (17.3 ± 2.6 vs 10.5 ± 1.3 mL/cm H2O; p mechanics similarly. The use of higher positive end-expiratory pressures in the open lung approach strategy did not worsen pulmonary vascular mechanics, improved lung mechanics, and gas exchange but at the expense of a lower cardiac index.

  10. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Global pattern of SARS epidemic · Slide 5 · SARS – clinical features ... SARS virus · SARS – Koch´Postulates proved. SARS – virus jumps species · How infectious is SARS virus · SARS – Global Distribution- 10th July 2003.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute and chronic airway disease is independent of genetic background: An experimental murine model

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    Ramilo Octavio

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading respiratory viral pathogen in young children worldwide. RSV disease is associated with acute airway obstruction (AO, long-term airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, and chronic lung inflammation. Using two different mouse strains, this study was designed to determine whether RSV disease patterns are host-dependent. C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice were inoculated with RSV and followed for 77 days. RSV loads were measured by plaque assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and whole lung samples; cytokines were measured in BAL samples. Lung inflammation was evaluated with a histopathologic score (HPS, and AO and AHR were determined by plethysmography. Results Viral load dynamics, histopathologic score (HPS, cytokine concentrations, AO and long-term AHR were similar in both strains of RSV-infected mice, although RSV-infected C57BL/6 mice developed significantly greater AO compared with RSV-infected BALB/c mice on day 5. PCR detected RSV RNA in BAL samples of RSV infected mice until day 42, and in whole lung samples through day 77. BAL concentrations of cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, and chemokines MIG, RANTES and MIP-1α were significantly elevated in both strains of RSV-infected mice compared with their respective controls. Viral load measured by PCR significantly correlated with disease severity on days 14 and 21. Conclusion RSV-induced acute and chronic airway disease is independent of genetic background.

  12. Acute respiratory infections at children

    OpenAIRE

    Delyagin, V.

    2009-01-01

    The common signs of virus respiratory diseases, role of pathological inclination to infections, value of immunodeficiency are presented at lecture. Features of most often meeting respiratory virus infections are given.

  13. The acute phase response of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA) in cattle undergoing experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Godson, D.L.; Toussaint, M.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of a pure virus infection to induce an acute phase protein response is of interest as viral infections are normally considered to be less efficient in inducing an acute phase protein response than bacterial infections. This was studied in a bovine model for infection with bovine...... respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), analysing the induction of the two most dominant bovine acute phase proteins haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA). Strong and reproducible acute phase responses were detected for both proteins, peaking at around 7-8 days after inoculation of BRSV, while no response...... was seen in mock-inoculated control animals. The serum concentrations reached for SAA and haptoglobin during the BRSV-induced acute phase response were generally the same or higher than previously reported for bacterial infections in calves. The magnitude and the duration of the haptoglobin response...

  14. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  15. The neurology of acutely failing respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2017-04-01

    Forces involved in breathing-which effectively pull in air-are the diaphragmatic, intercostal, spine, and neck muscles. Equally important is the bulbar musculature maintaining the architecture of a patent airway conduit and abdominal wall and internal intercostal muscles providing cough. Acute injury along a neural trajectory from brainstem to muscle will impair the coordinated interaction between these muscle groups. Acutely failing respiratory mechanics can be caused by central and peripheral lesions. In central lesions, the key lesion is in the nucleus ambiguus innervating the dilator muscles of the soft palate, pharynx, and larynx, but abnormal respiratory mechanics rarely coincide with abnormalities of the respiratory pattern generator. In peripheral lesions, diaphragmatic weakness is a main element, but in many neuromuscular disorders mechanical upper airway obstruction from oropharyngeal weakness contributes equally to an increased respiratory load. The neurology of breathing involves changes in respiratory drive, rhythm, mechanics, and dynamics. This review focuses on the fundamentals of abnormal respiratory mechanics in acute neurologic conditions, bedside judgment, interpretation of additional laboratory tests, and initial stabilization, with practical solutions provided. Many of these respiratory signs are relevant to neurologists, who in acute situations may see these patients first. Ann Neurol 2017;81:485-494. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  16. Acute Respiratory Insufficiency After Adenotonsillectomy

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    Öznur Şen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenotonsillectomy is one of the frequently performed surgical procedures in children and the most common complications of this procedure are bleeding and respiratory insufficiency. Here, we present a 20-month-old boy who was born prematurely. He underwent adenotonsillectomy and bilateral grommet insertion due to recurrent tonsilitis, snoring, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The patient required a prolonged intensive care unit stay due to postoperative respiratory insufficiency. In this paper, we aimed to evaluate the potential complications of adenotonsillectomy. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2013;51:193-6

  17. Current perspectives for management of acute respiratory insufficiency in premature infants with acute respiratory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zhang, Ying; Li, Long-Yun

    2014-09-01

    Current perspectives for management of acute respiratory insufficiency in premature infants with acute respiratory syndrome and the pathology of acute respiratory insufficiency in the preterm infant, including the current therapy modalities on disposition are presented. Since the therapeutical challenge and primary clinical goal are to normalize ventilation ratio and lung perfusion, when respiratory insufficiency occurs, it is very important to introduce the respiratory support as soon possible, in order to reduce development of pulmonary cyanosis and edema, and intrapulmonary or intracardial shunts. A characteristic respiratory instability that reflects through fluctuations in gas exchange and ventilation is often present in premature infants. Adapting the respiratory support on a continuous basis to the infant's needs is challenging and not always effective. Although a large number of ventilation strategies for the neonate are available, there is a need for additional consensus on management of acute respiratory distress syndrome in pediatric population lately redefined by Berlin definition criteria, in order to efficiently apply various modes of respiratory support in daily pediatrician clinical use.

  18. Environmental determinants of acute respiratory symptoms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental determinants of acute respiratory symptoms and diarrhoea in young coloured children living in urban and peri-urban areas of South Africa. ... access to essential environmental health services in urban areas and improvements in the educational status of women are urgently needed if childhood infections are ...

  19. Environmental determinants of acute respiratory symptoms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-20

    Apr 20, 1991 ... acute respiratory symptoms in South African coloured child- ren. A multistage ... epidemiological assessment of the effects of urban environments .... Flush inside. 908. 74,7. Flush outside. 207. 17,0. Communal flush. 23. 1,9. Own bucket system. 60. 4,9. Communal bucket system. 7. 0,6. Pit latrine. 6. 0,5.

  20. Meditation or Exercise May Help Acute Respiratory Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Meditation or Exercise May Help Acute Respiratory Infections, Study ... According to a recent study, exercising or practicing meditation may be effective in reducing acute respiratory infections. ...

  1. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, R M; Matthay, M A

    2000-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilation refers to any form of ventilatory support applied without the use of an endotracheal tube. It offers the potential to provide primary treatment for acute respiratory failure while avoiding complications associated with mechanical ventilation with endotracheal intubation. Noninvasive ventilation has been most commonly studied in hypercapnic respiratory failure. A review of randomized, controlled studies shows mixed results and methodologic limitations affect the interpretation of current evidence. Patient selection is clearly the most important issue in considering noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure. Unfortunately, patients who benefit from noninvasive ventilation represent only a minority of the total group with any one disease, and thus it is difficult to make broad conclusions concerning applicability of this treatment modality. Future studies are needed to focus on determining the specific patient populations who will benefit the most, evaluating the optimal ventilatory mode and mask for providing noninvasive ventilation, and clarifying its impact on clinical outcomes.

  2. PREVENTION OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Karneeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of inflammatory diseases of the upper airways and eardrum remains relevant and associated both with high prevalence of this pathology and likelihood of developing complications. Inflammation of nasal cavity’s mucosal lining causes discomfort, while chronic dysfunction of nasal breathing significantly reduces the patient’s quality of life. Difficulty in nasal breathing of newborns and infants results in quite severe complications. Nearly 70% of acute respiratory infections cases in children are complicated with acute inflammation of eardrum, 90% of children under 3 years once develop secretory otitis media, 50% of them have several cases of eardrum inflammation.Key words: acute respiratory infections, otitis, treatment, children.

  3. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, L

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  4. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, L; Alam, J; Lane, S

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  5. PREVENTION OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    O.V. Karneeva

    2009-01-01

    The issue of inflammatory diseases of the upper airways and eardrum remains relevant and associated both with high prevalence of this pathology and likelihood of developing complications. Inflammation of nasal cavity’s mucosal lining causes discomfort, while chronic dysfunction of nasal breathing significantly reduces the patient’s quality of life. Difficulty in nasal breathing of newborns and infants results in quite severe complications. Nearly 70% of acute respiratory infections cases in c...

  6. [Respiratory insufficiency in acute bronchiolitis in infancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbauer, H M; Haim, M; Zach, M; Zobel, G

    1989-06-01

    Forty-one infants with acute viral bronchiolitis were hospitalized in our paediatric intensive care unit during the seven year period from 1980 to 1987. In 14 out of 27 evaluated patients, Respiratory Syncitial Virus (RSV) was detected in the nasal secretions. Twenty-three children required only supportive care and monitoring. Eighteen infants had to be ventilated because of respiratory failure. The major indication for mechanical ventilation was an arterial or capillary pCO2 of more than 64 mmHg; other criteria were repeated apnoea, respiratory acidosis, and clinical deterioration. In all cases the type of the mechanical ventilation was an intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV) with flow and time cycled respirators; muscle relaxation was not required in any case. The average duration of mechanical ventilation was 40 hours. All the children recovered uneventfully. These data suggest that even the most severe cases of acute bronchiolotis can be treated successfully, and that the mortality rate of this disease entity can be reduced to zero.

  7. Pattern of acute respiratory infections in hospitalized children under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of acute respiratory infections in hospitalized children under five years of age in Jos Nigeria. ... Abstract. Background: Acute respiratory infections are the commonest cause of acute morbidity in children especially those under five in the developing countries. ... prevalence of 43.5/1000 person per year (39/897).

  8. Ventilator induced lung injury (VILI) in acute respiratory distress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is the most severe manifestation of acute lung injury and it is associated with high mortality rate. ARDS is characterized by the acute onset of diffuse neutrophilic alveolar infiltrates protein-rich edema due to enhanced alveolar-capillary permeability and hypoxemic respiratory failure.

  9. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azoulay, Elie; Pickkers, Peter; Soares, Marcio

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (ARF), initial management aims primarily to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). METHODS: To assess the impact of initial management on IMV and mortality rates, we performed a multinational observational...... prospective cohort study in 16 countries (68 centers). RESULTS: A total of 1611 patients were enrolled (hematological malignancies 51.9%, solid tumors 35.2%, systemic diseases 17.3%, and solid organ transplantation 8.8%). The main ARF etiologies were bacterial (29.5%), viral (15.4%), and fungal infections (14.......54-0.87), day-1 SOFA excluding respiratory score (1.12/point, 1.08-1.16), PaO2/FiO2

  10. Cigarette Smoke Exposure and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Calfee, CS; Matthay, MA; Kangelaris, KN; Siew, ED; Janz, DR; Bernard, GR; May, AK; Jacob, P; Havel, C; Benowitz, NL; Ware, LB

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. The association between cigarette smoke exposure and the acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with the most common acute respiratory distress syndrome risk factors of sepsis, pneumonia, and aspiration has not been well studied. The goal of this study was to test the association between biomarker-confirmed cigarette smoking and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a diverse cohort. Design: Prospective ...

  11. Variable positive end-expiratory pressure can maintain oxygenation in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by oleic acid in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.C. Lanza

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP or lung recruitment maneuvers (RM to improve oxygenation in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is used but it may reduce cardiac output (CO. Intermittent PEEP may avoid these complications. Our objective was to determine if variable PEEP compared with constant PEEP is capable of maintaining arterial oxygenation and minimizing hemodynamic alterations with or without RM. Eighteen dogs with ARDS induced by oleic acid were randomized into three equal groups: group 1, low variable PEEP; group 2, high variable PEEP, and group 3, RM + high variable PEEP. All groups were submitted to constant PEEP, followed by variable PEEP (PEEP was increased from 5 to 10 cmH2O in group 1, and from 5 to 18 cmH2O in the other two groups. PaO2 was higher in group 3 (356.2 ± 65.4 mmHg than in group 1 (92.7 ± 29.7 mmHg and group 2 (228.5 ± 72.4 mmHg, P 0.05. Variable PEEP is able to maintain PaO2 when performed in combination with RM in dogs with ARDS. After RM, CO was reduced and there was no relevant difference between the variable and constant PEEP periods.

  12. Acute Respiratory Failure in Acute Poisoning by Neutrotropic Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Lodyagin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of methods for diagnosing and treating critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF in acute poisoning by neurotropic substances. Subjects and methods. Two hundred and thirty-three patients with acute severe intoxication with neurotropic poisons were examined. All the patients were admitted for toxic-hypoxic coma and ARF; in this connection all the patients underwent artificial ventilation (AV. The patients were divided into 3 groups: 1 those in whom the traditional treatments (AV, detoxifying therapy, and infusional and cardiotropic support could restore the basic parameters of vital functions, as judged from the recovered oxygenation index; these patients had no metabolic shifts; 2 those who had signs of pulmonary hyperhydration, low cardiac output and moderate metabolic disorders, as suggested by elevated lactate levels; 3 seriously ill patients in whom the interval between the time of poisoning to care delivery was more than 20 hours; the patients of this group had the most significant metabolic disorders. Results. Correction of ARF in critically ill patients with acute poisoning should include, in addition to the rational parameters of AV and detoxifying therapy, agents for targeted therapy for sequels of hypoxia and energy deficiency states. For maximally rapid and effective oxygen transport recovery, the addition of perfluorane to the complex therapy cardinally improves the results of treatment and reduces mortality rates. Conclusion. The complexity of the pathogenesis of ARF and its sequels is a ground for diagnosing and correcting not only ventilation disturbances, but also pulmonary microcirculatory disorders and metabolic disturbances. Key words: acute intoxication with neu-rotropic poisons, acute respiratory failure, pulmonary hyperhydration, hypoxia, metabolic disturbances.

  13. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  14. Survival of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Mary Y Y; Cheng, Peter K C; Lim, Wilina W L

    2005-10-01

    The primary modes of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) appear to be direct mucus membrane contact with infectious droplets and through exposure to formites. Knowledge of the survival characteristics of the virus is essential for formulating appropriate infection-control measures. Survival of SARS-CoV strain GVU6109 was studied in stool and respiratory specimens. Survival of the virus on different environmental surfaces, including a laboratory request form, an impervious disposable gown, and a cotton nondisposable gown, was investigated. The virucidal effects of sodium hypochlorite, house detergent, and a peroxygen compound (Virkon S; Antec International) on the virus were also studied. SARS-CoV GVU6109 can survive for 4 days in diarrheal stool samples with an alkaline pH, and it can remain infectious in respiratory specimens for >7 days at room temperature. Even at a relatively high concentration (10(4) tissue culture infective doses/mL), the virus could not be recovered after drying of a paper request form, and its infectivity was shown to last longer on the disposable gown than on the cotton gown. All disinfectants tested were shown to be able to reduce the virus load by >3 log within 5 min. Fecal and respiratory samples can remain infectious for a long period of time at room temperature. The risk of infection via contact with droplet-contaminated paper is small. Absorbent material, such as cotton, is preferred to nonabsorptive material for personal protective clothing for routine patient care where risk of large spillage is unlikely. The virus is easily inactivated by commonly used disinfectants.

  15. Phytotherapy of Acute Respiratory Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Ershova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays phytotherapy is increasingly being implemented into medical practice, especially for the prevention and treatment of many diseases. Acute respiratory viral infections are most common in childhood and in adults. Acute rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis, nasopharyngitis and acute laryngitis refer to diseases of the upper respiratory tract. The main reason for respiratory diseases in recurrent respiratory infection child is disorders of mucociliary and immune protection. The therapeutic value of medicinal plants is determined by their biologically active substances. The method of application of phytotherpy is an integral part of traditional medicine. Herbal medicine can be used at home and does not require special equipment. The main indications for the herbal medicine use in pediatrics are the initial stage of the disease as a primary method of treatment due to mild and low toxicity; as a supporting treatment for enhancing the protective forces of the child’s body during the disease deterioration. During the recovery period herbal medicine again occupies a leading position, especially in case of chronic diseases because it can be used for a long time and is well combined with synthetic drugs. The terms of appointment of herbs for children: prescription of medicinal plants for children must be individual according to indications, taking into account the child’s age; it is recommended to take into account the form and nature of the course of the main disease and comorbidities as well; at the initial stage of the treatment it is better to use some medicinal plants or species consisting of 2–3 plants and in the future a more complex composition; therapy with medicinal plants requires a long period to be used use, especially in chronic diseases; in the treatment of chronic diseases a good effect preventive courses of herbal medicine was revealed, which are appointed during seasonal exacerbations; in case of intolerance

  16. Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Christopher E.; Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brooks, Antone L.; McCord, Stacey; Dagle, Gerald E.; James, Anthony C.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Thrall, Brian D.; Morgan, William F.

    2012-11-01

    The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [239Pu (NO3)4] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histological lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a non-uniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the sub-pleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within the respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential increase in cancer risk.

  17. Self-Reported Mental Health Predicts Acute Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lizzie; Barrett, Bruce; Chase, Joseph; Brown, Roger; Ewers, Tola

    2015-06-01

    Poor mental health conditions, including stress and depression, have been recognized as a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory infection. Very few studies have considered the role of general mental health in acute respiratory infection occurrence. The aim of this analysis is to determine if overall mental health, as assessed by the mental component of the Short Form 12 Health Survey, predicts incidence, duration, or severity of acute respiratory infection. Data utilized for this analysis came from the National Institute of Health-funded Meditation or Exercise for Preventing Acute Respiratory Infection (MEPARI) and MEPARI-2 randomized controlled trials examining the effects of meditation or exercise on acute respiratory infection among adults aged > 30 years in Madison, Wisconsin. A Kendall tau rank correlation compared the Short Form 12 mental component, completed by participants at baseline, with acute respiratory infection incidence, duration, and area-under-the-curve (global) severity, as assessed by the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey. Participants were recruited from Madison, Wis, using advertisements in local media. Short Form 12 mental health scores significantly predicted incidence (P = 0.037) of acute respiratory infection, but not duration (P = 0.077) or severity (P = 0.073). The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) negative emotion measure significantly predicted global severity (P = 0.036), but not incidence (P = 0.081) or duration (P = 0.125). Mindful Attention Awareness Scale scores significantly predicted incidence of acute respiratory infection (P = 0.040), but not duration (P = 0.053) or severity (P = 0.70). The PHQ-9, PSS-10, and PANAS positive measures did not show significant predictive associations with any of the acute respiratory infection outcomes. Self-reported overall mental health, as measured by the mental component of Short Form 12, predicts acute respiratory infection incidence.

  18. Vitamin D supplementation effective in preventing acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Studies have consistently shown low levels of vitamin D make people more susceptible to respiratory infections. Acute respiratory infections are a major cause of ill health and mortality. Observational studies have shown that people with low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the major circulating vitamin D metabolite, are susceptible to respiratory infection.

  19. Determinants of acute respiratory infections in Soweto - a population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are an important cause of infant morbidity in both developing and developed countries, and they are the leading cause of death in poorer parts of the world. Respiratory viruses appear to be the most frequent microbiological pathogens, especially respiratory syncytial virus.

  20. Chinese herbal medicine for severe acute respiratory syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Manheimer, Eric; Shi, Yi

    2004-01-01

    To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically.......To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically....

  1. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  2. RATIONAL ANTIVIRAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN OUTPATIENT CLINIC

    OpenAIRE

    M.G. Lukashevich

    2008-01-01

    An epidemiology and clinical symptomatology of frequently occurred acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI) and opportunities of treatment of patients with these diseases in outpatient clinics are described. New information about effectiveness and safety of antiviral medications in treatment and prophylaxis of ARVI in children are discussed.Key words: children, acute respiratory viral infections, antiviral medications, interferon, interferon inductors.

  3. RATIONAL ANTIVIRAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN OUTPATIENT CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Lukashevich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiology and clinical symptomatology of frequently occurred acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI and opportunities of treatment of patients with these diseases in outpatient clinics are described. New information about effectiveness and safety of antiviral medications in treatment and prophylaxis of ARVI in children are discussed.Key words: children, acute respiratory viral infections, antiviral medications, interferon, interferon inductors.

  4. Nasopharyngeal Protein Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Burke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of respiratory mucosa with viral pathogens triggers complex immunologic events in the affected host. We sought to characterize this response through proteomic analysis of nasopharyngeal lavage in human subjects experimentally challenged with influenza A/H3N2 or human rhinovirus, and to develop targeted assays measuring peptides involved in this host response allowing classification of acute respiratory virus infection. Unbiased proteomic discovery analysis identified 3285 peptides corresponding to 438 unique proteins, and revealed that infection with H3N2 induces significant alterations in protein expression. These include proteins involved in acute inflammatory response, innate immune response, and the complement cascade. These data provide insights into the nature of the biological response to viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and the proteins that are dysregulated by viral infection form the basis of signature that accurately classifies the infected state. Verification of this signature using targeted mass spectrometry in independent cohorts of subjects challenged with influenza or rhinovirus demonstrates that it performs with high accuracy (0.8623 AUROC, 75% TPR, 97.46% TNR. With further development as a clinical diagnostic, this signature may have utility in rapid screening for emerging infections, avoidance of inappropriate antibacterial therapy, and more rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic and public health strategies.

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: 30 Years Later?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Lesur

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS was first described about 30 years ago. Modern definitions and statements have recently been proposed to describe ARDS accurately, but none is perfect. Diffuse alveolar damage is the basic pathological pattern most commonly observed in ARDS, and the term includes permeability edema. The alveolar epithelium of the alveolar-capillary barrier is clearly a key component requiring repair, given its multipotent functional activity. Lung inflammation and neutrophil accumulation are essential markers of disease in ARDS, and a wide variety of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been described in the alveolar fluid and blood of patients. These molecules still have to prove their value as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of ARDS.

  6. Physiological relevance and performance of a minimal lung model – an experimental study in healthy and acute respiratory distress syndrome model piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiew Yeong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical ventilation (MV is the primary form of support for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS patients. However, intra- and inter- patient-variability reduce the efficacy of general protocols. Model-based approaches to guide MV can be patient-specific. A physiological relevant minimal model and its patient-specific performance are tested to see if it meets this objective above. Methods Healthy anesthetized piglets weighing 24.0 kg [IQR: 21.0-29.6] underwent a step-wise PEEP increase manoeuvre from 5cmH2O to 20cmH2O. They were ventilated under volume control using Engström Care Station (Datex, General Electric, Finland, with pressure, flow and volume profiles recorded. ARDS was then induced using oleic acid. The data were analyzed with a Minimal Model that identifies patient-specific mean threshold opening and closing pressure (TOP and TCP, and standard deviation (SD of these TOP and TCP distributions. The trial and use of data were approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty of the University of Liege, Belgium. Results and discussions 3 of the 9 healthy piglets developed ARDS, and these data sets were included in this study. Model fitting error during inflation and deflation, in healthy or ARDS state is less than 5.0% across all subjects, indicating that the model captures the fundamental lung mechanics during PEEP increase. Mean TOP was 42.4cmH2O [IQR: 38.2-44.6] at PEEP = 5cmH2O and decreased with PEEP to 25.0cmH2O [IQR: 21.5-27.1] at PEEP = 20cmH2O. In contrast, TCP sees a reverse trend, increasing from 10.2cmH2O [IQR: 9.0-10.4] to 19.5cmH2O [IQR: 19.0-19.7]. Mean TOP increased from average 21.2-37.4cmH2O to 30.4-55.2cmH2O between healthy and ARDS subjects, reflecting the higher pressure required to recruit collapsed alveoli. Mean TCP was effectively unchanged. Conclusion The minimal model is capable of capturing physiologically relevant TOP, TCP and SD of both healthy and ARDS lungs. The

  7. Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a common complication of many diseases. Its polyetiological pattern determines the specific features of lung morphological changes and the clinical course of ARDS. Objective: to analyze the pathogenesis of ARDS in the context of the general pathological processes underlying its development. Material and methods. More than 200 lungs from the people who had died from severe concomitant injury or ARDS-complicated pneumonia were investigated. More than 150 rat experiments simulated various types of lung injury: ventilator-induced lung injury with different ventilation parameters; reperfusion injuries (systemic circulation blockade due to 12-minute vascular fascicle ligation, followed by the recovery of cardiac performance and breathing; microcirculatory disorder (injection of a thromboplastin solution into the jugular vein; blood loss; betaine-pepsin aspiration; and closed chest injury. Different parts of the right and left lungs were histologically examined 1 and 3 hours and 1 and 3 days after initiation of the experiment. Lung pieces were fixed in 10% neutral formalin solution and embedded in paraffin. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and using the van Gieson and Weigert procedures; the Schiff test was used. Results. The influence of aggression factors (trauma, blood loss, aspiration, infection, etc. results in damage to the lung and particularly air-blood barrier structures (endothelium, alveolar epithelium, their basement membrane. In turn the alteration of cellular and extracellular structures is followed by the increased permeability of hemomicrocirculatory bed vessels, leading to the development of non-cardiogenic (interstitial, alveolar pulmonary edema that is a central component in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Conclusion. The diagnosis of the early manifestations of ARDS must account for the nature of an aggression factor, the signs confirming the alteration of the lung

  8. Quantitation of respiratory viruses in relation to clinical course in children with acute respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Rogier R.; Schinkel, Janke; dek, Irene; Koekkoek, Sylvie M.; Visser, Caroline E.; de Jong, Menno D.; Molenkamp, Richard; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2010-01-01

    Quantitation of respiratory viruses by PCR could potentially aid in clinical interpretation of PCR results. We conducted a study in children admitted with acute respiratory tract infections to study correlations between the clinical course of illness and semiquantitative detection of 14 respiratory

  9. The influence of a fentanyl and dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay G. Vengerovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synthetic opioid analgesic fentanyl is widely used for prophylaxis and therapy of traumatic shock associated with massive bleeding. Its side effects – skeletal muscle rigidity and respiratory center depression – are especially pronounced with repeated administration. It is rational to apply fentanyl in diminished doses in combination with non-opioid analgesics in order to reduce respiratory disturbances risk.Aim. The aim of the work is to justify the influence of opioid analgesic fentanyl and α2 -adrenomimetic dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model.Materials and methods. Acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume was modeled in experiments on 75 white mongrel male rats. The external respiratory functions (respiratory rate, respiratory volume, breath volume per minute were estimated in animals of 5 groups: 1 – rats without analgesic help (controls; 2–3 – rats receiving a single fentanyl intramuscular injection (ED99 98,96 mcg/kg or fentanyl together with dexme detomidine (ED99 of combination 67,94 mcg/kg 15 min after acute blood loss; 4–5 – rats receiving the same drugs 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min later.Results. In experimental acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume, 15 min later a secondary acute respiratory failure developed with a drop of respiratory rate, respiratory volume and volume of breath per minute by 30%, 21 and 47% (p < 0,05. The external respiratory functions recoverеd after 4 h mainly due to the increase of respiratory volume. A single intramuscular injection of fentanyl caused respiratory depression 15 min after experimental blood loss which resulted in the decrease of breath volume per minute to 30–61% (p < 0,05 for 90 min. Four intramuscular injections of fentanyl 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min after hemorrhage caused a severe respiratory dysfunction, accompanied by apnea periods and Biot’s respiration. Respiratory rate was reduced

  10. Soluble programmed cell death receptor-1 (sPD-1: a potential biomarker with anti-inflammatory properties in human and experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean F. Monaghan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains a common organ dysfunction in the critically ill patient. Mechanisms for its development have focused on immune mediated causes, aspects of our understanding are not complete, and we lack biomarkers. Design, setting, and subjects Blood and bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BAL from humans (n = 10–13 with ARDS and controls (n = 5–10 as well as a murine model of ARDS (n = 5–6 with controls (n = 6–7 were studied. Methods ARDS was induced in mice by hemorrhagic shock (day 1 followed by poly-microbial sepsis (day 2. Samples were then collected on the third day after the animals were euthanized. Ex vivo experiments used splenocytes from animals with ARDS cultured with and without soluble programmed death receptor-1 (sPD-1. Results Levels of sPD-1 are increased in both the serum (11,429.3 pg/mL(SD 2133.3 vs. 8061.4(SD 4187.8, p = 0.036 and bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL fluid (6,311.1 pg/mL(SD 3758.0 vs. 90.7 pg/mL(SD 202.8, p = 0.002 of humans with ARDS. Similar results are seen in the serum (9396.1 pg/mL(SD 1546.0 vs. 3464.5 pg/mL(SD 2511.8, p = 0.001 and BAL fluid (2891.7 pg/mL(SD 868.1 vs. 1385.9 pg/mL(SD 927.8, p = 0.012 of mice. sPD-1 levels in murine blood (AUC = 1(1–1, p = 0.006, murine BAL fluid (AUC = 0.905(0.717–1.093, p = 0.015, and human BAL (AUC = 1(1–1, p = 0.001 fluid predicted ARDS. To assess the importance of sPD-1 in ARDS, ex vivo experiments were undertaken. BAL fluid from mice with ARDS dampens the TNF-α production compared to cells cultured with BAL lacking sPD-1 (2.7 pg/mL(SD 3.8 vs. 52.38 pg/mL(SD 25.1, p = 0.002. Conclusions This suggests sPD-1 is elevated in critical illness and may represent a potential biomarker for ARDS. In addition, sPD-1 has an anti-inflammatory mechanism in conditions of marked stress and aids in the resolution of severe inflammation. sPD-1 could be used to not only diagnose ARDS

  11. Relationship between hyposalivation and acute respiratory infection in dental outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Hiroshi; Fujibayashi, Takashi; Yamane, Gen-yuki; Imai, Hirohisa; Nakao, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Hyposalivation may affect respiratory disease because the mouth serves as the entrance to the respiratory apparatus, as well as to the digestive tract. Patients with acute respiratory infection generally have a favorable prognosis and a short natural course. However, in cases in which the host has lowered resistance, such as in elderly patients, the infection may develop into pneumonia. A prospective study was performed to examine the relationship between hyposalivation, which is common in elderly patients, and acute respiratory infection, which tends to become severe in elderly patients. The subjects were 323 male and female patients ≥40 years old who lived in Utsunomiya City and surrounding areas and regularly visited the Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Tochigi National Hospital. A 6-month follow-up survey was performed to examine development of acute respiratory infection. Age, sex, and known risk factors were also investigated. Hyposalivation was defined as a saliva production (saliva secretion rate) of ≤0.6 ml/min. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex was performed to examine potential risk factors associated with the development of acute respiratory infection. Data were analyzed for 278 subjects who completed the follow-up survey. The incidence of acute respiratory infection was 60.4%, while hyposalivation was present in 96 subjects (35.5%). Multivariate analysis showed that the incidence of acute respiratory infection was higher in subjects with hyposalivation than in those without hyposalivation (adjusted odds ratio 1.761, p = 0.048). The results of this study suggest that hyposalivation may be a risk factor for acute respiratory infection. This also suggests that improvement of hyposalivation might prevent acute respiratory infection. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: epidemiology and management approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walkey AJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Allan J Walkey,1 Ross Summer,1 Vu Ho,1 Philip Alkana21The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 2Asthma Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Acute lung injury and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome represent a spectrum of lung disease characterized by the sudden onset of inflammatory pulmonary edema secondary to myriad local or systemic insults. The present article provides a review of current evidence in the epidemiology and treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, with a focus on significant knowledge gaps that may be addressed through epidemiologic methods.Keywords: acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, review, epidemiology

  13. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD? Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  14. Incidence of respiratory viruses in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Cornejo-Tapia, Angela; Weilg, Pablo; Verne, Eduardo; Nazario-Fuertes, Ronald; Ugarte, Claudia; del Valle, Luis J; Pumarola, Tomás

    2015-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections are responsible for high morbi-mortality in Peruvian children. However, the etiological agents are poorly identified. This study, conducted during the pandemic outbreak of H1N1 influenza in 2009, aims to determine the main etiological agents responsible for acute respiratory infections in children from Lima, Peru. Nasopharyngeal swabs collected from 717 children with acute respiratory infections between January 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed by multiplex RT-PCR for 13 respiratory viruses: influenza A, B, and C virus; parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4; and human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) A and B, among others. Samples were also tested with direct fluorescent-antibodies (DFA) for six respiratory viruses. RT-PCR and DFA detected respiratory viruses in 240 (33.5%) and 85 (11.9%) cases, respectively. The most common etiological agents were RSV-A (15.3%), followed by influenza A (4.6%), PIV-1 (3.6%), and PIV-2 (1.8%). The viruses identified by DFA corresponded to RSV (5.9%) and influenza A (1.8%). Therefore, respiratory syncytial viruses (RSV) were found to be the most common etiology of acute respiratory infections. The authors suggest that active surveillance be conducted to identify the causative agents and improve clinical management, especially in the context of possible circulation of pandemic viruses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  16. Acute effects of winter air pollution on respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, acute respiratory health effects of exposure to winter air pollution are investigated in panels of children (7-11 yr) and adults (50-70 yr) with and without chronic respiratory symptoms, living in urban and non-urban areas in the Netherlands. The study was performed during

  17. Acute respiratory acidosis and alkalosis – A modern quantitative interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andraž Stožer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three different approaches for assessing the acid-base status of a patient exist, i.e. the Boston, Copenhagen, and Stewart´s approach, and they employ different parameters to assess a given acid-base disturbance. Students, researchers, and clinicians are getting confused by heated debates about which of these performs best and by the fact that during their curricula, they typically get acquainted with one of the approaches only, which prevents them to understand sources employing other approaches and to critically evaluate the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. In this paper, the authors introduce and define the basic parameters characterizing each of the approaches and point out differences and similarities between them. Special attention is devoted to how the different approaches assess the degree of change in the concentration of plasma bicarbonate that occurs during primary respiratory changes; proper understanding of these is necessary to correctly interpret chronic respiratory and metabolic acid-base changes.Conclusion: During acute respiratory acidosis the concentration of bicarbonate rises and during acute respiratory alkalosis it falls, depending on the buffering strength of non-bicarbonate buffers. During acute respiratory acid-base disturbances, buffer base (employed by the Copenhagen approach, apparent and effective strong ion difference, as well as strong ion gap (employed by the Stewart approach remain unchanged; the anion gap (employed by the Boston and Copenhagen approach falls during acute respiratory acidosis and rises during acute respiratory alkalosis.

  18. [Antibiotic prescribing in acute respiratory tract infections in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, S; Bjerrum, L; Feja, C; Lallana, M J; Poncel, A; Rabanaque, M J

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide threat to public health. Acute respiratory tract infections are the main reason for antibiotic prescribing in the Spanish paediatric population. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency of antibiotic prescription and their pattern of use in acute respiratory tract infections diagnosed in children in Primary Care in Aragón (Spain). A study was conducted over a 1-year period on children between 0 and 14 years-old, recording all episodes of acute otitis, acute pharyngotonsillitis, non-specific upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchitis. The proportion of episodes within each diagnosis receiving an antibiotic prescription was calculated, and the prescribing pattern was determined. Half (50%) of the children in Aragón were diagnosed with a respiratory tract infection during the study period. Non-specific upper respiratory infection was the most frequent diagnosis. An antibiotic was prescribed in 75% of pharyngotonsillitis episodes, 72% of otitis, 27% of bronchitis, and 16% of non-specific upper respiratory infections. Broad spectrum antibiotics, mainly amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic, were predominantly prescribed. Antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections in children was generally high, and the choice of antibiotics was probably inappropriate in a high percentage of cases. Therefore an improvement in antibiotic prescribing in children appears to be needed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute respiratory failure as a first manifestation of syringomyelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Bashapshe Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40 year old woman presented with a short history of acute onset of breathlessness to the ER of our hospital and after initial evaluation for acute pulmonary embolism which was ruled out after carrying out the appropriate investigations, she was diagnosed to be afflicted with syringomyelia based on her neurological symptoms and clinical findings, which was confirmed by doing an MRI scan, which was her basic diagnosis that was complicated by acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. This case is being reported to highlight syringomyelia as an unusual cause of acute respiratory failure, which manifested clinically in this patient as its first presentation and the underlying neurological diagnosis has been found to be present in very few reported cases (less than 0.01% of case reports in the available literature as the basic disease in the absence of its classical presenting features. Problems associated with acute respiratory failure in the setting of syringomyelia are discussed.

  20. Ventilatory support in children with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimensberger, Peter C; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2015-06-01

    To describe the recommendations of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference for mechanical ventilation management of pediatric patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Consensus Conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. The Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference experts developed and voted on a total of 27 recommendations focused on the optimal mechanical ventilation approach of the patient with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Topics included ventilator mode, tidal volume delivery, inspiratory plateau pressure, high-frequency ventilation, cuffed endotracheal tubes, and gas exchange goals. When experimental data were lacking, a modified Delphi approach emphasizing the strong professional agreement was used. There were 17 recommendations with strong agreement and 10 recommendations with weak agreement. There were no recommendations with equipoise or disagreement. There was weak agreement on recommendations concerning approach to tidal volume and inspiratory pressure limitation (88% to 72% agreement, respectively), whereas strong agreement could be achieved for accepting permissive hypercapnia. Using positive end-expiratory pressure levels greater than 15 cm H2O in severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, under the condition that the markers of oxygen delivery, respiratory system compliance, and hemodynamics are closely monitored as positive end-expiratory pressure is increased, is strongly recommended. The concept of exploring the effects of careful recruitment maneuvers during conventional ventilation met an agreement level of 88%, whereas the use of recruitment maneuvers during rescue high-frequency oscillatory ventilation is highly recommended (strong agreement). The Consensus Conference developed pediatric-specific recommendations regarding mechanical ventilation of the patient with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as well as future research priorities. These recommendations are

  1. Emergency thyroidectomy: Due to acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfu Bayhan

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Respiratory failure due to giant nodular goiter is a life-threatening situation and should be treated immediately by performing awake endotracheal intubation following emergency total thyroidectomy.

  2. Respiratory muscle strength and muscle endurance are not affected by acute metabolic acidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizet, T.A.C.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Ven, M.J.T. van de; Bosch, F.H.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) contributes to respiratory failure with hypercapnia, and subsequent respiratory acidosis. Therapeutic induction of acute metabolic acidosis further increases the respiratory drive and, therefore, may diminish

  3. [Gas exchange in acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Guillermo A

    2003-01-01

    The hypoxemia of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) depends chiefly upon shunt and ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) inequality produced by fluid located in the interstitial space, alveolar collapse and flooding. Variables other tham inspired oxygen fraction and the underlying physiological abnormality can influence arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2). Changes in cardiac output, hemoglobin concentration, oxygen consumption and alcalosis can cause changes in PaO2 through their influence on mixed venous PO2. Gas exchange (GE) in ARDS may be studied using the inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) which enables to define the distribution of ventilation and perfusion without necessarily altering the FIO2 differentiating shunt from lung units with low VA/Q ratios and dead space from lung units with high VA/Q ratios. Different ventilatory strategies that increase mean airway pressure (positive end-expiratory pressure, high tidal volumes, inverse inspiratory-expiratory ratio, etc) improve PaO2 through increasing lung volume by recruiting new open alveoli and spreading the intra-alveolar fluid over a large surface area. Also prone-position ventilation would result in a marked improvement in GE enhancing dorsal lung ventilation by the effects on the gravitional distribution of pleural pressure and the reduction in the positive pleural pressure that develops in dorsal regions in ARDS. Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to increase PaO2 in ARDS patients by inducing vasodilation predominantly in ventilated areas redistributing pulmonary blood flow away from nonventilated toward ventilated areas of the lung thus resulting in a shunt reduction. On the same way inhaled prostaglandins (PGI2 or PGE1) causes selective pulmonary vasodilation improving pulmonary GE. Intravenous almitrine, a selective pulmonary vasoconstrictor, has been shown to increase PaO2 by increasing hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. A synergistic effect was found between inhaled NO and almitrine

  4. Human Metapneumovirus Infection and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Alina; McLaren, Rodney; Saunders, Paul; Karakash, Scarlett; Minkoff, Howard

    2017-09-01

    Human metapneumovirus has recently been recognized as an important cause of severe respiratory viral infections and of viral infections in patients admitted to intensive care units. Little is known about the course of this infection in pregnancy. A late-preterm primigravid woman was admitted to the intensive care unit for acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequently diagnosed with human metapneumovirus. Because of worsening maternal respiratory status, she was intubated and a primary cesarean delivery was performed. The patient's respiratory status continued to decline postpartum, and she ultimately required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She was treated supportively until her respiratory status improved, at which time she was extubated and weaned off extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and subsequently discharged home. Human metapneumovirus can lead to severe respiratory illness during pregnancy.

  5. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  6. Prospective evaluation for respiratory pathogens in children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wang, Winfred C; Gaur, Aditya; Smith, Teresa; Gu, Zhengming; Kang, Guolian; Leung, Wing; Hayden, Randall T

    2014-03-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV), human coronavirus (hCoV), human bocavirus (hBoV), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infections in children with sickle cell disease have not been well studied. Nasopharyngeal wash specimens were prospectively collected from 60 children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, over a 1-year period. Samples were tested with multiplexed-PCR, using an automated system for nine respiratory viruses, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Bordetella pertussis. Clinical characteristics and distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with and without acute chest syndrome (ACS) were evaluated. A respiratory virus was detected in 47 (78%) patients. Nine (15%) patients had ACS; a respiratory virus was detected in all of them. The demographic characteristics of patients with and without ACS were similar. HRV was the most common virus, detected in 29 of 47 (62%) patients. Logistic regression showed no association between ACS and detection of HRV, hCoV, hBoV, hMPV, and other respiratory pathogens. Co-infection with at least one additional respiratory virus was seen in 14 (30%) infected patients, and was not significantly higher in patients with ACS (P = 0.10). Co-infections with more than two respiratory viruses were seen in seven patients, all in patients without ACS. Bacterial pathogens were not detected. HRV was the most common virus detected in children with sickle cell disease and acute respiratory illness, and was not associated with increased morbidity. Larger prospective studies with asymptomatic controls are needed to study the association of these emerging respiratory viruses with ACS in children with sickle cell disease. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A review of pulmonary coagulopathy in acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Laurens; de Groot, Philip G.; Grutters, Jan C.; Biesma, Douwe H.

    Enhanced bronchoalveolar coagulation is a hallmark of many acute inflammatory lung diseases such as acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. Intervention with natural anticoagulants in these diseases has therefore become a topic of interest. Recently, new data on the

  8. Improvement of prophylax and treatment of acute respiratory viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yershov F.I.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to estimate prophylactic and clinical efficacy of cycloferon concerning acute respiratory viral infection among military men in the period of formation of military units. Material and methods. 1300 military men were under observation in the period of formation of military units. There was calculated efficiency coefficient. Index of efficiency, and severity of disease, frequency of development and character of complications were established. Results. It is established that application of both prophylactic and clinical course of tablet of cycloferon in the period of seasonal increase of morbidity of acute respiratory viral infection in the period of formation of military units enables to increase significantly efficiency of prophylactic and clinical activities, to decrease morbidity, frequency of severe and complicated forms of disease. Conclusion. According to these results, the perspectives of cycloferon use in prophylaxis and treatment of acute respiratory viral infection in the closed units were worked out.

  9. Acute Interstitial Pneumonia (Hamman-Rich Syndrome as a Cause of Idiopathic Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackrapong Bruminhent

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hamman-Rich syndrome, also known as acute interstitial pneumonia, is a rare and fulminant form of idiopathic interstitial lung disease. It should be considered as a cause of idiopathic acute respiratory distress syndrome. Confirmatory diagnosis requires demonstration of diffuse alveolar damage on lung histopathology. The main treatment is supportive care. It is not clear if glucocorticoid therapy is effective in acute interstitial pneumonia. We report the case of a 77-year-old woman without pre-existing lung disease who initially presented with mild upper respiratory tract infection and then progressed to rapid onset of hypoxic respiratory failure similar to acute respiratory distress syndrome with unknown etiology. Despite glucocorticoid therapy, she did not achieve remission and expired after 35 days of hospitalization. The diagnosis of acute interstitial pneumonia was supported by the histopathologic findings on her lung biopsy.

  10. Respiratory system mechanics in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallet, Richard H; Katz, Jeffrey A

    2003-09-01

    Respiratory mechanics research is important to the advancement of ARDS management. Twenty-eight years ago, research on the effects of PEEP and VT indicated that the lungs of ARDS patients did not behave in a manner consistent with homogenously distributed lung injury. Both Suter and colleagues] and Katz and colleagues reported that oxygenation continued to improve as PEEP increased (suggesting lung recruitment), even though static Crs decreased and dead-space ventilation increased (suggesting concurrent lung overdistension). This research strongly suggested that without VT reduction, the favorable effects of PEEP on lung recruitment are offset by lung overdistension at end-inspiration. The implications of these studies were not fully appreciated at that time, in part because the concept of ventilator-associated lung injury was in its nascent state. Ten years later. Gattinoni and colleagues compared measurements of static pressure-volume curves with FRC and CT scans of the chest in ARDS. They found that although PEEP recruits collapsed (primarily dorsal) lung segments, it simultaneously causes overdistension of non-dependent, inflated lung regions. Furthermore, the specific compliance of the aerated, residually healthy lung tissue is essentially normal. The main implication of these findings is that traditional mechanical ventilation practice was injecting excessive volumes of gas into functionally small lungs. Therefore, the emblematic low static Crs measured in ARDS reflects not only surface tension phenomena and recruitment of collapsed airspaces but also overdistension of the remaining healthy lung. The studies reviewed in this article support the concept that lung injury in ARDS is heterogeneously distributed, with resulting disparate mechanical stresses, and indicate the additional complexity from alterations in chest wall mechanics. Most of these studies, however, were published before lung-protective ventilation. Therefore, further studies are needed to

  11. CLARYTROMYCIN IN TREATMENT OF PEDIATRIC ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Simonova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory diseases still occupy leading positions among all pediatric diseases. This article contains modern data upon etiology of acute and recurrent bronchitides, as well as that of out-of-hospital pneumonias in children. Special attention is paid to the choice of antibacterial therapy. We observe modern Russian and international data upon bacterial resistance to antibacterial drugs. This article also contains description of biological, pharmacokinetic and antibacterial traits of macrolides, especially these of clarytromycin with description of its use in treatment of pediatric respiratory disorders.

  12. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: Aetiopathogenesis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. Keywords: SARS; Adult respiratory distress syndrome; pathology. Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine Vol. 1 (1) 2003: pp. 9-14. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/aipm.v1i1.39095 · AJOL African ...

  13. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI and/or fever. METHODS: cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc and University Hospital (HU, Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland, and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ2 or Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3% was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%, respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%, and coronavirus (6.8%. Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7 were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  14. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benites, Eliana C A; Cabrini, Dayane P; Silva, Andrea C B; Silva, Juliana C; Catalan, Daniel T; Berezin, Eitan N; Cardoso, Maria R A; Passos, Saulo D

    2014-01-01

    to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI) and/or fever. cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc) and University Hospital (HU), Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland), and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta) for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B), rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ(2) or Fisher's exact test). 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3%) was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%), respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%), and coronavirus (6.8%). Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7) were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute respiratory infections among returning Hajj pilgrims-Jordan, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdallat, Mohammad Mousa; Rha, Brian; Alqasrawi, Sultan; Payne, Daniel C; Iblan, Ibrahim; Binder, Alison M; Haddadin, Aktham; Nsour, Mohannad Al; Alsanouri, Tarek; Mofleh, Jawad; Whitaker, Brett; Lindstrom, Stephen L; Tong, Suxiang; Ali, Sami Sheikh; Dahl, Rebecca Moritz; Berman, LaShondra; Zhang, Jing; Erdman, Dean D; Gerber, Susan I

    2017-04-01

    The emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has prompted enhanced surveillance for respiratory infections among pilgrims returning from the Hajj, one of the largest annual mass gatherings in the world. To describe the epidemiology and etiologies of respiratory illnesses among pilgrims returning to Jordan after the 2014 Hajj. Surveillance for respiratory illness among pilgrims returning to Jordan after the 2014 Hajj was conducted at sentinel health care facilities using epidemiologic surveys and molecular diagnostic testing of upper respiratory specimens for multiple respiratory pathogens, including MERS-CoV. Among the 125 subjects, 58% tested positive for at least one virus; 47% tested positive for rhino/enterovirus. No cases of MERS-CoV were detected. The majority of pilgrims returning to Jordan from the 2014 Hajj with respiratory illness were determined to have a viral etiology, but none were due to MERS-CoV. A greater understanding of the epidemiology of acute respiratory infections among returning travelers to other countries after Hajj should help optimize surveillance systems and inform public health response practices. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Acute Respiratory Distress Following Administration of Gadovist.

    OpenAIRE

    Úsuga-Perilla*, Sandra; Martín-Bragrado, María Victoria; Asunción-Ortizá, María Teresa; Padilla del Rey, Mariluz; González-Pérez, Petra

    2014-01-01

    In September 2012, a healthy 36-year-old Caucasian woman needed a contrast study for tinnitus, the result of which was normal. One hour after injection of Gadovist® contrast, she developed diarrhea, vomiting, hypotension and respiratory distress (ARDS), which was treated symptomatically with bipap. She was discharged completely asymptomatic on the sixth day. There are no previous reports in the literature in which the relationship between gadolinium and ARDS is so obvious (in the other three ...

  17. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making. PMID:27925054

  18. Alcohol during pregnancy worsens acute respiratory infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libster, Romina; Ferolla, Fausto M; Hijano, Diego R; Acosta, Patricio L; Erviti, Anabella; Polack, Fernando P

    2015-11-01

    This study explored whether alcohol consumption during pregnancy increased the risk of life-threatening respiratory infections in children. We prospectively evaluated children under the age of two years admitted to hospitals in Buenos Aires, Argentina, with severe acute respiratory infections during the winters of 2011 and 2012. Information on maternal alcohol consumption during the third trimester of pregnancy was collected using standardised questionnaires and categorised as never, low if it was once a week and high if it was equal or more than once a week. Of the 3423 children hospitalised with acute respiratory infection, 2089 (63.7%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Alcohol consumption during the last trimester was reported by 398 mothers (12.4%) and categorised as low (n = 210, 6.5%) or high (n = 188, 5.9%). A greater effect on life-threatening respiratory infection, defined as oxygen saturation of or up to 87%, was observed with higher alcohol intake due to all viruses and specifically RSV in the logistic regression analyses. Alcohol consumption was strongly associated with life-threatening disease, particularly in boys whose adjusted odds ratio rose from 3.67 to 13.52 when their mothers drank alcohol. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy was associated with life-threatening respiratory infections in boys. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Clipboard: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): an old virus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4. Clipboard: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): an old virus jumping into a new host or a new creation? M S Shaila. Volume 28 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 359-360. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. [Methodology for the epidemiologic study on acute respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Ochoa, E; Bravo González, J R; Armas Pérez, L; Pérez Rodríguez, A; de Rojas López del Rincón, V

    1992-01-01

    The foundations and methodology for an epidemiological study on acute respiratory diseases are described. The study took place in 4 urban health areas in Havana City and 4 rural doctor's offices in Matanzas. A discussion is carried out regarding the intervention design for the staff of the health primary assistance team headed by the family doctor.

  1. Pattern of Presentation and Risk Factors of Acute Respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    70% of the subjects were between 3 and 5 years old. The prevalence of Acute Respiratory Infection was 52.9% with peak prevalence in the age range 4 to 5 years. Cough was present in 61.1% of the subjects while coryza was the most frequent symptom with a prevalence of 95%. The risk factors identified included contract ...

  2. Prevalence of viral aetiologies in children with acute respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children under five years in developing countries. Viruses have been long established to be causes of ARIs, but there is little information in developing countries especially Africa. This cross-sectional study was carried out ...

  3. Prevalence of acute respiratory bacterial pathogens in children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted in Gondar, North-Western Ethiopia, during 1997-1998 to determine the prevalence of bacterial etiologic agents of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. A total of 390 subjects were studied out of which 63% were cases from Gondar Hospital and Gondar Health Center and the rest (37%) were ...

  4. Acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Upper respiratory tract infections (UTRIs), which may be complicated by acute otitis media (AOM), account for a large number of visits to the primary physician especially in the developed world. Materials and Methods: This study aims to determine the knowledge and treatment outcomes of UTRIs complicated ...

  5. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Fernandes-Matano

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections.This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR.The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%. The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8% and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%. A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9% caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age.In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  6. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Matano, Larissa; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Sarquiz-Martinez, Brenda; Palomec-Nava, Iliana Donají; Pardavé-Alejandre, Hector Daniel; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; González-Bonilla, Cesar Raúl; Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections. This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR. The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%). The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%), human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8%) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%). A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9%) caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age. In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  7. Human herpesviruses respiratory infections in patients with acute respiratory distress (ARDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoli, Manuela; Arvia, Rosaria; di Valvasone, Simona; Liotta, Francesco; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Azzi, Alberta; Peris, Adriano

    2016-08-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is today a leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit (ICU). ARDS and pneumonia are closely related to critically ill patients; however, the etiologic agent is not always identified. The presence of human herpes simplex virus 1, human cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus in respiratory samples of critically ill patients is increasingly reported even without canonical immunosuppression. The main aim of this study was to better understand the significance of herpesviruses finding in lower respiratory tract of ARDS patients hospitalized in ICU. The presence of this group of herpesviruses, in addition to the research of influenza viruses and other common respiratory viruses, was investigated in respiratory samples from 54 patients hospitalized in ICU, without a known microbiological causative agent. Moreover, the immunophenotype of each patient was analyzed. Herpesviruses DNA presence in the lower respiratory tract seemed not attributable to an impaired immunophenotype, whereas a significant correlation was observed between herpesviruses positivity and influenza virus infection. A higher ICU mortality was significantly related to the presence of herpesvirus infection in the lower respiratory tract as well as to impaired immunophenotype, as patients with poor outcome showed severe lymphopenia, affecting in particular T (CD3+) cells, since the first days of ICU hospitalization. In conclusion, these results indicate that herpesviruses lower respiratory tract infection, which occurs more frequently following influenza virus infection, can be a negative prognostic marker. An independent risk factor for ICU patients with ARDS is an impaired immunophenotype.

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome, metabolic acidosis, and respiratory acidosis associated with citalopram overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawa Edriss

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a 53-year-old man who ingested 2400 mg of citalopram and presented to the emergency department three hours post-ingestion with altered mental status, somnolence, and a blood pressure of 67/45 mmHg. He failed to respond to three boluses of normal saline (1000 ml each and required vasopressors. The patient developed serotonin syndrome with hyper-reflexia, rigidity, and ankle myoclonus. He had a tonic-clonic seizure in the ER requiring intravenous lorazepam and phenytoin. An ECG showed QT prolongation. Chest x-ray on presentation was normal. Within 32 hours the patient developed acute respiratory distress, hypoxemia, a wide A-a gradient, PaO2/FiO2< 200, and chest x-ray changes compatible with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. He had normal central venous pressures, normal cardiac biomarkers, normal systolic and diastolic functions on echocardiography, and no acute ST/T wave changes. His ABG showed a metabolic acidosis and a respiratory acidosis. The patient required intubation and ventilation. Citalopram has been associated with seizures and ECG abnormalities after overdoses. The respiratory complications and metabolic acidosis have been reported only a few times in the literature.  We are reporting the second case of ARDS and the fifth case of metabolic acidosis due to citalopram overdose and suggest that the metabolic acidemia is explained by propionic acid. The respiratory acidosis seen in this patient has not been reported previously.

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, and mixed acute lower respiratory infections in children in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Nino, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting greater severity and worse outcomes in children with mixed as compared to single respiratory virus infections. However, studies that assess the risk factors that may predispose a child to a mixture of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenoviral infections, are scarce. In a retrospective cohort study, the study investigated the epidemiology of RSV and adenovirus infections and predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in young children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection in Bogota, Colombia, South America, over a 2-year period 2009-2011. Of a total of 5,539 children admitted with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory infection, 2,267 (40.9%) who were positive for RSV and/or adenovirus were selected. Out the total number of cases, 1,416 (62.5%) infections occurred during the 3-month period from March to May, the first rainy season of Bogota, Colombia. After controlling for gender, month when the nasopharyngeal sample was taken, and other pre-existing conditions, it was found that an age greater than 6 months (OR:1.74; CI 95%:1.05-2.89; P = 0.030) and malnutrition as a comorbidity (OR:9.92; CI 95%:1.01-100.9; P = 0.049) were independent predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in the sample of patients. In conclusion, RSV and adenovirus are significant causes of acute lower respiratory infection in infants and young children in Bogota, Colombia, especially during the first rainy season. The identified predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections should be taken into account when planning intervention, in order to reduce the burden of acute lower respiratory infection in young children living in the country. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. History of mechanical ventilation may affect respiratory mechanics evolution in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoukou, Antonia; Perraki, Helen; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Koulouris, Nikolaos G; Tromaropoulos, Andreas; Sotiropoulou, Christina; Roussos, Charis

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mechanical ventilation (MV) before acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) on subsequent evolution of respiratory mechanics and blood gases in protectively ventilated patients with ARDS. Nineteen patients with ARDS were stratified into 2 groups according to ARDS onset relative to the onset of MV: In group A (n = 11), MV was applied at the onset of ARDS; in group B (n = 8), MV had been initiated before ARDS. Respiratory mechanics and arterial blood gas were assessed in early (ventilated patients with ARDS, late alteration of respiratory mechanics occurs more commonly in patients who have been ventilated before ARDS onset, suggesting that the history of MV affects the subsequent progress of ARDS even when using protective ventilation.

  11. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p infected children required respiratory support. hMPV is present in young.......6%) ARTI episodes by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using primers targeting the hMPV N gene and the RSV L gene. Two children were co-infected with hMPV and RSV. They were excluded from statistical analysis. Hospitalization for ARTI caused by hMPV was restricted to very young...

  12. Epidemiology of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome in The Netherlands : A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Jan; Versteegt, Jens; Twisk, Jos; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Bindels, Alexander J. G. H.; Spijkstra, Jan-Jaap; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan

    2007-01-01

    Background: The characteristics, incidence and risk factors for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may depend on definitions and geography. Methods: A prospective, 3-day point-prevalence study was performed by a survey of all intensive care units (ICU) in the

  13. Acute respiratory tract infections: a potential trigger for the acute coronary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Ralf E.; van Ginkel, Margreet W.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) may be a risk factor for the acute coronary syndrome (ACS). ARTI is associated with an increased risk for ACS up to 2 weeks prior to a cardiac event. The mechanism that may underlie this association is unclear. Infections are

  14. Respiratory viruses and torque teno virus in adults with acute respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Afiono Agung; Desyardi, Martinus Nuherwan; Tanamas, Jimmy; Suradi; Reviono; Harsini; Kageyama, Seiji; Chikumi, Hiroki; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    To define the molecular epidemiology of respiratory viral infections in adult patients. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from all adult patients with influenza-like illness (ILI), acute respiratory infection (ARI), or severe ARI (SARI) admitted to a tertiary hospital in Surakarta, Indonesia, between March 2010 and April 2011 and analyzed for 19 respiratory viruses and for torque teno virus (TTV) and human gyrovirus (HGyV). Respiratory viruses were detected in 61.3% of the subjects, most of whom had ARI (90.8%, OR = 11.39), were hospitalized (96.9%, OR = 22.31), had asthma exacerbation (90.9%, OR = 8.67), and/or had pneumonia (80%, OR = 4.0). Human rhinovirus (HRV) A43 predominated. Influenza A H3N2, human metapneumovirus (HMPV) subtypes A1 and A2, the influenza B virus, human adenovirus B, and human coronavirus OC43 were also detected. All respiratory viruses were detected in the transition month between the rainy and dry seasons. No mixed respiratory virus infection was found. Coinfections of the influenza A H3N2 virus with TTV, HMPV with TTV, HRV with TTV, and human parainfluenza virus-3 with TTV were found in 4.7, 2.8, 19.8, and 0.9% of the samples, respectively. This study highlights the need to perform routine detection of respiratory viruses in adults hospitalized with ARI, asthma exacerbation, and/or pneumonia. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Human bocavirus in children with acute respiratory infections in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dinh Nguyen; Nguyen, Tran Quynh Nhu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Human bocavirus (HBoV), a novel virus, is recognized to increasingly associate with previously unknown etiology respiratory infections in young children. In this study, the epidemiological, clinical, and molecular characteristics of HBoV infections were described in hospitalized Vietnamese pediatric patients. From April 2010 to May 2011, 1,082 nasopharyngeal swab samples were obtained from patients with acute respiratory infections at the Children's Hospital 2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Samples were screened for HBoV by PCR and further molecularly characterized by sequencing. HBoV was found in 78 (7.2%) children. Co-infection with other viruses was observed in 66.7% of patients infected with HBoV. Children 12-24 months old were the most affected age group. Infections with HBoV were found year-round, though most cases occurred in the dry season (December-April). HBoV was possible to cause severe diseases as determined by higher rates of hypoxia, pneumonia, and longer hospitalization duration in patients with HBoV infection than in those without (P-value infection with HBoV did not affect the disease severity. The phylogenetic analysis of partial VP1 gene showed minor variations and all HBoV sequences belonged to species 1 (HBoV1). In conclusion, HBoV1 was circulating in Vietnam and detected frequently in young children during dry season. Acute respiratory infections caused by HBoV1 were severe enough for hospitalization, which implied that HBoV1 may have an important role in acute respiratory infections among children. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Air quality and acute respiratory disorders in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Garcia Gabas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between air pollution and acute respiratory disorders in children. Methods: An ecological study of time series conducted in public health units in the city of Campo Grande-MS, Brazil, from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2007. Dailydata of O3 (ozone were analyzed and, as outcome variables, 16,981 emergency pediatric consultations for respiratory symptoms; including in control model the variables related to time trend; seasonality; minimum, maximum and average temperature; relative humidity;rainfall and respiratory infections. We determined the Pearson correlation coefficient of respiratory diseases in relation to climatic parameters for the years 2004-2007. Results: Only O3 had a positive and statistically significant association, both with all emergency care attendances for respiratory complaints, as with these due to symptoms in lower airways. The daily average concentrations of O3 did not exceed the recommended daily limits. Conclusion: We found associations between air pollution and the number of emergencypediatric consultations for respiratory causes in Campo Grande, although the levels of monitored pollutant ozone remained below recommended levels throughout the study period.

  17. Message concerning Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ("SARS")

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANT REMINDER If you have just come back from one of the regions identified by the WHO as being infected with SARS, it is essential to monitor your state of health for ten days after your return. The syndrome manifests itself in the rapid onset of a high fever combined with respiratory problems (coughing, breathlessness, breathing difficulty). Should these signs appear, you must contact the CERN Medical Service as quickly as possible on number 73802 or 73186 during normal working hours, and the fire brigade at all other times on number 74444, indicating that you have just returned from one of the WHO-identified areas with recent local transmission.China: Beijing, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Guangdong Province, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi Province, Tianjin ProvinceTaiwan:TaipeiMoreover, until further notice the CERN Management requests that all trips to these various regions of the world be reduced to a strict minimum and then only with the consent of the Division Leader concerned. Anyone comin...

  18. Acute effects of urban air pollution on respiratory health of children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, S; Hoek, G; Boezen, H M; Schouten, Jan; van Wijnen, J H; Brunekreef, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate to what extent different components of air pollution are associated with acute respiratory health effects in children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: During three consecutive winters starting in 1992-3, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and respiratory

  19. PHYTOTHERAPY IN SEASONAL PREVENTION OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES AMONG SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Garashchenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the research findings of the application efficiency of the complex plant based preparation Sinupret (Bionorica AG, Germany for prevention of the acute respiratory diseases among sickly children. The authors showed that the application of the plant based preparation decreased the sick rate caused by the acute respiratory diseases and influenza, alleviated the run of the acute respiratory diseases, had some really good tolerance and might be recommended for the wide use, for the prevention of the acute respiratory diseases in organized children groups.Key words: acute respiratory diseases, prevention, phytotherapy, children, homeopathic remedies, vaccines.

  20. Model-based respiratory mechanics to titrate PEEP and monitor disease state for experimental ARDS subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drunen, Erwin J; Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Chase, J Geoffrey; Lambermont, Bernard; Janssen, Nathalie; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Modelling the respiratory mechanics of mechanically ventilated (MV) patients can provide useful information to guide MV therapy. Two model-based methods were evaluated based on data from three experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced piglets and validated against values available from ventilators. A single compartment lung model with integral-based parameter identification was found to be effective in capturing fundamental respiratory mechanics during inspiration. The trends matched clinical expectation and provided better resolution than clinically derived linear model metrics. An expiration time constant model also captured the same trend in respiratory elastance. However, the assumption of constant resistance and a slightly higher fitting error results in less insight than the single compartment model. Further research is required to confirm its application in titrating to optimal MV settings.

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complicating Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is endemic in tropic and subtropic areas, but is currently seldom encountered in developed area like Taiwan. We present an elder man with acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection. There was no significant clue initially for diagnosing this patient as having S. stercoralis hyperinfection. Neither peripheral eosinophilia nor significant hemoptysis was noted. Bronchoscopy played a critical role to define the unexpected cause of his progressive pulmonary infiltrates. The correct diagnosis was soon made by recognition of the worm in bronchioloalveolar lavage cytology, and specific treatment was initiated promptly. For a septic patient with progressive pulmonary infiltrates, bronchoscopic studies including cytology may be necessary for defining the cause. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis should be considered as a cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome in immunocompromised patient, especially with the presence of chronic gastrointestinal symptoms.

  2. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Milani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants,and also an important factor for hospitalization during the winter months. To determine the prevalence and importance of RSV as a cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection, we carried out a prospective study during 5 months period from November to March 1998 in 6 pediatric hospitals. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained for detection of RSV in all cases. Sociodemographic data, clinical signs, diagnosis and hospital admissions were documented. During this study period, 365 young infants (51.5% male, 48.5% female with respiratory tract infection were visited in 6 hospitals. The median age of patients was 24 months (range: 1 month to 5 years.RSV infection was found in 70 out of 365 patients (19.18%.Among the 70 children with RSV infection, 29 patients (41.42% were under 12 months of age.The main clinical manifestations of RSV infection were cough (88.57% and coryza (78.57%. There were no significant differences between patients who were tested positive for RSV and those who were tested negative with regard to demographic variables and clinical diagnoses. This study indicates that RSV is an important cause of respiratory tract infection in infants and young children .Distinguishing RSV from other respiratory infection is difficult because of the similarity in clinical presentation among children.

  3. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive ventilation (NIV in acute respiratory failure (ARF improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs. Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, Pneu - monia, acute lung injury / acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS. NIV treatment was CPAP or PSV + PEEP. 12 Pts (18,5% met primary endpoint (NIV failure: 11 Pts (17% needed ETI (5ALI/ARDS p < 0,0001, 6COPD 16,6%, 1 Patient (1,5% died (Pneumonia. No Pts with ACPE failed (p = 0,0027. Secondary endpoints: significant improvement in Respiratory Rate (RR, Kelly Score, pH, PaCO2, PaO2 vs baseline. Median duration of treatment: 16:06 hours: COPD 18:54, ACPE 4:15. Mean length of hospitalisation: 8.66 days. No patients discontinued NIV, no side effects. Results are consistent with literature. Hypoxemic ARF related to ALI/ARDS and pneumonia show worst outcome: it is not advisable to manage these conditions with NIV outside the ICU. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective in a general medical ward if selection of Pts, staff’s training and monitoring are appropriate. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting. According to strong evidences in literature, NIV should be considered a first line and standard treatment in these clinical conditions irrespective of the setting.

  4. Severe acute respiratory syndrome and its lesions in digestive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious atypical pneumonia that has recently been recognized in the patients in 32 countries and regions. This brief review summarizes some of the initial etiologic findings,pathological description, and its lesions of digestive system caused by SARS virus. It is an attempt to draw gastroenterologists and hepatologists' attention to this fatal illness, especially when it manifests itself initially as digestive symptoms.

  5. Interleukin-17A Is Associated With Alveolar Inflammation and Poor Outcomes in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikacenic, Carmen; Hansen, Elizabeth E; Radella, Frank; Gharib, Sina A; Stapleton, Renee D; Wurfel, Mark M

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin-17A is a proinflammatory cytokine known to play a role in host defense and pathologic inflammation in murine models of lung injury. The relationship between interleukin-17A and inflammation in human lung injury is unknown. Our primary objective was to determine whether interleukin-17A levels are associated with alveolar measures of inflammation and injury in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Our secondary objective was to test whether interleukin-17A levels are associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome-related outcomes. Observational study. Six North American medical centers. We studied two groups of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: 1) patients previously enrolled in a placebo-controlled clinical trial of omega-3 fatty acids performed at five North American medical centers (n = 86, acute respiratory distress syndrome 1), and 2) patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome admitted to an ICU who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (n = 140, acute respiratory distress syndrome 2). In acute respiratory distress syndrome 1, we used paired serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples obtained within 48 hours of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset, whereas in acute respiratory distress syndrome 2, we used plasma obtained within the first 24 hours of ICU admission. None. We measured circulating interleukin-17A in acute respiratory distress syndrome 1 and acute respiratory distress syndrome 2. We also measured interleukin-17A, neutrophil counts, and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from acute respiratory distress syndrome 1. We found that bronchoalveolar lavage interleukin-17A was strongly associated with higher bronchoalveolar lavage percent neutrophils (p syndrome1. In both acute respiratory distress syndrome 1 and acute respiratory distress syndrome 2, elevated interleukin-17A was associated with higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores (p syndrome.

  6. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  7. The acute respiratory distress syndrome network controversy: lessons and legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Henry J

    2004-12-01

    Several of the Acute Respiratory Disease Syndrome Network clinical trials embrace a clinical trial design that evaluates contrasting strategies, one or both of which represents only a segment of standard practices. Such a trial design has engendered ethical controversy regarding the value of such trials and their ability to protect human subjects. During the past year, commentators have continued to reflect on the significance of such trials. Several authors have reflected on the ethical significance of the standard of care in clinical trial design and have offered a framework for determining control group selection in critical care trials. Other authors have written on methodologic issues and approaches to determine whether control groups are reflective of standard practices. Surveys have been performed to determine the impact and hence the relevancy of the Acute Respiratory Disease Syndrome Network tidal volume trial on clinical practice. The controversy related to and the impact of the Acute Respiratory Disease Syndrome Network clinical trial design on clinical practice offer an opportunity to explore the trade-offs between explanatory and pragmatic types of clinical trials. Such discussions will lead to a clearer understanding of the value of both types of clinical trials and the optimal ethical conduct of such trials.

  8. Risk Factors for Mortality and Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Flávia F; Troster, Eduardo J; Oliveira, Cindy S; Faria, Aline; Lucena, Michelle; João, Paulo R D; Saad, Everardo D; Foronda, Flávia A K; Delgado, Artur F; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow

    2015-09-01

    Children admitted to PICUs often present with or develop respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventilation. We prospectively identified children admitted to three general PICUs, with the goal of identifying risk factors for mortality. Prospective multicenter observational study. Three general PICUs, two in São Paulo and one in Curitiba, Brazil. Children aged between 1 month and 15 years, consecutively admitted between August 2008 and July 2010, with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome that developed at least 12 hours after invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation. None. We used logistic regression models to explore the relationship between death and independent variables. Of 3,046 patients admitted to the three PICUs, 1,658 patients underwent mechanical ventilation, and 84 fulfilled the acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Nearly 60% were boys, and the median age was 31 months. Pressure control/assist control was the initial mode of mechanical ventilation in 86% of cases, and the median durations of mechanical ventilation and PICU stay were 12 and 15 days, respectively. None of the eight patients with acute lung injury died, whereas 33 of 76 of the remaining patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome died, for an overall mortality rate of 39.3% (95% CI, 28.8-50.6%). In different multivariate logistic regression model, the number of organ dysfunctions at admission, peak inspiratory pressure, airway pressure gradient on day 1, and the mean airway pressure gradient over the first 7 days of mechanical ventilation were significantly associated with mortality. Mortality is high in pediatric acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanical ventilation-associated risk factors for death among such patients are potential targets for intervention.

  9. Embelia ribes ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirole, R L; Shirole, N L; Saraf, M N

    2015-06-20

    Embelia ribes Burm. f. (Fam. Myrsinaceae) locally known as Vidanga have been used for treating tumors, ascites, bronchitis, jaundice, diseases of the heart and brain in traditional Indian medicine. However, no scientific studies providing new insights in its pharmacological properties with respect to acute respiratory distress syndrome have been investigated. The present investigation aimed to elucidate the effectiveness of Embelin isolated from Embelia ribes seeds on attenuation of LPS-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in murine models. Embelin (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day, i.p.) and Roflumilast (1 mg/kg/day, p.o.) were administered for four days and prior to LPS in rats (i.t.). Four hour after LPS challenge animals were anesthesized and bronchoalveolar lavage was done with ice-cold phosphate buffer. Assessment of BAL fluid was done for albumin, total protein, total cell and neutrophil count, TNF-α levels, nitrosoative stress. Superior lobe of right lung was used for histopathologic evaluation. Inferior lobe of right lung was used to obtain lung edema. Left lung was used for myeloperoxidase estimation. Arterial blood was collected immediately and analyzed for pH, pO2 and pCO2 were estimated. Pretreatment with embelin (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased lung edema, mononucleated cellular infiltration, nitrate/nitrite, total protein, albumin concentrations, TNF-α in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and myeloperoxidase activity in lung homogenate. Embelin markedly prevented pO2 down-regulation and pCO2 augmentation. Additionally, it attenuated lung histopathological changes in acute respiratory distress syndrome model. The study demonstrates the effectiveness of Embelia ribes Burm. f. (Fam. Myrsinaceae) seeds in acute respiratory distress syndrome possibly related to its anti-inflammatory and protective effect against LPS induced airway inflammation by reducing nitrosative stress, reducing physiological parameters of blood gas change, TNF-α and mononucleated

  10. The effectiveness of heliox in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Sema; Daglioglu, Kenan; Yildizdas, Dincer; Bayram, Ibrahim; Gumurdulu, Derya; Polat, Sait

    2013-01-01

    The management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was investigated with the use of heliox in an experimental model. To investigate whether heliox can be considered a new therapeutic approach in ARDS. ARDS was designed in Wistar albino male rats, 250-300 g in weight, by intratracheal instillation of physiological saline solution. Anesthezied and tracheotomized rats with ARDS were pressure-controlled ventilated. At the end of 210 min, helium gas was tried. All rats were assigned to two groups: Group 1 (n = 10) was the control group, and was given no treatment; group 2 (n = 7) was given heliox (He: O(2) = 50:50). The heliox group received heliox for 1 h continously. Rats were continued to be kept on a ventilator through the experiment. Two hours after the last inhalation, both lungs of the rats were excised for both histopathological examination and immunohistochemical evaluation. Histopathological grading were expressed as median interquartile range. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to assess the relationships between the variables. The infiltation of neutrophils were decreased in rats treated with heliox. Edema in the interstitial and intraalveolar areas was less than that of the control rats. Also, the diminishing of perivascular and/or intraalveolar hemorrhage was apperant. Hyaline membrane (HM) formation decreased in the heliox group compared with the control group. Decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was shown via immunohistochemical examination in the heliox group. The present study histopathologically indicated the effectiveness of heliox in the decreasing of neutrophil infiltation, interstitial/intraalveolar edema, perivascular and/or intraalveolar hemorrhage and HM formation in ARDS. Besides the known effect of heliox in obstructive lung disease, inhaled heliox therapy could be associated with the improvement of inflamation in ARDS.

  11. Risk factors and prognosis of critically ill cancer patients with postoperative acute respiratory insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xue-Zhong; Gao, Yong; Wang, Hai-Jun; Yang, Quan-Hui; Huang, Chu-Lin; Qu, Shi-Ning; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Qing-Ling; Sun, Ke-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the risk factors and outcome of critically ill cancer patients with postoperative acute respiratory insufficiency. The data of 190 critically ill cancer patients with postoperative acute respiratory insufficiency were retrospectively reviewed. The data of 321 patients with no acute respiratory insufficiency as controls were also collected. Clinical variables of the first 24 hours after admission to intensive care unit were collected, including age, sex, comorbid disease, type of surgery, admission type, presence of shock, presence of acute kidney injury, presence of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute physiologic and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II) score, sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA), and PaO2/FiO2 ratio. Duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, intensive care unit death, length of hospitalization, hospital death and one-year survival were calculated. The incidence of acute respiratory insufficiency was 37.2% (190/321). Multivariate logistic analysis showed a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (P=0.001), surgery-related infection (P=0.004), hypo-volemic shock (Prespiratory insufficiency. Compared with the patients without acute respiratory insufficiency, the patients with acute respiratory insufficiency had a prolonged length of intensive care unit stay (Prespiratory insufficiency (P=0.029, RR: 8.522, 95%CI: 1.243-58.437, B=2.143, SE=0.982, Wald=4.758). Compared with the patients without acute respiratory insufficiency, those with acute respiratory insufficiency had a shortened one-year survival rate (78.7% vs. 97.1%, Prespiratory insufficiency. Septic shock was the only independent prognostic factor of intensive care unit death in patients with acute respiratory insufficiency. Compared with patients without acute respiratory insufficiency, those with acute respiratory insufficiency had adverse short-term outcome and a decreased one

  12. Early Upregulation of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome-Associated Cytokines Promotes Lethal Disease in an Aged-Mouse Model of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Rockx, Barry; Baas, Tracey; Zornetzer, Gregory; Haagmans, Bart; Sheahan, Timothy; Frieman, Matthew; Dyer, Matthew; Teal, Thomas; Proll, Sean; Brand, Judith; Baric, Ralph; Katze, Michael

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSeveral respiratory viruses, including influenza virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), produce more severe disease in the elderly, yet the molecular mechanisms governing age-related susceptibility remain poorly studied. Advanced age was significantly associated with increased SARS-related deaths, primarily due to the onset of early- and late-stage acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pulmonary fibrosis. Infection of aged, but not young, mice...

  13. Duration of day-care attendance and acute respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Costa Fuchs

    Full Text Available Day-care attendance accounts for an increased frequency of acute respiratory infections (ARI, in numbers of both episodes and hospitalizations. In addition to day-care exposure, risk factors include age, siblings, and crowding. The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible association between duration of day-care exposure and ARI. A cross-sectional study was carried out to compared ARI rates for children exposed to day care and children cared for at home. Children with at least one parent working in a hospital were sampled from the hospital-run day-care center and those cared for at home. An acute respiratory infection was defined as the presence of two or more signs or symptoms in the previous two weeks. Children exposed to the day-care center for 12 to 50 hours a week had a three to five times greater risk of developing ARI than those staying at home. This risk was assessed independently, taking socioeconomic status, age, and number of siblings into account. Risk of respiratory illness and day-care attendance has been described elsewhere, but this study presents original findings related to duration of exposure. With a view towards reducing risk of ARI, improvements should be made in institutional day-care centers in Brazil, where family day care is still not available.

  14. Duration of day-care attendance and acute respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs Sandra Costa

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Day-care attendance accounts for an increased frequency of acute respiratory infections (ARI, in numbers of both episodes and hospitalizations. In addition to day-care exposure, risk factors include age, siblings, and crowding. The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible association between duration of day-care exposure and ARI. A cross-sectional study was carried out to compared ARI rates for children exposed to day care and children cared for at home. Children with at least one parent working in a hospital were sampled from the hospital-run day-care center and those cared for at home. An acute respiratory infection was defined as the presence of two or more signs or symptoms in the previous two weeks. Children exposed to the day-care center for 12 to 50 hours a week had a three to five times greater risk of developing ARI than those staying at home. This risk was assessed independently, taking socioeconomic status, age, and number of siblings into account. Risk of respiratory illness and day-care attendance has been described elsewhere, but this study presents original findings related to duration of exposure. With a view towards reducing risk of ARI, improvements should be made in institutional day-care centers in Brazil, where family day care is still not available.

  15. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: definition, incidence, and epidemiology: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemani, Robinder G; Smith, Lincoln S; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Erickson, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Although there are similarities in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults and children, pediatric-specific practice patterns, comorbidities, and differences in outcome necessitate a pediatric-specific definition. We sought to create such a definition. A subgroup of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome investigators who drafted a pediatric-specific definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome based on consensus opinion and supported by detailed literature review tested elements of the definition with patient data from previously published investigations. International PICUs. Children enrolled in published investigations of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. None. Several aspects of the proposed pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome definition align with the Berlin Definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults: timing of acute respiratory distress syndrome after a known risk factor, the potential for acute respiratory distress syndrome to coexist with left ventricular dysfunction, and the importance of identifying a group of patients at risk to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. There are insufficient data to support any specific age for "adult" acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with "pediatric" acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, children with perinatal-related respiratory failure should be excluded from the definition of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Larger departures from the Berlin Definition surround 1) simplification of chest imaging criteria to eliminate bilateral infiltrates; 2) use of pulse oximetry-based criteria when PaO2 is unavailable; 3) inclusion of oxygenation index and oxygen saturation index instead of PaO2/FIO2 ratio with a minimum positive end-expiratory pressure level for invasively ventilated patients; 4) and specific inclusion of children with preexisting chronic lung disease or cyanotic congenital heart disease. This

  16. Probiotics for preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiukui; Dong, Bi Rong; Wu, Taixiang

    2015-02-03

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyse 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI (at least one episode: odds ratio (OR) 0.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.76, P value Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute URTI (rate ratio 0.83; 95% CI 0.66 to 1.05, P value = 0.12, very low

  17. Cochrane Commentary: Probiotics For Prevention of Acute Upper Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, who are at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyze 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI [at least one episode: odds ratio (OR): 0.53; 95% CI = 0.37-0.76, P Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute URTI (rate ratio: 0.83; 95% CI = 0.66-1.05, P = .12, very low quality evidence) and adverse

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated with Tumour Lysis Syndrome in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaim M Bell

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute tumour lysis syndrome (ATLS developed in two patients with acute myelogenous leukemia soon after they were treated with cytosine arabinoside. The patients also developed respiratory distress requiring intubation. Autopsy and clinical findings demonstrated the presence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. An association appears to be present between ARDS and ATLS in this group of patients.

  19. Acute mitochondrial myopathy with respiratory insufficiency and motor axonal polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Yi, Jianhua; Liu, Li; Wang, Xiaoping; Dong, Liang; Du, Ailian

    2017-10-16

    Mitochondrial myopathies (MMs) are mainly presented with chronic muscle weakness and accompanied with other syndromes. MM with acute respiratory insufficiency is rare. To reveal the clinical, pathological and molecular characteristics of a life-threatening MM. Muscle biopsy and enzyme staining were performed in skeletal muscles. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing was analyzed and heteroplasmy were quantified by pyrosequencing. All three patients had tachycardia, acute lactic acidosis, dyspnea and sudden severe muscle weakness. Two patients had calf edema and abdominal pain, and one had a heart attack. Electromyography in two patients showed dramatically decreased axonal amplitudes of motor nerves. Muscle biopsies showed ragged red fibers and dramatic mitochondrial abnormality. A mtDNA m.3243A>G mutation was identified in Patient 1 (mutation load: 29% in blood and 73% in muscle) and Patient 3 (79% in blood and 89% in muscle). A mtDNA m.8344A>G mutation was found in Patient 2 (mutation load 80.4% in blood). MM characterized by lactic acidosis, respiratory failure and acute motor axonal neuropathy is life threatening.

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul N. Hein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre’s syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS developing as a result of Lemierre’s syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre’s syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre’s syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care.

  1. Implementing a bedside assessment of respiratory mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Chen, Guang-Qiang; Shore, Kevin; Shklar, Orest; Martins, Concetta; Devenyi, Brian; Lindsay, Paul; McPhail, Heather; Lanys, Ashley; Soliman, Ibrahim; Tuma, Mazin; Kim, Michael; Porretta, Kerri; Greco, Pamela; Every, Hilary; Hayes, Chris; Baker, Andrew; Friedrich, Jan O; Brochard, Laurent

    2017-04-04

    Despite their potential interest for clinical management, measurements of respiratory mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are seldom performed in routine practice. We introduced a systematic assessment of respiratory mechanics in our clinical practice. After the first year of clinical use, we retrospectively assessed whether these measurements had any influence on clinical management and physiological parameters associated with clinical outcomes by comparing their value before and after performing the test. The respiratory mechanics assessment constituted a set of bedside measurements to determine passive lung and chest wall mechanics, response to positive end-expiratory pressure, and alveolar derecruitment. It was obtained early after ARDS diagnosis. The results were provided to the clinical team to be used at their own discretion. We compared ventilator settings and physiological variables before and after the test. The physiological endpoints were oxygenation index, dead space, and plateau and driving pressures. Sixty-one consecutive patients with ARDS were enrolled. Esophageal pressure was measured in 53 patients (86.9%). In 41 patients (67.2%), ventilator settings were changed after the measurements, often by reducing positive end-expiratory pressure or by switching pressure-targeted mode to volume-targeted mode. Following changes, the oxygenation index, airway plateau, and driving pressures were significantly improved, whereas the dead-space fraction remained unchanged. The oxygenation index continued to improve in the next 48 h. Implementing a systematic respiratory mechanics test leads to frequent individual adaptations of ventilator settings and allows improvement in oxygenation indexes and reduction of the risk of overdistention at the same time. The present study involves data from our ongoing registry for respiratory mechanics (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02623192 . Registered 30 July 2015).

  2. Risk Factors for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Pavić, Ivan; Jurković, Marija; Paštar, Zrinjka

    2012-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) are the most common cause of childhood morbidity and an important public health problem. The aim of this study was to identify the significant risk factors for ARTI in children. The study took place in Ivankovo which is a rural area of Eastern Slavonia and with small socio-economic differences. The study population were 159 children who were 3–5 years old at the time of the study, and who were registrated at doctor’s office Ivankovo. The s...

  3. Mechanical ventilation in the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelbaum, Oleg; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-08-01

    The management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patient is fundamental to the field of intensive care medicine, and it presents unique challenges owing to the specialized mechanical ventilation techniques that such patients require. ARDS is a highly lethal disease, and there is compelling evidence that mechanical ventilation itself, if applied in an injurious fashion, can be a contributor to ARDS mortality. Therefore, it is imperative for any clinician central to the care of ARDS patients to understand the fundamental framework that underpins the approach to mechanical ventilation in this special scenario. The current review summarizes the major components of the mechanical ventilation strategy as it applies to ARDS.

  4. Transmission Dynamics and Control of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitch, Marc; Cohen, Ted; Cooper, Ben; Robins, James M.; Ma, Stefan; James, Lyn; Gopalakrishna, Gowri; Chew, Suok Kai; Tan, Chorh Chuan; Samore, Matthew H.; Fisman, David; Murray, Megan

    2003-06-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently described illness of humans that has spread widely over the past 6 months. With the use of detailed epidemiologic data from Singapore and epidemic curves from other settings, we estimated the reproductive number for SARS in the absence of interventions and in the presence of control efforts. We estimate that a single infectious case of SARS will infect about three secondary cases in a population that has not yet instituted control measures. Public-health efforts to reduce transmission are expected to have a substantial impact on reducing the size of the epidemic.

  5. MODERN POSSIBILITIES AND PRINCIPLES OF RATIONAL TREATMENT OF INFLUENZA AND OTHER ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Zaplatnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern possibilities and principles of rational treatment of influenza and other acute respiratory infection in children are demonstrated in this article. Epidemiology and etiology characteristics of acute respiratory infections during the period of seasonal morbidity of 2012–2013 and early period of 2013–2014 epidemic season are analyzed. The issues of safe and effective use of various etiotropic and symptomatic agents in influenza and acute respiratory viral infections of non-influenza etiology in children are discussed.

  6. MODERN POSSIBILITIES AND PRINCIPLES OF RATIONAL TREATMENT OF INFLUENZA AND OTHER ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    A. L. Zaplatnikov; E. I. Burtseva; A. A. Girina; N. V. Koroid; E. A. Garina

    2014-01-01

    Modern possibilities and principles of rational treatment of influenza and other acute respiratory infection in children are demonstrated in this article. Epidemiology and etiology characteristics of acute respiratory infections during the period of seasonal morbidity of 2012–2013 and early period of 2013–2014 epidemic season are analyzed. The issues of safe and effective use of various etiotropic and symptomatic agents in influenza and acute respiratory viral infections of non-influenza etio...

  7. Human coronavirus and severe acute respiratory infection in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Hygor; Faggion, Heloisa Z; Leotte, Jaqueline; Nogueira, Meri B; Vidal, Luine R R; Raboni, Sonia M

    2016-05-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are an important cause of respiratory tract infection and are responsible for causing the common cold in the general population. Thus, adequate surveillance of HCoV is essential. This study aimed to analyze the impact of HCoV infections and their relation to severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) in a hospitalized population in Southern Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital, and assessed inpatients under investigation for SARI by the hospital epidemiology department, and all patients who had nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from January 2012 to December 2013 to detect respiratory viruses (RVs). Viral infection was detected by multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), with primers specific to the subtypes HCoV-229E/NL63 and OC43/HKU1. The overall positivity rate was 58.8% (444/755), and HCoVs were detected in 7.6% (n = 34) of positive samples. Children below two years of age were most frequently affected (62%). Comorbidities were more likely to be associated with HCoVs than with other RVs. Immunosuppression was an independent risk factor for HCoV infection (OR = 3.5, 95% CI 1.6-7.6). Dyspnea was less frequently associated with HCoV infection (p infected with HCoV (9%) died from respiratory infection. HCoVs are important respiratory pathogens, especially in hospitalized children under 2 years of age and in immunosuppressed patients. They may account for a small proportion of SARI diagnoses, increased need for mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admission, and death.

  8. Acute effects of dokha smoking on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems among UAE male university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Rizwana B; Abdul Haque, Noor Mohammad; Abdul Hadi Khalil Al Mohsen, Hassan; Abdul Hadi Khalil Al Mohsen, Ali; Haitham Khalaf Humadi, Marwa; Zaki Al Mubarak, Zainab; Mathew, Elsheba; Al Sharbatti, Shatha

    2012-01-01

    In the United Arab Emirates (UAE) tobacco use is rampant. A less reported, yet widely used form of smoking native to UAE is midwakh or dhokha. The aim of the study is to assess the acute effects of smoking dokha (Arabian pipe) on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems among male university students in the UAE. A quasi-experimental study was conducted among 97 male volunteers aged more than 17 years. Blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate of each participant, were measured before and immediately after smoking. A self administered questionnaire was used to collect personal details and data about smoking pattern. Mean increases in systolic blood pressures (12±1 mmHg), heart rates (20±2 bpm) and respiratory rates (4±1 breaths/min) were observed (pSmoking dokha has a significant acute effect on systolic blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate. Anti smoking campaigns must address the ill effects of this form of smoking. Results from the study warrant further research into this method of smoking which is becoming more popular.

  9. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: a review of the Berlin definition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis Cabezón, N; Sánchez Castro, I; Bengoetxea Uriarte, U X; Rodrigo Casanova, M P; García Peña, J M; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is due to many causes. The absence of a universal definition up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive diagnosis. The incidences of ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) vary widely in the current literature. The American-European Consensus Conference definition has been applied since its publication in 1994 and has helped to improve knowledge about ARDS. However, 18 years later, in 2011, the European Intensive Medicine Society, requested a team of international experts to meet in Berlin to review the ARDS definition. The purpose of the Berlin definition is not to use it as a prognostic tool, but to improve coherence between research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Coccidioidomycosis: an unusual cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelson Nobre Veras

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A male farmer, 20 years old, from the countryside of the State of Piauí, developed acute respiratory infection. Despite adequate antimicrobial therapy, his conditions worsened, requiring mechanical ventilation. His X-rays showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. His PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 58. Direct microscopy and culture of tracheal aspirates showed the presence of Coccidioides immitis. Autochthonous cases of coccidioidomycosis have only recently been described in Brazil, most of them from the State of Piauí. C. immitis has been isolated from humans, dogs and armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus, and also from soil samples of armadillo's burrows. Failure to respond to antimicrobial therapy and a patient's origin from recognized endemic areas should alert to the possibility of acute pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.

  11. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. THE ETIOLOGY OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY INFECTION (COMMON COLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Perrin H.; Doull, James A.; Bourn, Janet M.; McComb, Emily

    1931-01-01

    Experimental upper respiratory infections similar to "common colds" were transmitted singly and in series through two and four passages in nine out of fifteen persons, by intransal inoculations with bacteria-free filtrates of nasopharyngeal washings obtained from individuals ill with natural "colds." These observations conform with those reported by previous workers and lend further support to the view that the incitant of the "common cold" is a filtrable virus. PMID:19869857

  13. Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Prof. Ariella Oppenheim CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hebrew University of Jerusalem...Lung / 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Prof. Ariella...Particles (VLPs), may attenuate ARDS, increasing survival and recovery from this severe clinical condition. The hypothesis was successfully

  14. Prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms in breath-hold divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialoni, Danilo; Sponsiello, Nicola; Marabotti, Claudio; Marroni, Alessandro; Pieri, Massimo; Maggiorelli, Fabrizio; Tonerini, Michele; Frammartino, Brunella

    2012-01-01

    After repetitive deep dives, breath-hold divers are often affected by a syndrome characterized by typical symptoms such as cough, sensation of chest constriction, blood-striated expectorate (hemoptysis) and, rarely, an overt acute pulmonary edema syndrome, often together with various degrees of dyspnea. The aim of this work is an epidemiological investigation to evaluate the prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms (ARS) in breath-hold divers (BHDs) in practicing breath-hold diving. A retrospective investigation has been performed using specific questionnaires completed by a selected sample of free-divers (212 breath-hold diving instructors--194 male, 18 female; mean age 34 +/- 6.91 years); affiliated with Apnea Academy, (International School for Education and Research of Free-Diving). We also investigated possible risk factors for post-dive acute respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, the authors report that a severe case of acute pulmonary edema occurred to a healthy and experienced breath-hold diving instructor. We reported detailed CT scan and follow-up CT scans three days later, with another scan reported 10 days later as well. A total of 56 subjects (26.4%) reported previous events such as cough, thoracic constraint, hemoptysis, associated with various degrees of dyspnea as confirmation of pulmonary involvement. Forty-five of them (82%) reported signs of true hemoptysis and a high degrees of dyspnea. A CT scan revealed the presence of patchy bilateral lung opacities at the level of superior and parahilar zones; follow-up CT scans three days later and 10 days later are also reported. Our data show that this is a common condition among experienced BHDs. In our opinion, this is particularly interesting for the free-diving community.

  15. SYMPTOMATIC THERAPY OF COUGH DURING SEASONAL INCREASE OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS PREVALENCE

    OpenAIRE

    K. S. Volkov; L. S. Namazova-Baranova; N. I. Voznesenskaya; V. A. Barannik; K. E. Efendieva

    2014-01-01

    Cough is the main symptom of the respiratory tract disorders. Mostly it occurs in viral, bacterial and mixed (viral and bacterial) respiratory tract infections. The highest rates of respiratory tract infections are among children: it is known that children have respiratory tract infections 3–4 times as much as adults. Available drugs used in acute respiratory tract infections are numerous and various and cover almost all methods of influence on the infectious process. Nowadays the problem of ...

  16. Respiratory viruses in young South African children with acute lower respiratory infections and interactions with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalay, Alicia A; Abbott, Salome; Sikazwe, Chisha; Khoo, Siew-Kim; Bizzintino, Joelene; Zhang, Guicheng; Laing, Ingrid; Chidlow, Glenys R; Smith, David W; Gern, James; Goldblatt, Jack; Lehmann, Deborah; Green, Robin J; Le Souëf, Peter N

    2016-08-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is the most common respiratory virus and has been associated with frequent and severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI). The prevalence of RV species among HIV-infected children in South Africa is unknown. To describe the prevalence of respiratory viruses, including RV species, associated with HIV status and other clinical symptoms in children less than two years of age with and without ALRI in Pretoria, South Africa. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 105 hospitalized ALRI cases and 53 non-ALRI controls less than two years of age. HIV status was determined. Common respiratory viruses were identified by PCR, and RV species and genotypes were identified by semi-nested PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic tree analyses. Respiratory viruses were more common among ALRI cases than controls (83.8% vs. 69.2%; p=0.041). RV was the most commonly identified virus in cases with pneumonia (45.6%) or bronchiolitis (52.1%), regardless of HIV status, as well as in controls (39.6%). RV-A was identified in 26.7% of cases and 15.1% of controls while RV-C was identified in 21.0% of cases and 18.9% of controls. HIV-infected children were more likely to be diagnosed with pneumonia than bronchiolitis (pinfected cases (n=15) compared with 30.6% of HIV-uninfected cases (n=85, p=0.013), and was identified more frequently in bronchiolitis than in pneumonia cases (43.8% vs. 12.3%; pinfection may be protective against RSV and bronchiolitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Surveillance for Hospitalized Acute Respiratory Infection in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, Jennifer R.; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  18. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Verani

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections (ARI are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4% cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7% among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6% of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0% had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9% case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000, followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000. These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and

  19. The Acute Respiratory Infection Quality Dashboard: a performance measurement reporting tool in an electronic health record

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Linder, Jeffrey A; Jung, Eunice; Housman, Dan; Eskin, Michael S; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S

    2007-01-01

    .... The Acute Respiratory Infection Quality Dashboard (ARI QD) for LMR users is a secure web report for performance measurement of an acute condition delivered through a central data warehouse and custom-built reporting tool...

  20. Clinical utility of the neutrophil elastase inhibitor sivelestat for the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aikawa, Naoki; Kawasaki, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    .... Sivelestat is a neutrophil elastase inhibitor approved in Japan and the Republic of Korea for acute lung injury, including acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome...

  1. Prolonged Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Je Ko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available When all conventional treatments for respiratory failure in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS have failed, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO can provide a chance of survival in these desperately ill patients. A 49-year-old male patient developed septic shock and progressive ARDS after liver abscess drainage. Venovenous ECMO was given due to refractory respiratory failure on postoperative day 6. Initially, two heparin-binding hollow-fiber microporous membrane oxygenators in parallel were used in the ECMO circuit. Twenty-two oxygenators were changed in the first 22 days of ECMO support because of plasma leak in the oxygenators. Each oxygenator had an average life of 48 hours. Thereafter, a single silicone membrane oxygenator was used in the ECMO circuit, which did not require change during the remaining 596 hours of ECMO. The patient's tidal volume was only 90 mL in the nadir and less than 300 mL for 26 days during the ECMO course. The patient required ECMO support for 48 days and survived despite complications, including septic shock, ARDS, acute renal failure, drug-induced leukopenia, and multiple internal bleeding. This patient received an unusually long duration of ECMO support. However, he survived, recovered well, and was in New York Heart Association functional class I-II, with a forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 81% of the predicted level 18 months later. In conclusion, ECMO can provide a chance of survival for patients with refractory ARDS. The reversibility of lung function is possible in ARDS patients regardless of the severity of lung dysfunction at the time of treatment.

  2. Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure from Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Secondary to Leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M. Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, characterized by hypoxemic respiratory failure, is associated with a mortality of 30–50% and is precipitated by both direct and indirect pulmonary insults. Treatment is largely supportive, consisting of lung protective ventilation and thereby necessitating Intensive Care Unit (ICU admission. The most common precipitant is community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, but other putative pathogens include viruses and fungi. On rare occasions, ARDS can be secondary to tropical disease. Accordingly, a history should include travel to endemic regions. Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease most common in the tropics and typically associated with mild pulmonary complications. We describe a case of a 25-year-old male with undiagnosed leptospirosis, presenting with fever and severe hypoxemic respiratory failure, returning from a Costa Rican holiday. There was no other organ failure. He was intubated and received lung protective ventilation. His condition improved after ampicillin and penicillin G were added empirically. This case illustrates the rare complication of ARDS from leptospirosis, the importance of taking a travel history, and the need for empiric therapy because of diagnostic delay.

  3. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Hannan, Liam M; Dominelli, Paolo B; Peters, Carli M; Fougere, Renee J; McKim, Douglas A; Sheel, A William; Road, Jeremy D

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR) acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs) in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW). Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12) and healthy controls (n=12) underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O(-1), p0.05). LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05). During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05). LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique.

  4. [Current approaches to the treatment of severe hypoxic respiratory insufficiency (acute lung injury; acute respiratory distress syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, S; Müller, T; Pfeifer, M

    2011-02-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, plateau pressure 90% and permissive hypercapnia results in reduction of the mortality rate in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The level of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) must be chosen in relation to oxygen requirement. High frequency oscillatory ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist are promising methods. However, further studies with firm end-points have to be awaited before a final judgment is possible. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can ensure life-sustaining gas exchange in patients with severe vitally compromised pulmonary failure, to provide time for lung tissue to heal and reduce ventilatory stress. The latest guidelines for analgesia and sedation in intensive care medicine demand consistent monitoring of the level of sedation and the intensity of pain. The sedation should be interrupted daily, with phases of awakenings and, if possible, spontaneous breathing. Methods of supportive treatment: Positional treatment (prone position) and inhalation of vasodilators can improve ventilation/perfusion mismatch and thus oxygenation. However, administration of surfactant is currently not advised in adult respiratory failure. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Early upregulation of acute respiratory distress syndrome-associated cytokines promotes lethal disease in an aged-mouse model of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Rockx (Barry); T. Baas (Tracey); G.A. Zornetzer (Gregory); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); T. Sheahan (Timothy); M. Frieman (Matthew); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); T.H. Teal (Thomas); S. Proll (Sean); J.M.A. van den Brand (Judith); R. Baric (Ralph); M.G. Katze (Michael)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSeveral respiratory viruses, including influenza virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), produce more severe disease in the elderly, yet the molecular mechanisms governing age-related susceptibility remain poorly studied. Advanced age was significantly

  6. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Moretti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Data indicate that adoption of a lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and of an open-lung ventilation strategy, characterized by sufficient positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP to avoid atelectasis, provides the greatest likelihood of survival and minimizes lung injury. The relative benefits of strategies such as high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO, recruiting manoeuvres and prone position are also considered. Moreover this article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its efficacy in the treatment of paediatric ARDS. In infants and children with acute lung injury the endogenous surfactant system is not only deficient, as observed in preterm infants, but altered via a variety of other mechanisms like inhibition and dysfunction. All factors contribute to the altered physiology seen in ARDS. The role of exogenous surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period is therefore more complex and its limited efficacy may be related to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution or, simply, an inability of the drug to counteract the underlying pathophysiology of ARDS. Several trials have found no clinical benefit from various surfactant supplementation methods in adult patients with ARDS, however some studies have shown that this therapy can improve oxygenation and decrease mortality in some specific

  7. Acute phase proteins as local biomarkers of respiratory infection in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohl, Annette; Schroedl, Wieland; Rhode, Heidrun; Reinhold, Petra

    2015-07-25

    Cumulating reports suggest that acute phase proteins (APPs) do not only play a role as systemic inflammatory mediators, but are also expressed in different tissues as local reaction to inflammatory stimuli. The present study aimed to evaluate presence and changes in luminal lung concentrations of the APPs haptoglobin (Hp), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), C-reactive protein (CRP), and lactoferrin (Lf) in calves with an acute respiratory disease experimentally induced by Chlamydia (C.) psittaci. Intra-bronchial inoculation of the pathogen resulted in a consistent respiratory illness. In venous blood of the infected calves (n = 13), concentrations of plasma proteins and serum LBP were assessed (i) before exposure and (ii) 8 times within 14 days after inoculation (dpi). Increasing clinical illness correlated significantly with increasing LBP-and decreasing albumin concentrations in blood, both verifying a systemic acute phase response. Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained from all 13 calves experimentally infected with C. psittaci at 4, 9 and 14 dpi, and from 6 uninfected healthy calves. Concentrations of bovine serum albumin (BSA), Hp, LBP, CRP and Lf in BALF were determined by ELISA. In infected animals, absolute concentrations of LBP and Hp in BALF correlated significantly with the respiratory score. The quotient [LBP]/[BSA] in BALF peaked significantly in acutely infected animals (4 dpi), showed a time-dependent decrease during the recovery phase (9-14 dpi), and was significantly higher compared to healthy controls. Concentrations of Hp and Lf in BALF as well as [Hp]/[BSA]--and [Lf]/[BSA]-quotients decreased during the study in infected animals, but were never higher than in healthy controls. CRP concentrations and [CRP]/[BSA]-quotient did not express significant differences between infected and healthy animals or during the course of infection. In conclusion, absolute concentrations of LBP in blood and BALF as well as the quotient [LBP

  8. Acute effects of ambient air pollution episodes on respiratory health of children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, G.

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis the acute effects of air pollution episodes on respiratory health of seven to eleven year old children living in non-urban communities in the Netherlands are discussed. Repeated measurements of pulmonary function (spirometry) and the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms

  9. Acute respiratory infections in elderly people: the role of micronutrients and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graat, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the most frequent of all infectious diseases. In popular speech common cold, flu (influenza), and pneumonia all denote acute respiratory infections. Elderly people show an increased risk of these infections and their complications. In The Netherlands about 2.000

  10. Acute respiratory infections in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Hana; Dallas, Ronald; Zhou, Yinmei; Pei, Dequing; Cheng, Cheng; Flynn, Patricia M; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge regarding the incidence, clinical course, and impact of respiratory viral infections in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is limited. A retrospective cohort of patients with newly diagnosed ALL who were treated on the Total Therapy XVI protocol at St Jude Children's Research Hospital between 2007 and 2011 was evaluated. Of 223 children, 95 (43%) developed 133 episodes of viral acute respiratory illness (ARI) (incidence, 1.1 per 1000 patient-days). ARI without viral etiology was identified in 65 patients (29%) and no ARI was detected in 63 patients (28%). There were no significant associations noted between race, sex, age, or ALL risk group and the development of ARI. Children receiving induction chemotherapy were found to be at the highest risk of viral ARI (incidence, 2.3 per 1000 patient-days). Influenza virus was the most common virus (38%) followed by respiratory syncytial virus (33%). Of 133 episodes of viral ARI, 61% of patients were hospitalized, 26% experienced a complicated course, 80% had their chemotherapy delayed, and 0.7% of patients died. Twenty-four patients (18%) developed viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), 5 of whom (21%) had complications. Patients with viral LRTI had a significantly lower nadir absolute lymphocyte count; were sicker at the time of presentation; and were more likely to have respiratory syncytial virus, to be hospitalized, and to have their chemotherapy delayed for longer compared with those with viral upper respiratory tract infections. Despite the low incidence of viral ARI in children with ALL, the associated morbidity, mortality, and delay in chemotherapy remain clinically significant. Viral LRTI was especially associated with high morbidity requiring intensive care-level support. Cancer 2016;122:798-805. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. SYMPTOMATIC THERAPY OF COUGH DURING SEASONAL INCREASE OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS PREVALENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Volkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cough is the main symptom of the respiratory tract disorders. Mostly it occurs in viral, bacterial and mixed (viral and bacterial respiratory tract infections. The highest rates of respiratory tract infections are among children: it is known that children have respiratory tract infections 3–4 times as much as adults. Available drugs used in acute respiratory tract infections are numerous and various and cover almost all methods of influence on the infectious process. Nowadays the problem of usage of effective and at the same time safe agents in acute respiratory tract infections in children is very topical. The modern approaches to treatment of acute respiratory tract infections in children are discussed in the article. A special attention is given to symptomatic therapy. The authors describe the approaches to treatment of cough according to its character, intensity and other characteristics.

  12. Rhabdomyolysis associated with acute renal failure in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L-L; Hsu, C-W; Tian, Y-C; Fang, J-T

    2005-10-01

    An outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred in Taiwan in 2003. SARS complicated with rhabdomyolysis has rarely been reported. This study reported three cases of rhabdomyolysis developing during the clinical course of SARS. Thirty probable SARS patients were admitted to the isolation wards at Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital between 4 April and 4 June 2003. Thirty patients, including four men and 26 women aged from 12 to 87 years (mean age 40). Eleven (36.7%) patients had respiratory failure and required mechanical ventilation with paralytic therapy; three (10%) patients had rhabdomyolysis complicated with acute renal failure and one received haemodialysis; four (13.3%) patients died. Three cases with rhabdomyolysis all received sedative and paralytic therapy for mechanical ventilation. Haemodialysis was performed on one patient. Two patients died from multiple organ failure, and one patient fully recovered from rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure. SARS is a serious respiratory illness, and its aetiology is a novel coronavirus. Rhabdomyolysis resulting from SARS virus infection was strongly suspected. Immobilisation under paralytic therapy and steroids may also be important in developing rhabdomyolysis.

  13. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear...... if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456...... prescription patterns for acute respiratory tract infections by data linkage of clinical indications. The findings confirm that penicillin V is the most commonly prescribed antibiotic agent for treatment of patients with an acute respiratory tract infection in Danish general practice. However, second...

  14. Aetiology of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Hospitalised Children in Cyprus

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Jan; Panayiotou, Christakis; Tryfonos, Christina; Koptides, Dana; Koliou, Maria; Kalogirou, Nikolas; Georgiou, Eleni; Christodoulou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve clinical management and prevention of viral infections in hospitalised children improved etiological insight is needed. The aim of the present study was to assess the spectrum of respiratory viral pathogens in children admitted to hospital with acute respiratory tract infections in Cyprus. For this purpose nasopharyngeal swab samples from 424 children less than 12 years of age with acute respiratory tract infections were collected over three epidemic seasons and were analy...

  15. A comparison of volume control and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Guldager, Henrik; Nielsen, Soeren L; Carl, Peder; Soerensen, Mogens B

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a new mode of ventilation (pressure-regulated volume control; PRVC) is associated with improvements in respiratory mechanics and outcome when compared with conventional volume control (VC) ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a randomised, prospective, open, cross over trial on 44 patients with acute respiratory failure in the general intensive care unit of a university hospital. After a stabiliz...

  16. Therapeutic bronchoscopy vs. standard of care in acute respiratory failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekjaer, K L; Meyhoff, T S; Møller, M H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess patient-important benefits and harms of therapeutic bronchoscopy vs. standard of care (no bronchoscopy) in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). METHODS: We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis (TSA......) according to the Cochrane Handbook and GRADE methodology, including a predefined protocol (PROSPERO no. CRD42016046235). We included randomized clinical trials (RCTs) comparing therapeutic bronchoscopy to standard of care in critically ill patients with ARF. Two reviewers independently assessed trials...... judged as having high risk of bias. There was no difference in all-cause mortality between therapeutic bronchoscopy and standard of care (TSA adjusted RR 0.39; 95% CI 0.14 to 1.07; I(2) 0%), and only 3% of the required information size had been accrued. There was no difference in ICU length of stay...

  17. Dress syndrome with sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumomediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhas Prasun Giri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, and is characterized by skin rash, fever, lymph node enlargement, and internal organ involvement. So far, numerous drugs such as sulfonamides, phenobarbital, sulfasalazine, carbamazepine, and phenytoin have been reported to cause DRESS syndrome. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who developed clinical manifestations of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hypereosinophilia, and visceral involvement (hepatitis and pneumonitis after taking phenobarbital for seizures, with subsequent development of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS and spontaneous air leak syndrome (pnemothorax and pneumomediastinum. She was put on steroids and various antibiotics and was ventilated, but ultimately succumbed to sepsis and pulmonary complications.

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress in Patient with Laryngeal Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mannarini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a neurogenic benign tumour arising from the proliferation of Schwann cells present in the peripheral nerve sheath of myelinated nerves. This proliferation can hypothetically appear in every anatomic region of the human body, but the nerve sheath tumors rarely occur within the larynx. In this paper the authors discuss the case of a 74-year-old female who presented to Emergency Unit (EU for an important acute respiratory distress. Airway flexible endoscopy revealed a bulky mass of the aryepiglottic fold measuring 3.5 cm in diameter. The patient underwent tracheotomy and a single-step surgical excision treatment of the mass which was recognized as a schwannoma at pathological examination. Tracheotomy was closed 2 weeks postoperatively. After 18 months of followup, the patient is alive and free of disease and her voice had improved markedly.

  19. Anti-infectious treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min GAO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is closely correlated with infection. Severe infection, e.g., sepsis and septic shock, can result in ARDS. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the common complications in ARDS related infection. As regards ARDS related infection, community acquired infection (CAI is different from hospital acquired infection (HAI in bacterial spectrum. The former is mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxelle catarrhalis, atypical pathogens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. However, HAI is mainly caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA, and other drug-resistant bacteria. The drug-resistant bacterial infection not only makes treatment difficult, but also leads to an increase in mechanical ventilation time, length of ICU stay, mortality rate, and medical costs. The present paper has reviewed the relationship between ARDS and infection, therapeutic principles and measures of ARDS related infection, and introduced the optimal strategy of anti-infectious treatment of ARDS.

  20. The current epidemiology and clinical decisions surrounding acute respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaas, Aimee K; Garner, Bronwen H; Tsalik, Ephraim L; Burke, Thomas; Woods, Christopher W; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2014-10-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a common diagnosis in outpatient and emergent care settings. Currently available diagnostics are limited, creating uncertainty in the use of antibacterial, antiviral, or supportive care. Up to 72% of ambulatory care patients with ARI are treated with an antibacterial, despite only a small fraction actually needing one. Antibiotic overuse is not restricted to ambulatory care: ARI accounts for approximately 5 million emergency department (ED) visits annually in the USA, where 52-61% of such patients receive antibiotics. Thus, an accurate test for the presence or absence of viral or bacterial infection is needed. In this review, we focus on recent research showing that the host-response (genomic, proteomic, or miRNA) can accomplish this task. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Postoperative acute respiratory insufficiency following adenotonsillectomy in children with neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Dayse; Sato, Juliana; Anastacio, Erika M

    2008-05-01

    Evaluate the incidence of acute respiratory insufficiency (ARI) in the immediate postoperative period following adenotonsillectomy in children with neurological diseases. Medical records from all pediatric adenotonsillectomies performed from January 1997 through August 2003 at the Roberto de Abreu Sodré Hospital of the Association for the Welfare of Physically Handicapped Children (AACD) in São Paulo were reviewed. Data were collected for patient age, neurological diagnosis, associated comorbidities, index of respiratory insufficiency in the immediate postoperative period and period of hospitalization. One hundred and nine patients charts had sufficient documentation to be included in this study. Of these, 15 (13.7%) developed ARI in the immediate postoperative period. Ages ranged from 1 to 12 years old (average of 5). Of the 15 patients that presented ARI, 10 (67%) were intubated in the first 3h following extubation. The predominant neurological diagnosis was non-progressive chronic encephalopathy, observed in 84 children (77%), and, among that, 14 (17%) presented ARI. Other neurological diagnoses present in this study were Rett syndrome, neuromuscular disease and meningomyelocele. All of the children that developed ARI presented quadriplegia. Among children that did not develop ARI, the predominant motor pattern was: 28 with quadriplegia, 38 diplegia, 10 hemiplegia, 12 with involuntary movement (choeroathethosis) and six without motor involvement. Children presenting ARI needed mechanical ventilation for an average of 37.87 h (1.5 days) in the intensive care unit. ARI increased the period of hospitalization; these children had an average length of stay of 7 days versus 1.5 days for those that did not develop complications. Children with neurological disorders, especially those with quadriplegic pattern of motor involvement and severe oropharyngeal dysphagia, are at higher risk for respiratory insufficiency in immediate postoperative period of adenotonsillectomy

  2. Extracorporeal support for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J. Finney

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygen (ECMO has been used for many years in patients with life-threatening hypoxaemia and/or hypercarbia. While early trials demonstrated that it was associated with poor outcomes and extensive haemorrhage, the technique has evolved. It now encompasses new technologies and understanding that the lung protective mechanical ventilation it can facilitate is inextricably linked to improving outcomes for patients. The positive results from the CESAR (Conventional ventilation or ECMO for Severe Adult Respiratory failure study and excellent outcomes in patients who suffered severe influenza A (H1N1/09 infection have established ECMO in the care of patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Controversy remains as to at what point in the clinical pathway ECMO should be employed; as a rescue therapy or more pro-actively to enable and ensure high-quality lung protective mechanical ventilation. The primary aims of this article are to discuss: 1 the types of extracorporeal support available; 2 the rationale for its use; 3 the relationship with lung protective ventilation; and 4 the current evidence for its use.

  3. [Molecular biology in the diagnosis of acute bacterial infection of the respiratory tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimón, José María; Cilla, Gustavo; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2008-07-01

    The bacteriological methods traditionally used in the diagnosis of acute respiratory infections (ARI) have limited sensitivity (culture, direct antigen detection, etc.) or require long periods to obtain results (appearance of antibodies). In the last few years, nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAAT) have been developed that allow pathogen-specific genetic targets to be detected in clinical samples. These techniques have been proven to be more sensitive than culture or direct detection and, unlike serological tests, are effective in the acute phase of the infection. However, NAAT also have certain limitations, such as the occasional presence of amplification inhibitors in clinical samples, the persistence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae or Chlamydophila pneumoniae in the mucosa of some individuals, and the lack of discrimination between pathogen infection and colonization in bacteria forming part of normal respiratory tract flora (Streptococcus pneumoniae). Recently developed real-time NAAT have raised expectations that some of these obstacles will be resolved, since these techniques allow bacterial load to be quantified. In the etiological diagnosis of ARI due to S. pneumoniae, the use of NAAT is still in an experimental phase. In M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae, combining NAAT with serological tests could potentially improve diagnosis. NAAT show good sensitivity and specificity in the detection of Legionella; however, the practical utility of these techniques should be weighed against that of antigenuria. NAAT provide advantages over other techniques in Bordetella pertussis. At present, these techniques are not useful in the diagnosis of Coxiella burnetii acute infections.

  4. Fifty Years of Research in ARDS. Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, William R; Chen, Lu; Amato, Marcelo B P; Brochard, Laurent J

    2017-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a multifactorial lung injury that continues to be associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Mechanical ventilation, although lifesaving, is associated with new iatrogenic injury. Current best practice involves the use of small Vt, low plateau and driving pressures, and high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure. Collectively, these interventions are termed "lung-protective ventilation." Recent investigations suggest that individualized measurements of pulmonary mechanical variables rather than population-based ventilation prescriptions may be used to set the ventilator with the potential to improve outcomes beyond those achieved with standard lung protective ventilation. This review outlines the measurement and application of clinically applicable pulmonary mechanical concepts, such as plateau pressures, driving pressure, transpulmonary pressures, stress index, and measurement of strain. In addition, the concept of the "baby lung" and the utility of dynamic in addition to static measures of pulmonary mechanical variables are discussed.

  5. Surfactant alteration and replacement in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walmrath Dieter

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a frequent, life-threatening disease in which a marked increase in alveolar surface tension has been repeatedly observed. It is caused by factors including a lack of surface-active compounds, changes in the phospholipid, fatty acid, neutral lipid, and surfactant apoprotein composition, imbalance of the extracellular surfactant subtype distribution, inhibition of surfactant function by plasma protein leakage, incorporation of surfactant phospholipids and apoproteins into polymerizing fibrin, and damage/inhibition of surfactant compounds by inflammatory mediators. There is now good evidence that these surfactant abnormalities promote alveolar instability and collapse and, consequently, loss of compliance and the profound gas exchange abnormalities seen in ARDS. An acute improvement of gas exchange properties together with a far-reaching restoration of surfactant properties was encountered in recently performed pilot studies. Here we summarize what is known about the kind and severity of surfactant changes occuring in ARDS, the contribution of these changes to lung failure, and the role of surfactant administration for therapy of ARDS.

  6. Human respiratory syncytial virus and metapneumovirus in patients with acute respiratory infection in Colombia, 2000 - 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa Ramirez, Juliana; Pulido Dominguez, Paola; Rey Benito, Gloria; Mendez Rico, Jairo; Castellanos, Jaime; Páez Martinez, Andrés

    2014-08-01

    To describe the epidemiology of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) in Colombia from 2000 - 2011, including seasonal trends. Nasopharyngeal aspirates and/or throat swabs from 14 870 patients with acute respiratory infections (ARI) were studied. Two subgroups were analyzed using molecular biology techniques. The first consisted of 264 RSV indirect fluorescence assay (IFA)-positive samples, the second of 264 RSV IFA-negative samples. RSV and hMPV were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). 2 799 samples (18.8%) contained a respiratory virus. RSV was detected by IFA in 1 333 samples (8.9%). RSV was detected by RT-PCR in 192 samples from the RSV IFA-positive subgroup and in 25 samples from the RSV IFA-negative subgroup. hMPV was detected in eight samples from the RSV IFA-positive subgroup and in 11 samples from the RSV IFA-negative subgroup. Among the RSV infections, subtype A was dominant in two-year intervals, subtype B was dominant in one-year intervals. 85.3% of RSV and 74% of hMPV infections occurred in children younger than 5 years old. RSV and hMPV infections were associated with rainy seasons. Co-infection with RSV A and RSV B was detected in two patients. Five cases of co-infection with RSV and hMPV were detected. This report is the first to examine the epidemiology of ARIs in Colombia, with an emphasis on RSV and hMPV. The samples studied here were obtained over a 12-year period and represent all age groups and both genders.

  7. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Molgat-Seon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW. Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12 and healthy controls (n=12 underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p0.05. LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05. During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05. LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique.

  8. Prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus infection among hospitalized children presenting with acute lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Soham; Shamsundar, Ranjani; Shet, Anita; Chawan, Rashmi; Srinivasa, Hiresave

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of RSV among hospitalized young children presenting with ALRI in Bangalore, India. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigen detection was performed by direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) staining on 77 nasopharyngeal wash samples collected from hospitalized children below 2 years of age with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI). Out of 77 samples tested for RSV with DFA, 17 (22.1%) were found RSV-positive with a mean age of 8.24 ± 7.21 months (M:F = 1.8:1). Three children had congenital cardiac disease and one child had a history of prematurity. One child had re-infection within one month of primary infection. RSV-infected children were more likely to have a diagnosis of bronchiolitis than RSV-negative children (p infection is a significant cause of morbidity among children presenting with ALRI in southern India. In resource-limited settings, DFA can be used as an important tool for rapid detection of RSV and can potentially eliminate prolonged hospitalization and unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  9. Is Overall Mortality the Right Composite Endpoint in Clinical Trials of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Jesús; Martínez, Domingo; Mosteiro, Fernando; Ambrós, Alfonso; Añón, José M; Ferrando, Carlos; Soler, Juan A; Montiel, Raquel; Vidal, Anxela; Conesa-Cayuela, Luís A; Blanco, Jesús; Arrojo, Regina; Solano, Rosario; Capilla, Lucía; Del Campo, Rafael; Civantos, Belén; Fernández, María Mar; Aldecoa, César; Parra, Laura; Gutiérrez, Andrea; Martínez-Jiménez, Chanel; González-Martín, Jesús M; Fernández, Rosa L; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2018-02-07

    Overall mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome is a composite endpoint because it includes death from multiple causes. In most acute respiratory distress syndrome trials, it is unknown whether reported deaths are due to acute respiratory distress syndrome or the underlying disease, unrelated to the specific intervention tested. We investigated the causes of death after contracting acute respiratory distress syndrome in a large cohort. A secondary analysis from three prospective, multicenter, observational studies. A network of multidisciplinary ICUs. We studied 778 patients with moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with lung-protective ventilation. None. We examined death in the ICU from individual causes. Overall ICU mortality was 38.8% (95% CI, 35.4-42.3). Causes of acute respiratory distress syndrome modified the risk of death. Twenty-three percent of deaths occurred from refractory hypoxemia due to nonresolving acute respiratory distress syndrome. Most patients died from causes unrelated to acute respiratory distress syndrome: 48.7% of nonsurvivors died from multisystem organ failure, and cancer or brain injury was involved in 37.1% of deaths. When quantifying the true burden of acute respiratory distress syndrome outcome, we identified 506 patients (65.0%) with one or more exclusion criteria for enrollment into current interventional trials. Overall ICU mortality of the "trial cohort" (21.3%) was markedly lower than the parent cohort (relative risk, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.43-0.70; p respiratory distress syndrome patients are not directly related to lung damage but to extrapulmonary multisystem organ failure. It would be challenging to prove that specific lung-directed therapies have an effect on overall survival.

  10. Acute Respiratory Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients: A Single Intensive Care Unit Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulas, Aydin; Kaplan, Serife; Zeyneloglu, Pinar; Torgay, Adnan; Pirat, Arash; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Frequency of pulmonary complications after renal transplant has been reported to range from 3% to 17%. The objective of this study was to evaluate renal transplant recipients admitted to an intensive care unit to identify incidence and cause of acute respiratory failure in the postoperative period and compare clinical features and outcomes between those with and without acute respiratory failure. We retrospectively screened the data of 540 consecutive adult renal transplant recipients who received their grafts at a single transplant center and included those patients admitted to an intensive care unit during this period for this study. Acute respiratory failure was defined as severe dyspnea, respiratory distress, decreased oxygen saturation, hypoxemia or hypercapnia on room air, or requirement of noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. Among the 540 adult renal transplant recipients, 55 (10.7%) were admitted to an intensive care unit, including 26 (47.3%) admitted for acute respiratory failure. Median time from transplant to intensive care unit admission was 10 months (range, 0-67 mo). The leading causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia (56%) and cardiogenic pulmonary edema (44%). Mean partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen ratio was 174 ± 59, invasive mechanical ventilation was used in 13 patients (50%), and noninvasive mechanical ventilation was used in 8 patients (31%). The overall mortality was 16.4%. Acute respiratory failure was the reason for intensive care unit admission in almost half of our renal transplant recipients. Main causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Mortality of patients admitted for acute respiratory failure was similar to those without acute respiratory failure.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure from Plasmodium ovale infection with fatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yee-Ling; Lee, Wenn-Chyau; Tan, Lian-Huat; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Syed Omar, Sharifah Faridah; Fong, Mun-Yik; Cheong, Fei-Wen; Mahmud, Rohela

    2013-11-04

    Plasmodium ovale is one of the causative agents of human malaria. Plasmodium ovale infection has long been thought to be non-fatal. Due to its lower morbidity, P. ovale receives little attention in malaria research. Two Malaysians went to Nigeria for two weeks. After returning to Malaysia, they fell sick and were admitted to different hospitals. Plasmodium ovale parasites were identified from blood smears of these patients. The species identification was further confirmed with nested PCR. One of them was successfully treated with no incident of relapse within 12-month medical follow-up. The other patient came down with malaria-induced respiratory complication during the course of treatment. Although parasites were cleared off the circulation, the patient's condition worsened. He succumbed to multiple complications including acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure. Sequencing of the malaria parasite DNA from both cases, followed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction suggested that the causative agent for both malaria cases was P. ovale curtisi. In this report, the differences between both cases were discussed, and the potential capability of P. ovale in causing severe complications and death as seen in this case report was highlighted. Plasmodium ovale is potentially capable of causing severe complications, if not death. Complete travel and clinical history of malaria patient are vital for successful diagnoses and treatment. Monitoring of respiratory and renal function of malaria patients, regardless of the species of malaria parasites involved is crucial during the course of hospital admission.

  12. Detection of respiratory viruses by real-time polymerase chain reaction in outpatients with acute respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Bragança Martins Júnior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the major contributors to the morbidity and mortality of upper and lower acute respiratory infections (ARIs for all age groups. The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies for a large range of respiratory viruses using a sensitive molecular detection technique in specimens from outpatients of all ages with ARIs. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from 162 individuals between August 2007-August 2009. Twenty-three pathogenic respiratory agents, 18 respiratory viruses and five bacteria were investigated using multiplex real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIF. Through IIF, 33 (20.4% specimens with respiratory virus were recognised, with influenza virus representing over half of the positive samples. Through a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay, 88 (54.3% positive samples were detected; the most prevalent respiratory viral pathogens were influenza, human rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. Six cases of viral co-detection were observed, mainly involving RSV. The use of multiplex real-time RT-PCR increased the viral detection by 33.9% and revealed a larger number of respiratory viruses implicated in ARI cases, including the most recently described respiratory viruses [human bocavirus, human metapneumovirus, influenza A (H1N1 pdm09 virus, human coronavirus (HCoV NL63 and HCoV HKU1].

  13. Continuous blood purification treatment for endotoxin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Lin, R; Xu, Y; Zhang, S; Cui, K; Zhu, M; Li, A; Chen, C; Yang, J; Yang, W

    2017-02-16

    This study aimed to explore the effects of continuous blood purification (CBP) treatment in pigs affected with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A total of 12 healthy male pigs, weighing 12±1.8 kg, were randomly and equally assigned to the control and experimental groups. The ARDS pig model was prepared by intravenous injections of endotoxin (20 µg/kg). The control group was given conventional supportive therapy, while the experimental group was given continuous veno-venous hemofiltration therapy. During the treatment process, the variations in dynamic lung compliance, oxygenation index, hemodynamics, and urine volume per hour at different times (Baseline, 0, 2, 4, and 6 h) were recorded. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-10 in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histomorphological changes of the lung, heart, and kidney were visualized using a light microscope. The nuclear factor κB p65 protein content of the heart, lung, and kidney tissues was also detected using western blot. The experimental group outperformed the control group in both respiratory and hemodynamic events. CBP treatment cleared TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 partially from serum and BALF. The pathological examination of the heart, lung, and kidney tissues revealed that the injury was less severe in the experimental group. CBP treatment can improve the organ functions of pigs affected with endotoxin-induced ARDS and protect these organs to some extent.

  14. Respiratory pulse pressure variation fails to predict fluid responsiveness in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhal, Karim; Ehrmann, Stephan; Benzekri-Lefèvre, Dalila; Runge, Isabelle; Legras, Annick; Dequin, Pierre-François; Mercier, Emmanuelle; Wolff, Michel; Régnier, Bernard; Boulain, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Fluid responsiveness prediction is of utmost interest during acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the performance of respiratory pulse pressure variation (ΔRESPPP) has scarcely been reported. In patients with ARDS, the pathophysiology of ΔRESPPP may differ from that of healthy lungs because of low tidal volume (Vt), high respiratory rate, decreased lung and sometimes chest wall compliance, which increase alveolar and/or pleural pressure. We aimed to assess ΔRESPPP in a large ARDS population. Our study population of nonarrhythmic ARDS patients without inspiratory effort were considered responders if their cardiac output increased by >10% after 500-ml volume expansion. Among the 65 included patients (26 responders), the area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) for ΔRESPPP was 0.75 (95% confidence interval (CI95): 0.62 to 0.85), and a best cutoff of 5% yielded positive and negative likelihood ratios of 4.8 (CI95: 3.6 to 6.2) and 0.32 (CI95: 0.1 to 0.8), respectively. Adjusting ΔRESPPP for Vt, airway driving pressure or respiratory variations in pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (ΔPAOP), a surrogate for pleural pressure variations, in 33 Swan-Ganz catheter carriers did not markedly improve its predictive performance. In patients with ΔPAOP above its median value (4 mmHg), AUC for ΔRESPPP was 1 (CI95: 0.73 to 1) as compared with 0.79 (CI95: 0.52 to 0.94) otherwise (P = 0.07). A 300-ml volume expansion induced a ≥ 2 mmHg increase of central venous pressure, suggesting a change in cardiac preload, in 40 patients, but none of the 28 of 40 nonresponders responded to an additional 200-ml volume expansion. During protective mechanical ventilation for early ARDS, partly because of insufficient changes in pleural pressure, ΔRESPPP performance was poor. Careful fluid challenges may be a safe alternative.

  15. Extracorporeal Respiratory Support With a Miniature Integrated Pediatric Pump-Lung Device in an Acute Ovine Respiratory Failure Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xufeng; Sanchez, Pablo G; Liu, Yang; Claire Watkins, A; Li, Tieluo; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory failure is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity all over the world. Therapeutic options to treat respiratory failure remain limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas transfer performance of a newly developed miniature portable integrated pediatric pump-lung device (PediPL) with small membrane surface for respiratory support in an acute ovine respiratory failure model. The respiratory failure was created in six adult sheep using intravenous anesthesia and reduced mechanical ventilation at 2 breaths/min. The PediPL device was surgically implanted and evaluated for respiratory support in a venovenous configuration between the right atrium and pulmonary artery. The hemodynamics and respiratory status of the animals during support with the device gas transfer performance of the PediPL were studied for 4 h. The animals exhibited respiratory failure 30 min after mechanical ventilation was reduced to 2 breaths/min, indicated by low oxygen partial pressure, low oxygen saturation, and elevated carbon dioxide in arterial blood. The failure was reversed by establishing respiratory support with the PediPL after 30 min. The rates of O2 transfer and CO2 removal of the PediPL were 86.8 and 139.1 mL/min, respectively. The results demonstrated that the PediPL (miniature integrated pump-oxygenator) has the potential to provide respiratory support as a novel treatment for both hypoxia and hypercarbia. The compact size of the PediPL could allow portability and potentially be used in many emergency settings to rescue patients suffering acute lung injury. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Quality indicators for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saust, Laura Trolle; Bjerrum, Lars; Arpi, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop quality indicators for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory tract infections, tailored to the Danish general practice setting. Design: A RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used. Setting: General practice. Subjects: A panel of nine experts, mainly...... general practitioners, was asked to rate the relevance of 64 quality indicators for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory tract infections based on guidelines. Subsequently, a face-to-face meeting was held to resolve misinterpretations and to achieve consensus. Main outcome measures...... with acute respiratory tract infections and to identify where there is a need for future quality improvements....

  17. Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Nosocomial Pneumonia

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    A. N. Kuzovlev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the informative value of the parameters of gas exchange, lung volumetry, and central hemodynamics in the diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in nosocomial pneumonia (NP. Subjects and methods. The study included 38 patients with cancer and severe injury who were divided into 3 groups in accordance with the diagnostic criteria of ARDS and NP: 1 patients with ARDS + NP; 2 those with NP; 3 those with non-ARDS, non-PN. ARDS was diagnosed in 2 steps. At Step 1, the investigators took into account risk factors for ARDS and used the lung injury scale developed by J. Murray et al. and the ARDS diagnostic criteria defined by the American-European Consensus Conference on ARDS. At Step 2, after obtaining the data of lung volume-try (1—2 hours after Step 1, they assessed the compliance of the above criteria for ARDS with those developed by the V. A. Negovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, and redistributed the patients between the groups. The stage of ARDS was determined in accordance with the classification of the above Institute. All the patients underwent a comprehensive examination the key element of which was to estimate gas exchange parameters and to monitor lung volumetry and central hemodynamics by the transpulmonary thermodilution methods, by using a Pulsion PiCCO Plus monitor (Pulsion Medical Systems, Germany. The findings were statistically analyzed using a Statistica 7.0 package (arithmetic mean, error of the mean, _ Student’s test, Newman-Keuls test, correlation analysis. The difference was considered to be significant if p-value was Results. The patients with ARDS + NP were observed to have a significantly lower oxygenation index (10 ml/kg and Murray scale scores (>2 than those in patients with NP without ARDS. The reference values of the pulmonary vascular permeability index due to its inadequate informative value call for further investigation. The

  18. Risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J; Shao, J; Qi, H-H; Song, D-W; Zhu, W

    2015-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Total 180 tetraplegia cases after acute traumatic CSCI treated in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed retrospectively and the frequency of respiratory failure in these patients were analyzed against the factors including age, gender, cause of injury, level/severity of injury, high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) therapy, and surgery intervention, using Chi-square test to look into the correlations of the prevalence of respiratory failure to those factors. Of the 180 tetraplegia with acute traumatic CSCI, 29 patients (16.11%) developed respiratory failure. The factors, including age, level and severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention, were found to significantly correlate with the appearance of respiratory failure in tetraplegia after acute traumatic CSCI (p < 0.05), while no significant correlation was found between the other factors: gender and cause of injury and the frequency of respiratory failure. Age, level/severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention are the four major relevant factors of respiratory failure in patients with acute traumatic CSCI. The appropriate and timing treatments involving high-dose MP therapy and surgical decompression and reconstruction can substantially increase the rates of clinical improvements and reduce the frequency of respiratory failure.

  19. Association of interleukin-8 and neutrophils with nasal symptom severity during acute respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Kelsey M; Hayney, Mary S; Xie, Yaoguo; Zhang, Zhengjun; Barrett, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Using a large data set (n = 811), the relationship between acute respiratory infection illness severity and inflammatory biomarkers was investigated to determine whether certain symptoms are correlated more closely than others with the inflammatory biomarkers, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and nasal neutrophils. Participants with community acquired acute respiratory infection underwent nasal lavage for IL-8 and neutrophil testing, in addition to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection and identification of respiratory viruses. Information about symptoms was obtained throughout the duration of the illness episode using the well-validated Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21). Global symptom severity was calculated by the area under the curve (AUC) plotting duration versus WURSS total. Of the specimens tested, 56% were positively identified for one or more of nine different respiratory viruses. During acute respiratory infection illness, both IL-8 and neutrophils positively correlate with AUC (r(s) = 0.082, P = 0.022; r(s)  = 0.080, P = 0.030). IL-8 and neutrophils correlate with nasal symptom severity: runny nose (r = 0.13, P = acute respiratory infection. Further research is necessary to determine if the concentration of these or other biomarkers can predict the overall duration and severity of acute respiratory infection illness. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Bedside evaluation of pressure-volume curves in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Lluis; López-Aguilar, Josefina; Villagrá, Ana

    2007-06-01

    To describe the physiologic and diagnostic utility of static pressure-volume curves of the respiratory system at the bedside in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The pressure-volume curve of the respiratory system is a useful tool for the measurement of respiratory system mechanics in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The pressure-volume curve has a sigmoid shape, with lower and upper points on the inspiratory limb and a point of maximum curvature on the expiratory limb. Visual and mathematical pressure-volume curve analysis may be useful for understanding individual lung mechanics and for selecting ventilator settings. Among the different techniques for acquiring pressure-volume curves at the bedside, the constant slow flow method is the simplest to perform, the most clinically reliable and has the fewest limitations. Measurement of pressure-volume curves at the bedside in critically ill patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome should be considered a useful respiratory monitoring tool to assess physiologic lung status and to adjust ventilator settings, when appropriate, to minimize superimposed lung injury associated with mechanical ventilators.

  1. Spontaneous breathing with biphasic positive airway pressure attenuates lung injury in hydrochloric acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jingen; Zhang, Heng; Sun, Bing; Yang, Rui; He, Hangyong; Zhan, Qingyuan

    2014-06-01

    It has been proved that spontaneous breathing (SB) with biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) can improve lung aeration in acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with controlled mechanical ventilation. The authors hypothesized that SB with BIPAP would attenuate lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with pressure-controlled ventilation. Twenty male New Zealand white rabbits with hydrochloric acid aspiration-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome were randomly ventilated using the BIPAP either with SB (BIPAP plus SB group) or without SB (BIPAP minus SB group) for 5 h. Inspiration pressure was adjusted to maintain the tidal volume at 6 ml/kg. Both groups received the same positive end-expiratory pressure level at 5 cm H2O for hemodynamic goals. Eight healthy animals without ventilatory support served as the control group. The BIPAP plus SB group presented a lower ratio of dead space ventilation to tidal volume, a lower respiratory rate, and lower minute ventilation. No significant difference in the protein levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue were measured between the two experimental groups. However, SB resulted in lower messenger ribonucleic acid levels of interleukin-6 (mean ± SD; 1.8 ± 0.7 vs. 2.6 ± 0.5; P = 0.008) and interleukin-8 (2.2 ± 0.5 vs. 2.9 ± 0.6; P = 0.014) in lung tissues. In addition, lung histopathology revealed less injury in the BIPAP plus SB group (lung injury score, 13.8 ± 4.6 vs. 21.8 ± 5.7; P hydrochloric acid-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome, SB with BIPAP attenuated lung injury and improved respiratory function compared with controlled ventilation with low tidal volume.

  2. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G.; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar–capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes. PMID:27047904

  3. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: fluid management in the PICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Ingelse

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS. Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes.

  4. Diarrhoeal and acute respiratory disease: the current situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    This paper describes the serious effect of diarrheal and acute respiratory (ARI) disease upon children under 5 years old, and international efforts undertaken by the World Health Organization (WHO) to reduce such mortality. Combined, these diseases account for more then 1/2 of all deaths in this age group, and constitute the most serious threat to their health. WHO estimates for 1990 that diarrheal illnesses caused 3.2 million childhood deaths and that ARI caused 4.3 million. While some child deaths are due to measles and pertussis, the majority is caused by pneumonia and the consequences of diarrheal illnesses. These deaths could be readily averted through the timely, effective treatment of trained health workers with essential drugs. Immunization as well as improved nutrition, particularly through the practice of exclusive breast feeding of the child's 1st 4-6 months of life, are addition weapons potentially employed against child mortality. WHO programs for diarrhea and ARI control focus upon simplified treatment guidelines, training, communication messages, drug supplies, and evaluation methodology. Despite obstacles such as the marketing of useless and/or potentially dangerous anti-diarrheal drugs and cough and cold remedies, and inappropriate breastmilk substitutes and unnecessary foods, widespread progress in program development and implementation has been made over the past decade. Increased amounts of oral rehydration therapy and solutions are available and used, while many health workers have benefited from training programs.

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): HRCT findings in survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jung Im; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Song, Jeong Sup; Lee, Kyo Young [The Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings of the lung in survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Among eleven patients who survived ARDS for one year, chest radiography and HRCT revealed pulmonary fibrosis in four. Causes of ARDS included pneumonia during pregnancy, near drowning, pneumonia during liver cirrhosis, and postoperative sepsis. Thoracoscopic biopsy and histopathologic correlation were available in one patient. HRCT showed diffuse interlobular septal thickening, ground glass opacity, parenchymal distortion, and traction bronchiectasis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules were seen in two patients and one patient had multiple, large bullae in the left hemithorax. In all patients, lesions affected the upper and anterior zones of the lung more prominently. The distribution of pulmonary fibrosis was characteristic and reflected the pathogenesis of lung injury; fibrosis was largely due to hyperoxia caused by ventilator care. In one patient, histopathologic correlation showed that imaging findings were accounted for by thickening of the alveolar septum along with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells and fibrosis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules corresponded with bronchiolitis.

  6. Fluid in the management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is the hallmark of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The amount of fluid and which fluid should be used in these patients is controversial. Methods 43 patients with ARDS treated in the intensive care unit (ICU of the Second Hospital, Jilin University between November 1, 2011-November 1, 2012 were prospectively analyzed and was observational. Volume and the type of fluid administered were compared to 90 day mortality and the 24 and 72 hour sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score, lactate level, oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2, duration of ICU stay, total ventilator days, and need for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. Results Mortality was increased when hydroxylethyl starch (HES was used in the first day or plasma substitutes were used during the first 3 days (P3000 ml during the first 24 hours or >8000 ml during the first 72 hours were associated with higher SOFA scores at 24 and 72 hours (P<0.05, both comparisons. Colloid, especially higher volume colloid use was also associated with increased SOFA scores at either 24 or 72 hours. Conclusions Limiting the use of colloids and the total amount of fluid administered to patients with ARDS is associated with improved mortality and SOFA scores.

  7. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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    Young-Jae Cho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We generate strong (1 and weak (2 grade of recommendations based on high (A, moderate (B and low (C grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B and inhaled nitric oxide (1A as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C, and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B. The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B, however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B. In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B. Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A. In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

  8. A relationship between acute respiratory illnesses and weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costilla-Esquivel, A; Corona-Villavicencio, F; Velasco-Castañón, J G; Medina-DE LA Garza, C E; Martínez-Villarreal, R T; Cortes-Hernández, D E; Ramírez-López, L E; González-Farías, G

    2014-07-01

    Weekly data from 7 years (2004-2010) of primary-care counts of acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) and local weather readings were used to adjust a multivariate time-series vector error correction model with covariates (VECMX). Weather variables were included through a partial least squares index that consisted of weekly minimum temperature (coefficient = - 0·26), weekly median of relative humidity (coefficient = 0·22) and weekly accumulated rainfall (coefficient = 0·5). The VECMX long-term test reported significance for trend (0·01, P = 0·00) and weather index (1·69, P = 0·00). Short-term relationship was influenced by seasonality. The model accounted for 76% of the variability in the series (adj. R 2 = 0·76), and the co-integration diagnostics confirmed its appropriateness. The procedure is easily reproducible by researchers in all climates, can be used to identify relevant weather fluctuations affecting the incidence of ARIs, and could help clarify the influence of contact rates on the spread of these diseases.

  9. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): the pharmacist's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Thomas W F; Chant, Clarence; Tanzini, Rosemary; Wells, Janice

    2004-06-01

    After two outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, from March-June 2003, we reviewed the unexpected role and responsibilities of pharmacists during these two crises, and present strategies for better crisis preparedness. Pharmacists were actively involved in battling the SARS crises. After conducting extensive literature searches and evaluations, pharmacists prepared administration and dosing guidelines for the two investigational drugs, ribavirin and interferon alfacon-1, that were being used to treat the syndrome. They provided direct patient care under modified conditions. They revised drug distribution procedures and developed new ones to meet more stringent infection-control standards. Collaborative teamwork with key stakeholders was important in accomplishing tasks in an efficient and timely manner. Regular communication with health care staff took place internally and externally. Education and updated information for pharmacists was crucial. Pharmacists can play a vital role during crises in the areas of drug distribution, drug information, and direct patient care. Collaborative teamwork and close communication are keys to success. Pharmacists must be proactive and take a leadership role in assuming pharmacy-related responsibilities. By evaluating what worked and what didn't, pharmacists can develop procedures for future crises requiring pharmacy support.

  10. Pulmonary hypertension due to acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Our aims were to describe the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, to characterize their hemodynamic cardiopulmonary profiles, and to correlate these parameters with outcome. All consecutive patients over 16 years of age who were in the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of ARDS and an in situ pulmonary artery catheter for hemodynamic monitoring were studied. Pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was >25 mmHg at rest with a pulmonary artery occlusion pressure or left atrial pressure <15 mmHg. During the study period, 30 of 402 critically ill patients (7.46% who were admitted to the ICU fulfilled the criteria for ARDS. Of the 30 patients with ARDS, 14 met the criteria for pulmonary hypertension, a prevalence of 46.6% (95% CI; 28-66%. The most common cause of ARDS was pneumonia (56.3%. The overall mortality was 36.6% and was similar in patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Differences in patients' hemodynamic profiles were influenced by the presence of pulmonary hypertension. The levels of positive end-expiratory pressure and peak pressure were higher in patients with pulmonary hypertension, and the PaCO2 was higher in those who died. The level of airway pressure seemed to influence the onset of pulmonary hypertension. Survival was determined by the severity of organ failure at admission to the intensive care unit.

  11. Intention to Receive Influenza Vaccine After an Acute Respiratory Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Balasubramani, G. K.; Schaffer, Mallory; Lieberman, Rhett H.; Eng, Heather; Kyle, Shakala; Wisniewski, Stephen; Zimmerman, Richard K.; Middleton, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of symptoms and presence of confirmed influenza on intention to receive an influenza vaccine, specifically in patients recovering from a medically-attended acute (≤ 7 days’ duration) respiratory illness (ARI). Methods During the 2013–2014 influenza season, individuals seeking outpatient care for an ARI that included cough were tested for influenza using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays (PCR) and completed surveys. Children (6 months–18 years) and adults (≥ 18 years) were grouped by their combined current season’s influenza vaccination status (vaccinated/not vaccinated) and their vaccination intentions for next season (intend/do not intend). Results Forty-one percent (323/786) were unvaccinated at enrollment, of whom nearly half (151/323) intended to be vaccinated next season. When adjusting for demographic, health and other factors, unvaccinated individuals who intended to be vaccinated next season were approximately 1.5 times more likely to have PCR-confirmed influenza compared with vaccinated individuals who intended to be vaccinated next season. Conclusion The combined experience of not being vaccinated against influenza and seeking medical attention for an ARI seemed to influence approximately one-half of unvaccinated participants to consider influenza vaccination for next season. PMID:26018106

  12. Acute respiratory failure after drowning: a retrospective multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet, Pierre; Bouzana, Fouad; Charmensat, Olivia; Tiger, Fabrice; Durand-Gasselin, Jacques; Hraiech, Sami; Jaber, Samir; Dellamonica, Jean; Ichai, Carole

    2017-08-01

    Despite the extensive literature on drowning, clinical data are still lacking on the best medical strategy to use. Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is the main component of drowning pathophysiology. The objectives of this multicenter study were to analyze the clinical course of drowning-related ARF patients and to describe the efficacy of the ventilatory strategies used. Medical records of drowned adult patients admitted in seven ICUs after prehospital emergency medical care during three consecutive summer periods were retrospectively analyzed. Among the 126 patients (58±21 years) admitted, 38 patients with cardiac arrest at the scene were not analyzed, 26 received mechanical ventilation (MV), and 48 patients received noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Compared with patients placed under MV, the NIV patients presented a better initial neurological (Glasgow Coma Scale of 7±4 vs. 12±3, P<0.05) and hemodynamic status from the prehospital stage (mean arterial pressure of 77±18 vs. 96±18, P<0.001). With comparable ARF-related hypoxemia to MV, the NIV was maintained with success in 92% (44/48). Both MV and NIV were associated with rapid improvement of oxygenation and short ICU length of stay [3 (1-14) and 2 (1-7), respectively]. Despite the absence of recommendation for NIV use in case of drowning-related ARF, this technique was often used with safety and efficacy. The decision for NIV use was mainly based on the preserved or improved neurological status.

  13. Profiling acute respiratory tract infections in children from Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory infections (ARI are leading global cause of under-five mortality and morbidity. Objective: To elicit the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among under-five children. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was undertaken in 21 registered urban slums of Guwahati in Assam to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among 370 under-five children from 184 households and 370 families. Results: The prevalence of ARI was found to be 26.22%; infants and female children were more affected. Majority of the ARI cases were from nuclear families (84.54%, living in kutcha houses (90.72% with inadequate ventilation (84.54%, overcrowded living condition (81.44%, with kitchen attached to the living room (65.98% and using biomass fuel for cooking (89.69%. ARI was significantly associated with ventilation, location of kitchen in household; presence of overcrowding, nutritional status, and primary immunization status also had impacts on ARI. Conclusion: The present study had identified a high prevalence of the disease among under-fives. It also pointed out various socio-demographic, nutritional, and environmental modifiable risk factors which can be tackled by effective education of the community.

  14. Lung tissue remodeling in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Souza Alba Barros de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, and evolves progressively with three phases: exsudative, fibroproliferative, and fibrotic. In the exudative phase, there are interstitial and alveolar edemas with hyaline membrane. The fibropro­liferative phase is characterized by exudate organization and fibroelastogenesis. There is proliferation of type II pneumocytes to cover the damaged epithelial surface, followed by differentiation into type I pneumocytes. The fibroproliferative phase starts early, and its severity is related to the patient?s prognosis. The alterations observed in the phenotype of the pulmonary parenchyma cells steer the tissue remodeling towards either progressive fibrosis or the restoration of normal alveolar architecture. The fibrotic phase is characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The dynamic control of collagen deposition and degradation is regulated by metalloproteinases and their tissular regulators. The deposition of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ARDS patients needs better study. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling, in normal conditions or in several pulmonary diseases, such as ARDS, results from a complex mechanism that integrate the transcription of elements that destroy the matrix protein and produce activation/inhibition of several cellular types of lung tissue. This review article will analyze the ECM organization in ARDS, the different pulmonary parenchyma remodeling mechanisms, and the role of cytokines in the regulation of the different matrix components during the remodeling process.

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated With Rabies: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Hsiang Hsu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is the first potentially lethal complication in rabies virus infection, although its occurrence is rare. We report on a fatal case of rabies virus infection in a 45-year-old woman from Hu-Nan Province, China. The neurologic signs of limb numbness and water phobia occurred from 61 days after the dog bite; the clinical course was progressive, with the most severe clinical manifestations being fever, encephalitis, and ARDS. The woman expired 12 days after admission to the hospital. An autopsy proved rabies encephalitis, mainly involving the medulla oblongata, the thalamus, part of the pons, the cerebellum, and the hippocampus. The lung pathologic examination revealed the organizing phase of ARDS with diffuse alveolar damage, hyaline membrane formation, type II alveolar cell hyperplasia accompanied by proliferation of fibroblasts and infiltration of mononuclear cells into the interstitial space. Immunohistochemistry stain and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for rabies virus failed to demonstrate the organism in the lung tissue. Strong expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS was detected in the alveolar macrophages. An immunologic mechanism with iNOS expression in the absence of direct invasion of the organism may participate in the pathogenesis of ARDS associated with rabies.

  16. Definition and epidemiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezoagli, Emanuele; Fumagalli, Roberto; Bellani, Giacomo

    2017-07-01

    Fifty years ago, Ashbaugh and colleagues defined for the first time the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), one among the most challenging clinical condition of the critical care medicine. The scientific community worked over the years to generate a unified definition of ARDS, which saw its revisited version in the Berlin definition, in 2014. Epidemiologic information about ARDS is limited in the era of the new Berlin definition, and wide differences are reported among countries all over the world. Despite decades of study in the field of lung injury, ARDS is still so far under-recognized, with 2 out of 5 cases missed by clinicians. Furthermore, although advances of ventilator strategies in the management of ARDS associated with outcome improvements-such as protective mechanical ventilation, lower driving pressure, higher PEEP levels and prone positioning-ARDS appears to be undertreated and mortality remains elevated up to 40%. In this review, we cover the history that led to the current worldwide accepted Berlin definition of ARDS and we summarize the recent data regarding ARDS epidemiology.

  17. Lung volume assessment in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Brochard, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of lung volumes allow evaluating the pathophysiogical severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in terms of the degree of reduction in aerated lung volume, calculating strain, quantifying recruitment and/or hyperinflation, and gas volume distribution. We summarize the current techniques for lung volume assessment selected according to their possible usage in the ICU and discuss the recent findings obtained with implementation of these techniques in patients with ARDS. Computed tomography technique remains irreplaceable in terms of quantitative aeration of different lung regions, but the commonly used cut-offs for classification may be questioned with recent findings on nonpathological lungs. Monitoring end expiratory lung volume using nitrogen washout technique enhanced our understanding on lung volume change during positioning, pleural effusion drainage, intra-abdominal hypertension, and recruitment maneuver. Recent studies supported that tidal volume could not surrogate tidal strain, which needs measurement of functional residual capacity and which is correlated with pro-inflammatory lung response. Although lung volume measurements are still limited to research area of ARDS, recent progress in technology provides clinicians more opportunities to evaluate lung volumes noninvasively at the bedside and may facilitate individualization of ventilator settings based on the specific physiological understandings of a given patient.

  18. [Risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus infection of lower respiratory tract in hospitalized infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Lijuan; Shi, Peng; Jiang, Gaoli; Jia, Pin; Wang, Chuankai; Wang, Libo; Qian, Liling

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the clinical epidemiologic characteristics and analyze risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI). ALRI infants admitted to Children's Hospital of Fudan University from March 1st, 2011 to February 29th, 2012, were enrolled in this study. Patient information included demographic characteristics, feeding history, family status, clinical presentation, accessory examination, treatment and prognosis. According to the etiology of ALRI infants, we compared the seasonal distribution, demographic characteristics, household characteristics and underlying diseases between RSV-positive patients and RSV-negative patients. Univariate and multiple Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors that were associated with risk of RSV infection. Among 1 726 ALRI infants, there were 913 RSV-positive infants (52.9%). The occurrence of RSV infection had a seasonal variation, with a peak in winter (59.1%). The median (P25, P75) age of RSV infants was 64 (21-155) days. The gestational age (GA) and body weight (BW) was (37.5 ± 2.4) weeks and (3.07 ± 0.66) kg, respectively. The male/female ratio among these was 1.9: 1. RSV infection was more popular among infants in the families with smoking members, crowded living conditions, history of atopic mother. Differences of the proportion of patients with underlying disease between RSV-positive and negative groups were statistically significant (59.4% vs. 54.2%, P infection were: GAinfection (OR = 1.351, 95%CI: 1.024-1.783; OR = 1.713, 95%CI: 1.332-2.204). Multivariate logistic regression determined the factors increasing the risk of RSV infection were: underlying CHD (OR = 1.298, 95%CI: 1.002-1.681), mother with atopic diseases (OR = 1.766, 95%CI: 1.237-2.520), autumn or winter infection (OR = 1.481, 95%CI: 1.105-1.985; OR = 1.766, 95%CI: 1.358-2.296). The prevalence of RSV infection was the highest in winter, while

  19. [Genetic predisposition and Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: New tools for genetic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erranz, M Benjamín; Wilhelm, B Jan; Riquelme, V Raquel; Cruces, R Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most severe form of respiratory failure. Theoretically, any acute lung condition can lead to ARDS, but only a small percentage of individuals actually develop the disease. On this basis, genetic factors have been implicated in the risk of developing ARDS. Based on the pathophysiology of this disease, many candidate genes have been evaluated as potential modifiers in patient, as well as in animal models, of ARDS. Recent experimental data and clinical studies suggest that variations of genes involved in key processes of tissue, cellular and molecular lung damage may influence susceptibility and prognosis of ARDS. However, the pathogenesis of pediatric ARDS is complex, and therefore, it can be expected that many genes might contribute. Genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy-number variations are likely associated with susceptibility to ARDS in children with primary lung injury. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies can objectively examine these variations, and help identify important new genes and pathogenetic pathways for future analysis. This approach might also have diagnostic and therapeutic implications, such as predicting patient risk or developing a personalized therapeutic approach to this serious syndrome. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  20. Postoperative acute respiratory failure caused by adult-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dingyu; Xu, Jun; Yang, Yi; Gu, Ming; Yu, Xuezhong

    2018-01-01

    Pompe disease, which leads to dysfunction of the enzyme acid a-glucosidase, is a genetic disorder seen in 1 in 40000 births. Adult-onset Pompe disease is known as a slowly progressive myasthenia with or without respiratory dysfunction. We herein report two cases of adult-onset Pompe disease, in which postoperative acute respiratory failure was the the initial manifestation. The two patients showed no symptoms of ambulatory and respiratory dysfunction before operation. The diagnosis of Pompe disease was determined by muscle biopsy and acid a-glucosidase assay in the blood. Rapid deterioration of already struggling diaphragmatic function induced by stress of surgery and anesthesia were thought to be the main reason of postoperative acute respiratory failure. Physicians should be aware of the existence of an adult form of Pompe disease which may present with postoperative acute respiratory failure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A Randomized Trial of an Intensive Physical Therapy Program for Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, Marc; Nordon-Craft, Amy; Malone, Dan; Van Pelt, David; Frankel, Stephen K.; Warner, Mary Laird; Kriekels, Wendy; McNulty, Monica; Fairclough, Diane L.; Schenkman, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Early physical therapy (PT) interventions may benefit patients with acute respiratory failure by preventing or attenuating neuromuscular weakness. However, the optimal dosage of these interventions is currently unknown.

  2. Geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, David J; Angus, Derek C; Seymour, Christopher W; Yealy, Donald M; Carr, Brendan G; Kurland, Kristen; Boujoukos, Arthur; Kahn, Jeremy M

    2014-01-01

    .... We sought to measure geographic access to these centers in the United States. Cross-sectional analysis of geographic access to high capability severe acute respiratory failure centers in the United States...

  3. Treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in secondary surfactant deficiency in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Samudro

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this report we present data of three premature infants who received 1 to 2 doses of surfactant for an acute respiratory deterioration and after initial surfactants treatment for RDS.

  4. Psychosocial factors and susceptibility to or outcome of acute respiratory tract infections [Review article

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Falagas, M.E; Karamanidou, C; Kastoris, A.C; Karlis, G; Rafailidis, P.I

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of the literature to assess the possible effect that psychosocial variables may have on the susceptibility and/or outcome of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs).METHODS...

  5. Saline nasal irrigation for acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David; Mitchell, Ben; Williams, Christopher P; Spurling, Geoffrey K P

    2015-04-20

    Acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), including the common cold and rhinosinusitis, are common afflictions that cause discomfort and debilitation and contribute significantly to workplace absenteeism. Treatment is generally by antipyretic and decongestant drugs and sometimes antibiotics, even though most infections are viral. Nasal irrigation with saline is often employed as an adjunct treatment for URTI symptoms despite a relative lack of evidence for benefit in this clinical setting. This review is an update of the Cochrane review by Kassel et al, which found that saline was probably effective in reducing the severity of some symptoms associated with acute URTIs. To assess the effects of saline nasal irrigation for treating the symptoms of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7), MEDLINE (1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to August 2014), CINAHL (1982 to August 2014), AMED (1985 to August 2014) and LILACS (1982 to August 2014). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing topical nasal saline treatment to other interventions in adults and children with clinically diagnosed acute URTIs. Two review authors (DK, BM) independently assessed trial quality with the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool and extracted data. We analysed all data using the Cochrane Review Manager software. Due to the large variability of outcome measures only a small number of outcomes could be pooled for statistical analysis. We identified five RCTs that randomised 544 children (three studies) and 205 adults (exclusively from two studies). They all compared saline irrigation to routine care or other nose sprays, rather than placebo. We included two new trials in this update, which did not contribute data of sufficient size or quality to materially change the original findings. Most trials were small and we judged them to be of low quality, contributing to an unclear risk of bias. Most outcome measures differed greatly between included studies and therefore could not be

  6. Detection and genotyping of human respiratory viruses in clinical specimens from children with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culebras, Esther; Betriu, Carmen; Vázquez-Cid, Emilia; López-Varela, Elisa; Rueda, Santiago; Picazo, Juan J

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory virus infections are a major health concern and represent the primary cause of testing consultation and hospitalization for young children. The application of nucleic acid amplification technology, particularly multiplex PCR coupled with fluidic or fixed microarrays, provides an important new approach for the detection of multiple respiratory viruses in a single test. The aim of this study was to analyze respiratory samples from children with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) using a commercial array-based method (CLART(®) PneumoVir Genomica, Coslada, Spain). These tests were used to identify viruses in 281 nasopharyngeal samples obtained from children affected by ARTI. Samples were obtained form October 2008 to April 2009. Viruses were identified in 80% of the studied ARTI providing useful information on clinical features and epidemiology of specific agents affecting children in cold months. Multiple viral infections were found in 33.45% of the specimens.

  7. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massa Zantah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis.

  8. Efficacy of prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome: overview of systematic reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Dalmedico, Michel Marcos; Salas, Dafne; Oliveira, Andrey Maciel de; Baran, Fátima Denise Padilha; Meardi, Jéssica Tereza; Santos, Michelle Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify and integrate the available scientific evidence related to the use of the prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome for the reduction of the outcome variable of mortality compared to the dorsal decubitus position. METHOD Overview of systematic reviews or meta-analyzes of randomized clinical trials. It included studies that evaluated the use of prone positioning in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome published between 201...

  9. Prognosis in Acute Cerebrovascular Accidents in Relation to Respiratory Pattern and Blood—gas Tensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, M. W.; Lane, D. J.; Wollner, L.

    1971-01-01

    Respiratory pattern and arterial blood gas tensions were assessed in patients with acute cerebrovascular accidents. Hyperventilation, low Pco2, and high arterial pH were associated with a poor prognosis, whereas patients with normal respiratory pattern and blood gas tensions survived. Periodic and Cheyne-Stokes breathing carried an intermediate prognosis. PMID:5091916

  10. Value of Bacterial Lysates in Prevention of Acute Respiratory Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Ye. Abaturov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The problem of acute respiratory infectious and inflammatory diseases in children is considered in the article. The functions of nonspecific defense system are described, and there is also given a detailed description of drugs used for the pathogenic treatment of respiratory infections — immunotropic agents of bacterial lysates, particularly Broncho-munal®.

  11. Acute respiratory illnesses in the first 18 months of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse M. López Bravo

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available To help assess the causes and frequency of acute respiratory illnesses (ARI during the first 18 months of life in Chile, a cohort of 437 children born in good health between May 1991 and April 1992 was followed at an urban health clinic in northern Santiago. Information was obtained from medical checkups performed at the clinic, from emergency health care services, from private physicians, and from interviews with each child's mother when the child was enrolled in the study and when it was 6, 12, and 18 months old. Followup was completed for 379 (87% of the children. ARI accounted for 67% of all 3762 episodes of illness recorded for these children in the 18-month study period, 1384 (55% of the ARI episodes affecting the upper respiratory tract and the remaining 1144 (45% affecting the lower. The overall rate of ARI observed was 33 episodes per 100 child-months of observation. The incidences of upper, lower, and total ARI episodes decreased significantly in the third six months of life. A statistically significant association was found between upper ARI ( > or = 2 episodes and maternal smoking ( > or = 5 cigarettes per day, but no significant associations were found with any of the other risk factors studied. However, lower ARI ( > or = 2 episodes was significantly associated with maternal schooling ( or = 4 episodes was significantly associated with these factors and also with the existence of one or more siblings, birth in a cold season, limited breast-feeding (<4 months, and low socioeconomic status. Significant associations were found between obstructive bronchitis episodes and most of the risk factors studied (gender, siblings, season of birth, duration of breast-feeding, maternal schooling, smoking, use of polluting fuels in the home, and a family history of atopic allergy; similarly, significant associations were found between the occurrence of pneumonia and many risk factors (including siblings, season of birth, duration of breast

  12. Alpha glucocorticoid receptor expression in different experimental rat models of acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertorelli, Giuseppina; Pesci, Alberto; Peveri, Silvia; Mergoni, Mario; Corradi, Attilio; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Tincani, Giovanni; Bobbio, Antonio; Rusca, Michele; Carbognani, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a frequent form of hypoxiemic respiratory failure caused by the acute development of diffuse lung inflammation. Dysregulated systemic inflammation with persistent elevation of circulating inflammatory cytokines is the

  13. [Viral respiratory co-infections in pediatric patients admitted for acute respiratory infection and their impact on clinical severity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Pamela; Cordero, Jaime; Valverde, Cristián; Unanue, Nancy; Dalmazzo, Roberto; Piemonte, Paula; Vergara, Ivonne; Torres, Juan P

    2012-04-01

    Respiratory viruses are the leading cause of acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) in children. It has been reported that viral respiratory co-infection could be associated with severe clinical course. To describe the frequency of viral co-infection in children admitted for AlRI and evaluate whether this co-infection was associated with more severe clinical course. Prospective, descriptive study in pediatric patients who were hospitalized for ARI, with molecular detection of at least 1 respiratory virus in nasopharyngeal sample studied by PCR-Microarray for 17 respiratory viruses. 110 out of 147 patients with detection of > 1 respiratory virus were included. Viral co-infection was detected in 41/110 (37%). 22/110 children (20%) were classified as moderate to severe clinical course and 88/110 (80%) were classified as mild clinical course. In the group of moderate to severe clinical course, viral respiratory co-infection was detected in 6/22 (27.3%), compared to 35/88 (39.8 %) in the mild clinical course group. No statistically significant difference was found regarding the presence of co-infection between groups (p = 0.33). We detected high rates of viral co-infection in children with ARI. It was not possible to demonstrate that viral co-infections were related with severe clinical course in hospitalized children.

  14. Respiratory mechanics and lung stress/strain in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiumello, Davide; Chidini, Giovanna; Calderini, Edoardo; Colombo, Andrea; Crimella, Francesco; Brioni, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    In sedated and paralyzed children with acute respiratory failure, the compliance of respiratory system and functional residual capacity were significantly reduced compared with healthy subjects. However, no major studies in children with ARDS have investigated the role of different levels of PEEP and tidal volume on the partitioned respiratory mechanic (lung and chest wall), stress (transpulmonary pressure) and strain (inflated volume above the functional residual capacity). The end-expiratory lung volume was measured using a simplified closed circuit helium dilution method. During an inspiratory and expiratory pause, the airway and esophageal pressure were measured. Transpulmonary pressure was computed as the difference between airway and esophageal pressure. Ten intubated sedated paralyzed healthy children and ten children with ARDS underwent a PEEP trial (4 and 12 cmH2O) with a tidal volume of 8, 10 and 12 ml/kgIBW. The two groups were comparable for age and BMI (2.5 [1.0-5.5] vs 3.0 [1.7-7.2] years and 15.1 ± 2.4 vs 15.3 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)). The functional residual capacity in ARDS patients was significantly lower as compared to the control group (10.4 [9.1-14.3] vs 16.6 [11.7-24.6] ml/kg, p = 0.04). The ARDS patients had a significantly lower respiratory system and lung compliance as compared to control subjects (9.9 ± 5.0 vs 17.8 ± 6.5, 9.3 ± 4.9 vs 16.9 ± 4.1 at 4 cmH2O of PEEP and 11.7 ± 5.8 vs 23.7 ± 6.8, 10.0 ± 4.9 vs 23.4 ± 7.5 at 12 cmH2O of PEEP). The compliance of the chest wall was similar in both groups (76.7 ± 30.2 vs 94.4 ± 76.4 and 92.6 ± 65.3 vs 90.0 ± 61.7 at 4 and 12 cmH2O of PEEP). The lung stress and strain were significantly higher in ARDS patients as compared to control subjects and were poorly related to airway pressure and tidal volume normalized for body weight. Airway pressures and tidal volume normalized to body weight are poor surrogates for lung stress and strain in mild pediatric ARDS

  15. Household Air Pollution and Acute Lower Respiratory Infections in Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Jary

    Full Text Available Household air pollution from solid fuel burning kills over 4 million people every year including half a million children from acute lower respiratory infections. Although biologically plausible, it is not clear whether household air pollution is also associated with acute lower respiratory infections in adults. We systematically reviewed the literature on household air pollution and acute lower respiratory infection in adults to identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities.Ten bibliographic databases were searched to identify studies of household air pollution and adult acute lower respiratory infection. Data were extracted from eligible studies using standardised forms.From 4617 titles, 513 abstracts and 72 full-text articles were reviewed. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria of which 2 found a significant adjusted increased risk of acute lower respiratory infection, 2 identified a univariate association whilst 4 found no significant association. Study quality was generally limited. Heterogeneity in methods and findings precluded meta-analysis.A systematic review of the literature found limited evidence for an association between household air pollution and risk of acute lower respiratory infection in adults. Additional research, with carefully defined exposure and outcome measures, is required to complete the risk profile caused by household air pollution in adults.CRD42015028042.

  16. Household Air Pollution and Acute Lower Respiratory Infections in Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jary, Hannah; Simpson, Hope; Havens, Deborah; Manda, Geoffrey; Pope, Daniel; Bruce, Nigel; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Household air pollution from solid fuel burning kills over 4 million people every year including half a million children from acute lower respiratory infections. Although biologically plausible, it is not clear whether household air pollution is also associated with acute lower respiratory infections in adults. We systematically reviewed the literature on household air pollution and acute lower respiratory infection in adults to identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities. Ten bibliographic databases were searched to identify studies of household air pollution and adult acute lower respiratory infection. Data were extracted from eligible studies using standardised forms. From 4617 titles, 513 abstracts and 72 full-text articles were reviewed. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria of which 2 found a significant adjusted increased risk of acute lower respiratory infection, 2 identified a univariate association whilst 4 found no significant association. Study quality was generally limited. Heterogeneity in methods and findings precluded meta-analysis. A systematic review of the literature found limited evidence for an association between household air pollution and risk of acute lower respiratory infection in adults. Additional research, with carefully defined exposure and outcome measures, is required to complete the risk profile caused by household air pollution in adults. CRD42015028042.

  17. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bryan; Typpo, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness, and, yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement, and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation and advancement and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both, over and underfeeding, prolong duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsen other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a “motor” of organ dysfunction, and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review, we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition

  18. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus persistence in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Gustavo; Jabado, Omar; Renwick, Neil; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W Ian

    2005-03-20

    Several coronaviruses establish persistent infections in vitro and in vivo, however it is unknown whether persistence is a feature of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) life cycle. This study was conducted to investigate viral persistence. We inoculated confluent monolayers of Vero cells with SARS-CoV at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1 TCID50 and passaged the remaining cells every 4 to 8 days for a total of 11 passages. Virus was titrated at each passage by limited dilution assay and nucleocapsid antigen was detected by Western blot and immunofluoresence assays. The presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells was assessed by electron microscopy. Changes in viral genomic sequences during persistent infection were examined by DNA sequencing. Cytopathic effect was extensive after initial inoculation but diminished with serial passages. Infectious virus was detected after each passage and viral growth curves were identical for parental virus stock and virus obtained from passage 11 cells. Nucleocapsid antigen was detected in the majority of cells after initial inoculation but in only 10%-40% of cells at passages 2-11. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells. Sequence analysis at passage 11 revealed fixed mutations in the spike (S) gene and ORFs 7a-8b but not in the nucleocapsid (N) gene. SARS-CoV can establish a persistent infection in vitro. The mechanism for viral persistence is consistent with the formation of a carrier culture whereby a limited number of cells are infected with each round of virus replication and release. Persistence is associated with selected mutations in the SARS-CoV genome. This model may provide insight into SARS-related lung pathology and mechanisms by which humans and animals can serve as reservoirs for infection.

  19. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus in tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loon, S-C; Teoh, S C B; Oon, L L E; Se-Thoe, S-Y; Ling, A-E; Leo, Y-S; Leong, H-N

    2004-07-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a new infectious disease that caused a global outbreak in 2003. Research has shown that it is caused by a novel coronavirus. A series of cases is reported where polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing on tears had demonstrated the presence of the virus. Detection of ocular infection from tears using the PCR technique has been widely used by ophthalmologists to diagnose infections for other viruses. This is a case series report from cases classified as probable or suspect SARS cases. Tear samples were collected from 36 consecutive patients who were suspected of having SARS in Singapore over a period of 12 days (7-18 April 2003), and analysed by PCR using protocols developed by the WHO network of laboratories. Three patients with probable SARS (one female and two male patients) had positive results from their tear samples. Tear samples were used to confirm SARS in the female patient, who was positive only from her tears. The positive specimens were found in cases sampled early in their course of infection. This is the first case series reported with the detection of the SARS coronavirus from tears, and has important implications for the practice of ophthalmology and medicine. The ability to detect and isolate the virus in the early phase of the disease may be an important diagnostic tool for future patients and tear sampling is both simple and easily repeatable. Many healthcare workers are in close proximity to the eyes of patients and this may be a source of spread among healthcare workers and inoculating patients. Ophthalmic practices may need to change as more stringent barrier methods, appropriate quarantine, and isolation measures are vital when managing patients with SARS.

  20. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Wilson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the PICU will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition, and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness and yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation, advancement, and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both over and underfeeding prolongs duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsens other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a ‘motor’ of organ dysfunction and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition, current

  1. Ventilatory strategies and supportive care in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luks, Andrew M

    2013-11-01

    While antiviral therapy is an important component of care in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following influenza infection, it is not sufficient to ensure good outcomes, and additional measures are usually necessary. Patients usually receive high levels of supplemental oxygen to counteract the hypoxemia resulting from severe gas exchange abnormalities. Many patients also receive invasive mechanical ventilation for support for oxygenation, while in resource-poor settings, supplemental oxygen via face mask may be the only available intervention. Patients with ARDS receiving mechanical ventilation should receive lung-protective ventilation, whereby tidal volume is decreased to 6 ml/kg of their predicted weight and distending pressures are maintained ≤ 30 cm H2 O, as well as increased inspired oxygen concentrations and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to prevent atelectasis and support oxygenation. While these measures are sufficient in most patients, a minority develop refractory hypoxemia and may receive additional therapies, including prone positioning, inhaled vasodilators, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, recruitment maneuvers followed by high PEEP, and neuromuscular blockade, although recent data suggest that this last option may be warranted earlier in the clinical course before development of refractory hypoxemia. Application of these "rescue strategies" is complicated by the lack of guidance in the literature regarding implementation. While much attention is devoted to these strategies, clinicians must not lose sight of simple interventions that affect patient outcomes including head of bed elevation, prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism and gastrointestinal bleeding, judicious use of fluids in the post-resuscitative phase, and a protocol-based approach to sedation and spontaneous breathing trials. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuchun Cao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large geographical extent but clustered in two areas: first in Guangdong Province, and about 3 months later in Beijing with its surrounding areas. Reanalysis of all available epidemiological data resulted in a total of 5327 probable cases of SARS, of whom 343 died. The resulting case fatality ratio (CFR of 6.4% was less than half of that in other SARS-affected countries or areas, and this difference could only partly be explained by younger age of patients and higher number of community acquired infections. Analysis of the impact of interventions demonstrated that strong political commitment and a centrally coordinated response was the most important factor to control SARS in mainland China, whereas the most stringent control measures were all initiated when the epidemic was already dying down. The long-term economic consequence of the epidemic was limited, much consumption was merely postponed, but for Beijing irrecoverable losses to the tourist sector were considerable. An important finding from a cohort study was that many former SARS patients currently suffer from avascular osteo­necrosis, as a consequence of the treatment with corticosteroids during their infection. The SARS epidemic provided valuable information and lessons relevant in controlling outbreaks of newly emerging infectious diseases, and has led to fundamental reforms of the Chinese health system. In particular, a comprehensive nation-wide internet-based disease reporting system was established.

  3. CORRECTION OF DYSBIOTIC ABNORMALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISORDERS

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    E. E. Tselipanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  A  special  attention  in  the treatment  of  acute   respiratory  disorders  (ARD in  children   should   be   paid   to   correction   of defense mechanisms  of the body, including elimination    of    dysbiotic    abnormalities.    The use  of  probiotics,  whose  mechanism   of  action is directed  to restoration  of qualitative and quantitative composition  of normal microbiota, is considered  to be perspective  in the combination therapy  of ARD  patients. Aim: to  assess  clinical and  laboratory  efficacy of probiotic  Florin forte in children  with  ARD.  Materials and  methods: One  hundred  and   eleven   children  aged   from3 months  to 14 years with ARD were included into the study. In 81.1% of cases they had concomitant obstruction of upper  respiratory  ways. From day1 after admission to the hospital, 81 patients  (the main  group  were  administered probiotic  Florin forte  as a part  of combination  therapy  for 5 to7 days, and  30 children  (the  comparator group were  administered  the  standard   treatment without  probiotics. Parameters  of oropharyngeal and  mucosal  microflora, immune  parameters of anti-infectious resistance (phagocytic activity, phagocytic index, neutrophilic index of digestion, as  well  as  secretory   immunoglobulin  A levels in  saliva  were  measured  during  the  course  of the  illness. Results: In the  patients  of the  main group   under   the   combination  therapy,  there was   a   significantly   more    rapid    elimination of    respiratory     symptoms     and     intoxication (p < 0.05, with shorter  duration  of hospitalization (4.43 ± 0.19  days vs 6.03 ± 0.25  in the  comparator group, p < 0.001. The acute  phase  of the  disease in both  groups  of patients  was characterized  by dysbiotic   abnormalities   in  oropharyngeal   and gut

  4. Mass casualty acute pepper spray inhalation – Respiratory severity effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. Sweeting*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: While the respiratory complaint was perceived as being the most detrimental of all presenting complaints, there was an overall non-threatening outcome in all patients. The presenting respiratory complaints were mostly subjective with benign outcome. Although various risk factors associated with severity increase of respiratory status, were present in a few of the index cases patients, their affect was negligible with a resultant benign outcome.

  5. Recovery from Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Long-Run Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Jeon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a severe lung disease associated with high mortality despite recent advances in management. Significant advances in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO devices and management allow short-term support for patients with acute reversible respiratory failure and can serve as a bridge to transplantation in patients with irreversible respiratory failure. When ARDS does not respond to conventional treatment, ECMO and the interventional lung assist membrane (iLA are the most widely used complementary treatment options. Here, we report a clinical case of an adult patient who required prolonged duration venovenous (VV-ECMO for severe ARDS resulting in improvement while waiting for lung transplantation.

  6. Sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome in children with cancer: the respiratory dynamics of a devastating condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Rodrigo Genaro; de Araujo, Orlei Ribeiro; da Silva, Dafne Cardoso Bourguignon; Senerchia, Andreza Almeida; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical course and respiratory parameters of mechanically ventilated children with cancer suffering from sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods This 2-year prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort study enrolled 29 children and adolescents. Clinical data, measurements of blood gases and ventilation parameters were collected at four different time points. Fluctuations between measurements as well as differences in estimated means were analyzed by linear mixed models in which death within 28 days from the onset of acute respiratory distress syndrome was the primary endpoint. Results There were 17 deaths within 28 days of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset and another 7 between 29 - 60 days. Only 5 patients survived for more than 60 days. Nine (31%) patients died as a direct consequence of refractory hypoxemia, and the others died of multiple organ failure and catecholamine-refractory shock. In 66% of the measurements, the tidal volume required to obtain oxygen saturation equal to or above 90% was greater than 7mL/kg. The estimated means of dynamic compliance were low and were similar for survivors and non-survivors but with a negative slope between the first and final measurements, accompanied by a negative slope of the tidal volume for non-survivors. Non-survivors were significantly more hypoxemic, with PaO2/FiO2 ratios showing lower estimated means and a negative slope along the four measurements. Peak, expiratory and mean airway pressures showed positive slopes in the non-survivors, who also had more metabolic acidosis. Conclusions In most of our children with cancer, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome progressed with deteriorating ventilation indexes and escalating organic dysfunction, making this triad nearly fatal in children. PMID:28099641

  7. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-05-15

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  8. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO2R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case–control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO2R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO2R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO2R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCO2R. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO2R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment to enable

  9. Uncommon associations of Hepatitis A in children: Acute respiratory distress syndrome and erosive gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shefali Parikh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A is a common cause of acute hepatitis in children and usually has a benign self-limiting course, moreover so in young children. We report two exceptional cases of erosive gastritis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, respectively, as rare associations of hepatitis A in children. Both children were < 5 years of age and eventually recovered.

  10. Impact of Air Pollutants on Outpatient Visits for Acute Respiratory Outcomes

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    Ran Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The air pollution in China is a severe problem. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of air pollutants on acute respiratory outcomes in outpatients. Outpatient data from 2 December 2013 to 1 December 2014 were collected, as well as air pollutant data including ozone (O3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, carbon monoxide (CO, sulfur dioxide (SO2, and particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10. We screened six categories of acute respiratory outcomes and analyzed their associations with different air pollutant exposures, including upper respiratory tract infection (URTI, acute bronchitis (AB, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, acute exacerbation of asthma (AE-asthma, and acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis (AEBX. A case-crossover design with a bidirectional control sampling approach was used for statistical analysis. A total of 57,144 patients were enrolled for analysis. PM2.5, PM10, NO2, SO2, and CO exposures were positively associated with outpatient visits for URTI, AB, CAP, and AEBX. PM10, SO2, and CO exposures were positively associated with outpatient visits for AECOPD. Exposure to O3 was positively associated with outpatient visits for AE-asthma, but negatively associated with outpatient visits for URTI, CAP, and AEBX. In conclusion, air pollutants had acute effects on outpatient visits for acute respiratory outcomes, with specific outcomes associated with specific pollutants.

  11. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Quantification of the acute respiratory insufficiency of laryngo-tracheal origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintilie, Cătălina; Burlacu, Gabriela; Costinescu, V

    2009-01-01

    Acute respiratory insufficiency defines that status in which the respiratory system is not able to supply the metabolic requirements of the organism. The laryngo-tracheal segment plays an important role in the respiratory function, an obstruction at this level inducing an important limitation of oxygen intake. Due to the requirement of fast repermeabilisation of this segment, it is necessary to define all criteria (clinical and laboratory examination) required to diagnose and to evaluate the respiratory failure. The present paper depicts the clinical aspects, the acid-base equilibrium impairment induced by high level airway obstruction and the functional investigations available by ventilation tests.

  13. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  14. Implementing hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections caused by influenza and other respiratory pathogens in New Zealand

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    Q Sue Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent experience with pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 highlighted the importance of global surveillance for severe respiratory disease to support pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. Improved surveillance in the southern hemisphere is needed to provide critical data on influenza epidemiology, disease burden, circulating strains and effectiveness of influenza prevention and control measures. Hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infection (SARI cases was established in New Zealand on 30 April 2012. The aims were to measure incidence, prevalence, risk factors, clinical spectrum and outcomes for SARI and associated influenza and other respiratory pathogen cases as well as to understand influenza contribution to patients not meeting SARI case definition. Methods/Design: All inpatients with suspected respiratory infections who were admitted overnight to the study hospitals were screened daily. If a patient met the World Health Organization’s SARI case definition, a respiratory specimen was tested for influenza and other respiratory pathogens. A case report form captured demographics, history of presenting illness, co-morbidities, disease course and outcome and risk factors. These data were supplemented from electronic clinical records and other linked data sources. Discussion: Hospital-based SARI surveillance has been implemented and is fully functioning in New Zealand. Active, prospective, continuous, hospital-based SARI surveillance is useful in supporting pandemic preparedness for emerging influenza A(H7N9 virus infections and seasonal influenza prevention and control.

  15. Epidemiology of Respiratory Pathogens among Elderly Nursing Home Residents with Acute Respiratory Infections in Corsica, France, 2013–2017

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    Shirley Masse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The current study aims to describe the demographical and clinical characteristics of elderly nursing home (NH residents with acute respiratory infections (ARIs during four winter seasons (2013/2014–2016/2017, as well as the microbiological etiology of these infections. Methods. Seventeen NHs with at least one ARI resident in Corsica, France, were included. An ARI resident was defined as a resident developing a sudden onset of any constitutional symptoms in addition to any respiratory signs. Nasopharyngeal swabs from ARI residents were screened for the presence of 21 respiratory agents, including seasonal influenza viruses. Results. Of the 107 ARI residents enrolled from NHs, 61 (57% were positive for at least one of the 21 respiratory pathogens. Forty-one (38.3% of the 107 ARI residents had influenza: 38 (92% were positive for influenza A (100% A(H3N2 and three (8% for influenza B/Victoria. Axillary fever (≥38°C was significantly more common among patients infected with influenza A(H3N2. Conclusion. The circulation of seasonal respiratory viruses other than influenza A(H3N2 seems to be sporadic among elderly NH residents. Investigating the circulation of respiratory viruses in nonwinter seasons seems to be important in order to understand better the dynamic of their year-round circulation in NHs.

  16. The Recent Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Epidemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is a syndrome characterized by fever, cough, sore throat , shortness of breath and malaise which may deteriorate very rapidly to respiratory failure and death. The symptoms of SARS are quite similar to those of common cold, malaria and respiratory tract infections all of which are common in our environment. SARS, being ...

  17. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren‐Gash, Charlotte; Fragaszy, Ellen; Hayward, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Warren‐Gash et al. (2012) Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/irv.12015. Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary and secondary transmission of (i) influenza and (ii) acute respiratory tract infections in community settings. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Cochrane databases up to 13 February 2012 for reports in any language of original research investigating the effect of hand hygiene on influenza or acute respiratory tract infection where aetiology was unspecified in community settings including institutions such as schools, and domestic residences. Data were presented and quality rated across outcomes according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria. There was moderate to low‐quality evidence of a reduction in both influenza and respiratory tract infection with hand hygiene interventions in schools, greatest in a lower–middle‐income setting. There was high‐quality evidence of a small reduction in respiratory infection in childcare settings. There was high‐quality evidence for a large reduction in respiratory infection with a hand hygiene intervention in squatter settlements in a low‐income setting. There was moderate‐ to high‐quality evidence of no effect on secondary transmission of influenza in households that had already experienced an index case. While hand hygiene interventions have potential to reduce transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections, their effectiveness varies depending on setting, context and compliance. PMID:23043518

  18. Pathogenesis of acute experimental liver amebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Tamayo, Ruy; Montfort, Irmgard; García, Alfonso Olivos; Ramos, Espiridión; Ostria, Carlos Barba

    2006-02-01

    Classical descriptions of the pathology of amebiasis portray the parasite as the cause of tissue damage and destruction, and in recent years a number of amebic molecules have been identified as virulence factors. In this review we describe a series of experiments that suggest a more complex host-parasite relation, at least during the early stages of acute experimental amebic liver abscess in hamsters. The problems of extrapolating experiments in vitro to explain observations in vivo are discussed. The role of amebic cysteine proteases is examined and evidence presented to suggest that they are primarily related not to tissue damage but to amebic survival, which is required for the progression of the lesion. Inflammation is shown to be not only the major cause of tissue damage but also an absolute requirement for amebic survival in the liver, whereas complement and ischemia are not involved in the disappearance of the parasite in the absence of inflammation.

  19. Association between sugar cane burning and acute respiratory illness on the island of Maui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnatzaganian, Christina Louise; Pellegrin, Karen L; Miyamura, Jill; Valencia, Diana; Pang, Lorrin

    2015-10-07

    Sugar cane harvesting by burning on Maui island is an environmental health issue due to respiratory effects of smoke. Volcanic smog ("vog") from an active volcano on a neighboring island periodically blankets Maui and could confound a study of cane smoke's effects since cane burning is not allowed on vog days. This study examines the association between cane burning and emergency department (ED) visits, hospital admissions, and prescription fills for acute respiratory illnesses. This retrospective study controlled for confounders that could increase respiratory distress on non-burn days by matching each burn day with a non-burn day and then comparing the ratio of patients with respiratory distress residing in the path of sugar burn smoke to those residing elsewhere on Maui on burn versus non-burn days. Patients with acute respiratory distress were defined as those with one or more acute respiratory diagnoses at one of the hospitals or emergency departments on Maui. Separately, patients with acute respiratory illness were identified through prescription records from four community pharmacies, specifically defined as those who filled prescriptions for acute respiratory distress. There were 1,256 reports of respiratory distress prescriptions and 686 hospital/ED diagnoses of acute respiratory illness. The ratio of cases within to outside of smoke exposure was higher on burn days for both the ED/hospital data and the pharmacy, though not statistically significant. In post-hoc analyses of the pharmacy data based on the number of acres burned as a proxy for volume of smoke, there was a dose response trend for acreage burned such that the highest quartile showed a statistically significant higher proportion of acute respiratory distress in the exposed versus non-exposed regions (P = 0.015, OR 2.4, 95% CI [1.2-4.8]). After adjusting for confounders on non-burn days, there was a significantly higher incidence of respiratory distress in smoke-exposed regions when greater

  20. Continuous blood purification treatment for endotoxin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Y. Jiang

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the effects of continuous blood purification (CBP treatment in pigs affected with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. A total of 12 healthy male pigs, weighing 12±1.8 kg, were randomly and equally assigned to the control and experimental groups. The ARDS pig model was prepared by intravenous injections of endotoxin (20 µg/kg. The control group was given conventional supportive therapy, while the experimental group was given continuous veno-venous hemofiltration therapy. During the treatment process, the variations in dynamic lung compliance, oxygenation index, hemodynamics, and urine volume per hour at different times (Baseline, 0, 2, 4, and 6 h were recorded. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and IL-10 in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histomorphological changes of the lung, heart, and kidney were visualized using a light microscope. The nuclear factor κB p65 protein content of the heart, lung, and kidney tissues was also detected using western blot. The experimental group outperformed the control group in both respiratory and hemodynamic events. CBP treatment cleared TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 partially from serum and BALF. The pathological examination of the heart, lung, and kidney tissues revealed that the injury was less severe in the experimental group. CBP treatment can improve the organ functions of pigs affected with endotoxin-induced ARDS and protect these organs to some extent.

  1. Update on the utility of corticosteroids in acute pediatric respiratory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigelman, Avraham; Chipps, Bradley E; Bacharier, Leonard B

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroids, delivered systemically and by inhalation, are widely used for the treatment of multiple acute respiratory illnesses in children. However, the level of evidence to support the utility of this therapy varies between these different acute respiratory illnesses. To summarize the evidence regarding the utility of corticosteroids in the management of common acute pediatric respiratory conditions and to highlights the controversies regarding their use. Literature search of manuscripts describing the evidence regarding the efficacy of corticosteroids (systemic and inhaled) in the management of: acute asthma exacerbation among school age children, acute episodic wheeze among preschool children, viral croup, and acute viral bronchiolitis. Current evidence indicates that systemic corticosteroids provide benefits for the treatment of acute asthma exacerbations in school age children, mainly in the acute care setting. In addition, high dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy administered in the Emergency Department appears to have comparable effect for the prevention of asthma-related hospital admission as systemic corticosteroids in this age group. In contrast, most available studies have not shown benefit for systemic corticosteroids during acute wheezing episodes in preschool children. Systemic corticosteroids decrease symptoms and the rate of hospital admissions in patients with severe croup; however, corticosteroids have no role in the treatment of acute bronchiolitis and their use in this condition should be discouraged. Corticosteroids treatment response varies between the acute respiratory illnesses presented in this review. Future research should aim to fill the current gaps-of-knowledge regarding the utility this intervention such as the identification of specific wheezing phenotypes among preschool children which might benefit from systemic corticosteroids as a treatment for acute viral wheeze.

  2. Pressure-controlled versus volume-controlled ventilation for acute respiratory failure due to acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Binila; Peter, John V; Tharyan, Prathap; John, George; Jeyaseelan, Lakshmanan

    2015-01-14

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) account for one-quarter of cases of acute respiratory failure in intensive care units (ICUs). A third to half of patients will die in the ICU, in hospital or during follow-up. Mechanical ventilation of people with ALI/ARDS allows time for the lungs to heal, but ventilation is invasive and can result in lung injury. It is uncertain whether ventilator-related injury would be reduced if pressure delivered by the ventilator with each breath is controlled, or whether the volume of air delivered by each breath is limited. To compare pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) versus volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) in adults with ALI/ARDS to determine whether PCV reduces in-hospital mortality and morbidity in intubated and ventilated adults. In October 2014, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Isssue 9), MEDLINE (1950 to 1 October 2014), EMBASE (1980 to 1 October 2014), the Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1994 to 1 October 2014) and Science Citation Index-Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) at the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1990 to 1 October 2014), as well as regional databases, clinical trials registries, conference proceedings and reference lists. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs (irrespective of language or publication status) of adults with a diagnosis of acute respiratory failure or acute on chronic respiratory failure and fulfilling the criteria for ALI/ARDS as defined by the American-European Consensus Conference who were admitted to an ICU for invasive mechanical ventilation, comparing pressure-controlled or pressure-controlled inverse-ratio ventilation, or an equivalent pressure-controlled mode (PCV), versus volume-controlled ventilation, or an equivalent volume-controlled mode (VCV). Two review authors independently screened and selected trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted

  3. Influenza cases from Surveillance Acute Respiratory Infection in Indonesia, 2011

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    Krisna N. A Pangesti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang:Infeksi Saluran Pernafasan Akut Berat (SARI atau pneumonia memiliki kontribusi besar dalam morbiditas dan mortalitas, namun Indonesia masih belum memiliki data epidemiologi yang cukup. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pola epidemiologi virus influenza sebagai etiologi kasus SARI.Metode:Analisis ini didasarkan pada surveilans sentinel SARI yang dilakukan oleh Pusat Biomedis dan Teknologi Dasar Kesehatan (Pusat BTDK pada sembilan rumah sakit di sembilan provinsi di Indonesia pada tahun 2011. Setiap pasien yang memenuhi kriteria SARI diikutsertakan dalam penelitian ini. Usap tenggorok dan hidung, serta serum diambil dan diperiksa di laboratorium Virologi Pusat BTDK untuk menentukan etiologinya. RT-PCR digunakan untuk mendeteksi jenis dan subtipe virus influenza dari usap tenggorok/hidung.Hasil:Sebanyak 333 kasus SARI didapatkan dari sembilan rumah sakit sentinel. Sebanyak 6% kasus yang positif influenza melalui pemeriksaan RT-PCR. Dari seluruh kasus SARI, proporsi influenza A adalah 5% dan influenza B 1%. Influenza A subtipe H1N1pdm09 mendominasi influenza musiman yang beredar di Indonesia dari kasus SARI.Kesimpulan:Virus Influenza musiman didapat dari kasus-kasus SARI namun jumlahnya tidak terlalu banyak. Oleh karena itu, penyebab lain dari kasus SARI masih perlu diteliti. (Health Science Indones 2014;1:7-11Kata kunci: SARI, Surveilans, InfluenzaAbstractBackground: Severe Acute Respiratory Infection (SARI or pneumonia has a major contribution in the morbidity and mortality, however, Indonesia still has lack of its epidemiology. The aim of the study is to know the epidemiological pattern of influenza virus as the etiology of SARI cases. Methods:This analysis based on the sentinel surveillanceSARI conducted by Center for Biomedical and Basic Technology of Health (CBBTH of Indonesia carried out at nine hospitals in nine provinces in 2011.Every patient who met the criteria of SARI was included in this study

  4. Epidemiology of Respiratory Pathogens among Elderly Nursing Home Residents with Acute Respiratory Infections in Corsica, France, 2013–2017

    OpenAIRE

    Shirley Masse; Lisandru Capai; Alessandra Falchi

    2017-01-01

    Background. The current study aims to describe the demographical and clinical characteristics of elderly nursing home (NH) residents with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) during four winter seasons (2013/2014–2016/2017), as well as the microbiological etiology of these infections. Methods. Seventeen NHs with at least one ARI resident in Corsica, France, were included. An ARI resident was defined as a resident developing a sudden onset of any constitutional symptoms in addition to any respi...

  5. Vitamin D in the prevention of acute respiratory infection: systematic review of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliffe, David A; Griffiths, Christopher J; Martineau, Adrian R

    2013-07-01

    Vitamin D metabolites enhance immunity to a wide range of respiratory pathogens in vitro. Numerous observational studies have investigated whether vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for acute respiratory infection, and a number of clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation for the prevention of acute respiratory infection have recently been conducted. Syntheses of this literature are lacking. We therefore conducted a systematic review of clinical studies investigating the association between vitamin D deficiency and susceptibility to acute respiratory infection in humans. A total of 39 studies (4 cross-sectional studies, 8 case-control studies, 13 cohort studies and 14 clinical trials) satisfying review eligibility criteria were identified. Observational studies predominantly reported statistically significant associations between low vitamin D status and increased risk of both upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Results from randomised controlled trials were conflicting however, reflecting heterogeneity in dosing regimens and baseline vitamin D status in study populations. Further trials of vitamin D supplementation for the prevention of acute respiratory infection should be conducted in populations with a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency at baseline, using doses sufficient to induce sustained elevation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, and powered to detect clinically important sub-group effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Viral etiology and epidemiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, B Y; Kim, M R; Park, J Y; Choi, E H; Lee, H J; Yun, C K

    1995-12-01

    Viral etiologic agents of acute lower respiratory tract infections were studied from November, 1990, through April, 1994, in Korean children. From 712 children who visited or were admitted to Seoul National University Children's Hospital because of acute lower respiratory tract infections, 804 nasal aspirates were collected; viral agents were detected by virus isolation and virus antigen was detected by indirect immunofluorescent staining. One or more viral agents were identified in 369 (45.9%) cases; of which 3.3% were mixed infections. The pathogens identified were respiratory syncytial virus (27.2%), parainfluenza virus type 3 (7.8%), influenza A virus (3.9%), adenovirus (3.9%), parainfluenza virus type 1 (1.7%), influenza B virus (1.4%), parainfluenza virus type 2 (0.5%), measles virus (0.1%) and others (0.9%). The clinical patterns of viral lower respiratory tract included pneumonia (56.6%), bronchiolitis (35.2%), croup (6.5%) and tracheo-bronchitis (1.6%). Infections with respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus types 1 and 3 and influenza A and B virus occurred in epidemics, whereas adenovirus was isolated sporadically throughout the study period. The data expand our understanding of the epidemiology of acute viral lower respiratory tract infections in Korean children and may be helpful to the clinicians and researchers interested in the control of viral respiratory tract infections.

  7. Use of non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation for acute respiratory failure: prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M T; Yam, L Y; Lau, C W; Ching, C K; Lee, C H

    2000-12-01

    To study the effectiveness and safety of non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation in the management of acute respiratory failure. Prospective study. Regional public hospital, Hong Kong. One hundred and eighty-nine haemodynamically stable adult Chinese patients with acute respiratory failure (119 men and 70 women; mean age, 71.2 years [range, 18-92 years]) who were treated with non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation as the primary mode of ventilatory assistance from 1 January 1996 to 31 December 1998. Arterial blood gas measurements, respiratory rate, airway pressures used, use of endotracheal intubation, and standardised mortality ratio. Fifty-two patients had hypoxaemic respiratory failure (group I); 97 had hypercapnic respiratory failure (group II); and 40 had either type with advanced co-morbidities and were not planned to receive endotracheal intubation (group III). For groups I and II, the overall mean duration of non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation was 56.2 hours. Improvements in gas exchange were seen in approximately 71% of these patients, endotracheal intubation was not needed for 82%, and the standardised mortality ratio was 0.86. The hospital survival rate was approximately 93% in non-intubated patients and 41% in intubated patients. Predictors of success were reduction in respiratory rate within 6 hours (Parterial carbon dioxide tension within 24 hours (PNon-invasive positive-pressure ventilation is effective in treating haemodynamically stable patients with acute respiratory failure and causes few and minor complications.

  8. Disassociating Lung Mechanics and Oxygenation in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehya, Nadir; Thomas, Neal J

    2017-07-01

    Both oxygenation and peak inspiratory pressure are associated with mortality in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Since oxygenation and respiratory mechanics are linked, it is difficult to identify which variables, pressure or oxygenation, are independently associated with outcome. We aimed to determine whether respiratory mechanics (peak inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, ΔP [PIP minus PEEP], tidal volume, dynamic compliance [Cdyn]) or oxygenation (PaO2/FIO2) was associated with mortality. Prospective, observational, cohort study. University affiliated PICU. Mechanically ventilated children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (Berlin). None. Peak inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, ΔP, tidal volume, Cdyn, and PaO2/FIO2 were collected at acute respiratory distress syndrome onset and at 24 hours in 352 children between 2011 and 2016. At acute respiratory distress syndrome onset, neither mechanical variables nor PaO2/FIO2 were associated with mortality. At 24 hours, peak inspiratory pressure, positive end-expiratory pressure, ΔP were higher, and Cdyn and PaO2/FIO2 lower, in nonsurvivors. In multivariable logistic regression, PaO2/FIO2 at 24 hours and ΔPaO2/FIO2 (change in PaO2/FIO2 over the first 24 hr) were associated with mortality, whereas pressure variables were not. Both oxygenation and pressure variables were associated with duration of ventilation in multivariable competing risk regression. Improvements in oxygenation, but not in respiratory mechanics, were associated with lower mortality in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Future trials of mechanical ventilation in children should focus on oxygenation (higher PaO2/FIO2) rather than lower peak inspiratory pressure or ΔP, as oxygenation was more consistently associated with outcome.

  9. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co‐detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  10. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J Jolley

    Full Text Available Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone (IOT, and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%, end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2% and neural respiratory drive (NRD (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography. Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  11. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus load normalized by cell quantification as predictor of acute respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Novo, Miriam; Boga, José A; Álvarez-Argüelles, Marta E; Rojo-Alba, Susana; Fernández, Ana; Menéndez, María J; de Oña, María; Melón, Santiago

    2018-01-05

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a common cause of respiratory infections. The main objective is to analyze the prediction ability of viral load of HRSV normalized by cell number in respiratory symptoms. A prospective, descriptive and analytical study was performed. From 7307 respiratory samples processed between December 2014 to April 2016, 1019 HRSV-positive samples, were included in this study. Low respiratory tract infection was present in 729 patients (71.54%). Normalized HRSV load was calculated by quantification of HRSV genome and human β-globin gene and expressed as log10 copies/1000 cells. HRSV mean loads were 4.09 ± 2.08 and 4.82 ± 2.09 log10 copies/1000 cells in the 549 pharyngeal and 470 nasopharyngeal samples, respectively (p respiratory tract infection and 4.22 ± 2.28 log10 copies/1000 cells with upper respiratory tract infection or febrile syndrome (p < 0.05). A possible cut off value to predict LRTI evolution was tentatively established. Normalization of viral load by cell number in the samples is essential to ensure an optimal virological molecular diagnosis avoiding that the quality of samples affects the results. A high viral load can be a useful marker to predict disease progression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Tympanic membrane changes in experimental acute otitis media and myringotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzbutiene, G.; Hermansson, A.; Caye-Thomasen, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present experimental study explored pathomorphological changes and calcium depositions in the tympanic membrane during experimental acute otitis media caused by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in myringotomized and nonmyringotomized ears. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A rat model of exp...

  13. Lung Recruitment Assessed by Respiratory Mechanics and Computed Tomography in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. What Is the Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiumello, Davide; Marino, Antonella; Brioni, Matteo; Cigada, Irene; Menga, Federica; Colombo, Andrea; Crimella, Francesco; Algieri, Ilaria; Cressoni, Massimo; Carlesso, Eleonora; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2016-06-01

    The assessment of lung recruitability in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may be important for planning recruitment maneuvers and setting positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). To determine whether lung recruitment measured by respiratory mechanics is comparable with lung recruitment measured by computed tomography (CT). In 22 patients with ARDS, lung recruitment was assessed at 5 and 15 cm H2O PEEP by using respiratory mechanics-based methods: (1) increase in gas volume between two pressure-volume curves (P-Vrs curve); (2) increase in gas volume measured and predicted on the basis of expected end-expiratory lung volume and static compliance of the respiratory system (EELV-Cst,rs); as well as by CT scan: (3) decrease in noninflated lung tissue (CT [not inflated]); and (4) decrease in noninflated and poorly inflated tissue (CT [not + poorly inflated]). The P-Vrs curve recruitment was significantly higher than EELV-Cst,rs recruitment (423 ± 223 ml vs. 315 ± 201 ml; P respiratory mechanics was 54 ± 28% (P-Vrs curve) and 39 ± 25% (EELV-Cst,rs) of the gas volume at 5 cm H2O PEEP. Recruitment measured by CT scan was 5 ± 5% (CT [not inflated]) and 6 ± 6% (CT [not + poorly inflated]) of lung tissue. Respiratory mechanics and CT measure-under the same term, "recruitment"-two different entities. The respiratory mechanics-based methods include gas entering in already open pulmonary units that improve their mechanical properties at higher PEEP. Consequently, they can be used to assess the overall improvement of inflation. The CT scan measures the amount of collapsed tissue that regains inflation. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00759590).

  14. Self-collected mid-turbinate swabs for the detection of respiratory viruses in adults with acute respiratory illnesses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar E Larios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gold standard for respiratory virus testing is a nasopharyngeal (NP swab, which is collected by a healthcare worker. Midturbinate (MT swabs are an alternative due to their ease of collection and possible self-collection by patients. The objective of this study was to compare the respiratory virus isolation of flocked MT swabs compared to flocked NP swabs. METHODS: Beginning in October 2008, healthy adults aged 18 to 69 years were recruited into a cohort and followed up for symptoms of influenza. They were asked to have NP and MT swabs taken as soon as possible after the onset of a fever or two or more respiratory symptoms with an acute onset. The swabs were tested for viral respiratory infections using Seeplex® RV12 multiplex PCR detection kit. Seventy six pairs of simultaneous NP and MT swabs were collected from 38 symptomatic subjects. Twenty nine (38% of these pairs were positive by either NP or MT swabs or both. Sixty nine (91% of the pair results were concordant. Two samples (3% for hCV OC43/HKU1 and 1 sample (1% for rhinovirus A/B were positive by NP but negative by MT. One sample each for hCV 229E/NL63, hCV OC43/HKU1, respiratory syncytial virus A, and influenza B were positive by MT but negative by NP. CONCLUSIONS: Flocked MT swabs are sensitive for the diagnosis of multiple respiratory viruses. Given the ease of MT collection and similar results between the two swabs, it is likely that MT swabs should be the preferred method of respiratory cell collection for outpatient studies. In light of this data, larger studies should be performed to ensure that this still holds true and data should also be collected on the patient preference of collection methods.

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Leukemic Infiltration of the Lung

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    Yao-Kuang Wu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome resulting from leukemic pulmonary infiltrates is seldom diagnosed antemortem. Two 60- and 80-year-old women presented with general malaise, progressive shortness of breath, and hyperleukocytosis, which progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS after admission. Acute leukemia with pulmonary infection was initially diagnosed, but subsequent examinations including open lung biopsy revealed leukemic pulmonary infiltrates without infection. In one case, the clinical condition and chest radiography improved initially after combination therapy with chemotherapy for leukemia and aggressive pulmonary support. However, new pulmonary infiltration on chest radiography and hypoxemia recurred, which was consistent with acute lysis pneumopathy. Despite aggressive treatment, both patients died due to rapidly deteriorating condition. Leukemic pulmonary involvement should be considered in acute leukemia patients with non-infectious diffusive lung infiltration, especially in acute leukemia with a high blast count.

  16. Strategies to improve oxygenation in experimental acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hartog (Arthur)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOne of the most important clinical syndromes, in which failure of oxygen uptake in the lung leads to severe hypoxia, is the so-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). ARDS is a complex of clinical signs and symptoms which occur following diverse pulmonary or systemic insults,

  17. Assessment of a new algorithm in the management of acute respiratory tract infections in children

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    Seyed Ahmad Tabatabaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the practicability of a new algorithm in decreasing the rate of incorrect diagnoses and inappropriate antibiotic usage in pediatric Acute Respiratory Tract Infection (ARTI. Materials and Methods: Children between 1 month to15 years brought to outpatient clinics of a children′s hospital with acute respiratory symptoms were managed according to the steps recommended in the algorithm. Results: Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Lower Respiratory Tract Infection, and undifferentiated ARTI accounted for 82%, 14.5%, and 3.5% of 1 209 cases, respectively. Antibiotics were prescribed in 33%; for: Common cold, 4.1%; Sinusitis, 85.7%; Otitis media, 96.9%; Pharyngotonsillitis, 63.3%; Croup, 6.5%; Bronchitis, 15.6%; Pertussis-like syndrome, 82.1%; Bronchiolitis, 4.1%; and Pneumonia, 50%. Conclusion: Implementation of the ARTIs algorithm is practicable and can help to reduce diagnostic errors and rate of antibiotic prescription in children with ARTIs.

  18. Pulmonary Specific Ancillary Treatment for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome : Proceedings From the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburro, Robert F.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    Objective: To provide an overview of the current literature on pulmonary-specific therapeutic approaches to pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome to determine recommendations for clinical practice and/or future research. Data Sources: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Library

  19. Acute Respiratory Viral Infection in Children: Modern Approaches to Diagnosis and Treatment

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    Alexander A. Baranov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI in children. ARVI take one of the leading places in a childhood morbidity structure. The article provides an overview of the clinical guidelines developed and approved by the professional association «Union of Pediatricians of Russia» for acute respiratory infections in children. These guidelines summarize the experience of the leading world and domestic specialists, contain scientific and practical data that correspond to the most relevant trends in the management of children with this pathology. The authors present modern information on the etiology, pathogenesis, classification, clinical findings and differential diagnosis of various nosological forms of acute respiratory tract infections in the pediatric population. The general (strategic principles of drug-free and drug treatment are discussed in detail.

  20. Disease spectrum and management of children admitted with acute respiratory infection in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T K P; Nguyen, D V; Truong, T N H; Tran, M D; Graham, S M; Marais, B J

    2017-06-01

    To assess the acute respiratory infection (ARI) disease spectrum, duration of hospitalisation and outcome in children hospitalised with an ARI in Viet Nam. We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of ARI admissions to primary (Hoa Vang District Hospital), secondary (Da Nang Hospital for Women and Children) and tertiary (National Hospital of Paediatrics in Ha Noi) level hospitals in Viet Nam over 12 months (01/09/2015 to 31/08/2016). Acute respiratory infections accounted for 27.9% (37 436/134 061) of all paediatric admissions; nearly half (47.6%) of all children admitted to Hoa Vang District Hospital. Most (64.6%) of children hospitalised with an ARI were Acute respiratory infection is a major cause of paediatric hospitalisation in Viet Nam, characterised by prolonged hospitalisation for relatively mild disease. There is huge potential to reduce unnecessary hospital admission and cost. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. PIDOTIMOD IN TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECURRENT OBSTRUCTIVE SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    E.E. Lokshina; O. V. Kravchenko; O. V. Zaytseva

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory infections are frequent in children; consequently evaluation of prophylactic effectiveness of immunomodulators is needed. Objective: to evaluate of clinical, immunological efficacy and safety of pidotimod in complex treatment of children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) and obstructive syndrome. Methods: patients 3–10 years old hospitalized with ARI and obstructive syndrome participated the study. Children from first group (n = 30) were treated with pidotimod 400 mg 2 times...

  2. Detection of viruses and atypical bacteria associated with acute respiratory infection of children in Hubei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zegang; Li, Yan; Gu, Jian; Zheng, Hongyun; Tong, Yongqing; Wu, Qing

    2014-02-01

    Acute respiratory infection is the major cause of disease and death in children, particularly in developing countries. However, the spectrum of pathogenic viruses and atypical bacteria that exist in many of these countries remains incompletely characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of pathogenic viruses and atypical bacteria associated with acute respiratory infection in children under the age of 16. A total of 10 435 serum sera specimens were collected from hospitalized children presenting with acute respiratory infection symptoms. Indirect immunofluorescence assays were performed to detect immunoglobulin M antibodies against nine common pathogens: mycoplasma pneumonia, influenza virus B, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, influenza virus A, legionella pneumophila, coxiella burnetii and chamydophila pneumonia. Of the 10 435 specimens examined, 7046 tested positive for at least one pathogen. Among all of the tested pathogens, mycoplasma pneumonia had the highest detection rate (56.9%). Influenza virus A and influenza virus B epidemics occurred during both winter and summer. The detection rate of respiratory syncytial virus and adenovirus was higher in spring. Cases of mixed infection were more complex: 4136 specimens (39.6%) tested positive for ≥2 pathogens. There were statistically significant difference in detection rates of mycoplasma pneumonia, influenza virus B, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, influenza virus A, legionella pneumophila and chamydophila pneumonia among different age groups (P acute respiratory infection among children in Hubei of China were mycoplasma pneumonia, influenza virus B and respiratory syncytial virus. The detection rates for each pathogen displayed specific seasonal and age group variations. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  3. Outcome of Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease Treated with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudzinski, Franziska C; Kaestner, Franziska; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim; Fähndrich, Sebastian; Seiler, Frederik; Böhmer, Philip; Linn, Oliver; Kaiser, Ralf; Haake, Hendrik; Langer, Frank; Bals, Robert; Wilkens, Heinrike; Lepper, Philipp M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure have a poor prognosis especially if mechanical ventilation is required. To investigate the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure in interstitial lung disease undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to recovery or transplantation. This was a retrospective analysis of all patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure treated with or without ECMO from March 2012 to August 2015. Forty patients with interstitial lung disease referred to our intensive care unit for acute respiratory failure were included in the analysis. Twenty-one were treated with ECMO. Eight patients were transferred by air from other hospitals within a range of 320 km (linear distance) for extended intensive care including the option of lung transplant. In total, 13 patients were evaluated, and eight were finally found to be suitable for lung transplantation from an ECMO bridge. Four patients from external hospitals were de novo listed during acute respiratory failure. Six patients underwent lung transplant, and two died on the waiting list after 9 and 63 days on ECMO, respectively. A total of 14 of 15 patients who did not undergo lung transplantation (93.3%) died after 40.3 ± 27.8 days on ECMO. Five out of six patients (83.3%) receiving a lung transplant could be discharged from hospital. ECMO is a lifesaving option for patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory failure provided they are candidates for lung transplantation. ECMO is not able to reverse the poor prognosis in patients that do not qualify for lung transplantation.

  4. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support in Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies and Severe Acute Respiratory Failure

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    Tai Sun Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Administering extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO to critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome has substantially increased over the last decade, however administering ECMO to patients with hematologic malignancies may carry a particularly high risk. Here, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure who were treated with ECMO. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure who were treated with ECMO at the medical intensive care unit of a tertiary referral hospital between March 2010 and April 2015. Results: A total of 15 patients (9 men; median age 45 years with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure received ECMO therapy during the study period. The median values of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, Murray Lung Injury Score, and Respiratory Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Survival Prediction Score were 29, 3.3, and -2, respectively. Seven patients received venovenous ECMO, whereas 8 patients received venoarterial ECMO. The median ECMO duration was 2 days. Successful weaning of ECMO was achieved in 3 patients. Hemorrhage complications developed in 4 patients (1 pulmonary hemorrhage, 1 intracranial hemorrhage, and 2 cases of gastrointestinal bleeding. The longest period of patient survival was 59 days after ECMO initiation. No significant differences in survival were noted between venovenous and venoarterial ECMO groups (10.0 vs. 10.5 days; p = 0.56. Conclusions: Patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure demonstrate poor outcomes after ECMO treatment. Careful and appropriate selection of candidates for ECMO in these patients is necessary.

  5. The effect of acute exposure to hyperbaric oxygen on respiratory system mechanics in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro; Porzionato, Andrea; Zara, Susi; Cataldi, Amelia; Garetto, Giacomo; Bosco, Gerardo

    2013-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of acute hyperbaric hyperoxia on respiratory mechanics of anaesthetised, positive-pressure ventilated rats. We measured respiratory mechanics by the end-inflation occlusion method in nine rats previously acutely exposed to hyperbaric hyperoxia in a standard fashion. The method allows the measurements of respiratory system elastance and of both the "ohmic" and of the viscoelastic components of airway resistance, which respectively depend on the newtonian pressure dissipation due to the ohmic airway resistance to air flow, and on the viscoelastic pressure dissipation caused by respiratory system tissues stress-relaxation. The activities of inducible and endothelial NO-synthase in the lung's tissues (iNOS and eNOS respectively) also were investigated. Data were compared with those obtained in control animals. We found that the exposure to hyperbaric hyperoxia increased respiratory system elastance and both the "ohmic" and viscoelastic components of inspiratory resistances. These changes were accompanied by increased iNOS but not eNOS activities. Hyperbaric hyperoxia was shown to acutely induce detrimental effects on respiratory mechanics. A possible causative role was suggested for increased nitrogen reactive species production because of increased iNOS activity.

  6. PECULIARITIES OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES IN PATIENTS WITH ATOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Ponezheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the work identified clinical and immunological characteristics of the course of ARVI patients with atopy and assessed the clinical efficacy of transfer factor in patients with severe immune deficiency. Emphasized the role of respiratory infections as the most important triggers of exacerbations of atopy and causes more severe and prolonged course. Describes the mechanisms of how respiratory viruses potentiate chronic inflammation and remodeling of the airways. The role of the causative agents of ARVI in patients with atopy deserve more practical attention towards and optimization of therapy.

  7. Clinical features of acute respiratory viral infections in children in conjunction with pathology of pharyngeal tonsil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Іванович Сміян

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study clinical features of the clinical course of an acute respiratory viral infection in conjunction with pathology of pharyngeal tonsil in children of preschool age. Methods: generally clinical;Laboratory and instrumental;Statistical.Separation of viral infection was done using the methods of lumicroscopy and polymerase chain reaction from nasopharynx lavage.Statistical processing of received results was carried out with the help of standard statistical computer system «MicrosoftExcel» (2007 adapted for medical and biological studies. Result:In the clinical presentation of respiratory viral infection prevailed rhinorrhea, short cough, subfibrilitet with usual duration near 3 days. On the contrary in children with acute respiratory viral infections with pathology of the pharyngeal tonsil prevailed stuffiness in nose, productive cough, snore and decrease of hearing, ear ache, polyadenopathy. Fever had fibril and hectic character with duration more than 3 days. . Dyspeptic syndrome was demonstrated more intensively in children with acute respiratory viral infections with pathology of the pharyngeal tonsil and characterized with thickening on tongue, periodic ache in stomach, meteorism, constipation, stool instability. Conclusions: The main syndromes in the clinical presentation of an acute respiratory viral infection were: intoxicational, catarrhal and dyspeptic. In children with pathology of the pharyngeal tonsil the clinical course of ARVI was more evident with long course and increase of the frequency of complications of ARVI

  8. Treatment of Adenoviral Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Using Cidofovir With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhyeok; Kim, Seulgi; Kwon, Oh Jung; Kim, Ji Hye; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Park, Hyun Woong; Kwon, Sun Jung

    2017-03-01

    Adenovirus infections are associated with respiratory (especially upper respiratory) infection and gastrointestinal disease and occur primarily in infants and children. Although rare in adults, severe lower respiratory adenovirus infections including pneumonia are reported in specific populations, such as military recruits and immunocompromised patients. Antiviral treatment is challenging due to limited clinical experience and lack of well-controlled randomized trials. Several previously reported cases of adenoviral pneumonia showed promising efficacy of cidofovir. However, few reports discussed the efficacy of cidofovir in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We experienced 3 cases of adenoviral pneumonia associated with ARDS and treated with cidofovir and respiratory support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All 3 patients showed a positive clinical response to cidofovir and survival at 28 days. Cidofovir with early ECMO therapy may be a therapeutic option in adenoviral ARDS. A literature review identified 15 cases of adenovirus pneumonia associated with ARDS.

  9. Acute or chronic respiratory failure. Assessment and management of patients with COPD in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G A; Hall, J B

    1989-06-16

    Patients with acute or chronic respiratory failure exhibit severe pulmonary impairment as a baseline characteristic. Additional minor insults can precipitate cardiopulmonary failure that requires hospital admission and possibly mechanical ventilation. Our approach to these patients emphasizes evaluation of the imbalance between neuromuscular competence and mechanical load on the respiratory system. In this way, reversible factors can be identified and corrected before they progress to inspiratory muscle fatigue and respiratory failure. For cases in which deterioration is inexorable, guidelines for mechanical ventilation are given and approaches to eventual liberation from the ventilator are reviewed.

  10. Current Issues of Antipyretic Therapy in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Novikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the current issues in the pediatric practice of seasonal incidence of children with acute respiratory infections. The basic etiological aspects of this pathology, specific clinical symptoms typical for different pathogens, causes of bursts of disease in certain periods are described. Special attention is paid to the tactics of antipyretic therapy in different groups of children with fever and acute respiratory diseases, understand the typical errors in its appointment. The author discusses the domestic and foreign results of using ibuprofen to relieve fever in children with this pathology, comparative efficacy and safety data of ibuprofen with other analgesics-antipyretics.

  11. [Sampling procedure for a survey of an interventional study on acute respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón Bravo, J; González Ochoa, E

    1993-01-01

    A description is made of the methodology used for obtaining a sample made up of 500 children under 5 years and 500 adults 65 year old and more, in order to carry out an intervention study on acute respiratory tract infections in an urban zone in Havana City and in a rural zone in Matanzas province, where different intervention stops will be taken with regards sanitary education about management of acute respiratory tract infections for the population and training for primary care medical personnel. We show the way the selected sample fits was planned with a very homogeneous distribution in the 8 areas under study, which allows for great reliability in the results.

  12. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebistorf, Fabienne; Karam, Oliver; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF) and mostly acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions. AHRF results from several systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in individuals of all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has been...... in renal failure in the INO groups (RR 1.59, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.16; I² statistic = 0%; high quality of evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Evidence is insufficient to support INO in any category of critically ill patients with AHRF. Inhaled nitric oxide results in a transient improvement in oxygenation but does...... not reduce mortality and may be harmful, as it seems to increase renal impairment....

  13. Assessment of the role of microorganisms of respiratory tract in patients with progressive acute respiratory viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgasova О.А.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the review of literature for the period from 1987 till 2012. It has been shown that the spread of acute respiratory viral infections (ARI and the incidence of complications is of great social and economic importance worldwide. Therefore, the identification of etiological factors and associated development of ARI is an urgent task for practical health care. It is of great importance to determine both the type of pathogen and the presence of its pathogenic factors. The etiological agent of bacterial complications of ARI becomes Moraxella catarrhalis, featuring a large set of markers of virulence. In the development of the pathological process in the respiratory tract, adhesins, a number of enzymes and toxins produced by M.catarrhalis are important. It allows to persist and multiply in the body of the patient. Dangerous strains of M.catarrhalis, resistant to (3-lactam antibiotics and characterized by multiresistance greatly reduce the effectiveness of the therapy. Lack of laboratory studies in acute inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract leads to the reduction of the etiological interpretation of these diseases, inadequate etiotropic treatment and as a consequence — the development of complications that reduces the effectiveness of therapy. In conclusion it is necessary to improve the system of microbiological diagnostics and tactics of treatment of ARI patients.

  14. Possible therapeutic effect of orally administered ribavirin for respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Byung Woo; Lee, Seung Hyeun

    2017-12-20

    Human respiratory syncytial virus usually causes self-limiting upper respiratory infection and occasionally causes pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. Respiratory syncytial virus-induced severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome in immunocompetent adults has been rarely described. Unfortunately, optimal treatment has not been established for this potentially fatal condition. We report a case of respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome occurring in a previously healthy man successfully treated with orally administered ribavirin. An 81-year-old previously healthy Korean man presented with cough, dyspnea, and febrile sensation. He had hypoxemia with diffuse ground glass opacity evident on chest radiography, which progressed and required mechanical ventilation. All microbiological tests were negative except multiplex real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using respiratory specimen, which was positive for human adenovirus. Under the diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome, orally administered ribavirin was administered and he recuperated completely without complications. This case demonstrates the potential usefulness of orally administered ribavirin as a therapeutic option for severe respiratory syncytial virus infection, at least in an immunocompetent host.

  15. New Pneumococcal Carriage Acquired in Association with Acute Respiratory Infection Is Prone to Cause Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auranen, Kari; Syrjänen, Ritva; Leino, Tuija; Kilpi, Terhi

    2016-01-01

    For considering vaccine-prevention of pneumococcal acute otitis media (PncAOM), relationships between pneumococcal carriage, respiratory infection and PncAOM need to be understood. We analyzed nasopharyngeal samples collected from 329 unvaccinated Finnish children aged 2-24 months at scheduled visits and at visits during respiratory infection in 1994-97. We assessed temporal associations of respiratory infection with pneumococcal acquisition and whether PncAOM hazard depends on the relative timing of acquisition and the infection onset. The data comprised 607 person-years of risk-time for acquisition, 245 person-months of concurrent respiratory infection and carriage, and 119 episodes of PncAOM. The acquisition hazard was 3-fold in the month preceding respiratory sickness (hazard ratio, HR 3.5, 90% credible interval CI 2.9, 4.1) as compared to acquisition in healthy children. Moreover, the PncAOM hazard was markedly higher (HR 3.7, 90% CI 2.4, 5.3) during the first month of carriage acquired around the acute phase of respiratory infection (between 1 month before and 1 week after the sickness onset), as compared to carriage acquired later during sickness. The high proportion (76%) of PncAOM events occurring within 1 month of acquisition was due to frequent acquisition being associated with respiratory infection as well as the susceptibility of such acquisition to cause otitis media.

  16. Respiratory and neurological disease in rabbits experimentally infected with equid herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitz, Fábio A; Cargnelutti, Juliana F; Anziliero, Deniz; Gonçalves, Kelley V; Masuda, Eduardo K; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F

    2015-10-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is an important pathogen of horses worldwide, associated with respiratory, reproductive and/or neurological disease. A mouse model for EHV-1 infection has been established but fails to reproduce some important aspects of the viral pathogenesis. Then, we investigated the susceptibility of rabbits to EHV-1 aiming at proposing this species as an alternative model for EHV-1 infection. Weanling rabbits inoculated intranasal with EHV-1 Kentucky D (10(7) TCID50/animal) shed virus in nasal secretions up to day 8-10 post-inoculation (pi), presented viremia up to day 14 pi and seroconverted to EHV-1 (virus neutralizing titers 4 to 64). Most rabbits (75%) developed respiratory disease, characterized by serous to hemorrhagic nasal discharge and mild to severe dyspnea. Some animals (20%) presented neurological signs as circling, bruxism and opisthotonus. Six animals died during acute disease (days 3-6); infectious virus and/or viral DNA were detected in the lungs, trigeminal ganglia (TG), olfactory bulbs (OBs) and cerebral cortex/brain (CC). Histological examination showed necrohemorrhagic, multifocal to coalescent bronchointerstitial pneumonia and diffuse alveolar edema. In two rabbits euthanized at day 50 pi, latent EHV-1 DNA was detected in the OBs. Dexamethasone administration at day 50 pi resulted in virus reactivation, demonstrated by virus shedding, viremia, clinical signs, and increase in VN titers and/or by detection of virus DNA in lungs, OBs, TGs and/or CC. These results demonstrate that rabbits are susceptible to EHV-1 infection and develop respiratory and neurological signs upon experimental inoculation. Thus, rabbits may be used to study selected aspects of EHV-1 biology and pathogenesis, extending and complementing the mouse model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Recent Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Epidemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The symptoms of SARS are quite similar to those of common cold, malaria and respiratory tract infections all of which are common in our environment. SARS, being a new disease, has as yet neither a definite diagnostic test nor treatment. With the international transmission of SARS first reported in March 2003, it became ...

  18. Childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections in Northern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... than five years worldwide in 2010, infectious diseases caused 68 percent (5·970 million), with the largest ... lower respiratory tract infection was diagnosed in a child with history of fever, cough, fast or difficult breathing, ..... Another earlier report found vitamin D deficiency in infants exclusively breast fed29.

  19. Mortality Factor Survey of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tei-Chu Liu

    2009-03-01

    Conclusion: The mortality rate of intubation patients was 115 times higher than that of those who did not require intubation. Therefore, special care must be taken with SARS disease with severe infiltration chest X-ray images and respiratory distress. Positive medical treatment should be performed to lower the mortality rate.

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Sundrome (ARDS): Pathogenesis and Treatment Modalities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Kari

    2003-01-01

    .... The syndrome was discernable by its symptoms of tachypnea, hypoxemia, cyanosis, decreased lung compliance, and diffuse infiltrates on chest radiograph. The 12 patients enrolled in the study were noted as being refractory to oxygen therapy and did not respond to the usual management of respiratory failure.

  1. Effects of acute respiratory virus infection upon tracheal mucous transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerrard, C.S.; Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Yeates, D.B.; Klein, E.

    Tracheal mucous velocity was measured in 13 healthy non-smokers using an aerosol labelled with /sup 99m/Tc and a multidetector probe during respiratory virus infections. The movement of boluses of tracheal mucous were either absent or reduced in number in five subjects with myxovirus infection (four influenza and one respiratory syncytial virus) within 48 hr of the onset of symptoms and in four subjects 1 wk later. One subject with influenza still had reduced bolus formation 12-16 wk after infection. Frequent coughing was a feature of those subjects with absent tracheal boluses. In contrast, four subjects with rhinovirus infection had normal tracheal mucous velocity at 48 hr after the onset of symptoms (4.1 +/- 1.3 mm/min). Tracheal mucous velocity was also normal (4.6 +/- 1.1 mm/min) in four subjects in whom no specific viral agent could be defined but had typical symptomatology of respiratory viral infection. During health tracheal mucous velocity was normal (4.8 +/- 1.6 mm/min) in the eleven subjects who had measurements made. Disturbances in tracheal mucous transport during virus infection appear to depend upon the type of virus and are most severe in influenza A and respiratory syncytial virus infection.

  2. Impact of a viral respiratory epidemic on the practice of medicine and rehabilitation: severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Peter A; Ng, Yee Sien; Tay, Boon Keng

    2004-08-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a new respiratory viral epidemic that originated in China but has affected many parts of the world, with devastating impact on economies and the practice of medicine and rehabilitation. A novel coronavirus has been implicated, with transmission through respiratory droplets. Rehabilitation was significantly affected by SARS, because strict infection control measures run counter to principles such as multidisciplinary interactions, patients encouraging and learning from each other, and close physical contact during therapy. Immunocompromised patients who may silently carry SARS are common in rehabilitation and include those with renal failure, diabetes, and cancer. Routine procedures such as management of feces and respiratory secretions (eg, airway suctioning, tracheotomy care) have been classified as high risk. Personal protection equipment presented not only a physical but also a psychologic barrier to therapeutic human contact. Visitor restriction to decrease chances of disease transmission are particularly difficult for long-staying rehabilitation patients. At the height of the epidemic, curtailment of patient movement stopped all transfers for rehabilitation, and physiatrists had to function as general internists. Our experiences strongly suggest that rehabilitation institutions should have emergency preparedness plans because such epidemics may recur, whether as a result of nature or of bioterrorism.

  3. Changes of Respiratory Mechanics in COPD Patients from Stable State to Acute Exacerbations with Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriana, Piero; Vitacca, Michele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Paneroni, Mara; Pisani, Lara; Nava, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Symptoms, clinical course, functional and biological data during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (EXCOPD) have been investigated, but data on physiological changes of respiratory mechanics during a severe exacerbation with respiratory acidosis requiring noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) are scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes of respiratory mechanics in COPD patients comparing data observed during EXCOPD with those observed during stable state in the recovery phase. In 18 COPD patients having severe EXCOPD requiring NIMV for global respiratory failure, we measured respiratory mechanics during both EXCOPD (T0) and once the patients achieved a stable state (T1). The diaphragm and inspiratory muscles effort was significantly increased under relapse, as well as the pressure-time product of the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscle (PTPdi and PTPes). The resistive loads to breathe (i.e., PEEPi,dyn, compliance and inspiratory resistances) were also markedly increased, while the maximal pressures generated by the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscles, together with forced expired volumes were decreased. All these indices statistically improved but with a great intrasubject variability in stable condition. Moreover, tension-time index (TTdi) significantly improved from the EXCOPD state to the condition of clinical stability (0.156 ± 0.04 at T0 vs. 0.082 ± 0.02 at T1 p respiratory pump is impaired, and although the patients exhibit a rapid shallow breathing pattern, this does not necessarily correlate with a TTdi ≥ 0.15. These changes are reverted once they recover from the EXCOPD, despite a large variability between patients.

  4. Replication and clearance of respiratory syncytial virus - Apoptosis is an important pathway of virus clearance after experimental infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2002-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is an important cause of severe respiratory disease in young children, the elderly, and in immunocompromised adults. Similarly, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is causing severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in calves. Both viruses are pneumovirus...... and the infections with human respiratory syncytial. virus and BRSV have similar clinical, pathological, and epidemiological characteristics. In this study we used experimental BRSV infection in calves as a model of respiratory syncytial virus infection to demonstrate important aspects of viral replication...... and clearance in a natural target animal. Replication of BRSV was demonstrated in the luminal part of the respiratory epithelial cells and replication in the upper respiratory tract preceded the replication in the lower respiratory tract. Virus excreted to the lumen of the respiratory tract was cleared...

  5. Metabolic acidosis aggravates experimental acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Patrícia Andréa da Fonseca; de Brito, Teresinha Silva; Freire, Rosemayre Souza; da Silva, Moisés Tolentino Bento; dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar; Vale, Mariana Lima; de Menezes, Dalgimar Beserra; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Libório, Alexandre Braga

    2016-02-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and metabolic acidosis (MA) are two critical conditions that may simultaneously occur in clinical practice. The result of this combination can be harmful to the kidneys, but this issue has not been thoroughly investigated. The present study evaluated the influence of low systemic pH on various parameters of kidney function in rats that were subjected to an experimental model of renal I/R injury. Metabolic acidosis was induced in male Wistar rats by ingesting ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) in tap water, beginning 2 days before ischemic insult and maintained during the entire study. Ischemia/reperfusion was induced by clamping both renal arteries for 45 min, followed by 48 h of reperfusion. Four groups were studied: control (subjected to sham surgery, n=8), I/R (n=8), metabolic acidosis (MA; 0.28 M NH4Cl solution and sham surgery, n=6), and MA+I/R (0.28 M NH4Cl solution plus I/R, n=9). Compared with I/R rats, MA+I/R rats exhibited higher mortality (50 vs. 11%, p=0.03), significant reductions of blood pH, plasma bicarbonate (pBic), and standard base excess (SBE), with a severe decline in the glomerular filtration rate and tubular function. Microscopic tubular injury signals were detected. Immunofluorescence revealed that the combination of MA and I/R markedly increased nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), but it did not interfere with the decrease in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression that was caused by I/R injury. Acute ischemic kidney injury is exacerbated by acidic conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Fragaszy, Ellen; Hayward, Andrew C

    2013-09-01

    Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary and secondary transmission of (i) influenza and (ii) acute respiratory tract infections in community settings. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Cochrane databases up to 13 February 2012 for reports in any language of original research investigating the effect of hand hygiene on influenza or acute respiratory tract infection where aetiology was unspecified in community settings including institutions such as schools, and domestic residences. Data were presented and quality rated across outcomes according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria. There was moderate to low-quality evidence of a reduction in both influenza and respiratory tract infection with hand hygiene interventions in schools, greatest in a lower-middle-income setting. There was high-quality evidence of a small reduction in respiratory infection in childcare settings. There was high-quality evidence for a large reduction in respiratory infection with a hand hygiene intervention in squatter settlements in a low-income setting. There was moderate- to high-quality evidence of no effect on secondary transmission of influenza in households that had already experienced an index case. While hand hygiene interventions have potential to reduce transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections, their effectiveness varies depending on setting, context and compliance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Drug use study for acute respiratory infection in children under 10 years of age

    OpenAIRE

    Iwan Dwiprahasto, Iwan Dwiprahasto

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is the commonest illness in children and the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many developing countries. It comprises approximately 50 % of all illness in children under five years. Even though usually viral in origin and of a self-limiting nature, various study indicate that antibiotic prescribing for ARI is inappropriately high.Objective: This study was aimed to assess general practitioners' (GPs) prescribing pattern for acute respira...

  8. Epidemiology and outcomes of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children according to the Berlin definition: a multicenter prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Eliane R; Munoz, Gabriela O C; Cavalheiro, Priscilla O; Suzuki, Adriana S; Degaspare, Natalia V; Shieh, Huei H; Martines, João A D S; Ferreira, Juliana C; Lane, Christianne; Carvalho, Werther B; Gilio, Alfredo E; Precioso, Alexander R

    2015-05-01

    In 2012, a new acute respiratory distress syndrome definition was proposed for adult patients. It was later validated for infants and toddlers. Our objective was to evaluate the prevalence, outcomes, and risk factors associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome in children up to 15 years according to the Berlin definition. A prospective, multicenter observational study from March to September 2013. Seventy-seven PICU beds in eight centers: two private hospitals and six public academic hospitals in Brazil. All children aged 1 month to 15 years admitted to the participating PICUs in the study period. None. All children admitted to the PICUs were daily evaluated for the presence of acute respiratory distress syndrome according to the American-European Consensus Conference and Berlin definitions. Of the 562 patients included, acute respiratory distress syndrome developed in 57 patients (10%) and 58 patients (10.3%) according to the Berlin definition and the American-European Consensus Conference definition, respectively. Among patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome according to the Berlin definition, nine patients (16%) were mild, 21 (37%) were moderate, and 27 (47%) were severe. Compared with patients without acute respiratory distress syndrome, patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome had significantly higher severity scores, longer PICU and hospital length of stay, longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and higher mortality (p definition can identify a subgroup of patients with distinctly worse outcomes, as shown by the increased mortality and reduced number of ventilator-free days in pediatric patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  9. Incidence and Mortality of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Children : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, LR; Veltkamp, F; Bos, AP; van Woensel, Job B M; Serpa Neto, A; Schultz, MJ; Wösten-van Asperen, RM

    Objectives: Our understanding of the acute respiratory distress syndrome in children is limited, and literature is dominated by investigations in adult patients. Recent preclinical studies suggest that the susceptibility to and severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children could differ

  10. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of human respiratory syncytial virus in Chinese adults with acute respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zichun; Gonzalez, Richard; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Chen, Lan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Yang, Qingqing; Li, Jianguo; Zhou, Hongli; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Jianwei

    2013-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of respiratory tract illnesses worldwide. Although the prevalence and clinical manifestations of the two subtypes, RSV-A and RSV-B, have been studied in some detail in infants and young children, they have not been determined in adults. To evaluate the prevalence of the RSV subtypes and disease severity between RSV-A and RSV-B infections in adults, nasal and throat swabs that were collected from patients ≥15 years old who sought medical care for acute respiratory infections at the Fever Clinic of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital in Beijing, China between May 2005 and April 2010. The samples were tested for RSV infection using PCR and sequencing analysis. RSV was detected in 95 (1%) of the adult patients, of whom 53 (55.8%) were positive for RSV-A and 42 (44.2%) for RSV-B. The incidence of RSV infections increased with age (χ(2) = 37.17, P = 1.66E-07). Demographic data and clinical manifestations of RSV-A were similar to those of RSV-B. Although RSV-A and RSV-B co-circulated during the 2005-2006 and 2008-2009 seasons, RSV-A was predominant in the 2006-2008 seasons, whereas RSV-B was predominant in the 2009-2010 season. Upper respiratory tract infections were diagnosed in most RSV-infected patients (n = 80, 84.2%), and three patients suffered from pulmonary infection. This is the first study to provide data on the prevalence and clinical manifestations of RSV subgroups among Chinese adults with fever and acute illness, over five successive epidemic seasons. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. High Prevalence of Respiratory Viral Infections in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Care Unit for Acute Respiratory Infections as Detected by Nucleic Acid-Based Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Legoff, Jérôme; Guérot, Emmanuel; Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Matta, Mathieu; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Gutmann, Laurent; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Forty-seven bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained from 41 patients with acute pneumonia attending an intensive care unit. By molecular diagnosis, 30% of total BAL and 63% of bacteria-negative BAL were positive for respiratory viruses. Molecular detection allows for high-rate detection of respiratory viral infections in adult patients suffering from severe pneumonia.

  12. Global, regional, and national disease burden estimates of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children in 2015: a systematic review and modelling study

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Ting; McAllister, David A.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Simoes, Eric A. F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Gessner, Bradford D.; Polack, Fernando P.; Balsells, Evelyn; Acácio, Sozinho; Aguayo, Claudia; Alassani, Issifou; Nicol, Mark P.; Nokes, D. James; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; da Costa Oliveira, Maria Tereza

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously estimated that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was associated with 22% of all episodes of (severe) acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) resulting in 55 000 to 199 000 deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2005. In the past 5 years, major research activity on RSV has yielded substantial new data from developing countries. With a considerabl...

  13. [Acute respiratory failures caused by post-tracheotomy tracheomalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Ayuko; Sato, Masayoshi; Seino, Keiko

    2014-02-01

    A 77-year-old man underwent thoracic surgery. He had a history of two previous operations: parapharyngeal tumor removal with temporal tracheotomy 14 years ago and, two years later, a sinus surgery when, according to our anesthesia registry, intubation was extremely difficult due to stricture of the trachea underneath the tracheotomy scar. Pathology was not fully elucidated. Preoperative examinations including chest x-ray, spirogram and CT were not remarkable. The scar above the suprasternal notch was visibly sunken and retracted with respiration. Stridor was auscultated but breathing was not labored. The patient was anesthetized with propofol and intubation was smooth. During surgery anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane, remifentanil and rocuronium. However, extubation was followed by desperate gasping and severe respiratory distress. The tracheotomy scar caved in and the airway collapsed. Continuous airway pressure via a facemask restored airway patency and improved breathing. After overnight respiratory support with non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), patient was weaned from ventilator. Airway collapse and the two episodes of respiratory failures while under general anesthesia were attributed to post-tracheotomy tracheomalacia.

  14. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, M W; Steven, M H; Phillips, G D; Branthwaite, M A

    1990-02-10

    The value of mechanical ventilation using intermittent positive pressure ventilation delivered non-invasively by nasal mask was assessed in six patients with life threatening exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease. Median (range) arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions were 4.4 (3.5-7.2) kPa and 8.7 (5.5-10.9) kPa respectively, with four patients breathing air and two controlled concentrations of oxygen. The arterial oxygen tension increased with mechanical ventilation to a median (range) of 8.7 (8.0-12.6) kPa and the carbon dioxide tension fell to 8.2 (6.5-9.2) kPa. Four patients discharged after a median of 10 (8-17) days in hospital were well five to 22 months later. One died at four days of worsening sputum retention and another after five weeks using the ventilator for 12-16 hours each day while awaiting heart-lung transplantation. This technique of mechanical ventilation avoids endotracheal intubation and can be used intermittently. Hypercapnic respiratory failure can be relieved in patients with either restrictive or obstructive lung disease in whom controlled oxygen treatment results in unacceptable hypercapnia. Respiratory assistance can be tailored to individual need and undertaken without conventional intensive care facilities.

  15. Prevalence of antibiotic use for pediatric acute upper respiratory tract infections in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sun Mi; Shin, Ju-Young; Kim, Mi Hee; Lee, Shin Haeng; Choi, Sohyun; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of antimicrobial prescribing for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URI) among pediatric outpatients and to identify the national patterns of its use from 2009 to 2011 in Korea. Using National Patients Sample database from 2009 to 2011, we estimated the frequency of antibiotics prescribing for URI in pediatric outpatients with diagnoses of acute nasopharyngitis (common cold), acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, acute tonsillitis, acute laryngitis/tracheitis, acute obstructive laryngitis/epiglottitis, and acute upper respiratory infections of multiple and unspecified sites. The proportions of each antibiotic class were calculated by year and absolute and relative differences were estimated. Also, we investigated daily amount of prescribed antibiotics per defined population according to the type of medical care institution, physician specialty, and geographic region. The overall antibiotic prescribing proportion was 58.7% and its annual proportion slightly decreased (55.4% in 2011 vs. 60.5% in 2009; adjusted odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.83). Variations by the type of medical care institution were observed. Tertiary hospitals (45.0%) were less likely to prescribe antibiotics than primary care clinics (59.4%), hospitals (59.0%), and general hospitals (61.2%); they showed different tendencies in choosing antibiotics. Variations by physician specialty and region were also observed. Prevalence of antimicrobial prescribing for pediatric URI is still considered higher than that of western countries and varies by the type of medical care institution, physician specialty, and geographic region.

  16. [Prevalence and seasonal distribution of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory tract infections, 2002-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçek, Candan; Arslan, Ayşe; Karakuş, Haydar Soydaner; Yalaz, Mehmet; Saz, Eylem Ulaş; Pullukçu, Hüsnü; Çok, Gürsel

    2015-04-01

    .6%) of the 1705 patients were infected with multiple respiratory viruses. The most frequently observed co-infections were RSV+INF-A (40/318; 12.6%), and RSV+PIV (33/318; 10.4%). The rate of positivity for the respiratory viruses in pediatric and adult groups were 35.4% (1369/3869) and 27.3% (336/1233), respectively (pinfections in pediatric and adult groups were 7.2% (280/3869) and 3% (38/1233), respectively. Most of the coinfections (280/318; 88%) were detected in children. Respiratory viruses were detected positive in 40.2% (445/1107) of outpatients, and in 31.5% (1260/3995) of inpatients (prespiratory viruses in winter, spring, summer and autumn were 44.4%, 27%, 8.3% and 20.3%, respectively. RSV was most frequently detected from December to March, influenza viruses from November to March, HRV from December to June, and mixed infections from January to February. In conclusion, the data of our study obtained in about 12-year period indicated that the prevalence of respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infections is 33.4%, and they typically active during the months of winter and early spring in our region.

  17. Prevalence of human coronaviruses in adults with acute respiratory tract infections in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lili; Gonzalez, Richard; Xu, Jin; Xiao, Yan; Li, Yongjun; Zhou, Hongli; Li, Jianguo; Yang, Qingqing; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Lan; Wang, Wei; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Jianwei

    2011-02-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are a common etiological agent of acute respiratory tract infections. HCoV infections, especially those caused by the two HCoVs identified most recently, NL63 and HKU-1, have not been characterized fully. To evaluate the prevalence and clinical presentations of HKU1 and NL63 in adults with acute respiratory tract infections, an investigation of HCoV infections in Beijing, China from 2005 to 2009 was performed by using reverse transcriptase PCR assays and sequencing analysis. Among 8,396 respiratory specimens studied, 87 (1%) clinical samples were positive for HCoVs, of which 50 samples (0.6% of the total) were positive for HCoV-OC43, 15 (0.2%) for HCoV-229E, 14 (0.2%) for HCoV-HKU1, and 8 (0.1%) for HCoV-NL63. The prevalence of HCoV infection in adults exhibited distinct seasonal fluctuations during the study period. In addition, patients positive for HCoV-229E infections were more likely to be co-infected with other respiratory viruses. Enterovirus, rhinovirus, and parainfluenza virus type 3 were the most common viruses found in patients with HCoV infections. The demographic and clinical data present in this study of HCoV infections in adults with acute respiratory tract infections should improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HCoVs. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. What Can We Apply to Manage Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with Acute Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Jungsil; Park, Ju Hee; Yoo, Kwang Ha

    2018-01-24

    Acute exacerbation(s) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) tend to be critical and debilitating events leading to poorer outcomes in relation to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treatment modalities, and contribute to a higher and earlier mortality rate in COPD patients. Besides pro-active preventative measures intended to obviate acquisition of AECOPD, early recovery from severe AECOPD is an important issue in determining the long-term prognosis of patients diagnosed with COPD. Updated GOLD guidelines and recently published American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society clinical recommendations emphasize the importance of use of pharmacologic treatment including bronchodilators, systemic steroids and/or antibiotics. As a non-pharmacologic strategy to combat the effects of AECOPD, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is recommended as the treatment of choice as this therapy is thought to be most effective in reducing intubation risk in patients diagnosed with AECOPD with acute respiratory failure. Recently, a few adjunctive modalities, including NIV with helmet and helium-oxygen mixture, have been tried in cases of AECOPD with respiratory failure. As yet, insufficient documentation exists to permit recommendation of this therapy without qualification. Although there are too few findings, as yet, to allow for regular andr routine application of those modalities in AECOPD, there is anecdotal evidence to indicate both mechanical and physiological benefits connected with this therapy. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy is another supportive strategy which serves to improve the symptoms of hypoxic respiratory failure. The therapy also produced improvement in ventilatory variables, and it may be successfully applied in cases of hypercapnic respiratory failure. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal has been successfully attempted in cases of adult respiratory distress syndrome, with protective hypercapnic ventilatory strategy. Nowadays, it is

  19. Physiological effects of noninvasive positive ventilation during acute moderate hypercapnic respiratory insufficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essouri, Sandrine; Durand, Philippe; Chevret, Laurent; Haas, Vincent; Perot, Claire; Clement, Annick; Devictor, Denis; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2008-12-01

    A prospective physiological study was performed in 12 paediatric patients with acute moderate hypercapnic respiratory insufficiency to assess the ability of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) to unload the respiratory muscles and improve gas exchange. Breathing pattern, gas exchange, and inspiratory muscle effort were measured during spontaneous breathing and NPPV. NPPV was associated with a significant improvement in breathing pattern, gas exchange and respiratory muscle output. Tidal volume and minute ventilation increased by 33 and 17%, and oesophageal and diaphragmatic pressure time product decreased by 49 and 56%, respectively. This improvement in alveolar ventilation translated into a reduction in mean partial pressure in carbon dioxide from 48 to 40 mmHg (P = 0.01) and in respiratory rate from 48 to 41 breaths/min (P = 0.01). No difference between a clinical setting and a physiological setting of NPPV was observed. In conclusion, this study shows that NPPV is able to unload the respiratory muscles and improve clinical outcome in young patients admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit for acute moderate hypercapnic respiratory insufficiency.

  20. Poor outcome of acute respiratory infection in young children with underlying health condition in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durigon, Giuliana Stravinskas; Oliveira, Danielle Bruna Leal; Felicio, Maria Carolina Calahani; Finelli, Cristiane; Pereira, Maria Fernanda Badue; Storni, Juliana Gamo; Caldeira, Raquel Negrão; Berezin, Reni Chehter; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Berezin, Eitan Naaman

    2015-05-01

    It is well established that respiratory viruses are an important cause of hospitalizations in young children worldwide, but data are limited on the contribution of specific viruses to severe illness in South America. We describe clinical and laboratory findings from prospective surveillance for acute respiratory infections at a tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. We screened children acute respiratory tract infections admitted to an urban tertiary hospital for respiratory viruses from March 2008 through February 2010, using polymerase chain reaction assays. Respiratory viruses were identified in 378 (53%) of the 715 samples analyzed. Respiratory syncytial virus was the most commonly identified virus (52%), followed by adenovirus (27%) and Human metapneumovirus (12%). More than one virus was identified in 19% of specimens. Almost half of the samples (46%) were from children with underlying health conditions. We demonstrated that compared to the previously healthy group, those with comorbidities had a worse outcome in terms of severity, with prolonged hospital stay and more need of intensive care. Identification of this high-risk population along with strategies for fast diagnosis might each help to reduce morbidity and mortality in this group. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Procalcitonin to initiate or discontinue antibiotics in acute respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuetz, Philipp; Wirz, Yannick; Sager, Ramon; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Stolz, Daiana; Tamm, Michael; Bouadma, Lila; Luyt, Charles E; Wolff, Michel; Chastre, Jean; Tubach, Florence; Kristoffersen, Kristina B; Burkhardt, Olaf; Welte, Tobias; Schroeder, Stefan; Nobre, Vandack; Wei, Long; Bucher, Heiner C; Bhatnagar, Neera; Annane, Djillali; Reinhart, Konrad; Branche, Angela; Damas, Pierre; Nijsten, Maarten W N; de Lange, Dylan W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815497; Deliberato, Rodrigo O; Lima, Stella Ss; Maravić-Stojković, Vera; Verduri, Alessia; Cao, Bin; Shehabi, Yahya; Beishuizen, Albertus; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik S; Corti, Caspar; van Oers, Jos A; Falsey, Ann R; de Jong, Evelien; Oliveira, Carolina F; Beghe, Bianca; Briel, Matthias; Mueller, Beat

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) comprise of a large and heterogeneous group of infections including bacterial, viral, and other aetiologies. In recent years, procalcitonin (PCT), a blood marker for bacterial infections, has emerged as a promising tool to improve decisions about

  2. Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Vogel LN, Elkins WR, et al. (2004) Mucosal immunisation of African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) with an attenuated parainfluenza virus...Severe acute respiratory syndrome in Singapore. Arch Dis Child 89: 551–556. 42. Babyn PS, Chu WC, Tsou IY, Wansaicheong GK, Allen U, et al. (2004) Severe

  3. Effect of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment on mortality in acute respiratory infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuetz, Philipp; Wirz, Yannick; Sager, Ramon

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In February, 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the blood infection marker procalcitonin for guiding antibiotic therapy in patients with acute respiratory infections. This meta-analysis of patient data from 26 randomised controlled trials was designed to assess safety ...

  4. Early exercise rehabilitation of muscle weakness in acute respiratory failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Michael J; Morris, Peter E

    2013-10-01

    Acute respiratory failure patients experience significant muscle weakness, which contributes to prolonged hospitalization and functional impairments after hospital discharge. Based on our previous work, we hypothesize that an exercise intervention initiated early in the intensive care unit aimed at improving skeletal muscle strength could decrease hospital stay and attenuate the deconditioning and skeletal muscle weakness experienced by these patients.

  5. The use of Rheum palmatum L. In the treatment of acute respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of Rheum palmatum L. In the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. Tie-zhu Yang, Yan Liu, Yue-Yun Liu, Xiu-Fang Ding, Jia-Xu Chen, Mei-Jing Kou, Xiao-Juan Zou ...

  6. Characterization of a novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Rota (Paul); M.S. Oberste (Steven); S.S. Monroe (Stephan); W.A. Nix (Allan); R. Campagnoli (Ray); J.P. Icenogle (Joseph); S. Penaranda; B. Bankamp (Bettina); K. Maher (Kaija); M.H. Chen (Min-hsin); S. Tong (Suxiong); A. Tamin (Azaibi); L. Lowe (Luis); M. Frace (Michael); J.L. DeRisi (Joseph); Q. Chen (Qi); D. Wang (David); D.D. Erdman (Dean); T.C. Peret (Teresa); C. Burns (Cara); T.G. Ksiazek (Thomas); P.E. Rollin (Pierre); A. Sanchez (Berenguer); S. Liffick (Stephanie); B. Holloway (Brian); J. Limor (Josef); K. McCaustland (Karen); M. Olsen-Rasmussen (Mellissa); S. Gunther; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); C. Drosten (Christian); M.A. Pallansch (Mark); L.J. Anderson (Larry); W.J. Belline; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn March 2003, a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was discovered in association with cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The sequence of the complete genome of SARS-CoV was determined, and the initial characterization of the viral genome is presented in this report. The

  7. Long-term survival for COPD patients receiving noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titlestad, Ingrid L; Lassen, Annmarie T; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) as an add-on treatment has been routinely used in a non-intensive care setting since 2004 for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute hypercapnic respiratory failure at a university hospital in Denmark. Although randomiz...

  8. Acute Respiratory Infections in the Middle-Belt Region of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: ARI continues to be a leeding cause of death among children globally beyond the year 2000. Close 12 million children under the age of 5years die each year in the developing countries, mainly from preventable causes and approximately 2.28 million (19%) were due to acute respiratory infections (ARI).

  9. Detection of viral acute lower respiratory tract infection in hospitalized infants using real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassant Meligy

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: RV was the most commonly detected virus in children under 3 years admitted with acute lower respiratory tract infections. Coinfection was present in the majority of our patients; however it was not related significantly to parameters of disease severity.

  10. Contrast media inhibit exogenous surfactant therapy in rats with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesecioglu, Jozef; Haitsma, Jack J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of various contrast media on the pulmonary surfactant system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a rat model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by lung lavage, the effects of surfactant suspended in saline were compared with surfactant suspended in the contrast

  11. Electrical impedance tomography in the assessment of extravascular lung water in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, P. W.; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.; Raaijmakers, E.; Bakker, J.; Groeneveld, A. B.; Postmus, P. E.; de Vries, P. M.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To establish the value of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) in assessing pulmonary edema in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure (ARF), as compared to the thermal dye double indicator dilution technique (TDD). DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: ICU of a general

  12. Noninvasive Ventilation of Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Insights from the LUNG SAFE Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Laffey, John G.; Pham, Tài; Madotto, Fabiana; Fan, Eddy; Brochard, Laurent; Esteban, Andres; Gattinoni, Luciano; Bumbasirevic, Vesna; Piquilloud, Lise; van Haren, Frank; Larsson, Anders; McAuley, Daniel F.; Bauer, Philippe R.; Arabi, Yaseen M.; Ranieri, Marco; Antonelli, Massimo; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Wrigge, Hermann; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Pesenti, Antonio; Rios, Fernando; Sottiaux, T.; Depuydt, p; Lora, Fredy S.; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar; Bugedo, Guillermo; Qiu, Haibo; Gonzalez, Marcos; Silesky, Juan; Cerny, Vladimir; Nielsen, Jonas; Jibaja, Manuel; Matamis, Dimitrios; Ranero, Jorge Luis; Amin, Pravin; Hashemian, S. M.; Clarkson, Kevin; Kurahashi, Kiyoyasu; Villagomez, Asisclo; Zeggwagh, Amine Ali; Heunks, Leo M.; Laake, Jon Henrik; Palo, Jose Emmanuel; do Vale Fernandes, Antero; Sandesc, Dorel; Arabi, Yaasen; Bumbasierevic, Vesna; Nin, Nicolas; Lorente, Jose A.; Abroug, Fekri; McNamee, Lia; Hurtado, Javier; Bajwa, Ed; Démpaire, Gabriel; Francois, Guy M.; Sula, Hektor; Nunci, Lordian; Cani, Alma; Zazu, Alan; Dellera, Christian; Insaurralde, Carolina S.; Alejandro, Risso V.; Daldin, Julio; Vinzio, Mauricio; Fernandez, Ruben O.; Cardonnet, Luis P.; Bettini, Lisandro R.; Bisso, Mariano Carboni; Osman, Emilio M.; Setten, Mariano G.; Lovazzano, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; Villar, Veronica; Pozo, Norberto C.; Grubissich, Nicolas; Plotnikow, Gustavo A.; Vasquez, Daniela N.; Ilutovich, Santiago; Tiribelli, Norberto; Chena, Ariel; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Saenz, María G.; Estenssoro, Elisa; Brizuela, Matias; Gianinetto, Hernan; Gomez, Pablo E.; Cerrato, Valeria I.; Bezzi, Marco G.; Borello, Silvina A.; Loiacono, Flavia A.; Fernandez, Adriana M.; Knowles, Serena; Reynolds, Claire; Inskip, Deborah M.; Miller, Jennene J.; Kong, Jing; Whitehead, Christina; Bihari, Shailesh; Seven, Aylin; Krstevski, Amanda; Rodgers, Helen J.; Millar, Rebecca T.; Mckenna, Toni E.; Bailey, Irene M.; Hanlon, Gabrielle C.; Aneman, Anders; Lynch, Joan M.; Azad, Raman; Neal, John; Woods, Paul W.; Roberts, Brigit L.; Kol, Mark R.; Wong, Helen S.; Riss, Katharina C.; Staudinger, Thomas; Wittebole, Xavier; Berghe, Caroline; Bulpa, Pierre A.; Dive, Alain M.; Verstraete, Rik; Lebbinck, Herve; Depuydt, Pieter; Vermassen, Joris; Meersseman, Philippe; Ceunen, Helga; Rosa, Jonas I.; Beraldo, Daniel O.; Piras, Claudio; Rampinelli, Adenilton M.; Nassar Jr, Antonio P.; Mataloun, Sergio; Moock, Marcelo; Thompson, Marlus M.; Gonçalves, Claudio H.; Antônio, Ana Carolina P.; Ascoli, Aline; Biondi, Rodrigo S.; Fontenele, Danielle C.; Nobrega, Danielle; Sales, Vanessa M.; Shindhe, Suresh; Aiman, Maizatul; Laffey, John; Beloncle, Francois; Davies, Kyle G.; Cirone, Rob; Manoharan, Venika; Ismail, Mehvish; Goligher, Ewan C.; Jassal, Mandeep; Nishikawa, Erin; Javeed, Areej; Curley, Gerard; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Parotto, Matteo; Ferguson, Niall D.; Mehta, Sangeeta; Knoll, Jenny; Pronovost, Antoine; Canestrini, Sergio; Bruhn, Alejandro R.; Garcia, Patricio H.; Aliaga, Felipe A.; Farías, Pamela A.; Yumha, Jacob S.; Ortiz, Claudia A.; Salas, Javier E.; Saez, Alejandro A.; Vega, Luis D.; Labarca, Eduardo F.; Martinez, Felipe T.; Carreño, Nicolás G.; Lora, Pilar; Liu, Haitao; Liu, Ling; Tang, Rui; Luo, Xiaoming; An, Youzhong; Zhao, Huiying; Gao, Yan; Zhai, Zhe; Ye, Zheng L.; Wang, Wei; Li, Wenwen; Li, Qingdong; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Yu, Wenkui; Shen, Juanhong; Li, Xinyu; Yu, Tao; Wu, Ya Q.; Huang, Xiao B.; He, Zhenyang; Lu, Yuanhua; Han, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Renhua; Wang, Hua X.; Qin, Shu H.; Zhu, Bao H.; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Jian; Li, Bin; Liu, Jing L.; Zhou, Fa C.; Li, Qiong J.; Zhang, Xing Y.; Li-Xin, Zhou; Xin-Hua, Qiang; Jiang, Liangyan; Gao, Yuan N.; Zhao, Xian Y.; Li, Yuan Y.; Li, Xiao L.; Wang, Chunting; Yao, Qingchun; Yu, Rongguo; Chen, Kai; Shao, Huanzhang; Qin, Bingyu; Huang, Qing Q.; Zhu, Wei H.; Hang, Ai Y.; Hua, Ma X.; Li, Yimin; Xu, Yonghao; Di, Yu D.; Ling, Long L.; Qin, Tie H.; Wang, Shou H.; Qin, Junping; Han, Yi; Zhou, Suming; Vargas, Monica P.; Silesky Jimenez, Juan I.; González Rojas, Manuel A.; Solis-Quesada, Jaime E.; Ramirez-Alfaro, Christian M.; Máca, Jan; Sklienka, Peter; Gjedsted, Jakob; Christiansen, Aage; Villamagua, Boris G.; Llano, Miguel; Burtin, Philippe; Buzancais, Gautier; Beuret, Pascal; Pelletier, Nicolas; Mortaza, Satar; Mercat, Alain; Chelly, Jonathan; Jochmans, Sébastien; Terzi, Nicolas; Daubin, Cédric; Carteaux, Guillaume; de Prost, Nicolas; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Daviaud, Fabrice; Pham, Tai; Fartoukh, Muriel; Barberet, Guillaume; Biehler, Jerome; Dellamonica, Jean; Doyen, Denis; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Briquet, Anais; Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Follin, Arnaud; Roux, Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Kalaitzis, Evangelos; Dangers, Laurence; Combes, Alain; Au, Siu-Ming; Béduneau, Gaetan; Carpentier, Dorothée; Zogheib, Elie H.; Dupont, Herve; Ricome, Sylvie; Santoli, Francesco L.; Besset, Sebastien L.; Michel, Philippe; Gelée, Bruno; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Goubaux, Bernard; Crova, Philippe J.; Phan, Nga T.; Berkelmans, Frantz; Badie, Julio C.; Tapponnier, Romain; Gally, Josette; Khebbeb, Samy; Herbrecht, Jean-Etienne; Schneider, Francis; Declercq, Pierre-Louis M.; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Duranteau, Jacques; Harrois, Anatole; Chabanne, Russell; Marin, Julien; Bigot, Charlene; Thibault, Sandrine; Ghazi, Mohammed; Boukhazna, Messabi; Zein, Salem Ould; Richecoeur, Jack R.; Combaux, Daniele M.; Grelon, Fabien; Le Moal, Charlene; Sauvadet, Elise P.; Robine, Adrien; Lemiale, Virginie; Reuter, Danielle; Dres, Martin; Demoule, Alexandre; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Baboi, Loredana; Guérin, Claude; Lohner, Ralph; Kraßler, Jens; Schäfer, Susanne; Zacharowski, Kai D.; Meybohm, Patrick; Reske, Andreas W.; Simon, Philipp; Hopf, Hans-Bernd F.; Schuetz, Michael; Baltus, Thomas; Papanikolaou, Metaxia N.; Papavasilopoulou, Theonymfi G.; Zacharas, Giannis A.; Ourailogloy, Vasilis; Mouloudi, Eleni K.; Massa, Eleni V.; Nagy, Eva O.; Stamou, Electra E.; Kiourtzieva, Ellada V.; Oikonomou, Marina A.; Avila, Luis E.; Cortez, Cesar A.; Citalán, Johanna E.; Jog, Sameer A.; Sable, Safal D.; Shah, Bhagyesh; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K.; Memon, Mohammedfaruk; Muthuchellappan, Radhakrishnan; Ramesh, Venkatapura J.; Shenoy, Anitha; Unnikrishnan, Ramesh; Dixit, Subhal B.; Rhayakar, Rachana V.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Bhardwaj, Vallish K.; Mahto, Heera L.; Sagar, Sudha V.; Palaniswamy, Vijayanand; Ganesan, Deeban; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Heidari, Farshad; Meaney, Edel A.; Nichol, Alistair; Knapman, Karl M.; O’Croinin, Donall; Dunne, Eimhin S.; Breen, Dorothy M.; Clarkson, Kevin P.; Jaafar, Rola F.; Dwyer, Rory; Amir, Fahd; Ajetunmobi, Olaitan O.; O’Muircheartaigh, Aogan C.; Black, Colin S.; Treanor, Nuala; Collins, Daniel V.; Altaf, Wahid; Zani, Gianluca; Fusari, Maurizio; Spadaro, Savino; Volta, Carlo A.; Graziani, Romano; Brunettini, Barbara; Palmese, Salvatore; Formenti, Paolo; Umbrello, Michele; Lombardo, Andrea; Pecci, Elisabetta; Botteri, Marco; Savioli, Monica; Protti, Alessandro; Mattei, Alessia; Schiavoni, Lorenzo; Tinnirello, Andrea; Todeschini, Manuel; Giarratano, Antonino; Cortegiani, Andrea; Sher, Sara; Rossi, Anna; Antonelli, Massimo M.; Montini, Luca M.; Casalena, Paolo; Scafetti, Sergio; Panarello, Giovanna; Occhipinti, Giovanna; Patroniti, Nicolò; Pozzi, Matteo; Biscione, Roberto R.; Poli, Michela M.; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Albiero, Daniela; Crapelli, Giulia; Beck, Eduardo; Pota, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Molin, Alexandre; Tarantino, Fabio; Monti, Giacomo; Frati, Elena; Mirabella, Lucia; Cinnella, Gilda; Fossali, Tommaso; Colombo, Riccardo; Terragni, Pierpaolo; Pattarino, Ilaria; Mojoli, Francesco; Braschi, Antonio; Borotto, Erika E.; Cracchiolo, Andrea N.; Palma, Daniela M.; Raponi, Francesco; Foti, Giuseppe; Vascotto, Ettore R.; Coppadoro, Andrea; Brazzi, Luca; Floris, Leda; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Venti, Aaron; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Takagi, Shunsuke; Maeyama, Hiroki N.; Watanabe, Eizo; Yamaji, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kazuyoshi; Shiozaki, Kyoko; Futami, Satoru; Ryosuke, Sekine; Saito, Koji; Kameyama, Yoshinobu; Ueno, Keiko; Izawa, Masayo; Okuda, Nao; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Tomofumi; Nasu, Michitaka; Takada, Tadaaki; Ito, Fumihito; Nunomiya, Shin; Koyama, Kansuke; Abe, Toshikazu; Andoh, Kohkichi; Kusumoto, Kohei; Hirata, Akira; Takaba, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Shuhei; Higashijima, Ushio; Honda, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Nobumasa; Imai, Hiroshi; Ogino, Yasuaki; Mizuguchi, Ichiko; Ichikado, Kazuya; Nitta, Kenichi; Mochizuki, Katsunori; Hashida, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Niimi, Daisuke; Ueda, Takeshi; Kashiwa, Yozo; Uchiyama, Akinori; Sabelnikovs, Olegs; Oss, Peteris; Haddad, Youssef; Liew, Kong Y.; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A.; Jarquin-Badiola, Yves D.; Sanchez-Hurtado, Luis A.; Gomez-Flores, Saira S.; Marin, Maria C.; Villagomez, Asisclo J.; Lemus, Jordana S.; Fierro, Jonathan M.; Cervantes, Mavy Ramirez; Flores Mejia, Francisco Javier; Dector, Dulce; Dector, Dulce M.; Gonzalez, Daniel R.; Estrella, Claudia R.; Sanchez-Medina, Jorge R.; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Alvaro; George, Fernando G.; Aguirre, Janet S.; Buensuseso, Juan A.; Poblano, Manuel; Dendane, Tarek; Balkhi, Hicham; Elkhayari, Mina; Samkaoui, Nacer; Ezzouine, Hanane; Benslama, Abdellatif; Amor, Mourad; Maazouzi, Wajdi; Cimic, Nedim; Beck, Oliver; Bruns, Monique M.; Schouten, Jeroen A.; Rinia, Myra; Raaijmakers, Monique; van Wezel, Hellen M.; Heines, Serge J.; Strauch, Ulrich; Buise, Marc P.; Simonis, Fabienne D.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Goodson, Jennifer C.; Browne, Troy S.; Navarra, Leanlove; Hunt, Anna; Hutchison, Robyn A.; Bailey, Mathew B.; Newby, Lynette; Mcarthur, Colin; Kalkoff, Michael; Mcleod, Alex; Casement, Jonathan; Hacking, Danielle J.; Andersen, Finn H.; Dolva, Merete S.; Laake, Jon H.; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Noremark, Kim Andre L.; Søreide, Eldar; Sjøbø, Brit Å; Guttormsen, Anne B.; Yoshido, Hector H. Leon; Aguilar, Ronald Zumaran; Oscanoa, Fredy A. Montes; Alisasis, Alain U.; Robles, Joanne B.; Pasanting-Lim, Rossini Abbie B.; Tan, Beatriz C.; Andruszkiewicz, Pawel; Jakubowska, Karina; Coxo, Cristina M.; Alvarez, António M.; Oliveira, Bruno S.; Montanha, Gustavo M.; Barros, Nelson C.; Pereira, Carlos S.; Messias, António M.; Monteiro, Jorge M.; Araujo, Ana M.; Catorze, Nuno T.; Marum, Susan M.; Bouw, Maria J.; Gomes, Rui M.; Brito, Vania A.; Castro, Silvia; Estilita, Joana M.; Barros, Filipa M.; Serra, Isabel M.; Martinho, Aurelia M.; Tomescu, Dana R.; Marcu, Alexandra; Bedreag, Ovidiu H.; Papurica, Marius; Corneci, Dan E.; Negoita, Silvius Ioan; Grigoriev, Evgeny; Gritsan, Alexey I.; Gazenkampf, Andrey A.; Almekhlafi, Ghaleb; Albarrak, Mohamad M.; Mustafa, Ghanem M.; Maghrabi, Khalid A.; Salahuddin, Nawal; Aisa, Tharwat M.; Al Jabbary, Ahmed S.; Tabhan, Edgardo; Trinidad, Olivia A.; Al Dorzi, Hasan M.; Tabhan, Edgardo E.; Bolon, Stefan; Smith, Oliver; Mancebo, Jordi; Lopez-Delgado, Juan C.; Esteve, Francisco; Rialp, Gemma; Forteza, Catalina; de Haro, Candelaria; Artigas, Antonio; Albaiceta, Guillermo M.; de Cima-Iglesias, Sara; Seoane-Quiroga, Leticia; Ruiz-Aguilar, Antonio L.; Claraco-Vega, Luis M.; Soler, Juan Alfonso; Lorente, Maria del Carmen; Hermosa, Cecilia; Gordo, Federico; Prieto-González, Miryam; López-Messa, Juan B.; Perez, Manuel P.; Perez, Cesar P.; Allue, Raquel Montoiro; Roche-Campo, Ferran; Ibañez-Santacruz, Marcos; Temprano, Susana; Pintado, Maria C.; de Pablo, Raul; Gómez, Pilar Ricart Aroa; Rodriguez Ruiz, Silvia; Iglesias Moles, Silvia; Jurado, Mª Teresa; Arizmendi, Alfons; Piacentini, Enrique A.; Franco, Nieves; Honrubia, Teresa; Perez Cheng, Meisy; Perez Losada, Elena; Blanco, Javier; Yuste, Luis J.; Carbayo-Gorriz, Cecilia; Cazorla-Barranquero, Francisca G.; Alonso, Javier G.; Alda, Rosa S.; Algaba, Ángela; Navarro, Gonzalo; Cereijo, Enrique; Diaz-Rodriguez, Esther; Pastor Marcos, Diego; Alvarez Montero, Laura; Herrera Para, Luis; Jimenez Sanchez, Roberto; Blasco Navalpotro, Miguel Angel; Diaz Abad, Ricardo; Castro, Alejandro G.; Jose D Artiga, Maria; Ceniceros-Barros, Alexandra; Montiel González, Raquel; Parrilla Toribio, Dácil; Penuelas, Oscar; Roser, Tomas P.; Olga, Moreno F.; Gallego Curto, Elena; Manzano Sánchez, Rocío; Imma, Vallverdu P.; Elisabet, Garcia M.; Claverias, Laura; Magret, Monica; Pellicer, Ana M.; Rodriguez, Lucia L.; Sánchez-Ballesteros, Jesús; González-Salamanca, Ángela; Jimenez, Antonio G.; Huerta, Francisco P.; Sotillo Diaz, Juan Carlos J.; Bermejo Lopez, Esther; Llinares Moya, David D.; Tallet Alfonso, Alec A.; Eugenio Luis, Palazon Sanchez; Sanchez Cesar, Palazon; Rafael, Sánchez I.; Virgilio, Corcoles G.; Recio, Noelia N.; Adamsson, Richard O.; Rylander, Christian C.; Holzgraefe, Bernhard; Broman, Lars M.; Wessbergh, Joanna; Persson, Linnea; Schiöler, Fredrik; Kedelv, Hans; Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna; Appelberg, Henrik; Hedlund, Lars; Helleberg, Johan; Eriksson, Karin E.; Glietsch, Rita; Larsson, Niklas; Nygren, Ingela; Nunes, Silvia L.; Morin, Anna-Karin; Kander, Thomas; Adolfsson, Anne; Zender, Hervé O.; Leemann-Refondini, Corinne; Elatrous, Souheil; Bouchoucha, Slaheddine; Chouchene, Imed; Ouanes, Islem; Souissi, Asma Ben; Kamoun, Salma; Demirkiran, Oktay; Aker, Mustafa; Erbabacan, Emre; Ceylan, Ilkay; Girgin, Nermin Kelebek; Ozcelik, Menekse; Ünal, Necmettin; Meco, Basak Ceyda; Akyol, Onat O.; Derman, Suleyman S.; Kennedy, Barry; Parhar, Ken; Srinivasa, Latha; McAuley, Danny; Hopkins, Phil; Mellis, Clare; Kakar, Vivek; Hadfield, Dan; Vercueil, Andre; Bhowmick, Kaushik; Humphreys, Sally K.; Ferguson, Andrew; Mckee, Raymond; Raj, Ashok S.; Fawkes, Danielle A.; Watt, Philip; Twohey, Linda; Jha, Rajeev R.; Thomas, Matthew; Morton, Alex; Kadaba, Varsha; Smith, Mark J.; Hormis, Anil P.; Kannan, Santhana G.; Namih, Miriam; Reschreiter, Henrik; Camsooksai, Julie; Kumar, Alek; Rugonfalvi, Szabolcs; Nutt, Christopher; Oneill, Orla; Seasman, Colette; Dempsey, Ged; Scott, Christopher J.; Ellis, Helen E.; McKechnie, Stuart; Hutton, Paula J.; Di Tomasso, Nora N.; Vitale, Michela N.; Griffin, Ruth O.; Dean, Michael N.; Cranshaw, Julius H.; Willett, Emma L.; Ioannou, Nicholas; Gillis, Sarah; Csabi, Peter; Macfadyen, Rosaleen; Dawson, Heidi; Preez, Pieter D.; Williams, Alexandra J.; Boyd, Owen; Ortiz-Ruiz de Gordoa, Laura; Bramall, Jon; Symmonds, Sophie; Chau, Simon K.; Wenham, Tim; Szakmany, Tamas; Toth-Tarsoly, Piroska; Mccalman, Katie H.; Alexander, Peter; Stephenson, Lorraine; Collyer, Thomas; Chapman, Rhiannon; Cooper, Raphael; Allan, Russell M.; Sim, Malcolm; Wrathall, David W.; Irvine, Donald A.; Zantua, Kim S.; Adams, John C.; Burtenshaw, Andrew J.; Sellors, Gareth P.; Welters, Ingeborg D.; Williams, Karen E.; Hessell, Robert J.; Oldroyd, Matthew G.; Battle, Ceri E.; Pillai, Suresh; Kajtor, Istvan; Sivashanmugavel, Mageswaran; Okane, Sinead C.; Donnelly, Adrian; Frigyik, Aniko D.; Careless, Jon P.; May, Martin M.; Stewart, Richard; Trinder, T. John; Hagan, Samantha J.; Wise, Matt P.; Cole, Jade M.; MacFie, Caroline C.; Dowling, Anna T.; Nin, Nicolás; Nuñez, Edgardo; Pittini, Gustavo; Rodriguez, Ruben; Imperio, María C.; Santos, Cristina; França, Ana G.; Ebeid, Alejandro; Deicas, Alberto; Serra, Carolina; Uppalapati, Aditya; Kamel, Ghassan; Banner-Goodspeed, Valerie M.; Beitler, Jeremy R.; Reddy Mukkera, Satyanarayana; Kulkarni, Shreedhar; Lee, Jarone; Mesar, Tomaz; Shinn Iii, John O.; Gomaa, Dina; Tainter, Christopher; Yeatts, Dale J.; Warren, Jessica; Lanspa, Michael J.; Miller, Russel R.; Grissom, Colin K.; Brown, Samuel M.; Gosselin, Ryan J.; Kitch, Barrett T.; Cohen, Jason E.; Beegle, Scott H.; Gueret, Renaud M.; Tulaimat, Aiman; Choudry, Shazia; Stigler, William; Batra, Hitesh; Huff, Nidhi G.; Lamb, Keith D.; Oetting, Trevor W.; Mohr, Nicholas M.; Judy, Claine; Saito, Shigeki; Kheir, Fayez M.; Kheir, Fayez; Schlichting, Adam B.; Delsing, Angela; Crouch, Daniel R.; Elmasri, Mary; Ismail, Dina; Dreyer, Kyle R.; Blakeman, Thomas C.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Quintana Grijalba, Carolina; Hou, Peter C.; Seethala, Raghu; Aisiku, Imo; Henderson, Galen; Frendl, Gyorgy; Hou, Sen-Kuang; Owens, Robert L.; Schomer, Ashley; Jovanovic, Bojan; Surbatovic, Maja; Veljovic, Milic

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is increasingly used in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The evidence supporting NIV use in patients with ARDS remains relatively sparse. Objectives: To determine whether, during NIV, the categorization of ARDS severity based on the

  13. Risk Factors for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Under‑five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) constitute the major causes of mortality and morbidity among under‑five children of the developing world. The prevalence of ARIs is determined individually or collectively by a number of factors which may be prevalent in our environment. Aim: The present study is aimed ...

  14. Risk Factors for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Under-five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Paediatrician, College of Clinical Medicine, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Nigeria. Abstract. Background: Acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) constitute the major causes of mortality and morbidity among under‑five children of the developing world. The prevalence of ARIs is determined individually or collectively by a ...

  15. Viral respiratory tract infections among patients with acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phuong, Hoang Lan; Nga, Tran T. T.; van Doornum, Gerard J.; Groen, Jan; Binh, Tran Q.; Giao, Phan T.; Hung, Le Q.; Nams, Nguyen V.; Kager, P. A.; de Vries, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the proportion of viral respiratory tract infections among acute undifferentiated fevers (AUFs) at primary health facilities in southern Vietnam during 2001-2005, patients with AUF not caused by malaria were enrolled at twelve primary health facilities and a clinic for malaria control

  16. Plasma carotenoid concentrations in relation to acute respiratory infections in elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graat, J.M.; Kok, F.J.; Schouten, E.G.

    2004-01-01

    A high plasma carotenoid concentration could improve the immune response and result in decreased risk of infectious diseases. However, data on the relationship of plasma carotenoid concentration with acute respiratory infections, which occur frequently in elderly people, are scarce. We investigated,

  17. Investigation of an outbreak of acute respiratory disease in Côte D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study aim was to investigate an outbreak of human cases of unexplained influenza-like illness and fatal acute respiratory infection (ARI), with simultaneous poultry illness and high mortality raising concerns of possible influenza A (H5N1), virus in Cote d'Ivoire in February and March 2007. Materials and ...

  18. Surveillance of acute respiratory infections in general practices - The Netherlands, winter 1997/98

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen MLA; Bartelds AIM; Wilbrink B; Verweij C; Bijlsma K; Nat H van der; Boswijk H; Boer AB de; Sprenger MJW; Dorigo-Zetsma JW; NIVEL; CIE; NIVEL; LIS

    1999-01-01

    To provide insight into the virological aetiology of influenza-like illnesses and other acute respiratory infections, nose/throat swabs were taken by 30 general practitioners of the sentinel surveillance network of the Netherlands Institute of Primary Health Care from a random selection of patients

  19. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe

  20. Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years After Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-10

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases' synopsis, Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome.  Created: 4/10/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/11/2013.

  1. Identification of a novel coronavirus in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Drosten (Christian); N. Escriou (Nicolas); S. Kramme; H.R. Brodt; S. Becker (Stephan); H. Rabenau; M. Eickmann; H. Schmitz; S. Muller; M. Panning; L. Kolesnikova; K. Grywna; H.D. Klenk; J. Cinatl; M. Sturmer; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.M. Burguiere; H.W. Doerr; J.C. Manuguerra; A. Berger (Annemarie); S. Gunther; W. Preiser (Wolfgang); V. Rickerts; S. Vieth; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); S. van der Werf (Sylvie)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has recently been identified as a new clinical entity. SARS is thought to be caused by an unknown infectious agent. METHODS: Clinical specimens from patients with SARS were searched for unknown viruses with the use of cell cultures

  2. Modern approaches to physical rehabilitation of children, who often suffer from acute respiratory infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khrystova T.E.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There it is described a comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation, which aims at the prevention of acute respiratory diseases in children of primary school age. The research involved 106 children aged 6-9 years. Comprehensive program of physical rehabilitation included: aromafitotherapy and cryomassage of feet. The research proves that using of the mentioned methods leads to improving health, a significant decrease in throat hyperemia, cough and nasal discharge. It also helps to normalize the indices of breathing and physical development of children. More visible effect was observed while using the essential oils of sage and composition of essential oils (sage, lavender, mint. It is proved that the use of aromafitotherapy and cryomassage of feet helps to reduce the frequency of acute respiratory infections and exacerbations of chronic diseases of children upper respiratory organs at age of 6-12 months. It significantly reduces the number of days when children have to be absent at school because of illness.

  3. Individualized positive end-expiratory pressure application in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintado, M C; de Pablo, R

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome is based on ventilatory support with a lung protective strategy, avoiding the development of iatrogenic injury, including ventilator-induced lung injury. One of the mechanisms underlying such injury is atelectrauma, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is advocated in order to avoid it. The indicated PEEP level has not been defined, and in many cases is based on the patient oxygen requirements for maintaining adequate oxygenation. However, this strategy does not consider the mechanics of the respiratory system, which varies in each patient and depends on many factors-including particularly the duration of acute respiratory distress syndrome. A review is therefore made of the different methods for adjusting PEEP, focusing on the benefits of individualized application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Alveolar Hemorrhage after Exposure to Organic Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH is associated with severe outcomes. We report a case of acute respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation and was clinically and pathologically diagnosed as DAH related to exposure to organic dust. A 39-year-old man, who had visited a warehouse to grade beans for purchase, was referred to our hospital for impending respiratory failure. His initial radiographic examinations revealed diffuse bilateral ground-glass opacities in his lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage resulted in progressively bloodier returns, which is characteristic of DAH. He underwent bedside open lung biopsy of his right lower lobe in the intensive care unit. Biopsy results revealed DAH and organization with accumulation of hemosiderin-laden macrophages and a few fibroblastic foci. The patient was treated with empirical antibiotics and high-dose corticosteroids and successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation. DAH might be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute respiratory failure after exposure to organic particles.

  5. Acute Intermittent Porphyria Associated with Respiratory Failure: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Gil Cezar, Alkmim-Teixeira; Casarini, Karin Aparecida; Muniz Cordeiro, Kátia Simone; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Despite being challenging, delivery of effective nursing care to patients with acute intermittent porphyria is a matter of utmost importance. In this paper, the diversity of symptoms and the difficult diagnosis of this condition are emphasized, and details concerning the treatment of this disorder in the intensive care unit are presented. We believe that acute intermittent porphyria should be borne in mind during performance of differential diagnosis of neurological, psychiatric, and gastroenterological disorders on patients whose routine investigation tests are normal, especially when precipitating factors exist. Intensive care measures and a multidisciplinary team approach are essential. PMID:21687623

  6. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  7. Tidal volume in acute respiratory distress syndrome: how best to select it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Michele; Marino, Antonella; Chiumello, Davide

    2017-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation is the type of organ support most widely provided in the intensive care unit. However, this form of support does not constitute a cure for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), as it mainly works by buying time for the lungs to heal while contributing to the maintenance of vital gas exchange. Moreover, it can further damage the lung, leading to the development of a particular form of lung injury named ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Experimental evidence accumulated over the last 30 years highlighted the factors associated with an injurious form of mechanical ventilation. The present paper illustrates the physiological effects of delivering a tidal volume to the lungs of patients with ARDS, and suggests an approach to tidal volume selection. The relationship between tidal volume and the development of VILI, the so called volotrauma, will be reviewed. The still actual suggestion of a lung-protective ventilatory strategy based on the use of low tidal volumes scaled to the predicted body weight (PBW) will be presented, together with newer strategies such as the use of airway driving pressure as a surrogate for the amount of ventilatable lung tissue or the concept of strain, i.e., the ratio between the tidal volume delivered relative to the resting condition, that is the functional residual capacity (FRC). An ultra-low tidal volume strategy with the use of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) will be presented and discussed. Eventually, the role of other ventilator-related parameters in the generation of VILI will be considered (namely, plateau pressure, airway driving pressure, respiratory rate (RR), inspiratory flow), and the promising unifying framework of mechanical power will be presented.

  8. Similar virus spectra and seasonality in paediatric patients with acute respiratory disease, Ghana and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, A; Ebach, F; Corman, V M; Krumkamp, R; Adu-Sarkodie, Y; Eis-Hübinger, A M; Kruppa, T; Simon, A; May, J; Evans, J; Panning, M; Drosten, C; Drexler, J F

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological differences between tropical and temperate regions regarding viruses causing acute respiratory infection are poorly understood. This is in part because methodological differences limit the comparability of data from these two regions. Using identical molecular detection methods, we tested 1174 Ghanaian and 539 German children with acute respiratory infections sampled over 12 months for the 15 most common respiratory viruses by PCR. A total 43.2% of the Ghanaian and 56.6% of the German children tested positive for at least one respiratory virus. The pneumoviruses respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus were most frequently detected, in 13.1% and 25.1% within the Ghanaian and German children, respectively. At both study sites, pneumoviruses were more often observed at younger ages (p prevalence rate ratio (PR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.7-2.4). In contrast, non-enveloped viruses were more frequent during the Ghanaian dry season (PR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.8). In Germany, enveloped viruses were also more frequently detected during the relatively colder winter season (PR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.1) and non-enveloped viruses during summer (PR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.9). Despite a distance of about 5000 km and a difference of 44° latitude separating Germany and Ghana, virus spectra, age associations and seasonal fluctuation showed similarities between sites. Neither respiratory viruses overall, nor environmentally stable (non-enveloped) viruses in particular were more frequent in tropical Ghana. The standardization of our sampling and laboratory testing revealed similarities in acute respiratory infection virus patterns in tropical and temperate climates. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Human bocavirus isolated from children with acute respiratory tract infections in Korea, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jong Gyun; Choi, Seong Yeol; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2014-12-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) was first recognized in respiratory samples in 2005. The clinical importance of HBoV infection remains unclear. This report describes the clinical features and molecular phylogeny of HBoV isolates in children with acute respiratory infections. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from 1,528 children with acute respiratory infections between 2010 and 2011. Respiratory samples were screened for HBoV by multiplex PCR. A phylogenetic analysis of the HBoV VP1/VP2 gene was also undertaken. HBoV was detected in 187 (12.2%) of the 1,528 patients with a peak incidence of infection observed in patients aged 12-24 months. Coinfection with other respiratory viruses was observed in 107 (57.2%) of the HBoV-positive children. The peak of HBoV activity occurred during the month of June in both 2010 and 2011. A higher previous history of wheezing (P = 0.016), a higher frequency of chest retraction (P respiratory symptom score (P = 0.002), and a longer duration of hospital stay (P = 0.021) were observed in HBoV-positive children compared with the HBoV-negative group. Phylogenetic analysis showed all 187 HBoV-positive isolates were identified as HBoV 1, indicating minimal sequence variations among the isolates. A single lineage of HBoV 1 was found to have circulated in children with acute respiratory infections between 2010 and 2011 and was associated with several clinical characteristics including age, seasonality, and clinical severity with retraction, wheezing, and longer hospitalization. The clinical relevance of the minimal sequence variations of HBoV remains to be determined. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Antiviral therapy and prophylaxis of acute respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Osidak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thearticle presents the results of years of studies (including biochemical and immunological of the effectiveness of application and prophylaxis (in relation to nosocomial infections and the safety of antiviral chemical preparation Arbidol in 694 children with influenza and influenza-like illness, including the coronavirus infection (43 children and combined lesions of respiratory tract (150, indicating the possible inclusion of the drug in the complex therapy for children with the listed diseases, regardless of the severity and nature of their course. The studies were conducted according to the regulated standard of test conditions and randomized clinical trials.

  11. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, M W; Steven, M H; Phillips, G D; Branthwaite, M A

    1990-01-01

    The value of mechanical ventilation using intermittent positive pressure ventilation delivered non-invasively by nasal mask was assessed in six patients with life threatening exacerbations of chronic respiratory disease. Median (range) arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions were 4.4 (3.5-7.2) kPa and 8.7 (5.5-10.9) kPa respectively, with four patients breathing air and two controlled concentrations of oxygen. The arterial oxygen tension increased with mechanical ventilation to a median (...

  12. Core Domains for Clinical Research in Acute Respiratory Failure Survivors: An International Modified Delphi Consensus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Alison E; Sepulveda, Kristin A; Dinglas, Victor D; Chessare, Caroline M; Bingham, Clifton O; Needham, Dale M

    2017-06-01

    To identify the "core domains" (i.e., patient outcomes, health-related conditions, or aspects of health) that relevant stakeholders agree are essential to assess in all clinical research studies evaluating the outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. A two-round consensus process, using a modified Delphi methodology, with participants from 16 countries, including patient and caregiver representatives. Prior to voting, participants were asked to review 1) results from surveys of clinical researchers, acute respiratory failure survivors, and caregivers that rated the importance of 19 preliminary outcome domains and 2) results from a qualitative study of acute respiratory failure survivors' outcomes after hospital discharge, as related to the 19 preliminary outcome domains. Participants also were asked to suggest any additional potential domains for evaluation in the first Delphi survey. Web-based surveys of participants representing four stakeholder groups relevant to clinical research evaluating postdischarge outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors: clinical researchers, clinicians, patients and caregivers, and U.S. federal research funding organizations. None. None. Survey response rates were 97% and 99% in round 1 and round 2, respectively. There were seven domains that met the a priori consensus criteria to be designated as core domains: physical function, cognition, mental health, survival, pulmonary function, pain, and muscle and/or nerve function. This study generated a consensus-based list of core domains that should be assessed in all clinical research studies evaluating acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. Identifying appropriate measurement instruments to assess these core domains is an important next step toward developing a set of core outcome measures for this field of research.

  13. Incorporating Inflammation into Mortality Risk in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinter, Matt S; Orwoll, Benjamin E; Spicer, Aaron C; Alkhouli, Mustafa F; Calfee, Carolyn S; Matthay, Michael A; Sapru, Anil

    2017-05-01

    In pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, lung injury is mediated by immune activation and severe inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients with elevated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines would have higher mortality rates and that these biomarkers could improve risk stratification of poor outcomes. Multicenter prospective observational study. We enrolled patients from five academic PICUs between 2008 and 2015. Patients were 1 month to 18 years old, used noninvasive or invasive ventilation, and met the American European Consensus Conference definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Eight proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were measured on acute respiratory distress syndrome day 1 and correlated with mortality, ICU morbidity as measured by survivor Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction score, and biomarkers of endothelial injury, including angiopoietin-2, von Willebrand Factor, and soluble thrombomodulin. We measured biomarker levels in 194 patients, including 38 acute respiratory distress syndrome nonsurvivors. Interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, interleukin-18, and tumor necrosis factor-R2 were each strongly associated with all-cause mortality, multiple markers of ICU morbidity, and endothelial injury. A multiple logistic regression model incorporating oxygenation index, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor-R2 was superior to a model of oxygenation index alone in predicting the composite outcome of mortality or severe morbidity (area under the receiver operating characteristic, 0.77 [0.70-0.83] vs 0.70 [0.62-0.77]; p = 0.042). In pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are strongly associated with mortality, ICU morbidity, and biochemical evidence of endothelial injury. These cytokines significantly improve the ability of the oxygenation index to discriminate risk of mortality or severe morbidity and may allow for identification and enrollment of high

  14. FLT-3 ITD Positive Acute Basophilic Leukemia with Rare Complex Karyotype Presenting with Acute Respiratory Failure: Case Report

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    Antohe Ion

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute basophilic leukemia is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, as categorized by the 2008 World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms. Acute basophilic leukemia diagnosis requires thorough morphological, cytochemical, immunophenotypic, molecular, and cytogenetic studies and exclusion of other hematological neoplasms associating basophilia. The disease course is defined by histamine driven, occasionally life-threatening respiratory, cardiovascular, cutaneous or digestive complications, as well as primary refractoriness to standard therapy. Clinical presentation: We herein report a case of a 63-year-old asthmatic female patient diagnosed with acute basophilic leukemia, associated with previously unpublished cytogenetic features and FLT-3 ITD mutation, pulmonary leukostasis and spontaneous pulmonary capillary leak syndrome, which worsened immediately following chemotherapy initiation. Respiratory complications were successfully managed, but recrudesced upon emergence of refractory disease and were ultimately fatal. We highlight the likelihood of pulmonary complications induced by basophil degranulation and tumor lysis in hypercellular acute basophilic leukemia and the potential benefit of histamine receptor blockade in this setting.

  15. Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    harvested 24 hrs post insult; C. VLP-treated and 2CLP-operated harvested 24 hrs post insult; D1,2. VLPtreated and 2CLP-operated harvested 4 days post ...insult; E. VLP-treated and 2CLP-operated harvested 12 days post insult. Magnification x400. 11 12 Lungs of the sacrificed rats were...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0125 TITLE: "Potential Application of Viral Empty Capsids for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory

  16. Comparing written programs and self-reported respiratory protection practices in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sietsema, Margaret; Conroy, Lorraine M; Brosseau, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Airborne biological hazards in hospitals require the use of respiratory protection. A well-implemented respiratory protection program can protect health care workers from these exposures. This study examines the relationship between written respiratory programs and reported practices in health care settings. Twenty-eight hospitals in Illinois and Minnesota were recruited to a study of respiratory protection programs and practices in acute care settings. Interviews were conducted with hospital managers, unit managers, and health care workers from departments where respirators are commonly required. Each hospital's written respiratory protection program was scored for the 11 elements required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), using a standardized tool, for a maximum possible score of 22 (2 pts. per element). Twenty interview questions associated with program practices were also scored by percent correct responses. Written program scores ranged from 2-17 with an average of 9.2. Hospital and unit managers scored on average 82% and 81%, respectively, when compared to the OSHA standard; health care workers scored significantly lower, 71% (p respiratory protection programs in the study sites did not provide the level of detail required OSHA. Interview responses representing hospital practices surrounding respiratory protection indicated that hospitals were aware of and following regulatory guidelines.

  17. Acute polyneuromyopathy with respiratory failure secondary to monensin intoxication in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Luis; Bersenas, Alexa M; Bateman, Shane

    2017-12-06

    To describe a successfully managed case of polyneuropathy and respiratory failure secondary to presumed monensin intoxication. A 9-month-old Australian Shepherd was evaluated for progressive generalized weakness and respiratory distress. Several days preceding presentation, the dog was seen playing with a monensin capsule, and had free access to a barn where the product was stored and where chewed capsules were subsequently found. The dog was presented with flaccid tetraparesis, hyperthermia, and severe respiratory distress. Bloodwork and urinalysis revealed marked increase in serum creatine kinase concentration and presumed myoglobinuria. Cardiac troponin I level was markedly increased. Management included mechanical ventilation for 5 days, fluid-therapy, active cooling, antimicrobial therapy, analgesia, gastroprotectants, antiemetics, enteral feedings, continuous nursing care, and physiotherapy. Intravenous lipid rescue therapy was administered with lack of improvement in respiratory function and muscle strength. The patient completely recovered and was discharged after 12 days of hospitalization. Monensin intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute polyneuromyopathy and respiratory failure in dogs with access to this compound. Respiratory failure secondary to monensin intoxication does not necessarily carry a poor prognosis if mechanical ventilation can be provided as a bridge until return of respiratory function is achieved. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  18. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yun-Hang; Liu, Wei; Urbino, Rosario; Ranieri, V Marco; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Yang, Yi

    2016-07-20

    Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. However, airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance. This study was to evaluate the Pawstress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Pawstress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients. Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital, Nanjing, China and Ospedale S. Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy. All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min. PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol. The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio. The high elastance group (H group, n = 14) had a ratio ≥30%, and the low elastance group (L group, n = 10) had a ratio Respiratory elastance, gas-exchange, Pawstress index, and PLstress index were measured. Student's t-test, regression analysis, and Bland-Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis. Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%). Compared with the L group, PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs. 9.0 ± 2.3 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Compared with the H group, lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs. 11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L, P < 0.01), and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs. 4.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02). A linear relationship was observed between the Pawstress index and the PLstress index in H group (R2 = 0.56, P < 0.01) and L group (R2 = 0.85, P < 0.01). In the ARF patients with MV, Pawstress index can substitute for PLto guide ventilator settings. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02196870 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02196870).

  19. Sedation Management in Children Supported on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, James B; Sweberg, Todd; Asaro, Lisa A; Kirby, Aileen; Wypij, David; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Curley, Martha A Q

    2017-10-01

    To describe sedation management in children supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for acute respiratory failure. Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from a multicenter randomized trial of sedation (Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure). Twenty-one U.S. PICUs. One thousand two hundred fifty-five children, 2 weeks to 17 years old, with moderate/severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Sedation managed per usual care or Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure protocol. Sixty-one Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure patients (5%) with moderate/severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome were supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, including 29 managed per Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure protocol. Most extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients received neuromuscular blockade (46%) or were heavily sedated with State Behavioral Scale scores -3/-2 (34%) by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation day 3. Median opioid and benzodiazepine doses on the day of cannulation, 0.15 mg/kg/hr (3.7 mg/kg/d) and 0.11 mg/kg/hr (2.8 mg/kg/d), increased by 36% and 58%, respectively, by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation day 3. In the 41 patients successfully decannulated prior to study discharge, patients were receiving 0.40 mg/kg/hr opioids (9.7 mg/kg/d) and 0.39 mg/kg/hr benzodiazepines (9.4 mg/kg/d) at decannulation, an increase from cannulation of 108% and 192%, respectively (both p withdrawal than moderate/severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome patients managed without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support (p managed per Randomized Evaluation of Sedation Titration for Respiratory Failure protocol, usual care extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients received more opioids during the study period (mean cumulative dose of 183.0 vs 89.8 mg/kg; p = 0.02), over 6

  20. Parents' Expectations and Experiences of Antibiotics for Acute Respiratory Infections in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxeter, Peter D; Mar, Chris Del; Hoffmann, Tammy C

    2017-03-01

    Primary care visits for children with acute respiratory infections frequently result in antibiotic prescriptions, although antibiotics have limited benefits for common acute respiratory infections and can cause harms, including antibiotic resistance. Parental demands are often blamed for antibiotic prescription. We aimed to explore parents' beliefs about antibiotic necessity, quantify their expectations of antibiotic benefit, and report experiences of other management options and exposure to and preferences for shared decision making. We conducted computer-assisted telephone interviews in an Australia-wide community sample of primary caregivers, hereafter referred to as parents, of children aged 1 to 12 years, using random digit dialing of household landline telephones. Of the 14,505 telephone numbers called, 10,340 were eligible numbers; 589 potentially eligible parents were reached, of whom 401 were interviewed. Most believed antibiotics provide benefits for common acute respiratory infections, especially for acute otitis media (92%), although not using them, particularly for acute cough and sore throat, was sometimes acceptable. Parents grossly overestimated the mean benefit of antibiotics on illness symptom duration by 5 to 10 times, and believed they reduce the likelihood of complications. The majority, 78%, recognized antibiotics may cause harm. Recalling the most recent relevant doctor visit, 44% of parents reported at least some discussion about why antibiotics might be used; shared decision making about antibiotic use was inconsistent, while 75% wanted more involvement in future decisions. Some parents have misperceptions about antibiotic use for acute respiratory infections, highlighting the need for improved communication during visits, including shared decision making to address overoptimistic expectations of antibiotics. Such communication should be one of several strategies that is used to reduce antibiotic use. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  1. [An unusual cause of acute respiratory distress: obstructive bronchial aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margery, J; Perez, J-P; Vaylet, F; Bordier, E; Dot, J-M; Saint-Blancard, P; Bonnichon, A; Guigay, J; Pats, B; L'Her, P

    2004-06-01

    We report the case of a 77-Year-old immunocompetent woman who required intensive care for acute dyspnea revealing complete atelectasia of the left lung related to an aspergillus mycelium plug blocking the principal bronchus. The clinical course was favorable after deobstruction by thermocoagulation and oral itraconazole given for six Months. The patient was free of parenchymatous or endobronchial sequelae. Adjuvant oral corticoid therapy was given temporarily during the second Month of treatment when signs of transition towards allergic aspergillosis developed. Four Months after discontinuing the antifungal treatment, the patient developed a new episode of acute dyspnea caused by atelectasia limited to the right lower lobe. Treatment by itraconazole was resumed and continued as long-term therapy. No recurrence has been observed for eighteen Months. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems raised by Aspergillus fumigatus are well known in the immunocompromised subject, but can also be encountered in the immunocompetent subject.

  2. Efficacy of continuous renal replacement therapy in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis associated acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H-X; Xu, J-Y; Li, M-Q

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) using continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) by evaluating the effect of CRRT on respiratory and circulatory function as well as serum cytokines level. Fifty four randomly selected patients with confirmed SAP complicated by ARDS after being admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) within 72 hr of onset were included in the study. Patients received mechanical respiratory support and CRRT. Arterial blood gas analysis was conducted and serum cytokine levels, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), as well as C reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated respectively both before and 6h, 12h, and 24h after CRRT therapy. Peak inspiratory pressure and pulmonary compliance were also recorded. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO2), oxygenation index (OI) as well as dynamic pulmonary compliance were all elevated significantly, whereas peak inspiratory pressure significantly decreased at 6h, 12h and 24h after CRRT respectively; serum cytokine level and CRP significantly decreased (p < 0.05). CRRT can effectively reduce the level of inflammatory mediators, and improve respiratory and circulatory function.

  3. Experimental Assessment of a Variable Orifice Flowmeter for Respiratory Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Tardi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of gas exchanges is essential in mechanical ventilation and in respiratory monitoring. Among the large number of commercial flowmeters, only few kinds of sensors are used in these fields. Among them, variable orifice meters (VOMs show some valuable characteristics, such as linearity, good dynamic response, and low cost. This paper presents the characterization of a commercial VOM intended for application in respiratory monitoring. Firstly, two nominally identical VOMs were calibrated within ±10 L·min−1, to assess their metrological properties. Furthermore, experiments were performed by humidifying the air, to evaluate the influence of vapor condensation on sensor’s performances. The condensation influence was investigated during two long lasting trials (i.e., 4 hours by delivering 4 L·min−1 and 8 L·min−1. Data show that the two VOMs’ responses are linear and their response is comparable (sensitivity difference of 1.4%, RMSE of 1.50 Pa; their discrimination threshold is <0.5 L·min−1, and the settling time is about 66 ms. The condensation within the VOM causes a negligible change in sensor sensitivity and a very slight deterioration of precision. The good static and dynamic properties and the low influence of condensation on sensor’s response make this VOM suitable for applications in respiratory function monitoring.

  4. Pulmonar recruitment in acute respiratory distress syndrome. What is the best strategy?

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    Cíntia Lourenço Santos

    Full Text Available Supporting patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, using a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volume and limitation of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP is a standard practice in the intensive care unit. However, these strategies can promote lung de-recruitment, leading to the cyclic closing and reopening of collapsed alveoli and small airways. Recruitment maneuvers (RM can be used to augment other methods, like positive end-expiratory pressure and positioning, to improve aerated lung volume. Clinical practice varies widely, and the optimal method and patient selection for recruitment maneuvers have not been determined, considerable uncertainty remaining regarding the appropriateness of RM. This review aims to discuss recent findings about the available types of RM, and compare the effectiveness, indications and adverse effects among them, as well as their impact on morbidity and mortality in ARDS patients. Recent developments include experimental and clinical evidence that a stepwise extended recruitment maneuver may cause an improvement in aerated lung volume and decrease the biological impact seen with the traditionally used sustained inflation, with less adverse effects. Prone positioning can reduce mortality in severe ARDS patients and may be an useful adjunct to recruitment maneuvers and advanced ventilatory strategies, such noisy ventilation and BIVENT, which have been useful in providing lung recruitment.

  5. Phased-array intracardiac echocardiographic imaging of acute cardiovascular emergencies: Experimental studies in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Elina; Zhang, Yi; Davies, Ray; Coddington, William; Kerber, Richard E

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated a newly developed phased-array intracardiac echocardiographic catheter. Our aim was to evaluate the imaging capability of this new ICE catheter in an animal model simulating acute cardiovascular abnormalities. ICE images were obtained from the right atrium during (1) acute left ventricular dysfunction; (2) acute coronary occlusion; (3) pericardial effusion and tamponade; and (4) pulmonary embolism. Left ventricular dysfunction, induced experimentally by halothane inhalation, resulted in a fall in echocardiography-calculated ejection fraction from 47% +/- 11% to 25% +/- 10%, P small as 15 mL. Right ventricular and atrial compression and respiratory variation in right ventricular inflow during tamponade were demonstrated. After injection of intravenous thrombin to create venous thromboembolism, we demonstrated right ventricular dilatation and dysfunction and thrombi attached to the tricuspid and pulmonary valves and in the pulmonary artery. This new phased-array ICE catheter may be a useful clinical tool for the diagnosis of heart failure, ischemia, tamponade, and pulmonary embolism.

  6. Current concepts in acute respiratory support for neonates and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca, Marjorie J; Uhing, Michael; Wakeham, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Current trends in mechanical respiratory support are evolving toward gentle approaches to avoid short- and long-term problems that are historically associated with mechanical ventilation. These ventilator-associated issues include the need for long-term sedation, muscle deconditioning, ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This article will describe recent trends of ventilatory support in neonates and children: (1) utilization of volume ventilation in infants, (2) synchrony and improving patient-ventilator interaction specifically using neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA), and (3) use of noninvasive ventilation techniques. When applicable, their uses in the surgical newborn and pediatric patients are described. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. INFLUENZA AND ACUTE VIRAL RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN THE PRACTICE OF THE EMERGENCY CREWS OF MOSCOW

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    N. F. Plavunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza and acute viral respiratory infections have a great social significance during epidemic rise of morbidity and demand differential diagnosis of pneumonia with bacterial etiology and consultation with an infectious disease doctor in case of seeing patients in non-core hospitals. This article highlights the problem of influenza and acute respiratory viral infections’ early diagnosis. Clinical manifestations of influenza and other respiratory extremely similar. The differential diagnosis must take into account the presence of mixed infection in the same patient. According to the results of consultative infectious ambulance teams in 2014-2016, quality of diagnostics of this infectious pathology was examined. Observed deaths in persons later seeking medical treatment, not receiving timely antiviral therapy and related to high-risk groups: patients with obesity, chronic alcohol intoxication, diabetes, pregnant women. Influenza and acute viral respiratory infections, more complicated by pneumonia, people in the older age group, indicating the need for timely medical evacuation of patients older than 60 years. In some cases, in the diagnosis of influenza was helped by the results of laboratory studies (especially the trend to leukopenia and a positive rapid test. It should be noted that a negative rapid test for influenza was not a reason for exclusion of the diagnosis “influenza”.

  8. Effects of acute respiratory and metabolic acidosis on diaphragm muscle obtained from rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet, Pierre; Carreira, Serge; Demoule, Alexandre; Amour, Julien; Langeron, Olivier; Riou, Bruno; Coirault, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory acidosis is associated with alterations in diaphragm performance. The authors compared the effects of respiratory acidosis and metabolic acidosis in the rat diaphragm in vitro. Diaphragmatic strips were stimulated in vitro, and mechanical and energetic variables were measured, cross-bridge kinetics calculated, and the effects of fatigue evaluated. An extracellular pH of 7.00 was obtained by increasing carbon dioxide tension (from 25 to 104 mmHg) in the respiratory acidosis group (n = 12) or lowering bicarbonate concentration (from 24.5 to 5.5 mM) in the metabolic acidosis group (n = 12) and the results compared with a control group (n = 12, pH = 7.40) after 20-min exposure. Respiratory acidosis induced a significant decrease in maximum shortening velocity (-33%, P acidosis impaired more relaxation than contraction, as shown by impairment in contraction-relaxation coupling under isotonic (-26%, P metabolic acidosis group. In rat diaphragm, acute (20 min) respiratory acidosis induced a marked decrease in the diaphragm contractility, which was not observed in metabolic acidosis.

  9. Viral etiology among the elderly presenting acute respiratory infection during the influenza season

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    Aripuanã Sakurada Aranha Watanabe

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory tract infections are the most common illness in all individuals. Rhinoviruses have been reported as the etiology of more than 50% of respiratory tract infections worldwide. The study prospectively evaluated 47 elderly individuals from a group of 384 randomly assigned for acute respiratory viral infections (cold or flu and assessed the occurrence of human rhinovirus (HRV, influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus and metapneumovirus (hMPV in Botucatu, State of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Forty-nine nasal swabs collected from 47 elderly individuals following inclusion visits from 2002 to 2003 were tested by GenScan RT-PCR. HRV-positive samples were sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. RESULTS: No sample was positive for influenza A/B or RSV. HRV was detected in 28.6% (14/47 and hMPV in 2% (1/47. Of 14 positive samples, 9 isolates were successfully sequenced, showing the follow group distribution: 6 group A, 1 group B and 2 group C HRVs. CONCLUSIONS: The high incidence of HRV during the months of the influenza season requires further study regarding HRV infection impact on respiratory complications among this population. Infection caused by HRV is very frequent and may contribute to increasing the already high demand for healthcare during the influenza season.

  10. Etiology of Acute Respiratory Infections in Infants: A Prospective Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prawin; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R; Mishra, Vishnu S; Islam, Mojahidul; Randev, Shivani; Mukherjee, Aparna; Chaudhry, Rama; Kapil, Arti; Ram Jat, Kana; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, Sushil K

    2017-01-01

    There is paucity of studies on etiology of acute respiratory infections (ARI) in infants. The objective of this study is to document incidence and etiology of ARI in infants, their seasonal variability and association of clinical profile with etiology. A birth cohort was followed for the first year of life; for each episode of ARI, nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected to identify the causative respiratory virus(es) using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. For lower respiratory tract infections blood culture, serum procalcitonin, serum antibodies to Mycoplasma and Chlamydia and urinary Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen were also assayed. A total of 503 ARI episodes were documented in 310 infants for an incidence rate of 1.8 episodes per infant per year. Of these, samples were processed in 395 episodes (upper respiratory tract infection: 377; lower respiratory tract infection: 18). One or more viruses were detected in 250 (63.3%) episodes and viral coinfections in 72 (18.2%) episodes. Rhinovirus was the most common virus [105 (42%)] followed by respiratory syncytial virus [50 (20%)], parainfluenza virus [42 (16.8%)] and coronavirus [44 (17.6%)]. In lower respiratory tract infections, viral infections were detected in 12 (66.7%) episodes, bacterial infections in 17 (94.4%) episodes and mixed bacterial-viral infections in 8 (44.4%) episodes. Peak incidence of viruses was observed during February-March and September-November. There was no significant difference in symptom duration with virus types. In this cohort of infants, ARI incidence was 1.8 episodes per year per infant; 95% were upper respiratory tract infections. Viruses were identified in 63.3% episodes, and the most common viruses detected were rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus.

  11. Adenovirus type 7 associated with severe and fatal acute lower respiratory infections in Argentine children

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    Misirlian Alicia

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenoviruses are the second most prevalent cause of acute lower respiratory infection of viral origin in children under four years of age in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and outcome of acute lower respiratory infection associated with different adenovirus genotypes in children. Methods Twenty-four cases of acute lower respiratory infection and adenovirus diagnosis reported in a pediatric unit during a two-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Adenovirus was detected by antigen detection and isolation in HEp-2 cells. Adenovirus DNA from 17 isolates was studied by restriction enzyme analysis with Bam HI and Sma I. Results Subgenus b was found in 82.3% of the cases, and subgenus c in 17.7%. Within subgenus b, only genotype 7 was detected, with genomic variant 7h in 85.7% (12/14 and genomic variant 7i in 14.3% (2/14. Mean age was 8.8 ±; 6 months, and male to female ratio was 3.8: 1. At admission, pneumonia was observed in 71% of the cases and bronchiolitis in 29%. Malnutrition occurred in 37% of the cases; tachypnea in 79%; chest indrawing in 66%; wheezing in 58%; apneas in 16%; and conjunctivitis in 29%. Blood cultures for bacteria and antigen detection of other respiratory viruses were negative. During hospitalization, fatality rate was 16.7% (4 /24. Of the patients who died, three had Ad 7h and one Ad 7i. Thus, fatality rate for adenovirus type 7 reached 28.6% (4/14. Conclusions These results show the predominance of adenovirus 7 and high lethality associated with the genomic variants 7h and 7i in children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection.

  12. Acute respiratory symptoms and evacuation-related behavior after exposure to chlorine gas leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung-Woo; Choi, Won-Jun; Yi, Min-Kee; Song, Seng-Ho; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Han, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed on the accidental chlorine gas leakage that occurred in a factory of printed circuit boards manufactured without chlorine. Health examination was performed for all 52 workers suspected of exposure to chlorine gas, and their evacuation-related behaviors were observed in addition to analyzing the factors that affected the duration of their acute respiratory symptoms. Behavioral characteristics during the incidence of the accidental chlorine gas leakage, the estimated time of exposure, and the duration of subjective acute respiratory symptoms were investigated. In addition, clinical examination, chest radiography, and dental erosion test were performed. As variables that affected the duration of respiratory symptoms, dose group, body weight, age, sex, smoking, work period, and wearing a protective gear were included and analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazard model. Of 47 workers exposed to chlorine gas, 36 (77 %) developed more than one subjective symptom. The duration of the subjective symptoms according to exposure level significantly differed, with a median of 1 day (range, 0-5 days) in the low-exposure group and 2 days (range, 0-25 days) in the high-exposure group. Among the variables that affected the duration of the acute respiratory symptoms, which were analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazard model, only exposure level was significant (hazard ratio 2.087, 95 % CI = 1.119, 3.890). Regarding the evacuation-related behaviors, 22 workers (47 %) voluntarily evacuated to a safety zone immediately after recognizing the accidental exposure, but 25 workers (43 %) delayed evacuation until the start of mandatory evacuation (min 5, max 25 min). The duration of the subjective acute respiratory symptoms significantly differed between the low- and high-exposure groups. Among the 27 workers in the high-exposure group, 17 misjudged the toxicity after being aware of the gas leakage, which is a relatively high number.

  13. NEW OPPORTUNITIES OF PROPHYLAXIS OF BRONCHIAL ASTHMA EXACERBATIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

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    V.N. Chernyshov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The data on pidotimod (Imunorix effectiveness in prophylaxis of bronchial asthma exacerbations in children are analyzed. Authors’ trial included 55 children 5–10 years old with exacerbations of a disease caused by acute respiratory infections. Authors studied influence of pidotimod on antioxidant system of blood serum. The effectiveness of the drug for the prophylaxis of respiratory infections in children with bronchial asthma was shown, and this effect favored to the decrease of rate of exacerbations.Key words: children, bronchial asthma, prophylaxis, pidotimod.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(2:54-57

  14. The pragmatics of feeding the pediatric patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Judy T; Bradshaw, Darla J; Henry, Elizabeth; Roberts, Kathryn E

    2004-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents the ultimate pulmonary response to a wide range of injuries, from septicemia to trauma. Optimal nutrition is vital to enhancing oxygen delivery, supporting adequate cardiac contractility and respiratory musculature, eliminating fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and supporting the proinflammatory response. Research is providing a better understanding of nutrients that specifically address the complex physiologic changes in ARDS. This article highlights the pathophysiology of ARDS as it relates to nutrition, relevant nutritional assessment, and important enteral and parenteral considerations for the pediatric patient who has ARDS.

  15. [Human Bocavirus 1: role in the acute respiratory infection and epidemiology in Cordoba, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, María Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is an agent of acute respiratory infection frequent in children. It can cause pneumonia in infants, in the absence of epidemiological risk factors and comorbidities. Well-controlled studies of clinical cases and case series are still useful for the characterization of the clinicoepideiological features of the infection, while research dives on the molecular biology of the virus and the virus-cell relationship allowing to unveil tha natural history of the infection. This article reviews the state of the art and future perspectives on this new human parvovirus and its etiological role in the respiratory pathology.

  16. Burden and Seasonality of Viral Acute Respiratory Tract Infections among Outpatients in Southern Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, David; Bodinayake, Champica K; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Devasiri, Vasantha; Kurukulasooriya, Ruvini; Hsiang, Jeremy; Nicholson, Bradley; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Østbye, Truls; Reller, Megan E; Woods, Christopher W; Tillekeratne, L Gayani

    2017-07-01

    In tropical and subtropical settings, the epidemiology of viral acute respiratory tract infections varies widely between countries. We determined the etiology, seasonality, and clinical presentation of viral acute respiratory tract infections among outpatients in southern Sri Lanka. From March 2013 to January 2015, we enrolled outpatients presenting with influenza-like illness (ILI). Nasal/nasopharyngeal samples were tested in duplicate using antigen-based rapid influenza testing and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for respiratory viruses. Monthly proportion positive was calculated for each virus. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify associations between sociodemographic/clinical information and viral detection. Of 571 subjects, most (470, 82.3%) were ≥ 5 years of age and 53.1% were male. A respiratory virus was detected by PCR in 63.6% ( N = 363). Common viral etiologies included influenza (223, 39%), human enterovirus/rhinovirus (HEV/HRV, 14.5%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 4.2%), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV, 3.9%). Both ILI and influenza showed clear seasonal variation, with peaks from March to June each year. RSV and hMPV activity peaked from May to July, whereas HEV/HRV was seen year-round. Patients with respiratory viruses detected were more likely to report pain with breathing (odds ratio [OR] = 2.60, P = 0.003), anorexia (OR = 2.29, P respiratory viruses detected. ILI showed clear seasonal variation in southern Sri Lanka, with most activity during March to June; peak activity was largely due to influenza. Targeted infection prevention activities such as influenza vaccination in January-February may have a large public health impact in this region.

  17. Viral acute lower respiratory infections impair CD8+ T cells through PD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, John J; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Hastings, Andrew K; Tollefson, Sharon J; Johnson, Monika; Downing, Melissa B; Boyd, Kelli L; Johnson, Joyce E; Kim, Annette S; Joyce, Sebastian; Williams, John V

    2012-08-01

    Viruses are leading causes of severe acute lower respiratory infections (LRIs). These infections evoke incomplete immunity, as individuals can be repeatedly reinfected throughout life. We report that acute viral LRI causes rapid pulmonary CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (TCD8) functional impairment via programmed death-1/programmed death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1) signaling, a pathway previously associated with prolonged antigenic stimulation during chronic infections and cancer. PD-1-mediated TCD8 impairment occurred acutely in mice following infection with human metapneumovirus or influenza virus. Viral antigen was sufficient for PD-1 upregulation, but induction of PD-L1 was required for impairment. During secondary viral infection or epitope-only challenge, memory TCD8 rapidly reexpressed PD-1 and exhibited severe functional impairment. Inhibition of PD-1 signaling using monoclonal antibody blockade prevented TCD8 impairment, reduced viral titers during primary infection, and enhanced protection of immunized mice against challenge infection. Additionally, PD-1 and PD-L1 were upregulated in the lungs of patients with 2009 H1N1 influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, or parainfluenza virus infection. These results indicate that PD-1 mediates TCD8 functional impairment during acute viral infection and may contribute to recurrent viral LRIs. Therefore, the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may represent a therapeutic target in the treatment of respiratory viruses.

  18. Acute respiratory and cardiovascular admissions after a public smoking ban in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Humair

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many countries have introduced legislations for public smoking bans to reduce the harmful effects of exposure to tobacco smoke. Smoking bans cause significant reductions in admissions for acute coronary syndromes but their impact on respiratory diseases is unclear. In Geneva, Switzerland, two popular votes led to a stepwise implementation of a state smoking ban in public places, with a temporary suspension. This study evaluated the effect of this smoking ban on hospitalisations for acute respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. METHODS: This before and after intervention study was conducted at the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, across 4 periods with different smoking legislations. It included 5,345 patients with a first hospitalisation for acute coronary syndrome, ischemic stroke, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia and acute asthma. The main outcomes were the incidence rate ratios (IRR of admissions for each diagnosis after the final ban compared to the pre-ban period and adjusted for age, gender, season, influenza epidemic and secular trend. RESULTS: Hospitalisations for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease significantly decreased over the 4 periods and were lowest after the final ban (IRR=0.54 [95%CI: 0.42-0.68]. We observed a trend in reduced admissions for acute coronary syndromes (IRR=0.90 [95%CI: 0.80-1.00]. Admissions for ischemic stroke, asthma and pneumonia did not significantly change. CONCLUSIONS: A legislative smoking ban was followed by a strong decrease in hospitalisations for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a trend for reduced admissions for acute coronary syndrome. Smoking bans are likely to be very beneficial for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  19. Acute respiratory and cardiovascular admissions after a public smoking ban in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humair, Jean-Paul; Garin, Nicolas; Gerstel, Eric; Carballo, Sebastian; Carballo, David; Keller, Pierre-Frédéric; Guessous, Idris

    2014-01-01

    Many countries have introduced legislations for public smoking bans to reduce the harmful effects of exposure to tobacco smoke. Smoking bans cause significant reductions in admissions for acute coronary syndromes but their impact on respiratory diseases is unclear. In Geneva, Switzerland, two popular votes led to a stepwise implementation of a state smoking ban in public places, with a temporary suspension. This study evaluated the effect of this smoking ban on hospitalisations for acute respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. This before and after intervention study was conducted at the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, across 4 periods with different smoking legislations. It included 5,345 patients with a first hospitalisation for acute coronary syndrome, ischemic stroke, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia and acute asthma. The main outcomes were the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of admissions for each diagnosis after the final ban compared to the pre-ban period and adjusted for age, gender, season, influenza epidemic and secular trend. Hospitalisations for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease significantly decreased over the 4 periods and were lowest after the final ban (IRR=0.54 [95%CI: 0.42-0.68]). We observed a trend in reduced admissions for acute coronary syndromes (IRR=0.90 [95%CI: 0.80-1.00]). Admissions for ischemic stroke, asthma and pneumonia did not significantly change. A legislative smoking ban was followed by a strong decrease in hospitalisations for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a trend for reduced admissions for acute coronary syndrome. Smoking bans are likely to be very beneficial for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  20. Adaptation of a Biomarker-Based Sepsis Mortality Risk Stratification Tool for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehya, Nadir; Wong, Hector R

    2018-01-01

    The original Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model and revised (Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model-II) biomarker-based risk prediction models have demonstrated utility for estimating baseline 28-day mortality risk in pediatric sepsis. Given the paucity of prediction tools in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, and given the overlapping pathophysiology between sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome, we tested the utility of Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model and Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model-II for mortality prediction in a cohort of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, with an a priori plan to revise the model if these existing models performed poorly. Prospective observational cohort study. University affiliated PICU. Mechanically ventilated children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Blood collection within 24 hours of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset and biomarker measurements. In 152 children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model performed poorly and Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model-II performed modestly (areas under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.61 and 0.76, respectively). Therefore, we randomly selected 80% of the cohort (n = 122) to rederive a risk prediction model for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. We used classification and regression tree methodology, considering the Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model biomarkers in addition to variables relevant to acute respiratory distress syndrome. The final model was comprised of three biomarkers and age, and more accurately estimated baseline mortality risk (area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.85, p Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model and Pediatric Sepsis Biomarker Risk Model-II, respectively). The model was tested in the remaining 20% of subjects (n = 30) and demonstrated similar test characteristics. A validated, biomarker-based risk stratification tool designed for

  1. Viral aetiology in adults with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Jinan, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqin; Tong, Jiabei; Pei, Fengyan; Yang, Yanping; Xu, Dong; Ji, Mingyu; Xing, Chunyan; Jia, Pingdong; Xu, Chao; Wang, Yunshan; Li, Gongchao; Chai, Zhenbin; Liu, Yan; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-01-01

    Our study investigated the epidemiology of respiratory viruses in adult patients with upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) between August 2009 and September 2010 in Jinan, northern China. Nasal and throat swabs (n = 596) were collected from adult patients with URTIs. Nine respiratory-related viruses, including IFV, PIV, HRV, HMPV, HBoV, HCoV, ADV, RSV, and EV, were detected in all samples by conventional and reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions. Positive detection rate for respiratory virus was 38.76% and codetection rate was 4.70% in adults with acute respiratory tract infections. IFV (20.81%) was the dominant agent detected and IFVB had a higher incidence (12.58%) than IFVA (7.72%). Detection rates of 8.22%, 5.03%, 3.69%, and 2.52% were observed for HBoV, HRV, EV, and RSV, respectively. HCoV had the lowest detection rate of 0.50%. HBoV, HRV, EV, and ADV infection rates were higher in the 14-25-year-old group than in the 26-65-year-old group. Codetection rates were higher (7.52%) in the 14-25-year-old group than in the older age group (2.64%). The spectrum of respiratory virus infection in adult patients with URTIs was different in Jinan compared with other cities in China.

  2. Effect of Influenza Vaccination on Acute Respiratory Symptoms in Malaysian Hajj Pilgrims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Habsah; Deris, Zakuan Zainy; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Abdul Wahab, Mohd Suhaimi; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Ab Rahman, Zulkefle; Othman, Nor Hayati

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory illness were a major problem and caused high hospital admission during hajj seasons. One of the contributing cause to this illness is infection. Various measures had been implemented to reduce respiratory infections. The aim on the study is to determine the effect of influenza vaccination against acute respiratory illness among Malaysian Hajj pilgrims. This is an observational cohort study. Influenza vaccination was given to pilgrims at least 2 weeks prior to departure. The occurrence of symptoms for respiratory illness such as cough, fever, sore throat and runny nose was monitored daily for 6 weeks during pilgrimage using a health diary. A total of 65 vaccinated hajj pilgrims and 41 controls were analyzed. There was no significant difference in pattern of occurrence of symptoms of respiratory illness by duration of pilgrimage as well as the number of symptoms between both groups. Hajj pilgrims have frequent respiratory symptoms. We were unable to document benefit from influenza vaccination, but our study was limited by a small sample size and lack of laboratory testing for influenza.

  3. Chest Physiotherapy on the Respiratory Mechanics and Elimination of Sputum in Paralyzed and Mechanically Ventilated Patients With Acute Lung Injury: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Minhee; Heitkemper, Margaret; Smi, Choi-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) is commonly used for mechanically ventilated patients, but little is known about its physiological effects, particularly in patients with acute lung injury (ALI). The aim of the study was to determine the benefits and risks of delivering multimodal respiratory physiotherapy to mechanically ventilated patients with ALI receiving paralytic agents. Methods: A repeated measure-experimental design using a counterbalancing method was employed. Fifteen patients received ...

  4. Ambulatory antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis and cough and hospital admissions for respiratory infections: time trends analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainous, Arch G; Saxena, Sonia; Hueston, William J; Everett, Charles J; Majeed, Azeem

    2006-07-01

    To examine the relationship between ambulatory antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis and cough with hospital admissions for respiratory infections in the USA between 1996 and 2003. Analysis of data on antibiotic prescribing for episodes of acute bronchitis/cough illness in ambulatory care and hospitalization for respiratory infections for adults between 1996 and 2003 in the USA. USA: ambulatory prescribing behaviour was derived from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey while hospitalizations in acute care hospitals were assessed in the National Hospital Discharge Survey. Adults 18-64 years old. None. Proportion of visits for acute bronchitis/cough receiving a prescription for antibiotics and hospitalization for respiratory infections. Ambulatory antibiotic prescribing practices for acute bronchitis/cough and hospitalizations for respiratory infections exhibited non-linear patterns over the 8 year period. However, antibiotic prescribing practices for acute bronchitis/cough and hospitalizations for respiratory infections had a weak/moderate negative association. For three of the seven yearly changes in prescribing and hospitalizations as one increased the other decreased (P<0.01). Ambulatory antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections was inversely associated with hospital admissions for respiratory tract infections.

  5. Acute phase proteins in naturally occurring respiratory disease of feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idoate, Ignacio; Vander Ley, Brian; Schultz, Loren; Heller, Meera

    2015-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate three acute phase proteins (APP) [haptoglobin (HPT), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and transferrin (Tf)] in feedlot cattle with naturally occurring respiratory disease diagnosed by a calf health scoring chart (CHSC). Seventy-seven beef calves were observed for signs of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD) during the first 28 days after arrival at the feedlot. Fourteen cases and pen matched controls were selected based on the CHSC. BRD cases were defined as a score of ≥ 5, while controls were defined as a score ≤ 4. The mean CHSC score in cases was 6.9 which was significantly greater than the controls 2.8 (P respiratory disease in feedlot conditions. Transferrin concentrations between the two groups were not statistically different. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Acute Respiratory Infection Quality Dashboard: a performance measurement reporting tool in an electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Jeffrey A; Jung, Eunice; Housman, Dan; Eskin, Michael S; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S

    2007-10-11

    Quality reporting tools, integrated with electronic health records, can help clinicians understand performance, manage populations, and improve quality. The Acute Respiratory Infection Quality Dashboard (ARI QD) for LMR users is a secure web report for performance measurement of an acute condition delivered through a central data warehouse and custom-built reporting tool. Pilot evaluation of the ARI QD indicates that clinicians prefer a quality report that combines not only structured data regarding diagnosis and antibiotic prescribing rates entered into EHRs but one that also shows billing data. The ARI QD has the potential to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing for ARIs.

  7. RIBOSOMAL COMPLEX IN PROPHYLAXIS AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Alekseeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections (ARI are widespread in children regardless of age and region of living; they are characterized with big amount of infectious agents and absence of a trend to morbidity decrease. Drugs for nonspecific prophylaxis (immunostimulators and immunomodulatory agents are frequently used for prevention of ARI. There are plenty of immunomodulating agents; the wellstudied medication with systemic action with good efficacy and safety in pediatric practice is ribosomal-proteoglycan complex. The article presents the description of clinical experience of treatment with this complex in pediatric practice.Key words: children, acute respiratory infections, prophylaxis, treatment, ribosomal complex.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(6:127-130

  8. PIDOTIMOD IN TREATMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION IN FREQUENTLY AILING CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Kharlamova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This trial studied effectiveness and safety of pidotimoid (Imunorix in complex treatment of children with acute respiratory infection (ARI. Treatment with pidotimoid during 2 weeks (n = 30 resulted in lesser duration of fever and intoxication symptoms, and symptoms of laryngo-tracheitis, compared to control group (n = 30. Besides, children from pidotimoid group showed more rapid transformation of dry cough to hydrated cough, and decrease of its intensity. This beneficial change was accompanied by improvement of microbiocenosis. Effectiveness of pidotimoid was estimated by 73% of doctors as «good» (67% in control group. There was no any complication, related to treatment with this medication. The rate of repeated cases of ARI was three times lower then in control group in 6 months. All patients with ARI had no recurrent laryngeal stenosis.Key words: frequently ailing children, acute respiratory infection, treatment, prophylaxis, pidotimoid.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(2:27-33

  9. [Acute respiratory insufficiency due to COPD: invasive mechanical ventilation or not?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, K Merijn; Djamin, Remco S; Belderbos, Huub N A; van den Berg, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The decision to move to a form of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure due to an acute exacerbation of COPD is influenced by expectations about survival and quality of life after discharge from the ICU. Physicians tend to be too pessimistic about the survival outcome of an ICU stay with invasive mechanical ventilation. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) is not an adequate prognostic parameter. In order to prevent undertreatment of patients with respiratory failure due to an exacerbation of COPD, knowledge of prognostic parameters and quality of life in these patients is very important. End of life care should be integrated into the standard care of COPD patients.

  10. The effect of inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karam, O; Gebistorf, F; Wetterslev, J

    2017-01-01

    differences in ventilator-free days, duration of mechanical ventilation, resolution of multi-organ failure, quality of life, length of stay in intensive care unit or hospital, cost-benefit analysis and methaemoglobin and nitrogen dioxide levels. There was an increased risk of renal impairment (risk ratio (95......Acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Inhaled nitric oxide has been used to improve oxygenation but its role remains controversial. Our primary objective in this systematic review was to examine the effects of inhaled nitric oxide administration...... on mortality in adults and children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We included all randomised, controlled trials, irrespective of date of publication, blinding status, outcomes reported or language. Our primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. We performed several subgroup and sensitivity...

  11. Immunothrombosis in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Cross Talks between Inflammation and Coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzeskaki, Frantzeska; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Orfanos, Stylianos E

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined as a syndrome of acute onset, with bilateral opacities on chest imaging and respiratory failure not caused by cardiac failure, leading to mild, moderate, or severe oxygenation impairment. The syndrome is most commonly a manifestation of sepsis-induced organ dysfunction, characterized by disruption of endothelial barrier integrity and diffuse lung damage. Imbalance between coagulation and inflammation is a predominant characteristic of ARDS, leading to extreme inflammatory response and diffuse fibrin deposition in vascular capillary bed and alveoli. Activated platelets, neutrophils, endothelial cells, neutrophil extracellular traps, microparticles, and coagulation proteases, participate in the complex process of immunothrombosis, which is a key event in ARDS pathophysiology. The present review is focused on the elucidation of immunothrombosis in ARDS and the potential therapeutic implications. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. CERTAIN ASPECTS OF COUGH PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF ACUTE CHILD RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Bardenikova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An open controlled comparative research was conducted on 263 children with acute respiratory infection (ARI in order to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, acceptability and safety of plant based preparation that contains ivy leaf extract. It was established that prescribing the preparation during the first days of disease reduced the duration of dry and inefficient cough, improved sputum rheology and bronchial tree drainage function, reduced bronchial obstruction intensity, reduced the need for prescribing bronchial spasmolitics less necessary and decreased Staybin term. Compared to other antibcough medicines, plant based preparation with ivy leaf extract has quicker effect (effective on the 1st–3rd day.Key words: children, acute respiratory infections, cough, treatment.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of WU polyomavirus in hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infection in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Teng; Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Wo, Ying; Zhuang, Lu; Zhang, Pan-He; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Wei, Wei; Liu, Wei

    2017-05-01

    To explore the molecular epidemiology and clinical characteristics of Washington University polyomavirus (WUPyV) infection in pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infections in China. A laboratory surveillance was performed to recruit pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infections. WUPyV was detected using real-time PCR and complete genome was sequenced for randomly selected positive nasopharyngeal aspirate. Altogether 122 (7.5%) of 1617 children found to be infected with WUPyV and 88 (72.1%) were coinfected with other viruses during 2012-2015. The phylogenetic analysis showed that 14 strains from our study formed two new clusters (Id and IIIc) within the Branch I and Branch III, respectively. WUPyV is persistently circulating in China. Surveillance on WUPyV infection in wider areas and long persistence is warranted.

  14. Influences of pleural effusion on respiratory mechanics, gas exchange, hemodynamics, and recruitment effects in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chou-Chin; Hsu, Hsian-He; Wu, Chin-Pyng; Lee, Shih-Chun; Peng, Chung-Kan; Chang, Hung

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) cause substantial morbidity and mortality despite improvements in the understanding of lung injury and advances in treatment. Recruitment maneuver (RM) with high sustained airway pressures is proposed as an adjunct to mechanical ventilation to maintain alveolar patency. In addition, RM has been advocated to improve pulmonary gas exchange. However, many factors may influence responses to RM and the effect of pleural effusion (PLE) is unknown. There were four groups in this study (n = 6 in each group). Group A was the control group, group B was the PLE group, group C was ARDS with RM, and group D was ARDS with PLE and RM. RM was performed in groups C and D, consisting of a peak pressure of 45 cm H2O with positive end-expiratory pressure of 35 cm H2O sustained for 1 min. Arterial blood gas, systemic and pulmonary hemodynamics, lung water, and respiratory mechanics were measured throughout. After the induction of ALI/ARDS, there were significant decreases in partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood, mean arterial pressure, systemic vascular resistance, and lung compliance. There were also significant increases in the alveolar-arterial O2 tension difference, partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, and lung water. The RM improved oxygenation, which was attenuated by PLE. ALI/ARDS leads to poor oxygenation and hemodynamics. RM results in improved oxygenation, but this improvement is attenuated by PLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidemiology of human respiratory viruses in children with acute respiratory tract infections in Jinan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqin; Wang, Shifu; Zhang, Lehai; Xu, Chao; Bian, Cuirong; Wang, Zhaoxia; Ma, Yanhui; Wang, Ke; Ma, Lixia; Meng, Chen; Ni, Caiyun; Tong, Jiabei; Li, Gongchao; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-01-01

    The viral etiologies of UTRIs and LTRIs in children in Jinan city were investigated between July 2009 and June 2010. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from 397 children with URTIs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens were collected from 323 children with LRTIs. RT-PCR/PCR was used to examine all samples for IFV, PIV, RSV, RV, hMPV, HBoV, CoV, ADV, RSV, and EV. Viral pathogens were detected in 47.10% of URTI samples and 66.57% samples, and the incidence of viral coinfection was 5.29% and 21.05%, respectively. IFV was the most common virus in URTIs, with a detection rate of 19.40%, followed by PIV (10.83%), RV (10.58%), and EV (6.30%). For LRTIs, PIV and RV were both detected in 27% of samples, followed by RSV (9.91%), HBoV (8.36%), IFV (5.57%), and hMPV (5.57%). RSV and HBoV were more prevalent in the youngest children of no more than six months. Meanwhile, RV, PIV, and RSV were the most frequent viruses combined with bacterial pathogens in LRTIs. In conclusion, the spectrum of respiratory virus infections in URTIs and LRTIs differed in terms of the most common pathogens, seasonal distribution, and coinfection rate.

  16. Epidemiology of Human Respiratory Viruses in Children with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Jinan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqin Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The viral etiologies of UTRIs and LTRIs in children in Jinan city were investigated between July 2009 and June 2010. Nasal and throat swabs were collected from 397 children with URTIs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens were collected from 323 children with LRTIs. RT-PCR/PCR was used to examine all samples for IFV, PIV, RSV, RV, hMPV, HBoV, CoV, ADV, RSV, and EV. Viral pathogens were detected in 47.10% of URTI samples and 66.57% samples, and the incidence of viral coinfection was 5.29% and 21.05%, respectively. IFV was the most common virus in URTIs, with a detection rate of 19.40%, followed by PIV (10.83%, RV (10.58%, and EV (6.30%. For LRTIs, PIV and RV were both detected in 27% of samples, followed by RSV (9.91%, HBoV (8.36%, IFV (5.57%, and hMPV (5.57%. RSV and HBoV were more prevalent in the youngest children of no more than six months. Meanwhile, RV, PIV, and RSV were the most frequent viruses combined with bacterial pathogens in LRTIs. In conclusion, the spectrum of respiratory virus infections in URTIs and LRTIs differed in terms of the most common pathogens, seasonal distribution, and coinfection rate.

  17. Immunization with an Attenuated Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Deleted in E Protein Protects Against Lethal Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netland, Jason; DeDiego, Marta L.; Zhao, Jincun; Fett, Craig; Álvarez, Enrique; Nieto-Torres, José L.; Enjuanes, Luis; Perlman, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) caused substantial morbidity and mortality in 2002-2003. Deletion of the envelope (E) protein modestly diminished virus growth in tissue culture but abrogated virulence in animals. Here, we show that immunization with rSARS-CoV-ΔE or SARS-CoV-Δ[E,6-9b] (deleted in accessory proteins (6,7a,7b,8a,8b,9b) in addition to E) nearly completely protected BALB/c mice from fatal respiratory disease caused by mouse-adapted SARS-CoV and partly protected hACE2 Tg mice from lethal disease. hACE2 Tg mice, which express the human SARS-CoV receptor, are extremely susceptible to infection. We also show that rSARS-CoV-ΔE and rSARS-CoV-Δ[E,6-9b] induced anti-virus T cell and antibody responses. Further, the E-deleted viruses were stable after 16 blind passages through tissue culture cells, with only a single mutation in the surface glycoprotein detected. The passaged virus remained avirulent in mice. These results suggest that rSARS-CoV-ΔE is an efficacious vaccine candidate that might be useful if SARS recurred. PMID:20110095

  18. Outcome of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus related acute lower respiratory tract infection among hospitalized newborns: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, Serdar; Erdeve, Omer; Cakir, Ufuk; Akduman, Hasan; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Akcakus, Mustafa; Tunc, Turan; Gokmen, Zeynel; Ates, Can; Atasay, Begum; Arsan, Saadet

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence and outcomes of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-related acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI) including morbidity, nosocomial infection and mortality among newborn infants who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). A multicenter, prospective study was conducted in newborns who were hospitalized with community acquired or nosocomial RSV infection in 44 NICUs throughout Turkey. Newborns with ALRI were screened for RSV infection by Respi-Strip®-test. Main outcome measures were the incidence of RSV-associated admissions in the NICUs and morbidity, mortality and epidemics results related to these admissions. The incidence of RSV infection was 1.24% (n: 250) and RSV infection constituted 19.6% of all ALRI hospitalizations, 226 newborns (90.4%) had community-acquired whereas 24 (9.6%) patients had nosocomial RSV infection in the NICUs. Of the 250 newborns, 171 (68.4%) were full-term infants, 183 (73.2%) had a BW >2500 g. RSV-related mortality rate was 1.2%. Four NICUs reported seven outbreaks on different months, which could be eliminated by palivizumab prophylaxis in one NICU. RSV-associated ALRI both in preterm and term infants accounts an important percent of hospitalizations in the season, and may threat other high-risk patients in the NICU.

  19. Comparative Epidemiology of Human Infections with Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronaviruses among Healthcare Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shelan; Chan, Ta-Chien; Chu, Yu-Tseng; Wu, Joseph Tsung-Shu; Geng, Xingyi; Zhao, Na; Cheng, Wei; Chen, Enfu; King, Chwan-Chuen

    2016-01-01

    The largest nosocomial outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) occurred in South Korea in 2015. Health Care Personnel (HCP) are at high risk of acquiring MERS-Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections, similar to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infections first identified in 2003. This study described the similarities and differences in epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 183 confirmed global MERS cases and 98 SARS cases in Taiwan associated with HCP. The epidemiological findings showed that the mean age of MERS-HCP and total MERS cases were 40 (24~74) and 49 (2~90) years, respectively, much older than those in SARS [SARS-HCP: 35 (21~68) years, p = 0.006; total SARS: 42 (0~94) years, p = 0.0002]. The case fatality rates (CFR) was much lower in MERS-HCP [7.03% (9/128)] or SARS-HCP [12.24% (12/98)] than the MERS-non-HCP [36.96% (34/92), pinfections involving both novel Coronavirus is crucially important to protect HCP.

  20. Aspectos histomorfológicos e respiratórios em modelo de lesão pulmonar aguda por sepse em ratos tratados com pentoxifilina Histomorphologic and respiratory aspects of acute lung injury in rats induced by experimental sepsis and under pentoxifylline treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Rogerio Souza de Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as alterações histomorfológicas e respiratórias em modelo de lesão pulmonar aguda por sepse em ratos tratados com pentoxifilina. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 15 ratos adultos distribuídos em três grupos (n=5, por grupo, assim constituídos: GC - receberam apenas ventilação mecânica; GS - Animais sépticos tratados com solução salina e mecanicamente ventilados; GS+PTX - Animais sépticos, com infusão de pentoxifilina e mecanicamente ventilados. Todos os animais foram ventilados por um período de 180 minutos. Ao final deste período, foram avaliadas variáveis gasométricas (gasometria arterial, gravimétricas (relação peso úmido/peso seco, concentração de proteínas totais no lavado broncoalveolar e histomorfométricas (espessura dos septos alveolares. Os dados obtidos foram submetidos a análise estatística (P OBJECTIVE: Respiratory repercussion on acute lung injury in a model of induced sepsis intraperitoneally. METHODS: Fifteen animals taken at random were submitted to adult male Wistar rats. The rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=15: Group C - control group received only mechanical ventilation; Group S - rats received live Escherichia coli (E. coli intraperitoneally (septic and after 6 hours they were treated with normal saline infusion and ventilated with a low tidal volume. Group S+PTX - rats received live Escherichia coli intraperitoneally (septic and after 6 hours they were treated with pentoxifylline (PTX infusion and ventilated with a low tidal volume. All animals were ventilated during 180 minutes. We analyzed the arterial blood gases, gravimetric indices and histomorphometric analysis. RESULTS: Blood gases, wet to dry ratios, and total protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage were analyzed in all experimental groups. In the end of the experiment the partial pressure of oxygen was higher in the GS+PTX (460,0 ± 38,2 mmHg compared with GS (336,0 ± 14,6 mmHg. Pentoxifylline with

  1. Parainfluenza virus as a cause of acute respiratory infection in hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecchini, Rogério; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Souza, Maria Cândida; Vaz-de-Lima, Lourdes de Andrade; Sato, Neuza; Salgado, Maristela; Ueda, Mirthes; Passos, Saulo Duarte; Rangel, Raphael; Catebelota, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses account for a significant proportion of lower respiratory tract infections in children. To assess the prevalence of Human parainfluenza viruses as a cause of acute respiratory infection and to compare clinical data for this infection against those of the human respiratory syncytial virus. A prospective study in children younger than five years with acute respiratory infection was conducted. Detection of respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples was performed using the indirect immunofluorescence reaction. Length of hospital stay, age, clinical history and physical exam, clinical diagnoses, and evolution (admission to Intensive Care Unit or general ward, discharge or death) were assessed. Past personal (premature birth and cardiopathy) as well as family (smoking and atopy) medical factors were also assessed. A total of 585 patients were included with a median age of 7.9 months and median hospital stay of six days. No difference between the HRSV+ and HPIV+ groups was found in terms of age, gender or length of hospital stay. The HRSV+ group had more fever and cough. Need for admission to the Intensive Care Unit was similar for both groups but more deaths were recorded in the HPIV+ group. The occurrence of parainfluenza peaked during the autumn in the first two years of the study. Parainfluenza was responsible for significant morbidity, proving to be the second-most prevalent viral agent in this population after respiratory syncytial virus. No difference in clinical presentation was found between the two groups, but mortality was higher in the HPIV+ group. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  2. Parainfluenza virus as a cause of acute respiratory infection in hospitalized childrens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Pecchini

    Full Text Available Background: Human parainfluenza viruses account for a significant proportion of lower respiratory tract infections in children.Objective: To assess the prevalence of Human parainfluenza viruses as a cause of acute respiratory infection and to compare clinical data for this infection against those of the human respiratory syncytial virus.Methods: A prospective study in children younger than five years with acute respiratory infection was conducted. Detection of respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples was performed using the indirect immunofluorescence reaction. Length of hospital stay, age, clinical history and physical exam, clinical diagnoses, and evolution (admission to Intensive Care Unit or general ward, discharge or death were assessed. Past personal (premature birth and cardiopathy as well as family (smoking and atopy medical factors were also assessed.Results: A total of 585 patients were included with a median age of 7.9 months and median hospital stay of six days. No difference between the HRSV+ and HPIV+ groups was found in terms of age, gender or length of hospital stay. The HRSV+ group had more fever and cough. Need for admission to the Intensive Care Unit was similar for both groups but more deaths were recorded in the HPIV+ group. The occurrence of parainfluenza peaked during the autumn in the first two years of the study.Conclusion: Parainfluenza was responsible for significant morbidity, proving to be the second-most prevalent viral agent in this population after respiratory syncytial virus. No difference in clinical presentation was found between the two groups, but mortality was higher in the HPIV+ group.

  3. Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chan-Yeung, Moira; Yu, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong. DESIGN: Descriptive case series. SETTING: Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region, China RESULTS: The outbreak started with a visitor from southern China on 21 February. At the hospitals where the first cases were treated the disease spread quickly among healthcare workers, and then out into the community as family members became infected. By 1 April, 685 cases had been reported with 16 deaths. Symptoms in...

  4. Predictors of Successful Noninvasive Ventilation Treatment for Patients Suffering Acute Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shian Lin

    2008-08-01

    Conclusion: APACHE II scores recorded prior to NIV treatment, PImax30, R30, RR60, as well as improvements to RR during the first 30 minutes of NIV treatment and to PEmax during the first 60 minutes of NIV treatment were predictors of successful NIV treatment for patients suffering from acute respiratory failure. Such parameters may be helpful in selecting patients to receive NIV treatment and also for deciding when early termination of the treatment is appropriate.

  5. Impaired gas exchange: accuracy of defining characteristics in children with acute respiratory infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pascoal, Lívia Maia; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira; Chaves, Daniel Bruno Resende; Beltrão, Beatriz Amorim; Silva, Viviane Martins da; Monteiro, Flávia Paula Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the accuracy of the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange nursing diagnosis in children with acute respiratory infection.METHOD: open prospective cohort study conducted with 136 children monitored for a consecutive period of at least six days and not more than ten days. An instrument based on the defining characteristics of the Impaired gas exchange diagnosis and on literature addressing pulmonary assessment was used to collect data. The accuracy means of...

  6. Clinical features of acute respiratory viral infections in children in conjunction with pathology of pharyngeal tonsil

    OpenAIRE

    Олександр Іванович Сміян; Євгенія Василівна Дмітрова; Олена Геннадіївна Васильєва

    2015-01-01

    Aim: to study clinical features of the clinical course of an acute respiratory viral infection in conjunction with pathology of pharyngeal tonsil in children of preschool age. Methods: generally clinical;Laboratory and instrumental;Statistical.Separation of viral infection was done using the methods of lumicroscopy and polymerase chain reaction from nasopharynx lavage.Statistical processing of received results was carried out with the help of standard statistical computer system «MicrosoftExc...

  7. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections in healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Sabetta

    Full Text Available Declining serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D seen in the fall and winter as distance increases from the equator may be a factor in the seasonal increased prevalence of influenza and other viral infections. This study was done to determine if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations correlated with the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections.In this prospective cohort study serial monthly concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured over the fall and winter 2009-2010 in 198 healthy adults, blinded to the nature of the substance being measured. The participants were evaluated for the development of any acute respiratory tract infections by investigators blinded to the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. The incidence of infection in participants with different concentrations of vitamin D was determined. One hundred ninety-five (98.5% of the enrolled participants completed the study. Light skin pigmentation, lean body mass, and supplementation with vitamin D were found to correlate with higher concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Concentrations of 38 ng/ml or more were associated with a significant (p<0.0001 two-fold reduction in the risk of developing acute respiratory tract infections and with a marked reduction in the percentages of days ill.Maintenance of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentration of 38 ng/ml or higher should significantly reduce the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections and the burden of illness caused thereby, at least during the fall and winter in temperate zones. The findings of the present study provide direction for and call for future interventional studies examining the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in reducing the incidence and severity of specific viral infections, including influenza, in the general population and in subpopulations with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, such as pregnant women, dark skinned individuals, and the obese.

  8. The adenoviral infections in children admitted to hospital with pneumonia, acute bronchiolitis or respiratory viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecu, Cristina; Mihai, Maria E; Alexandrescu, Viorel I; Orăşanu, Dumitru; Zapucioiu, Carmen; Matei, Dumitru; Craiu, M; Cochino, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the percent of infections with adenovirus (ADV) in children who had pneumonia, acute bronchiolitis or viral respiratory infections and were admitted to two pediatrics hospitals in Bucharest (Grigore Alexandrescu Hospital and Alfred Rusescu Hospital). 70 children aged one month - five years, admitted to the above mentioned pediatrics hospitals in Bucharest, who were negative for the Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and the human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) by Reverse Transcription -Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). 48 of them presented pneumonia upon admission to hospital, 6--acute bronchiolitis and 16 respiratory viral infections. Samples (nasal swabs) were taken from patients and introduced in viral transport medium. RT-PCR for RSV and hMPV, Multiplex PCR by seeplex multi-detection system with Seeplex RV/PB 18 ASE Detection for detection of 5 pneumonial bacteria and Real-Time PCR, Duplica Real Time Adenovirus Detection for ADV. Of the total 70 patients negative for RSV, hMPV and 5 pneumonial bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila), 10 were ADV positive; none of the children < 6 months (N = 16) presented ADV infection. In the 6 months - 2 years group (N = 35), 6 were ADV positive. In the 2 - 5 years group (N = 19), 4 were ADV positive. The percent of ADV infections in children hospitalized with acute respiratory infections (ARI) caused by neither RSV or hMPV is 14.2%. ADV is most frequently encountered in the 6 months - 2 years and then 2 - 5 years groups, but the most severe pneumonia forms can be seen in the 6 months - 2 years group. In children < 6 months with acute bronchiolitis ADV was not found to be an etiologic agent.

  9. Surfactant Apoprotein D in Preterm Neonates with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Perepelitsa; Golubev, A M; V. V. Moroz; Ye. Yu. Yefremova; O. B. Avakyan; M. V. Sakayeva; I.I. Klintsevich

    2009-01-01

    Objective: to study the production of surfactant apoprotein D in preterm neonates with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during artificial ventilation (AV). Subjects and methods. The paper presents the results of studying the production of surfactant protein D (SP-D) in various biological fluids in 44 preterm neonates. Two groups of newborn infants were identified according to the clinical manifestations of ARDS. The study group comprised 25 infants with the severe course of the dise...

  10. Genomic Analysis Reveals Age-Dependent Innate Immune Responses to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Baas, Tracey; Roberts, Anjeanette; Teal, Thomas H; Vogel, Leatrice; Chen, Jun; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Katze, Michael G.; Subbarao, Kanta

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between immunosenescence and the host response to virus infection is poorly understood at the molecular level. Two different patterns of pulmonary host responses to virus were observed when gene expression profiles from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-infected young mice that show minimal disease were compared to those from SARS-CoV-infected aged mice that develop pneumonitis. In young mice, genes related to cellular development, cell growth, and cell...

  11. Cross-host evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus in palm civet and human

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Huai-Dong; Tu, Chang-chun; Zhang, Guo-wei; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zheng, Kui; Lei, Lian-Cheng; Chen, Qiu-Xia; Gao, Yu-Wei; Zhou, Hui-qiong; Xiang, Hua; Zheng, Hua-Jun; Chern, Shur-Wern Wang; Cheng, Feng; Pan, Chun-Ming; Xuan, Hua

    2005-01-01

    The genomic sequences of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses from human and palm civet of the 2003/2004 outbreak in the city of Guangzhou, China, were nearly identical. Phylogenetic analysis suggested an independent viral invasion from animal to human in this new episode. Combining all existing data but excluding singletons, we identified 202 single-nucleotide variations. Among them, 17 are polymorphic in palm civets only. The ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide substitut...

  12. Association between the concentration of fine particles in the atmosphere and acute respiratory diseases in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Paula Nascimento

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the association between fine particulate matter concentration in the atmosphere and hospital care by acute respiratory diseases in children. METHODS Ecological study, carried out in the region of Grande Vitória, Espírito Santo, in the winter (June 21 to September 21, 2013 and summer (December 21, 2013 to March 19, 2014. We assessed data of daily count for outpatient care and hospitalization by respiratory diseases (ICD-10 in children from zero to 12 years in three hospitals in the Region of Grande Vitória. For collecting fine particulate matter, we used portable samplers of particles installed in six locations in the studied region. The Generalized Additive Model with Poisson distribution, fitted for the effects of predictor covariates, was used to evaluate the relationship between respiratory outcomes and concentration of fine particulate matter. RESULTS The increase of 4.2 µg/m3 (interquartile range in the concentration of fine particulate matter increased in 3.8% and 5.6% the risk of medical care or hospitalization, respectively, on the same day and with six-day lag from the exposure. CONCLUSIONS We identified positive association between outpatient care and hospitalizations of children under 12 years due to acute respiratory diseases and the concentration of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere.

  13. Patients' Outcomes After Acute Respiratory Failure: A Qualitative Study With the PROMIS Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, Michelle N; Patel, Yashika; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro; Dinglas, Victor D; Needham, Dale M; Turnbull, Alison E

    2017-11-01

    As mortality rates for patients treated in intensive care units decrease, greater understanding of the impact of critical illness on patients' well-being is needed. To describe the survivorship experience of patients who had acute respiratory failure by using the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) framework. A total of 48 adult patients who had acute respiratory failure completed at least 1 semistructured telephone-based interview between 5 and 18 months after their stay in the intensive care unit. Participants were asked about overall well-being and important health outcomes. Major themes were identified within each of the 3 PROMIS components: physical health, mental health, and social health. The following themes were particularly prominent: mobility impairments, pulmonary symptoms, fatigue, anxiety and depression symptoms, and decreased ability to work and participate in valued activities. Impacts on overall well-being and on relationships with friends and family members varied among the survivors. Some survivors reported gratitude, increased appreciation of life, and closer relationships to loved ones. Other survivors reported boredom, social isolation, and wishing they had not survived. Survivors of acute respiratory failure reported substantial issues with their physical, mental, and social health. Holistic assessments of outcomes of survivors of critical illness should capture the complex beneficial and adverse impacts of critical illness on survivors' well-being and social health. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus detection in young children with acute bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeratakulpisarn, Jamaree; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Pientong, Chamsai; Limwattananon, Chulaporn

    2007-01-01

    This study was conducted to detect human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in young children hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis, using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nasopharyngeal secretions were collected from 170 children between 1 and 24 months of age admitted to two tertiary hospitals in northeastern Thailand, between 2002 and 2004. Acute bronchiolitis was defined as the first episode of wheezing associated with tachypnea, increased respiratory effort and an upper respiratory tract infection. Two-thirds (115/170) were positive for viral etiologies: 64.7% RSV (110/170) and 3.5% hMPV (6/170). One patient had a dual infection. hMPV was detected between August and November, while RSV was prevalent from July through March. The clinical manifestations among the 6 hMPV, RSV and non-RSV-infected children were similar. RSV was the leading cause of acute bronchiolitis in young children and hMPV had a low prevalence in northeastern Thailand.

  15. Mild Acute Intermittent Hypoxia Improves Respiratory Function in Unanesthetized Rats With Midcervical Contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Chiang, Shu-Chi; Li, Yu-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Mild intermittent hypoxia has been considered a potential approach to induce respiratory neuroplasticity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether mild acute intermittent hypoxia can improve breathing function in a clinically relevant spinal cord injury animal model. Adult male rats received laminectomy or unilateral contusion at the C3-C4 spinal cord using a MASCIS Impactor (height: 6.25 or 12.5 mm). At 4 weeks postinjury, the breathing patterns of unanesthetized rats were measured by whole body plethysmography before, during and after 10 episodes of 5 minutes of hypoxia (10% O2, 4% CO2, balance N2) with 5 minutes of normoxia intervals. The results demonstrated that cervical contusion resulted in reduction in breathing capacity and number of phrenic motoneurons. Acute hypoxia induced significant increases in frequency and tidal volume in sham surgery and contused animals. In addition, there was a progressive decline in the magnitude of hypoxic ventilatory response during intermittent hypoxia. Further, the tidal volume was significantly enhanced in contused but not sham surgery rats at 15 and 30 minutes postintermittent hypoxia, suggesting intermittent hypoxia can bring about long-term facilitation of tidal volume following cervical spinal contusion. These results suggest that mild acute intermittent hypoxia can elicit differential forms of respiratory plasticity in sham surgery versus contused animals, and may be a promising neurorehabilitation approach to improve respiratory function after cervical spinal cord injury.

  16. Relevance of Lung Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Failure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezière, Gilbert A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study assesses the potential of lung ultrasonography to diagnose acute respiratory failure. Methods: This observational study was conducted in university-affiliated teaching-hospital ICUs. We performed ultrasonography on consecutive patients admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory failure, comparing lung ultrasonography results on initial presentation with the final diagnosis by the ICU team. Uncertain diagnoses and rare causes (frequency syndrome), lung sliding, and alveolar consolidation and/or pleural effusion. Combined with venous analysis, these items were grouped to assess ultrasound profiles. Results: Predominant A lines plus lung sliding indicated asthma (n = 34) or COPD (n = 49) with 89% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Multiple anterior diffuse B lines with lung sliding indicated pulmonary edema (n = 64) with 97% sensitivity and 95% specificity. A normal anterior profile plus deep venous thrombosis indicated pulmonary embolism (n = 21) with 81% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Anterior absent lung sliding plus A lines plus lung point indicated pneumothorax (n = 9) with 81% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Anterior alveolar consolidations, anterior diffuse B lines with abolished lung sliding, anterior asymmetric interstitial patterns, posterior consolidations or effusions without anterior diffuse B lines indicated pneumonia (n = 83) with 89% sensitivity and 94% specificity. The use of these profiles would have provided correct diagnoses in 90.5% of cases. Conclusions: Lung ultrasound can help the clinician make a rapid diagnosis in patients with acute respiratory failure, thus meeting the priority objective of saving time. PMID:18403664

  17. Relevance of lung ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute respiratory failure: the BLUE protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Daniel A; Mezière, Gilbert A

    2008-07-01

    This study assesses the potential of lung ultrasonography to diagnose acute respiratory failure. This observational study was conducted in university-affiliated teaching-hospital ICUs. We performed ultrasonography on consecutive patients admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory failure, comparing lung ultrasonography results on initial presentation with the final diagnosis by the ICU team. Uncertain diagnoses and rare causes (frequencysyndrome), lung sliding, and alveolar consolidation and/or pleural effusion. Combined with venous analysis, these items were grouped to assess ultrasound profiles. Predominant A lines plus lung sliding indicated asthma (n=34) or COPD (n=49) with 89% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Multiple anterior diffuse B lines with lung sliding indicated pulmonary edema (n=64) with 97% sensitivity and 95% specificity. A normal anterior profile plus deep venous thrombosis indicated pulmonary embolism (n=21) with 81% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Anterior absent lung sliding plus A lines plus lung point indicated pneumothorax (n=9) with 81% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Anterior alveolar consolidations, anterior diffuse B lines with abolished lung sliding, anterior asymmetric interstitial patterns, posterior consolidations or effusions without anterior diffuse B lines indicated pneumonia (n=83) with 89% sensitivity and 94% specificity. The use of these profiles would have provided correct diagnoses in 90.5% of cases. Lung ultrasound can help the clinician make a rapid diagnosis in patients with acute respiratory failure, thus meeting the priority objective of saving time.

  18. Use and Safety of Anthroposophic Medications for Acute Respiratory and Ear Infections: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald J. Hamre

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Anthroposophic medications (AMED are widely used, but safety data on AMED from large prospective studies are sparse. The objective of this analysis was to determine the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR to AMED in outpatients using AMED for acute respiratory and ear infections. Methods A prospective four-week observational cohort study was conducted in 21 primary care practices in Europe and the U.S.A. The cohort comprised 715 consecutive outpatients aged ≥1 month, treated by anthroposophic physicians for acute otitis and respiratory infections. Physicians’ prescription data and patient reports of adverse events were analyzed. Main outcome measures were use of AMED and ADR to AMED. Results Two patients had confirmed ADR to AMED: 1 swelling and redness at the injection site after subcutaneous injections of Prunus spinosa 5%, 2 sleeplessness after intake of Pneumodoron ® 2 liquid. These ADR lasted one and two days respectively; both subsided after dose reduction; none were unexpected; none were serious. The frequency of confirmed ADR to AMED was 0.61% (2/327 of all different AMED used, 0.28% (2/715 of patients, and 0.004% (3/73,443 of applications. Conclusion In this prospective study, anthroposophic medications used by primary care patients with acute respiratory or ear infections were well tolerated. Abbreviations A-: anthroposophy; ADR: adverse drug reactions; AE: adverse events; AM: anthroposophic medicine; AMED: AM medication; C-: conventional; ENE-patients: eligible, not enrolled patients; IIPCOS: International Primary Care Outcomes Study

  19. Assisted Ventilation in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Lung-distending Pressure and Patient-Ventilator Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduin, J.; Sinderby, C.A.; Beck, J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Heunks, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the use of assisted mechanical ventilation is a subject of debate. Assisted ventilation has benefits over controlled ventilation, such as preserved diaphragm function and improved oxygenation. Therefore, higher level of

  20. Validation of Impact of Events Scale in nurses under threat of contagion by severe acute respiratory syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    CHEN, CHENG‐SHENG; YANG, PINCHEN; YEN, CHENG‐FANG; WU, HSIU‐YUEH

    2005-01-01

    ...) in a sample of nurses working under threat of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The internal consistency, construct validity and convergent validity of the instrument were examined in a sample of 128 nurses during the SARS outbreak in Taiwan...

  1. Epidemiology, Patterns of Care, and Mortality for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Intensive Care Units in 50 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Laffey, John G.; Pham, Tài; Fan, Eddy; Brochard, Laurent; Esteban, Andres; Gattinoni, Luciano; van Haren, Frank; Larsson, Anders; McAuley, Daniel F.; Ranieri, Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Thompson, B. Taylor; Wrigge, Hermann; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Pesenti, Antonio; Francois, Guy M.; Rabboni, Francesca; Madotto, Fabiana; Conti, Sara; Sula, Hektor; Nunci, Lordian; Cani, Alma; Zazu, Alan; Dellera, Christian; Insaurralde, Carolina S.; Alejandro, Risso V.; Daldin, Julio; Vinzio, Mauricio; Fernandez, Ruben O.; Cardonnet, Luis P.; Bettini, Lisandro R.; Bisso, Mariano Carboni; Osman, Emilio M.; Setten, Mariano G.; Lovazzano, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; Villar, Veronica; Pozo, Norberto C.; Grubissich, Nicolas; Plotnikow, Gustavo A.; Vasquez, Daniela N.; Ilutovich, Santiago; Tiribelli, Norberto; Chena, Ariel; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Saenz, María G.; Estenssoro, Elisa; Brizuela, Matias; Gianinetto, Hernan; Gomez, Pablo E.; Cerrato, Valeria I.; Bezzi, Marco G.; Borello, Silvina A.; Loiacono, Flavia A.; Fernandez, Adriana M.; Knowles, Serena; Reynolds, Claire; Inskip, Deborah M.; Miller, Jennene J.; Kong, Jing; Whitehead, Christina; Bihari, Shailesh; Seven, Aylin; Krstevski, Amanda; Rodgers, Helen J.; Millar, Rebecca T.; Mckenna, Toni E.; Bailey, Irene M.; Hanlon, Gabrielle C.; Aneman, Anders; Lynch, Joan M.; Azad, Raman; Neal, John; Woods, Paul W.; Roberts, Brigit L.; Kol, Mark R.; Wong, Helen S.; Riss, Katharina C.; Staudinger, Thomas; Wittebole, Xavier; Berghe, Caroline; Bulpa, Pierre A.; Dive, Alain M.; Verstraete, Rik; Lebbinck, Herve; Depuydt, Pieter; Vermassen, Joris; Meersseman, Philippe; Ceunen, Helga; Rosa, Jonas I.; Beraldo, Daniel O.; Piras, Claudio; Rampinelli, Adenilton M.; Nassar, Antonio P.; Mataloun, Sergio; Moock, Marcelo; Thompson, Marlus M.; Gonçalves, Claudio H.; Antônio, Ana Carolina P.; Ascoli, Aline; Biondi, Rodrigo S.; Fontenele, Danielle C.; Nobrega, Danielle; Sales, Vanessa M.; Shindhe, Suresh; Ismail, Dk Maizatul Aiman B. Pg Hj; Laffey, John; Beloncle, Francois; Davies, Kyle G.; Cirone, Rob; Manoharan, Venika; Ismail, Mehvish; Goligher, Ewan C.; Jassal, Mandeep; Ferguson, Niall D.; Nishikawa, Erin; Javeed, Areej; Curley, Gerard; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Parotto, Matteo; Mehta, Sangeeta; Knoll, Jenny; Pronovost, Antoine; Canestrini, Sergio; Bruhn, Alejandro R.; Garcia, Patricio H.; Aliaga, Felipe A.; Farías, Pamela A.; Yumha, Jacob S.; Ortiz, Claudia A.; Salas, Javier E.; Saez, Alejandro A.; Vega, Luis D.; Labarca, Eduardo F.; Martinez, Felipe T.; Carreño, Nicolás G.; Lora, Pilar; Liu, Haitao; Qiu, Haibo; Liu, Ling; Tang, Rui; Luo, Xiaoming; An, Youzhong; Zhao, Huiying; Gao, Yan; Zhai, Zhe; Ye, Zheng L.; Wang, Wei; Li, Wenwen; Li, Qingdong; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Yu, Wenkui; Shen, Juanhong; Li, Xinyu; Yu, Tao; Lu, Weihua; Wu, Ya Q.; Huang, Xiao B.; He, Zhenyang; Lu, Yuanhua; Han, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Renhua; Wang, Hua X.; Qin, Shu H.; Zhu, Bao H.; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Jian; Li, Bin; Liu, Jing L.; Zhou, Fa C.; Li, Qiong J.; Zhang, Xing Y.; Li-Xin, Zhou; Xin-Hua, Qiang; Jiang, Liangyan; Gao, Yuan N.; Zhao, Xian Y.; Li, Yuan Y.; Li, Xiao L.; Wang, Chunting; Yao, Qingchun; Yu, Rongguo; Chen, Kai; Shao, Huanzhang; Qin, Bingyu; Huang, Qing Q.; Zhu, Wei H.; Hang, Ai Y.; Hua, Ma X.; Li, Yimin; Xu, Yonghao; Di, Yu D.; Ling, Long L.; Qin, Tie H.; Wang, Shou H.; Qin, Junping; Han, Yi; Zhou, Suming; Vargas, Monica P.; Jimenez, Juan I. Silesky; Rojas, Manuel A. González; Solis-Quesada, Jaime E.; Ramirez-Alfaro, Christian M.; Máca, Jan; Sklienka, Peter; Gjedsted, Jakob; Christiansen, Aage; Nielsen, Jonas; Villamagua, Boris G.; Llano, Miguel; Burtin, Philippe; Buzancais, Gautier; Beuret, Pascal; Pelletier, Nicolas; Mortaza, Satar; Mercat, Alain; Chelly, Jonathan; Jochmans, Sébastien; Terzi, Nicolas; Daubin, Cédric; Carteaux, Guillaume; de Prost, Nicolas; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Daviaud, Fabrice; Fartoukh, Muriel; Barberet, Guillaume; Biehler, Jerome; Dellamonica, Jean; Doyen, Denis; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Briquet, Anais; Klasen, Fanny; Papazian, Laurent; Follin, Arnaud; Roux, Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Kalaitzis, Evangelos; Dangers, Laurence; Combes, Alain; Au, Siu-Ming; Béduneau, Gaetan; Carpentier, Dorothée; Zogheib, Elie H.; Dupont, Herve; Ricome, Sylvie; Santoli, Francesco L.; Besset, Sebastien L.; Michel, Philippe; Gelée, Bruno; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Goubaux, Bernard; Crova, Philippe J.; Phan, Nga T.; Berkelmans, Frantz; Badie, Julio C.; Tapponnier, Romain; Gally, Josette; Khebbeb, Samy; Herbrecht, Jean-Etienne; Schneider, Francis; Declercq, Pierre-Louis M.; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Duranteau, Jacques; Harrois, Anatole; Chabanne, Russell; Marin, Julien; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Thibault, Sandrine; Ghazi, Mohammed; Boukhazna, Messabi; Zein, Salem Ould; Richecoeur, Jack R.; Combaux, Daniele M.; Grelon, Fabien; Le Moal, Charlene; Sauvadet, Elise P.; Robine, Adrien; Lemiale, Virginie; Reuter, Danielle; Dres, Martin; Demoule, Alexandre; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Baboi, Loredana; Guérin, Claude; Lohner, Ralph; Kraßler, Jens; Schäfer, Susanne; Zacharowski, Kai D.; Meybohm, Patrick; Reske, Andreas W.; Simon, Philipp; Hopf, Hans-Bernd F.; Schuetz, Michael; Baltus, Thomas; Papanikolaou, Metaxia N.; Papavasilopoulou, Theonymfi G.; Zacharas, Giannis A.; Ourailogloy, Vasilis; Mouloudi, Eleni K.; Massa, Eleni V.; Nagy, Eva O.; Stamou, Electra E.; Kiourtzieva, Ellada V.; Oikonomou, Marina A.; Avila, Luis E.; Cortez, Cesar A.; Citalán, Johanna E.; Jog, Sameer A.; Sable, Safal D.; Shah, Bhagyesh; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K.; Memon, Mohammedfaruk; Muthuchellappan, Radhakrishnan; Ramesh, Venkatapura J.; Shenoy, Anitha; Unnikrishnan, Ramesh; Dixit, Subhal B.; Rhayakar, Rachana V.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Bhardwaj, Vallish K.; Mahto, Heera L.; Sagar, Sudha V.; Palaniswamy, Vijayanand; Ganesan, Deeban; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Heidari, Farshad; Meaney, Edel A.; Nichol, Alistair; Knapman, Karl M.; O'Croinin, Donall; Dunne, Eimhin S.; Breen, Dorothy M.; Clarkson, Kevin P.; Jaafar, Rola F.; Dwyer, Rory; Amir, Fahd; Ajetunmobi, Olaitan O.; O'Muircheartaigh, Aogan C.; Black, Colin S.; Treanor, Nuala; Collins, Daniel V.; Altaf, Wahid; Zani, Gianluca; Fusari, Maurizio; Spadaro, Savino; Volta, Carlo A.; Graziani, Romano; Brunettini, Barbara; Palmese, Salvatore; Formenti, Paolo; Umbrello, Michele; Lombardo, Andrea; Pecci, Elisabetta; Botteri, Marco; Savioli, Monica; Protti, Alessandro; Mattei, Alessia; Schiavoni, Lorenzo; Tinnirello, Andrea; Todeschini, Manuel; Giarratano, Antonino; Cortegiani, Andrea; Sher, Sara; Rossi, Anna; Antonelli, Massimo M.; Montini, Luca M.; Casalena, Paolo; Scafetti, Sergio; Panarello, Giovanna; Occhipinti, Giovanna; Patroniti, Nicolò; Pozzi, Matteo; Biscione, Roberto R.; Poli, Michela M.; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Albiero, Daniela; Crapelli, Giulia; Beck, Eduardo; Pota, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Molin, Alexandre; Tarantino, Fabio; Monti, Giacomo; Frati, Elena; Mirabella, Lucia; Cinnella, Gilda; Fossali, Tommaso; Colombo, Riccardo; Pattarino, Pierpaolo Terragni Ilaria; Mojoli, Francesco; Braschi, Antonio; Borotto, Erika E.; Cracchiolo, Andrea N.; Palma, Daniela M.; Raponi, Francesco; Foti, Giuseppe; Vascotto, Ettore R.; Coppadoro, Andrea; Brazzi, Luca; Floris, Leda; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Venti, Aaron; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Takagi, Shunsuke; Maeyama, Hiroki N.; Watanabe, Eizo; Yamaji, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kazuyoshi; Shiozaki, Kyoko; Futami, Satoru; Ryosuke, Sekine; Saito, Koji; Kameyama, Yoshinobu; Ueno, Keiko; Izawa, Masayo; Okuda, Nao; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Tomofumi; Nasu, Michitaka; Takada, Tadaaki; Ito, Fumihito; Nunomiya, Shin; Koyama, Kansuke; Abe, Toshikazu; Andoh, Kohkichi; Kusumoto, Kohei; Hirata, Akira; Takaba, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Shuhei; Higashijima, Ushio; Honda, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Nobumasa; Imai, Hiroshi; Ogino, Yasuaki; Mizuguchi, Ichiko; Ichikado, Kazuya; Nitta, Kenichi; Mochizuki, Katsunori; Hashida, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Niimi, Daisuke; Ueda, Takeshi; Kashiwa, Yozo; Uchiyama, Akinori; Sabelnikovs, Olegs; Oss, Peteris; Haddad, Youssef; Liew, Kong Y.; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A.; Jarquin-Badiola, Yves D.; Sanchez-Hurtado, Luis A.; Gomez-Flores, Saira S.; Marin, Maria C.; Villagomez, Asisclo J.; Lemus, Jordana S.; Fierro, Jonathan M.; Cervantes, Mavy Ramirez; Mejia, Francisco Javier Flores; Dector, Dulce; Dector, Dulce M.; Gonzalez, Daniel R.; Estrella, Claudia R.; Sanchez-Medina, Jorge R.; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Alvaro; George, Fernando G.; Aguirre, Janet S.; Buensuseso, Juan A.; Poblano, Manuel; Dendane, Tarek; Zeggwagh, Amine Ali; Balkhi, Hicham; Elkhayari, Mina; Samkaoui, Nacer; Ezzouine, Hanane; Benslama, Abdellatif; Amor, Mourad; Maazouzi, Wajdi; Cimic, Nedim; Beck, Oliver; Bruns, Monique M.; Schouten, Jeroen A.; Rinia, Myra; Raaijmakers, Monique; Heunks, Leo M.; van Wezel, Hellen M.; Heines, Serge J.; Strauch, Ulrich; Buise, Marc P.; Simonis, Fabienne D.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Goodson, Jennifer C.; Browne, Troy S.; Navarra, Leanlove; Hunt, Anna; Hutchison, Robyn A.; Bailey, Mathew B.; Newby, Lynette; Mcarthur, Colin; Kalkoff, Michael; Mcleod, Alex; Casement, Jonathan; Hacking, Danielle J.; Andersen, Finn H.; Dolva, Merete S.; Laake, Jon H.; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Noremark, Kim Andre L.; Søreide, Eldar; Sjøbø, Brit Å; Guttormsen, Anne B.; Yoshido, Hector H. Leon; Aguilar, Ronald Zumaran; Oscanoa, Fredy A. Montes; Alisasis, Alain U.; Robles, Joanne B.; Pasanting-Lim, Rossini Abbie B.; Tan, Beatriz C.; Andruszkiewicz, Pawel; Jakubowska, Karina; Coxo, Cristina M.; Alvarez, António M.; Oliveira, Bruno S.; Montanha, Gustavo M.; Barros, Nelson C.; Pereira, Carlos S.; Messias, António M.; Monteiro, Jorge M.; Araujo, Ana M.; Catorze, Nuno T.; Marum, Susan M.; Bouw, Maria J.; Gomes, Rui M.; Brito, Vania A.; Castro, Silvia; Estilita, Joana M.; Barros, Filipa M.; Serra, Isabel M.; Martinho, Aurelia M.; Tomescu, Dana R.; Marcu, Alexandra; Bedreag, Ovidiu H.; Papurica, Marius; Corneci, Dan E.; Negoita, Silvius Ioan; Grigoriev, Evgeny; Gritsan, Alexey I.; Gazenkampf, Andrey A.; Almekhlafi, Ghaleb; Albarrak, Mohamad M.; Mustafa, Ghanem M.; Maghrabi, Khalid A.; Salahuddin, Nawal; Aisa, Tharwat M.; Al Jabbary, Ahmed S.; Tabhan, Edgardo; Arabi, Yaseen M.; Trinidad, Olivia A.; Al Dorzi, Hasan M.; Tabhan, Edgardo E.; Bolon, Stefan; Smith, Oliver; Mancebo, Jordi; Aguirre-Bermeo, Hernan; Lopez-Delgado, Juan C.; Esteve, Francisco; Rialp, Gemma; Forteza, Catalina; de Haro, Candelaria; Artigas, Antonio; Albaiceta, Guillermo M.; de Cima-Iglesias, Sara; Seoane-Quiroga, Leticia; Ceniceros-Barros, Alexandra; Ruiz-Aguilar, Antonio L.; Claraco-Vega, Luis M.; Soler, Juan Alfonso; Lorente, Maria del Carmen; Hermosa, Cecilia; Gordo, Federico; Prieto-González, Miryam; López-Messa, Juan B.; Perez, Manuel P.; Perez, Cesar P.; Allue, Raquel Montoiro; Roche-Campo, Ferran; Ibañez-Santacruz, Marcos; Temprano, Susana; Pintado, Maria C.; de Pablo, Raul; Gómez, Pilar Ricart Aroa; Ruiz, Silvia Rodriguez; Moles, Silvia Iglesias; Jurado, Ma Teresa; Arizmendi, Alfons; Piacentini, Enrique A.; Franco, Nieves; Honrubia, Teresa; Cheng, Meisy Perez; Losada, Elena Perez; Blanco, Javier; Yuste, Luis J.; Carbayo-Gorriz, Cecilia; Cazorla-Barranquero, Francisca G.; Alonso, Javier G.; Alda, Rosa S.; Algaba, Ángela; Navarro, Gonzalo; Cereijo, Enrique; Diaz-Rodriguez, Esther; Marcos, Diego Pastor; Montero, Laura Alvarez; Para, Luis Herrera; Sanchez, Roberto Jimenez; Navalpotro, Miguel Angel Blasco; Abad, Ricardo Diaz; González, Raquel Montiel; Toribio, Dácil Parrilla; Castro, Alejandro G.; Artiga, Maria Jose D.; Penuelas, Oscar; Roser, Tomas P.; Olga, Moreno F.; Curto, Elena Gallego; Sánchez, Rocío Manzano; Imma, Vallverdu P.; Elisabet, Garcia M.; Claverias, Laura; Magret, Monica; Pellicer, Ana M.; Rodriguez, Lucia L.; Sánchez-Ballesteros, Jesús; González-Salamanca, Ángela; Jimenez, Antonio G.; Huerta, Francisco P.; Diaz, Juan Carlos J. Sotillo; Lopez, Esther Bermejo; Moya, David D. Llinares; Alfonso, Alec A. Tallet; Luis, Palazon Sanchez Eugenio; Cesar, Palazon Sanchez; Rafael, Sánchez I.; Virgilio, Corcoles G.; Recio, Noelia N.; Adamsson, Richard O.; Rylander, Christian C.; Holzgraefe, Bernhard; Broman, Lars M.; Wessbergh, Joanna; Persson, Linnea; Schiöler, Fredrik; Kedelv, Hans; Tibblin, Anna Oscarsson; Appelberg, Henrik; Hedlund, Lars; Helleberg, Johan; Eriksson, Karin E.; Glietsch, Rita; Larsson, Niklas; Nygren, Ingela; Nunes, Silvia L.; Morin, Anna-Karin; Kander, Thomas; Adolfsson, Anne; Piquilloud, Lise; Zender, Hervé O.; Leemann-Refondini, Corinne; Elatrous, Souheil; Bouchoucha, Slaheddine; Chouchene, Imed; Ouanes, Islem; Ben Souissi, Asma; Kamoun, Salma; Demirkiran, Oktay; Aker, Mustafa; Erbabacan, Emre; Ceylan, Ilkay; Girgin, Nermin Kelebek; Ozcelik, Menekse; Ünal, Necmettin; Meco, Basak Ceyda; Akyol, Onat O.; Derman, Suleyman S.; Kennedy, Barry; Parhar, Ken; Srinivasa, Latha; McNamee, Lia; McAuley, Danny; Steinberg, Jack; Hopkins, Phil; Mellis, Clare; Kakar, Vivek; Hadfield, Dan; Vercueil, Andre; Bhowmick, Kaushik; Humphreys, Sally K.; Ferguson, Andrew; Mckee, Raymond; Raj, Ashok S.; Fawkes, Danielle A.; Watt, Philip; Twohey, Linda; Jha, Rajeev R.; Thomas, Matthew; Morton, Alex; Kadaba, Varsha; Smith, Mark J.; Hormis, Anil P.; Kannan, Santhana G.; Namih, Miriam; Reschreiter, Henrik; Camsooksai, Julie; Kumar, Alek; Rugonfalvi, Szabolcs; Nutt, Christopher; Oneill, Orla; Seasman, Colette; Dempsey, Ged; Scott, Christopher J.; Ellis, Helen E.; McKechnie, Stuart; Hutton, Paula J.; Di Tomasso, Nora N.; Vitale, Michela N.; Griffin, Ruth O.; Dean, Michael N.; Cranshaw, Julius H.; Willett, Emma L.; Ioannou, Nicholas; Gillis, Sarah; Csabi, Peter; Macfadyen, Rosaleen; Dawson, Heidi; Preez, Pieter D.; Williams, Alexandra J.; Boyd, Owen; de Gordoa, Laura Ortiz-Ruiz; Bramall, Jon; Symmonds, Sophie; Chau, Simon K.; Wenham, Tim; Szakmany, Tamas; Toth-Tarsoly, Piroska; Mccalman, Katie H.; Alexander, Peter; Stephenson, Lorraine; Collyer, Thomas; Chapman, Rhiannon; Cooper, Raphael; Allan, Russell M.; Sim, Malcolm; Wrathall, David W.; Irvine, Donald A.; Zantua, Kim S.; Adams, John C.; Burtenshaw, Andrew J.; Sellors, Gareth P.; Welters, Ingeborg D.; Williams, Karen E.; Hessell, Robert J.; Oldroyd, Matthew G.; Battle, Ceri E.; Pillai, Suresh; Kajtor, Istvan; Sivashanmugavel, Mageswaran; Okane, Sinead C.; Donnelly, Adrian; Frigyik, Aniko D.; Careless, Jon P.; May, Martin M.; Stewart, Richard; Trinder, T. John; Hagan, Samantha J.; Wise, Matt P.; Cole, Jade M.; MacFie, Caroline C.; Dowling, Anna T.; Hurtado, Javier; Nin, Nicolás; Nuñez, Edgardo; Pittini, Gustavo; Rodriguez, Ruben; Imperio, María C.; Santos, Cristina; França, Ana G.; Ebeid, Alejandro; Deicas, Alberto; Serra, Carolina; Uppalapati, Aditya; Kamel, Ghassan; Banner-Goodspeed, Valerie M.; Beitler, Jeremy R.; Mukkera, Satyanarayana Reddy; Kulkarni, Shreedhar; Lee, Jarone; Mesar, Tomaz; Shinn, John O.; Gomaa, Dina; Tainter, Christopher; Yeatts, Dale J.; Warren, Jessica; Lanspa, Michael J.; Miller, Russel R.; Grissom, Colin K.; Brown, Samuel M.; Bauer, Philippe R.; Gosselin, Ryan J.; Kitch, Barrett T.; Cohen, Jason E.; Beegle, Scott H.; Stoger, John H.; Gueret, Renaud M.; Tulaimat, Aiman; Choudry, Shazia; Stigler, William; Batra, Hitesh; Huff, Nidhi G.; Lamb, Keith D.; Oetting, Trevor W.; Mohr, Nicholas M.; Judy, Claine; Saito, Shigeki; Kheir, Fayez M.; Kheir, Fayez; Schlichting, Adam B.; Delsing, Angela; Crouch, Daniel R.; Elmasri, Mary; Ismail, Dina; Dreyer, Kyle R.; Blakeman, Thomas C.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Grijalba, Carolina Quintana; Hou, Peter C.; Seethala, Raghu; Aisiku, Imo; Henderson, Galen; Frendl, Gyorgy; Hou, Sen-Kuang; Owens, Robert L.; Schomer, Ashley; Bumbasirevic, Vesna; Jovanovic, Bojan; Surbatovic, Maja; Veljovic, Milic

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information exists about the epidemiology, recognition, management, and outcomes of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). OBJECTIVES To evaluate intensive care unit (ICU) incidence and outcome of ARDS and to assess clinician recognition, ventilation

  2. Recombinant human activated protein C in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome : A randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Cornet (Alexander); A.B.J. Groeneveld (Johan); J.J. Hofstra (Jorrit Jan); A.P.J. Vlaar (Alexander); S. Tuinman (Sietske); A. van Lingen (Arthur); M. Levi (Michael); A.R.J. Girbes (Armand); M.J. Schultz (Marcus); A. Beishuizen (Auke)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRationale: Pulmonary coagulopathy may play a pathogenetic role in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), by contributing to alveolocapillary inflammation and increased permeability. Recombinant human activated protein C (rh-APC) may inhibit this process and thereby improve patient

  3. Viral Etiologies of Acute Respiratory Infections among Hospitalized Vietnamese Children in Ho Chi Minh City, 2004-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, A.H.L.; van Doorn, H.R.; Nghiem, M.N.; Bryant, J.E.; Hoang, T.H.T.; Do, Q.H.; Le Van, T.; Tran, T.T.; Wills, B.; Nguyen, V.C.; Vo, M.H.; Vo, C.K.; Nguyen, M.D.; Farrar, J.; Tran, T.H.; de Jong, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The dominant viral etiologies responsible for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are poorly understood, particularly among hospitalized children in resource-limited tropical countries where morbidity and mortality caused by ARIs are highest. Improved etiological insight is needed to

  4. Treatment of acute experimental schistosomiasis Tratamento da esquistossomose aguda experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilton A. Andrade

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available A model of acute schistosomiasis of the mouse was used to observe whether curative treatment would be followed by an enhancement of the hepatic and splenic lesions, as a consequence of the massive destruction of worms and eggs within the portal system. Mice infected with 50 cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni were treated with both oxamniquine and praziquantel on the 50th day of infection and submitted to a sequential histologic examination from the 2nd to the 45th day after treatment. Although severe focal lesions due to dead and disintegranting worms were present in the livers of the treated animals, no aggravation of the general changes (reative hepatitis and splenitis, or periovular granulomas was seen in comparison with a control non-treated group. Of 50 animals treated during the acute phase of schistosomiasis only one died espontaneously, while 16 ou of 30 infected controls died before the end of the experiment. The present investigation indicates that curative treatment during the acute phase of schistosomiasis does not enhance previous lesions at first and results in progressive disappearance of the lesions starting six days following chemotherapy.Foi utilizado um modelo de esquistossomose aguda do camundongo para testar se o tratamentop curativo da parasitose nesta fase poderia produzir uma exacerbação das lesões hepáticas e esplênicas, em virtude da destruição maciça de vermes e ovos nointerior do sistema porta. Camundongos infectados com 50 cercárias do Schistosoma mansoni foram tratados no 50º dia da infecção por uma combinação de oxamniquine e praziquantel e submetidos a exames histopatológicos seqüenciados desde o 2º até o 45º dia após o tratamento. Muito embora tenham sido encontrados lesões focais intensas causadas por vermes mortos no interior do fígado, não foi encontrada qualquer evidência de agravamento das lesões gerais (hepatite reacional e esplenite, ou nos granulomas periovulares quando se fez

  5. Asthma and pneumonia among children less than five years with acute respiratory symptoms in Mulago Hospital, Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nantanda, Rebecca; Tumwine, James K; Ndeezi, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia is considered the major cause of mortality among children with acute respiratory disease in low-income countries but may be over-diagnosed at the cost of under-diagnosing asthma. We report the magnitude of asthma and pneumonia among "under-fives" with cough and difficulty breathing, bas...... on stringent clinical criteria. We also describe the treatment for children with acute respiratory symptoms in Mulago Hospital....

  6. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections from Lima, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Orellana-Peralta, Fiorella; Marcelo-Rodr?guez, Alvaro; Verne, Eduardo; Esquivel-Vizcarra, M?nica; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; Weilg, Pablo; Casabona-Or?, Ver?nica; Ugarte, Claudia; del Valle, Luis J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are atypical pathogens responsible for pneumonia and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low income countries. The study objective is to determine the prevalence of this pathogens in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections. Methods A consecutive cross-sectional study was conducted in Lima, Peru from May 2009 to September 2010. A total of 675 children admitted with clinical diagnoses of acute respiratory ...

  7. ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION IN CHILDREN IN THE AGE ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Rovny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical features of laboratory-confirmed acute respiratory syncytial virus infection (ARSVI are described in 221 children of the age from 1 month to 5 years. Febrile fever has been recorded in 76% of patients with ARSVI, and significantly more often in children in the second year of life (92%, but the difference in the temerature or duration has not been found. 98% of children have had symptoms of the lower respiratory tract lesions. The most common ARSVI manifestations in the patients of the first year of life were obstructive diseases of the lower respiratory tract (obstructive bronchitis in 53% and bronchiolitis in 11% of children, in the patients of the second year of life — pneumonia (28%, p < 0,05 and catarrhal otitis (26%; p < 0,05. Bronchial obstruction syndrome in children of the first year of life was characterized by the significantly higher frequency (73% and the maximal duration (9,7 ± 1,08 days. The largest number of cases of the severe respiratory failure has been recorded among patients of the second year of life (3 degree of respiratory failure in 22% of patients, p < 0,05.

  8. Harmonisation of the acute respiratory infection reporting system in the Czech Republic with the European community networks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyncl, J.; Paget, W.J.; Havlickova, M.; Kriz, B.

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory virus activity is detected in Europe each winter, yet the precise timing and size of this activity is highly unpredictable. The impact of influenza infection and/or acute respiratory infection in European countries is continuously monitored through a variety of surveillance systems. All

  9. Modulation of the acute respiratory effects of winter air pollution by serum and dietary antioxidants : a panel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grievink, L; Hoek, G; Boezen, HM; van't Veer, P; Brunekreef, B

    This study investigated whether a high dietary intake or serum concentration of antioxidant (pro-) vitamins could attenuate the acute respiratory effects of air pollution in panels of adults (n=227) aged 50-70 yrs with chronic respiratory symptoms in two winters starting in 1993/1994. Subjects

  10. A prospective, community-based study on virologic assessment among elderly people with and without symptoms of acute respiratory infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graat, J.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Heijnen, M.L.; Kok, F.J.; Pallast, E.G.; Greeff, de S.C.; Dorigo-Zetsma, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Objective: Community-based elderly studies concerning microbiology of acute respiratory infections are scarce. Data on subclinical infections are even totally absent, although asymptomatic persons might act as a source of respiratory infections. Methods: In a 1-year community-based

  11. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011-2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role.

  12. Viral Etiology of acute respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children and adults in Shandong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ti; Li, Zhong; Zhang, Shengyang; Song, Shaoxia; Julong, Wu; Lin, Yi; Guo, Nongjian; Xing, Chunyan; Xu, Aiqiang; Bi, Zhenqiang; Wang, Xianjun

    2015-10-14

    The dominant viral etiologies responsible for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are poorly understood, particularly among hospitalized patients. Improved etiological insight is needed to improve clinical management and prevention of ARIs. Clinical and demographic information and throat swabs were collected from 607 patients from 2011 to 2013 in Shandong Province, China. Multiplex RT-PCR (SeeplexTM RV detection, Seegene) was performed to detected 12 respiratory viral pathogens. A total of 607 hospitalized patients were enrolled from 2011 to 2013. Viruses were identified in 35.75 % (217/607) of cases, including 78 influenza virus A and B (IVA and IVB), 47 para-influenza viruses (PIVs), 41 respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and 38 adenovirus (ADV). For the children under 15 year old, the common detected viruses were influenza viruses, RSV, PIVS and ADV, while the principal respiratory viruses were human coronaviruses (HCoV), PIVs, influenza viruses for the old adults. Co-infections with multiple viruses were detected in 15.67 % of patients. Children under 5 years were more likely to have one or more detectable virus associated with their ARI. The peak of ARI caused by the respiratory viruses occurred in winter. This study demonstrated respiratory viruses were the major cause of hospitalized ARI patients in Shandong Province, influenza virus was the most common detected, RSV was the highest incidence among the young children (≤5 years). These findings also gave a better understand of virus distribution among different age and seasons, which help to consider potential therapeutic approaches and develop effective prevention strategies for respiratory virus infection.

  13. Volume Delivered During Recruitment Maneuver Predicts Lung Stress in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitler, Jeremy R; Majumdar, Rohit; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Malhotra, Atul; Thompson, B Taylor; Owens, Robert L; Loring, Stephen H; Talmor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Global lung stress varies considerably with low tidal volume ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome. High stress despite low tidal volumes may worsen lung injury and increase risk of death. No widely available parameter exists to assess global lung stress. We aimed to determine whether the volume delivered during a recruitment maneuver (V(RM)) is inversely associated with lung stress and mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome. Substudy of an acute respiratory distress syndrome clinical trial on esophageal pressure-guided positive end-expiratory pressure titration. U.S. academic medical center. Forty-two patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome in whom airflow, airway pressure, and esophageal pressure were recorded during the recruitment maneuver. A single recruitment maneuver was performed before initiating protocol-directed ventilator management. Recruitment maneuvers consisted of a 30-second breath hold at 40 cm H2O airway pressure under heavy sedation or paralysis. V(RM) was calculated by integrating the flow-time waveform during the maneuver. End-inspiratory stress was defined as the transpulmonary (airway minus esophageal) pressure during end-inspiratory pause of a tidal breath and tidal stress as the transpulmonary pressure difference between end-inspiratory and end-expiratory pauses. V(RM) ranged between 7.4 and 34.7 mL/kg predicted body weight. Lower V(RM) predicted high end-inspiratory and tidal lung stress (end-inspiratory: β = -0.449; 95% CI, -0.664 to -0.234; p volume, or plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure, V(RM) remained independently associated with both end-inspiratory and tidal stress. In unadjusted analysis, low V(RM) predicted increased risk of death (odds ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.72-1.00; p = 0.026). V(RM) remained significantly associated with mortality after adjusting for study arm (odds ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.71-1.00; p = 0.022). Low V(RM) independently predicts high lung stress and may

  14. Transcriptional profiling at different sites in lungs of pigs during acute bacterial respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Shila; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Heegaard, Peter M H

    2011-02-01

    The local transcriptional response was studied in different locations of lungs from pigs experimentally infected with the respiratory pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5B, using porcine cDNA microarrays. This infection gives rise to well-demarcated infection loci in the lung, characterized by necrotic and haemorrhagic lesions. Lung tissue was sampled from necrotic areas, from visually unaffected areas and from areas bordering on necrotic areas. Expression pattern of these areas from infected pigs was compared to healthy lung tissue from un-infected pigs. Transcription of selected genes important in the innate defence response were further analysed by quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR. A clear correlation was observed between the number of differentially expressed genes as well as the magnitude of their induction and the sampling location in the infected lung, with the highest number of differentially expressed genes, and the most highly induced genes found in necrotic areas. Interestingly, a group of differentially regulated genes was represented in all three areas, comprising genes encoding cytokines, acute phase proteins, and factors related to regulation of apoptosis and the complement system. Interferon-γ was downregulated in both necrotic and bordering areas. Evidence of neutrophil recruitment was seen by the up-regulation of chemotactic factors for neutrophils. In conclusion, we found subsets of genes expressed at different levels in the three selected areas of the infected lung as compared to the control group. Thus it is demonstrated that an infection with clearly defined infected loci leads to a rapid disseminated intra-organ response in neighbouring seemingly unaffected tissue areas of the infected organ. Within the lung, we found a clear division of induced genes as, in unaffected areas a large part of differently expressed genes were involved in systemic reactions to infections, while differently expressed genes in

  15. [A three-year review of acute respiratory tract infections caused by Streptococcus milleri group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Rei; Kawayama, Tomotaka; Rikimaru, Toru; Oizumi, Kotaro

    2002-03-01

    The objective of our study is to understand the clinical features of patients with acute respiratory tract infection associated with Streptococcus milleri group (SMG). Fifteen patients with SMG respiratory tract infection visited our hospital from July, 1997 through May, 2000. There were seven cases of pneumonia, two pulmonary abscess, three thoracic empyema and three acute bronchitis. The mean age of the patients was 57.8 years (range 16-87), twelve were males, and seven were smokers. The moderately to severe underlying diseases existed in thirteen patients (86.7%) and included the following: respiratory diseases (20.0%), history of the esophageal or gastric surgery (26.7%), central nerve system diseases (13.3%), alcohol intake (60.0%), hepatitis and pancreatitis (33.3%), diabetes mellitus (13.3%) and malignancy (6.7%). The species of SMG detected were as follows: S. constellatus, 8, S. anginosus, 6 and S. intermedius, 1. Anaerobic organism and other microorganisms were detected in five patients. A patient with SMG nosocominal pneumonia who previously had thoracic surgery for esophageal cancer died. Antibiotics therapy with carbapenem or combination therapy, drainage and no surgery, were successful in 14 of the 15 cases (93.3%). The number of intermediately or complete resistant strains against penicillin G, ampicillin and cefmetazole were 5 (33.3%), 8 (53.3%) and 12 (80.0%), respectively in this series. Recently, it is seemed that acute respiratory tract infections caused by SMG are increasing in the patients with moderately to severe underlying diseases, and several clinical strains of SMG are acquiring a tolerance to antibiotics.

  16. Patients With Fibrotic Interstitial Lung Disease Hospitalized for Acute Respiratory Worsening: A Large Cohort Analysis.

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    Moua, Teng; Westerly, Blair D; Dulohery, Megan M; Daniels, Craig E; Ryu, Jay H; Lim, Kaiser G

    2016-05-01

    Acute respiratory worsening (ARW) requiring hospitalization in patients with fibrotic interstitial lung disease (f-ILD) is common. Little is known about the frequency and implications of ARW in IPF and non-IPF ILD patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation (AE) vs known causes of ARW. All consecutive patients with f-ILD hospitalized with ARW at our institution from 2000 to 2014 were reviewed. ARW was defined as any worsening of respiratory symptoms with new or worsened hypoxemia or hypercapnia within 30 days of admission. Suspected AE was defined using modified 2007 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria. Known causes of ARW were reviewed and collated along with in-hospital and all-cause mortality postdischarge. A total of 220 patients (100 with IPF and 120 non-IPF) composed 311 admissions for ARW. Suspected AE (SAE) comprised 52% of ARW admissions, followed by infection (20%), and subacute progression of disease (15%). In-hospital mortality was similar in patients with IPF vs patients without (55 vs 45%, P = .18), but worse in suspected AE admission types (OR, 3.1 [1.9-5.14]). One-year survival after last ARW admission for the whole cohort was 22%, despite only 27% of patients presenting with baseline oxygen requirement at admission and a mean admission Charlson Comorbidity Index score of 5.4 (expected 1-year survival, 89%). Survival after discharge was similar between SAE and secondary ARW admission types in both IPF and non-IPF patients. Among patients with f-ILD, hospitalization for ARW appears associated with significant in-hospital and postdischarge mortality regardless of underlying fibrotic lung disease or non-AE cause of acute respiratory decline. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  18. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1-4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A-F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011-2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12-24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV-Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV-bocavirus / bocavirus-influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12-24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis.

  19. RESULTS OF MULTICENTER STUDY OF PIDOTIMOD FOR THE PROPHYLAXIS OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN FREQUENTLY AILING CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Namazova-Baranova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes actual pediatric problem — frequent development of respiratory infections in children. Authors present the results of Russian multicenter study of effectiveness and safety of pidotimod (Imunorix in frequently ailing children. It was shown that treatment with pidotimod during 30 days resulted in decreased rate of acute respiratory infections and their complications including ones with necessity of antibacterial therapy compared to children from control group. The dynamics of immunological rates in blood serum was studied.Key words: frequently ailing children, acute respiratory infections, prophylaxis, pidotimod.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(2:40-44

  20. Sex-specific respiratory effects of acute and chronic caffeine administration in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchi, Hayet; Uppari, NagaPraveena; Joseph, Vincent; Bairam, Aida

    2017-06-01

    Caffeine is widely used for the treatment of apnea of prematurity (AoP) but whether this effect varies with sex is unknown. To shed some light on this question, we present a summary of data obtained on the effects of caffeine on the respiratory chemoreflexes and apnea frequency in 1- and 12-days old male and female rats. Caffeine was either administered as a single acute injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) or for 10 consecutive days (7.5mg/kg/day between 3 and 12days of life by gavage, simulating its clinical use). Acute caffeine had little effects on breathing in 1-day old male and female rats. In 12-days old female rats caffeine reduced the response to hypercapnia (not hypoxia) compared to males. During the steady state of hypoxia females had a lower frequency of apneas than males, and acute injection of caffeine decreased the frequency of apnea, suppressing the differences between males and females. In 12-days old rats chronic administration of caffeine stimulated basal breathing and decreased the frequency of apnea similarly in males and females. In response to hypoxia, chronic caffeine administration also masked the difference in respiratory frequency between males and females observed in control rats. Female rats had lower frequency of apnea than males with or without caffeine treatment. These observations indicate that sex influences the respiratory responses to caffeine and this effect seems to depend on the modality of administration (acute vs chronic) and environmental oxygen (normoxia vs hypoxia). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk factors for and impact of respiratory failure on mortality in the early phase of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombernowsky, Tilde; Kristensen, Marlene Østermark; Rysgaard, Sisse; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Novovic, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of respiratory failure and other respiratory complications in the early phase of acute pancreatitis (AP) is not well investigated. To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of respiratory failure, and its impact on mortality in the early phase AP. Retrospective cohort study including 359 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis. Information was gathered from electronic patient records. We defined respiratory failure based on the modified Marshall scoring system in the revised Atlanta criteria. Predictors of respiratory failure were evaluated in univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis. The cohort included 188 women and 171 men with a mean age of 56.1 years. Respiratory complications including pleural effusion, pneumonia and atelectasis were registered in 80 patients (22%), 100 (29%) needed oxygen therapy, 27 (8%) continuous positive airway pressure, and six (2%) mechanical ventilation. Thirty-two patients (9%) were treated with bronchodilators and 12 (3%) with steroids. Thirty-one patients (9%) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for respiratory failure. Five of these patients (16%) did not have effusion, atelectasis or pneumonia. Predictors of respiratory failure in multivariable analysis were age (OR 1.04; CI 95% (1.03-1.07)) and smoking (OR 2.67; CI 95% (1.21-5.86)). Thirteen patients died in hospital. The Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests showed that patients with respiratory failure had increased in-hospital mortality as did patients with cardiovascular and renal failure (P Respiratory complications are frequent in the early phase of AP. Respiratory, cardiovascular and renal failure is associated with a poor outcome. The fact that patients without effusion, atelectasis, or pneumonia may develop respiratory failure, suggests that acute lung injury, possibly associated with systemic inflammation, may be important. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in children under one year of age hospitalized for acute respiratory diseases in Pelotas, RS

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    Macedo Silvia Elaine Cardozo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory diseases (ARDs are a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: The present case-controlled study investigated the hospitalizations by ARDs in children under one year of age and the association with the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in za Pelotas, RS. METHODS: All children under one year of age hospitalized due to ARDs from August 1997 to July of 1998 were followed-up in the four hospitals of the city. A standardized questionnaire was applied to the children's mother regarding symptoms of the actual illness in addition to social and demographic variables, nutrition, and previous morbidity. The final diagnosis of ARDs was performed by an arbiter (a pediatrician based on the hospital records of the children and the data on the questionnaire. Nasopharyngeal secretions were collected for RSV detection by direct immunofluorescence. RESULTS: The study included 650 children and the annual incidence rate of hospital admissions for ARDs was 13.9%. Admissions showed a seasonal pattern with most of the hospitalizations occurring from July to October. The main causes of admission were: pneumonia (43.7%, bronchiolitis (31.0%, asthma (20.3%, influenza (3.5%, otitis media (0.8% and laryngitis (0.6%. The overall prevalence of RSV was 30.7%, with 40.2% in bronchiolitis, 28.6% in influenza, 27.4% in asthma, 26.3% in pneumonia, and 25% in otitis media. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study confirm the high morbidity of ARDs in childhood and the seasonal pattern of ARDs hospitalizations and their association with RSV infection.

  3. A novel swine model of ricin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Shahaf Katalan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to the plant toxin ricin leads to respiratory insufficiency and death. To date, in-depth study of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS following pulmonary exposure to toxins is hampered by the lack of an appropriate animal model. To this end, we established the pig as a large animal model for the comprehensive study of the multifarious clinical manifestations of pulmonary ricinosis. Here, we report for the first time, the monitoring of barometric whole body plethysmography for pulmonary function tests in non-anesthetized ricin-treated pigs. Up to 30 h post-exposure, as a result of progressing hypoxemia and to prevent carbon dioxide retention, animals exhibited a compensatory response of elevation in minute volume, attributed mainly to a large elevation in respiratory rate with minimal response in tidal volume. This response was followed by decompensation, manifested by a decrease in minute volume and severe hypoxemia, refractory to oxygen treatment. Radiological evaluation revealed evidence of early diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates while hemodynamic parameters remained unchanged, excluding cardiac failure as an explanation for respiratory insufficiency. Ricin-intoxicated pigs suffered from increased lung permeability accompanied by cytokine storming. Histological studies revealed lung tissue insults that accumulated over time and led to diffuse alveolar damage. Charting the decline in PaO2/FiO2 ratio in a mechanically ventilated pig confirmed that ricin-induced respiratory damage complies with the accepted diagnostic criteria for ARDS. The establishment of this animal model of pulmonary ricinosis should help in the pursuit of efficient medical countermeasures specifically tailored to deal with the respiratory deficiencies stemming from ricin-induced ARDS.

  4. PM10 Air Pollution and Acute Hospital Admissions for Cardiovascular and Respiratory Causes in Ostrava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomášková, Hana; Tomášek, Ivan; Šlachtová, Hana; Polaufová, Pavla; Šplíchalová, Anna; Michalík, Jiří; Feltl, David; Lux, Jaroslav; Marsová, Marie

    2016-12-01

    The city of Ostrava and its surroundings belong to the most long-therm polluted areas in the Czech Republic and Europe. For identification of health risk, the World Health Organization recommends a theoretical estimation of increased short-term PM10 concentrations effect on hospital admissions for cardiac complaints based on a 0.6% increase per 10 µg.m(-3) PM10 and 1.14% increase for respiratory causes. The goal of the present study is to verify the percentage increase of morbidity due to cardiovascular and respiratory causes, as per WHO recommendations for health risk assessment, in the population of Ostrava. The input data include data on PM10 air pollution, meteorological data, the absolute number of hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in the period 2010-2012. To examine the association between air pollution and health outcomes the time series Poisson regression adjusted for covariates was used. A significant relationship was found between the cardiovascular hospital admissions (percentage increase of 1.24% per 10 µg.m(-3)) and values of PM10 less than 150 µg.m(-3) in the basic model, although after adjustment for other factors, this relationship was no longer significant. A significant relationship was also observed for respiratory causes of hospital admissions in the basic model. Contrary to cardiovascular hospitalization, the relationship between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 values below 150 µg.m(-3) (percentage increase of 1.52%) remained statistically significant after adjustment for other factors. The observed significant relationship between hospital admissions for respiratory causes was consistent with the results of large European and American studies.

  5. Molecular viral epidemiology and clinical characterization of acute febrile respiratory infections in hospitalized children in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yu-Fen; Lee, Chia-Lin; Wu, Meng-Che; Ho, Chi-Lin; Chang, Yu-Chuan; Chan, Yu-Jiun

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is a leading cause of morbidity and hospitalization in children. To profile the viruses causing ARI in children admitted to a community-based hospital in central Taiwan, a cross-sectional study was conducted on children under 14 years of age that were hospitalized with febrile ARI. Viral etiology was determined using conventional cell culture and a commercial respiratory virus panel fast assay (xTAG RVP), capable of detecting 19 different respiratory viruses and subtype targets. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were recorded and analyzed. The RVP fast assay identified at least one respiratory virus in 130 of the 216 specimens examined (60.2%) and rose to 137 (63.4%) by combining the results of cell culture and RVP fast assay. In order of frequency, the etiological agents identified were, rhinovirus/enterovirus (24.6%), respiratory syncytial virus (13.8%), adenovirus (11.5%), parainfluenza virus (9.2%), influenza B (8.4%), influenza A (5.4%), human metapneumovirus (4.6%), human coronavirus (2%), and human bocavirus (2%). Co-infection did not result in an increase in clinical severity. The RVP assay detected more positive specimens, but failed to detect 6 viruses identified by culture. The viral detection rate for the RVP assay was affected by how many days after admission the samples were taken (P = 0.03). In conclusion, Rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus were prevalent in this study by adopting RVP assay. The viral detection rate is influenced by sampling time, especially if the tests are performed during the first three days of hospitalization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Acute viral respiratory infections among children in MERS-endemic Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagbo, Shamsudeen F; Garbati, Musa A; Hasan, Rami; AlShahrani, Dayel; Al-Shehri, Mohamed; AlFawaz, Tariq; Hakawi, Ahmed; Wani, Tariq Ahmad; Skakni, Leila

    2017-02-01

    The emergence of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in Saudi Arabia has intensified focus on Acute Respiratory Infections [ARIs]. This study sought to identify respiratory viruses (RVs) associated with ARIs in children presenting at a tertiary hospital. Children (aged ≤13) presenting with ARI between January 2012 and December 2013 tested for 15 RVs using the Seeplex R RV15 kit were retrospectively included. Epidemiological data was retrieved from patient records. Of the 2235 children tested, 61.5% were ≤1 year with a male: female ratio of 3:2. Viruses were detected in 1364 (61.02%) children, 233 (10.4%) having dual infections: these viruses include respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (24%), human rhinovirus (hRV) (19.7%), adenovirus (5.7%), influenza virus (5.3%), and parainfluenzavirus-3 (4.6%). Children, aged 9-11 months, were most infected (60.9%). Lower respiratory tract infections (55.4%) were significantly more than upper respiratory tract infection (45.3%) (P < 0.001). Seasonal variation of RV was directly and inversely proportional to relative humidity and temperature, respectively, for non MERS coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, and OC43). The study confirms community-acquired RV associated with ARI in children and suggests modulating roles for abiotic factors in RV epidemiology. However, community-based studies are needed to elucidate how these factors locally influence RV epidemiology. J. Med. Virol. 89:195-201, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Human bocavirus infection as a cause of severe acute respiratory tract infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesker, F M; van Kampen, J J A; van der Eijk, A A; van Rossum, A M C; de Hoog, M; Schutten, M; Smits, S L; Bodewes, R; Osterhaus, A D M E; Fraaij, P L A

    2015-10-01

    In 2005 human bocavirus (HBoV) was discovered in respiratory tract samples of children. The role of HBoV as the single causative agent for respiratory tract infections remains unclear. Detection of HBoV in children with respiratory disease is frequently in combination with other viruses or bacteria. We set up an algorithm to study whether HBoV alone can cause severe acute respiratory tract infection (SARI) in children. The algorithm was developed to exclude cases with no other likely cause than HBoV for the need for admission to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with SARI. We searched for other viruses by next-generation sequencing (NGS) in these cases and studied their HBoV viral loads. To benchmark our algorithm, the same was applied to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-positive patients. From our total group of 990 patients who tested positive for a respiratory virus by means of RT-PCR, HBoV and RSV were detected in 178 and 366 children admitted to our hospital. Forty-nine HBoV-positive patients and 72 RSV-positive patients were admitted to the PICU. We found seven single HBoV-infected cases with SARI admitted to PICU (7/49, 14%). They had no other detectable virus by NGS. They had much higher HBoV loads than other patients positive for HBoV. We identified 14 RSV-infected SARI patients with a single RSV infection (14/72, 19%). We conclude that our study provides strong support that HBoV can cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. USE OF A NEW FORM OF IBUPROFEN IN CHILDREN WITH FEVER AND ACUTE RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS

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    E. E. Lokshina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study clinical efficacy, tolerance and safety of a new pelleted ibuprofen form for children in treatment of fever in patients with acute respiratory tract infection. Patients and methods: children aged from 6 to 12 years old with clinical manifestation of respiratory tract infections and requiring antipyretic treatment were included into the study. Children (n = 50 were administered ibuprofen at a single dose of 5–10 mg/kg of body weight, not more than 3–4 times per day. The efficacy assessment included time needed for temperature decrease (assessment was performed in 15, 30 and 60 minutes and duration of the antipyretic effect (assessment in 6, 8 and 12 hours. Rapidity of analgesic effect in children with ear ache, headache and myalgias was performed in 15, 30, 60 minutes and 6, 8 and 12 hours after the drug intake. Results: antipyretic effect of pelleted ibuprofen for children begins in 15 minutes after its intake. Stable temperature decrease during the first 6 hours was observed in 58% of children (the mean temperature was 37,1 ± 0,3 and maintained up for 12 hours. Relief of pain intensity was established in 62,1% of patients during the first 3 hours, and in 37,9% the pain syndrome was arrested completely. Conclusions: the new pelleted form of ibuprofen for children was proved to have high clinical efficacy and safety in treatment of fever in children with acute respiratory tract infections.

  9. Official ERS/ATS clinical practice guidelines: noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard, Laurent; Elliott, Mark W.; Hess, Dean; Hill, Nicholas S.; Navalesi, Paolo; Antonelli, Massimo; Brozek, Jan; Conti, Giorgio; Ferrer, Miquel; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha; Jaber, Samir; Keenan, Sean; Mancebo, Jordi; Mehta, Sangeeta; Raoof, Suhail

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) is widely used in the acute care setting for acute respiratory failure (ARF) across a variety of aetiologies. This document provides European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society recommendations for the clinical application of NIV based on the most current literature. The guideline committee was composed of clinicians, methodologists and experts in the field of NIV. The committee developed recommendations based on the GRADE (Grading, Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology for each actionable question. The GRADE Evidence to Decision framework in the guideline development tool was used to generate recommendations. A number of topics were addressed using technical summaries without recommendations and these are discussed in the supplementary material. This guideline committee developed recommendations for 11 actionable questions in a PICO (population–intervention–comparison–outcome) format, all addressing the use of NIV for various aetiologies of ARF. The specific conditions where recommendations were made include exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, de novo hypoxaemic respiratory failure, immunocompromised patients, chest trauma, palliation, post-operative care, weaning and post-extubation. This document summarises the current state of knowledge regarding the role of NIV in ARF. Evidence-based recommendations provide guidance to relevant stakeholders. PMID:28860265

  10. Short-term effects of noisy pressure support ventilation in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Peter M; Güldner, Andreas; Huhle, Robert; Beda, Alessandro; Bluth, Thomas; Schreiter, Dierk; Ragaller, Max; Gottschlich, Birgit; Kiss, Thomas; Jaber, Samir; Pelosi, Paolo; Koch, Thea; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2013-10-31

    This study aims at comparing the very short-term effects of conventional and noisy (variable) pressure support ventilation (PSV) in mechanically ventilated patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Thirteen mechanically ventilated patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure were enrolled in this monocentric, randomized crossover study. Patients were mechanically ventilated with conventional and noisy PSV, for one hour each, in random sequence. Pressure support was titrated to reach tidal volumes approximately 8 mL/kg in both modes. The level of positive end-expiratory pressure and fraction of inspired oxygen were kept unchanged in both modes. The coefficient of variation of pressure support during noisy PSV was set at 30%. Gas exchange, hemodynamics, lung functional parameters, distribution of ventilation by electrical impedance tomography, breathing patterns and patient-ventilator synchrony were analyzed. Noisy PSV was not associated with any adverse event, and was well tolerated by all patients. Gas exchange, hemodynamics, respiratory mechanics and spatial distribution of ventilation did not differ significantly between conventional and noisy PSV. Noisy PSV increased the variability of tidal volume (24.4 ± 7.8% vs. 13.7 ± 9.1%, P ventilator synchrony, at comparable levels of gas exchange. ClinicialTrials.gov, NCT00786292.

  11. ASSESSMENT OF EFFICACY IN APPLICATION OF TOPICAL IMMUNOLOGIC RESPONSE MODIFIER FOR PREVENTION OF INFLUENZA AND ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

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    I.N. Lytkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to assess the efficacy of bacterial lysate for prevention of acute respiratory infections. The article provides results of monitoring children in the orphanage who were administered the medication of this group as a prophylactic drug against acute respiratory infections. Children also from orphanages who were not administered the medication were selected as a control group. It was found that out of 80 children who underwent preventive treatment, only 26 children fell ill, while out of 80 children in the control group so did 78 orphans. The results achieved allowed the topical immunologic response modifier to be recommended as a general preventive medication for wide use in children in the period of seasonal respiratory infection incidence rate pickup.Key words: influenza, acute respiratory infections, preventive treatment, children.

  12. Gene Expression Profiles Link Respiratory Viral Infection, Platelet Response to Aspirin, and Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jason J; Voora, Deepak; Cyr, Derek D; Lucas, Joseph E; Zaas, Aimee K; Woods, Christopher W; Newby, L Kristin; Kraus, William E; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Influenza infection is associated with myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that respiratory viral infection may induce biologic pathways that contribute to MI. We tested the hypotheses that 1) a validated blood gene expression signature of respiratory viral infection (viral GES) was associated with MI and 2) respiratory viral exposure changes levels of a validated platelet gene expression signature (platelet GES) of platelet function in response to aspirin that is associated with MI. A previously defined viral GES was projected into blood RNA data from 594 patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and used to classify patients as having evidence of viral infection or not and tested for association with acute MI using logistic regression. A previously defined platelet GES was projected into blood RNA data from 81 healthy subjects before and after exposure to four respiratory viruses: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) (n=20), Human Rhinovirus (HRV) (n=20), Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1) (n=24), Influenza A Virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2) (n=17). We tested for the change in platelet GES with viral exposure using linear mixed-effects regression and by symptom status. In the catheterization cohort, 32 patients had evidence of viral infection based upon the viral GES, of which 25% (8/32) had MI versus 12.2% (69/567) among those without evidence of viral infection (OR 2.3; CI [1.03-5.5], p=0.04). In the infection cohorts, only H1N1 exposure increased platelet GES over time (time course p-value = 1e-04). A viral GES of non-specific, respiratory viral infection was associated with acute MI; 18% of the top 49 genes in the viral GES are involved with hemostasis and/or platelet aggregation. Separately, H1N1 exposure, but not exposure to other respiratory viruses, increased a platelet GES previously shown to be associated with MI. Together, these results highlight specific genes and pathways that link viral infection, platelet activation, and MI especially in the

  13. Gene Expression Profiles Link Respiratory Viral Infection, Platelet Response to Aspirin, and Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason J Rose

    Full Text Available Influenza infection is associated with myocardial infarction (MI, suggesting that respiratory viral infection may induce biologic pathways that contribute to MI. We tested the hypotheses that 1 a validated blood gene expression signature of respiratory viral infection (viral GES was associated with MI and 2 respiratory viral exposure changes levels of a validated platelet gene expression signature (platelet GES of platelet function in response to aspirin that is associated with MI.A previously defined viral GES was projected into blood RNA data from 594 patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and used to classify patients as having evidence of viral infection or not and tested for association with acute MI using logistic regression. A previously defined platelet GES was projected into blood RNA data from 81 healthy subjects before and after exposure to four respiratory viruses: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV (n=20, Human Rhinovirus (HRV (n=20, Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1 (n=24, Influenza A Virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2 (n=17. We tested for the change in platelet GES with viral exposure using linear mixed-effects regression and by symptom status.In the catheterization cohort, 32 patients had evidence of viral infection based upon the viral GES, of which 25% (8/32 had MI versus 12.2% (69/567 among those without evidence of viral infection (OR 2.3; CI [1.03-5.5], p=0.04. In the infection cohorts, only H1N1 exposure increased platelet GES over time (time course p-value = 1e-04.A viral GES of non-specific, respiratory viral infection was associated with acute MI; 18% of the top 49 genes in the viral GES are involved with hemostasis and/or platelet aggregation. Separately, H1N1 exposure, but not exposure to other respiratory viruses, increased a platelet GES previously shown to be associated with MI. Together, these results highlight specific genes and pathways that link viral infection, platelet activation, and MI especially in the

  14. Risk factors for and impact of respiratory failure on mortality in the early phase of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, Tilde; Kristensen, Marlene Østermark; Rysgaard, Sisse

    2016-01-01

    : Retrospective cohort study including 359 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis. Information was gathered from electronic patient records. We defined respiratory failure based on the modified Marshall scoring system in the revised Atlanta criteria. Predictors of respiratory failure were evaluated...... or pneumonia. Predictors of respiratory failure in multivariable analysis were age (OR 1.04; CI 95% (1.03-1.07)) and smoking (OR 2.67; CI 95% (1.21-5.86)). Thirteen patients died in hospital. The Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests showed that patients with respiratory failure had increased in......, or pneumonia may develop respiratory failure, suggests that acute lung injury, possibly associated with systemic inflammation, may be important....

  15. Assessing gas exchange in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: diagnostic techniques and prognostic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattinoni, Luciano; Carlesso, Eleonora; Cressoni, Massimo

    2011-02-01

    To provide the most recent insights on the assessment of gas exchange in acute lung injury. Central venous blood may be used as a surrogate of arterial blood to assess carbon dioxide tension and acid-base status. In contrast arterial oxygenation cannot be estimated with confidence from venous blood. However, the use of venous blood associated with pulse oximetry may provide the SvO2 which is useful for monitoring and targeting the resuscitation therapy. Impaired CO2 clearance and increased dead space have been confirmed as useful prognostic indices of structural lung damage and mortality in acute respiratory failure. A simplified technique based on multiple inert gas technique has been described to assess ventilation-perfusion mismatch while a new analysis of pulse oximetry has been suggested to detect lung opening and closing. Finally, new insight has been provided on the relationship between lung anatomy, as detected by computed tomography, oxygenation and CO2 clearance. Although oxygenation assessment is of primary importance during respiratory lung injury, dead space and CO2 retention are more strictly associated with outcome. The association of central venous blood analysis and pulse oximetry may provide more information than arterial blood alone.

  16. Inhaled Nitric Oxide for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Acute Lung Injury in Adults and Children: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, defined as acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, are critical conditions associated with frequent mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been used to improve oxygenation, but its role remains...... be recommended for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. iNO results in a transient improvement in oxygenation but does not reduce mortality and may be harmful....... to fraction of inspired oxygen (mean difference [MD] 15.91, 95% CI 8.25 to 23.56; I² = 25%). However, iNO appears to increase the risk of renal impairment among adults (RR 1.59, 95% CI 1.17 to 2.16; I² = 0) but not the risk of bleeding or methemoglobin or nitrogen dioxide formation. CONCLUSION: iNO cannot...

  17. Computerised Analysis of Telemonitored Respiratory Sounds for Predicting Acute Exacerbations of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Fernandez-Granero

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the commonest causes of death in the world and poses a substantial burden on healthcare systems and patients’ quality of life. The largest component of the related healthcare costs is attributable to admissions due to acute exacerbation (AECOPD. The evidence that might support the effectiveness of the telemonitoring interventions in COPD is limited partially due to the lack of useful predictors for the early detection of AECOPD. Electronic stethoscopes and computerised analyses of respiratory sounds (CARS techniques provide an opportunity for substantial improvement in the management of respiratory diseases. This exploratory study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using: (a a respiratory sensor embedded in a self-tailored housing for ageing users; (b a telehealth framework; (c CARS and (d machine learning techniques for the remote early detection of the AECOPD. In a 6-month pilot study, 16 patients with COPD were equipped with a home base-station and a sensor to daily record their respiratory sounds. Principal component analysis (PCA and a support vector machine (SVM classifier was designed to predict AECOPD. 75.8% exacerbations were early detected with an average of 5 ± 1.9 days in advance at medical attention. The proposed method could provide support to patients, physicians and healthcare systems.

  18. A molecular epidemiological study of respiratory viruses detected in Japanese children with acute wheezing illness

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    Noda Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies strongly suggest that some respiratory viruses are associated with the induction of acute wheezing and/or exacerbation of bronchial asthma. However, molecular epidemiology of these viruses is not exactly known. Methods Using PCR technology, we attempted to detect various respiratory viruses from 115 Japanese children. Furthermore, the detected viruses were subjected to homology, pairwise distance, and phylogenetic analysis. Results Viruses were detected from 99 (86.1% patients. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV alone and human rhinovirus (HRV alone were detected in 47 (40.9% and 36 (31.3% patients, respectively. Both RSV and HRV were detected in 14 (12.2% patients. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV alone and human parainfluenza virus (HPIV alone were detected in 1 (0.9% patient each, respectively. Homology and phylogenetic analyses showed that the RSV and HRV strains were classified into genetically diverse species or subgroups. In addition, RSV was the dominant virus detected in patients with no history of wheezing, whereas HRV was dominant in patients with a history of wheezing. Conclusions The results suggested that these genetically diverse respiratory viruses, especially RSV and HRV, might be associated with wheezing in Japanese children.

  19. Air Quality and Acute Respiratory Illness in Biomass Fuel using homes in Bagamoyo, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nakai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory Diseases are public health concern worldwide. The diseases have been associated with air pollution especially indoor air pollution from biomass fuel burning in developing countries. However, researches on pollution levels and on association of respiratory diseases with biomass fuel pollution are limited. A study was therefore undertaken to characterize the levels of pollutants in biomass fuel using homes and examine the association between biomass fuel smoke exposure and Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI disease in Nianjema village in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. Pollution was assessed by measuring PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations in kitchen, living room and outdoors. ARI prevalence was assessed by use of questionnaire which gathered health information for all family members under the study. Results showed that PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations were highest in the kitchen and lowest outdoors. Kitchen concentrations were highest in the kitchen located in the living room for all pollutants except CO. Family size didn’t have effect on the levels measured in kitchens. Overall ARI prevalence for cooks and children under age 5 making up the exposed group was 54.67% with odds ratio (OR of 5.5; 95% CI 3.6 to 8.5 when compared with unexposed men and non-regular women cooks. Results of this study suggest an association between respiratory diseases and exposure to domestic biomass fuel smoke, but further studies with improved design are needed to confirm the association.

  20. Vitamin A deficiency alters airway resistance in children with acute upper respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Cleia T; Pontes, Núbia N; Maciel, Bruna L L; Bezerra, Hugo S M; Triesta, Ana Nataly A B; Jeronimo, Selma M B; McGowan, Stephen E; Dantas, Vera M

    2013-05-01

    To assess whether vitamin A deficiency alters the recovery of total respiratory resistance (TRR) following acute upper respiratory tract infection (URI). This is a case control study of children, age 4-6 years and grouped as: URI, (n = 74), URI and wheezing, (URI-wheezing, n = 52), and healthy controls (n = 51). Vitamin A and total respiratory resistance (TRR) were assessed using the modified relative dose response (MRDR) and forced oscillometry, respectively. Children with URI and URI-wheezing had lower retinol, 32.4 ± 13.12 and 18.3 ± 6.83 µg/dl respectively, compared to controls, 56.9 ± 29.82 µg/dl (ANOVA, P 0.06. In the URI-wheezing group, TRR declined independently of retinol and MRDR. Vitamin A contributes to preservation of airway function during and in recovery after upper respiratory infection in children. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Clinical review: Exogenous surfactant therapy for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterised by severe hypoxemic respiratory failure and poor lung compliance. Despite advances in clinical management, morbidity and mortality remains high. Supportive measures including protective lung ventilation confer a survival advantage in patients with ARDS, but management is otherwise limited by the lack of effective pharmacological therapies. Surfactant dysfunction with quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of both phospholipids and proteins are characteristic of patients with ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement in animal models of ARDS and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome shows consistent improvements in gas exchange and survival. However, whilst some adult studies have shown improved oxygenation, no survival benefit has been demonstrated to date. This lack of clinical efficacy may be related to disease heterogeneity (where treatment responders may be obscured by nonresponders), limited understanding of surfactant biology in patients or an absence of therapeutic effect in this population. Crucially, the mechanism of lung injury in neonates is different from that in ARDS: surfactant inhibition by plasma constituents is a typical feature of ARDS, whereas the primary pathology in neonates is the deficiency of surfactant material due to reduced synthesis. Absence of phenotypic characterisation of patients, the lack of an ideal natural surfactant material with adequate surfactant proteins, coupled with uncertainty about optimal timing, dosing and delivery method are some of the limitations of published surfactant replacement clinical trials. Recent advances in stable isotope labelling of surfactant phospholipids coupled with analytical methods using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry enable highly specific molecular assessment of phospholipid subclasses and synthetic rates that can be utilised for phenotypic characterisation and individualisation of exogenous surfactant

  2. [Role of biomarkers in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure in the immediate postoperative period of lung transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, L; Sacanell, J; Roman, A; Rello, J

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of suffering many complications during the immediate postoperative period, such as primary graft dysfunction, acute graft rejection or infection. The most common symptom is the presence of acute respiratory failure, and the use of biomarkers could be useful for establishing an early diagnosis of these conditions. Different biomarkers have been studied, but none have proven to be the gold standard in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure. This paper offers a review of the different biomarkers that have been studied in this field. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy of Chistonos for Children in the Treatment and Prevention of Acute Respiratory Viral Infections in Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Dahaieva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The complex of treatment of acute respiratory viral infection (ARVI, acute rhinitis in 43 preschool children was supplemented by endonasal irrigations of Chistonos for children, which is a dosing gel spray containing sea salt, β-carotene, aloe and calendula extracts. A marked local symptomatic relief was registered, as well as an acceleration of the regression of inflammatory changes in the nasal cavity and a significant decrease in the number of complications after acute respiratory disease. Prophylactic use of the product in the preseason allowed to decrease the ARVI (including influenza morbidity rate and to reduce the incidence of the severe form of the disease.

  4. Efficacy of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package in hospitalized elderly patients with acute exacerbation of COPD: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Lin-Yu; Chen, Kuei-Min; Chung, Wei-Sheng; Chien, Jung-Yien

    2015-01-01

    NCT02329873. Acute exacerbation (AE) of COPD is characterized by a sudden worsening of COPD symptoms. Previous studies have explored the effectiveness of respiratory rehabilitation for patients with COPD; however, no training program specific to acute exacerbation in elderly patients or unstable periods during hospitalization has been developed. To evaluate the effects of a respiratory rehabilitation exercise training package on dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration among hospitalized elderly patients with AECOPD. A randomized control trial was conducted. Pretest and posttest evaluations of 61 elderly inpatients with AECOPD (experimental group n=30; control group n=31) were performed. The experimental group received respiratory rehabilitation exercise training twice a day, 10-30 minutes per session for 4 days. The clinical parameters (dyspnea, cough, exercise tolerance, and sputum expectoration) were assessed at the baseline and at the end of the fourth day. All participants (median age =70 years, male =60.70%, and peak expiratory flow 140 L) completed the study. In the patients of the experimental group, dyspnea and cough decreased and exercise tolerance and sputum expectoration increased significantly compared with those of the patients in the control group (all Prespiratory rehabilitation exercise training package reduced symptoms and enhanced the effectiveness of the care of elderly inpatients with AECOPD.

  5. PROPHYLAXIS OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT BRONCHOPULMONARY DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Simonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most urgent problems of Russian pediatrics — high prevalence of acute respiratory infections — is analyzed in this article. The author characterizes a special group of «frequently ill children». Patients of this group are the most prone to recurrent bronchopulmonary diseases, due to special features of their immunological statuses. The article also contains a short literature review on pidotimod trials, which have proved this drug to be effective and safe in acute and recurrent bronchopulmonary diseases as well as in bronchial asthma. In the patients who were administered pidotimod the frequency of relapses of acute respiratory tract infections decreased, the duration of the disease course shortened significantly, as well as these patients required antibacterial and antifebrile agents more rarely and did not have complications of allergic diseases. Children with recurrent bronchopulmonary diseases and bronchial asthma receiving pidotimod were shown to have lower rate of relapses and normalization of immunological characteristics. It is important to mention that pidotimod do not affect results of peak flowmetry and improve results of «Asthma Control Test». Pidotimod usage during vaccination guaranteed uneventful course of post-vaccination period and stimulation of immune response. Long-term study of clinical efficacy and safety of pidotimod allowed to recommend this drug as preventive and medicinal measure in pediatric practice.

  6. [Acute respiratory insufficiency due to severe lung injury - ARDS and ALI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, M

    2010-09-01

    As a consequence of the novel therapeutic option of mechanical ventilation in early intensive care medicine, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined as a disease entity of its own representing the most severe form of acute lung injury (ALI). Since its first description four decades ago, our knowledge about the aetiology, physiology, histology and epidemiology of this lethal pulmonary complication of severe acute diseases such as pneumonia or sepsis has been increasing steadily. The initial major therapeutic advances were due to improvements in intensive care medical procedures and monitoring. The large ARDS Network clinical trial on the magnitude of tidal volume impressively demonstrated the feasibility of targeted clinical trials in patients with ARDS that provide robust evidence in this field. This clinical trial, as well as following large-scale trials in ARDS patients, led to significant changes of ventilation therapy and therapeutic strategies that improve the outcome of this disease entity. Advances in the standardisation of care for ARDS patients involving innovative therapeutic procedures such as extracorporeal gas exchange systems will lead to a further improvement in ARDS management and outcome. Modern pulmonary medicine can play a pivotal role in this process and can contribute its rich experiences in all areas of the respiratory system. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  7. The Relationship between the Plasma Triglyceride Concentration and the Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kuzkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Triglycerides (TG may be involved in the pathogenesis of critical impairments. Objective: to study the relationship between the plasma concentration of TG, the outcome of the disease, and the markers of its severity in intensive care unit patients with early-stage acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Subjects and methods. The prospective study included 18 patients with acute lung injury (ALI, who needed respiratory support. For further analysis, all the patients were divided into groups with TG < 1.00 mmol/l (TGlow; n=7 and >1.00 mmol/l (TGhigh; n=11. Results. A negative correlation was found between plasma TG concentration and oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2. In the TG^jgh group, extravas-cular lung water index was significantly higher and cardiac index was lower than those in the TGlow group. Among the deceased patients, there was a 1.03 mmol/l reduction in TG concentration by day 4 of the study whereas in the survivors, TG concentration increased by an average of 0.15 mmol/l (p=0.02. Conclusion. In the patients with ALI, the plasma concentration of TG is related to oxygenation impairments and the degree of pulmonary edema, as well as with the outcome of the disease. Key words: triglycerides, acute lung injury, extravascular lung water index, pulmonary edema.

  8. SELECTIVE PROPHYLAXIS OF RHINO-SINUSITIS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Aleksandrovna Mashkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of treatment of 52 children with acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI aged from 4 to 10 years were studied based onobservation diaries, filled by parents, and data of the otorhinolaryngologists examinations on the 7th and 10th days from the onset of the disease. The children were divided into 2 groups: 1 group consisted of 30 children, which were treated with Sinupret monotherapy; 2 group consisted of 22 children, which were treated with endonasal irrigation, decongestants and antiseptics. The parallel analysis of the treatment results of children with ARVI showed, that Sinupret is well-tolerated by patients, contributes to milder course of the disease. Due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-viral actions this drug prevents development of such complications of respiratory tract infections as acute purulent rhino-sinusitis and acute otitis media. Sinupret also precipitates the processes of convalescence on 45% at the average and shorten the prolongation of disease on 5 days at the average, so it can be recommended to be included into the standard protocol of treatment children with ARVI.

  9. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Injured lungs can be partially protected by optimal settings and ventilation modes, using low tidal volume (VT) values and high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP). The benefits in ARDS outcomes caused by these interventions have been confirmed by several prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and are attributed to reduction in volutrauma. The purpose of this article is to present an approach to VILI pathophysiology focused on the effects of volutrauma that lead to lung injury and the ‘mechanotransduction’ mechanism. A more complete understanding about the molecular effects that physical forces could have, is essential for a better assessment of existing strategies as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies to reduce the damage resulting from VILI, and thereby contribute to reducing mortality in ARDS. PMID:26312103

  10. Oxidative stress and apoptosis after acute respiratory hypoxia and reoxygenation in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Coimbra-Costa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute hypoxia increases the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the brain. However, the effect of reoxygenation, unavoidable to achieve full recovery of the hypoxic organ, has not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of exposition to acute severe respiratory hypoxia followed by reoxygenation on the evolution of oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain. We investigated the effect of in vivo acute severe normobaric hypoxia (rats exposed to 7% O2 for 6 h and reoxygenation in normoxia (21% O2 for 24 h or 48 h on oxidative stress markers, the antioxidant system and apoptosis in the brain. After respiratory hypoxia we found increased levels of HIF-1α expression, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and nitric oxide in brain extracts. Antioxidant defence systems such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, reduced glutathione (GSH and glutathione peroxidase (GPx and the reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio were significantly decreased in the brain. After 24 h of reoxygenation, oxidative stress parameters and the anti-oxidant system returned to control values. Regarding the apoptosis parameters, acute hypoxia increased cytochrome c, AIF and caspase 3 activity in the brain. The apoptotic effect is greatest after 24 h of reoxygenation. Immunohistochemistry suggests that CA3 and dentate gyrus in the hippocampus seem more susceptible to hypoxia than the cortex. Severe acute hypoxia increases oxidative damage, which in turn could activate apoptotic mechanisms. Our work is the first to demonstrate that after 24 h of reoxygenation oxidative stress is attenuated, while apoptosis is maintained mainly in the hippocampus, which may, in fact, be the cause of impaired brain function.

  11. Long-Term Pulmonary Function and Quality of Life in Children After Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Feasibility Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Shan L; Turpin, Autumn; Spicer, Aaron C; Treadwell, Marsha J; Church, Gwynne D; Flori, Heidi R

    2017-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of pulmonary function and quality of life evaluations in children after acute respiratory distress syndrome. A prospective follow-up feasibility study. A tertiary PICU. Children less than 18 years old with acute respiratory distress syndrome admitted between 2000 and 2005. Pulmonary function testing and patient and parental quality of life surveys approximately 12-month after acute respiratory distress syndrome. One hundred eighty patients met acute respiratory distress syndrome criteria; 37 (20%) died, 90 (51%) declined participation, 28 (16%) consented but did not return, and 24 (13%) returned for follow-up visit. Twenty-three patients completed quality of life testing and 17 completed pulmonary functions. Clinical characteristics of those who returned were no different from those who did not except for age (median age, 4.9 vs 1.8 yr). One-third had mild to moderate pulmonary function deficits. Quality of life scores were marginal with general health perception, physical functioning, and behavior being areas of concern. These scores were lower than scores in children with chronic asthma. Parental quality of life assessments report lower scores in single-parent homes but no differences were noted by race or parental employment status. Valuable information may be discerned from acute respiratory distress syndrome patients who return for follow-up evaluation. In this pilot study, up to one-third of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome exhibit pulmonary function deficits and 12-month postillness quality of life scores are lower than in children with chronic asthma. Parental perceptions of postillness quality of life may be negatively impacted by socioeconomic constraints. Long-term follow of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome is feasible and bears further investigation.

  12. Acute respiratory infection case definitions for young children: a systematic review of community-based epidemiologic studies in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Daniel E; Gaffey, Michelle F; Smith-Romero, Evelyn; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Morris, Shaun K

    2015-12-01

    To explore the variability in childhood acute respiratory infection case definitions for research in low-income settings where there is limited access to laboratory or radiologic investigations. We conducted a systematic review of community-based, longitudinal studies in South Asia published from January 1990 to August 2013, in which childhood acute respiratory infection outcomes were reported. Case definitions were classified by their label (e.g. pneumonia, acute lower respiratory infection) and clinical content 'signatures' (array of clinical features that would be always present, conditionally present or always absent among cases). Case definition heterogeneity was primarily assessed by the number of unique case definitions overall and by label. We also compared case definition-specific acute respiratory infection incidence rates for studies reporting incidence rates for multiple case definitions. In 56 eligible studies, we found 124 acute respiratory infection case definitions. Of 90 case definitions for which clinical content was explicitly defined, 66 (73%) were unique. There was a high degree of content heterogeneity among case definitions with the same label, and some content signatures were assigned multiple labels. Within studies for which incidence rates were reported for multiple case definitions, variation in content was always associated with a change in incidence rate, even when the content differed by a single clinical feature. There has been a wide variability in case definition label and content combinations to define acute upper and lower respiratory infections in children in community-based studies in South Asia over the past two decades. These inconsistencies have important implications for the synthesis and translation of knowledge regarding the prevention and treatment of childhood acute respiratory infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The war on severe acute respiratory syndrome: United States Forces Korea's campaign plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, John J; Lee, Hee-Choon S; O'Mara, Sean T; Plummer, Andrew D

    2006-02-01

    A mysterious new respiratory illness known as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has become the most perplexing infectious disease to emerge in the 21st century. From March to May 2003, it competed daily with the war in Iraq as the most sensational media event of the moment. U.S. personnel serving in the Republic of Korea represented the largest U.S. military population at risk for SARS. With tensions growing between Pyongyang and Washington, the United States/Republic of Korea alliance could not afford to be rendered combat ineffective by SARS. To remain mission ready, the U.S. Forces Korea (USFK) commander declared a "War on SARS" and directed his medical staff to develop a plan to prevent a SARS outbreak among USFK personnel. This article outlines the USFK campaign plan for the SARS epidemic and documents lessons learned for future outbreaks of highly infectious diseases.

  14. Acute respiratory failure and mechanical ventilation in pregnant patient: A narrative review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological changes of pregnancy imposes higher risk of acute respiratory failure (ARF with even a slight insult and remains an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Although pregnant women have different respiratory physiology and different causes of ARF, guidelines specific to ventilatory settings, goals of oxygenation and weaning process could not be framed due to lack of large-scale randomized controlled trials. During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, pregnant women had higher morbidity and mortality compared to nonpregnant women. During this period, alternative strategies of ventilation such as high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, inhalational of nitric oxide, prone positioning, and extra corporeal membrane oxygenation were increasingly used as a desperate measure to rescue pregnant patients with severe hypoxemia who were not improving with conventional mechanical ventilation. This article highlights the causes of ARF and recent advances in invasive, noninvasive and alternative strategies of ventilation used during pregnancy.

  15. Local and disseminated acute phase response during bacterial respiratory infection in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The acute phase response is playing an important role, aiming to restore the healthy state after tissue injury, inflammation and infection. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate defense reactions remain somewhat elusive. Expression of acute phase...... proteins (APP) outside the liver is increasingly recognized, still little is known of extra-hepatic production of APP in pigs. 14-18 h after experimental infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, causing acute pleuropneumonia in pigs, we studied local APP gene expression changes in different...... differentially expressed between infected and control animals. We demonstrated that acute pleuropneumonia caused by A. pleuropneumoniae leads to a rapid disseminated local intra-lung APP response, also in apparently unaffected areas of the infected lung. Further extrahepatic expression of several acute...

  16. Pulmonary histopathology in dalmatians with familial acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjä, P; Saari, S; Rajamäki, M; Saario, E; Järvinen, A-K

    2009-11-01

    The histopathological changes in the lungs of 12 related Dalmatians with idiopathic acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are described. Affected dogs had multiple foci of marked atypical hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, patchy ongoing fibrosis with myofibroblastic metaplasia, smooth muscle hyperplasia and occasional honeycombing of alveolar walls, and hyperplasia of atypical type II pneumocytes. There was an abrupt transition between these proliferative lesions and areas of acute alveolar oedema with hyaline membranes in partially normal lung. Diseased areas were associated with moderate lymphohistiocytic interstitial inflammation. Immunohistochemical labelling for cytokeratin expression indicated that the metaplastic epithelium was of bronchiolar origin and that it extended into peribronchiolar alveolar spaces. Some of the bronchiolar lesions were pre-neoplastic and one adult dog suffered from bronchoalveolar carcinoma. These lesions are compared with the two forms of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia reported as causes of ARDS in man: acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The observed lesions in the Dalmatians are distinct from the diffuse alveolar damage that characterizes AIP, but show some histological similarities to the usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) that occurs in IPF with acute exacerbation in man. UIP has not previously been described in the dog.

  17. Viruses as Sole Causative Agents of Severe Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesker, Fleur M; van Kampen, Jeroen J A; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; de Hoog, Matthijs; Koopmans, Marion P G; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fraaij, Pieter L A

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A viruses are known to cause severe acute respiratory tract infections (SARIs) in children. For other viruses like human rhinoviruses (HRVs) this is less well established. Viral or bacterial co-infections are often considered essential for severe manifestations of these virus infections. The study aims at identifying viruses that may cause SARI in children in the absence of viral and bacterial co-infections, at identifying disease characteristics associated with these single virus infections, and at identifying a possible correlation between viral loads and disease severities. Between April 2007 and March 2012, we identified children (acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI) (controls). Data were extracted from the clinical and laboratory databases of our tertiary care paediatric hospital. Patient specimens were tested for fifteen respiratory viruses with real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assays and we selected patients with a single virus infection only. Typical bacterial co-infections were considered unlikely to have contributed to the PICU or MC admission based on C-reactive protein-levels or bacteriological test results if performed. We identified 44 patients admitted to PICU with SARI and 40 patients admitted to MC with ARTI. Twelve viruses were associated with SARI, ten of which were also associated with ARTI in the absence of typical bacterial and viral co-infections, with RSV and HRV being the most frequent causes. Viral loads were not different between PICU-SARI patients and MC-ARTI patients. Both SARI and ARTI may be caused by single viral pathogens in previously healthy children as well as in children with a medical history. No relationship between viral load and disease severity was identified.

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome after Early Successful Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Therapy in Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ming Su

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by acute-onset dyspnea, diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltration, low pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP, and an arterial oxygen tension/ inspired oxygen fraction (PaO2/FiO2 ratio of less than 200 mmHg. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI, whether complicated by circulatory arrest, cardiogenic shock, and hypotension or not, was reported as an etiologic factor in the development of ARDS in the prethrombolytic era. In the thrombolytic era, two cases of AMI complicated with ARDS have been reported. ARDS in these two patients resulted from anaphylactic reaction to the thrombolytic agent and not from the hemodynamic consequences of AMI. Development of ARDS during the AMI period has not been reported after early successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Herein, we report a 61-year-old male patient with persistent chest pain who was diagnosed with Killip II anterior ST-segment elevation AMI. He was treated successfully with primary PCI 2.5 hours after the onset of chest pain. Unfortunately, on the third hospital day, acuteonset dyspnea (respiratory rate, 33 beats/min, fever (38.5°C, leukocytosis (white blood cell count, 18,360/μL, and diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltration were noted. ARDS was diagnosed from the low PCWP (8 mmHg and a PaO2/FiO2 of less than 200 mmHg (160 mmHg. No usual causes of ARDS such as infection, aspiration, trauma, shock, or drug reactions were noted. We assumed that, in this particular patient, the systemic inflammatory response syndrome frequently induced by AMI might have caused this episode of ARDS. This may imply that AMI itself is a possible etiology of ARDS.

  19. Estimating dead-space fraction for secondary analyses of acute respiratory distress syndrome clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitler, Jeremy R; Thompson, B Taylor; Matthay, Michael A; Talmor, Daniel; Liu, Kathleen D; Zhuo, Hanjing; Hayden, Douglas; Spragg, Roger G; Malhotra, Atul

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary dead-space fraction is one of few lung-specific independent predictors of mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, it is not measured routinely in clinical trials and thus altogether ignored in secondary analyses that shape future research directions and clinical practice. This study sought to validate an estimate of dead-space fraction for use in secondary analyses of clinical trials. Analysis of patient-level data pooled from acute respiratory distress syndrome clinical trials. Four approaches to estimate dead-space fraction were evaluated: three required estimating metabolic rate; one estimated dead-space fraction directly. U.S. academic teaching hospitals. Data from 210 patients across three clinical trials were used to compare performance of estimating equations with measured dead-space fraction. A second cohort of 3,135 patients from six clinical trials without measured dead-space fraction was used to confirm whether estimates independently predicted mortality. None. Dead-space fraction estimated using the unadjusted Harris-Benedict equation for energy expenditure was unbiased (mean ± SD Harris-Benedict, 0.59 ± 0.13; measured, 0.60 ± 0.12). This estimate predicted measured dead-space fraction to within ±0.10 in 70% of patients and ±0.20 in 95% of patients. Measured dead-space fraction independently predicted mortality (odds ratio, 1.36 per 0.05 increase in dead-space fraction; 95% CI, 1.10-1.68; p dead-space fraction or its association with mortality less well. Dead-space fraction should be measured in future acute respiratory distress syndrome clinical trials to facilitate incorporation into secondary analyses. For analyses where dead-space fraction was not measured, the Harris-Benedict estimate can be used to estimate dead-space fraction and adjust for its association with mortality.

  20. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and the Incidence of Acute Viral Respiratory Tract Infections in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetta, James R.; DePetrillo, Paolo; Cipriani, Ralph J.; Smardin, Joanne; Burns, Lillian A.; Landry, Marie L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Declining serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D seen in the fall and winter as distance increases from the equator may be a factor in the seasonal increased prevalence of influenza and other viral infections. This study was done to determine if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations correlated with the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections. Methodology/Findings In this prospective cohort study serial monthly concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured over the fall and winter 2009–2010 in 198 healthy adults, blinded to the nature of the substance being measured. The participants were evaluated for the development of any acute respiratory tract infections by investigators blinded to the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. The incidence of infection in participants with different concentrations of vitamin D was determined. One hundred ninety-five (98.5%) of the enrolled participants completed the study. Light skin pigmentation, lean body mass, and supplementation with vitamin D were found to correlate with higher concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Concentrations of 38 ng/ml or more were associated with a significant (prespiratory tract infections and with a marked reduction in the percentages of days ill. Conclusions/Significance Maintenance of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentration of 38 ng/ml or higher should significantly reduce the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections and the burden of illness caused thereby, at least during the fall and winter in temperate zones. The findings of the present study provide direction for and call for future interventional studies examining the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in reducing the incidence and severity of specific viral infections, including influenza, in the general population and in subpopulations with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, such as pregnant women, dark skinned individuals, and the obese. PMID:20559424

  1. Prone Positioning Improves Ventilation Homogeneity in Children With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton-Smith, Alison; Argent, Andrew; Rimensberger, Peter; Frerichs, Inez; Morrow, Brenda

    2017-05-01

    To determine the effect of prone positioning on ventilation distribution in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Prospective observational study. Paediatric Intensive Care at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. Mechanically ventilated children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Electrical impedance tomography measures were taken in the supine position, after which the child was turned into the prone position, and subsequent electrical impedance tomography measurements were taken. Thoracic electrical impedance tomography measures were taken at baseline and after 5, 20, and 60 minutes in the prone position. The proportion of ventilation, regional filling characteristics, and global inhomogeneity index were calculated for the ventral and dorsal lung regions. Arterial blood gas measurements were taken before and after the intervention. A responder was defined as having an improvement of more than 10% in the oxygenation index after 60 minutes in prone position. Twelve children (nine male, 65%) were studied. Four children were responders, three were nonresponders, and five showed no change to prone positioning. Ventilation in ventral and dorsal lung regions was no different in the supine or prone positions between response groups. The proportion of ventilation in the dorsal lung increased from 49% to 57% in responders, while it became more equal between ventral and dorsal lung regions in the prone position in nonresponders. Responders showed greater improvements in ventilation homogeneity with R improving from 0.86 ± 0.24 to 0.98 ± 0.02 in the ventral lung and 0.91 ± 0.15 to 0.99 ± 0.01 in the dorsal lung region with time in the prone position. The response to prone position was variable in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Prone positioning improves homogeneity of ventilation and may result in recruitment of the dorsal lung regions.

  2. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d and the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabetta, James R; DePetrillo, Paolo; Cipriani, Ralph J; Smardin, Joanne; Burns, Lillian A; Landry, Marie L

    2010-06-14

    Declining serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D seen in the fall and winter as distance increases from the equator may be a factor in the seasonal increased prevalence of influenza and other viral infections. This study was done to determine if serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations correlated with the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections. In this prospective cohort study serial monthly concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured over the fall and winter 2009-2010 in 198 healthy adults, blinded to the nature of the substance being measured. The participants were evaluated for the development of any acute respiratory tract infections by investigators blinded to the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. The incidence of infection in participants with different concentrations of vitamin D was determined. One hundred ninety-five (98.5%) of the enrolled participants completed the study. Light skin pigmentation, lean body mass, and supplementation with vitamin D were found to correlate with higher concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Concentrations of 38 ng/ml or more were associated with a significant (prespiratory tract infections and with a marked reduction in the percentages of days ill. Maintenance of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentration of 38 ng/ml or higher should significantly reduce the incidence of acute viral respiratory tract infections and the burden of illness caused thereby, at least during the fall and winter in temperate zones. The findings of the present study provide direction for and call for future interventional studies examining the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in reducing the incidence and severity of specific viral infections, including influenza, in the general population and in subpopulations with lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, such as pregnant women, dark skinned individuals, and the obese.

  3. CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN BETWEEN 2MONTHS TO 5 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitoj Singh Chhina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in under - five children in developing countries. Hence, the present study was undertaken to study the various risk factors, clinical profile and outcome of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI in children aged 2 month to 5 years. OBJECTIVE : clinical features, laborato ry assessment and morbidity and mortality pattern associated with acute lower respiratory tract infections in children aged 2 months to 5 years. METHODS: 100 ALRI cases fulfilling WHO criteria for pneumonia, in the age group of 2 month to 5 years were evaluated for clinical profile as per a predesigned proforma in a rural medical college. RESULTS : Of cases 61% were infants and remaining 39%12 - 60 months age group, males outnumbered females with sex ratio of 1.3;1. Elevated total leukocyte counts for age were observed in only 22% of cases, of these 3% were having pneumonia, 9% severe pneumonia and 10% very severe pneumonia. Significant association was found between leukocytosis and ALRI severity (p= 0.0001 Positive blood culture was obtained in 8% of cases and was significantly associated with ALRI severity (p=. 0.027. Among the ALRI cases, 84% required oxygen supplementation at any time during the hospital stay and 8% required mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 1%; with 99% of cases recovering and getting discharged uneventfully. CONCLUSION : Among the clinical variables, the signs and symptoms of ALRI as per the WHO ARI Control Programme were found in almost all cases. Regarding the laboratory profile, leukocytosis and blood culture positivity w ere observed in a small percentage, but significant association with ALRI severity was observed for both. Thus, clinical signs, and not invasive blood tests are a better diagnostic tools, though the latter may provide additional therapeutic and prognostic information in severe disease

  4. Use and Safety of Anthroposophic Medications for Acute Respiratory and Ear Infections: A Prospective Cohort Study

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    Harald J. Hamre

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anthroposophic medications (AMED are widely used, but safety data on AMED from large prospective studies are sparse. The objective of this analysis was to determine the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR to AMED in outpatients using AMED for acute respiratory and ear infections.Methods: A prospective four-week observational cohort study was conducted in 21 primary care practices in Europe and the U.S.A. The cohort comprised 715 consecutive outpatients aged 1 month, treated by anthroposophic physicians for acute otitis and respiratory infections. Physicians’ prescription data and patient reports of adverse events were analyzed. Main outcome measures were use of AMED and ADR to AMED.Results: Two patients had confirmed ADR to AMED: 1 swelling and redness at the injection site after subcutaneous injections of Prunus spinosa 5%, 2 sleeplessness after intake of Pneumodoron® 2 liquid. These ADR lasted one and two days respectively; both subsided after dose reduction; none were unexpected; none were serious. The frequency of confirmed ADR to AMED was 0.61% (2/327 of all different AMED used, 0.28% (2/715 of patients, and 0.004% (3/73,443 of applications.Conclusion: In this prospective study, anthroposophic medications used by primary care patients with acute respiratory or ear infections were well tolerated.Abbreviations: A-: anthroposophy; ADR: adverse drug reactions; AE: adverse events; AM: anthroposophic medicine; AMED: AM medication; C-: conventional; ENE-patients: eligible, not enrolled patients; IIPCOS: International Primary Care Outcomes Study

  5. Indoor air pollution in developing countries and acute respiratory infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, M R; Boleij, J S; Smith, K R; Wafula, E M

    1989-02-25

    Indoor air pollution emerges as an important risk factor for acute respiratory infections (ARI) in developing countries. In many developing countries, in addition to an increasing amount of tobacco smoke, many homes contain high levels of smoke from the combustion of biofuels such as wood, crop residues, and animal dung for cooking or heating. In about half the world's households, such fuels are used for cooking daily, usually without a flue or chimney and with poor ventilation. Results of investigations in 6 developing nations have shown the range of indoor pollution in such circumstances. The best single indicator for comparison of toxic noncarcinogenic effects is most likely respirable particulates, similar to tar reported for cigarette emissions. Results of studies in animals suggest any difference in respiratory-system toxicity according to mass is not likely to be large. On the basis of the small amount of evidence available, peak and daily exposures to indoor particulate levels in villages in developing countries seem to be about 20 times greater than in developed nations. The results of a semi-quantitative epidemiological study conducted in Nepal showed a direct relation between reported hours/day spent near the stove by infants and children aged under 2 years and episodes of life threatening acute respiratory infections. If one discounts the many possible confounding factors, extrapolation shows that by moving all children into the lowest smoke exposure groups as much as 25% of moderate and severe infections would be eliminated. Extrapolation from studies of both ARI and environmental tobacco smoke also indicates indirectly the potential effect of indoor smoke from biofuels. Some environmental tobacco smoke studies have reported a dose-response relation between the number of cigarettes smoked in the home and respiratory symptoms in children. In sum, biofuel smoke is likely to be a factor in ARI, but its importance in relation to other risk factors is

  6. Update: outbreak of acute febrile respiratory illness among college students--Acapulco, Mexico, March 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-11

    On March 30, CDC was notified by the Pennsylvania Department of Health of an acute febrile respiratory illness characterized by fever, chills, dry cough, chest pain, and headache among college students who traveled to Acapulco during March 2001. Initial laboratory testing indicated that most students had histoplasmosis, an infection caused by the soil-inhabiting fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum. While in Acapulco, most ill students had stayed at the Calinda Beach Hotel. This report updates the investigation of the outbreak and presents possible evidence of ongoing transmissions.

  7. NEW POSSIBILITIES OF ANTIBACTERIAL TREATMENT IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Simonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors show the data on current microbiological pattern in children with acute and chronic respiratory disorders and dynamics of microflora susceptibility to the most frequently used antibiotics over recent years. The principles of antibiotic choice and control for their efficiency, peculiarities of their usage in children and the most common side effects are given. New aspects of the usage of combined antibacterial agents - ecoantibiotics – are discussed. Including of the Lactulose Anhydro into their composition allows to achieve high microbiological efficacy and does not cause antibiotic-induced diarrhea, which has a great importance in pediatric practice.

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress following Intravenous Injection of an Oil-Steroid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Russell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of acute respiratory distress and hypoxemia following accidental intravenous injection of an oil-steroid solution in a body builder is presented. Chest roentography at the time of presentation showed diffuse bilateral opacities, and computed tomography revealed predominantly peripheral ground-glass opacifications. The patient’s symptoms gradually improved over 48 h and imaging of the chest was unremarkable one week later. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of this rare but potentially life-threatening complication of intravenous oil injection are discussed.

  9. Primary pneumocystis infection in infants hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Hans Henrik; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Lundgren, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    with 431 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) by using a real-time PCR assay. In 68 episodes in 67 infants, P. jirovecii was identified. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of a positive signal compared with the first quartile of age (7-49 days) was 47.4 (11.0-203), 8.7 (1......Acquisition of Pneumocystis jirovecii infection early in life has been confirmed by serologic studies. However, no evidence of clinical illness correlated with the primary infection has been found in immunocompetent children. We analyzed 458 nasopharyngeal aspirates from 422 patients hospitalized...

  10. [The acute respiratory distress syndrome in malaria: is it always the prerogative of Plasmodium falciparum?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachimi, M A; Hatim, E A; Moudden, M K; Elkartouti, A; Errami, M; Louzi, L; Hanafi, S M; Mahmoudi, A

    2013-10-01

    Severe malaria causes nearly one million deaths annually in endemic areas and is a public health priority worldwide. Severity associated with the occurrence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a well-known complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum and can reach 25% of infected adults. However, ARDS is less often described with other Plasmodium species. We report the case of a young Moroccan soldier who died in an array of ARDS related to malaria of Plasmodium ovale 7 months after his return from an endemic country. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Pulse Pressure Variation Adjusted by Respiratory Changes in Pleural Pressure, Rather Than by Tidal Volume, Reliably Predicts Fluid Responsiveness in Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wei, Lu-qing; Li, Guo-qiang; Yu, Xin; Li, Guo-feng; Li, Yu-ming

    2016-02-01

    1) To evaluate the ability of pulse pressure variation adjusted by respiratory changes in pleural pressure to predict fluid responsiveness compared with pulse pressure variation alone. 2) To identify factors explaining the poor performance of pulse pressure variation in acute respiratory distress syndrome. Prospective study. Forty-bed university hospital general ICU. Ninety-six mechanically ventilated acute respiratory distress syndrome patients requiring fluid challenge. Fluid challenge, 500 mL saline over 20 minutes. Before fluid challenge, esophageal pressure was measured at the end-inspiratory and end-expiratory occlusions. Change in pleural pressure was calculated as the difference between esophageal pressure measured at end-inspiratory and end-expiratory occlusions. Hemodynamic measurements were obtained before and after the fluid challenge. Patients were ventilated with tidal volume 7.0 ± 0.8 mL/kg predicted body weight. The fluids increased cardiac output by greater than 15% in 52 patients (responders). Adjusting pulse pressure variation for changes in pleural pressure (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.94 [0.88-0.98]) and the ratio of chest wall elastance to total respiratory system elastance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.93 [0.88-0.98]) predicted fluid responsiveness better than pulse pressure variation (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.78 [0.69-0.86]; all p variation/changes in pleural pressure values (1.94-2.1) in 3.1% of patients for whom fluid responsiveness could not be predicted reliably. On logistic regression analysis, two independent factors affected the correct classification of fluid responsiveness at a 12% pulse pressure variation cutoff: tidal volume (adjusted odds ratio 1.57/50 mL; 95% CI, 1.05-2.34; p = 0.027) and chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance (adjusted odds ratio, 2.035/0.1 unit; 95% CI, 1.36-3.06; p = 0.001). In patients with chest wall

  12. The impact of the H1N1 influenza pandemic on clinical presentations and viral epidemiology of acute respiratory infection in preschool children in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawkner-Corbett, David W; Duarte, Maria Carmo M B; Rose, Katie; Fonceca, Angela; Bezerra, Patricia; Hopkins, Mark; Britto, Murilo; Cuevas, Luis E; Correia, Jailson B; McNamara, Paul Stephen

    2012-06-01

    We assessed the impact of the H1N1 influenza pandemic on acute respiratory infection in young children from low-income families in Brazil. Influenza (specifically H1N1) detection in acute respiratory infection quintupled during the pandemic and, during its peak, it was associated with 30% of all acute respiratory infection visits to the emergency department. H1N1 was also associated with increased risk of hospitalization and coinfection.

  13. Non-invasive ventilation improves respiratory distress in children with acute viral bronchiolitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combret, Yann; Prieur, Guillaume; LE Roux, Pascal; Médrinal, Clément

    2017-06-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a common treatment for bronchiolitis. However, consensus concerning its efficacy is lacking. The aim of this systematic review was to assess NIV effectiveness to reduce respiratory distress. Secondary objectives were to summarize the effects of NIV, identify predictive factors for failure and describe settings and applications. Literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, PEDro, Cochrane, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, UpToDate, and SuDoc from 1990 to April 2015. Randomized controlled trials, controlled non-randomized trials and prospective studies of NIV (continuous positive airway pressure [CPAP], bi-level CPAP, or neurally-adjusted ventilator assist) for bronchiolitis in infants younger than 2 years were included. Fourteen studies were included, for a total of 379 children. Of these, 357 were treated with NIV as first intention. Respiratory distress, heart rate, respiratory rate and respiratory effort improved (P<0.05). Results were inconclusive regarding prevention of endotracheal intubation. Few adverse events were reported. NIV reduced carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in 10 studies. Two randomized controlled studies reported a decrease of 7 mmHg in pCO2 (P<0.05). Predictive factors of NIV failure were apneas, high pCO2, young age, low weight, elevated heart rate and high pediatric risk of mortality score. NIV is mostly administered through a nasal mask, nasal cannula or helmet, with an initial expiratory positive airway pressure of 7 cmH2O. NIV shows promising results for the reduction of respiratory distress in acute viral bronchiolitis, as shown in several recent studies. However, there is a lack of robust studies to confirm this.

  14. Viral etiology of acute respiratory infections among Iranian Hajj pilgrims, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborzi, Abdolvahab