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Sample records for experiment remediation project

  1. Program management plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The primary mission of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project is to effectively implement the risk-reduction strategies and technical plans to stabilize and prevent further migration of uranium within the MSRE facility, remove the uranium and fuel salts from the system, and dispose of the fuel and flush salts by storage in appropriate depositories to bring the facility to a surveillance and maintenance condition before decontamination and decommissioning. This Project Management Plan (PMP) for the MSRE Remediation Project details project purpose; technical objectives, milestones, and cost objectives; work plan; work breakdown structure (WBS); schedule; management organization and responsibilities; project management performance measurement planning, and control; conduct of operations; configuration management; environmental, safety, and health compliance; quality assurance; operational readiness reviews; and training.

  2. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  4. Documenting cost and performance for environmental remediation projects: Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-08

    The purpose of this DOE guide is to facilitate the use of consistent procedures to document cost and performance information for projects involving the remediation of media contaminated with hazardous and radioactive wastes. It provides remedial action project managers with a standardized set of data to document completed remediation projects. Standardized reporting of data will broaden the utility of the information, increase confidence in the effectiveness of future remedial technologies, and enhance the organization, storage and retrieval of relevant information for future cleanup projects. The foundation for this guide was laid down by the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR) in their publication, Guide to Documenting Cost and Performance for Remediation Projects, EPA-542-B- 95-002. Member agencies of the FRTR include the US EPA, the US DOD, the US DOE, and the US DOI. All the member agencies are involved in site remediation projects and anticipate following the guidance provided in the above reference. Therefore, there is much to be gained for DOE to be consistent with the other member agencies as it will be easier to compare projects across different agencies and also to learn from the experiences of a wider spectrum of prior completed projects.

  5. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  6. Green PCB Remediation from Sediment Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPRSS technology is an in situ remediation technique for PCB-contaminated sediments. The technique provides an effective and safe method for sediment cleanup...

  7. Laboratory Experiment on Electrokinetic Remediation of Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed-Ali, Alya H.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2011-01-01

    Electrokinetic remediation is a method of decontaminating soil containing heavy metals and polar organic contaminants by passing a direct current through the soil. An undergraduate chemistry laboratory is described to demonstrate electrokinetic remediation of soil contaminated with copper. A 30 cm electrokinetic cell with an applied voltage of 30…

  8. Unique Construction and Social Experiences in Residential Remediation Sites - 13423

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Paul; Scarborough, Rebecca [Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. 2749 Lockport Road, Niagara Falls, NY 14305 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc., (Sevenson) has performed several radiological remediation projects located in residential urban areas. Over the course of these projects, there has been a wide variety of experiences encountered from construction related issues to unique social situations. Some of the construction related issues included the remediation of interior basements where contaminated material was located under the footers of the structure or was used in the mortar between cinder block or field stone foundations. Other issues included site security, maintaining furnaces or other utilities, underpinning, backfilling and restoration. In addition to the radiological hazards associated with this work there were occupational safety and industrial hygiene issues that had to be addressed to ensure the safety and health of neighboring properties and residents. The unique social situations at these job sites have included arson, theft/stolen property, assault/battery, prostitution, execution of arrest warrants for residents, discovery of drugs and paraphernalia, blood borne pathogens, and unexploded ordnance. Some of these situations have become a sort of comical urban legend throughout the organization. One situation had historical significance, involving the demolition of a house to save a tree older than the Declaration of Independence. All of these projects typically involve the excavation of early 20. century items such as advertisement signs, various old bottles (milk, Listerine, perfume, whisky) and other miscellaneous common trash items. (authors)

  9. Sustainable geoengineering projects for the remediation of mine site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Lopez, Salvadora; Gonzalez, Eva; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Molina-Ruiz, Jose; Belen Martinez, Lucia; Hernandez, Carmen; Bech, Jaime; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    A large number of soils are contaminated by heavy metals due to mining activities, generating adverse effects on human health and the environment. In response to these negative effects, a variety of technologies have been developed. In situ immobilization by means of soil amendment is a non-intrusive and cost effective alternative that transforms the highly mobile toxic heavy metals to physico-chemically stable forms. Limestone filler is a good selection for such a purpose, because of its characteristics. In addition, the use of this amendment could revalorize the residues, reducing the costs of the process. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of an immobilization technique in sediments contaminated by heavy metals. Two experimental areas, approximately 1 Ha each one, were selected, and technosols were developed as follows: original sediments, sediments mixed with limestone filler in a 1:1 proportion, gravel to avoid capillary and natural soil to allow plant growth. After the remediation technique was applied, monitoring was done in 18 points collecting samples (sediment and water) during a 4 years period at two month intervals. The pH and electrical conductivity as well as the heavy metal (Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu and As) contents were measured. Microtox bioassay was also applied. Sediments before the remediation technique showed acidic pH, high EC values and high trace elements content. The results obtained after the immobilization showed that sediment samples had neutral pH (average value of 8.3) low electrical conductivity (1.32 dS m-1) and low trace elements concentration. It can be concluded that the use of limestone filler is an excellent option in sediments polluted because of the risk for human health or ecosystem disappears or is decreased in a large extent. In addition, the designed experience allows stabilizer proportion to be optimized and may suppose a big cost-saving in the project in areas affected by mining activities.

  10. Fernald Environmental Management Project remedial investigation and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, J.C.

    1993-04-15

    Environmental restoration involves the cleanup and restoration of US Department of Energy (DOE) sites and facilities contaminated with hazardous substances during past production or disposal activities. An important element of the environmental restoration process is the remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS), which is designed to determine the extent of contamination and to identify alternatives for cleanup. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management is responsible for policy direction and oversight of DOE`s environmental restoration program. The objective of the audit was to determine whether DOE and its contractors had developed effective management control systems to ensure that maximum benefits were obtained from the funds spent on the RI/FS at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. Although DOE had improved the Fernald RI/FS project over the previous 18 months, the project at Fernald was not planned and controlled cost effectively. This condition occurred because (1) DOE and its contractors lacked experience in the RI/FS process, (2) DOE and its contractors had not communicated effectively with one another and outside regulators, and (3) DOE had not placed enough emphasis on management control systems. As a result, after about 6 years and the expenditure of over $100 million on the RI/FS project at Fernald, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had made no decisions as to future land use, cleanup methods, disposal sites, or the level of environmental protection needed for the site. For each year that the completion of the RI/FS and cleanup is unnecessarily delayed, DOE will be required to spend about $149 million to support site infrastructure costs. Finally, DOE was planning for the possible construction of waste storage buildings, estimated to cost $2.6 billion, when the need for the buildings had not been validated .

  11. Fernald Environmental Management Project remedial investigation and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layton, J.C.

    1993-04-15

    Environmental restoration involves the cleanup and restoration of US Department of Energy (DOE) sites and facilities contaminated with hazardous substances during past production or disposal activities. An important element of the environmental restoration process is the remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS), which is designed to determine the extent of contamination and to identify alternatives for cleanup. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management is responsible for policy direction and oversight of DOE's environmental restoration program. The objective of the audit was to determine whether DOE and its contractors had developed effective management control systems to ensure that maximum benefits were obtained from the funds spent on the RI/FS at the Fernald Environmental Management Project. Although DOE had improved the Fernald RI/FS project over the previous 18 months, the project at Fernald was not planned and controlled cost effectively. This condition occurred because (1) DOE and its contractors lacked experience in the RI/FS process, (2) DOE and its contractors had not communicated effectively with one another and outside regulators, and (3) DOE had not placed enough emphasis on management control systems. As a result, after about 6 years and the expenditure of over $100 million on the RI/FS project at Fernald, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had made no decisions as to future land use, cleanup methods, disposal sites, or the level of environmental protection needed for the site. For each year that the completion of the RI/FS and cleanup is unnecessarily delayed, DOE will be required to spend about $149 million to support site infrastructure costs. Finally, DOE was planning for the possible construction of waste storage buildings, estimated to cost $2.6 billion, when the need for the buildings had not been validated .

  12. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC).

  13. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  14. Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, S.N.; Tiner, P.F.; Gosslee, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environmental protection and safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  15. Green PCB Remediation from Sediment Systems (GPRSS) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Quinn, Jacqueline; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    An ongoing problem facing the global environment community including NASA centers is the removal and remediation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PCBs were commonly used in a variety of materials including paints, caulking, and adhesives due to the advantageous physical and chemical properties that PCBs imparted to these various materials. Unfortunately, these properties have made the treatment of sites contaminated with these chemicals extremely difficult to deal with, due to their inherent chemical stability. The remediation of sediments contaminated with PCBs is especially difficult, primarily due to the risk of releasing the contaminant into the environment during the treatment process. Traditional treatment options involve the use of dredging and incineration of the contaminated soils/sediments, in which the chance of releasing the contaminants is greatly increased. The purpose of this project is to develop cleanup technology capable of remediating contaminated sediments in-situ, with minimum intrusion. This allows for the minimization of any potential contaminant release during the treatment process, providing a safer method for cleanup operations (as opposed to dredging/incineration) and still treating the basic problem of PCB contamination (as opposed to capping).

  16. Examples from the Greenland-Project - Gentle Remediation Optiones (GROs) on Pb/zn Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Kidd, Petra; Siebielec, Grzegorz

    2017-04-01

    The GREENLAND-project brought together "best practice" examples of several field applied gentle remediation techniques (EUFP7-project "Gentle remediation of trace element-contaminated land - GREENLAND; www.greenland-project.eu) with 17 partners from 11 countries. Gentle remediation options (GRO) comprise environmentally friendly technologies that have little or no negative impact on the soil. The main technologies are • phytoextraction • in situ immobilization and • assisted phytostabilization. Mining and processing activities affecting many sites worldwide negatively. The huge amounts of moved and treated materials have led to considerable flows of wastes and emissions. Alongside the many advantages of processed ores to our society, adverse effects in nature and risks for the environment and human health are observed. Three stages of impact of Pb/Zn-ore-treatment on the environment are discussed here: (1) On sites where the ores are mined impacts are the result of crushing, grinding, concentrating activities, and where additionally parts of the installations remain after abandoning the mine, as well as by the massive amounts of remaining deposits or wastes (mine tailings). (2) On sites where smelting and processing takes place, depending on the process (Welz, Doerschel) different waste materials are deposited. The Welz process waste generally contains less Cd and Pb than the Doerschel process waste which additionally shows higher water- extractable metals. (3) On sites close to the emitting source metal contamination can be found in areas for housing, gardening, and agricultural use. Emissions consist mainly from oxides and sulfides (Zn, Cd), sulfates (Zn, Pb, and Cd), chlorides (Pb) and carbonates (Cd). All these wastes and emissions pose potential risks of dispersion of pollutants into the food chain due to erosion (wind, water), leaching and the transfer into feeding stuff and food crops. In-situ treatments have the potential for improving the situation

  17. Final 2014 Remedial Action Report Project Chariot, Cape Thompson, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-03-01

    This report was prepared to document remedial action (RA) work performed at the former Project Chariot site located near Cape Thompson, Alaska during 2014. The work was managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Alaska District for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM). Due to the short field season and the tight barge schedule, all field work was conducted at the site July 6 through September 12, 2014. Excavation activities occurred between July 16 and August 26, 2014. A temporary field camp was constructed at the site prior to excavation activities to accommodate the workers at the remote, uninhabited location. A total of 785.6 tons of petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL)-contaminated soil was excavated from four former drill sites associated with test holes installed circa 1960. Diesel was used in the drilling process during test hole installations and resulted in impacts to surface and subsurface soils at four of the five sites (no contamination was identified at Test Hole Able). Historic information is not definitive as to the usage for Test Hole X-1; it may have actually been a dump site and not a drill site. In addition to the contaminated soil, the steel test hole casings were decommissioned and associated debris was removed as part of the remedial effort.

  18. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 1 [of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. A phased and integrated approach to waste retrieval operations was used for the GAAT Remediation Project. The project promoted safety by obtaining experience from low-risk operations in the North Tank Farm before moving to higher-risk operations in the South Tank Farm. This approach allowed project personnel to become familiar with the tanks and waste, as well as the equipment, processes, procedures, and operations required to perform successful waste retrieval. By using an integrated approach to tank waste retrieval and tank waste management, the project was completed years ahead of the original baseline schedule, which resulted in avoiding millions of dollars in associated costs. This report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the GAAT Remediation Project. It also describes the different types of equipment and how they were used. The emphasis of Volume 1 is on the description of the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the GAAT Remediation Project. Volume 2 provides the appendixes for the report, which include the following information: (A) Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; (B) Annotated Bibliography; (C) Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; (D) GAAT Equipment Matrix; and (E) Vendor List

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE`s overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program.

  1. Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela [MMM Group Limited, 100 Commerce Valley Drive West, Thornhill, Ontario, L3T 0A1 (Canada); Palmeter, Tim [Public Works and Government Services Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario, M2N 6A6 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

  2. Aeroelastic Benchmark Experiments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes to conduct canonical aeroelastic benchmark experiments. These experiments will augment existing sources for aeroelastic data in the transonic...

  3. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  4. 40 CFR 300.120 - On-scene coordinators and remedial project managers: general responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... project managers: general responsibilities. 300.120 Section 300.120 Protection of Environment... Response § 300.120 On-scene coordinators and remedial project managers: general responsibilities. (a) The... regional or district head of the lead agency. EPA and the USCG shall predesignate OSCs for all areas in...

  5. Remediation of Gremikha Coastal maintenance base - status of the project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillette-Cousin, L. [AREVA TA, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Stepennov, B.S. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gorbatchev, A. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    The former coastal maintenance base in Gremikha is located in the Kola Peninsula, along the Barents Sea, about 300 km east from Murmansk. There is no road or railway to get there, therefore the only possible connection is either by sea or by helicopter. Remediation of the Gremikha coastal maintenance base (CMB) is now one of the main priorities for Rosatom (the Agency for Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation) because nuclear and radioactive waste are currently stored in conditions which do not meet the up-to-date safety and regulatory requirements and it might represent an environmental hazard and a risk of misappropriation of the nuclear material stored there. (authors)

  6. Peak Experience Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  7. Tank SY-102 remediation project: Flowsheet and conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, S.L.; Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Pope, N.G.; Agnew, S.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Thomas, K.W.; Ortic, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. A major program in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal. Pretreatment is needed to resolve tank safety issues and to separate wastes into high-level and low-level fractions for subsequent immobilization and disposal. There is a fixed inventory of actinides and fission products in the tank which must be prepared for disposal. By segregating the actinides and fission products from the bulk of the waste, the tank`s contents can be effectively managed. Due to the high public visibility and environmental sensitivity of this problem, real progress and demonstrated efforts toward addressing it must begin as soon as possible. As a part of this program, personnel at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flowsheet to remediate tank SY-102 which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of the flowsheet demonstrations performed with simulated, but radioactive, wastes using an existing glovebox line at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The tank waste was characterized using both a tank history approach and an exhaustive evaluation of the available core sample analyses. This report also presents a conceptual design complete with a working material flow model, a major equipment list, and cost estimates.

  8. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers

  9. A Study of Factors Caused for Time & Cost Overruns in Construction Project & their Remedial Measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mr. Salim S. Mulla; Mr. Salim S. MullaProf. Ashish P. Waghmare

    2015-01-01

    .... How to achieve this task is a problem, which should be solved. The overall objective of this study is to identify the factors resposinle for overruns in time and cost of the construction project and suggest the suitable remedial solutions. Poor planning, implementation and management are the main reasons for time and cost overruns in construction projects in India. Since most of the reasons are well known and can be controlled if a proper arrangement is made.

  10. The Remediation of Nosferatu:Exploring transmedia experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Ghellal, Sabiha; Morrison, Ann; Hassenzahl, Marc; Schaufler, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present The Remediation of Nosferatu, a location based augmented reality horror adventure. Using the theory of fictional universe elements, we work with diverse material from Nosferatu’s horror genre and vampire themes as a case study. In this interdisciplinary research we intertwine traditional storytelling and scriptwriting skills with interaction design methods. For the game setting, we create hybrid spaces merging the fictional universe and the physical environment into o...

  11. Causes and remedies for the dominant risk factors in Enterprise System implementation projects: the consultants' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the causes of the dominant risk factors, affecting Enterprise System implementation projects and propose remedies for those risk factors from the perspective of implementation consultants. The study used a qualitative research strategy, based on e-mail interviews, semi-structured personal interviews with consultants and participant observation during implementation projects. The main contribution of this paper is that it offers viable indications of how to mitigate the dominant risk factors. These indications were grouped into the following categories: stable project scope, smooth communication supported by the project management, dedicated, competent and decision-making client team, competent and engaged consultant project manager, schedule and budget consistent with the project scope, use of methodology and procedures, enforced and enabled by the project managers, competent and dedicated consultants. A detailed description is provided for each category.

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings remedial action project waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this plan is to establish a waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness (WM/PPA) program for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The program satisfies DOE requirements mandated by DOE Order 5400.1. This plan establishes planning objectives and strategies for conserving resources and reducing the quantity and toxicity of wastes and other environmental releases.

  13. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  14. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.; Espegren, M.L.; O' Donnell, F.R.; Ramos, S.J.; Retolaza, C.D.; Rood, A.S.; Santos, F.A.; Witt, D.A.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards.

  15. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  16. Chernobyl 30 years on. Key remediation and safety projects are 'on track'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Thirty years after the accident at Chernobyl, key remediation and safety projects are on track and construction of the vital Euro 1.5 bn (US Dollars 1.6 bn) New Safe Confinement (NSC) is almost finished with commissioning scheduled for November 2017, the company in charge of construction and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) told NucNet. The NSC is the most high profile and expensive element of the US Dollars 2.15 bn Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP), a framework developed to overcome the consequences of the accident.

  17. Project report - an overview of the project and experiences with project management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    1996-01-01

    A collection of the project planning and the experiences with project management from the Catering 2000 project.As appendieces articles etc. from journals, newspapers etc. about the project.......A collection of the project planning and the experiences with project management from the Catering 2000 project.As appendieces articles etc. from journals, newspapers etc. about the project....

  18. The Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project Tank Waste Retrieval Performance and Lessons Learned, vol. 2 [of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, BE

    2003-10-07

    The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Remediation Project was the first of its kind performed in the United States. Robotics and remotely operated equipment were used to successfully transfer almost 94,000 gal of remote-handled transuranic sludge containing over 81,000 Ci of radioactive contamination from nine large underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The sludge was transferred with over 439,000 gal of radioactive waste supernatant and {approx}420,500 gal of fresh water that was used in sluicing operations. The GAATs are located in a high-traffic area of ORNL near a main thoroughfare. Volume 1 provides information on the various phases of the project and describes the types of equipment used. Volume 1 also discusses the tank waste retrieval performance and the lessons learned during the remediation effort. Volume 2 consists of the following appendixes, which are referenced in Vol. 1: A--Background Information for the Gunite and Associated Tanks Operable Unit; B--Annotated Bibliography; C--GAAT Equipment Matrix; D--Comprehensive Listing of the Sample Analysis Data from the GAAT Remediation Project; and E--Vendor List for the GAAT Remediation Project. The remediation of the GAATs was completed {approx}5.5 years ahead of schedule and {approx}$120,435K below the cost estimated in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the project. These schedule and cost savings were a direct result of the selection and use of state-of-the-art technologies and the dedication and drive of the engineers, technicians, managers, craft workers, and support personnel that made up the GAAT Remediation Project Team.

  19. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  20. Regenerative medicine, resource and regulation: lessons learned from the remedi project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginty, Patrick J; Rayment, Erin A; Hourd, Paul; Williams, David J

    2011-03-01

    The successful commercialization of regenerative medicine products provides a unique challenge to the manufacturer owing to a lack of suitable investment/business models and a constantly evolving regulatory framework. The resultant slow translation of scientific discovery into safe and clinically efficacious therapies is preventing many potential products from reaching the market. This is despite of the need for new therapies that may reduce the burden on the world's healthcare systems and address the desperate need for replacement tissues and organs. The collaborative Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded remedi project was devised to take a holistic but manufacturing-led approach to the challenge of translational regenerative medicine in the UK. Through strategic collaborations and discussions with industry and other academic partners, many of the positive and negative issues surrounding business and regulatory success have been documented to provide a remedi-led perspective on the management of risk in business and the elucidation of the regulatory pathways, and how the two are inherently linked. This article represents the findings from these discussions with key stakeholders and the research into best business and regulatory practices.

  1. Tank waste remediation system year 2000 dedicated file server project HNF-3418 project plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPENCER, S.G.

    1999-04-26

    The Server Project is to ensure that all TWRS supporting hardware (fileservers and workstations) will not cause a system failure because of the BIOS or Operating Systems cannot process Year 2000 dates.

  2. Permeable reactive barriers for the remediation of groundwater in a mining area: results for a pilot-scale project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Perez-Sirvent, Carmen; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Martinez-Lopez, Salvadora; Perez-Espinosa, Victor; Gonzalez-Ciudad, Eva; Belen Martinez-Martinez, Lucia; Hernandez, Carmen; Molina-Ruiz, Jose

    2017-04-01

    The Sierra Minera of Cartagena-La Union is located in the Region of Murcia, Southeast of Spain. This zone presents high levels of heavy metals due to natural, geogenic reasons. In addition, the prolonged mining activity, and subsequent abandonment of farms, has had consequences on the environment, including severe affectation of the groundwater in the area. To remediate this situation, the Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) technology was assayed, which required in addition to the hydro-geological study of the zone, a careful optimization study for the design and construction of PRBs. For such a purpose a pilot-scale project was developed, and this communication reports some of the most relevant findings obtained after a four-years monitorization period. The selected reactive material for the PRBs was limestone filler. The filler is a waste material produced in many factories in the zone. These residues have good adsorption properties, high alkalinity, low cost and high availability, which make them suitable for use in remediation. The PRB was constituted by a 50% limestone filler and 50% sand, a proportion optimized by means of independent batch experiments. A layer of gravel was placed at the top, and on it a layer of natural soil. The barrier was designed in the form of a continuous trench, because the level of the contaminated groundwater was not very deep. In this way, the barrier could be prepared with standard excavation equipment. Parallel to the barrier, 6 wells where arranged downstream for sample collection. The pH and conductivity of the samples was measured directly in situ, and the content of Zn, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Pb were analyzed in the laboratory. All the samples collected after the PRB was constructed had basic pH values between 7.5 and 8. The conductivity was between 5 and 11 mS / cm except for the well 4, which had a value of 3.70 mS / cm. The concentration values of trace elements were below the detection limit (atomic absorption measurement) in

  3. SAFETY IMPROVES DRAMATICALLY IN FLUOR HANFORD SOIL AND GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GERBER MS

    2007-12-05

    This paper describes dramatic improvements in the safety record of the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state over the past four years. During a period of enormous growth in project work and scope, contractor Fluor Hanford reduced injuries, accidents, and other safety-related incidents and enhanced a safety culture that earned the SGRP Star Status in the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) in 2007. This paper outlines the complex and multi-faceted work of Fluor Hanford's SGRP and details the steps taken by the project's Field Operations and Safety organizations to improve safety. Holding field safety meetings and walkdowns, broadening safety inspections, organizing employee safety councils, intensively flowing down safety requirements to subcontractors, and adopting other methods to achieve remarkable improvement in safety are discussed. The roles of management, labor and subcontractors are detailed. Finally, SGRP's safety improvements are discussed within the context of overall safety enhancements made by Fluor Hanford in the company's 11 years of managing nuclear waste cleanup at the Hanford Site.

  4. An outline of a model-based expert system to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring contaminated acquatic ecosystems: The project ``moira``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelgren, A.; Bergstrom, U. [Studsvik Eco and AB, Nykoping (Sweden); Brittain, J. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). LFI Zoological Museum; Gallego Diaz, E. [Madrid Universidad Politecnica (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Nuclear; Hakanson, L. [KEMA Nuclear, Arnhem (Niger); Monte, L. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-10-01

    The present report describes the fundamental principles of the research programme MOIRA (a model based computerized system for management support to Identify optimal remedial strategies for Restoring radionuclide contaminated Aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas) financed by the EC (European Community) (Contract N F14P-CT96-0036). The interventions to restore radionuclides contaminated aquatic systems may result in detrimental ecological, social and economical effects. Decision makers must carefully evaluate these impacts. The main aim of the MOIRA project is the development of an expert system based on validated models predicting the evolution of the radioactive contamination of fresh water systems following countermeasure applications and their relevant ecological, social and economical impacts. The expert system will help decision makers, that are not necessarily gifted with experience in environmental modeling, to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring contaminated fresh water systems.

  5. Investigation of the Use of "Cucumis Sativus" for Remediation of Chromium from Contaminated Environmental Matrices: An Interdisciplinary Instrumental Analysis Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Lynsey R.; Edwards, Michael R.; Farmer, Russell; Greenly, Kathryn J.; Hensler, Sherri; Jenkins, Scott E.; Joyce, J. Michael; Mann, Jason A.; Prentice, Boone M.; Puckette, Andrew E.; Shuford, Christopher M.; Porter, Sarah E. G.; Rhoten, Melissa C.

    2009-01-01

    An interdisciplinary, semester-long project is presented in which students grow Cucumis sativus (cucumber) plants from seeds and study the ability of the plants to remediate a heavy metal from contaminated soil or water or both. Phytoremediation strategies for environmental cleanup are presented as possible alternatives to chemical based clean-up…

  6. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.

  7. A Discovery-Based Experiment Illustrating How Iron Metal Is Used to Remediate Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balko, Barbara A.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2001-12-01

    In this article, we describe an experiment for undergraduate general chemistry in which students investigate the chemistry behind iron-permeable reactive barriers (iron PRBs), a new technology that is widely used to remediate contaminated groundwater. Contaminant remediation involving iron PRBs is a redox process: the iron metal undergoes oxidative dissolution while the contaminant is reduced. The reaction is complicated, however, by the fact that it involves a surface that changes owing to the development of a layer of rust (iron oxide) on the iron. In this experiment, students examine the iron PRB-contaminant reaction by characterizing the kinetics of the degradation of a dye (the model contaminant) in the presence of granular iron under various experimental conditions. Students can be asked to design their own experiments to investigate aspects of the degradation reaction that are of particular interest to them. The material covered in the lab includes oxidation-reduction reactions, pseudo first-order kinetics, spectrophotometry, and the application of chemistry to solving environmental problems. The experiment can also be used as a vehicle to introduce more advanced topics in chemistry such as heterogeneous reactions, corrosion, passive film growth, and mass transport.

  8. Project Ida: Manitoba's Telecommunications Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlynka, Denis; Hurly, Paul

    1981-01-01

    The Manitoba Telephone System has established an experimental integrated home information system called Project Ida in a trial group of 100 homes. Discussed here are the origin, current operation, and future prospects of this system, which includes videotex, fire monitoring, telemetering, and educational television. (Author/JJD)

  9. Remediation of copper contaminated soil by using different particle sizes of apatite: a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jinfeng; Hu, Tiantian; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    The particle size of apatite is one of the critical factors that influence the adsorption of heavy metals on apatite in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils using apatite. However, little research has been done evaluating the impact of different particle sizes of apatite on immobilization remediation of heavy metal polluted soils in field. In this study, the adsorption isothermal experiments of copper on three kinds of apatite was tested, and the field experiment by using different particle sizes apatite [nano-hydroxyapatite (NAP), micro-hydroxyapatite (MAP), ordinary particle apatite (OAP)] at a same dosage of 25.8 t/ha (1.16 %, W/W) was also conducted. Ryegrass was chosen as the test plant. The ryegrass biomass, the copper contents in ryegrass and the copper fractionations in soil were determined after field experiments. Results of adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption amounts of copper on OAP was the lowest among different particles. The adsorption amounts of copper on MAP was higher than NAP at high copper equilibrium concentration (>1 mmol L(-1)), an opposite trend was obtained at low copper concentration (experiment, we found that the application of different apatites could effectively increase the soil pH, decrease the available copper concentration in soil, provide more nutrient phosphate and promote the growth of ryegrass. The ryegrass biomass and the copper accumulation in ryegrass were the highest in MAP among all treatments. The effective order of apatite in phytoremediation of copper contaminated field soil was MAP > NAP > OAP, which was attributed to the high adsorption capacity of copper and the strong releasing of phosphate by MAP.

  10. Experiments in the HAW project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonka, V.

    1992-11-01

    In order to improve the final concept for HAW disposal in salt formations the complete technical system of an underground repository is to be tested in a one-to-one scale test facility. Such a facility has been established in the Asse salt mine (FRG). The HAW project is carried out by the Institut fuer Tieflagerung (IfT) of the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung (GSF) in close co-operation with the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN). 17 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary for second quarter 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-11

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the second quarter of 1998 is enclosed. The data presented constitutes the QEDS. The data were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), merged into the database during the second quarter of 1998. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Air data are not stored in the database and KPA data are not merged into the regular database. All data received and verified during the second quarter were within a permissible range of variability, except for those listed. Above normal occurrences are cited for groundwater, air, and NPDES data. There were no above normal occurrences for springs or surface water. The attached tables present the most recent data for air and the data merged into the database during the second quarter 1998 for groundwater, NPDES, surface water, and springs.

  12. Weldon Spring Site environmental report for calendar year 1993. Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1993 describes the environmental monitoring programs at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The objectives of these programs are to assess actual or potential exposure to contaminant effluents from the project area by providing public use scenarios and dose estimates, to demonstrate compliance with Federal and State permitted levels, and to summarize trends and/or changes in contaminant concentrations from environmental monitoring program. In 1993, the maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the chemical plant site perimeter was 0.03 mrem (0.0003 mSv). The maximum committed dose to a hypothetical individual at the boundary of the Weldon Spring Quarry was 1.9 mrem (0.019 mSv). These scenarios assume an individual walking along the perimeter of the site-once a day at the chemical plant/raffinate pits and twice a day at the quarry-250 days per year. This hypothetical individual also consumes fish, sediment, and water from lakes and other bodies of water in the area. The collective dose, based on an effected population of 112,000 was 0.12 person-rem (0.0012 person-Sv). This calculation is based on recreational use of the August A. Busch Memorial Conservation Area and the Missouri Department of Conservation recreational trail (the Katy Trail) near the quarry. These estimates are below the U.S. Department of Energy requirement of 100 mrem (I mSv) annual committed effective dose equivalent for all exposure pathways. Results from air monitoring for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) program indicated that the estimated dose was 0.38 mrem, which is below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard of 10 mrem per year.

  13. Estonian folk traditional experiences on natural anticancer remedies: from past to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Katrin; Jürisoo, Kadi; Raal, Ain

    2014-07-01

    Despite diagnostic and therapeutic advancements, the burden of cancer is still increasing worldwide. Toxicity of current chemotherapeutics to normal cells and their resistance to tumor cells highlights the urgent need for new drugs with minimal adverse side effects. The use of natural anticancer agents has entered into the area of cancer research and increased efforts are being made to isolate bioactive products from medicinal plants. To lead the search for plants with potential cytotoxic activity, ethnopharmacological knowledge can give a great contribution. Therefore, the attention of this review is devoted to the natural remedies traditionally used for the cancer treatment by Estonian people over a period of almost 150 years. Two massive databases, the first one stored in the Estonian Folklore Archives and the second one in the electronic database HERBA ( http://herba.folklore.ee/ ), containing altogether more than 30 000 ethnomedicinal texts were systematically reviewed to compile data about the Estonian folk traditional experiences on natural anticancer remedies. As a result, 44 different plants with potential anticancer properties were elicited, 5 of which [Angelica sylvestris L. (Apiaceae), Anthemis tinctoria L. (Asteraceae), Pinus sylvestris L. (Pinaceae), Sorbus aucuparia L. (Rosaceae), and Prunus padus L. (Rosaceae)] have not been previously described with respect to their tumoricidal activities in the scientific literature, suggesting thus the potential herbal materials for further investigations of natural anticancer compounds.

  14. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.

  15. A ``dog gone`` restoration project: Remediation of an AEC research facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, P.E.; Brooks, B.T. [Bechtel Environmental, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This facility was established in 1958 by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at the facility originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) and radium 226 ({sup 226}Ra), using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988 the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to close out the research program, shut down the facility and turn it over to the tenant after remediation. This paper examines the remediation activities relative to Animal Hospitals 1 and 2 (AH-1 and AH-2), the cobalt 60 ({sup 60}Co) source and the Specimen Storage Room. Remediation of this facility took place over one year period beginning in August 1992. Portions of the facility not requiring remediation are now a part of an ongoing research facility. While excluded from areas where remediation took place, facility personnel and others were in close proximity to the remediation, sometimes separated only by a common building wall. This close proximity required remediation techniques that stressed contamination control.

  16. Investigating Conscious Experience through the Beeper Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzo, Vincent A.; Miller, Emily

    2002-01-01

    The Experience Sampling Method (ESM; Larson & Csikszentmihalyi, 1983) is a means to investigate the subjective experiences of individuals as they go about their daily lives. Students from 2 Adolescent Psychology courses used the ESM in a required "beeper project." Student research teams investigated a typical week in the life of an adolescent by…

  17. Experiments in the HAW project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonka, V.

    1992-09-01

    In order to improve the final concept for HAW disposal in salt formations the complete technical system of an underground repository is to be tested in a one-to-one scale test facility. Such a facility has been established in the Asse salt mine (FRG). Thirty canisters containing glass blocks with highly radioactive radionuclides Cs-137 and Sr-90 will be placed in six boreholes located in two test galleries A and B at the-800 m level in the Asse salt mine. The research programme is aimed at the observation and measurement of the interaction between the canisters with the radioactive content and the rock salt. Because of the requirement to retrieve the canisters when necessary during the five years' test period, the canisters are loaded in boreholes lined with tubes. Thermally induced pressure stresses in the salt will cause the tube to deform. The canister will be retrieved when the deformation exceeds a maximum set value. The Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten, Netherlands, has designed special canister guiding systems for loading and unloading the boreholes together with a monitoring system that continuously monitors the gap between the canisters and the inner wall of the tube. This progress report is the tenth of a series intended to document the progress obtained from HAW in situ experiment. (A.S.). 14 refs.; 10 figs.

  18. Overview and lessons learned : RCMP detachment remediation project, Carcross, Yukon Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.R. [Hemmera, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Mayberry, J. [RCMP, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Office of Environment and Sustainable Development

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation described the remediation of a Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) detachment site in Carcross, Yukon Territory (YT). Soil and ground water contamination at the site was caused by 4000 litres of heating oil. Over 1600 m{sup 3} of soil were impacted by the spill, and a 900 m{sup 2} groundwater plume was also identified. Directional drilling was used to determine the impacts of the spill on soils under buildings. A remediation plan was then designed to remove polycyclic hydrocarbons (PHCs) at the site while provided temporary supports of the buildings while contaminated soil was excavated. A risk assessment was then conducted to determine post-remediation ground water quality and to ensure that hydrocarbon concentrations were below recommended levels. Details of the planning, contractual and administrative processes used to conduct the remediation were presented. tabs., figs.

  19. Ten years of the project Chain Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susman, Katarina; Ziherl, Saša; Bajc, Jurij

    2017-05-01

    In this paper the project Chain Experiment is presented. It can be viewed as a competition or as a popularization activity for science, technology, and physics in particular. We present the basic idea of a toppling-domino-like chain of contraptions that are operated one after another, and each demonstrates different physical phenomena. The evolution into its current form with three different types of activities is briefly described. The emphasis of the paper is on the impact of the project on physics education. The ways in which physics students, physics teachers, and participating pupils profit from the different project activities are presented in detail.

  20. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Rifle, Colorado: Phase 2, Construction drawings [Engineering Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-05-13

    This document consists of engineering drawings related to the remedial action of the Old Rifle Processing site, the New Rifle Processing site, and the Estes Gulch disposal site. This report is intended to accompany report DOE/UMTRA--050506 volume 3, appendix F.

  1. Executive summary: Weldon Spring Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report has been prepared to provide information about the public safety and environmental protection programs conducted by the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. The Weldon Spring site is located in southern St. Charles County, Missouri, approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The site consists of two main areas, the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and raffinate pits and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The objectives of the Site Environmental Report are to present a summary of data from the environmental monitoring program, to characterize trends and environmental conditions at the site, and to confirm compliance with environmental and health protection standards and requirements. The report also presents the status of remedial activities and the results of monitoring these activities to assess their impacts on the public and environment. The scope of the environmental monitoring program at the Weldon Spring site has changed since it was initiated. Previously, the program focused on investigations of the extent and level of contaminants in the groundwater, surface waters, buildings, and air at the site. In 1992, the level of remedial activities required monitoring for potential impacts of those activities, particularly on surface water runoff and airborne effluents. This report includes monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological sampling activities. These data include estimates of dose to the public from the Weldon Spring site; estimates of effluent releases; and trends in groundwater contaminant levels. Also, applicable compliance requirements, quality assurance programs, and special studies conducted in 1992 to support environmental protection programs are reviewed.

  2. Waste minimization opportunities at the U.S. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Rifle, Colorado, site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, G.L. [Geraghty and Miller, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arp, S. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hempill, H. [Morrison Knudsen-Environmental Services, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    At two uranium mill sites in Rifle, Colorado, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is removing uranium mill tailings and contaminated subgrade soils. This remediation activity will result in the production of groundwater contaminated with uranium, heavy metals, ammonia, sulfates, and total dissolved solids (TDS). The initial remediation plan called for a wastewater treatment plant for removal of the uranium, heavy metals, and ammonia, with disposal of the treated water, which still includes the sulfates and TDSS, to the Colorado River. The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination (NPDES) permit issued by the Colorado Department of Health for the two Rifle sites contained more restrictive discharge limits than originally anticipated. During the detailed review of alternate treatment systems to meet these more restrictive limits, the proposed construction procedures were reviewed emphasizing the methods to minimize groundwater production to reduce the size of the water treatment facility, or to eliminate it entirely. It was determined that with changes to the excavation procedures and use of the contaminated groundwater for use in dust suppression at the disposal site, discharge to the river could be eliminated completely.

  3. Danish experiences on EIA of livestock projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Per

    2006-01-01

    , especially when it comes to livestock projects. In an evaluation of the Danish EIA experience, we have looked more closely at how the EIA instruments function regarding livestock projects. This article addresses both the EIA process as well as the EIA screening. It is demonstrated that the EIA screening......Since its introduction into Danish planning in 1989, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) has been widely discussed. At the centre of the debate has been the question of whether EIA actually offered anything new and there has been a great deal of scepticism about the efficacy of the instrument...... that these changes definitely address some of the shortcomings found in the evaluation....

  4. Experiences in managing the Prometheus Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, David H.; Clark, Karla B.; Cook, Beverly A.; Gavit, Sarah A.; Kayali, Sammy A.; McKinney, John C.; Milkovich, David C.; Reh, Kim R.; Taylor, Randall L.; Casani, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Congress authorized NASA?s Prometheus Project in February 2003, with the first Prometheus mission slated to explore the icy moons of Jupiter. The Project had two major objectives: (1) to develop a nuclear reactor that would provide unprecedented levels of power and show that it could be processed safely and operated reliably in space for long-duration, deep-space exploration and (2) to explore the three icy moons of Jupiter - Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa - and return science data that would meet the scientific goals as set forth in the Decadal Survey Report of the National Academy of Sciences. Early in Project planning, it was determined that the development of the Prometheus nuclear powered Spaceship would be complex and require the intellectual knowledge residing at numerous organizations across the country. In addition, because of the complex nature of the Project and the multiple partners, approaches beyond those successfully used to manage a typical JPL project would be needed. This paper1 will describe the key experiences in managing Prometheus that should prove useful for future projects of similar scope and magnitude

  5. Experts by Experience. Lay Users as Authorities in Slimming Remedy Advertisements, 1918–1939

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hieke Huistra

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses Dutch newspaper advertisements for slimming remedies in the 1920s and 1930s in order to investigate which authorities patients relied on in the past when deciding which pharmaceuticals to take...

  6. Project LITE - Light Inquiry Through Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, K.

    2004-12-01

    Hands-on, inquiry-based, constructivist activity offers students a powerful way to explore, uncover and ultimately gain a feel for the nature of science. In order to make practicable a more genuine approach to learning astronomy, we have undertaken the development of hands-on (and eyes-on) materials that can be used in introductory undergraduate astronomy courses. These materials focus on light and optics. Over the past several years as part of Project LITE (Light Inquiry Through Experiments), we have developed a kit of optical materials that is integrated with a set of Java applets. The combined kit and software allows students to do actual experiments concerning geometrical optics, fluorescence, phosphorescence, polarization and other topics by making use of the photons that are emitted by their computer screens. We have also developed a suite of over 100 Flash applets that allow students to directly explore many aspects of visual perception. A major effort of the project concerns spectroscopy, since it is arguably the most important tool used by astronomers to disentangle the nature of the universe. It is also one of the most challenging subjects to teach in undergraduate astronomy courses. The spectroscopy component of Project LITE includes take-home laboratory materials and experiments that are integrated with web-based software. We have also developed a novel quantitative handheld binocular spectrometer (patent pending). Our major spectroscopic software is called the Spectrum Explorer (SPEX). It allows students to create, manipulate and explore all types of spectra including blackbody, power law, emission and absorption. We are now extending the SPEX capabilities to help students gain easy access to the astronomical spectra included in the NVO databases. All of the Project LITE software can be found http://lite.bu.edu. Project LITE is supported by Grant #DUE-0125992 from the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education.

  7. SF Box--a tool for evaluating the effects on soil functions in remediation projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchko, Yevheniya; Norrman, Jenny; Rosén, Lars; Norberg, Tommy

    2014-10-01

    Although remediation is usually aimed at reducing the risks posed by contaminants to human health and the environment, it is also desirable that the remediated soil within future green spaces is capable of providing relevant ecological functions, e.g., basis for primary production. Yet while addressing a contamination problem by reducing contaminant concentration and/or amounts in the soil, the remedial action itself can lead to soil structure disturbances, decline in organic matter and nutrient deficiencies, and in turn affect a soil's capacity to carry out its ecological soil functions. This article presents the Soil Function Box (SF Box) tool that is aimed to facilitate integration of information from suggested soil quality indicators (SQIs) into a management process in remediation using a scoring method. The scored SQIs are integrated into a soil quality index corresponding to 1 of 5 classes. SF Box is applied to 2 cases from Sweden (Kvillebäcken and Hexion), explicitly taking into consideration uncertainties in the results by means of Monte Carlo simulations. At both sites the generated soil quality indices corresponded to a medium soil performance (soil class 3) with a high certainty. The main soil constraints at both Kvillebäcken and Hexion were associated with biological activity in the soil, as soil organisms were unable to supply plant-available N. At the Kvillebäcken site the top layer had a content of coarse fragment (ø > 2 mm) higher than 35%, indicating plant rooting limitations. At the Hexion site, the soil had limited amount of organic matter, thus poor aggregate stability and nutrient cycling potential. In contrast, the soil at Kvillebäcken was rich in organic matter. The soils at both sites were capable of storing a sufficient amount of water for soil organisms between precipitation events. © 2014 SETAC.

  8. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. [UMTRA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrach, A.; Hoopes, J.; Morycz, D. (Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Bone, M.; Cox, S.; Jones, D.; Lechel, D.; Meyer, C.; Nelson, M.; Peel, R.; Portillo, R.; Rogers, L.; Taber, B.; Zelle, P. (Weston (Roy F.), Inc., Washington, DC (USA)); Rice, G. (Sergent, Hauskins and Beckwith (USA))

    1984-12-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Gunnison uranium of mill tailings site located 0.5 miles south of Gunnison, Colorado. The site covers 56 acres and contains 35 acres of tailings, 2 of the original mill buildings and a water tower. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control of Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated (vicinity) properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the occurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Four alternatives have been addressed in this document. The first alternative is to consolidate the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile on the southern portion of the existing site. A radon barrier of silty clay would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Two other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a location farther from the city of Gunnison. The no action alternative is also assessed.

  9. Data assimilation experiments within the POGEQA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuch, V.; Attie, J. E.; Claeyman, M.; El Amroui, L.; Ricaud, P.; Semane, N.; Massart, S.; Piacentini, A.; Cariolle, D.; Flaud, J.; Bergametti, G.; Cantie, R.; Pasternak, F.; Lehors, L.; von Clarmann, T.; Hoepfner, M.; Orphal, J.

    2009-12-01

    The POGEQA (Observation of Air Quality from a Geostationary Platform) project is a French and German initiative currently funded by RTRA STAE (Midi-Pyrenees region). It links also with other international teams and initiatives sharing similar objectives, such as GEOCAPE. Using a sophisticated chemical data assimilation system, MOCAGE-PALM, POGEQA aims at defining optimal characteristics for a future instrument in geostationary orbit complementing orbiting instruments and surface observations for Air Quality monitoring and forecasting. POGEQA sits also in the context of the european initiative GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) and the project MACC, which aims at assembling operational atmospheric services ; MOCAGE-PALM is indeed one of the pre-operational systems upon which the production of regional Air Quality products is based. These experiments comprise both assimilation of currently existing sensors for tropospheric ozone and CO, such as IASI and MOPITT, and assimilation of synthetic data (OSSEs, Observing System Simulation Experiments) representative of possible geostationary instrumental concepts. These numerical experiments, though representing a very small fraction of the cost compared to the development of a real test instrument, will allow to justify quantitatively the requirements (geometry, sensitivity, errors,…). Differents aspects of operating such an instrument in real conditions (clouds, observations with representativeness errors, radiances…) can also be considered. We will show highlights from the first results obtained in the project. In particular, we will present the synthetic observations generating tool, which is based upon the KOPRA and KOPRAFIT models and 3D chemical scenes produced with chemical models CHIMERE and/or MOCAGE. We will discuss also findings from assimilation experiments and OSSEs.

  10. Genome project: An experiment in sharing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, L.

    1990-05-25

    The Human Genome Project is in many respects a gigantic experiment in data sharing. Around the world, investigators are working on pieces of the same puzzle. And whether the project succeeds will depend in large measure on these investigators making available their data and materials - cell lines, probes, and clones - to their colleagues and competitors. While sharing may be the norm in, say, immunology or bacterial genetics, human genetics has always been intensely competitive. So should the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy, which both fund the genome project, promulgate rules to govern access to data and sharing of materials A DOE committee has drafted some guidelines, which have yet to be formally endorsed. They stipulate that data and materials must be publicly available 6 months after they are generated or characterized. But at NIH, James Watson, who heads the genome project, is shying away from setting rules. He points to the new collaborative plans to map chromosome 21 as evidence that the community will develop its own ways of sharing data. Because of its known role in Down syndrome and its suspected role in Alzheimer's disease, chromosome 21 has generated a vast amount of interest. Lots of groups are already hard at work constructing maps of the chromosome - first developing a series of landmarks spaced along the chromosome, and then a collection of ordered DNA fragments. But the maps all these groups generate will be essentially useless unless they pool their data and adopt a common language.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Annual Environmental Monitoring Report calendar year 1992: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-31

    This report describes environmental monitoring and compliance at eight UMTRA sites where remedial action was underway during 1992 and at the ten sites that were complete at the end of 1992. Volume I contains information for Ambrosia Lake, NM; Cannonsburg/Burrell, PA; Durango, CO; Falls City, TX; Grand Junction, CO; Green River, UT; and Gunnison, CO. Each site report contains a site description, compliance summary, environmental program information, environmental radiological and non-radiological program information, water resources protection, and quality assurance information.

  12. Environmental remediation 1991: ``Cleaning up the environment for the 21st Century``. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, D.E. [ed.] [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    This report presents discussions given at a conference on environmental remediation, September 8--11, Pasco, Washington. Topics include: public confidence; education; in-situ remediation; Hanford tank operations; risk assessments; field experiences; standards; site characterization and monitoring; technology discussions; regulatory issues; compliance; and the UMTRA project. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  13. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project -2006 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2006-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. This paper presents a status of the coolant stability over the past year as well as results from destructive analyses of hardware removed from the on-orbit system and the current approach to coolant remediation.

  14. Undergraduate group projects: Challenges and learning experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac, Siara Ruth; Tormey, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Working in groups and managing projects are important professional skills for engineers, and there is a growing demand to teach and assess such skills. But what should be taught and when? Tuckman’s famous “stages of development of performing groups” provides a framework for understanding the types of challenges which groups face. Yet, as with any abstract model, it will not be transferred into students’ practice if they do not see it as relevant to their lived experiences. In 2014, a new cou...

  15. Experts by Experience : Lay Users as Authorities in Slimming Remedy Advertisements, 1918–1939

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huistra, H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31622149X

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses Dutch newspaper advertisements for slimming remedies in the 1920s and 1930s in order to investigate which authorities patients relied on in the past when deciding which pharmaceuticals to take. I argue that lay users, not doctors, were the most prominent cultural authorities in

  16. INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE C-400 INTERIM REMEDIAL PROJECT PHASE I RESULTS, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Looney, B.; Rossabi, J.; Stewart,L.; Richards, W.

    2010-10-29

    The groundwater and soil in the vicinity of the C-400 Building at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), is contaminated with substantial quantities of industrial solvents, primarily trichoroethene (TCE). This solvent 'source' is recognized as a significant challenge and an important remediation target in the overall environmental cleanup strategy for PGDP. Thus, the cleanup of the C-400 TCE Source is a principal focus for the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors, and for PGDP regulators and stakeholders. Using a formal investigation, feasibility study and decision process, Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH) was selected for the treatment of the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of C-400. ERH was selected as an interim action to remove 'a significant portion of the contaminant mass of TCE at the C-400 Cleaning Building area through treatment' with the longer term goal of reducing 'the period the TCE concentration in groundwater remains above its Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL).' ERH is a thermal treatment that enhances the removal of TCE and related solvents from soil and groundwater. The heterogeneous conditions at PGDP, particularly the high permeability regional gravel aquifer (RGA), are challenging to ERH. Thus, a phased approach is being followed to implement this relatively expensive and complex remediation technology. Conceptually, the phased approach encourages safety and efficiency by providing a 'lessons learned' process and allowing appropriate adjustments to be identified and implemented prior to follow-on phase(s) of treatment. More specifically, early deployment targeted portions of the challenging RGA treatment zone with relatively little contamination reducing the risk of adverse collateral impacts from underperformance in terms of heating and capture. Because of the importance and scope of the C-400 TCE source remediation activities, DOE chartered an Independent Technical Review (ITR) in

  17. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement: Quarterly environmental data summary for third quarter 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-06

    In support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement, a copy of the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the third quarter of 1998 is enclosed. The data presented in this letter and attachment constitute the QEDS. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the third quarter of 1998. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined above normal Level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal Level 2 values are based, in ES and H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits, and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in the event that above normal data occur.

  18. Acid mine drainage in the Iberian Pyrite Belt: 2. Lessons learned from recent passive remediation experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayora, Carlos; Caraballo, Manuel A; Macias, Francisco; Rötting, Tobias S; Carrera, Jesús; Nieto, Jose-Miguel

    2013-11-01

    The Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB), SW Spain and Portugal, contains about 100 abandoned mine wastes and galleries that release acid mine drainages (AMD) to the Tinto and Odiel rivers. In situ passive remediation technologies are especially suitable to remediate the drainages of these orphan sites. However, traditional remediation systems, designed for coal mines, have been demonstrated inefficient to treat the IPB mine waters. Due to their high acidity and metal loads, large amount of solids precipitate and fast clogging of porosity or passivation (coating) of the reactive grains occurs. To overcome these problems, the dispersed alkaline substrate (DAS) a mixture of fine-grained limestone sand and a coarse inert matrix (e.g., wood shavings) was developed. The small grains provide a large reactive surface and dissolve almost completely before the growing layer of precipitates passivates the substrate. The high porosity retards clogging. However, calcite dissolution only raises pH to values around 6.5, at which the hydroxides of trivalent metals (Al and Fe) precipitate, but it is not high enough to remove divalent metals. Caustic magnesia (MgO) buffers the solution pH between 8.5 and 10. A DAS system replacing limestone with caustic magnesia has been tested to be very efficient to remove divalent metals (Zn, Cd, Mn, Cu, Co, Ni, and Pb) from the water previously treated with calcite.

  19. The projected background for the CUORE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alduino, C.; Avignone, F.T.; Chott, N.; Creswick, R.J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wilson, J. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); Alfonso, K.; Hickerson, K.P.; Huang, H.Z.; Sakai, M.; Schmidt, J.; Trentalange, S.; Zhu, B.X. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Artusa, D.R.; Rusconi, C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Columbia, SC (United States); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Azzolini, O.; Camacho, A.; Keppel, G.; Palmieri, V.; Pira, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Banks, T.I.; Drobizhev, A.; Freedman, S.J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Wagaarachchi, S.L. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bari, G.; Deninno, M.M. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Beeman, J.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bellini, F.; Cosmelli, C.; Ferroni, F.; Piperno, G. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Benato, G.; Singh, V. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bersani, A.; Caminata, A. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M.; Faverzani, M.; Fiorini, E.; Gironi, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Nastasi, M.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pozzi, S.; Sisti, M.; Terranova, F.; Zanotti, L. [Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milan (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Branca, A.; Taffarello, L. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padua (Italy); Bucci, C.; Cappelli, L.; D' Addabbo, A.; Gorla, P.; Pattavina, L.; Pirro, S.; Laubenstein, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Canonica, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Cao, X.G.; Fang, D.Q.; Ma, Y.G.; Wang, H.W.; Zhang, G.Q. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Carbone, L.; Cremonesi, O.; Ferri, E.; Giachero, A.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E. [INFN-Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Dafinei, I.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P.J.; Pettinacci, V.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M. [INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Copello, S.; Di Domizio, S.; Fernandes, G.; Marini, L.; Pallavicini, M. [INFN-Sezione di Genova, Genoa (Italy); Universita di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genoa (Italy); Cushman, J.S.; Davis, C.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Lim, K.E.; Maruyama, R.H. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); Dell' Oro, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Di Vacri, M.L.; Santone, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, L' Aquila (Italy); Franceschi, M.A.; Ligi, C.; Napolitano, T. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Fujikawa, B.K.; Mei, Y.; Schmidt, B.; Smith, A.R.; Welliver, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Giuliani, A.; Novati, V.; Tenconi, M. [Universit Paris-Saclay, CSNSM, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Gladstone, L.; Leder, A.; Ouellet, J.L.; Winslow, L.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Gutierrez, T.D. [California Polytechnic State University, Physics Department, San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Haller, E.E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); Han, K. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai (China); Hansen, E. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kadel, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Martinez, M. [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Universidad de Zaragoza, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Zaragoza (Spain); Moggi, N. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Scienze per la Qualita della Vita, Bologna (Italy); Nones, C. [CEA/Saclay, Service de Physique des Particules, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Norman, E.B.; Wang, B.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States); O' Donnell, T. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Center for Neutrino Physics, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Pagliarone, C.E. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Meccanica, Cassino (Italy); Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Wise, T. [Yale University, Department of Physics, New Haven, CT (United States); University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Woodcraft, A. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, Institute for Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Zimmermann, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Engineering Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Zucchelli, S. [INFN-Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te with an array of 988 TeO{sub 2} bolometers operating at temperatures around 10 mK. The experiment is currently being commissioned in Hall A of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. The goal of CUORE is to reach a 90% C.L. exclusion sensitivity on the {sup 130}Te decay half-life of 9 x 10{sup 25} years after 5 years of data taking. The main issue to be addressed to accomplish this aim is the rate of background events in the region of interest, which must not be higher than 10{sup -2} counts/keV/kg/year. We developed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation, based on results from a campaign of material screening, radioassays, and bolometric measurements, to evaluate the expected background. This was used over the years to guide the construction strategies of the experiment and we use it here to project a background model for CUORE. In this paper we report the results of our study and our expectations for the background rate in the energy region where the peak signature of neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te is expected. (orig.)

  20. The projected background for the CUORE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduino, C.; Alfonso, K.; Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Benato, G.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Branca, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Camacho, A.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Cappelli, L.; Carbone, L.; Cardani, L.; Carniti, P.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Copello, S.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Cushman, J. S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dafinei, I.; Davis, C. J.; Dell'Oro, S.; Deninno, M. M.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Drobizhev, A.; Fang, D. Q.; Faverzani, M.; Fernandes, G.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Hansen, E.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hickerson, K. P.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Keppel, G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Leder, A.; Ligi, C.; Lim, K. E.; Ma, Y. G.; Maino, M.; Marini, L.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P. J.; Napolitano, T.; Nastasi, M.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Novati, V.; Nucciotti, A.; O'Donnell, T.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sakai, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Santone, D.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Singh, V.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Tenconi, M.; Terranova, F.; Tomei, C.; Trentalange, S.; Vignati, M.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zhang, G. Q.; Zhu, B. X.; Zimmermann, S.; Zucchelli, S.; Laubenstein, M.

    2017-08-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of ^{130}Te with an array of 988 TeO_2 bolometers operating at temperatures around 10 mK. The experiment is currently being commissioned in Hall A of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. The goal of CUORE is to reach a 90% C.L. exclusion sensitivity on the ^{130}Te decay half-life of 9 × 10^{25} years after 5 years of data taking. The main issue to be addressed to accomplish this aim is the rate of background events in the region of interest, which must not be higher than 10^{-2} counts/keV/kg/year. We developed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation, based on results from a campaign of material screening, radioassays, and bolometric measurements, to evaluate the expected background. This was used over the years to guide the construction strategies of the experiment and we use it here to project a background model for CUORE. In this paper we report the results of our study and our expectations for the background rate in the energy region where the peak signature of neutrinoless double beta decay of ^{130}Te is expected.

  1. Project ABLE: (Atmospheric Balloonborne Lidar Experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, O.; Aurilio, G.; Bucknam, R. D.; Hurd, A. G.; Sheehan, W. H.

    1985-03-01

    Project ABLE (Atmospheric Balloonborne Lidar Experiment) is part of the A.F. Geophysics Laboratory's continuing interest in developing techniques for making remote measurements of atmospheric quantities such as density, pressure, temperatures, and wind motions. The system consists of a balloonborne lidar payload designed to measure neutral molecular density as a function of altitude from ground level to 70 km. The lidar provides backscatter data at the doubled and tripled frequencies of a Nd:YAG laser, which will assist in the separation of the molecular and aerosol contributions and subsequent determination of molecular and aerosol contributions and subsequent determination of molecular density vs altitude. The object of this contract was to fabricate and operate in a field test a balloonborne lidar experiment capable of performing nighttime atmospheric density measurements up to 70 km altitude with a resolution of 150 meters. The payload included a frequency-doubled and -tripled Nd:YAG laser with outputs at 355 and 532 nm; a telescoped receiver with PMT detectors; a command-controlled optical pointing system; and support system, including thermal control, telmetry, command, and power. Successful backscatter measurements were made during field operations which included a balloon launch from Roswell, NM and a flight over the White Sands Missile Range.

  2. Status Report for Remediation Decision Support Project, Task 1, Activity 1.B – Physical and Hydraulic Properties Database and Interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, Mark L.

    2008-09-26

    The objective of Activity 1.B of the Remediation Decision Support (RDS) Project is to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for sediments from the Hanford Site, to port these data into the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS), and to make the data web-accessible to anyone on the Hanford Local Area Network via the so-called Virtual Library. In past years efforts were made by RDS project staff to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for Hanford sediments and to transfer these data into SoilVision{reg_sign}, a commercial geotechnical software package designed for storing, analyzing, and manipulating soils data. Although SoilVision{reg_sign} has proven to be useful, its access and use restrictions have been recognized as a limitation to the effective use of the physical and hydraulic property databases by the broader group of potential users involved in Hanford waste site issues. In order to make these data more widely available and useable, a decision was made to port them to HEIS and to make them web-accessible via a Virtual Library module. In FY08 the objectives of Activity 1.B of the RDS Project were to: (1) ensure traceability and defensibility of all physical and hydraulic property data currently residing in the SoilVision{reg_sign} database maintained by PNNL, (2) transfer the physical and hydraulic property data from the Microsoft Access database files used by SoilVision{reg_sign} into HEIS, which has most recently been maintained by Fluor-Hanford, Inc., (3) develop a Virtual Library module for accessing these data from HEIS, and (4) write a User's Manual for the Virtual Library module. The development of the Virtual Library module was to be performed by a third party under subcontract to Fluor. The intent of these activities is to make the available physical and hydraulic property data more readily accessible and useable by technical staff and operable unit managers involved in waste site assessments

  3. An assessment of plant biointrusion at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project rock-covered disposal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    This study is one of a number of special studies that have been conducted regarding various aspects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This special study was proposed following routine surveillance and maintenance surveys and observations reported in a special study of vegetative covers (DOE, 1988), in which plants were observed growing up through the rock erosion layer at recently completed disposal cells. Some of the plants observed were deep-rooted woody species, and questions concerning root intrusion into disposal cells and the need to control plant growth were raised. The special study discussed in this report was designed to address some of the ramifications of plant growth on disposal cells that have rock covers. The NRC has chosen rock covers over vegetative covers in the arid western United States because licenses cannot substantiate that the vegetative covers will be significantly greater than 30 percent and preferably 70 percent,'' which is the amount of vegetation required to reduce flow to a point of stability.'' The potential impacts of vegetation growing in rock covers are not addressed by the NRC (1990). The objectives, then, of this study were to determine the species of plants growing on two rock-covered disposal cells, study the rooting pattern of plants on these cells, and identify possible impacts of plant root penetration on these and other UMTRA Project rock-covered cells.

  4. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Volume 2, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.

    1995-03-01

    J-Field encompasses about 460 acres at the southern end of the Gunpowder Neck Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of APG (Figure 2.1). Since World War II, the Edgewood Area of APG has been used to develop, manufacture, test, and destroy chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). For the purposes of this project, J-Field has been divided into eight geographic areas or facilities that are designated as areas of concern (AOCs): the Toxic Burning Pits (TBP), the White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP), the Riot Control Burning Pit (RCP), the Robins Point Demolition Ground (RPDG), the Robins Point Tower Site (RPTS), the South Beach Demolition Ground (SBDG), the South Beach Trench (SBT), and the Prototype Building (PB). The scope of this project is to conduct a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and ecological risk assessment to evaluate the impacts of past disposal activities at the J-Field site. Sampling for the RI will be carried out in three stages (I, II, and III) as detailed in the FSP. A phased approach will be used for the J-Field ecological risk assessment (ERA).

  5. FEBEX II Project THG Laboratory Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missana, T.

    2004-07-01

    The main roles of the bentonite in a radioactive waste repository is to act as a geochemical barrier against the radionuclides migration. The effectiveness of this geochemical barrier depends on the surface properties of the solid phases and on the physico-chemical environment generated by the interaction of the solid phases with the groundwater. Within the FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barriers Experiment) project, a program of laboratory tests was designed to study and to understand the processes taking place in the clay barrier. Since the first stages of the project, these laboratory tests enabled to isolate different processes, making easier their interpretation, and provided fundamental parameters to be used in the Thermo Hydro Mechanical (THM) and Thermo Hydro Geochemical (THG) models. Additionally, experimental data enabled to check the predictive capability of these models. In the second phase of the project, laboratory tests focused on all those relevant aspects not sufficiently covered during FEBEX I. Particularly, the following main objectives were proposed for the THG investigations during FEBEX II : Attainment of a reliable description of the pore water chemistry at different geochemical conditions. Identification of the different types of water present in the bentonite and to determine the amount of available water for the solute transport.Evaluation of the potential effects of the extraction pressure in the chemical composition of the water obtained by squeezing methods.Study of the effects of the exchange complex in the rheological properties of the clay.Identification and modelling of the surface processes occurring in smectite, determination of the solubility constants of smectite and the formation constants of the surface complexes.Understanding of the mechanisms involved in the sorption of different radionuclides in the bentonite. Investigation of the diffusion mechanisms of conservative neutral and anionic species to have a deeper insight on the

  6. Baking soda misuse as a home remedy: case experience of the California Poison Control System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abri, S A; Kearney, T

    2014-02-01

    Baking soda is a common household product promoted by the manufacturer as an antacid. It contains sodium bicarbonate and has the potential for significant toxicity when ingested in excessive amounts. Characterizing the patterns and outcomes from the misuse of baking soda as a home remedy can guide the clinical assessment and preventative counselling of patients at risk for use of this product. We conducted a retrospective review of all symptomatic cases involving ingestion and misuse of a baking soda powder product that were reported to the California Poison Control System between the years 2000 and 2012. Of the 192 cases we identified, 55·8% were female, ages ranged 2 months to 79 years, and the most common reasons for misuse included antacid (60·4%), 'beat a urine drug test' (11·5%) and treat a UTI (4·7%). Most cases (55·2%) had significant symptoms warranting a medical evaluation, whereas 12 patients required hospital admission developed either electrolyte imbalances, metabolic alkalosis or respiratory depression. Misuse of baking soda can result in serious electrolyte and acid/base imbalances. Patients at highest risk of toxicity may include those who chronically use an antacid, those who use the method to 'beat' urine drug screens, pregnant women and young children. Self-treatment with baking soda as a home remedy may also mask or delay medical care thereby complicating or exacerbating an existing medical problem. We suggest that healthcare providers counsel high-risk patients about the potential complications of misuse of baking soda as a home remedy. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Learning by Experience in the Project-Bases Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Turner (Rodney); A. Keegan (Anne); L. Crawford

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes how project-based organizations use structured experience to aid the learning and development of individuals, and how they capture their experience of projects to feed that back into the improved management of future projects and the experiential learning of

  8. The Shakespeare Project: Experiments in Multimedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Larry

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Shakespeare Project, a multimedia system on HyperCard with a two-screen workstation linking a Macintosh, videodisc player, and video monitor. States that this project brings theater to students as a serious object of study. (MG)

  9. Project governance: selected South African government experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van der Walt

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Some form of accountability and power structure binds all organisations. Such structures are typically referred to as the “governance” structure of the organisation. In organisations that have relatively mature project applications and methodologies in place, governance mechanisms are established on more permanent bases. With its focus on performance, results and outcomes, project governance establishes decision-making structures, as well as accountability and responsibility mechanisms in public institutions to oversee projects. As government institutions increasingly place emphasis on project applications for policy implementation and service delivery initiatives, mechanisms or structures should be established to facilitate clear interfaces between the permanent organisation and the temporary project organisation. Such mechanisms or structures should enhance the governance of projects, that is, the strategic alignment of projects, the decentralisation of decision- making powers, rapid resource allocation, and the participation of external stakeholders. The purpose of this article is to explore the concept “project governance”, and to highlight examples of project governance as applied in selected government departments in provincial and national spheres. This would enable the establishment of best practice examples and assist to develop benchmarks for effective project applications for service delivery improvement.

  10. Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997.

  11. Environmental summary of the F- and H-area seepage basins groundwater remediation project, Savannah River site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friday, G.P.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of nearly 70 investigations of the baseline environment, describes the remedial action, and identifies constituents of interest that pose potential risk to human health and the environment. It also proposes an approach for evaluating the effectiveness of the remedial action.

  12. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project: Report from the DOE voluntary protection program onsite review, November 17--21, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-28

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-VPP) Review Team`s findings from the five-day onsite evaluation of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP), conducted November 17--21, 1997. The site was evaluated against the program requirements contained in ``US Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, Part 1: Program Elements`` to determine its success in implementing the five tenets of DOE-VPP. DOE-VPP consists of three programs, with names and functions similar to those in OSHA`s VPP. These programs are STAR, MERIT, and DEMONSTRATION. The STAR program is the core of DOE-VPP. The program is aimed at truly outstanding protectors of employee safety and health. The MERIT program is a steppingstone for contractors and subcontractors that have good safety and health programs but need time and DOE guidance to achieve STAR status. The DEMONSTRATION program is rarely used; it allows DOE to recognize achievements in unusual situations about which DOE needs to learn more before determining approval requirements for the STAR status.

  13. UMTRA Project remedial action planning and disposal cell design to comply with the proposed EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) standards (40 CFR Part 192)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project involves stabilizing 24 inactive uranium mill tailings piles in 10 states. Remedial work must meet standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Remedial action must be designed and constructed to prevent dispersion of the tailings and other contaminated materials, and must prevent the inadvertent use of the tailings by man. This report is prepared primarily for distribution to parties involved in the UMTRA Project, including the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and states and tribes. It is intended to record the work done by the DOE since publication of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards, and to show how the DOE has attempted to respond and react in a positive way to the new requirements that result from the proposed standards. This report discusses the groundwater compliance strategies now being defined and implemented by the DOE, and details the changes in disposal cell designs that result from studies to evaluate ways to facilitate compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. This report also serves to record the technical advances, planning, and progress made on the UMTRA Project since the appearance of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. The report serves to establish, document, and disseminate technical approaches and engineering and groundwater information to people who may be interested or involved in similar or related projects. 24 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are

  15. Linguistic analysis of project ownership for undergraduate research experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, D I; Frederick, J; Fotinakes, B; Strobel, S A

    2012-01-01

    We used computational linguistic and content analyses to explore the concept of project ownership for undergraduate research. We used linguistic analysis of student interview data to develop a quantitative methodology for assessing project ownership and applied this method to measure degrees of project ownership expressed by students in relation to different types of educational research experiences. The results of the study suggest that the design of a research experience significantly influences the degree of project ownership expressed by students when they describe those experiences. The analysis identified both positive and negative aspects of project ownership and provided a working definition for how a student experiences his or her research opportunity. These elements suggest several features that could be incorporated into an undergraduate research experience to foster a student's sense of project ownership.

  16. Experiences from three community health promotion projects in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Tine; Olesen, Ingelise; Kjeldsen, Ann B

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: Three community health promotion projects have been implemented in Greenland in the municipalities of Upernavik, Ittoqqortoormiit and Qasigiannguit. Based on project reports and other written material, this paper describes experiences from the three projects and discusses...... with strong leadership and a central organisation, whereas the Qasigiannguit project was designed as a community project with population participation in all phases of the project. The two former projects have probably had a greater direct change impact on the community, whereas the latter has strengthened...

  17. Visualization in Real-Time Experiment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project will be to migrate some of the outputs from the WFF Mission Planning Lab (MPL) into a real-time visualization system.  The MPL is...

  18. Experts by Experience. Lay Users as Authorities in Slimming Remedy Advertisements, 1918–1939

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieke Huistra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses Dutch newspaper advertisements for slimming remedies in the 1920s and 1930s in order to investigate which authorities patients relied on in the past when deciding which pharmaceuticals to take. I argue that lay users, not doctors, were the most prominent cultural authorities in these advertisements. My main sources are newspaper advertisements extracted from the digital newspaper database of the Dutch National Library. In addition to the historical analysis the article also offers a practical guide for extracting relevant sources from such large digital repositories.Dit artikel analyseert advertenties voor afslankmiddelen in Nederlandse kranten uit het Interbellum, om te onderzoeken op welke autoriteiten mensen destijds vertrouwden wanneer ze beslisten om bepaalde medicijnen wel of niet te gebruiken. Ik laat zien dat in de bestudeerde advertenties niet dokters de belangrijkste autoriteit  aren, maar leken die zelf het middel gebruikt hadden. Ik gebruik de gedigitaliseerde kranten van de Koninklijke Bibliotheek. Naast mijn historische analyse bied ik ook een praktische handleiding voor het vinden van relevante bronnen in dergelijke grote digitale  databestanden. 

  19. Cultural services remediated in Second Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the Danish Public Libraries conducted an experiment in establishing a library in the virtual world Second Life. The Info Island DK provided the framework for a number of online library services and cultural events. This study, based on interviews with most of the active participants...... in the project, discusses the experiences in remediating conventional library services into the new medium and in understanding and redefining the role of the librarian in an online virtual world....

  20. EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates

  1. A Bubble Mixture Experiment Project for Use in an Advanced Design of Experiments Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Stefan H.; Hamada, Michael; White, Bethany J.Giddings; Kutsyy, Vadim; Mosesova, Sofia; Salloum, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    This article gives an example of how student-conducted experiments can enhance a course in the design of experiments. We focus on a project whose aim is to find a good mixture of water, soap and glycerin for making soap bubbles. This project is relatively straightforward to implement and understand. At its most basic level the project introduces…

  2. The integrated project as a learning experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Antequera

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Florida is a higher education centre specialising in technical and business training. Postgraduate programs, university qualifications, vocational training, secondary education, further education, occupational training and languages are taught at Florida. An educational model in accordance with the demands of the European Higher Education Area has been designed, focussing on teaching for professional competencies. We have chosen to use a methodology which promotes the development of skills and abilities, it promotes participation and it is student-centric as s/he must look for knowledge him/herself thus connecting the educational and the real world. In the different university degrees taught in our centre, each year the student carries out a project set in a real context which integrates specific competencies from the course subject and develops transversal competencies associated with the project which are the purpose of planning and progressive learning: team work, effective communication, conflict resolution, leadership skills, innovation and creativity. The IP counts for 25% of each course in terms of objectives, scheduling and final evaluation. The project grade is an individual grade for each student and is the same for all subjects which form part of the project.

  3. Laboratory Experiments on the Electrochemical Remediation of the Environment. Part 8. Microscale Simultaneous Photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Mena-Brito, Rodrigo; Fregoso-Infante, Arturo

    2005-01-01

    A microscale experiment in which the simultaneous oxidation of an organic compound and the reduction of a metal ion are photocatalytically performed in an aqueous slurry containing TiO[subscript 2] irradiated with UV light. This experiment can be performed in the laboratory session with simple chemicals and equipments.

  4. Electrodialytic soil remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsmose, Bodil; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Lene

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of how heavy metals can be found in the soil and the theory of electrodialytic remediation. Basically electrodialytic remediation works by passing electric current through the soil, and the heavy metals in ionic form will carry some of the current. Ion-exchange membranes...... prevents the protons and the hydroxides ions from the electrode processes to enter the soil. The heavy metals are collected in a concentration compartment, which is separated from the soil by ion-exchange membranes. Examples from remediation experiments are shown, and it is demonstrated that it is possible...... to remediate soil polluted with heavy metals be this method. When adding desorbing agents or complexing agents, chosing the right current density, electrolyte and membranes, the proces can be optimised for a given remediation situation. Also electroosmosis is influencing the system, and if extra water...

  5. Experiences from new Swedish passive house projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janson, U. [Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden). Energy and Building Design

    2009-07-01

    Passive houses are common in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, and their use is being considered in Sweden as a means to decrease carbon dioxide emissions and address climate change issues. It is anticipated that the use of passive houses in Sweden may contribute to the country's plan to decrease energy use in buildings by 20 per cent per heated unit area before 2020 compared to 1995 energy use. The first Swedish passive house project was built in Lindas in 2001. The Lindas project includes 20 terrace houses and was built according to the German Passive house standard with a maximum use of space heating of 15 kWh per m{sup 2} per year. Although tenants expressed satisfaction in terms of indoor comfort and reduced energy consumption, not many passive houses have been built in Sweden since the project was launched. Therefore, in 2005, the the Department of Energy and Building Design at Lund University launched 4 new Passive house research projects involving 2 apartment buildings, 1 family house and 1 renovation project. The main purpose was to gain information on the entire building process and determine what knowledge, components and systems are required for widespread construction of passive houses in a cold climate. Only residential buildings were studied for this project. The passive houses were closely followed from the clients decision to build a passive house, through the planning process, the building process, measurements of actual energy use after the tenants moved in and the tenants' opinions on living in a passive house. The study showed that passive houses offer high indoor comfort with low energy requirement for heating. One of the passive houses consumed 44 kWh per m{sup 2} per year of district heating for heating and domestic hot water, which constitutes a 72 per cent reduction compared to the Swedish average of 160 kWh per m{sup 2} per year. There is no special architecture or building material needed to build a passive house, but moderate

  6. Researchers' Experiences, Positive and Negative, in Integrative Landscape Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Bärbel; Tress, Gunther; Fry, Gary

    2005-12-01

    Integrative (interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary) landscape research projects are becoming increasingly common. As a result, researchers are spending a larger proportion of their professional careers doing integrative work, participating in shifting interdisciplinary teams, and cooperating directly with non-academic participants. Despite the growing importance of integrative research, few studies have investigated researchers’ experiences in these projects. How do researchers perceive the outcomes of integrative projects, or career effects? Do they view the projects generally as successes or failures? This study analyses researchers’ experiences in integrative landscape studies and investigates what factors shape these experiences. The data stems from 19 semi-structured qualitative interviews and a Web-based survey among 207 participants in integrative landscape research projects. It finds that researchers experience participation in integrative projects as positive, in particular discussions among participants, networking, teamwork, and gaining new insights and skills. Furthermore, most researchers perceive the projects as successful and as having a positive effect on their careers. Less positive aspects of integration relate to publications and merit points. Factors found to contribute to positive experiences include reaching a high degree of integration amongst the involved disciplines, common definitions of integrative research concepts, and projects that include a large share of fundamental research as well as projects with many project outcomes. Based on these findings, we advise future projects to plan for integration, facilitate discussions, and reach agreement on integrative concepts. We suggest that aspects of fundamental research be included in integrative projects. We also suggest that planning be done at an early stage for peer-reviewed publications, to ensure that participants gain merit points from their participation in integrative research

  7. Researchers' experiences, positive and negative, in integrative landscape projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Bärbel; Tress, Gunther; Fry, Gary

    2005-12-01

    Integrative (interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary) landscape research projects are becoming increasingly common. As a result, researchers are spending a larger proportion of their professional careers doing integrative work, participating in shifting interdisciplinary teams, and cooperating directly with non-academic participants. Despite the growing importance of integrative research, few studies have investigated researchers' experiences in these projects. How do researchers perceive the outcomes of integrative projects, or career effects? Do they view the projects generally as successes or failures? This study analyses researchers' experiences in integrative landscape studies and investigates what factors shape these experiences. The data stems from 19 semi-structured qualitative interviews and a Web-based survey among 207 participants in integrative landscape research projects. It finds that researchers experience participation in integrative projects as positive, in particular discussions among participants, networking, teamwork, and gaining new insights and skills. Furthermore, most researchers perceive the projects as successful and as having a positive effect on their careers. Less positive aspects of integration relate to publications and merit points. Factors found to contribute to positive experiences include reaching a high degree of integration amongst the involved disciplines, common definitions of integrative research concepts, and projects that include a large share of fundamental research as well as projects with many project outcomes. Based on these findings, we advise future projects to plan for integration, facilitate discussions, and reach agreement on integrative concepts. We suggest that aspects of fundamental research be included in integrative projects. We also suggest that planning be done at an early stage for peer-reviewed publications, to ensure that participants gain merit points from their participation in integrative research

  8. Remedial self-fulfilling prophecy: two field experiments to prevent Golem effects among disadvantaged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, O B; Eden, D

    2000-06-01

    The Pygmalion effect is a self-fulfilling prophecy (SFP) in which raising leader expectations boosts subordinate performance. Although attempts to produce Pygmalion effects have been successful repeatedly among men, attempts to produce Pygmalion effects with female leaders have yielded null results. Also, only 1 experiment has demonstrated the Golem effect (i.e., negative SFP in which low leader expectations impair subordinate performance). In 2 field experiments testing the SFP hypothesis among women leading disadvantaged women, experimental leaders were led to believe that their trainees had higher than usual potential. In reality, the trainees had been assigned randomly. Manipulation checks confirmed that the treatment raised leader expectations toward experimental trainees. Analysis of variance of performance detected the predicted SFP effects in both experiments. These were the first-ever experimental confirmations of SFP among women as leaders.

  9. Project Marco Polo: Experiences Applying Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trygestad, JoAnn; Nelson, Jasmine

    1993-01-01

    Describes a summer 1992 study tour of Egypt and Greece by 15 teachers, 15 students, and 5 geography administrators. Focuses on the experiences and attitudes of one eighth-grade student. Asserts that her presentations to student and adult groups have encouraged other students to become more interested in travel and other cultures. (CFR)

  10. Panama Canal Watershed Experiment- Agua Salud Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, Robert F.; Ogden, Fred L.; Elsenbeer, Helmut; Hall, Jefferson S.

    2010-01-01

    The Agua Salud Project utilizes the Panama Canal’s (Canal) central role in world commerce to focus global attention on the ecosystem services provided by tropical forests. The Canal was one of the great engineering projects in the world. Completed in 1914, after almost a decade of concerted effort, its 80 km length greatly shortened the voyage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. An entire class of ships, the Panamax, has been constructed to maximize the amount of cargo that can be carried in a Canal passage. In today’s parlance, the Canal is a “green” operation, powered largely by water (Table 1). The locks, three pairs on each end with a net lift of 27 meters, are gravity fed. For each ton of cargo that is transferred from ocean to ocean, about 13 tons of water (m3) are used. Lake Gatún forms much of the waterway in the Canal transect. Hydroelectricity is generated at the Gatún dam, whenever there is surplus water, and at Madden Dam (completed in 1936) when water is transferred from Lake Alhajuela to Lake Gatún. The Canal watershed is the source of drinking water for Panama City and Colon City, at either end of the Canal, and numerous towns in between.

  11. Remedying Secondary School Students' Illusion of Linearity: A Teaching Experiment Aiming at Conceptual Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dooren, Wim; De Bock, Dirk.; Hessels, An; Janssens, Dirk; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2004-01-01

    Already at a very young age, children experience the wide applicability and intrinsic simplicity of linear/proportional relations. In primary and secondary school mathematics education, moreover, extensive attention is paid to this type of relations. In the long run, students develop the misbelief that each relation can be quantified as…

  12. Resonance Project; Music from the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration comprises physicists, engineers, technicians and support staff from 38 countries who have come together at CERN to build and run one of the largest, most complex scientific experiments known to mankind. Drawn together by our common love of science, many of us are also passionate about music. In October 2008, we marked the completion of the ATLAS detector construction with a series of live performances, and thus was born the idea for Resonance. The recording experience was exciting and enjoyable for all of us, many of whom had never entered a studio before. Resonance is a double CD featuring a variety of musical styles from classical to heavy metal. It also includes a DVD with footage of the recording sessions and interviews with some of the musicians. For more information go to www.atlas-resonance.ch

  13. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  14. Correlational Study of Project Managers' Competence Experience, Education, and Technology Experience on Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosford, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Organizations continue to rely on information technology (IT) as a foundational element, yet poor IT project success continues to impact growth and innovation. Research into IT project success is widespread yet has focused on high-level project management attributes, not specific IT solutions. A review of the research literature revealed that the…

  15. Project Management Web Tools at the MICE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Project management tools like Trac are commonly used within the open-source community to coordinate projects. The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) uses the project management web application Redmine to host mice.rl.ac.uk. Many groups within the experiment have a Redmine project: analysis, computing and software (including offline, online, controls and monitoring, and database subgroups), executive board, and operations. All of these groups use the website to communicate, track effort, develop schedules, and maintain documentation. The issue tracker is a rich tool that is used to identify tasks and monitor progress within groups on timescales ranging from immediate and unexpected problems to milestones that cover the life of the experiment. It allows the prioritization of tasks according to time-sensitivity, while providing a searchable record of work that has been done. This record of work can be used to measure both individual and overall group activity, identify areas lacking sufficient personne...

  16. Ecotoxicity testing and environmental risk assessment of iron nanomaterials for sub-surface remediation – Recommendations from the FP7 project NanoRem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Coutris, Claire; Nguyen, Nhung

    2017-01-01

    engineered Fe nanomaterials, specifically, Nano-Goethite, Trap-Ox Fe-zeolites, Carbo-Iron® and FerMEG12, developed within the European FP7 project NanoRem for sub-surface remediation towards a test battery consisting of eight ecotoxicity tests on bacteria (V. fisheri, E. coli), algae (P. subcapitata......, aggregation and sedimentation behavior in aqueous media. This paper provides a number of recommendations concerning future testing of Fe nanomaterials and discusses environmental risk assessment considerations related to these....

  17. CRP: Collaborative Research Project (A Mathematical Research Experience for Undergraduates)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsley, Jason; Rusinko, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The "Collaborative Research Project" ("CRP")--a mathematics research experience for undergraduates--offers a large-scale collaborative experience in research for undergraduate students. CRP seeks to widen the audience of students who participate in undergraduate research in mathematics. In 2015, the inaugural CRP had 100…

  18. Genealogy Remediated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi

    2007-01-01

    Genealogical websites are becoming an increasingly popular genre on the Web. This chapter will examine how remediation is used creatively in the construction of family history. While remediation of different kinds of old memory materials is essential in genealogy, digital technology opens new...... and technological competences, which helps to anchor the owner within the genealogical community....

  19. The EEE experiment project: status and first physics results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbrescia, M.; Agocs, A.; Aiola, S.; Antolini, R.; Avanzini, C.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossini, E.; Bressan, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cicaló, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Coccia, E.; De Gruttola, D.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Dreucci, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Frolov, V.; Garbini, M.; Gemme, G.; Gnesi, I.; Gustavino, C.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; La Rocca, P.; Li, S.; Librizzi, F.; Maggiora, A.; Massai, M.; Miozzi, S.; Panareo, M.; Paoletti, R.; Perasso, L.; Pilo, F.; Piragino, G.; Regano, A.; Riggi, F.; Righini, G. C.; Romano, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Scapparone, E.; Scribano, A.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Spandre, G.; Squarcia, S.; Taiuti, M.; Toselli, F.; Votano, L.; Williams, M. C. S.; Yánez, G.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2013-06-01

    The Extreme Energy Events Project is an experiment for the detection of Extensive Air Showers which exploits the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber technology. At the moment 40 EEE muon telescopes, distributed all over the Italian territory, are taking data, allowing the relative analysis to produce the first interesting results, which are reported here. Moreover, this Project has a strong added value thanks to its effectiveness in terms of scientific communication, which derives from the peculiar way it was planned and carried on.

  20. Wabash River coal gasification repowering project -- first year operation experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troxclair, E.J. [Destec Energy, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Stultz, J. [PSI Energy, Inc., West Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project (WRCGRP), a joint venture between Destec Energy, Inc. and PSI Energy, Inc., began commercial operation in November of 1995. The Project, selected by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Clean Coal Program (Round IV) represents the largest operating coal gasification combined cycle plant in the world. This Demonstration Project has allowed PSI Energy to repower a 1950`s vintage steam turbine and install a new syngas fired combustion turbine to provide 262 MW (net) of electricity in a clean, efficient manner in a commercial utility setting while utilizing locally mined high sulfur Indiana bituminous coal. In doing so, the Project is also demonstrating some novel technology while advancing the commercialization of integrated coal gasification combined cycle technology. This paper discusses the first year operation experience of the Wabash Project, focusing on the progress towards achievement of the demonstration objectives.

  1. Wrinkle Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be providing your cosmetic treatment UV photography shows hidden sun damage Wrinkle remedies Children For kids About ... Publications Connect With Us Contact Us Media contacts Advertising contacts AAD logo Advertising, marketing and sponsorships Legal ...

  2. Developing an integrated project plan for the preparation of a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanston, B.

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of project planning is to develop a formalized baseline project plan that is used during project execution to track and monitor project performance. The baseline project plan developed under the guidelines presented in this paper integrates the technical scope, schedule, and budget so that the objectives of the project can be accomplished. During project execution, performance data are collected and measured against this baseline project plan. When performance varies from the plan, timely actions can be taken to alleviate potential problems. Thus, effective performance measurement is ultimately a function of the quality of the baseline project plan. When viewed in this light, the importance of a quality baseline project plan cannot be overemphasized.

  3. Electrodialytic Remediation of Copper Mine Tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.K.; Rojo, A.; Ottosen, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    This work compares and evaluates sixteen electrodialytic laboratory remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. Different parameters were analysed, such as remediation time, addition of desorbing agents, and the use of pulsed electrical fields.......This work compares and evaluates sixteen electrodialytic laboratory remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. Different parameters were analysed, such as remediation time, addition of desorbing agents, and the use of pulsed electrical fields....

  4. Transfer of Physical and Hydraulic Properties Databases to the Hanford Environmental Information System - PNNL Remediation Decision Support Project, Task 1, Activity 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Middleton, Lisa A.

    2009-03-31

    This report documents the requirements for transferring physical and hydraulic property data compiled by PNNL into the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) Project is managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support Hanford Site waste management and remedial action decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy and one of their current site contractors - CH2M-Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The objective of Task 1, Activity 6 of the RDS project is to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for sediments from the Hanford Site, to port these data into the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS), and to make the data web-accessible to anyone on the Hanford Local Area Network via the so-called Virtual Library.1 These physical and hydraulic property data are used to estimate parameters for analytical and numerical flow and transport models that are used for site risk assessments and evaluation of remedial action alternatives. In past years efforts were made by RDS project staff to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for Hanford sediments and to transfer these data into SoilVision{reg_sign}, a commercial geotechnical software package designed for storing, analyzing, and manipulating soils data. Although SoilVision{reg_sign} has proven to be useful, its access and use restrictions have been recognized as a limitation to the effective use of the physical and hydraulic property databases by the broader group of potential users involved in Hanford waste site issues. In order to make these data more widely available and useable, a decision was made to port them to HEIS and to make them web-accessible via a Virtual Library module. In FY08 the original objectives of this activity on the RDS project were to: (1) ensure traceability and defensibility of all physical and hydraulic property data currently residing in the SoilVision{reg_sign} database

  5. [Patient experiences and patient centeredness : The website project DIPEx Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuning, Martina; Lucius-Hoene, Gabriele; Burbaum, Christina; Himmel, Wolfgang; Bengel, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Patient centeredness is a central concept in the treatment and rehabilitation of persons with chronic illness in Germany. There are various concepts of and approaches to patient centeredness, most of them developed from the perspective of health care research and the institutions. In terms of participation requirements, there has been a lack of understanding of the patient's perspective and experiences so far. In this article, the authors assume that the collection and analysis of patient experiences can improve patient participation and provide access to the experience of living and coping with an illness, including the patient's interactions with the health care system, their participation, and their preferences for participation. Potential uses for and the limits and risks of utilizing patient experiences are discussed, using the example of the website project Krankheitserfahrungen.de (DIPEx Germany). The project collects patient experiences in the form of narrative interviews. In the course of sharing their stories, the speakers become experts on their own lives and describe where and how they feel engaged in their health care and how they wish to become further engaged, thereby experiencing participation in terms of the International Classification of Functioning. The experience of rehabilitation is viewed in a comprehensive manner for those affected. It is not limited to experiences in specific institutions, but rather, the patient experience includes the context and processes, and describes how patients can find their way back to their lives after the interruption of an illness.

  6. Enhancing the Student Learning Experience in Software Engineering Project Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maira; Ochoa, Sergio F.; Bastarrica, Maria Cecilia; Gutierrez, Francisco J.

    2018-01-01

    Carrying out real-world software projects in their academic studies helps students to understand what they will face in industry, and to experience first-hand the challenges involved when working collaboratively. Most of the instructional strategies used to help students take advantage of these activities focus on supporting agile programming,…

  7. The "Tesoros" Literacy Project: An Experiment in Democratic Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStigter, Todd

    1998-01-01

    Narrates effects of a 10-week literacy project, a collaboration between Latino English-as-a-Second-Language students and at-risk Anglo counterparts in a rural high school in the upper midwest. Highlights "treasures" of their experience as they gather to read Spanish- and English-language literature, to write stories and poems, and to…

  8. Beginning the Program. Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experiences Program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connett, Jane; And Others

    Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experience Program) was developed to improve the behavior and attitudes of secondary students in schools where dropouts, absenteeism, and poor attitudes are existing problems. The open classroom with student involvement and participation in goal setting, presentation, and evaluation is the basic concept of…

  9. Residential combustion venting failure. A systems approach. Final technical report. Project 5: Remedial measures for wood-burning fireplaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This report is a review of remedial measures available for avoiding or correcting combustion venting problems in wood-burning fireplaces and included on account of field tests of airtight doors with direct air supply and of a fireplace spillage advisor. It appeared that properly designed, truly airtight doors are effective in isolating fireplaces from the house indoor pressure regime and that this remedial measure does not affect the fire safety of the fireplace. It was also found that the detection of smoke particles was effective when the fire was hot and flaming, but not during the smoldering stage of the fire; on the other hand, the detection of carbon monoxide was not effective during the hot and flaming stage, but was effective during the smoldering stage. It is, therefore, necessary, for a fireplace spillage advisor to incorporate both technologies. The design and optimum location of a fireplace spillage advisor are discussed. A list of fires due to burning solid fuel in British Columbia during the year of 1985 in given, together with their assumed causes. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Electrodialytic remediation of solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Karlsmose, Bodil

    1996-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation of heavy metal polluted solid waste is a method that combines the technique of electrodialysis with the electromigration of ions in the solid waste. Results of laboratory scale remediation experiments of soil are presented and considerations are given on how to secure...

  11. Students’ Team Project Experiences and Their Attitudes Towards Teamwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Rudawska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the influence of team project experiences of students (presence and role of a leader; fairness in team projects; conditions supporting teamwork created by a university on their attitudes towards teamwork, especially the perception of teamwork effectiveness and the preference of working in teams. Methodology: In the study the quantitative research was done among master degree Polish students of Management (105 questionnaires. The measures used for the study were developed specifcally for the study referring to the previous research in the feld. Findings: Results indicate that leaders in team projects and conditions supporting teamwork are connected with the students’ perception of teamwork effectiveness, while the fairness in team projects is connected with students’ preference of working collectively. Research implications: We conclude that in order to develop a positive attitude towards teamwork, the teamwork projects should be better supported by the instructors (especially supporting the emergence of leader(s and minimising the problem of free riders and the university should create a climate that facilitates teamworking, otherwise team projects might negatively influence students’ attitude towards collective work. Value: On the labour market the teamwork skills are one of the most important skills of employees, as the team-based organizational designs are becoming the norm in work organization. The study is contributing to the understanding of the relations between student experiences and their attitudes as well as the role played by high education in the development of these attitudes. Some previous research in Anglo-Saxon culture countries indicate that team project assignments realised by students during studies might even hinder their attitudes to teamwork and their willingness to work in teams in the future.

  12. Woodbridge research facility remedial investigation/feasibility study. Sampling and analysis plan vol 1: Field sampling plan vol II: Quality assurance project plan. Addendum 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisbeck, D.; Thompson, P.; Williams, T.; Ehlers, M.; Eliass, M.

    1996-09-01

    U.S. Army Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) was used in the past as a major military communications center and a research and development laboratory where electromagnetic pulse energy was tested on military and other equipment. WRF is presently an inactive facility pursuant to the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure list. Past investigation activities indicate that polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) are the primary chemicals of concern. This task calls for provision of the necessary staff and equipment to provide remedial investigation/feasibility study support for the USAEC BRAC Program investigation at WRF. This Sampling and Analysis Plan, Addendum 1, Field Sampling Plan presents the sample location and rationale for additional samples required to complete the RI/FS; and the Quality Assurance Project Plan presents any additional data quality objectives and proposed laboratory methods for chemical analysis of samples.

  13. Student experiences with an international public health exchange project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, Kim A; Richardson, Eileen; Aarts, Clara; Campbell, Barbara; Hemmingway, Ann; Koskinen, Liisa; Mitchell, Maureen P; Nordstrom, Pam

    2009-01-01

    With growing interconnectivity of healthcare systems worldwide and increased immigration, inappropriate cultural and role assumptions are often seen when cultures clash within a country or when there is practice across country boundaries in times of disaster and during international travel. To increase students' multicultural awareness and work experiences abroad, the authors describe a 7-school, 5-country international student exchange project. The authors also share the students' evaluations of their experiences as they are challenged to erase boundaries and embrace nursing across countries. Participating faculty describe the process, challenges, and keys to success found in creating and living this international project. Students involved in the exchange process evaluate the learning opportunities and challenges and the joy of coming together as newfound colleagues and friends.

  14. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  15. Sustainable assessment of learning experiences based on projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio TRAVERSO RIBÓN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In a project-based learning experience, the detailed monitoring of the activities in which team members participate can be useful to evaluate their work. Using learning-oriented assessment procedures, supervisors can assess the teamwork abilities with a formative purpose. Evaluation strategies such as self-assessment, peer assessment and co-assessment are often used to make evaluation formative and sustainable. Conducting an assessment strategy is not easy for team members, since they need before to have a reasonable understanding of the evaluation process and criteria. This paper describes a learning-oriented evaluation methodology and an open data framework that can be applied to collaborative project settings. An evaluation rubric and a series of indicators that provide evidences about the developed skills have been elaborated and applied in a small-scale project-based course. Projects were managed and developed with the help of an open source software forge that contains a ticketing tool for planning and tracking of tasks, a version control repository to save the software outcomes, and using a wiki to host text deliverables. The experience provides evidences in favor of using the assessment method and open data framework to make teamwork evaluation more sustainable.

  16. Debriefing in Laboratory Experiences: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihos, Jill; Pollard, Loreen; Bazin, Moira; Lozza, Denaine; MacDonald, Penny; Moniz, Nadine; Spies, Dorothy

    The purpose of this project was to explore (a) how nursing students regarded debriefing sessions at the end of a laboratory skills class and (b) the cognitive, affective, and social learning outcomes of debriefing sessions. Survey questionnaires were administered to 378 prelicensure nursing students after their nursing skills laboratory class that included a debriefing session. Most students either agreed or strongly agreed that debriefing facilitated the discussion about their experience and reflection on learning.

  17. Data acquisition and experiment control system of the project Maus (materials science experiments under weightlessness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensch, D.

    In the context of Spacelab and Shuttle utilization, it is possible to conduct experiments in 'Small Self Contained Packages' (SSCP). This possibility exists primarily for experiments related to materials research/industrial processing engineering. The program involved is called 'get away special' (GAS). The project Maus was established in West Germany with the aim to participate in the program GAS. The autonomous design of the considered experiments made it necessary to develop an electronic unit for the control and the automatic conduction of the experiment. In addition, the process of the acquisition and the recording of the experimental data is also controlled.

  18. Students’ Lived Experience of Project-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Ferianda

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by personal experiences during the study time in the Graduate Program in English Language Studies (ELS Sanata Dharma University Yogyakarta, this research focused mainly on investigating the ELS students’ lived experience of project-based learning implemented by the ELS lecturers. This study employed hermeneutic phenomenology since it described and interpreted the meanings of ELS students lived experience. The participants of this study were the three ELS students considered to be illuminating from the three different streams batch of 2015. In this study we used one-on-one in depth interview to gain the data. The findings of this study consisted of four prefigured meanings and two emergent meanings namely a authentic learning, b learner autonomy, c cooperative learning, d multiple intelligences, e understanding others, and f personal development. The findings of this study gave implications not only to the ELS students and lecturers, but also to the audience. Lastly, recommendations were also addressed to the ELS students as their habit formation, to the ELS lecturers as their inputs to give more feedbacks to their students, and to the future researchers. Keywords: Lived experience, project-based learning.

  19. Radiation safety during remediation of the SevRAO facilities: 10 years of regulatory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, M K; Shandala, N; Kiselev, S; Simakov, A; Titov, A; Seregin, V; Kryuchkov, V; Shcheblanov, V; Bogdanova, L; Grachev, M; Smith, G M

    2015-09-01

    In compliance with the fundamentals of the government's policy in the field of nuclear and radiation safety approved by the President of the Russian Federation, Russia has developed a national program for decommissioning of its nuclear legacy. Under this program, the State Atomic Energy Corporation 'Rosatom' is carrying out remediation of a Site for Temporary Storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste (RW) at Andreeva Bay located in Northwest Russia. The short term plan includes implementation of the most critical stage of remediation, which involves the recovery of SNF from what have historically been poorly maintained storage facilities. SNF and RW are stored in non-standard conditions in tanks designed in some cases for other purposes. It is planned to transport recovered SNF to PA 'Mayak' in the southern Urals. This article analyses the current state of the radiation safety supervision of workers and the public in terms of the regulatory preparedness to implement effective supervision of radiation safety during radiation-hazardous operations. It presents the results of long-term radiation monitoring, which serve as informative indicators of the effectiveness of the site remediation and describes the evolving radiation situation. The state of radiation protection and health care service support for emergency preparedness is characterized by the need to further study the issues of the regulator-operator interactions to prevent and mitigate consequences of a radiological accident at the facility. Having in mind the continuing intensification of practical management activities related to SNF and RW in the whole of northwest Russia, it is reasonable to coordinate the activities of the supervision bodies within a strategic master plan. Arrangements for this master plan are discussed, including a proposed programme of actions to enhance the regulatory supervision in order to support accelerated mitigation of threats related to the nuclear legacy in the

  20. Large-scale Experiments As A Tool For The Development of An Enhanced Remediation Technology With Thermal Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiester, U.; Theurer, T.; Winkler, A.; Koschitzky, H.-P.; Färber, A.

    The "cold"soil vapour extraction (SVE) is a state-of-the-art technology to remove volatile non- aqueous phase liquids from the unsaturated zone. This technology is most efficient for contaminants with low boiling points and soils with high to medium permeability. To increase phase transition from liquid to gas, thermal enhancement has been developed. Temperatures greater than 100oC are required to vaporize contami- nants with low vapour pressures in low permeable soils. This means, such that steam injection is inadequate. Thermal wells are the alternative remediation option.

  1. The Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Michael [Fermilab

    2014-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a new, far-reaching initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division to drive the future of computing services for experiments at FNAL and elsewhere. It is a collaborative effort between computing professionals and experiment scientists to produce an end-to-end, fully integrated set of services for computing on the grid and clouds, managing data, accessing databases, and collaborating within experiments. FIFE includes 1) easy to use job submission services for processing physics tasks on the Open Science Grid and elsewhere, 2) an extensive data management system for managing local and remote caches, cataloging, querying, moving, and tracking the use of data, 3) custom and generic database applications for calibrations, beam information, and other purposes, 4) collaboration tools including an electronic log book, speakers bureau database, and experiment membership database. All of these aspects will be discussed in detail. FIFE sets the direction of computing at Fermilab experiments now and in the future, and therefore is a major driver in the design of computing services worldwide.

  2. Experiment Software and Projects on the Web with VISPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, M.; Fischer, B.; Fischer, R.; Geiser, E.; Glaser, C.; Müller, G.; Rieger, M.; Urban, M.; von Cube, R. F.; Welling, C.

    2017-10-01

    The Visual Physics Analysis (VISPA) project defines a toolbox for accessing software via the web. It is based on latest web technologies and provides a powerful extension mechanism that enables to interface a wide range of applications. Beyond basic applications such as a code editor, a file browser, or a terminal, it meets the demands of sophisticated experiment-specific use cases that focus on physics data analyses and typically require a high degree of interactivity. As an example, we developed a data inspector that is capable of browsing interactively through event content of several data formats, e.g., MiniAOD which is utilized by the CMS collaboration. The VISPA extension mechanism can also be used to embed external web-based applications that benefit from dynamic allocation of user-defined computing resources via SSH. For example, by wrapping the JSROOT project, ROOT files located on any remote machine can be inspected directly through a VISPA server instance. We introduced domains that combine groups of users and role-based permissions. Thereby, tailored projects are enabled, e.g. for teaching where access to student’s homework is restricted to a team of tutors, or for experiment-specific data that may only be accessible for members of the collaboration. We present the extension mechanism including corresponding applications and give an outlook onto the new permission system.

  3. Status Report on Transfer of Physical and Hydraulic Properties Databases to the Hanford Environmental Information System - PNNL Remediation Decision Support Project, Task 1, Activity 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Middleton, Lisa A.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2009-06-30

    This document provides a status report on efforts to transfer physical and hydraulic property data from PNNL to CHPRC for incorporation into HEIS. The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) Project is managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support Hanford Site waste management and remedial action decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy and their contractors. The objective of Task 1, Activity 6 of the RDS project is to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for sediments from the Hanford Site, to port these data into the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS), and to make the data web-accessible to anyone on the Hanford Local Area Network via the so-called Virtual Library. These physical and hydraulic property data are used to estimate parameters for analytical and numerical flow and transport models that are used for site risk assessments and evaluation of remedial action alternatives. In past years efforts were made by RDS project staff to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for Hanford sediments and to transfer these data into SoilVision{reg_sign}, a commercial geotechnical software package designed for storing, analyzing, and manipulating soils data. Although SoilVision{reg_sign} has proven to be useful, its access and use restrictions have been recognized as a limitation to the effective use of the physical and hydraulic property databases by the broader group of potential users involved in Hanford waste site issues. In order to make these data more widely available and useable, a decision was made to port them to HEIS and to make them web-accessible via a Virtual Library module. In FY08 the original objectives of this activity on the RDS project were to: (1) ensure traceability and defensibility of all physical and hydraulic property data currently residing in the SoilVision{reg_sign} database maintained by PNNL, (2) transfer the physical and hydraulic property data from the Microsoft

  4. Explore the solar system! 25 great projects, activities, experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Yasuda, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Explore the Solar System! 25 Great Projects, Activities, Experiments introduces kids ages 6-9 to the planets, moons, and other celestial bodies that surround our star, the sun, as well as the universe beyond. Combining a hands-on element with history and science, kids investigate solar eclipses, phases of the moon, Jupiter's rings, and what astronauts wear. Who named the stars? What is the Milky Way? Why is there night? By combining a hands-on element with riddles, jokes, fun facts, and comic cartoons, kids Explore the Solar System!, and have a blast along the way.

  5. Status of the AFP project in the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taševský, Marek

    2015-04-01

    Status of the AFP project in the ATLAS experiment is summarized. The AFP system is composed of a tracker to detect intact, diffractively scattered protons, and of a time-of-flight detector serving to suppress background from pile-up interactions. The whole system, located around 210 m from the main ATLAS detector, is placed in Roman Pots which move detectors from and to the incident proton beams. A typical distance of the closest approach of the tracker to these beams is 2-3 mm. The main physics motivation lies in measuring diffractive processes in runs with not a very high amount of pile-up.

  6. Status of the AFP project in the ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taševský, Marek [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-10

    Status of the AFP project in the ATLAS experiment is summarized. The AFP system is composed of a tracker to detect intact, diffractively scattered protons, and of a time-of-flight detector serving to suppress background from pile-up interactions. The whole system, located around 210 m from the main ATLAS detector, is placed in Roman Pots which move detectors from and to the incident proton beams. A typical distance of the closest approach of the tracker to these beams is 2–3 mm. The main physics motivation lies in measuring diffractive processes in runs with not a very high amount of pile-up.

  7. Status of the AFP project in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tasevsky, Marek; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Status of the AFP project in the ATLAS experiment is summarized. The AFP system is composed of a tracker to detect intact, diffractively scattered protons, and of a time-of-flight detector serving to suppress background from pile-up interactions. The whole system, located around 210~m from the main ATLAS detector, is placed in Roman Pots which move detectors from and to the incident proton beams. A typical distance of the closest approach of the tracker to these beams is 2--3~mm. The main physics motivation lies in measuring diffractive processes in runs with not a very high amount of pile-up.

  8. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (Project FALSIRE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney-Walker, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes the recently completed Phase I of the Project for Fracture Analysis of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (Project FALSIRE). Project FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of Principal Working Group No. 3 (PWG/3) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)/Nuclear Energy Agency`s (NEA`s) Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI). Motivation for the project was derived from recognition by the CSNI-PWG/3 that inconsistencies were being revealed in predictive capabilities of a variety of fracture assessment methods, especially in ductile fracture applications. As a consequence, the CSNI/FAG was formed to evaluate fracture prediction capabilities currently used in safety assessments of nuclear components. Members are from laboratories and research organizations in Western Europe, Japan, and the United States of America (USA). On behalf of the CSNI/FAG, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen--und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS), Koeln, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) had responsibility for organization arrangements related to Project FALSIRE. The group is chaired by H. Schulz from GRS, Koeln, FRG.

  9. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-04-01

    The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. One of these alternatives is the proposed action. These alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies because the PEIS is a planning document only. It assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. This PEIS differs substantially from a site-specific environmental impact statement because multiple ground water compliance strategies, each with its own set of potential impacts, could be used to implement all the alternatives except the no action alternative. In a traditional environmental impact statement, an impacts analysis leads directly to the defined alternatives. The impacts analysis for implementing alternatives in this PEIS first involves evaluating a ground water compliance strategy or strategies, the use of which will result in site-specific impacts. This PEIS impacts analysis assesses only the potential impacts of the various ground water compliance strategies, then relates them to the alternatives to provide a comparison of impacts.

  10. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1985-09-01

    This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

  11. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

  12. Integrating Passive Sampling Methods into Management of Contaminated Sediment Sites: A Guide for Department of Defense Remedial Project Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    equilibrium is reached. Danny Reible, Texas Tech University Experience: Health and Safety Considerations For deeper waters , many passive sampling...Toxic Pollutants Total Maximum Daily Loads. Prepared by California Regional Water Quality Board Los Angeles Region and U.S. Environmental Protection...Were Used to Guide Water Quality and Sediment Management Decisions ............................................................. 49 LIST OF

  13. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek remedial action project, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has three major operating facilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee: the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed by Lockheed Martin Environmental Research Corporation. All facilities are managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (Energy Systems) for the DOE. The Y-12 Plant is adjacent to the city of Oak Ridge and is also upstream from Oak Ridge along East Fork Poplar Creek. The portion of the creek downstream from the Y-12 Plant is Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC). This project will remove mercury-contaminated soils from the LEFPC floodplain, transport the soils to Industrial Landfill V (ILF-V), and restore any affected areas. This project contains areas that were designated in 1989 as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. The site includes DOE property and portions of commercial, residential, agricultural, and miscellaneous areas within the city of Oak Ridge.

  14. Data System Architectures: Recent Experiences from Data Intensive Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, G.; Frame, M. T.; Boden, T.; Devarakonda, R.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Latysh, N.; Krassovski, M.; Killeffer, T.; Hook, L.

    2014-12-01

    U.S. Federal agencies are frequently trying to address new data intensive projects that require next generation of data system architectures. This presentation will focus on two new such architectures: USGS's Science Data Catalog (SDC) and DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments - Arctic Data System. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a Science Data Catalog (data.usgs.gov) to include records describing datasets, data collections, and observational or remotely-sensed data. The system was built using service oriented architecture and allows USGS scientists and data providers to create and register their data using either a standards-based metadata creation form or simply to register their already-created metadata records with the USGS SDC Dashboard. This dashboard then compiles the harvested metadata records and sends them to the post processing and indexing service using the JSON format. The post processing service, with the help of various ontologies and other geo-spatial validation services, auto-enhances these harvested metadata records and creates a Lucene index using the Solr enterprise search platform. Ultimately, metadata is made available via the SDC search interface. DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments (NGEE) Arctic project deployed a data system that allows scientists to prepare, publish, archive, and distribute data from field collections, lab experiments, sensors, and simulated modal outputs. This architecture includes a metadata registration form, data uploading and sharing tool, a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) tool, a Drupal based content management tool (http://ngee-arctic.ornl.gov), and a data search and access tool based on ORNL's Mercury software (http://mercury.ornl.gov). The team also developed Web-metric tools and a data ingest service to visualize geo-spatial and temporal observations.

  15. Ecotoxicity testing and environmental risk assessment of iron nanomaterials for sub-surface remediation - Recommendations from the FP7 project NanoRem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Rune; Coutris, Claire; Nguyen, Nhung H A; Sevcu, Alena; Gallego-Urrea, Juliàn Alberto; Baun, Anders; Joner, Erik J

    2017-09-01

    Nanoremediation with iron (Fe) nanomaterials opens new doors for treating contaminated soil and groundwater, but is also accompanied by new potential risks as large quantities of engineered nanomaterials are introduced into the environment. In this study, we have assessed the ecotoxicity of four engineered Fe nanomaterials, specifically, Nano-Goethite, Trap-Ox Fe-zeolites, Carbo-Iron® and FerMEG12, developed within the European FP7 project NanoRem for sub-surface remediation towards a test battery consisting of eight ecotoxicity tests on bacteria (V. fisheri, E. coli), algae (P. subcapitata, Chlamydomonas sp.), crustaceans (D. magna), worms (E. fetida, L. variegatus) and plants (R. sativus, L. multiflorum). The tested materials are commercially available and include Fe oxide and nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI), but also hybrid products with Fe loaded into a matrix. All but one material, a ball milled nZVI (FerMEG12), showed no toxicity in the test battery when tested in concentrations up to 100 mg/L, which is the cutoff for hazard labeling in chemicals regulation in Europe. However it should be noted that Fe nanomaterials proved challenging to test adequately due to their turbidity, aggregation and sedimentation behavior in aqueous media. This paper provides a number of recommendations concerning future testing of Fe nanomaterials and discusses environmental risk assessment considerations related to these. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The message and the experience of the site project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, E. V.; Karnik, K. S.

    The Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE) was a unique effort aimed at studying the possibilities of satellite broadcasting for education and national development. This one-year joint India-USA project was carried out in 1975-1976 using the ATS-6 spacecraft. This paper briefly describes the experiment and its major findings. It goes on to distill the learning experiences derived from SITE and analyses the extent to which these have influenced the design and configuration of India's domestic satellite system, INSAT. INSAT-1B, which will serve as a replacement for the short-lived INSAT-1A, will be launched shortly and will be operational by the end of 1983. Its payload includes two S-band TV transponders capable of broadcasting directly to augmented TV sets. The paper examines which lessons of SITE are being applied in the planning and operationalisation of the TV system and discusses why others are not being taken account of. Major issues confronting TV system planners in developing countries like India are highlighted and the possible role of satellite broadcasting discussed in this context. The paper concludes by outlining an "ideal scenario" for a large, multilingual country like India, towards which TV planners could attempt to strive.

  17. Electrokinetic remediation of copper mine tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Rojo, Adrián; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2007-01-01

    in similar experiments but without the bipolar electrodes. The new electrokinetic remediation design was tested on copper mine tailings with different applied electric fields, remediation times and pre-treatment. The results showed that the copper removal was increased from 8% (applying 20V for 8 days...... in sulphuric acidified tailings) without bipolar electrodes to 42% when bipolar electrodes were implemented. Furthermore, the results showed that in this system sulphuric acid addition prior to remediation was better than citric acid addition. In addition, applying a too strong electric field (even......Important process parameters to optimize in electrokinetic soil remediation are those influencing remediation time and power consumption since these directly affect the cost of a remediation action. This work shows how the electrokinetic remediation (EKR) process could be improved by implementing...

  18. Automatic Tools for Enhancing the Collaborative Experience in Large Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourilkov, D.; Rodriquez, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    With the explosion of big data in many fields, the efficient management of knowledge about all aspects of the data analysis gains in importance. A key feature of collaboration in large scale projects is keeping a log of what is being done and how - for private use, reuse, and for sharing selected parts with collaborators and peers, often distributed geographically on an increasingly global scale. Even better if the log is automatically created on the fly while the scientist or software developer is working in a habitual way, without the need for extra efforts. This saves time and enables a team to do more with the same resources. The CODESH - COllaborative DEvelopment SHell - and CAVES - Collaborative Analysis Versioning Environment System projects address this problem in a novel way. They build on the concepts of virtual states and transitions to enhance the collaborative experience by providing automatic persistent virtual logbooks. CAVES is designed for sessions of distributed data analysis using the popular ROOT framework, while CODESH generalizes the approach for any type of work on the command line in typical UNIX shells like bash or tcsh. Repositories of sessions can be configured dynamically to record and make available the knowledge accumulated in the course of a scientific or software endeavor. Access can be controlled to define logbooks of private sessions or sessions shared within or between collaborating groups. A typical use case is building working scalable systems for analysis of Petascale volumes of data as encountered in the LHC experiments. Our approach is general enough to find applications in many fields.

  19. Time projection chambers for the T2K experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Dean; T2K/TPC Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    The T2K experiment will study neutrino oscillation properties by directing a high intensity neutrino beam produced at J-PARC in Tokai, Japan, towards the large super-Kamiokande detector located 295 km away, in Kamioka, Japan. The experiment includes a sophisticated near detector complex, 280 m downstream of the neutrino production target. A key element of the near detectors is the ND280 tracker consisting of two active scintillator-bar target systems surrounded by three large time projection chambers (TPCs) for charged particle tracking. The tracker will provide high statistics samples for studying charged current neutrino interaction rates and kinematics prior to oscillation, so as to better understand backgrounds in the far detector. The tracker is surrounded by the UA1/Nomad dipole magnet and the TPCs will measure the charge, momentum, particle type (through ionization energy loss in the gas) of particles passing through them. Novel features of these TPCs include the rectangular box design, constructed from composite panels, the use of bulk micromegas detectors for gas amplification, electronics readout based on a new ASIC, and a photoelectron calibration system. This paper describes the design and construction of the TPCs, the readout electronics, the gas handling system and shows the performance of a completed TPC as deduced from measurements with particle beams, cosmic rays, and the calibration system.

  20. Remediation of Uranium in the Hanford Vadose Zone Using Ammonia Gas: FY 2010 Laboratory-Scale Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Zhong, Lirong; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Mark D.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Zheming; Bargar, John; Faurie, Danielle K.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2010-12-01

    This investigation is focused on refining an in situ technology for vadose zone remediation of uranium by the addition of ammonia (NH3) gas. Objectives are to: a) refine the technique of ammonia gas treatment of low water content sediments to minimize uranium mobility by changing uranium surface phases (or coat surface phases), b) identify the geochemical changes in uranium surface phases during ammonia gas treatment, c) identify broader geochemical changes that occur in sediment during ammonia gas treatment, and d) predict and test injection of ammonia gas for intermediate-scale systems to identify process interactions that occur at a larger scale and could impact field scale implementation.Overall, NH3 gas treatment of low-water content sediments appears quite effective at decreasing aqueous, adsorbed uranium concentrations. The NH3 gas treatment is also fairly effective for decreasing the mobility of U-carbonate coprecipitates, but shows mixed success for U present in Na-boltwoodite. There are some changes in U-carbonate surface phases that were identified by surface phase analysis, but no changes observed for Na-boltwoodite. It is likely that dissolution of sediment minerals (predominantly montmorillonite, muscovite, kaolinite) under the alkaline conditions created and subsequent precipitation as the pH returns to natural conditions coat some of the uranium surface phases, although a greater understanding of these processes is needed to predict the long term impact on uranium mobility. Injection of NH3 gas into sediments at low water content (1% to 16% water content) can effectively treat a large area without water addition, so there is little uranium mobilization (i.e., transport over cm or larger scale) during the injection phase.

  1. Flash for Biological Dosimetry Experiments- A BEXUS 16 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigge, K.; Cermak, D.; Schuberg, V.; Guerin, E. A.; Blessenohl, M. A.; Passenberg, F.; Bach, M.; Hausmann, M.; Hildenbrand, G.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of low dose radiation on living organisms are still topic of current research and radiation protection. Complex compound radiation, such as of cosmic origin, is of special interest, since it is of pivotal significance for human space flight and, in the long run, cancer research. Fluid LAb in the StratospHere (FLASH) is a Heidelberg University student project that transported specimens of living cells of human origin into the stratosphere to investigate the effects of cosmic radiation on the 3D chromatin nanostructure of their genome. Since, owing to its complexity, cosmic radiation is extremely difficult to replicate on the ground, the FLASH project took part in the BEXUS (Balloon Experiments for University Students) program of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) to use a balloon to get better access to cosmic radiation over several hours. To keep the cells alive and allow for in-flight fixation after given radiation exposure times in order to prevent restorative processes, a compact and fully automated fluid lab suited for low-pressure environments was designed and built. Challenges included fluid exchange of specimen buffers and temperature control, as well as low-budget insulating mounting. After the flight, the specimens fixed during the flight were subjected to further analysis. After antibody labeling specific against heterochromatin, Spectral Precision Distance Microscopy (SPDM) (an embodiment of super-resolution localization microscopy) was used, which is a new approach for the sensitive detection and analysis of structure modifying irradiation effects on organisms. This technique allows light resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. Preliminary evaluation of the data indicated reasonable differences in chromatin conformation compared to control specimen data.

  2. Justification of remediation strategies in the long term after the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesenko, S; Jacob, P; Ulanovsky, A; Chupov, A; Bogdevich, I; Sanzharova, N; Kashparov, V; Panov, A; Zhuchenka, Yu

    2013-05-01

    Following the accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl a number of different remedial actions were developed and implemented in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. Recommendations on the application of countermeasures and remedial actions were published by the IAEA as "Guidelines for agricultural countermeasures following an accidental release of radionuclides" in 1994. Since then, new information on the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment and effectiveness of countermeasures in the long term has been obtained and reviewed by many projects, including the Chernobyl Forum. Additionally, new approaches to derive remediation strategies were developed and successfully implemented in the most affected countries. This paper describes a justification of the remediation strategies suggested for rehabilitation of the areas most affected by the Chernobyl accident based on this experience. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrating Project Management, Product Design with Industry Sponsored Projects provides Stimulating Senior Capstone Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip A. Sanger

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract ¾ Many students are uncomfortable with real world engineering problems where needs and requirements must be concretely defined and the selection of design solutions is not black and white. This paper describes a two semester, multi-disciplinary senior capstone project for students from three Engineering and Technology Department programs (electrical engineering, electrical and computer engineering technology, and engineering technology that brings together the tools of project management and the creative product development process into industry sponsored projects.  The projects are fully integrated with the Center for Rapid Product Realization with its dual goals of economic development and enhanced learning.  The stage/gate development process is used with six formal reviews covering the development of the proposal through to the fabrication and testing of the project’s output.  Over the past four years thirty five (35 projects have been undertaken with students getting an exciting

  4. Nanotechnology for Site Remediation: Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet presents a snapshot of nanotechnology and its current uses in remediation. It presents information to help site project managers understand the potential applications of this group of technologies at their sites.

  5. Learning from project experiences using a legacy-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.; Majchrzak, Ann; Faraj, Samer

    2005-01-01

    As project teams become used more widely, the question of how to capitalize on the knowledge learned in project teams remains an open issue. Using previous research on shared cognition in groups, an approach to promoting post-project learning was developed. This Legacy Review concept was tested on four in tact project teams. The results from those test sessions were used to develop a model of team learning via group cognitive processes. The model and supporting propositions are presented.

  6. Student Views of Class Projects as Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Beth A.; Evans, Beverly

    2014-01-01

    Group projects have long been an important element of higher education classes. Class projects involve additional cooperation and coordination among students. Student perceptions are an important factor in evaluating the effectiveness of projects. This exploratory study used a 39-item questionnaire to examine undergraduate student perceptions of…

  7. The Time Projection Chamber of the HARP Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lundborg, A

    2002-01-01

    The hadron production experiment HARP aims to measure hadron collision cross sections with a 2-15 GeV particle beam and several targets. This energy regime is in a borderline zone between the low energy region dominated by resonance formation and the high energy domain where perturbative Quantum Chromo Dynamics is applicable. The emphasis of this master thesis is put on the HARP central tracker, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). In the thesis work, Finite Element Method computations of the electric field in critical regions of the TPC have been performed to provide design input concerning the electrostatic configuration of the field cages and of the wire chamber. A first step in the chain of reconstruction of the information produced by the detector is the equalisation and monitoring of about 4000 analogue signals. An algorithm that processes the raw digitised signals, filters out electronics noise and extracts the pad gain from signal distributions has been produced and analysed for this purpose. The algori...

  8. New IAEA guidelines on environmental remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesenko, Sergey [International Atomic Energy Agency, A2444, Seibersdorf (Austria); Howard, Brenda [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, LA1 4AP, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Kashparov, Valery [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology, 08162, 7, Mashinobudivnykiv str., Chabany, Kyivo-Svyatoshin region, Kyiv (Ukraine); Sanzharova, Natalie [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Russian Federation, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Vidal, Miquel [Analytical Chemistry Department-Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    dimensions including radiological, economic, social and environmental aspects. The system of criteria used for evaluating management options, including effectiveness and technical feasibility economic cost, waste generation, social and ethical issues, side effects and factors constraining application are discussed. Rather than a comprehensive analysis of remedial options, the new document gives selected information, describe key issues that are relevant to their implementation based on practical experience, and provide some guidance of their usefulness as part of a remediation strategy. Basic mechanisms behind the effectiveness of most of management options are also described. The document provides recommendations on remediation planning, optimising remediation strategies and available tools for decision making on remediation of different environments. The document specifically collates, and summarises, recent activities relevant to remediation conducted under the auspices of the IAEA, but also refers to relevant studies conducted elsewhere. The text thus capitalises on the knowledge and expertise gained by the many experts involved. In common with previous IAEA documents on remediation, much of the document is relevant for many other situations which may need to be remediated. (authors)

  9. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  10. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Holzer-Popp

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI project Aerosol_cci (2010–2013, algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1 a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2 a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3 a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008 of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun

  11. The Pedotopia Project: A Transdisciplinary Experiment in Soil Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toland, A.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    In the absence of every-day interactions with the land, a hands-on, comprehensive soil education across disciplines and ages is necessary. Soil education is usually integrated into earth science and geography curricula and only rarely into social science, arts and humanities programs. Furthermore, an emphasis on measurement and modeling in conventional classroom science often neglects aesthetic, moral and other non-quantifiable values, precluding a broader cultural context in which soil education could take place. The arts play a vital role in communicating environmental issues to the greater public and represent a dynamic approach to help students discover soil complexity in new and unexpected ways. Artistic methods have recently been introduced as pedagogical tools in soil awareness-raising programs for children and youth. Painting with soil has become an interesting new approach to soil education from Kindergarten to University levels (SZLEZAK 2008). And a growing amount of literature describes artists who have undertaken different soil issues, suggesting that such artistic focus may improve wider understanding and appreciation of soil conservation issues (FELLER et al 2010, TOLAND & WESSOLEK 2010, WAGNER 2002). How can art contribute to soil science, policy and education - both with the aim of generating greater public understanding, but also by honing creative methods to confront problems such as contamination, erosion, and urban sprawl? What artistic approaches exist to protect and restore soils as well as our relationship to the land? And how can these approaches support current soil education goals? These questions were addressed in the transdisciplinary soil seminar, "Pedotopia - Re-sourcing Urban Soils" from September 2010 to September 2011 in Berlin. A cooperation between the Technical University of Berlin's Department of Soil Protection and the Berlin University of Arts' Institute for Art in Context, the project served as a teaching experiment as well

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  13. Assessing sustainable remediation frameworks using sustainability principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridsdale, D Reanne; Noble, Bram F

    2016-12-15

    The remediation industry has grown exponentially in recent decades. International organizations of practitioners and remediation experts have developed several frameworks for integrating sustainability into remediation projects; however, there has been limited attention to how sustainability is approached and operationalized in sustainable remediation frameworks and practices - or whether sustainability plays any meaningful role at all in sustainable remediation. This paper examines how sustainability is represented in remediation frameworks and the guidance provided for practical application. Seven broad sustainability principles and review criteria are proposed and applied to a sample of six international remediation frameworks. Not all review criteria were equally satisfied and none of the frameworks fully met all criteria; however, the best performing frameworks were those identified as sustainability remediation frameworks. Intra-generational equity was addressed by all frameworks. Integrating social, economic and biophysical components beyond triple-bottom-line indicators was explicitly addressed only by the sustainable remediation frameworks. No frameworks provided principle- or rule-based guidance for dealing with trade-offs in sustainability decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Using scenarios for dissemination - Experiences from the IMS GLOBEMEN project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollus, Martin; Hartel, Ingo; Tølle, Martin

    2002-01-01

    in the field and contributions from the project. Based upon a generic Virtual Enterprise Reference Architecture (called VERA) the partners in the project have developed a set of protypes to be implemeted in their own business processes. The results will be illutrated in one integrated scenario....

  15. An Applied Project-Driven Approach to Undergraduate Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karls, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper I will outline the process I have developed for conducting applied mathematics research with undergraduates and give some examples of the projects we have worked on. Several of these projects have led to refereed publications that could be used to illustrate topics taught in the undergraduate curriculum.

  16. New Zealand Teachers Respond to the "National Writing Project" Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Terry; Whitehead, David; Dix, Stephanie; Cawkwell, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on early data from a two-year project (2009-11) being undertaken in the New Zealand context by the authors entitled: "Teachers as Writers: Transforming Professional Identity and Classroom Practice". Based on the National Writing Project in the USA (and in New Zealand in the 1980s) its hypothesis is that when teachers…

  17. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, volume 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Michelson, D.C.; Turmer, G.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 604 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the ninth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Subsections for sections 1, 2, 5, and 6 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at (615) 576-0568 or FTS 626-0568.

  18. Integrated project management information systems: the French nuclear industry experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquin, J.-C.; Caupin, G.-M.

    1990-03-01

    The article discusses the desirability of integrated project management systems within the French nuclear power industry. Change in demand for nuclear generation facilities over the last two decades has necessitated a change of policy concerning organization, cost and planning within the industry. Large corporate systems can benefit from integrating equipment and bulk materials tracking. Project management for the nuclear industry will, in future, need to incorporate computer aided design tools and project management information systems data bases as well as equipment and planning data. (UK).

  19. Conditions, factors and criteria for successful project implementation: generalization of experience of project management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feraru Galina Sergeevna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article addresses issues characterizing features of project management contributing to their competitive advantage; shows the factors and criteria of success of projects and the main reasons for their failures, making the failed efforts of developers to create projects.

  20. Health Education Field Experience Stories: A Reflective, Digital, Performance-Based Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyde, Adrian R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a reflective, systematic, performance-based project resulting in the development of a digital story about a community health education field experience. The project is designed for preservice health education students at the college/university level. The primary benefit of the project is that it challenges students to engage…

  1. Researchers' experiences, positive and negative, in integrative landscape projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tress, B.; Tress, G.; Fry, G.

    2005-01-01

    Integrative (interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary) landscape research projects are becoming increasingly common. As a result, researchers are spending a larger proportion of their professional careers doing integrative work, participating in shifting interdisciplinary teams, and cooperating

  2. Ecological benefits of contaminated sediment remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarull, Michael A; Hartig, John H; Krantzberg, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Contaminated sediment has been identified as a source of ecological impacts in marine and freshwater systems throughout the world, and the importance of the contaminated sediment management issue continues to increase in all industrialized countries. In many areas, dredging or removal of sediments contaminated with nutrients, metals, oxygen-demanding substances, and persistent toxic organic chemicals has been employed as a form of environmental remediation. In most situations, however, the documentation of the sediment problem has not been quantitatively coupled to ecological impairments. In addition, the lack of long-term, postactivity research and monitoring for most projects has impeded a better understanding of the ecological significance of sediment contamination. Establishing quantitatively the ecological significance of sediment-associated contamination in any area is a difficult time- and resource-consuming exercise. It is, however, absolutely essential that it be done. Such documentation will likely be used as the justification for remedial and rehabilitative action(s) and also as the rationale for proposing when intervention is necessary in one place but not another. Bounding the degree of ecological impact (at least semiquantitatively) provides for realistic expectations for improvement if sediment remediation is to be pursued. It should also provide essential information on linkages that could be used in rehabilitating other ecosystem components such as fish or wildlife habitat. The lack of information coupling contaminated sediment to specific ecological impairments has, in many instances, precluded a clear estimate of how much sediment requires action to be taken, why, and what improvements can be expected to existing impairment(s) over time. Also, it has likely resulted in either a delay in remedial action or abandonment of the option altogether. A clear understanding of ecological links not only provides adequate justification for a cleanup program

  3. MANAGING CONFLICT IN ENGINEERING PROJECTS: NEW ZEALAND EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Naismith

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a wealth of knowledge concerning conflict management and its resolution in the workplace, however there is a dearth of information relating to conflict management and its resolution in engineering project management. This paper set out to examine the reality of conflict management in engineering project management in New Zealand. This was achieved through a review of credible literature sources and the completion of a pilot study to gain subject matter expert perspectives. The research suggests that conflicts can be destructive, resulting in anxiety and strong emotional responses leading to reflexive reactions including avoidance, aggression, fight, hostility and a breakdown in communications and relationships. Findings indicate that managing a project structure is synonymous with handling conflict and these disagreements can be detrimental to the success of a project. The initial results suggest that a number of factors act as drivers of conflict in engineering projects in New Zealand. These drivers are: power, personality, group dynamics and organisation culture. The conflict resolution tools cited as being widely used for engineering projects are collaboration and negotiation. The paper also offers recommendations for future research.

  4. Teaching as Improvisational Experience: Student Music Teachers' Reflections on Learning during an Intercultural Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Heidi; Partti, Heidi; Karlsen, Sidsel

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative instrumental case study explores Finnish student music teachers' experiences of teaching and learning as participants in an intercultural project in Cambodia. The Multicultural Music University project aimed at increasing master's level music education students' intercultural competencies by providing experiences of teaching and…

  5. Theme-Based Project Learning: Design and Application of Convergent Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Man-Seog; Kang, Kwang Il; Kim, Young H.; Kim, Young Mee

    2015-01-01

    This case study aims to verify the benefits of theme-based project learning for convergent science experiments. The study explores the possibilities of enhancing creative, integrated and collaborative teaching and learning abilities in science-gifted education. A convergent project-based science experiment program of physics, chemistry and biology…

  6. Computational Experiment Study on Selection Mechanism of Project Delivery Method Based on Complex Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Project delivery planning is a key stage used by the project owner (or project investor for organizing design, construction, and other operations in a construction project. The main task in this stage is to select an appropriate project delivery method. In order to analyze different factors affecting the PDM selection, this paper establishes a multiagent model mainly to show how project complexity, governance strength, and market environment affect the project owner’s decision on PDM. Experiment results show that project owner usually choose Design-Build method when the project is very complex within a certain range. Besides, this paper points out that Design-Build method will be the prior choice when the potential contractors develop quickly. This paper provides the owners with methods and suggestions in terms of showing how the factors affect PDM selection, and it may improve the project performance.

  7. Experiments on domain adaptation for patent machine translation in the PLuTO project

    OpenAIRE

    Ceausu, Alexandru; Tinsley, John; Zhang, Jian; Way, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The PLUTO1 project (Patent Language Translations Online) aims to provide a rapid solution for the online retrieval and translation of patent documents through the integration of a number of existing state-of-the-art components provided by the project partners. The paper presents some of the experiments on patent domain adaptation of the Machine Translation (MT) systems used in the PLuTO project. The experiments use the International Patent Classification for domain adaptation and are foc...

  8. Topical Day on Site Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, H. [ed.

    1996-09-18

    Ongoing activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre relating to site remediation and restoration are summarized. Special attention has been paid to the different phases of remediation including characterization, impact assessment, evaluation of remediation actions, and execution of remediation actions.

  9. Screening of variable importance for optimizing electrodialytic remediation of heavy metals from polluted harbour sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kristine B.; Lejon, Tore; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Using multivariate design and modelling, the optimal conditions for electrodialytic remediation (EDR) of heavy metals were determined for polluted harbour sediments from Hammerfest harbour located in the geographic Arctic region of Norway. The comparative importance of the variables, current...... density, remediation time, light/no light, the liquid-solid ratio and stirring rate of the sediment suspension, was determined in 15 laboratory-scale EDR experiments by projection to latent structures (PLS). The relation between the X matrix (experimental variables) and the Y matrix (removal efficiencies...

  10. CSI flight experiment projects of the Naval Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Shalom

    1993-02-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is involved in an active program of CSI flight experiments. The first CSI flight experiment of the Naval Research Laboratory, the Low Power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) dynamics experiment, has successfully measured vibrations of an orbiting satellite with a ground-based laser radar. The observations, made on January 7, 8 and 10, 1991, represent the first ever measurements of this type. In the tests, a narrowband heterodyne CO2 laser radar, operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, detected vibration induced differential-Doppler signatures of the LACE satellite. Power spectral densities of forced oscillations and modal frequencies and damping rates of free-damped vibrations were obtained and compared with finite element structural models of the LACE system. Another manifested flight experiment is the Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX) designed to demonstrate active and passive damping with piezo-electric (PZT) sensors and actuators. This experiment was developed under the management of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory with integration of the experiment at NRL. It is to ride as a secondary, or 'piggyback,' experiment on a future Navy satellite.

  11. Enabling the publication of practice based experiences and projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dewing

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to a new issue of the IPDJ. Although the journal team is already working on our next issue – a special issue with an in-depth analysis of the caring system in Norway led by colleagues in Bergen at the Western Norway University of Applied Sciences – we are taking a pause to reflect on this issue and to acknowledge its rich vein of contents. The variety of the articles we publish in each issue never ceases to amaze me. Some submissions come in from previously unknown sources, as is the way with most academic journals. Others originate from emails sent by authors asking whether the IPDJ might be interested in a particular topic or project. Then, there are those that come via the members of the International Practice Development Collaborative (IPDC and the IPDJ editorial board. In addition, our editorial board members are expected to submit an article every two years – not too arduous, you might think, but time passes quickly and the board members, like other authors, have other publishing obligations to meet. As the journal’s academic editor and a practice developer, focused on person-centred processes and outcomes, it is a highlight of my role to see someone who has sent their first tentative email enquiring about the possibility of publication then going on to be published. I like to imagine the joy this brings to the novice authors, their family and colleagues. In this issue, for example, I am especially delighted that one of Queen Margaret University’s final year BSc nursing students is being published. A great time in one’s career to achieve a first publication, and something I would never have considered when I was a student nurse. Indeed, I can recall being seriously deterred from publishing by receiving quite unfriendly and hostile reviews as I began my own journey of writing for publication. One review is etched in my memory for all the wrong reasons; this reviewer told me I could not write and should not bother trying

  12. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1987-09-01

    The 553 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eighth in a series of reports. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Management, Technical Measurements Center, and General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations.

  13. Experience Report: Introducing Kanban Into Automotive Software Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Majchrzak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The boundaries between traditional and agile approach methods are disappearing. A significant number of software projects require a continuous implementation of tasks without dividing them into sprints or strict project phases. Customers expect more flexibility and responsiveness from software vendors in response to the ever-changing business environment. To achieve better results in this field, Capgemini has begun using the Lean philosophy and Kanban techniques. \\\\The following article illustrates examples of different uses of Kanban and the main stakeholder of the process. The article presents the main advantages of transparency and ways to improve the customer co-operation as well as stakeholder relationships. The Authors try to visualise all of the elements in the context of the project. \\\\There is also a discussion of different approaches in two software projects. The article fokuses on the main challenges and the evolutionary approach used. An attempt is made to answer the question how to convince both the team as well as the customer, and how to optimise ways to achieve great results.

  14. Re-Envisioning the Honors Senior Project: Experience as Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Kevin; Cureton, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    One of the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program is that it creates opportunities for undergraduate research, opportunities that frequently culminate in a senior thesis or capstone project. This article describes how the University of Texas at Arlington Honors College integrated…

  15. Influencing citizen behavior: experiences from multichannel marketing pilot projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wijngaert, Lidwien; Pieterson, Willem Jan; Teerling, Marije L.

    2011-01-01

    Information technology allows national and local governments to satisfy the needs of citizens in a cost effective way. Unfortunately, citizens still tend to prefer traditional, more costly channels, such as the front desk, phone and mail. Through pilot projects government agencies attempt to

  16. The Effectiveness of Peer Tutoring in Remedying Misconceptions of Operating System Concepts: A Design-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakiroglu, Ünal; Öngöz, Sakine

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to examine students' experiences on collaborative work with peer tutoring in projects. The study also focused impact of peer tutoring on remedying misconceptions. The study was conducted in the context of an operating system course in which 30 pre-service ICT teachers are the participants. Data were gathered from pre-tests,…

  17. Experience and Methodology gained from 4 years of Student Satellite Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten; Bhanderi, Dan

    2005-01-01

    The AAU Cubesat student satellite project at Aalborg University was initiated in September 2001 and led to the launch of the satellite on the 30th of June 2003 with a “Rockot” rocket from Plesetsk in Russia. The satellite survived three months in orbit and based on the experiences gained the next...... student satellite project was commenced called AAUSAT II which is due for launch early 2006. This paper presents the experiences gained and lessons learned from the work with student satellite projects at Aalborg University as well as the methodology used to manage these projects. First an introduction...... to the concept of student satellite projects is given and the two student satellite projects are introduced. Then an introduction and description of the Problem Based Learning concept used at Aalborg University is given and advantages of applying it to these projects are discussed. The benets of student...

  18. The New Small Wheel Upgrade Project of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070368; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest phase 1 upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19. The NSWs consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), both providing trigger and tracking capabilities, for a total active surface of more than 2500 m2. It represents the first system with such a large size based on Micro Pattern (Micromegas) and wire detectors (sTGC). The technological novelties and the expected performance of the NSW system is discussed. The status of the project and the plan for the completion is summarized.

  19. Sandia photovoltaic systems definition and application experiment projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G.

    1983-04-01

    A compilation is given of the abstracts and visual material used in presentation at the Fourth Photovoltaic Systems Definition and Applications Projects Integration Meeting held at the Marriott Hotel, April 12-14, 1983, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The meeting provided a forum for detailed analyses on recently completed and current activities. These activities include systems research, balance-of-system technology development, residential experimentation, and evaluation of intermediate-sized applications.

  20. Experiences with Codes and Standards for the Arnhem SOFC Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerwen, Rob J.F. van; Veer, Jan H.C. van der [KEMA Power Generation and Sustainables PO-Box 9035. NL-6800 ET Arnhem (Netherlands); Kuipers, Joop [Antiloopstraat 79, NL-6531 TL Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    By the end of 1994, a group of Danish and Dutch utilities agreed with Westinghouse (now Siemens-Westinghouse) upon the delivery of a 100 kWe Solid Oxide Fuel Cell unit. Identifying applicable codes and standards for the SOFC system was considered part of the learning process and was done after the contract was signed. This has proven to be a viable procedure, despite the fact that it took a lot of discussion (and time) to come to an agreement. This demonstration project has taught which codes and standards for this new and promising technology are applicable and which should be established. (author)

  1. UNESCO Chemistry Teaching Project in Asia: Experiments on Nuclear Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabanandana, Salag

    This teacher's guide on nuclear science is divided into two parts. The first part is a discussion of some of the concepts in nuclear chemistry including radioactivity, types of disintegration, radioactive decay and growth, and tracer techniques. The relevant experiments involving the use of radioisotopes are presented in the second part. The…

  2. Power-Efficient Computing: Experiences from the COSA Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cesini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption is today one of the most relevant issues in operating HPC systems for scientific applications. The use of unconventional computing systems is therefore of great interest for several scientific communities looking for a better tradeoff between time-to-solution and energy-to-solution. In this context, the performance assessment of processors with a high ratio of performance per watt is necessary to understand how to realize energy-efficient computing systems for scientific applications, using this class of processors. Computing On SOC Architecture (COSA is a three-year project (2015–2017 funded by the Scientific Commission V of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN, which aims to investigate the performance and the total cost of ownership offered by computing systems based on commodity low-power Systems on Chip (SoCs and high energy-efficient systems based on GP-GPUs. In this work, we present the results of the project analyzing the performance of several scientific applications on several GPU- and SoC-based systems. We also describe the methodology we have used to measure energy performance and the tools we have implemented to monitor the power drained by applications while running.

  3. Conducting Closed Habitation Experiments: Experience from the Lunar Mars Life Support Test Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Edeen, Marybeth A.; Henninger, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    The Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project (LMLSTP) was conducted from 1995 through 1997 at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) to demonstrate increasingly longer duration operation of integrated, closed-loop life support systems that employed biological and physicochemical techniques for water recycling, waste processing, air revitalization, thermal control, and food production. An analog environment for long-duration human space travel, the conditions of isolation and confinement also enabled studies of human factors, medical sciences (both physiology and psychology) and crew training. Four tests were conducted, Phases I, II, IIa and III, with durations of 15, 30, 60 and 91 days, respectively. The first phase focused on biological air regeneration, using wheat to generate enough oxygen for one experimental subject. The systems demonstrated in the later phases were increasingly complex and interdependent, and provided life support for four crew members. The tests were conducted using two human-rated, atmospherically-closed test chambers, the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC) and the Integrated Life Support Systems Test Facility (ILSSTF). Systems included test articles (the life support hardware under evaluation), human accommodations (living quarters, kitchen, exercise equipment, etc.) and facility systems (emergency matrix system, power, cooling, etc.). The test team was managed by a lead engineer and a test director, and included test article engineers responsible for specific systems, subsystems or test articles, test conductors, facility engineers, chamber operators and engineering technicians, medical and safety officers, and science experimenters. A crew selection committee, comprised of psychologists, engineers and managers involved in the test, evaluated male and female volunteers who applied to be test subjects. Selection was based on the skills mix anticipated for each particular test, and utilized

  4. Projected sensitivity of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Arnquist, I.; Baker, W.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cartaro, C.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fritts, M.; Gerbier, G.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hong, Z.; Hoppe, E.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Iyer, V.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kubik, A.; Kurinsky, N. A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Poudel, S.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Roberts, A.; Robinson, A. E.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Serfass, B.; Speller, D.; Stein, M.; Street, J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Villano, A. N.; von Krosigk, B.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, X.

    2017-04-07

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB will be a next-generation experiment aimed at directly detecting low-mass (< 10 GeV/c$^2$) particles that may constitute dark matter by using cryogenic detectors of two types (HV and iZIP) and two target materials (germanium and silicon). The experiment is being designed with an initial sensitivity to nuclear recoil cross sections ~ 1 x 10$^{-43}$ cm$^2$ for a dark matter particle mass of 1 GeV/c$^2$, and with capacity to continue exploration to both smaller masses and better sensitivities. The phonon sensitivity of the HV detectors will be sufficient to detect nuclear recoils from sub-GeV dark matter. A detailed calibration of the detector response to low energy recoils will be needed to optimize running conditions of the HV detectors and to interpret their data for dark matter searches. Low-activity shielding, and the depth of SNOLAB, will reduce most backgrounds, but cosmogenically produced $^{3}$H and naturally occurring $^{32}$Si will be present in the detectors at some level. Even if these backgrounds are x10 higher than expected, the science reach of the HV detectors would be over three orders of magnitude beyond current results for a dark matter mass of 1 GeV/c$^2$. The iZIP detectors are relatively insensitive to variations in detector response and backgrounds, and will provide better sensitivity for dark matter particle masses (> 5 GeV/c$^2$). The mix of detector types (HV and iZIP), and targets (germanium and silicon), planned for the experiment, as well as flexibility in how the detectors are operated, will allow us to maximize the low-mass reach, and understand the backgrounds that the experiment will encounter. Upgrades to the experiment, perhaps with a variety of ultra-low-background cryogenic detectors, will extend dark matter sensitivity down to the "neutrino floor", where coherent scatters of solar neutrinos become a limiting background.

  5. LINKING UNIVERSITY IN THE INTERCULTURAL MODEL OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN MEXICO. THE EXPERIENCE OF A PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe González Ortiz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It describes an experience of linking with the indigenous community. From that Project we are building the blocks of the substantive activity of university: the university extension

  6. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers for Dark Matter and Neutrino Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Manenti, L

    2016-01-01

    This thesis illustrates the contribution of the author to experiments using liquid argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPCs), a technology already widely used, that is becoming the dominating detection technique in dark matter (DM) and neutrino searches.

  7. TPC status for MPD experiment of NICA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averyanov, A.; Bazhazhin, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Chepurnov, V. V.; Cheremukhina, G.; Chernenko, S.; Fateev, O.; Kiriushin, Yu.; Kolesnikov, A.; Korotkova, A.; Levchanovsky, F.; Lukstins, J.; Movchan, S.; Pilyar, A.; Razin, S.; Ribakov, A.; Samsonov, V.; Vereschagin, S.; Zanevsky, Yu.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zruev, V.

    2017-06-01

    In a frame of the JINR scientific program on study of hot and dense baryonic matter a new accelerator complex Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) based on the Nuclotron-M is under realization. It will operate at luminosity up to 1027 cm-2s-1 for Au79+ ions. Two interaction points are foreseen at NICA for two detectors which will operate simultaneously. One of these detectors, the Multi-Purpose Detector (MPD), is optimized for investigations of heavy-ion collisions. The Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main tracking detector of the MPD central barrel. It is a well-known detector for 3-dimensional tracking and particle identification for high multiplicity events. The conceptual layout of MPD and detailed description of the design and main working parameters of TPC, the readout system based on MWPC and readout electronics as well as the TPC subsystems and tooling for assembling and integration TPC into MPD are presented.

  8. [The construction of a Project in adolescent maternity: an experience report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Maria Isabel Ruiz; de Freitas, Marildy Aparecida; Dupas, Giselle; Fabbro, Márcia Regina Cangiani; Ruggiero, Eliete Maria Scarfon

    2011-04-01

    This article reports on the experience of a group of nursing faculty on the development of a project aimed at adolescent maternity with a view to prevent unwanted pregnancies. An additional proposal of the referred project is guiding adolescent mothers in terms of self-care, care with their babies, and encouraging exclusive breastfeeding. This would reduce the difficulties that those young mothers experience and, therefore, contribute with the maternal-child area.

  9. Projected sensitivity of the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Arnquist, I.; Baker, W.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cartaro, C.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fritts, M.; Gerbier, G.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hong, Z.; Hoppe, E.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Iyer, V.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kubik, A.; Kurinsky, N. A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Poudel, S.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Roberts, A.; Robinson, A. E.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Serfass, B.; Speller, D.; Stein, M.; Street, J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Villano, A. N.; von Krosigk, B.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, X.

    2017-04-01

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB will be a next-generation experiment aimed at directly detecting low-mass particles (with masses ≤ 10 GeV/c^2) that may constitute dark matter by using cryogenic detectors of two types (HV and iZIP) and two target materials (germanium and silicon). The experiment is being designed with an initial sensitivity to nuclear recoil cross sections ~1×10^-43 cm^2 for a dark matter particle mass of 1 GeV/c^2, and with capacity to continue exploration to both smaller masses and better sensitivities. The phonon sensitivity of the HV detectors will be sufficient to detect nuclear recoils from sub-GeV dark matter. A detailed calibration of the detector response to low-energy recoils will be needed to optimize running conditions of the HV detectors and to interpret their data for dark matter searches. Low-activity shielding, and the depth of SNOLAB, will reduce most backgrounds, but cosmogenically produced H-3 and naturally occurring Si-32 will be present in the detectors at some level. Even if these backgrounds are 10 times higher than expected, the science reach of the HV detectors would be over 3 orders of magnitude beyond current results for a dark matter mass of 1 GeV/c^2. The iZIP detectors are relatively insensitive to variations in detector response and backgrounds, and will provide better sensitivity for dark matter particles with masses ≳5 GeV/c^2. The mix of detector types (HV and iZIP), and targets (germanium and silicon), planned for the experiment, as well as flexibility in how the detectors are operated, will allow us to maximize the low-mass reach, and understand the backgrounds that the experiment will encounter. Upgrades to the experiment, perhaps with a variety of ultra-low-background cryogenic detectors, will extend dark matter sensitivity down to the “neutrino floor,” where coherent scatters of solar neutrinos become a limiting background.

  10. Use of borehole radar reflection logging to monitor steam-enhanced remediation in fractured limestone-results of numerical modelling and a field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, C.; Joesten, P.K.; Lane, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar is an efficient geophysical method for the detection and location of fractures and fracture zones in electrically resistive rocks. In this study, the use of down-hole (borehole) radar reflection logs to monitor the injection of steam in fractured rocks was tested as part of a field-scale, steam-enhanced remediation pilot study conducted at a fractured limestone quarry contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons at the former Loring Air Force Base, Limestone, Maine, USA. In support of the pilot study, borehole radar reflection logs were collected three times (before, during, and near the end of steam injection) using broadband 100 MHz electric dipole antennas. Numerical modelling was performed to predict the effect of heating on radar-frequency electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity, attenuation, and fracture reflectivity. The modelling results indicate that EM wave velocity and attenuation change substantially if heating increases the electrical conductivity of the limestone matrix. Furthermore, the net effect of heat-induced variations in fracture-fluid dielectric properties on average medium velocity is insignificant because the expected total fracture porosity is low. In contrast, changes in fracture fluid electrical conductivity can have a significant effect on EM wave attenuation and fracture reflectivity. Total replacement of water by steam in a fracture decreases fracture reflectivity of a factor of 10 and induces a change in reflected wave polarity. Based on the numerical modelling results, a reflection amplitude analysis method was developed to delineate fractures where steam has displaced water. Radar reflection logs collected during the three acquisition periods were analysed in the frequency domain to determine if steam had replaced water in the fractures (after normalizing the logs to compensate for differences in antenna performance between logging runs). Analysis of the radar reflection logs from a borehole where the temperature

  11. [Neurophenomenology: Project for a Science of Past Experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia-Cuellar, Andrés

    2012-09-01

    Since the middle of 20(th) Century, cognitive science has been recognized as the genuine convergence field for all scientific advances in human mind studies with the mechanisms enabling knowledge. Since then, it has become a multidisciplinary area where several research disciplines and actors have acquired citizenship, allowing new expectations on the scientific study of human uniqueness. Critical assessment of the discussion that the discourse of theoretical biology has been assuming regarding the study of the cognitive phenomenon with special attention to the enactive project and, extensively, to the neuro-phenomenology of Francisco J. Varela. Starting with a brief and synthesized history of cognitive science, we will establish the key principles for understanding the emergence of the enactive paradigm and the "embodied" turn influenced by continental phenomenology in the cognitive science, as well as the general guidelines of Neurophenomenology. The "hard problem" of consciousness still faces several types of reductionism relegating the cognitive issue to a kind of merely rational, individual, abstract and disembodied mechanism, thus strengthening the functionalist paradigm in mind philosophy. A solution to classic dichotomies in mind sciences must start rejecting such assumptions. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Experiences of technology-rich innovation in European schools within the Open Discovery Space project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia PEINADO

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Open Discovery Space (ODS project was conceived to introduce innovative resource-based teaching and learning practices in European schools, to promote the creation of communities between European school members and to boost the demand for open educational resources among teachers. After 3 years of applying the ODS innovation model, more than 2,000 European schools have carried out diverse experiences of technology-rich innovation to achieve the project aims. This paper describes the experiences and results of ODS in 7 different European countries, along with the international activities that aim at expanding the scope of the project beyond the European limits.

  13. Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2003-03-06

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  14. The Web Based Monitoring Project at the CMS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio [Fermilab; Badgett, William [Fermilab; Behrens, Ulf [DESY; Chakaberia, Irakli [Kansas State U.; Jo, Youngkwon [Korea U.; Maeshima, Kaori; Maruyama, Sho [Fermilab; Patrick, James [Fermilab; Rapsevicius, Valdas [Fermilab; Soha, Aron [Fermilab; Stankevicius, Mantas [Fermilab; Sulmanas, Balys [Fermilab; Toda, Sachiko [Kansas State U.; Wan, Zongru [Kansas State U.

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid is a large a complex general purpose experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), built and maintained by many collaborators from around the world. Efficient operation of the detector requires widespread and timely access to a broad range of monitoring and status information. To the end the Web Based Monitoring (WBM) system was developed to present data to users located anywhere from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging systems to relational databases. This system provides the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimenters, including data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions, and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user’s side. This paper describes the WBM system architecture and describes how the system has been used from the beginning of data taking until now (Run1 and Run 2).

  15. The Web Based Monitoring project at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Badgett, William; Behrens, Ulf; Chakaberia, Irakli; Jo, Youngkwon; Maruyama, Sho; Patrick, James; Rapsevicius, Valdas; Soha, Aron; Stankevicius, Mantas; Sulmanas, Balys; Toda, Sachiko; Wan, Zongru

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid is a large a complex general purpose experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), built and maintained by many collaborators from around the world. Efficient operation of the detector requires widespread and timely access to a broad range of monitoring and status information. To the end the Web Based Monitoring (WBM) system was developed to present data to users located anywhere from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging systems to relational databases. This system provides the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimenters, including data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions, and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user’s side. This paper describes the WBM system architecture and describes how the system has been used from the beginning of data taking until now (Run1 and Run 2).

  16. Lidars for Wind Tunnels - an IRPWind Joint Experiment Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Vignaroli, Andrea; Angelou, Nikolas

    2017-01-01

    Measurement campaigns with continuous-wave Doppler Lidars (Light detection and ranging) developed at DTU Wind Energy in Denmark were performed in two very different wind tunnels. Firstly, a measurement campaign in a small icing wind tunnel chamber at VTT in Finland was performed with high frequency...... measurements for increasing the understanding of the effect of in-cloud icing conditions on Lidar signal dynamics. Secondly, a measurement campaign in the relatively large boundary-layer wind tunnel at NTNU in Norway was performed in the wake of a scaled test turbine in the same configuration as previously...... used in blind test comparisons for wind turbine wake modelers. These Lidar measurement activities constitute the Joint Experiment Project” L4WT - Lidars for Wind Tunnels, with applications to wakes and atmospheric icing in a prospective Nordic Network” with the aim of gaining and sharing knowledge...

  17. Innovative Startup-Projects: Experience, Evaluation, Implementation Contradictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inshakov Maksim Olegovich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Innovative companies in the conditions of global post-crisis economic recovery and increased economic activity become again a promising area for investments of large investment and venture capital funds, venture divisions of large transnational corporations, business angels and other private investors. This is confirmed by the data on the increase in the volume of venture capital market in the US and Europe and on a significant increase in the cost of the leading foreign and Russian start-up companies which are rated as of 2014 in the present article. The comparative analysis of the leading Russian and foreign start-ups showed the prevalence of companies engaged in the field of IT-Internet-Mobile and focused on the provision of various kinds of innovative services to consumers among the foreign participants of the rating. Among Russian startups-winners the companies of technological orientation (biological, medical, and “clean” technologies dominate. They reflect the increasing importance of start-ups in the innovative development of the Russian economy. Participation in such competitions and ratings is a favorable factor of promoting start-ups, increasing awareness of potential investors and consumers of start-up products. The importance of start-ups formation and the development of effective regional and national innovation systems update the studies related to the identification of the fundamental contradictions in the activities of Russian start-ups and to the development of recommendations for their resolution. The article identifies the key issues of economic, organizational, informational and marketing character causing the collapse of start-up projects in the Russian economy in modern conditions.

  18. Advances in Grid Computing for the FabrIc for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermialb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herner, K. [Fermilab; Alba Hernandex, A. F. [Fermilab; Bhat, S. [Fermilab; Box, D. [Fermilab; Boyd, J. [Fermilab; Di Benedetto, V. [Fermilab; Ding, P. [Fermilab; Dykstra, D. [Fermilab; Fattoruso, M. [Fermilab; Garzoglio, G. [Fermilab; Kirby, M. [Fermilab; Kreymer, A. [Fermilab; Levshina, T. [Fermilab; Mazzacane, A. [Fermilab; Mengel, M. [Fermilab; Mhashilkar, P. [Fermilab; Podstavkov, V. [Fermilab; Retzke, K. [Fermilab; Sharma, N. [Fermilab; Teheran, J. [Fermilab

    2016-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a major initiative within the Fermilab Scientic Computing Division charged with leading the computing model for Fermilab experiments. Work within the FIFE project creates close collaboration between experimenters and computing professionals to serve high-energy physics experiments of diering size, scope, and physics area. The FIFE project has worked to develop common tools for job submission, certicate management, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, robust data transfer, job monitoring, and databases for project tracking. Since the projects inception the experiments under the FIFE umbrella have signicantly matured, and present an increasingly complex list of requirements to service providers. To meet these requirements, the FIFE project has been involved in transitioning the Fermilab General Purpose Grid cluster to support a partitionable slot model, expanding the resources available to experiments via the Open Science Grid, assisting with commissioning dedicated high-throughput computing resources for individual experiments, supporting the eorts of the HEP Cloud projects to provision a variety of back end resources, including public clouds and high performance computers, and developing rapid onboarding procedures for new experiments and collaborations. The larger demands also require enhanced job monitoring tools, which the project has developed using such tools as ElasticSearch and Grafana. in helping experiments manage their large-scale production work ows. This group in turn requires a structured service to facilitate smooth management of experiment requests, which FIFE provides in the form of the Production Operations Management Service (POMS). POMS is designed to track and manage requests from the FIFE experiments to run particular work ows, and support troubleshooting and triage in case of problems. Recently a new certicate management infrastructure called Distributed

  19. Advances in Grid Computing for the Fabric for Frontier Experiments Project at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herner, K.; Alba Hernandez, A. F.; Bhat, S.; Box, D.; Boyd, J.; Di Benedetto, V.; Ding, P.; Dykstra, D.; Fattoruso, M.; Garzoglio, G.; Kirby, M.; Kreymer, A.; Levshina, T.; Mazzacane, A.; Mengel, M.; Mhashilkar, P.; Podstavkov, V.; Retzke, K.; Sharma, N.; Teheran, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Fabric for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is a major initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division charged with leading the computing model for Fermilab experiments. Work within the FIFE project creates close collaboration between experimenters and computing professionals to serve high-energy physics experiments of differing size, scope, and physics area. The FIFE project has worked to develop common tools for job submission, certificate management, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, robust data transfer, job monitoring, and databases for project tracking. Since the projects inception the experiments under the FIFE umbrella have significantly matured, and present an increasingly complex list of requirements to service providers. To meet these requirements, the FIFE project has been involved in transitioning the Fermilab General Purpose Grid cluster to support a partitionable slot model, expanding the resources available to experiments via the Open Science Grid, assisting with commissioning dedicated high-throughput computing resources for individual experiments, supporting the efforts of the HEP Cloud projects to provision a variety of back end resources, including public clouds and high performance computers, and developing rapid onboarding procedures for new experiments and collaborations. The larger demands also require enhanced job monitoring tools, which the project has developed using such tools as ElasticSearch and Grafana. in helping experiments manage their large-scale production workflows. This group in turn requires a structured service to facilitate smooth management of experiment requests, which FIFE provides in the form of the Production Operations Management Service (POMS). POMS is designed to track and manage requests from the FIFE experiments to run particular workflows, and support troubleshooting and triage in case of problems. Recently a new certificate management infrastructure called

  20. Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences and Views on Project-Based Learning Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dag, Funda; Durdu, Levent

    2017-01-01

    Project-based learning (PjBL) has been promoted as an effective and frequently used student-centered learning approach for various learning environments. To have various learning experiences with PjBL is an important requirement for pre-service teachers (PSTs). The purpose of the study was to investigate the experiences PSTs had with group work…

  1. The Corporeal Marker Project (CMP): Teaching about Bodily Difference, Identity and Place through Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluri, Jennifer L.; Trauger, Amy

    2011-01-01

    In response to recent articles and ideas for experiential learning activities in human geography, this paper outlines a particular approach to learning about the body, difference, mobility and geographic space through experience. The Corporeal Marker Project designed and implemented by the authors provides a spatial experience of difference for…

  2. Hypoxia and Nutrient Reduction in the Coastal Zone: Advice for Prevention, Remediation and Research.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Meryl Williams, M.; Harper, N.; Chaitovitz, C.; Dansie, A.; Diaz, R.; Harper, N.; Heidemeier, J.; Jiang, Y.; Kemp, M.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Neretin, L.; Ross, A.; Susan, C.; Schuster-Wallace, C.; Zavadksy, I.

    urgently increase their support to nutrient reduction projects, building on GEF’s experi- ence and leadership. Coastal hypoxia and its causes are multi-focal area issues. GEF-International Waters is the lead focal area but hypoxia also concerns... limited impact. Intervention areas should be selected based on their expected potential for preven- tion or remediation and progress should be monitored. GEF should establish principles for supporting priority systems in which to test management responses...

  3. Remedial Measures for Erroneous Environmental Policies: Assessing Infrastructure Projects of Waste-to-Energy Incineration in Taiwan with a Case Study of the Taitung Incinerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lih-Ren Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan, like many other countries, often incentivizes private investors to participate in the construction of infrastructures for environmental protection. The build-operate-transfer (BOT or build-operate-own (BOO model of financing public infrastructure was introduced to Taiwan in the 1990s. Among them, the construction of incinerators to treat the municipal solid waste using the BOT/BOO model was quite a success in the beginning. With the socio-technical change of lifestyle and waste generation, the amount of amount of trash dropped dramatically. The policy failed eventually, however, because the government over-estimated the trash quantity and refrained from inter-municipality cooperation to treat trash efficiently. This failure triggered a rash of intense debates and legal disputes. In the case of the Taitung incinerator, the 26th incinerator located in southeastern Taiwan, the arbitration resulted in the government making significant compensation payments to the private sector. The finished construction was consequently converted into a “mothballed and pensioned off” facility. This study applies in-depth interviews and literature review to discuss aspects contributing to the policy failure and proposes some possible remedial measures. Five aspects are summarized, namely, the administrative organization’s rigid attitude, the irrationality of the BOT/BOO contracts, the loss of the spirit of BOO partnerships, the heavy financial burden on local government, and the abandonment of inter-municipality cooperation. The remedial measures for the policy failure are presented in the form of thorough policy evaluation, room for contract adjustments under the BOT/BOO model, encouragement of cross-boundary cooperation, and revision of the legal framework for implementing decentralization.

  4. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-09-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

  5. Evaluation of community-based health projects: the healthy tomorrows experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch-Ross, Holly; Keller, David; Miller, Nicole; Bassewitz, Jane; Melinkovich, Paul

    2008-09-01

    To address the "millennial morbidities," pediatricians must partner with community-based organizations to develop interventions. Little is known about the capacity of the resulting programs for program evaluation or the importance of evaluation in project success and sustainability. The objective of this study was to examine the capacity of community-based health programs to conduct project evaluations and determine the impact of project evaluation on project outcome. Project directors from 149 community-based programs funded from 1989 to 2003 through the Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program were surveyed regarding their project experience with evaluation and documentation of project outcomes and the current status of their project. Program directors from 123 (83%) programs completed the survey. Despite barriers to the evaluation process, 83% of the respondents indicated that their evaluations produced useful information. Programs that were described by respondents as "well evaluated" were more likely to report that the evaluation was implemented as planned and that the evaluation included outcome measures. Projects were more likely to be sustained in their original form when at least 1 outcome was reported on the survey. Evaluation of community-based programs, although challenging, is beneficial to project success and sustainability. Policy makers and funding agencies should consider ways to encourage community partnerships to incorporate evaluation into their planning process.

  6. Environmental Remediation Data Management Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierowski, J. V.; Henry, L. G.; Dooley, D. A.

    2002-02-26

    Computer software tools for data management can improve site characterization, planning and execution of remediation projects. This paper discusses the use of two such products that have primarily been used within the nuclear power industry to enhance the capabilities of radiation protection department operations. Advances in digital imaging, web application development and programming technologies have made development of these tools possible. The Interactive Visual Tour System (IVTS) allows the user to easily create and maintain a comprehensive catalog containing digital pictures of the remediation site. Pictures can be cataloged in groups (termed ''tours'') that can be organized either chronologically or spatially. Spatial organization enables the user to ''walk around'' the site and view desired areas or components instantly. Each photo is linked to a map (floor plan, topographical map, elevation drawing, etc.) with graphics displaying the location on the map and any available tour/component links. Chronological organization enables the user to view the physical results of the remediation efforts over time. Local and remote management teams can view these pictures at any time and from any location. The Visual Survey Data System (VSDS) allows users to record survey and sample data directly on photos and/or maps of areas and/or components. As survey information is collected for each area, survey data trends can be reviewed for any repetitively measured location or component. All data is stored in a Quality Assurance (Q/A) records database with reference to its physical sampling point on the site as well as other information to support the final closeout report for the site. The ease of use of these web-based products has allowed nuclear power plant clients to plan outage work from their desktop and realize significant savings with respect to dose and cost. These same tools are invaluable for remediation and decommissioning

  7. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  8. Societal constraints related to environmental remediation and decommissioning programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, Tanja; Monken-Fernandes, Horst; Martell, Meritxell; Zeleznik, Nadja; O'Sullivan, Patrick

    2017-06-20

    The decisions related to decommissioning or environmental remediation projects (D/ER) cannot be isolated from the socio-political and cultural environment. Experiences of the IAEA Member States point out the importance of giving due attention to the societal aspects in project planning and implementation. The purpose of this paper is threefold: i) to systematically review societal constraints that some organisations in different IAEA Member States encounter when implementing D/ER programmes, ii) to identify different approaches to overcome these constraints and iii) to collect examples of existing practices related to the integration of societal aspects in D/ER programmes worldwide. The research was conducted in the context of the IAEA project Constraints to Decommissioning and Environmental Remediation (CIDER). The research results show that societal constraints arise mostly as a result of the different perceptions, attitudes, opinions and concerns of stakeholders towards the risks and benefits of D/ER programmes and due to the lack of stakeholder involvement in planning. There are different approaches to address these constraints, however all approaches have common points: early involvement, respect for different views, mutual understanding and learning. These results are relevant for all on-going and planned D/ER programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Midwifery students experience of teamwork projects involving mark-related peer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn R; Fahy, Kathleen M; Parratt, Jenny A; Grace, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Lack of teamwork skills among health care professionals endangers patients and enables workplace bullying. Individual teamwork skills are increasingly being assessed in the undergraduate health courses but rarely defined, made explicit or taught. To remedy these deficiencies we introduced a longitudinal educational strategy across all three years of the Bachelor of Midwifery program. To report on students' experiences of engaging in team based assignments which involved mark-related peer feedback. Stories of midwifery students' experiences were collected from 17 participants across the three years of the degree. These were transcribed and analysed thematically and interpreted using feminist collaborative conversations. Most participants reported being in well-functioning teams and enjoyed the experience; they spoke of 'we' and said 'Everyone was on Board'. Students in poorly functioning teams spoke of 'I' and 'they'. These students complained about the poor performance of others but they didn't speak up because they 'didn't want to make waves' and they didn't have the skills to be able to confidently manage conflict. All participants agreed 'Peer-related marks cause mayhem'. Teamwork skills should be specifically taught and assessed. These skills take time to develop. Students, therefore, should be engaged in a teamwork assignment in each semester of the entire program. Peer feedback should be moderated by the teacher and not directly related to marks. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Design of Electric Racing Vehicles: An experience of interdisciplinary project-based education in engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Ramos, José; Fernández-Lozano, Juan Jesús; Gago-Calderón, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a project based learning program carried out in the E.T.S.I.I. of the University of Malaga, Spain, whose main objective is the organization of a team for the development of experimental electric racing vehicles and their evaluation in competitive races. It is shown the work done during the first two years of the project, highlighting the most important aspects of the experience: the training focused on senior students (capstone courses), the training focused on freshmen (...

  11. Boosting critical thinking in a Project Management course: An active learning experience

    OpenAIRE

    Berbegal-Mirabent, Jasmina; Gil-Domènech, Dolors; Gieure, Clara

    2016-01-01

    [EN] The present study reports the experience of a project-based activity in which students are asked to plan an event. It is part of a Project Management course taught at Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, in a Masters’ Degree in Business Administration and Production Systems. The activity has been designed in such a way that it is expected to help students develop the acquired technical skills while it requires the use of different quantitative methods and tools to in...

  12. Final quality assurance project plan, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This quality assurance project plan describes relevant quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures to be used by Analytical Resources, Inc. for the installation restoration program at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  13. Final quality assurance project plan, installation restoration program remedial investigation/feasibility study, Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This quality assurance project plan describes relevant quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures to be used by Analytical Resources, Inc. for the installation restoration program at Kotzebue Long Range Radar Station, Alaska.

  14. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) project: an overview of its experience and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, N; Davis, A; Wilson, M; Wartman, S; Sherwood, R; Nowalk, A; Kahn, R; Bazell, C

    2001-04-01

    The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project was a competitive, seven-year demonstration project funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). It was established to determine whether specific interdisciplinary innovations in preclinical medical school curricula could affect students' selection of careers in family medicine, general internal medicine, or general pediatrics. Through collaboration among the three generalist disciplines, the IGC innovation exposed all preclinical students in ten demonstration schools to a new or significantly enhanced preclinical curriculum that included a direct supervised clinical experience with a generalist physician preceptor. The project was managed by an interdisciplinary executive committee that was codirected by one representative each from family medicine, general internal medicine, and general pediatrics. A national advisory committee with representation from the academic and professional organizations of family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, and osteopathy provided input to the executive committee in guiding the project. The project was externally evaluated. Major outcomes of the IGC Project include sustained curricular changes in ten institutions, prompted by relatively few dollars and demonstration of models for collaboration at institutional and national levels. This supplement describes the IGC Project's experience and outcomes so that others may draw pertinent information to apply to their own efforts in medical education.

  15. Land Conversion, Social Impacts, and Legal Remedies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Land Conversion, Social Impacts, and Legal Remedies: Understanding the Role of Community Paralegals in Addressing Impacts of Land Use Change in Asia. This project addresses the ... Six world-class research teams to investigate overcoming therapeutic resistance in high fatality cancers. The world-class research ...

  16. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-05

    This program plan establishes the framework for conduct of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and is specifically intended to support the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing firm contracts for waste immobilization.

  17. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Robert M; Didham, Raphael K; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L; Turner, Edgar C

    2011-11-27

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification.

  18. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Robert M.; Didham, Raphael K.; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D.; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L.; Turner, Edgar C.

    2011-01-01

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification. PMID:22006969

  19. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

    2007-09-10

    This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

  20. Science Experiments on File. Experiments, Demonstrations and Projects for School and Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Vicki, Ed.

    This book, addressed to students for their independent use as well as to teachers as a supplement to the standard texts, contains nearly 100 practical science experiments that cover a wide range of subjects at different grade and ability levels. It is designed to involve students in active scientific experimentation, demonstrations, and projects…

  1. Green Remediation: Best Management Practices for Excavation and Surface Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet is one of a series describing best management practices (BMPs) for green remediation, which holistically addresses a cleanup project's energy requirements, air emissions, impacts on water, impacts on land and ecosystems, material consumpt..

  2. Mold: Cleanup and Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Mold Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Mold Cleanup & Remediation Homeowner’s and Renter’s Guide to Mold ...

  3. PLEs in Primary School: The Learners' Experience in The PIPLEP Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Moreno de Diezmas, Esther; Dondarza Manzano, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the experience of learners during the first phase of the PIPLEP project is explored. PIPLEP is aimed at promoting digital literacy and independent learning with the creation of personal learning environments (PLEs) as the final product. The participants were a group of 17 students enrolled in year 5 of primary school, and the main…

  4. Experiences from Swedish demonstration projects with phosphoric acid fuel cells; Erfarenheter fraan svenska demonstrationsprojekt med fosforsyrabraensleceller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Per [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sarkoezi, Laszlo [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-10-01

    In Sweden, there are today two phosphoric acid fuel cells installed, one PC25A which have been in operation in more than 4 years, and one PC25C which have been in operation for two years. The aim with this project has been two compare operation characteristics, performance, and operation experiences for these two models.

  5. Rocket to Creativity: A Field Experience in Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Sharon F.; Bloom, Lisa A.; Doss, Kristy Kowalske

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the impact of a field experience in problem-based (PBL) and project-based learning (PjBL) on in-service teachers' conceptions of experiential learning. Participants had been enrolled in a hybrid class that included an online component in which they learned about PBL and PjBL, and an experiential component in which they…

  6. Innovative Experiential Learning Activities in Aging: The Experiences of Four BEL Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, Kristina M.; Poole, Jay; Floyd, Melissa; Moore, Crystal Dea; Rogers, Anissa T.; Tower, Leslie E.

    2017-01-01

    The BSW Experiential Learning (BEL) Program aims to infuse intergenerational content into the curriculum and recruit students to the field of social work by implementing face-to-face learning opportunities with older adults. This article discusses and compares the experiences of 4 diverse BEL projects that implemented gero-experiential learning…

  7. The "Real-World" Experience: Students' Perspectives on Service-Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify how students gain "real-world" experience via service-learning projects. This article describes the results of a pilot study conducted with over 75 business graduate students to investigate the effects of service-learning curriculum at the collegiate level. The following qualitative data was…

  8. An Undergraduate Mechatronics Project Class at Philadelphia University, Jordan: Methodology and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutunji, T. A.; Saleem, A.; Rabbo, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Mechatronics is a branch of engineering whose final product should involve mechanical movements controlled by smart electronics. The design and implementation of functional prototypes are an essential learning experience for the students in this field. In this paper, the guidelines for a successful mechatronics project class are presented,…

  9. A Guide for Implementing Project DEEP (Diversified Educational Experiences Program). Administrator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connett, Jane; Swanson, Monty

    The guide is designed to provide the building level administrator a step by step model for implementing Project DEEP's (Diversified Educational Experiences Program) alternative classroom management system for secondary academic classrooms with disaffected (attendance problems, discipline problems, potential dropouts), average, and gifted and…

  10. Assessing landscape experiences as a cultural ecosystem service in public infrastructure projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Lindhjem, Henrik; Magnussen, Kristin

    Undesirable landscape changes, especially from large infrastructure projects, may give rise to large welfare losses due to degraded landscape experiences. These losses are largely unaccounted for in Nordic countries’ planning processes. There is a need to develop practical methods of including pe...

  11. Preschool Work against Bullying and Degrading Treatment: Experiences from an Action Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderström, Åsa; Löfdahl Hultman, Annica

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with experiences from an action learning project against bullying and degrading treatment among nine Swedish preschools. Even though definitions of bullying and degrading treatment tend to lead to thoughts of school-age children rather than preschoolers, previous research shows that bullying occurs in preschool as well. Our data…

  12. Culminating Experience Action Research Projects, Volume 18, Part 1, Spring 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Deborah A., Ed.

    2017-01-01

    As a part of the teacher licensure program at the graduate level at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC), the M.Ed. licensure candidate is required to complete an action research project during a 3-semester-hour course that coincides with the 9-semester-hour student teaching experience or with school employment. This course, Education…

  13. Creating International Community Service Learning Experiences in a Capstone Marketing-Projects Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Lynn E.

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines the development of a project-based capstone marketing course, specifically designed to provide marketing students with an international community service learning experience. It differs significantly from previous studies, which focus on integrating service learning into existing marketing courses and on helping local…

  14. Redesigning a library-based genetics class research project through instructional theory and authentic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Michele R; Edwards, Mary; Miyamoto, Michael M

    2012-04-01

    How can the library-based research project of a genetics course be reinvigorated and made sustainable without sacrificing educational integrity? The University of Florida's Health Science Center Library provides the case study. Since 1996, the librarian has codeveloped, supported, and graded all components of the project. In 2009, the project evolved from a single-authored paper to a group-work poster, with graded presentations hosted by the library. In 2010, students were surveyed regarding class enhancements. Responses indicated a preference for collaborative work and the poster format and suggested the changes facilitated learning. Instructors reported that the poster format more clearly documented students' understanding of genetics. Results suggest project enhancements contributed to greater appreciation, understanding, and application of classroom material and offered a unique and authentic learning experience, without compromising educational integrity. The library benefitted through increased visibility as a partner in the educational mission and development of a sustainable instructional collaboration.

  15. Remediation of heavy-metal contaminated sediments by means of bioleaching. Study: project results - economic efficiency - market assessment. Final report; Reinigung schwermetallbelasteter Sedimente durch Bioleaching. Studie: Projektergebnisse - Wirtschaftlichkeit - Marktbewertung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeser, C.; Zehnsdorf, A.; Hoffmann, P.; Seidel, H.; Schmerold, R.

    2002-07-01

    Sediments in running and stationary waters continue to pose environmental as well as cost problems. In Saxonian waters alone some 3.7 million m{sup 3} of sediments mostly contaminated with heavy metals from mining or industrial activities are in need of remediation. For lack of practicable remediation methods excavated sediments nowadays are landfilled. However, due to its persisting hazard potential this solution is ecologically unsatisfactory. Exposure of these sediments to oxygen leads to microbial oxidation and acidification processes and hence partial solubilisation of heavy metals. If allowed to proceed uncontrolled this natural bioleaching process poses an environmental hazard. However, if accelerated artificially through activation of autochtonous sulphur oxidising bacteria (e.g. thiobacilli) it can be used to remediate sediments. The goal is to provide a semi-natural sediment decontamination process based on natural biological solubilisation potentials After decontamination, sediments can be returned to the materials cycle as soil substrates. The present process was developed using heavily contaminated sediments from the Weisse Elster region south of Leipzig as example material. For economic reasons it was decided to use a fixed-bed leaching process based on percolation. It proved necessary to use a multistage process. The laboratory and technical-scale experiments were dedicated to developing and implementing measures for faster metal solubilisation. [German] Gewaessersedimente sind ein bisher ungeloestes Umwelt- und Kostenproblem. Allein aus den Gewaessern Sachsens muessen ca. 3,7 Millionen m{sup 3} Sedimente beraeumt werden, diese sind zum grossen Teil mit Schwermetallen aus bergbaulichen und industriellen Aktivitaeten belastet. Gegenwaertig werden die ausgebaggerten Sedimente deponiert, da praktikable Sanierungsverfahren fehlen. Die Deoponierung ist wegen des weiter bestehenden Gefaehrdungspotentials keine oekologisch befriedigende Loesung. Kommen die

  16. Trans-Pacific HDR Satellite Communications Experiment Phase-2 Project Plan and Experimental Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eddie; Kadowaki, Naoto; Yoshimura, Naoko; Takahashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Bergman, Larry; Bhasin, Kul

    2000-01-01

    The trans-Pacific high data rate (TP-HDR) satellite communications experiment was proposed at the Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Space (JUCS) Program Workshop held in Hawaii in 1993 and remote high definition video post-production was demonstrated as the first phase trial. ATM-based 45 Mbps trans-Pacific link was established in the first phase, and the following experiments with 155 Mbps was planned as the phase 2. This paper describes the experimental network configuration and project plan of TP-HDR experiment phase 2. Additional information is provided in the original.

  17. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: Results from a post-project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008) http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. Methods A national interdisciplinary group of 20 researchers, one of whom was the project manager, formed the Steering Committee for the project. We used project management to ensure project outputs and outcomes were achieved and all aspects of the project were planned, implemented, monitored and controlled. Sixteen of the researchers were asked to complete a self administered questionnaire for a post-project review. Results The project was delivered according to the project protocol within the allocated budget and time frame. Fifteen researchers (93.8%) completed a questionnaire. They reported that project management increased the effectiveness of the project, communication, teamwork, and application of the interdisciplinary group of researchers' expertise. They would recommend this type of project management for future projects. Conclusions Our post-project review showed that researchers comprehensively endorsed project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project and agreed that project management had contributed substantially to the research. In future, we will project manage new projects and conduct post-project reviews. The results will be used to encourage continuous learning and continuous improvement of project management, and provide greater transparency and accountability of health and medical research. The use of project management can benefit both management and scientific outcomes of health and medical research projects. PMID:21635721

  18. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: results from a post-project review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Janet M; France, Kathryn E; Henley, Nadine; D'Antoine, Heather A; Bartu, Anne E; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Bower, Carol

    2011-06-02

    Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008) http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. A national interdisciplinary group of 20 researchers, one of whom was the project manager, formed the Steering Committee for the project. We used project management to ensure project outputs and outcomes were achieved and all aspects of the project were planned, implemented, monitored and controlled. Sixteen of the researchers were asked to complete a self administered questionnaire for a post-project review. The project was delivered according to the project protocol within the allocated budget and time frame. Fifteen researchers (93.8%) completed a questionnaire. They reported that project management increased the effectiveness of the project, communication, teamwork, and application of the interdisciplinary group of researchers' expertise. They would recommend this type of project management for future projects. Our post-project review showed that researchers comprehensively endorsed project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project and agreed that project management had contributed substantially to the research. In future, we will project manage new projects and conduct post-project reviews. The results will be used to encourage continuous learning and continuous improvement of project management, and provide greater transparency and accountability of health and medical research. The use of project management can benefit both management and scientific outcomes of health and medical research projects.

  19. Isoscalar giant resonance studies from a stored-beam experiment for the EXL project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, J.C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: EXL E105-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the EXL project is the investigation of nuclear structure of EXotic nuclei, in Light-ion induced reactions, by using the future storage ring NESR at FAIR. In this project a universal detector system will provide high resolution and large solid angle coverage for kinematically complete measurements. In a recent experiment at the present Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI, the collaboration has performed feasibility studies and first experiments by using a dedicated UHV capable detector setup. With this setup the interaction of a {sup 58}Ni beam with an internal helium gas-jet target was investigated. The aim of the present experiment is to study the Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance (ISGMR) and the Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance (ISGDR) from inelastic alpha scattering. In this talk, simulation results and the current status of the data analysis are discussed.

  20. Electrodialytic remediation of copper mine tailings: Comparing different operational conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojo, Adrian; Hansen, Henrik K.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2006-01-01

    This work compares and evaluates sixteen electrodialytic laboratory remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. Different parameters were analyzed, such as remediation time, voltage drop, addition of desorbing agents, and the use of pulsed electrical fields. The results show that electric...... of copper citrate complexes. Using pulsed electric fields the remediation process with sulphuric acid addition was also improved by a decrease in the polarization cell. Main results: considering remediation with watery tailing as the base line, for three weeks experiments no copper removal was observed......, adding sulphuric acid total copper removal reached 39%. Adding citric acid, total copper removal was improved in terms of remediation time: after 5h experiment copper removal was 16% instead of 9% obtained after 72h with sulphuric acid addition. Using pulsed electric fields total copper removal was also...

  1. Mechanisms of support of “green” projects financing: experience of countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan D. Rakov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to assess the effectiveness of the mechanisms supporting ldquogreenrdquo projectsrsquo funding in developed countries and in Russia. Methods comparative analysis regression analysis. Results the article substantiates the necessity of mainstreaming the environmental protection issues under modern conditions of the world economy development. It is emphasized that despite the advantages of the development of ldquogreenrdquo economy for society as a whole the market highlights a variety of hindering factors. In this context it is increasingly important to study the experience of countries in implementing projects on ldquogreenrdquo economy formation. We analyze the experience of Great Britain in creating special institutions to support ldquogreenrdquo investment raising funds mainly through the use of credit and warranty programs. The UK also demonstrates the experience of applying environmental taxes and a wide range of environmental financial products. Analysis of the experience of South Korea showed the country39s strategy for ldquogreenrdquo growth and the functioning of a framework law providing financial support to ldquogreenrdquo companies and private investment in this area. The experience of Canada province of Ontario shows that in the field of ldquogreenrdquo economy such support mechanisms are applied as ldquogreenrdquo bonds preferential tariff programs etc. Germany also demonstrates progress in addressing environmental problems by imposing requirements for the population in this area as well as the creation of preferential programs of financing ldquogreenrdquo projects. The analysis showed that in contrast to the studied countries in Russia there is no comprehensive mechanism of state support for environmental projects. The existing mechanisms are associated with the implementation of state programs in the sphere of hightech industries. Basing on regression analysis we estimated the influence of state support measures for

  2. Technique for rapid establishment of American lotus in remediation efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryon, M. G.; Jett, R. T.; McCracken, M. K.; Morris, G. W.; Roy, W. K.; Fortner, A. M.; Goins, K. N.; Riazi, A. S.

    2013-03-01

    A technique for increasing the establishment rate of American lotus (Nelumbo lutea) and simplifying planting was developed as part of a pond remediation project. Lotus propagation techniques typically require scarification of the seed, germination in heated water, and planting in nursery containers. Then mature (~ 1 yr) nursery-grown stock is transferred to planting site or scarified seed are broadcast applied. Mature plants should grow more quickly, but can be sensitive to handling, require more time to plant, and cost more. Scarified seeds are easier to plant and inexpensive, but have a lag time in growth, can fail to germinate, and can be difficult to site precisely. We developed an intermediate technique using small burlap bags that makes planting easier, provides greater germination success, and avoids lag time in growth. Data on survival and growth from experiments using mature stock, scarified seeds, and bag lotus demonstrate that bag lotus grow rapidly in a variety of conditions, have a high survival rate, can be processed and planted easily and quickly, and are very suitable for a variety of remediation projects

  3. Research Plan: Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Lirong; Hart, Andrea T.; Szecsody, James E.; Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ankeny, Mark; Hull, Laurence; Oostrom, Martinus; Freshley, Mark D.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2009-01-16

    Research proposals were submitted to the Scientific and Technical Basis for In Situ Treatment of Metals and Radionuclides Technical Working Group under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (specifically, EM-22). After a peer review and selection process, the proposal, “Foam Delivery of Remedial Amendments to Deep Vadose Zone for Metals and Radionuclides Remediation,” submitted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was selected for support by the program. A research plan was requested for this EM funded project. The overall objective of this project is to develop foam delivery technology for the distribution of remedial amendments to deep vadose zone sediments for in situ immobilization of metal and radionuclide contaminants. The focus of this research in FY 2009 is on the physical aspects of the foam delivery approach. Specific objectives are to 1) study the foam quality (i.e. the gas volume fraction in foam) influence on injection pressure, 2) study the sediment air permeability influence on injection pressure, 3) investigate liquid uptake in sediment and determine whether a water front will be formed during foam delivery, 4) test amendment distance (and mass) delivery by foam from the injection point, 5) study the enhanced sweeping over heterogeneous systems (i.e., low K zones) by foam delivery relative to water-based delivery under vadose zone conditions, and 6) numerically simulate foam delivery processes in the vadose zone. Laboratory scale experiments will be conducted at PNNL to study a range of basic physical aspects of the foam propagation in sediments, including foam quality and sediment permeability influence on injection pressure, liquid uptake, and foam sweeping across heterogeneous systems. This study will be augmented with separate studies to be conducted at MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate foam transport and amendment delivery at the intermediate-scale. The results of intermediate

  4. Pro-sustainability choices and child deaths averted: from project experience to investment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarriot, Eric G; Swedberg, Eric A; Ricca, James G

    2011-05-01

    The pursuit of the Millennium Development Goals and advancing the 'global health agenda' demand the achievement of health impact at scale through efficient investments. We have previously offered that sustainability-a necessary condition for successful expansion of programmes-can be addressed in practical terms. Based on benchmarks from actual child survival projects, we assess the expected impact of translating pro-sustainability choices into investment strategies. We review the experience of Save the Children US in Guinea in terms of investment, approach to sustainability and impact. It offers three benchmarks for impact: Entry project (21 lives saved of children under age five per US$100 000), Expansion project (37 LS/US$100k), and Continuation project (100 LS/US$100k). Extrapolating this experience, we model the impact of a traditional investment scenario against a pro-sustainability scenario and compare the deaths averted per dollar spent over five project cycles. The impact per dollar spent on a pro-sustainability strategy is 3.4 times that of a traditional one over the long run (range from 2.2 to 5.7 times in a sensitivity analysis). This large efficiency differential between two investment approaches offers a testable hypothesis for large-scale/long-term studies. The 'bang for the buck' of health programmes could be greatly increased by following a pro-sustainability investment strategy.

  5. HANFORD GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHARBONEAU, B; THOMPSON, M; WILDE, R.; FORD, B.; GERBER, M.S.

    2006-02-01

    By 1990 nearly 50 years of producing plutonium put approximately 1.70E + 12 liters (450 billion gallons) of liquid wastes into the soil of the 1,518-square kilometer (586-square mile) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The liquid releases consisted of chemicals used in laboratory experiments, manufacturing and rinsing uranium fuel, dissolving that fuel after irradiation in Hanford's nuclear reactors, and in liquefying plutonium scraps needed to feed other plutonium-processing operations. Chemicals were also added to the water used to cool Hanford's reactors to prevent corrosion in the reactor tubes. In addition, water and acid rinses were used to clean plutonium deposits from piping in Hanford's large radiochemical facilities. All of these chemicals became contaminated with radionuclides. As Hanford raced to help win World War II, and then raced to produce materials for the Cold War, these radioactive liquid wastes were released to the Site's sandy soils. Early scientific experiments seemed to show that the most highly radioactive components of these liquids would bind to the soil just below the surface of the land, thus posing no threat to groundwater. Other experiments predicted that the water containing most radionuclides would take hundreds of years to seep into groundwater, decaying (or losing) most of its radioactivity before reaching the groundwater or subsequently flowing into the Columbia River, although it was known that some contaminants like tritium would move quickly. Evidence today, however, shows that many contaminants have reached the Site's groundwater and the Columbia River, with more on its way. Over 259 square kilometers (100 square miles) of groundwater at Hanford have contaminant levels above drinking-water standards. Also key to successfully cleaning up the Site is providing information resources and public-involvement opportunities to Hanford's stakeholders. This large, passionate, diverse, and

  6. An Experiment with Using Google Tools for Project Supervision at Tertiary Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    Problem oriented project pedagogy is an alternative educational approach which often provides a strong natural motivation for the students' work. On the other hand, it requires certain coordination and cooperation skills in communication inside the project group as well as between the group and i...... supervisor. We study the use of content and coordination management tools for the support of group work. An experiment using a combination of Google Groups/Docs/Calendar services was carried out at Aalborg University in Denmark and we report here on the outcomes of the trial....

  7. The Impact of Project-Based Climate Change Learning Experiences on Students' Broad Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWaters, J.; Powers, S. E.; Dhaniyala, S.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based pedagogical approaches such as project- and inquiry-based techniques have been shown to promote effective learning in science and engineering. The impact of project-based learning experiences on middle school (MS), high school (HS), and undergraduate (UG) students' climate literacy was investigated as part of a NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) project. Project-based modules were developed and taught by MS and HS teachers who participated in climate change education workshops. UG students enrolled in a climate science course completed independent research projects that provided the basis for several of the HS/MS modules. All modules required students to acquire and analyze historical temperature data and future climate predictions, and apply their analysis to the solution of a societal or environmental problem related to our changing climate. Three versions of a quantitative survey were developed and used in a pre-test/post-test research design to help evaluate the project's impact on MS, HS, and UG students' climate literacy, which includes broad climate knowledge as well as affective and behavioral aspects. Content objectives were guided primarily by the 2009 document, Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences. All three groups of students made modest but statistically significant cognitive (paffective (pbehavior scores (p=0.001). Results of an ANCOVA showed significant differences in students' cognitive (pbehavioral (p=0.005) and self-efficacy (p=0.012) outcomes among the 9 participating MS and HS classrooms, where both teacher and module content varied. The presentation will include a description of some key aspects of the project-based curricula developed and used in this research, the development and content of the climate literacy survey, and the interpretation of specific pre/post changes in participating students relative to the content of and approach used in the project-based modules.

  8. Enterprise System Design for RFID Enabled Supply Chains from Experience in Two National Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P.T. Mo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Two national demonstrator projects have been developed using global RFID standards to explore the suitability of this pervasive technology to the fast moving consumer goods supply chain. The projects show that RFID technology is still not reliable enough to produce advantages over traditional tracking technologies. This paper reviews the processes and gaps in these experiences, and assesses future research opportunities in this area. A system modelling approach is used to understand the relationships between different sub-systems in the enterprises of the supply chain and examine the enterprise processes that drive the activities in the national projects. Based on these analyses, an enterprise system model is proposed for designing future development of RFID based supply chains.

  9. Ecological restoration of small water courses, experiences from Germany and from projects in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Binder

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From 2009 until 2012 the project “Watershed Management of Forest Land in Beijing, Restoration of Small Water Bodies (SWBR” was implemented, combining Close to Nature Forest Management and Restoration of Small Water Bodies. The targets were to improve flood control, to enhance the ecological conditions by copying nature and to support the recreational value of small water bodies, all in cooperation with people living there. The efficiency of each project was proofed by comparison of biological and hydro-morphological assessment before the projects started and 2–3 years after they were finished. The results confirmed the ecological improvements of the restored river sections and showed the achievements. Guidelines to assess the biological and hydro-morphological status of rivers were developed and there are plans to introduce them as Beijing Standards. Planning and implementation of measures, based on experiences in Central Europe, will be documented in a handbook.

  10. Electrodialytic Soil Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Lene; Hansen, Henrik K.

    1997-01-01

    It is not possible for all heavy metal polluted soils to remediate it by an applied electric field alone. A desorbing agent must in different cases be added to the soil in order to make the process possible or to make it cost effective......It is not possible for all heavy metal polluted soils to remediate it by an applied electric field alone. A desorbing agent must in different cases be added to the soil in order to make the process possible or to make it cost effective...

  11. Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

  12. A Public Policy Advocacy Project to Promote Food Security: Exploring Stakeholders' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkey, Kayla M; Raine, Kim D; Storey, Kate E; Willows, Noreen D

    2016-09-01

    To achieve food security in Canada, comprehensive approaches are required, which involve action at the public policy level. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 14 stakeholders engaging in a 9-month participatory public policy advocacy project to promote community food security in the province of Alberta through the initiation of a campaign to develop a Universal School Food Strategy. Through this exploration, four main themes were identified; a positive and open space to contribute ideas, diversity and common ground, confidence and capacity, and uncertainty. Findings from this study suggest that the participatory advocacy project provided a positive and open space for stakeholders to contribute ideas, through which the group was able to narrow its focus and establish a goal for advocacy. The project also seems to have contributed to the group's confidence and capacity to engage in advocacy by creating a space for learning and knowledge sharing, though stakeholders expressed uncertainty regarding some aspects of the project. Findings from this study support the use of participatory approaches as a strategy for facilitating engagement in public policy advocacy and provide insight into one group's advocacy experience, which may help to inform community-based researchers and advocates in the development of advocacy initiatives to promote community food security elsewhere. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  13. MISTY ECHO Tunnel Dynamics Experiment--Data report: Volume 1; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.S.; Luke, B.A.; Long, J.W.; Lee, J.G.

    1992-04-01

    Tunnel damage resulting from seismic loading is an important issue for the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. The tunnel dynamics experiment was designed to obtain and document ground motions, permanent displacements, observable changes in fracture patterns, and visible damage at ground motion levels of interest to the Yucca Mountain Project. Even though the maximum free-field loading on this tunnel was 28 g, the damage observed was minor. Fielding details, data obtained, and supporting documentation are reported.

  14. TRAILER Project Overview. Tagging, Recognition and Acknowledgment of Informal Learning ExpeRiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco J.; Zangrando, Valentina; García Holgado, Alicia; Conde González, Miguel Ángel; Seoane Pardo, Antonio; Alier Forment, Marc; Janssen, José; Griffiths, Dai; Mykowska, Aleksandra; Ribeiro Alves, Gustavo; Minovic, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    García-Peñalvo, F. J., Zangrando, V., García Holgado, A., Conde González, M. Á., Seoane Pardo, A. M., Alier Forment, M., Janssen, J., et al. (2012). TRAILER Project Overview. Tagging, Recognition and Acknowledgment of Informal Learning ExpeRiences. In F. J. García, L. Vicent, M. Ribó, A. Climent, J.

  15. An investigation into the lived experience of project leaders in a loosely-coupled transient project context

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The leadership of projects is an important area within project management domain, but the project management literature itself still tends to focus mainly on the technical aspects of project management, including planning tools and methodologies (PERT, PMBOK, Prince II etc.). For experienced project leaders, these technical capabilities are the minimum needed to be effective and the greater challenges are often presented by the socio-behavioural demands of the role. Recently, several promi...

  16. Choosing a remediation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, S.D.; Rathgeber, J.; Knafla, T. [Komex Consultants Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Hardisty, P. [Komex Clarke Bond, Bristol, (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    A technical-economic-risk analysis for choosing remedial options was presented for a site in Alberta with groundwater impacted by petroleum industry contaminants. Typical impacts from oil and natural gas activities include degraded air quality and damage to soil and groundwater quality. Various contaminants can impact soil and groundwater quality through leaking underground storage tanks, ponds, pits, and lagoons or through spills. The common contaminants of soil and groundwater from oil and gas activities in Alberta are metals, alkanolamines, sulfolane, glycols, aromatic compounds such as the BTEX constituents (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols and salts. The following sequence of steps for the clean-up process were recommended: (1) understand the problems at the site, (2) assess the risks posed by the problem, (3) set remedial goals and constraints for the site, (4) choose the most cost effective remedial technology that can achieve the set goal, (5) field test the chosen method, (6) implement the optimal remediation program at the site, and (7) monitor the results and modify the system. 5 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. to Aedilitian Remedies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The next question is whether the representation as pleaded is incapable of being read as bearing upon the quality of the shares. Now quality is a word with a fairly wide connotation. To preserve the mercantile usefulness of the Aedilitian remedies, I do not consider that the word should be given a restricted meaning.

  18. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  19. Space Debris Environment Remediation Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.; Klinkrad, Heiner

    2009-01-01

    Long-term projections of the space debris environment indicate that even drastic measures, such as an immediate, complete halt of launch and release activities, will not result in a stable environment of man-made space objects. Collision events between already existing space hardware will within a few decades start to dominate the debris population, and result in a net increase of the space debris population, also in size regimes which may cause further catastrophic collisions. Such a collisional cascading will ultimately lead to a run-away situation ("Kessler syndrome"), with no further possibility of human intervention. The International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) has been investigating the status and the stability of the space debris environment in several studies by first looking into space traffic management possibilities and then investigating means of mitigating the creation of space debris. In an ongoing activity, an IAA study group looks at ways of active space debris environment remediation. In contrast to the former mitigation study, the current activity concentrates on the active removal of small and large objects, such as defunct spacecraft, orbital stages, and mission-related objects, which serve as a latent mass reservoir that fuels initial catastrophic collisions and later collisional cascading. The paper will outline different mass removal concepts, e.g. based on directed energy, tethers (momentum exchange or electrodynamic), aerodynamic drag augmentation, solar sails, auxiliary propulsion units, retarding surfaces, or on-orbit capture. Apart from physical principles of the proposed concepts, their applicability to different orbital regimes, and their effectiveness concerning mass removal efficiency will be analyzed. The IAA activity on space debris environment remediation is a truly international project which involves more than 23 contributing authors from 9 different nations.

  20. An E-Learning Experience: A written analysis based on my experience in an e-Learning Pilot Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabita Bose

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the experience of an e-Learning pilot project selected by the Educational Technology Unit (EduTech of the Centre for Academic Development (CAD, University of Botswana (UB. This e-Learning package was designed and delivered in connection with the three-credit course “Issues and Trends in Early Childhood Education” (EPI-642, which is required for the first year of the master’s program in the Department of Primary Education. The course was taught via a flexi-time, gradual, phase-by-phase transition from traditional face-to-face teaching to the electronic medium of an e-Learning lab (called SMART classroom. This course utilized a student centred e-Learning package that retained the learning qualities of traditional teaching, personal guidance, and mentoring, while seeking to enhance students’ research and computer skills.

  1. Overview of large scale experiments performed within the LBB project in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadecka, P.; Lauerova, D. [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czechoslovakia)

    1997-04-01

    During several recent years NRI Rez has been performing the LBB analyses of safety significant primary circuit pipings of NPPs in Czech and Slovak Republics. The analyses covered the NPPs with reactors WWER 440 Type 230 and 213 and WWER 1000 Type 320. Within the relevant LBB projects undertaken with the aim to prove the fulfilling of the requirements of LBB, a series of large scale experiments were performed. The goal of these experiments was to verify the properties of the components selected, and to prove the quality and/or conservatism of assessments used in the LBB-analyses. In this poster, a brief overview of experiments performed in Czech Republic under guidance of NRI Rez is presented.

  2. Overview of ICE Project: Integration of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeman, James D.; Blech, Richard A.; Babrauckas, Theresa L.; Jones, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a prototype integrated environment for interactively exploring, analyzing, and validating information from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations and experiments. The Integrated CFD and Experiments (ICE) project is a first attempt at providing a researcher with a common user interface for control, manipulation, analysis, and data storage for both experiments and simulation. ICE can be used as a live, on-tine system that displays and archives data as they are gathered; as a postprocessing system for dataset manipulation and analysis; and as a control interface or "steering mechanism" for simulation codes while visualizing the results. Although the full capabilities of ICE have not been completely demonstrated, this report documents the current system. Various applications of ICE are discussed: a low-speed compressor, a supersonic inlet, real-time data visualization, and a parallel-processing simulation code interface. A detailed data model for the compressor application is included in the appendix.

  3. Patient participation in ERS guidelines and research projects: the EMBARC experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, James D; Timothy, Alan; Polverino, Eva; Almagro, Marta; Ruddy, Thomas; Powell, Pippa; Boyd, Jeanette

    2017-09-01

    The European Multicentre Bronchiectasis Audit and Research Collaboration (EMBARC) is a European Respiratory Society (ERS) Clinical Research Collaboration dedicated to improving research and clinical care for people with bronchiectasis. EMBARC has created a European Bronchiectasis Registry, funded by the ERS and by the European Union (EU) Innovative Medicines Initiative Programme. From the outset, EMBARC had the ambition to be a patient-focussed project. In contrast to many respiratory diseases, however, there are no specific patient charities or European patient organisations for patients with bronchiectasis and no existing infrastructure for patient engagement. This article describes the experience of EMBARC and the European Lung Foundation in establishing a patient advisory group and then engaging this group in European guidelines, an international registry and a series of research studies. Patient involvement in research, clinical guidelines and educational activities is increasingly advocated and increasingly important. Genuine patient engagement can achieve a number of goals that are critical to the success of an EU project, including focussing activities on patient priorities, allowing patients to direct the clinical and research agenda, and dissemination of guidelines and research findings to patients and the general public. Here, we review lessons learned and provide guidance for future ERS task forces, EU-funded projects or clinical research collaborations that are considering patient involvement. To understand the different ways in which patients can contribute to clinical guidelines, research projects and educational activities.To understand the barriers and potential solutions to these barriers from a physician's perspective, in order to ensure meaningful patient involvement in clinical projects.To understand the barriers and potential solutions from a patient's perspective, in order to meaningfully involve patients in clinical projects.

  4. Rocket to Creativity: A Field Experience in Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon F. Dole

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of a field experience in problem-based (PBL and project-based learning (PjBL on pre-service and in-service teachers’ conceptions of experiential learning. In our study, participants had been enrolled in a hybrid class that included an online component in which they learned about PBL and PjBL and an experiential component in which they facilitated PBL and PjBL with children in grades 1-9 during a one-week field experience on a university campus. The goal of the field experience is for teachers to change their practice from didactic to inquiry and to promote critical and creative thinking in their students. We used a case study method that involved data derived from six different sources: online structured interviews, follow-up telephone interviews, discussion board posts, reflections, course feedback, and observations. The main theme that emerged from the data analysis was the critical role the field experience played in applying theory to practice. Sub-themes included understanding the process of implementing PBL and PjBL, mastering the logistics of PBL and PjBL, becoming facilitators, and collaborating with partners. Results showed that the field experience gave the teachers the “courage” to experiment with a student-centered methodology.

  5. Student experiences and perceptions of compulsory research projects: a veterinary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardwell, Jacqueline M; Magnier, Kirsty; Kinnison, Tierney; Silva-Fletcher, Ayona

    2017-01-01

    Although research underpins clinical work, many students training to be clinicians are not inherently interested in developing research skills. To characterise and understand veterinary student experiences and perceptions of compulsory research projects. This was an explanatory sequential mixed-methods study, with a questionnaire survey of an entire cohort informing purposive selection for focus group discussions. Student views were triangulated with staff questionnaire data. About a third of the cohort felt that the project had not been worthwhile or had not fostered useful skills. Focus group data analysis identified fragility of motivation and lack of clear schemata for the research process as key themes. Students were easily demotivated by typical research challenges and lack of schemata contributed to a poor understanding of the rationale for the project, encouraging highly extrinsic forms of motivation. Triangulation with staff questionnaire data indicated that staff understood students' challenges, but were more likely than students to consider it to be a valuable learning experience. Findings support ongoing curriculum development and emphasise that, to optimise motivation, engagement and learning, students training to be clinicians need a clear rationale for research, based on development of critical inquiry skills as a core clinical competency.

  6. Electrodialytic Remediation of Soil Polluted with Copper from Wood Preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Hansen, Henrik; Laursen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    The principle of electrodialytic soil remediation was tested in six experiments on a copper polluted loamy sand. It was possible to decontaminate from 1360 to below 40 mg of Cu/kg of dry soil......The principle of electrodialytic soil remediation was tested in six experiments on a copper polluted loamy sand. It was possible to decontaminate from 1360 to below 40 mg of Cu/kg of dry soil...

  7. Impediments to User Gains: Experiences from a Critical Participatory Design Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Dindler, Christian; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    2012-01-01

    Actual studies of user gains from involvement in design processes are few, although a concern for users’ gains is a core characteristic of participatory design (PD). We explore the question of user gains through a retrospective evaluation of a critical PD project. We conducted ten qualitative int...... prominent in the research study. Based on these findings, we provide an analysis of impediments for users gains in PD projects: Differences between aims were unresolved, absence of a shared set-up for collaboration and different conceptions of technology.......Actual studies of user gains from involvement in design processes are few, although a concern for users’ gains is a core characteristic of participatory design (PD). We explore the question of user gains through a retrospective evaluation of a critical PD project. We conducted ten qualitative...... interviews with participants in a project aimed at developing technology that fosters engaging museum experiences, and rethinking cultural heritage communication. Despite the use of established PD techniques by experienced PD practitioners, a significant number of frustrations relating to the PD process were...

  8. Engaging the public in hydrological observations - first experiences from the CrowdWater project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Jan; Strobl, Barbara; Etter, Simon; Vis, Marc; Ewen, Tracy; (Ilja) van Meerveld, H. J.

    2017-04-01

    The project CrowdWater (www.crowdwater.ch) explores opportunities for citizen scientists in hydrological observations. For data collection in CrowdWater, we use a "geocaching" type approach with the help of a smartphone app. Citizens can participate in the collection of hydrological data using the smartphone app, which allows both the submission of observations for existing sites and to set up new sites. A crucial challenge in any citizen science project is finding ways to connect to enough people who want to participate and to keep them motivation to contribute to the project. Here, we present the approaches that will be used in the CrowdWater project and discuss our first experiences. To connect to the public and recruit participants we use publications in traditional media, social media and a MOOC (massive open online course). In order to keep participant motivated the collected data is immediately shown in the app and online and gamification elements are used in the app.

  9. [Experience in training in emergencies, Division of Special Projects in Health, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Vega, Felipe; Loría-Castellanos, Jorge; Hernández-Olivas, Irma Patricia; Franco-Bey, Rubén; Ochoa-Avila, César; Sánchez-Badillo, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    There has been interest in the Division of Special Projects in Health to offer the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social personnel resources for training and quality thereby respond to potential contingencies. Presented here is their experience in this field. To describe and analyse the productivity in different training programs in emergencies and disasters developed by the Division of Special Projects in Health, Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). Observational study in which different training activities conducted by the Division of Special Projects in Health between 1989 and 2014 are described. Descriptive statistics were used. In these 25 years have trained 20,674 participants; 19.451 IMSS and 1,223 other health institutions. The most productive courses were life support (BLS/ACLS) (47.17%), distance courses "Hospital medical evacuation plans and units" (14.17%), the workshop-run "Evacuation of hospital units with an emphasis on critical areas" (5.93%) and course "Programme Evaluators of Hospital Insurance" (8.43%). Although the Special Projects Division Health has primarily operational functions, it nevertheless has neglected its responsibility to maintain constantly trained and updated institute staff that every day is in a position to face any type of emergency and disaster. This increases the chance that the answer to any contingency is more organised and of higher quality, always to the benefit of the population. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the

  11. Succesful Experience of the Project "ASTROTOP" in Israel: Space-astonomy Science education in form of independent reserch projects of pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustil'Nik, Lev

    We present more then 10 year experience of educational project in Space/Astrophysics/Environment field, realized on the base of National Science- Educational Center "Blossoms of Science" of the Jordan Valley College. Our approach is based on the natural curiosity of children as driver of their self-development from the first minutes of their life and even in adult state. This approach shift center of the weight in educational process from direct lectures, sermons, explanation from teacher to children on own attempts of children to investigate problem, what is interesting for them, by themselves (individually or in group). Our approach includes four levels of the projects: "nano-projects" for children garden and basic school (up to 10-12 years), "micro-projects" for intermediate school (12-16 years), "mini-projects" for high school (16-18 years), and "macro-projects" for the best graduates high schools and students of colleges (17-22 years). These levels and projects are interconnected one with another and sometimes participants, started on the micro-projects level in intermediate school, continue their activity up to macro-projects of the graduate's diploma level. For each level we organize courses for preparation of the teachers and instructors, interested in the using of our receipts, and published books and brochures for them. The content of our activity for different levels: a) Level of kinder gardens/basic schools- special software with interactive movie -nano-projects; b) Level of intermediate school: "Days of Science" in tens schools of Israel- first contact with astronomy; c) Summer astronomy camps (4-5 of one week camps on 200-300 pupils from all country) with introduce to astronomy and with preparation of micro-projects on themes - first successful experience of research in real science fields (hundreds projects); d) ASTROTOP - one year program of preparation of short projects, with solution on the quality level of chosen astrophysical problem - mini-projects

  12. Economics of Large Helium Cryogenic Systems experience from Recent Projects at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Claudet, S; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    1999-01-01

    Large projects based on applied superconductivity, such as particle accelerators, tokamaks or SMES, require powerful and complex helium cryogenic systems, the cost of which represents a significant, if not dominant fraction of the total capital and operational expenditure. It is therefore important to establish guidelines and scaling laws for costing such systems, based on synthetic estimators of their size and performance. Although such data has already been published for many years, the experience recently gathered at CERN with the LEP and LHC projects, which have de facto turned the laboratory into a major world cryogenic center, can be exploited to update this information and broaden the range of application of the scaling laws. We report on the economics of 4.5 K and 1.8 K refrigeration, cryogen distribution and storage systems, and indicate paths towards their cost-to-performance optimisation.

  13. Transdisciplinary Project Communication and Knowledge Sharing Experiences in Tanzania and Zambia through a One Health Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnol, Brigitte; Clarke, Elizabeth; Li, Mu; Maulaga, Wende; Lumbwe, Hilda; McConchie, Robyn; de Bruyn, Julia; Alders, Robyn Gwen

    2016-01-01

    The project "Strengthening food and nutrition security through family poultry and crop integration in Tanzania and Zambia" brings together animal, crop, and human health specialists, economists, ecologists, social scientists, and practitioners to work with participating communities. It aims to increase poultry value chain, crop farming systems efficiency, and household food and nutrition security and thus requires understanding of, and ability to work effectively within, complex systems. In this context, communication knowledge sharing and synthesis between stakeholders from diverse backgrounds and a range of experiences, perspectives, agendas, and knowledge is a challenge. To address this situation, communication is conceived as a dialog and a participatory process bringing together all stakeholders. This process results in unanticipated and unexpected results that require a high degree of flexibility and adaptability from team members. The paper analyses the approach and aim of the communication strategy developed for the project and the challenges faced.

  14. The European TrustHealth project experiences with implementing a security infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blobel, B

    2000-11-01

    Accepting the shared care paradigm, communication and co-operation required between health care establishments must be provided in a trustworthy way. The solution for establishing such trustworthy environment has to be based on a common policy framework, on services, and mechanisms, which have been standardised. In Europe, the legal framework, other policy issues, and the services and mechanisms needed have been developed within projects launched by the European Commission, by the European standards body CEN as well as by temporarily established groups. Within the European TrustHealth projects. a security infrastructure for trustworthy health telematics applications has been specified, implemented, and evaluated. It is based on Health Professional Cards and Trusted Third Party services. Experiences regarding organisational and technological implications of the specification, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of such a security infrastructure are described on the basis of the ONOCONET example. For the complete software lifecycle, the UML methodology has been deployed.

  15. The Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (CDR-MIP) Initial Results and Future Experiment Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D. P.; Scott, V.; Lenton, A.; Vaughan, N.

    2016-12-01

    Continued anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are changing the climate threatening "severe, pervasive and irreversible" impacts. Inadequate emissions reduction is resulting in increased attention on Climate Intervention (CI) - deliberate interventions to counter climate change that seek to either modify the Earth's radiation budget, or remove the primary greenhouse gas from the atmosphere - Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR). The majority of future scenarios that do not exceed 2°C warming by 2100 include CDR methods. At present, there is little consensus on the efficacy and impacts of CDR and proposed CDR methods. In response, the Carbon Dioxide Removal Model Intercomparison Project (or CDR-MIP) has been initiated. This project brings together a suite of Earth System Models (ESMs) and Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICS) in a common framework to explore the potential, risks, and challenges of CDR and different proposed CDR methods. The first set of CDR-MIP experiments investigate climate "reversibility" and the response of the Earth system to idealized engineered permanent CO2 removal. Here we present early results of these experiments and also discuss the design and implementation of the next experiments that explore CDR via land use change and ocean alkalinization. In particular we will highlight which components of the simulated climate system exhibit "reversibility", when CO2 increases and then decreases, and the time scales over which this occurs. Many of the trends are similar in different models; however, there is some disagreement in the response of the simulated carbon cycle.

  16. New tools for scientific learning in the EduSeis project: the e-learning experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zollo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Educational Seismological Project (EduSeis is a scientific and educational project, the main aim of which is the development and implementation of new teaching methodologies in Earth Sciences, using seismology as a vehicle for scientific learning and awareness of earthquake risk. Within this framework, we have recently been experimenting with new learning and information approaches that are mainly aimed at a high school audience. In particular, we have designed, implemented and tested a model of an e-learning environment in a high school located in the surroundings of the Mt. Vesuvius volcano. The proposed e-learning model is built on the EduSeis concepts and educational materials (web-oriented, and is based on computer-supported collaborative learning. Ten teachers from different disciplines and fifty students at the I.T.I.S. “Majorana” technical high school (Naples have been taking part in a cooperative e-learning experiment in which the students have been working in small groups (communities. The learning process is assisted and supervised by the teachers. The evaluation of the results from this cooperative e-learning experiment has provided useful insights into the content and didactic value of the EduSeis modules and activities. The use of network utilities and the “Learning Community” approach promoted the exchange of ideas and expertises between students and teachers and allowed a new approach to the seismology teaching through a multidisciplinary study.

  17. Employment creation through public works programmes and projects in South Africa: Experiences and potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. D. Thwala

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/objectives: The aim of this article is to look at the experiences, problems and the potential contribution of employment creation programmes in alleviating the unemployment problem in other African countries through the construction of public infrastructure through the use of labour-intensive methods. The article then describes the problems and experiences that have been encountered in South Africa in relation to employment creation through the construction of public infrastructure.Problem investigated: In South Africa the levels of unemployment and poverty are extremely high and unemployment is one of South Africa's most pressing problems. At the same time there is a lack of capacity and skills at institutional, community and individual levels. Labour-intensive programmes generate more direct and indirect local employment opportunities and income by using locally available inputs (materials, simple tools and local labour and thus creating a greater demand for local products and services than do high-technology programmes reliant on imported technology and equipment. Design/Methodology/Approach: Drawing on research on labour-intensive, public works programmes and projects, the paper is mainly a literature review. From a theoretical perspective supported by experience elsewhere in Africa, there are reasons for considering that properly formulated employment creation programmes based on the use of labour-intensive methods could be established to construct and maintain the required physical infrastructure, thus creating employment, skills and institutional capacities. The article closes with some recommendations for the future programmes success.Findings/Implications: The article attributes the failure of projects and programmes in South Africa to different factors which must be avoided in future in order for projects and programmes to be successful in South Africa. Investment in infrastructure has a huge potential to redress the high

  18. Building international experiences into an engineering curriculum - a design project-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Victor; Castillo, Luciano; Carbajal, Gerardo; Hajela, Prabhat

    2014-07-01

    This paper is a descriptive account of how short-term international and multicultural experiences can be integrated into early design experiences in an aerospace engineering curriculum. Such approaches are considered as important not only in fostering a student's interest in the engineering curriculum, but also exposing them to a multicultural setting that they are likely to encounter in their professional careers. In the broader sense, this programme is described as a model that can be duplicated in other engineering disciplines as a first-year experience. In this study, undergraduate students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Universidad del Turabo (UT) in Puerto Rico collaborated on a substantial design project consisting of designing, fabricating, and flight-testing radio-controlled model aircraft as a capstone experience in a semester-long course on Fundamentals of Flight. The two-week long experience in Puerto Rico was organised into academic and cultural components designed with the following objectives: (i) to integrate students in a multicultural team-based academic and social environment, (ii) to practise team-building skills and develop students' critical thinking and analytical skills, and finally (iii) to excite students about their engineering major through practical applications of aeronautics and help them decide if it is a right fit for them.

  19. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 11 entitled: Evaluation of TCE contamination before and after the field experiment, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, B.M.; Athmer, C.J.; Sheridan, P.W. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task No. 11 summarizes the results of TCE analysis in soil and carbon before and after conducting the field experiment. In addition, a discussion of the TCE material balance demonstrates that the Lasagna{trademark} process is effective in moving TCE from the contaminated soil into carbon treatment zones in the field experiment at DOE`s Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky.

  20. Project of the SND tracking system for experiments at VEPP-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulchenko, V.M.; Bukin, D.A.; Dimova, T.V.; Druzhinin, V.P.; Filatov, P.V.; Golubev, V.B.; Koshuba, S.V.; Maksimov, L.V.; Obrazovsky, A.E.; Serednyakov, S.I.; Shary, V.V.; Sirotkin, A.A.; Skripkin, A.G.; Titov, V.M.; Usov, Yu.V.; Vasiljev, A.V. E-mail: vasiljev@inp.nsk.su

    2002-11-21

    The project of the new spherical neutral detector tracking system for experiments at VEPP-2000 e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is presented. The tracking system consists of a drift and a proportional chambers in a common gas volume. The drift chamber provides 9 measurements along the track for charged particles within 94% solid angle. Design angular resolutions for radial tracks are {sigma}{sub phi}=0.18 deg., {sigma}{sub {theta}}=0.3 deg., the vertex resolution is {sigma}{sub R}=0.2 mm. The design of the tracking system, electric field configuration, electronics, and detector simulation are described.

  1. Evolution and experience with the ATLAS Simulation at Point1 Project

    CERN Document Server

    Ballestrero, Sergio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Simulation at Point1 project is successfully running traditional ATLAS simulation jobs on the TDAQ HLT resources. The pool of available resources changes dynamically, therefore we need to be very effective in exploiting the available computing cycles. We present our experience with using the Event Service that provides the event-level granularity of computations. We show the design decisions and overhead time related to the usage of the Event Service. The improved utilisation of the resources is also presented with the recent development in monitoring, automatic alerting, deployment and GUI.

  2. Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) and the Continental-scale International Project (GCIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Deborah

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the objectives of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) and the Continental-scale International Project (GCIP) is presented in vugraph form. The objectives of GEWEX are as follows: determine the hydrological cycle by global measurements; model the global hydrological cycle; improve observations and data assimilation; and predict response to environmental change. The objectives of GCIP are as follows: determine the time/space variability of the hydrological cycle over a continental-scale region; develop macro-scale hydrologic models that are coupled to atmospheric models; develop information retrieval schemes; and support regional climate change impact assessment.

  3. Evolution and experience with the ATLAS simulation at Point1 project

    CERN Document Server

    Ballestrero, Sergio; The ATLAS collaboration; Fazio, Daniel; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Kouba, Tomas; Lee, Christopher; Scannicchio, Diana; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Twomey, Matthew Shaun; Wang, Fuquan; Zaytsev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Simulation at Point1 project is successfully running traditional ATLAS simulation jobs on the TDAQ HLT resources. The pool of available resources changes dynamically, therefore we need to be very effective in exploiting the available computing cycles. We will present our experience with using the Event Service that provides the event-level granularity of computations. We will show the design decisions and overhead time related to the usage of the Event Service. The improved utilization of the resources will also be presented with the recent development in monitoring, automatic alerting, deployment and GUI.

  4. Laboratory Experiments on the Electrochemical Remediation of the Environment. Part 9: Microscale Recovery of a Soil Metal Pollutant and Its Extractant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Balderas-Hernandez, Patricia; Garcia-Pintor, Elizabeth; Barba-Gonzalez, Sandy Nohemi; Doria-Serrano, Ma. del Carmen; Hernaiz-Arce, Lorena; Diaz-Perez, Armando; Lozano-Cusi, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Many soils throughout the world are contaminated with metal salts of diverse toxicity. We have developed an experiment to demonstrate the removal of a metal from an insoluble surrogate soil pollutant, CuCO[subscript 3] multiplied by Cu(OH)[subscript 2], by complexation followed by the simultaneous electrochemical recovery of the ligand (i.e.,…

  5. From project-oriented to service-oriented software development: an industrial experience guided by a service reference model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalinowski, Marcos; Biffl, Stefan; Spínola, Rodrigo Oliveira; Reinehr, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    ...-neutral project-oriented software deliveries.This article reports on the industrial experience of restructuring the supplier-side software development process into a value-based service-oriented format, guided by a service reference model...

  6. Collaborative learning environments and collective creation in 3 weeks bside project experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Javier Rodríguez Sánchez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This  paper proposes  a  socio-critical review  and  reflection  related to collaborative learning environment as pedagogical agent and its relationship with artistic-practice communities of collective creativity. The main goal of this research is to introduce the case study 3 weeks bside project experience (3WBPE, from now on. Through participatory action research and the analysis of different concepts and their practical and theoretical aspects. In the framework of an education self-manage- ment development universe, the project pro- cess is based on a collaborative learning. It is focused on the constructions of a common discourse about the idea of territory that is represented in a publication and site specific exhibition. 3WBPE allowed setting up stanc- es that suggest a social interaction transfer related to construction of belong, participa- tion and transformation environment, ques- tion a teacher role or collective creation of a project, emphasizing the importance of pro- cess as a goal, beyond of culture artifact pro- ductions. It was dealt with dialog structures, where a social harmony supposed a personal and common reflection space about author’s stance, nigh socio-culture environments and the bond within the education, arts and visu- al culture focused in the horizontal and flexi- ble work capacity, that proposes a collabora- tive learning environment settings.

  7. FOREIGN EXPERIENCE OF THE USE OF "MINECRAFT: EDUCATION EDITION" IN PROJECT ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konevshchynska O.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the rapid development of Internet technologies in today's digital society, causing rapid changes in education is substantiated in the article. A thorough analysis of the foreign experience of using the educational version of "MINECRAFT: EDUCATION EDITION" in the project activity has been carried out. Internet sources, psychological-pedagogical and educational-methodical literature on the research problem are analyzed. The main educational trends, including remote and mobile learning, MOOC, supplemented reality, cloud LMS, personalization, BigData, gamification, which change the content of education and its impact on quality are named. It is proved that the use of gaming models and techniques for educational purposes can have a positive effect on the effectiveness of children teaching. The content of the sections and the main directions of using the educational platform in the educational process and the project activity of the students and teachers are considered. The results of joint work of children in mathematics, language and literature, history and geography are presented. The important aspects that are necessary in the information society are the cooperation, self-study and effective communication of subjects of the educational process for the implementation of project-oriented, educational-cognitive and innovative activities in educational practice. A promising area for further research is the design of Minecraft: Education Edition game scenarios methodology for the further implementation in domestic educational practice.

  8. Experiences and Challenges of Community Participation in Urban Renewal Projects: The Case of Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington Didibhuku Thwala

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Urban renewal and inner city regeneration have become critical efforts for the South African government, which has invested in several structures to stem the tide of decline in its nine major cities. Commitment to the alleviation of poverty is a focal point of the renewal and regeneration agenda and will remain so in the future. This effort is motivated by the fact that around 24% of the South African population currently lives on less than USD 1.00 per day, below the poverty line defined by the World Bank. The Central Government has made numerous public commitments to development, a part of which concerns extensive infrastructure investment and service delivery. Communities are expected to participate fully in the planning and implementation of these urban renewal projects. To this aim, participation is a process through which stakeholders influence and share control over development initiatives and the decisions and resources which affect them. Community participation should be aimed at empowering people by ensuring the development of skills and the creation of employment opportunities. This paper first explores the concept of community participation, and will then look at relevant past experiences in relation to community participation in urban renewal projects. Furthermore, the paper outlines the challenges and problems of community participation in urban renewal projects in Johannesburg, and finally, close with recommendations for the future.

  9. Athens automation and control experiment project review meeting, Dallas, Texas, December 5-6, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detwiler, J.S.; Hu, P.S.; Lawler, J.S.; Markel, L.C.; McIntyre, J.M.; McKinley, K.F.; Monteen, L.D.; Purucker, S.L.; Reed, J.H.; Rizy, D.T.

    1985-12-01

    The AACE is an electric power distribution automation project involving research and development of both hardware and software. Equipment for the project is being installed on the electric distribution system of the Athens Utilities Board (AUB), located in Athens, Tennessee. Purposes of the AACE are to develop and test load control, volt/var control, and system reconfiguration capabilities on an electric distribution system and to transfer what is learned to the electric utility industry. Expected benefits include deferral of costly power generation plants and increased electric service reliability. A project review meeting was held to review the progress of the AACE and to communicate the objectives and experimental plans to the electric utility industry. At the time of the meeting, the experimental test plans were being written; much of the AACE field equipment had been received by AUB, and installation had begun. A computer system, the AACE Test System (AACETS), was already operational at ORNL. AACETS will be used to develop and test applications software and experimental control strategies prior to their implementation on the AUB system. The AACE experiments are scheduled to begin in October 1985 and to continue through October 1987.

  10. Effects of Collective Efficacy, Teamwork Attitudes, and Experience on Group Project Performance: Comparisons between 2 Food Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Poppy Lauretta; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between past teamwork and task-related experiences, attitude toward teamwork, collective efficacy, and task performance among undergraduates (N = 298) assigned to group projects (N = 48) in 2 different Food Science courses was examined. The results of survey data collected at the beginning and end of the projects showed that past…

  11. Use of Simulation in Nursing Education: Initial Experiences on a European Union Lifelong Learning Programme--Leonardo Da Vinci Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzioglu, Fusun; Tuna, Zahide; Duygulu, Sergul; Boztepe, Handan; Kapucu, Sevgisun; Ozdemir, Leyla; Akdemir, Nuran; Kocoglu, Deniz; Alinier, Guillaume; Festini, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this paper is to share the initial experiences on a European Union (EU) Lifelong Learning Programme Leonardo Da Vinci Transfer of Innovation Project related to the use of simulation-based learning with nursing students from Turkey. The project started at the end of the 2010 involving 7 partners from 3 different countries including…

  12. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase I consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  13. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  14. Cross-border teleradiology-Experience from two international teleradiology projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Peeter [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tallinn University of Technology, East Tallinn Central Hospital, Paernu mnt 104, 11312 Tallinn (Estonia)], E-mail: Peeter.Ross@itk.ee; Sepper, Ruth [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 15, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia)], E-mail: Ruth.Sepper@gmail.com; Pohjonen, Hanna [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 15, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia)], E-mail: Hanna.Pohjonen@rosalieco.fi

    2010-01-15

    Teleradiology aims to even radiologists' workload, ensure on-call services, reduce waiting lists, consult other specialists and cut costs. Cross-border teleradiology widens this scope beyond the country borders. However, the new service should not reduce the quality of radiology. Quality and trust are key factors in establishment of teleradiology. Additionally there are organizational, technical, legal, security and linguistic issues influencing the service. Herein, we have used experiences from two partially European Union funded telemedicine projects to evaluate factors affecting cross-border teleradiology. Clinical partners from Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Lithuania and the Netherlands went through 649 radiology test cases in two different teleradiology projects to build trust and agree about the report structure. Technical set-up was established using secure Internet data transfer, streaming technology, integration of workflows and creating structured reporting tool to overcome language barriers. The biggest barrier to overcome in cross-border teleradiology was the language issue. Establishment of the service was technically and semantically successful but limited to knee and hip X-ray examinations only because the structured reporting tool did not cover any other anatomical regions yet. Special attention has to be paid to clinical quality and trust between partners in cross-border teleradiology. Our experience shows that it is achievable. Legal, security and financial aspects are not covered in this paper because today they differ country by country. There is however an European Union level harmonization process started to enable cross-border eHealth in general.

  15. Experience in Use of Project Method During Technology Lessons in Secondary Schools of the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheludko Inna

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the opportunities and prospects for the use of experience of project method during “technology lessons” in US secondary schools, since the value of project technology implementation experience into the educational process in the USA for ensuring holistic development of children, preparing them for adult life, in which they will be able to realize themselves and benefit society, seems undeniable to improve the quality of Ukrainian education. Its structure and content accorded with national traditions and European standards have made possible the success of educational components of American secondary school. This encourages national scientists and teachers to identify and scientifically justify the ways how to use scientific achievements of American educational system. Given the above, we have defined the following objectives: to summarize progressive trends and innovative approaches to the quality training of students in national secondary schools; to formulate guidelines that will improve the efficiency of training Ukrainian students during technology lessons and as a result, will provide the successful integration of the national education system into the European educational space.

  16. Integrating physiological threshold experiments with climate modeling to project mangrove species' range expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Kyle C; Parker, John D; Cook-Patton, Susan C; Feller, Ilka C; Williams, A Park; Kellner, James R

    2015-05-01

    Predictions of climate-related shifts in species ranges have largely been based on correlative models. Due to limitations of these models, there is a need for more integration of experimental approaches when studying impacts of climate change on species distributions. Here, we used controlled experiments to identify physiological thresholds that control poleward range limits of three species of mangroves found in North America. We found that all three species exhibited a threshold response to extreme cold, but freeze tolerance thresholds varied among species. From these experiments, we developed a climate metric, freeze degree days (FDD), which incorporates both the intensity and the frequency of freezes. When included in distribution models, FDD accurately predicted mangrove presence/absence. Using 28 years of satellite imagery, we linked FDD to observed changes in mangrove abundance in Florida, further exemplifying the importance of extreme cold. We then used downscaled climate projections of FDD to project that these range limits will move northward by 2.2-3.2 km yr(-1) over the next 50 years. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Remediation Technologies Eliminate Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    All research and development has a story behind it, says Jacqueline Quinn, environmental engineer at Kennedy Space Center. For Quinn, one such story begins with the Saturn 1B launch stand at Kennedy and ends with a unique solution to a challenging environmental problem. Used in a number of Apollo missions and during the Skylab program, the Saturn 1B launch stand was dismantled following the transition to the Space Shuttle Program and stored in an open field at Kennedy. Decades later, the Center s Environmental Program Office discovered evidence of chemicals called polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the field s soil. The findings were puzzling since PCBs a toxin classified as a probable carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been banned in the United States since 1979. Before the ban, PCBs were commonly used in transformer oils that leached into the ground when the oils were changed out and dumped near transformer sites, but there were no electrical transformers near the dismantled stand. It soon became apparent that the source of the PCBs was the launch stand itself. Prior to the ban, PCBs were used extensively in paints to add elasticity and other desirable characteristics. The PCB-laden paint on the Saturn 1B launch stand was flaking off into the field s soil. Nobody knew there were PCBs in the paint, says Quinn, noting that the ingredient was not monitored carefully when it was in use in 1960s. In fact, she says, the U.S. EPA was not even established until 1970, a year after Neil Armstrong first set foot on the Moon. Nobody knew any better at the time, Quinn says, but today, we have the responsibility to return any natural environmental media to as close to pristine a condition as possible. Quinn, fellow engineer Kathleen Loftin, and other Kennedy colleagues already had experience developing unprecedented solutions for environmental contamination; the team invented the emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) technology to safely treat

  18. Methodology to remediate a mixed waste site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    In response to the need for a comprehensive and consistent approach to the complex issue of mixed waste management, a generalized methodology for remediation of a mixed waste site has been developed. The methodology is based on requirements set forth in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and incorporates ``lessons learned`` from process design, remediation methodologies, and remediation projects. The methodology is applied to the treatment of 32,000 drums of mixed waste sludge at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. Process technology options are developed and evaluated, first with regard to meeting system requirements and then with regard to CERCLA performance criteria. The following process technology options are investigated: (1) no action, (2) separation of hazardous and radioactive species, (3) dewatering, (4) drying, and (5) solidification/stabilization. The first two options were eliminated from detailed consideration because they did not meet the system requirements. A quantitative evaluation clearly showed that, based on system constraints and project objectives, either dewatering or drying the mixed waste sludge was superior to the solidification/stabilization process option. The ultimate choice between the drying and the dewatering options will be made on the basis of a technical evaluation of the relative merits of proposals submitted by potential subcontractors.

  19. Effects of remediation amendments on vadose zone microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Hannah M.; Tilton, Fred A.

    2012-08-10

    Surfactant-based foam delivery technology has been studied to remediate Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment. However, the surfactants and remediation amendments have an unknown effect on indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Microbial populations are important factors to consider in remediation efforts due to their potential to alter soil geochemistry. This project focuses on measuring microbial metabolic responses to remediation amendments in batch and column studies using Deep Vadose Zone Sediments. Initial studies of the microbes from Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone sediment showed surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and remediation amendment calcium polysulfide (CPS) had no affect on microbial growth using BiologTM Ecoplates. To move towards a more realistic field analog, soil columns were packed with Hanford 200 Area sediment. Once microbial growth in the column was verified by observing growth of the effluent solution on tryptic soy agar plates, remedial surfactants were injected into the columns, and the resulting metabolic diversity was measured. Results suggest surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) stimulates microbial growth. The soil columns were also visualized using X-ray microtomography to inspect soil packing and possibly probe for evidence of biofilms. Overall, BiologTM Ecoplates provide a rapid assay to predict effects of remediation amendments on Hanford 200 area deep vadose zone microorganisms.

  20. [Telemedicine in Bolivia: RAFT-Altiplano project, experiences, future prospects, and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Alejandro; Ugalde, Miguel; Vargas, Reynaldo; Narvaez, Ramiro; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the RAFT-Altiplano project (RAFT: Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine, or African Francophone Telemedicine Network) is to evaluate the viability, potential, and risks of implementing and developing a telemedicine network in the context of a developing country-specifically, the Altiplano region of Bolivia-to improve access to medical care and continuing education in a rural area. The activities described in this report took place between 2011 and 2013. Digital telemedicine equipment was donated to the health centers and a Microsoft®-based platform capable of integration with other technologies (using standardized formats) was developed to manage documents and clinical content electronically. Health professionals were trained in teleconsultation and the teleconsultation workflow was designed. The tele-education system used is Dudal, which requires only a small bandwidth. After three years of implementation, an organized working structure of teleconsultation and tele-education tools, adapted to the Latin American context, is now in place and connections have been established with hospitals, institutions, and health centers. The project has improved access to specialized medical care in remote health centers and third-level hospitals in urban areas, and it has become the foundation for development of the national project "TeleSalud for Bolivia" promoted by the Ministry of Health, which involves use of the new Bolivian satellite, Túpac Katari. It is viable to develop and set up telemedicine tools to serve the population in remote regions of Bolivia when they are made available to government and municipal health institutions and communication between them and the health centers takes place in a coordinated manner. The sharing of experiences, challenges, and risks encountered is very useful in designing and implementing the telemedicine project "TeleSalud for Bolivia" on a national scale.

  1. The Effects of Remedial Mathematics on the Learning of Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerlöf, Johan N. M.; Seltzer, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of remedial mathematics on performance in university-level economics courses using a natural experiment. They studied exam results prior and subsequent to the implementation of a remedial mathematics course that was compulsory for a subset of students...... and unavailable for the others, controlling for background variables. They found that, consistent with previous studies, the level of and performance in secondary school mathematics have strong predictive power on students' performances at university-level economics. However, they found relatively little evidence...... for a positive effect of remedial mathematics on student performance....

  2. ELECTROKINETIC REMEDIATION STUDY FOR CADMIUM CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bala Ramudu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental research undertaken to evaluate different purging solutions to enhance the removal of cadmium from spiked contaminated field soil by electrokinetic remediation. Three experiments were conducted when soil was saturated with deionised water and subsequently deionised water, ammonium citrate and sodium citrate were used as purging solutions at anode end. One experiment was conducted when the soil was saturated with ammonium citrate and itself was used as the purging solution. Results showed that 49% reduction of cadmium concentration was achieved in the case of soil saturated (washed with ammonium citrate as well as purging solution also was ammonium citrate. The soil pH and washing solutions were the most important factors in controlling the removal of cadmium in electrokinetic remediation process.

  3. Electrokinetic remediation prefield test methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodko, Dalibor (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Methods for determining the parameters critical in designing an electrokinetic soil remediation process including electrode well spacing, operating current/voltage, electroosmotic flow rate, electrode well wall design, and amount of buffering or neutralizing solution needed in the electrode wells at operating conditions are disclosed These methods are preferably performed prior to initiating a full scale electrokinetic remediation process in order to obtain efficient remediation of the contaminants.

  4. Phytotechnologies: remediation of environmental contaminants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anjum, Naser A

    2013-01-01

    .... The book offers an evaluation of the known plant species for their different roles in phytotechnological applications in relation to remediation of varied environmental contaminants and also explores...

  5. SURFACE REMEDIATION IN THE ALEUTIAN ISLANDS: A CASE STUDY OF AMCHITKA ISLAND, ALASKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giblin, M. O.; Stahl, D. C.; Bechtel, J. A.

    2002-02-25

    Amchitka Island, Alaska, was at one time an integral player in the nation's defense program. Located in the North Pacific Ocean in the Aleutian Island archipelago, the island was intermittently inhabited by several key government agencies, including the U.S. Army, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy), and the U.S. Navy. Since 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted extensive investigations on Amchitka to determine the nature and extent of contamination resulting from historic nuclear testing. The uninhabited island was the site of three high-yield nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. These test locations are now part of the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's Environmental Management Program. In the summer of 2001, the DOE launched a large-scale remediation effort on Amchitka to perform agreed-upon corrective actions to the surface of the island. Due to the lack of resources available on Amchitka and logistical difficulties with conducting work at such a remote location, the DOE partnered with the Navy and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to share certain specified costs and resources. Attempting to negotiate the partnerships while organizing and implementing the surface remediation on Amchitka proved to be a challenging endeavor. The DOE was faced with unexpected changes in Navy and USACE scope of work, accelerations in schedules, and risks associated with construction costs at such a remote location. Unfavorable weather conditions also proved to be a constant factor, often slowing the progress of work. The Amchitka Island remediation project experience has allowed the DOE to gain valuable insights into how to anticipate and mitigate potential problems associated with future remediation projects. These lessons learned will help the DOE in conducting future work more efficiently, and can also serve as a guide for other agencies performing similar

  6. Overview of the recovery and processing of {sup 233}U from the Oak Ridge molten salt reactor experiment (MSRE) remediation activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.; Dai, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) was operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1965 to 1969 to test the concept of a high-temperature, homogeneous, fluid-fueled reactor. The discovery that UF{sub 6} and F{sub 2} migrated from the storage tanks into distant pipes and a charcoal bed resulted in significant activities to remove and recover the {sup 233}U and to decommission the reactor. The recovered fissile uranium will be converted into uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8} ), which is a suitable form for long-term storage. This publication reports the research and several new developments that were needed to carry out these unique activities. (author)

  7. High Resolution Site Characterization as key element for proper design and cost estimation of groundwater remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Dijkshoorn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Substantial amounts of money are spent each year on cleaning up ground water contaminations that were caused by historical industrial site activities. Too often, however, remedial objectives are not achieved within the anticipated time frame. Moreover, remedial budgets which were estimated prior to the start of remediation turn out to be largely insufficient to meet the remedial objectives. This situation, very common, creates significant troubles for all the stakeholders involved in the remediation project. The reason for not meeting remedial regulatory closure criteria or exceeding remedial budgets is often due to an incomplete conceptual site model. Having conducted high resolution site characterization programs at numerous sites where remediation was previously conducted, ERM has found several recurring themes: • Missed source areas and plumes; • Inadequate understanding of source area and plume architectures (i.e., three-dimensional contaminant distribution; • Inadequate understanding of the effects of site (hydrogeologic conditions on the ability to access contamination (i.e., via remedial additive injections of groundwater/soil gas extraction. This paper explains why remediations often fail and what the alternatives to prevent these failures (and exceeding remedial budgets are. More specifically, it focuses on alternative investigation methods and approaches that help to get to a more complete (high resolution conceptual site model. This more complete conceptual site model in return helps a more focused remedial design with a higher remedial efficiency. As a minimum, it will take away a lot of (financial uncertainty during the decision making when selecting a remedial alternative. Contaminants that have a greater density then water are known to have a greater complexity in terms of both investigation as well as remediation. Therefore, they will be the main focus of this paper.

  8. Flow assurance intervention, hydrates remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, Christopher S. [Oceaneering International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the issues of removing hydrates in sub sea flow lines and associated equipment with an Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) of opportunity and a multi-service-vessel (MSV). The paper is split into three topics: the equipment used with the ROV, assessing the interface points and handling fluids produced from drawing down the pressure. Each section is explained thoroughly and backed up with real world experience. The equipment section details information from actual jobs performed and why the particular components were utilized. The system is generally contained in an ROV mounted skid. Pumps are utilized to draw down the pressure inside the hydrated section of equipment, removing one of the three necessary components for hydrates formation. Once the section is pumped down, several options exist for handling the fluids pumped out of the system: pumping to surface, re-injection into the well, or injection into an operating flow line. This method of hydrates remediation is both economical and timely. Hydrate blockages form in low temperatures and high pressures. Reducing the pressure or increasing the temperature so the conditions lie to the right of the hydrate dissociation curve will slowly decompose the blockage. Depressurization and the use of MEG or methanol will give favorable conditions to remove the hydrate plug. Oceaneering has the capabilities to remove hydrates using the FRS in conjunction with an installation vessel to dispose of the gas and fluid removed from the flow line. Hydrate remediation techniques should be implemented into the initial design to reduce costs later. The cost of stopped production combined with the day rate for equipment needed for hydrate removal outweighs the costs if no technique is utilized. (author)

  9. [Experience of knowledge translation in the ITSAL (immigration, work and health) research project with representatives of the target population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronda, Elena; López-Jacob, M José; Paredes-Carbonell, Joan J; López, Pilar; Boix, Pere; García, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the experience of knowledge translation between researchers of the ITSAL (immigration, work and health) project and representatives of organizations working with immigrants to discuss the results obtained in the project and future research lines. A meeting was held, attended by three researchers and 18 representatives from 11 institutions. Following a presentation of the methodology and results of the project, the participants discussed the results presented and research areas of interest, thus confirming matches between the two sides and obtaining proposals of interest for the ITSAL project. We understand the process described as an approach to social validation of some of the main results of this project. This experience has allowed us to open a channel of communication with the target population of the study, in line with the necessary two-way interaction between researchers and users. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

  11. The Project PLASMONX for Plasma Acceleration Experiments and a Thomson X-Ray Source at SPARC

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, Luca; Alessandria, Franco; Bacci, Alberto; Baldeschi, Walter; Barbini, Alessandro; Bellaveglia, Marco; Bertolucci, Sergio; Biagini, Maria; Boni, Roberto; Bonifacio, Rodolfo; Boscolo, Ilario; Boscolo, Manuela; Bottigli, Ubaldo; Broggi, Francesco; Castellano, Michele; Cecchetti, Carlo A; Cialdi, Simone; Clozza, Alberto; De Martinis, Carlo; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Drago, Alessandro; Esposito, Adolfo; Ferrario, Massimo; Ficcadenti, L; Filippetto, Daniele; Fusco, Valeria; Galimberti, Marco; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo; Ghigo, Andrea; Giove, Dario; Giulietti, Antonio; Giulietti, Danilo; Gizzi, Leonida A; Golosio, Bruno; Guiducci, Susanna; Incurvati, Maurizio; Köster, Petra; Labate, Luca; Ligi, Carlo; Marcellini, Fabio; Maroli, Cesare; Mauri, Marco; Migliorati, Mauro; Mostacci, Andrea; Oliva, Pier N; Palumbo, Luigi; Pellegrino, Luigi; Petrillo, Vittoria; Piovella, Nicola; Poggiu, Angela; Pozzoli, Roberto; Preger, Miro; Ricci, Ruggero; Rome, Massimiliano; Rossi, Antonella; Sanelli, Claudio; Serio, Mario; Sgamma, Francesco; Spataro, Bruno; Stecchi, Alessandro; Stella, Angelo; Stumbo, Simone; Tazzioli, Franco; Tommasini, Paolo; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vescovi, Mario; Vicario, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    We present the status of the activity on the project PLASMONX, which foresees the installation of a multi-TW Ti:Sa laser system at the CNR-ILIL laboratory to conduct plasma acceleration experiments and the construction of an additional beam line at SPARC to develop a Thomson X-ray source at INFN-LNF. After pursuing self-injection experiments at ILIL, when the electron beam at SPARC will be available the SPARC laser system will be upgraded to TW power level in order to conduct either external injection plasma acceleration experiments and ultra-bright X-ray pulse generation with the Thomson source. Results of numerical simulations modeling the interaction of the SPARC electron beam and the counter-propagating laser beam are presented with detailed discussion of the monochromatic X-ray beam spectra generated by Compton backscattering: X-ray energies are tunable in the range 20 to 1000 keV, with pulse duration from 30 fs to 20 ps. Preliminary simulations of plasma acceleration with self-injection are illustrated,...

  12. Adult English Language Learners Constructing and Sharing Their Stories and Experiences: The Cultural and Linguistic Autobiography Writing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    This article is the culmination of the Cultural and Linguistic Autobiography (CLA) writing project, which details narrative descriptions of adult English language learners' (ELLs') cultural and linguistic experiences and how those experiences may have influenced the ways in which these learners constructed and reconstructed their identities.…

  13. Remediating Remediation: From Basic Writing to Writing across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This article challenges faculty members and administrators to rethink current definitions of remediation. First year college students are increasingly placed into basic writing courses due to a perceived inability to use English grammar correctly, but it must be acknowledged that all students will encounter the need for remediation as they attempt…

  14. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 18. Part 1B: Citations with abstracts, sections 10 through 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3,638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D and D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized sites Remedial Action Program; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluation; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues.

  15. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Volume 18. Part 1A: Citations with abstracts, sections 1 through 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3,638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration program; (2) DOE D and D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluation; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues.

  16. Supporting Innovation in Organic Agriculture: A European Perspective Using Experience from the SOLID Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padel, Susanne; Vaarst, Mette; Zaralis, K.

    2015-01-01

    the alternative framework of innovation systems describing innovation as the outcome of stakeholder interaction and examples from the SOLID (Sustainable Organic Low-Input Dairying) project to discuss the role of farmers, researchers and knowledge exchange for innovation. We used a farmer-led participatory...... approach to identify problems of organic and low-input dairy farming in Europe and develop and evaluate innovative practices. Experience so far shows that improvements of sustainability can be made through better exploitation of knowledge. For example, it is recognized that optimal utilization of good...... quality forage is vitally important, but farmers showed a lack of confidence in the reliability of forage production both in quantity and quality. We conclude that the systems framework improves the understanding of innovation processes in organic agriculture. Farmer-led research is an effective way...

  17. On the use of airborne gravimetry in gravity field modelling: Experiences from the AGMASCO project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastos, L.; Cunha, S.; Forsberg, René

    2000-01-01

    Important areas of the earth are still not covered by accurate gravity measurements. The gravity field may be determined by using different techniques but airborne gravity surveying is becoming the most powerful tool available today. One of the main problems in airborne gravity is the separation...... of the vertical accelerations acting on the airborne platform from the natural gravity signal. With the advances in DGPS techniques new prospects arise for gravity field recovery which are of great importance for geodesy, geophysics oceanography and satellite navigation. Furthermore, airborne gravimetric...... and the methods validated. Recovery of the gravity values directly from measurements with the Lacoste & Romberg air/sea gravimeter and from measurements with the inertial sensors was analysed. The potential of these sensors to recover gravity and the experience gained within this project are reported here....

  18. Krypton calibration of time projection chambers of the NA61/SHINE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Naskret, Michal

    The NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN is searching for the critical point in phase transition between quark-gluon plasma and hadronic matter. To do so we use the most precise apparatus - Time Projection Chamber. Its main task is to find trajectories of particles created in a relativistic collision. In order to improve efficiency of TPCs, we introduce calibration using radioactive krypton gas. Simulation of events in a TPC cham- ber through a decay of excited krypton atoms gives us a spectrum, which is later fitted to the model spectrum of krypton from a Monte-Carlo simulation. The data obtained in such a way serves us to determine malfunctioning electronics in TPCs. Thanks to the krypton calibration we can create a map of pad by pad gains. In this thesis I will de- scribe in detail the NA61 experimental setup, krypton calibration procedure, calibration algorithm and results for recent calibration runs

  19. Controlled Sonar Exposure Experiments on Cetaceans in Norwegian Waters: Overview of the 3S-Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Frans-Peter A; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A; Curé, Charlotte; Kleivane, Lars; Sivle, Lise Doksæter; van Ijsselmuide, Sander P; Visser, Fleur; von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Dekeling, René P A

    2016-01-01

    In mitigating the risk of sonar operations, the behavioral response of cetaceans is one of the major knowledge gaps that needs to be addressed. The 3S-Project has conducted a number of controlled exposure experiments with a realistic sonar source in Norwegian waters from 2006 to 2013. In total, the following six target species have been studied: killer, long-finned pilot, sperm, humpback, minke, and northern bottlenose whales. A total of 38 controlled sonar exposures have been conducted on these species. Responses from controlled and repeated exposure runs have been recorded using acoustic and visual observations as well as with electronic tags on the target animal. So far, the first dose-response curves as well as an overview of the scored severity of responses have been revealed. In this paper, an overview is presented of the approach for the study, including the results so far as well as the current status of the ongoing analysis.

  20. Fermentative processes for environmental remediation

    OpenAIRE

    Grilli, Selene

    2013-01-01

    The growing interest in environmental protection has led to the development of emerging biotechnologies for environmental remediation also introducing the biorefinery concept. This work mainly aimed to evaluate the applicability of innovative biotechnologies for environmental remediation and bioenergy production, throught fermentative processes. The investigated biotechnologies for waste and wastewater treatment and for the valorisation of specific feedstocks and energy recovery, were m...

  1. Strategic considerations for the sustainable remediation of nuclear installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobbs, S; Orr, P; Weber, I

    2017-08-05

    Nuclear sites around the world are being decommissioned and remedial actions are being undertaken to enable the sites or parts of the sites to be reused. Although this is relatively straightforward for most sites, experience has suggested that preventative action is needed to minimise the impact of remediation activities on the environment and the potential burden to future generations. Removing all contamination in order to make a site suitable for any use generates waste and has associated environmental, social and economic detriments and benefits that should be taken into account. Recent experience of OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) member countries in the remediation of contaminated land, predominantly contaminated soil and groundwater, on nuclear sites during decommissioning has been assessed by an NEA task group. The experience was used to identify strategic considerations for nuclear site remediation, to consider the application of sustainability principles to nuclear site remediation, to describe good practice, and to make recommendations for further research and development. The key aspects that were identified were that 1) site remediation should be sustainable by resulting in an overall net benefit; and 2) an adaptive approach is essential in order to take into account the inherent uncertainty associated with the decommissioning and site remediation timescales. A report describing the findings was published by OECD/NEA in 2016. The conclusions provide insights to decision makers, regulators, implementers and stakeholders involved in nuclear site decommissioning so that they can achieve sustainable remediation of nuclear sites, now and in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of comprehensive care system for children with autism syndrome disorders in Russia: one project experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alekhina S.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Attention to the issue of children with ASD in our country is growing steadily. Since the release of the new Law «About the education in Russian Federation», where for the first time this category of children was secured by state guarantees, all normative acts and basic solutions are focused on the development of comprehensive care for children with ASD and their families. Official initiatives are in many ways supported with the activity of community organizations and parental associations, representing the interests of families. Experience of many years becomes the basis for efficient solutions and social problems analysis of the identification, education and support of people with autism. Also it becomes platform for social and psychological support of their families. Currently, in the Russian Federation, domestic model for providing comprehensive medical and social, psychological and educational assistance for children with autism just begin to develop. However, the policy, conducted by the government for individuals with disabilities, including children with ASD, confirms state structures readiness to take the main measures of comprehensive rehabilitation and habilitation. The article describes the experience of creating integrated care systems for children with ASD in Russia. The example of project real¬ization involving three of the Russian Federation states, which is aimed at ensuring high quality of life of children, is shown

  3. A Time Projection Chamber for High-Rate Experiments: Towards an Upgrade of the ALICE TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Ketzer, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a powerful detector for 3-dimensional tracking and particle identification for ultra-high multiplicity events. It is the central tracking device of many experiments, e.g. the ALICE experiment at CERN. The necessity of a switching electrostatic gate, which prevents ions produced in the amplification region o MWPCs from entering the drift volume, however, restricts its application to trigger rates of the order of 1 kHz. Charge amplification by Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) foils instead of proportional wires offers an intrinsic suppression of the ion backflow, although not to the same level as a gating grid. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the distortions due to residual space charge from back-drifting ions can be limited to a few cm, and thus can be corrected using standard calibration techniques. A prototype GEM-TPC has been built with the largest active volume to date for a detector of this type. It has been commissioned with cosmics and particle beams at t...

  4. Intersectionalities of Gender Violence: Legal Remedies: Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Goldscheid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Critiques of legal remedies’ capacity adequately to address the intersectional nature of gender violence lie at the heart of both theoretical and practical discourse. Concern about remedies complements the important literature detailing the narrative experiences of those who experience violence grounded in multiple intersections of identity. This is an introduction to a set of papers that represent highlights from the conference entitled “International Congress on Gender Violence: Intersectionalities”. The papers address approaches to legal remedies that take into account the intersectional nature of gender violence. Las críticas a la capacidad de los remedies legales para abordar la naturaleza interseccional de la violencia de género están en el centro del discurso teórico y práctico. La preocupación sobre los remedios complementa la importante literatura que detalla las experiencias narrativas de las personas que experimentan violencia alojada en múltiples intersecciones de identidad. Esta es una introducción a artículos representativos del Congreso Internacional sobre Violencia de Género: Intersecciones. Los artículos abordan un acercamiento a los remedios legales que tienen en cuenta la naturaleza interseccional de la violencia de género. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2710535

  5. Gunnar uranium mine environmental remediation - Northern Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muldoon, Joe; Yankovich, Tamara; Schramm, Laurier L. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Gunnar Mine and mill site was the largest of some 38 now-abandoned uranium mines that were developed and operated in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada, during the Cold War years. During their operating lifetimes these mines produced large quantities of ore and tailings. The Gunnar mine (open pit and underground) produced over 5 million tonnes of uranium ore and nearly 4.4 million tonnes of mine tailings during its operations from 1955 through 1963. An estimated 2.2 to 2.7 million m{sup 3} of waste rock that was generated during the processing of the ore abuts the shores of Lake Athabasca, the 22. largest lake in the world. After closure in the 1960's, the Gunnar site was abandoned with little to no decommissioning being done. The Saskatchewan Research Council has been contracted to manage the clean-up of these abandoned northern uranium mine and mill sites. The Gunnar Mine, because of the magnitude of tailings and waste rock, is subject to an environmental site assessment process regulated by both provincial and federal governments. This process requires a detailed study of the environmental impacts that have resulted from the mining activities and an analysis of projected impacts from remediation efforts. The environmental assessment process, specific site studies, and public involvement initiatives are all now well underway. Due to the many uncertainties associated with an abandoned site, an adaptive remediation approach, utilizing a decision tree, presented within the environmental assessment documents will be used as part of the site regulatory licensing. A critical early task was dealing with major public safety hazards on the site. The site originally included many buildings that were remnants of a community of approximately 800 people who once occupied the site. These buildings, many of which contained high levels of asbestos, had to be appropriately abated and demolished. Similarly, the original mine head frame and mill site buildings, many of which

  6. Remediation System Evaluation, Vineland Chemical Company Superfund Site, Vineland, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vineland Chemical Company Superfund Site was selected by EPA OSRTI based on recommendations from the EPA Remedial Project Manager for the site and from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Philadelphia District that provides oversight of remedial..

  7. Electroreductive Remediation of Halogenated Environmental Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Erin T; McGuire, Caitlyn M; Mubarak, Mohammad S; Peters, Dennis G

    2016-12-28

    Electrochemical reduction of halogenated organic compounds is gaining increasing attention as a strategy for the remediation of environmental pollutants. We begin this review by discussing key components (cells, electrodes, solvents, and electrolytes) in the design of a procedure for degrading a targeted pollutant, and we describe and contrast some experimental techniques used to explore and characterize the electrochemical behavior of that pollutant. Then, we describe how to probe various mechanistic features of the pertinent electrochemistry (including stepwise versus concerted carbon-halogen bond cleavage, identification of reaction intermediates, and elucidation of mechanisms). Knowing this information is vital to the successful development of a remediation procedure. Next, we outline techniques, instrumentation, and cell designs involved in scaling up a benchtop experiment to an industrial-scale system. Finally, the last and major part of this review is directed toward surveying electrochemical studies of various categories of halogenated pollutants (chlorofluorocarbons; disinfection byproducts; pesticides, fungicides, and bactericides; and flame retardants) and looking forward to future developments.

  8. In situ soil remediation: Bacteria or fungi?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutright, T.J.; Lee, S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-07-01

    Contamination of the environment is not a new problem. For most of recorded history, the unwanted byproducts of industrial and residential processes have been dumped into unlined pits or nearby streams. Although disposal techniques have greatly improved, significant quantities of hazardous materials are still being released to the environment via accidental spills and leaking underground storage tanks. One particular group of contaminants of critical environmental concern is polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAH-contaminated sites typically cover large areas; therefore, the development of in situ remediation techniques such as bioremediation is strongly emphasized. In situations when inherent microorganisms are not capable of degrading the contaminants, foreign strains must be used. Bioremediation experiments were conducted to compare the remediation efficiencies of a bacteria and a fungus for an industrially PAH contaminated soil. Specifically, the use of three supplemental nutrient solutions were investigated in conjunction with the bacteria Achromobacter sp. and fungus Cunninghamella echinulata var. elegans.

  9. Ethics control of vertebrate animals experiments in biosatellite BION-M1 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, Eugene

    During April 19-May 19, 2013 it was realized 30-days flight of Russian biosatellite Bion-M1. The main goal of this flight was to study effects of microgravity upon behavior and structural-functional state of different physiological systems of vertebrates. The folloving species were accommodated aboard of biosatellite: 45 mice C57bl/6, 8 Mongolian gerbils Meriones unguiculatus, 15 lizards, i.e. geckos Chondrodctylus turneri Gray, and fish Oreochromis mossambicus. The selection and traing of mice for the flight and ground-based control experiments was carried out at the Research Institute of Mitoengineering by Moscow State University. The protocols for animals care and reserch were revised and adopted by Bioethics Commission of above mentioned institute (decision on November 01, 2013, N35). The final version of Bion-M1 Scientific Reseach Program and protocols for separate experiments were discussed and adopted by Biomedical Ethics Commission of Institute of Biomedical Problems (decision on April 4, 2014, N317). The IMBP Commission has a status of Physiological Section of Russian Bioethics Committee by Russian Commision for UNESCO affairs and follows the Russian Bioethical Guidelines for Experiments in Aerospace and Naval Medicine and other national and international rules including COSPAR International Policy and Guidelines for Animal Care and Use in Space-born Research. Because US-scientists were the main partners in mice investigations the decision of IMBP Biomedical Commission related to Bion-M1 project was sended for information to Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of NASA Ames Research Center. Postflight estimation of mice was done by Russian veterinary with the participation of NASA Chief veterinary.

  10. Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Vieira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Several reviews of the literature support the idea that cognitive deficits observed in a large percentage of patients with schizophrenia are responsible for the cognitive performance deficit and functional disability associated with the disease. The grow- ing importance of neurocognition in Psychiatry, especially with regard to planning strategies and rehabilitative therapies to improve the prognosis of patients contrib- utes to the interest of achieving this literature review on cognitive rehabilitation in schizophrenia. In this work, drawn from research in the areas of schizophrenia, cog- nition, cognitive rehabilitation and cognitive remediation (2000-2012 through PubMed and The Cochrane Collaboration, it is intended, to describe the types of psychological and behavioral therapies recommended in the treatment of cognitive disabilities in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. This review will also highlight the clinical and scientific evidence of each of these therapies, as their effect on cognitive performance, symptoms and functionality in patients with schizophrenia.

  11. DDE remediation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John E; Ou, Li-Tse; All-Agely, Abid

    2008-01-01

    DDT and its metabolites, DDD and DDE, have been shown to be recalcitrant to degradation. The parent compound, DDT, was used extensively worldwide starting in 1939 and was banned in the United States in 1973. The daughter compound, DDE, may result from aerobic degradation, abiotic dehydrochlorination, or photochemical decomposition. DDE has also occurred as a contaminant in commercial-grade DDT. The p,p'-DDE isomer is more biologically active than the o,p-DDE, with a reported half-life of -5.7 years. However, when DDT was repeatedly applied to the soil, the DDE concentration may remain unchanged for more than 20 yr. Remediation of DDE-contaminated soil and water may be done by several techniques. Phytoremediation involves translocating DDT, DDD, and DDE from the soil into the plant, although some aquatic species (duckweed > elodea > parrot feather) can transform DDT into predominantly DDD with some DDE being formed. Of all the plants that can uptake DDE, Cucurbita pepo has been the most extensively studied, with translocation values approaching "hyperaccumulation" levels. Soil moisture, temperature, and plant density have all been documented as important factors in the uptake of DDE by Cucurbita pepo. Uptake may also be influenced positively by amendments such as biosurfactants, mycorrhizal inoculants, and low molecular weight organic acids (e.g., citric and oxalic acids). DDE microbial degradation by dehalogenases, dioxygenases, and hydrolases occurs under the proper conditions. Although several aerobic degradation pathways have been proposed, none has been fully verified. Very few aerobic pure cultures are capable of fully degrading DDE to CO2. Cometabolism of DDE by Pseudomonas sp., Alicaligens sp., and Terrabacter sp. grown on biphenyl has been reported; however, not all bacterial species that produce biphenyl dioxygenase degraded DDE. Arsenic and copper inhibit DDE degradation by aerobic microorganisms. Similarly, metal chelates such as EDTA inhibit the

  12. Scientific Literacy and the Socially Disadvantaged Youth--A Laboratory-Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitrogan, David

    1969-01-01

    Presents the procedures, results and conclusions of an experimental project conducted to provide remedial reading experiences coordinated with physical science activities to 20 socially disadvantaged students in the 8th grade of a special service school. A description of some of the science activities and innovative teaching methods is included.…

  13. Inclusion of social indicators in decision support tools for the selection of sustainable site remediation options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuyns, Valérie

    2016-12-15

    Sustainable remediation requires a balanced decision-making process in which environmental, economic and social aspects of different remediation options are all considered together and the optimum remediation solution is selected. More attention has been paid to the evaluation of environmental and economic aspects, in particular to reduce the human and environmental risks and the remediation costs, to the exclusion of social aspects of remediation. This paper investigates how social aspects are currently considered in sustainability assessments of remediation projects. A selection of decision support tools (DSTs), used for the sustainability assessment of a remediation project, is analyzed to define how social aspects are considered in those tools. The social indicator categories of the Sustainable Remediation Forum - United Kingdom (SuRF-UK), are used as a basis for this evaluation. The consideration of social aspects in the investigated decision support tools is limited, but a clear increase is noticed in more recently developed tools. Among the five social indicator categories defined by SuRF-UK to facilitate a holistic consideration of social aspects of a remediation project only "Human health and safety" is systematically taken into account. "Neighbourhood and locality" is also often addressed, mostly emphasizing the potential disturbance caused by the remediation activities. However, the evaluation of 'Ethics and Equality', Communities and community involvement', and 'Uncertainty and evidence' is often neglected. Nevertheless, concrete examples can be found in some of the investigated tools. Specific legislation, standard procedures, and guidelines that have to be followed in a region or country are mainly been set up in the context of protecting human and ecosystem health, safety and prevention of nuisance. However, they sometimes already include some of the aspects addressed by the social indicators. In this perspective the use of DST to evaluate the

  14. Phototropism experiments in microgravity-the Seedling Growth project in the EMCS on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, John; Edelmann, Richard; Herranz, Raul; Medina, Francisco Javier; Millar, Katherine

    The microgravity environment aboard orbiting spacecraft has provided a unique laboratory to explore important topics in basic plant biology. Our group has utilized the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to study plant growth, development, tropisms, and gene expression in a series of spaceflight experiments. The most current project performed on the ISS was termed Seeding Growth-1 (SG-1) which builds on the previous TROPI (for tropisms) experiments. TROPI-1 was the first EMCS experiment, and we discovered a novel red-light-based phototropism in hypocotyls of seedlings grown in microgravity (Millar et al. 2010). In TROPI-2, our experiments were extended to reduced gravity levels and found that 0.1-0.3 g can attenuate the red-light response (Kiss et al. 2012). In addition, we performed gene profiling studies and noted that approximately 280 genes that were differentially regulated at least two-fold in the space samples compared to the ground controls (Correll et al. 2013). Major technical and operational changes in SG-1 (launched in March 2013) compared to the TROPI experiments include: improvements in lighting conditions within the EMCS to optimize the environment for phototropism studies and the use of infrared illumination to provide high-quality images of the seedlings. In SG-1, the red-light-based phototropism in roots and hypocotyls of seedlings that was noted in TROPI-2 was confirmed and now can be more precisely characterized based on the improvements in procedures. As we move forward, the SG-2 experiments (to be launched in 2014), in addition to a continued focus on phototropism, will consider the cell cycle as well as the growth and proliferation of plant cells in microgravity (Matía et al. 2010). Furthermore, the lessons learned from sequential experiments from TROPI-1 to TROPI-2 to SG-1 can provide insights to other researchers developing space experiments in plant biology. References: Correll M.J., T

  15. Project Based Learning experiences in the space engineering education at Technical University of Madrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jacobo; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; del Cura, Juan M.; Ezquerro, José M.; Lapuerta, Victoria; Cordero-Gracia, Marta

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the innovation activities performed in the field of space education since the academic year 2009/10 at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM), in collaboration with the Spanish User Support and Operations Center (E-USOC), the center assigned by the European Space Agency (ESA) in Spain to support the operations of scientific experiments on board the International Space Station. These activities have been integrated within the last year of the UPM Aerospace Engineering degree. A laboratory has been created, where students have to validate and integrate the subsystems of a microsatellite using demonstrator satellites. In parallel, the students participate in a Project Based Learning (PBL) training process in which they work in groups to develop the conceptual design of a space mission. One student in each group takes the role of project manager, another one is responsible for the mission design and the rest are each responsible for the design of one of the satellite subsystems. A ground station has also been set up with the help of students developing their final thesis, which will allow future students to perform training sessions and learn how to communicate with satellites, how to receive telemetry and how to process the data. Several surveys have been conducted along two academic years to evaluate the impact of these techniques in engineering learning. The surveys evaluate the acquisition of specific and generic competences, as well as the students' degree of satisfaction with respect to the use of these learning methodologies. The results of the surveys and the perception of the lecturers show that PBL encourages students' motivation and improves their results. They not only acquire better technical training, but also improve their transversal skills. It is also pointed out that this methodology requires more dedication from lecturers than traditional methods.

  16. The Arnot capacity increase project - An integrated boiler and turbine retrofit by Alstom - Implementation and operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Mike; Stephen, Don; Rich, Glyn; Mills, Jeff; Allen, Steve

    2010-09-15

    In cooperation with South African utility giant Eskom, Alstom has undertaken an ambitious project to upgrade the six-unit Arnot Power Station. The objective was to retrofit major plant components in a cost effective manner in order to extend plant life and increase output. This paper will consider the implementation of the project, the challenges overcome and the operational experience subsequently gained. Lessons learned will be identified. Conclusions will be drawn concerning the effectiveness of a comprehensive feasibility study prior to project implementation and the ability of modern design and manufacturing techniques to retrofit older machines, thus releasing latent potential.

  17. A Japan-Sino joint project, ADEC - Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, M.

    2004-05-01

    In recent years, aeolian dust has been thought to be an important factor of the climate system on the earth by the radiative forcing effect in the atmosphere and by the influence on the carbon dioxide cycle because deposited dust supplies nutrient salts for the phytoplankton on the ocean surface. Among them, radiative forcing direct and/or indirect effects are important factors of the global warming. Nevertheless, the reliability of the evaluation regarding the radiative forcing impact of aeolian dust is very low. [IPCC, 2001]. This is because the understanding and the model representations of dust entrainment, spatial and temporal distribution of dust, and optical properties of dust particles are not so accurate. Based on this background, Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact (ADEC) was started in April 2000 as a Japan-Sino Joint Project. The goal of this project is to evaluate the global dust supply to the atmosphere and its radiative forcing direct effect. For this purpose, we have made: 1) in situ observations at desert areas in China for wind erosion processes, 2) network observations from China to Japan, ranging from 80 to 140 East, for understanding spatial-size distribution, chemical, and optical properties of dust particles, and 3) numerical simulation by GCM dust model for evaluation of dust impact on the global climate over the past 50 years. This was planned as a five-year project and two intensive observations, IOP-1, April 12-25 2002, and IOP-2, March 15-26 2003, were put into practice. Intensive observations were made at 6 sites in China (Qira, Aksu, Dunhuang, Shapotou, Beijing, and Qingdao) and 4 sites in Japan (Naha, Fukuoka, Nagoya, and Tsukuba). Preliminary results show that 1) saltation flux at a gobi desert monitored by a newly developed sand particle counter was around 10 times larger than that of a sand dune, which will be caused by the difference of the parent soil size distribution of each ground condition, 2) the background of KOSA

  18. Sydney Tar Ponds Remediation: Experience to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Bryson, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    The infamous "Sydney Tar Ponds" are well known as one of the largest toxic waste sites of Canada, due to almost 100 years of steelmaking in Sydney, a once beautiful and peaceful city located on the east side of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. This article begins with a contextual overview of the Tar Ponds issue including a brief…

  19. Development of an Automated Remedy Performance Evaluation Program - 13622

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkin, Matthew J.; Kennel, Jonathan [S.S. Papadopulos and Assoc., Inc., 7944 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD (United States); Biebesheimer, Frederick; Dooley, David [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Performance monitoring is a vital element of groundwater remediation. Unfortunately, the enormous efforts and costs that are expended procuring, managing, processing and storing monitoring data are often not subject to correspondingly rigorous evaluation. This is despite the fact that many steps in the process are predictable and are repeated many times over the remedy life cycle. At the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, a program is underway to automate many of these steps - processing, formatting any analyzing large volumes of heterogeneous data associated with the operation of several groundwater pump-and-treat (P and T) and in-situ remedies. The Automated Remedy Performance Evaluation Program (ARPEP) was developed from a work-flow process designed to deliver (a) monthly data summaries and preliminary analysis, (b) quarterly performance assessments, and (c) annual roll-up analyses that detect changes in long-term monitoring datasets and support remedy optimization. The intent of the ARPEP is to provide detailed, systematic and traceable data summaries, depictions and analyses that can be used by project scientists to complete their evaluation of remedy performance. The ARPEP work-flow was formalized following extensive review of applicable guidance, regulation and industry standards. The ARPEP incorporates disparate data types collected over different frequencies, such as water levels and pumping rates recorded every minute, and groundwater sample results obtained on quarterly, annual or irregular intervals. The data are processed, reduced to frequencies suitable for assessment, and combined in various ways leading to performance indicators such as (a) pumped well capacities and system downtime that reflect operational performance; (b) hydraulic gradients and areas of hydraulic containment that reflect hydraulic performance; and (c) time-series (longitudinal) and geo-statistical (spatial) trend analyses that reflect progress toward attainment of Remedial

  20. Lessons learned from national food fortification projects: experiences from Morocco, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, James P; Laillou, Arnaud; Rohner, Fabian; Northrop-Clewes, Christine A; Macdonald, Barbara; Moench-Pfanner, Regina

    2012-12-01

    Fortification of staple foods has been repeatedly recommended as an effective approach to reduce micronutrient deficiencies. With the increased number of fortification projects globally, there is a need to share practical lessons learned relating to their implementation and responses to project-related and external challenges. To document the achievements, challenges, lessons learned, and management responses associated with national fortification projects in Morocco, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam. Independent end-of-project evaluations conducted for each project served as the primary data source and contain the history of and project activities undertaken for, each fortification project. Other sources, including national policy documents, project reports from the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) and other stakeholders, industry assessments, and peer-reviewed articles, were used to document the current responses to challenges and future project plans. All projects had key achievements related to the development of fortification standards and the procurement of equipment for participating industry partners. Mandatory fortification of wheat flour was a key success in Morocco and Uzbekistan. Ensuring the quality of fortified foods was a common challenge experienced across the projects, as were shifts in consumption patterns and market structures. Adjustments were made to the projects' design to address the challenges faced. National fortification projects are dynamic and must be continually modified in response to specific performance issues and broader shifts in market structure and consumption patterns.

  1. Enhanced remediation of an oily sludge with saline water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the potentials of saline (that is, brackish) water to enhance the remediation of an oily sludge, which was part of the waste stream from the improvement project of the Tank Farm at the Bonny Island in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. Twice weekly, five separate laboratory-scale reactors (labeled A, B, ...

  2. Mediated Instruction and Redundancy Remediation in Sciences in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A computer designed instruction on circulatory system developed on power point projection was used in treating the experimental group, while the expository pedagogical strategy was used to teach the control groups on the same lesson. Redundancy remediation achievement test (RRAT) was developed to test the ability ...

  3. Remediation of Legacy Arsenic Mining Areas in Yunnan Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian H. von Lindern

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions. The success of the demonstration project was recognized and has provided direction and momentum for a wider effort by the Province to address mining pollution and water contamination challenges. It demonstrates the success of using known techniques for environmental remediation in the US, with local partners in China responding to their communities’ health and environmental problems.

  4. FEASIBILITY OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF SOILS TO IMPROVE REMEDIAL ACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydraulic fracturing, a technique commonly used to increase the yields of oil wells, could improve the effectiveness of several methods of in situ remediation. This project consisted of laboratory and field tests in which hydraulic fractures were created in soil. Laboratory te...

  5. Design-Build Highway Projects : A Review of Practices and Experiences, Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Texas has employed different project delivery methods in recent years in an effort to add capacity, reduce congestion, and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the states transportation system. These transportation improvement projects are ...

  6. Implementation of a Project Management Office (PMO)--experiences from year 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isola, Miriam; Polikaitis, Audrius; Laureto, Rose Ann

    2006-01-01

    Recognized as an early leader in clinical information systems, the University of Illinois Medical Center was challenged to meet the ever-increasing demand for information systems. Interviews with key stakeholders revealed unfavorable attitudes toward the Information Services department. Reasons given were that projects often are not aligned with business strategy, projects are delayed, IS itself is a barrier to progress, and a lack of proactive planning precipitates crises. Under the leadership of a new CIO, IS began developing a Project Management Office, or PMO, to better meet medical center business objectives and to more effectively manage technology projects. Successes during the first year included comprehensive IT strategic planning. Collaborative relationships were established with departmental leaders for planning, prioritizing, budgeting, and executing projects. A formal Web-based process for requesting IS projects was implemented, project management training was provided, and elements of standard project management methodology were implemented. While a framework for effective project management was created, significant effort is still required to firmly root these new processes within the organizational culture. Project management office goals for the second year include implementing a project portfolio management tool, refining the benefits methodology, and continuing the advancement of the project management methodology.

  7. Smart city pilot projects, scaling up or fading out? : Experiences from Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winden, W.

    2016-01-01

    In many cities, pilot projects are set up to test or develop new technologies that improve sustainability, urban quality of life or urban services (often labelled as “smart city” projects). Typically, these projects are supported by the municipality, funded by subsidies, and run in partnerships.

  8. Tackling Real World Complexity in a Software Engineering Student Project : An Experience Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Leo Pruijt; Christian Köppe

    2015-01-01

    Author-supplied abstract: Developing large-scale complex systems in student projects is not common, due to various constraints like available time, student team sizes, or maximal complexity. However, we succeeded to design a project that was of high complexity and comparable to real world projects.

  9. Environmental health literacy within the Italian Asbestos Project: experience in Italy and Latin American contexts. Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Daniela; Comba, Pietro; De Castro, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of multidisciplinary approaches to foster scientific research in public health and strengthen its impact on society is nowadays unavoidable. Environmental health literacy (EHL) may be defined as the ability to search for, understand, evaluate, and use environmental health information to promote the adoption of informed choices, the reduction of health risks, the improvement of quality of life and the protection of the environment. Both public health and environmental health literacy involve access to and dissemination of scientific information (including research findings), individual and collective decision-making and critical thinking. Specific experiences in environmental health literacy have been developed within the Italian National Asbestos Project (Progetto Amianto) in Latin American countries where the use of asbestos is still permitted, and in Italy where a specific effort in EHL has been dedicated to the risks caused by the presence of fluoro-edenite fibers in the town of Biancavilla (Sicily). Taking into account the different geographical and socio-economic contexts, both public health and environmental health literacy were addressed to a wide range of stakeholders, within and outside the health domain.

  10. Environmental health literacy within the Italian Asbestos Project: experience in Italy and Latin American contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marsili

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of multidisciplinary approaches to foster scientific research in public health and strengthen its impact on society is nowadays unavoidable. Environmental health literacy (EHL may be defined as the ability to search for, understand, evaluate, and use environmental health information to promote the adoption of informed choices, the reduction of health risks, the improvement of quality of life and the protection of the environment. Both public health and environmental health literacy involve access to and dissemination of scientific information (including research findings, individual and collective decision-making and critical thinking. Specific experiences in environmental health literacy have been developed within the Italian National Asbestos Project (Progetto Amianto in Latin American countries where the use of asbestos is still permitted, and in Italy where a specific effort in EHL has been dedicated to the risks caused by the presence of fluoro-edenite fibers in the town of Biancavilla (Sicily. Taking into account the different geographical and socio-economic contexts, both public health and environmental health literacy were addressed to a wide range of stakeholders, within and outside the health domain.

  11. Asbestos--cement pipeline experience at the Raft River Geothermal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.G.; Kunze, J.F.; Sanders, R.D.

    1977-04-01

    The first buried asbestos-cement (Transite) pipeline used in high temperature (approximately 300/sup 0/F) service for transport of geothermal fluids was installed in the fall of 1975, and has seen 1/sup 1///sub 2/ years of service. The line is 4000 ft long, between the deep geothermal wells No. 1 and No. 2, in the Raft River Valley of Idaho. The experience in using this pipeline has been satisfactory, and methods have been developed for minimizing the thermal expansion/thermal shock breakage problems. Recommendations on improved design and construction practices for future pipelines are given. The substantially reduced cost (factor of 2) of an asbestos-cement pipeline compared to the conventional steel pipeline, plus the esthetically desirable effect of a buried pipeline dictate adoption of this type as standard practice for moderate temperature geothermal developments. The Raft River Geothermal Project intends to connect all future wells with pipelines of asbestos-cement, insulated with 1 to 2-inches of urethane, and buried between 2 and 3 ft. Total cost will be approximately $110,000/mile for 10-inch diameter pipe, $125,000/mile for 12-inch diameter.

  12. The main goals of experiments with the higher plants in the project MARS - 500.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychev, Vladimir; Levinskikh, Margarita; Podolsky, Igor; Gushin, Vadim; Bingham, Gail; Bates, Scott

    At the present step of development of manned flight to Mars there is a current opinion that including a greenhouse in the composition of Life Support Systems (LSS) of Martian expedition would essentially improve a spacecraft habitat conditions and also would have impact to preventing of a number of possible consequences of continuous presence of human in artificial environment. Development of design objectives of future space greenhouses applicable for conditions of Martian expedition should be based, in our opinion, not only on the results of real space experiments, conducted onboard of orbital stations, but also on the results of ground-based experiments. In connection with above considerations there is a number of technological, biological and psychological experiments is planned to be conducted in the frame of MARS-500 project to resolve questions related to incorporation of higher plants in LSS of inter-planetary flights. The questions include: testing of developed elements of the greenhouse construction and methods for cultivation of vegetables under conditions of imitation of the flight of Martian expedition; selection of breeds and species of vegetables, characterized by high speed of biomass accumulation, attractive taste and appearance; investigation of growth, development and metabolism of plants under long-term continuous cultivation in manned pressurized object; comparison of the productivity of the plants as a function of utilization of different light source; determination of maximum amount of planted biomass of the plants and number of possible vegetation under conditions of long-term utilization of vegetation chamber of the greenhouse without substrate replacement; investigation of crops dietetic preferences of crew members; estimation of quality of plant biomass using seeding of the plants by microorganisms and nitrates and vitamins content as markers; development and approbation of methodical approaches to estimation of psychological factors of

  13. Dynamic Testing of the NASA Hypersonic Project Combined Cycle Engine Testbed for Mode Transition Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in developing technology that leads to more routine, safe, and affordable access to space. Access to space using airbreathing propulsion systems has potential to meet these objectives based on Airbreathing Access to Space (AAS) system studies. To this end, the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) Hypersonic Project is conducting fundamental research on a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system. The TBCC being studied considers a dual flow-path inlet system. One flow-path includes variable geometry to regulate airflow to a turbine engine cycle. The turbine cycle provides propulsion from take-off to supersonic flight. The second flow-path supports a dual-mode scramjet (DMSJ) cycle which would be initiated at supersonic speed to further accelerate the vehicle to hypersonic speed. For a TBCC propulsion system to accelerate a vehicle from supersonic to hypersonic speed, a critical enabling technology is the ability to safely and effectively transition from the turbine to the DMSJ-referred to as mode transition. To experimentally test methods of mode transition, a Combined Cycle Engine (CCE) Large-scale Inlet testbed was designed with two flow paths-a low speed flow-path sized for a turbine cycle and a high speed flow-path designed for a DMSJ. This testbed system is identified as the CCE Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition studies (CCE-LIMX). The test plan for the CCE-LIMX in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 10- by 10-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10 SWT) is segmented into multiple phases. The first phase is a matrix of inlet characterization (IC) tests to evaluate the inlet performance and establish the mode transition schedule. The second phase is a matrix of dynamic system identification (SysID) experiments designed to support closed-loop control development at mode transition schedule operating points for the CCE-LIMX. The third phase includes a direct demonstration of controlled mode transition using a closed loop control

  14. Plant-based remediation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Dharmendra Kumar (ed.) [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), Mol (Belgium). Radiological Impact and Performance Assessment Division

    2013-11-01

    A valuable source of information for scientists in the field of environmental pollution and remediation. Describes the latest biotechnological methods for the treatment of contaminated soils. Includes case studies and protocols. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that employs higher plants for the clean-up of contaminated environments. Basic and applied research have unequivocally demonstrated that selected plant species possess the genetic potential to accumulate, degrade, metabolize and immobilize a wide range of contaminants. The main focus of this volume is on the recent advances of technologies using green plants for remediation of various metals and metalloids. Topics include biomonitoring of heavy metal pollution, amendments of higher uptake of toxic metals, transport of heavy metals in plants, and toxicity mechanisms. Further chapters discuss agro-technological methods for minimizing pollution while improving soil quality, transgenic approaches to heavy metal remediation and present protocols for metal remediation via in vitro root cultures.

  15. ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. M. Heileson

    2007-09-26

    This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

  16. Mammography with and without radiolucent positioning sheets : Comparison of projected breast area, pain experience, radiation dose and technical image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Janine; ten Voorde, Marloes; van Engen, Ruben E.; van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; Pijnappel, Ruud; Droogh-de Greve, Kitty; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare projected breast area, image quality, pain experience and radiation dose between mammography performed with and without radiolucent positioning sheets. Methods: 184 women screened in the Dutch breast screening programme (May-June 2012) provided written informed consent to have

  17. Geoscience Education Research Project: Student Benefits and Effective Design of a Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortz, Karen M.; van der Hoeven Kraft, Katrien J.

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate research has been shown to be an effective practice for learning science. While this is a popular discussion topic, there are few full examples in the literature for introductory-level students. This paper describes the Geoscience Education Research Project, an innovative course-based research experience designed for…

  18. The Advanced Interdisciplinary Research Laboratory: A Student Team Approach to the Fourth-Year Research Thesis Project Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Boyd, Cleo; Barzda, Virginijus; Gradinaru, Claudiu C.; Krull, Ulrich J.; Stefanovic, Sasa; Stewart, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The advanced interdisciplinary research laboratory (AIRLab) represents a novel, effective, and motivational course designed from the interdisciplinary research interests of chemistry, physics, biology, and education development faculty members as an alternative to the independent thesis project experience. Student teams are assembled to work…

  19. Regional climate projections for Northeast India: an appraisal from CORDEX South Asia experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D.; Dimri, A. P.

    2017-11-01

    An appraisal of the recent changes in the present climate (1970-2005) followed by the possible future (2006-2100) changes in the climate has been carried out in the current study using the observations and regional climate model (REMO) over the Northeast Indian region. The regional climate model simulation has been used from the COordinated Regional climate Downscaling EXperiment (CORDEX) South Asia framework. A consistent warming for the winter (December, January, and February (DJF)) and post-monsoon (October and November (ON)) has been observed for the present climate especially in the northern and eastern parts of the region. The changes in the near future (2020-2049) and far future (2070-2099) temperature climatology suggest a rise in temperature by 3-8 °C across different representative concentration pathways (RCPs). The rate of long-term (1970-2099) increase in temperature has been found ranging between 0.01 and 0.07 °C/year across the region in the least emission (RCP2.6) to strongest emission (RCP8.5) scenarios. The daily mean precipitation statistics suggests an overall increasing trends of precipitation during the pre-monsoon (March, April, and May (MAM)) for the present across the region with a mixed trend in other seasons. A change in daily mean precipitation ranging from - 60% (during winter) to + 40% during post-monsoon has been projected by the model across different RCPs. RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 show a strong deficit in precipitation in the warmer climate across the region as compared to RCP2.6. This fact is also confirmed from the long-term trend of precipitation where a consistent decreasing trend dominates in the RCP4.5- and RCP8.5-simulated precipitations by the end of the twenty-first century. A large model bias in temperature and precipitation along with high amount of uncertainty is associated with the model simulations; thus, in order to use the projections, a more careful approach to improve the utility of downscaled product should be adopted.

  20. Initial experiences of implementation of functional integration (FI) in LEPRA India projects in Orissa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V Prabhakara; Bhuskade, R A; Raju, M Sathi; Rao, P V Ranganadha; Desikan, K V

    2002-06-01

    In 2000, the Government of the State of Orissa (population 37 million) in India decided to introduce functional integration for the control of leprosy, in place of the long-established vertical programme, using the general health services and the primary health care system. This paper describes the initial (9 months) experience of implementing this strategy in two projects run by LEPRA India. One of these, in the district of Koraput, was established in 1991 and covers a population of 1.5 million people. The other, in Kalahandi district, started in 1997 and covers a population of 600,000. Both projects operate under difficult conditions with regard to terrain, the use of numerous tribal languages, illiteracy, water shortage, poor roads and communications. The preparatory phase included intensive health education of the public on leprosy, using a wide range of educational media and techniques. At the same time, LEPRA India supported the Government in the training and orientation of trainers, medical officers, primary health care staff and female health workers at village level. In all, over 2000 were trained. This paper describes all aspects of the implementation of functional integration in these two areas. In the 9-month period, 4207 suspect cases were referred to medical officers by health workers, but only 256 (6%) were confirmed as having leprosy. There were 169 confirmed self-reporting cases. Despite the clearly understood intention to involve primary health staff in case detection, 67% of all cases were in fact detected by LEPRA India, possibly due to overlapping attendance at clinics by vertical and general staff. There is obviously a need for further training of the general staff since only 6% of cases referred by them were confirmed as having leprosy. Steps must also be taken to ensure that the emphasis on case detection, confirmation and treatment shifts from the vertical to the general health staff. The supply of anti-leprosy drugs and steroids to primary

  1. Duct Remediation Program: Material characterization and removal/handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

    1992-11-01

    Remediation efforts were successfully performed at Rocky Flats to locate, characterize, and remove plutonium holdup from process exhaust ducts. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) techniques were used to determine holdup locations and quantities. Visual characterization using video probes helped determine the physical properties of the material, which were used for remediation planning. Assorted equipment types, such as vacuum systems, scoops, brushes, and a rotating removal system, were developed to remove specific material types. Personnel safety and material handling requirements were addressed throughout the project.

  2. Vocational training in sustainable energy technologies. Leonardo Da Vinci project experience (2000 - 2001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, L. [Universitatea Politehnica, Bucharest (Romania). Physics Dept.; Gutierrez, C. [European Forum for Renewable Energy Sources (EUFORES) (Luxembourg); Fara, S. [Inst. of Research and Design for Automation (IPA SA), Bucharest (Romania)

    2001-07-01

    The project ''Vocational Training in Sustainable Energy Technologies'' developed under the EU Programme Leonardo da Vinci covered a period of 18 months in 2000 - 2001. The project partners were IPA SA (project co-ordinator), NARE, and ELECTRICA SA from Romania, and EUFORES, Luxembourg, CIRCE and FUELE from Spain. The energy sector in this county is the main target sector of this project. The main project results are: (a) the opportunity to improve and complete education in the new presented fields for participants who have been working in the energetic field; (b) the possibility to work in the energetic sector and make use of the knowledge obtained from courses for the unemployed participants in the courses; (c) the establishment of a Regional Centre for Sustainable Energies Caras Severin at the ''Eftimie Murgu'' Technical University of Resita, for consulting activities and specific national and international projects. (orig.)

  3. Education and Public Outreach at EGO/Virgo: past experiences and future projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzano, Massimiliano

    2015-08-01

    We are approaching the new generation Gravitational Wave (GW) detector Era and in the next months a new exiting period for GW scientists will start enforcing collaboration and interactions among different scientific communities. We aim to reach a wider audience to spread this enthusiasm in the general public about our every day activities and let them know how it will change our understanding of the Universe, once revealed the Gravitational waves. In this talk, we will report about the activities of the last years and about the EGO/Virgo outreach plans for the future. The main goal of the Virgo/EGO outreach activity is to raise awareness and curiosity about the GW research projects. In the past years we informed the general public about science we do at EGO/Virgo site, trying to attract students in doing research, letting them know about the Virgo detector and involving them in small research activities. We run a regular program of site visits, and we often organized astronomical observations and science cafe' events which attracted a large number of people. Efforts were made also to involve kids in understanding our scientific job. We started a series of regular events in which art and science were fused.We are strengthening our outreach activities with common efforts in the Virgo laboratories which are spread all over in Europe.We plan to make available a scientific path within Virgo, where the public can do little experiences of science or for example tile, for a day, the activity of our researchers.

  4. The Africa Yoga Project: A Participant-Driven Concept Map of Kenyan Teachers' Reported Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jessalyn E; Cook-Cottone, Catherine; Giambrone, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The Africa Yoga Project (AYP) trains and funds Kenyans to teach community yoga classes. Preliminary research with a small sample of AYP teachers suggested the program had a positive impact. This study used concept mapping to explore the experiences of a larger sample. Participants brainstormed statements about how practicing and/or teaching yoga changed them. They sorted statements into self-defined piles and rated them in terms of perceived importance. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) of sort data calculated statement coordinates wherein each statement is placed in proximity to other statements as a function of how frequently statements are sorted together by participants. These results are then and mapped in a two-dimensional space. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of these data identified clusters (i.e., concepts) among statements. Cluster average importance ratings gave the concept map depth and indicated concept importance. Bridging analysis and researchers' conceptual understanding of yoga literature facilitated HCA interpretive decisions. Of 72 AYP teachers, 52 and 48 teachers participated in brainstorming and sorting/rating activities, respectively. Teachers brainstormed 93 statements about how they had changed. The resultant MDS statement map had adequate validity (stress value = .29). HCA created a 12-cluster solution with the following concepts of perceived change: Identity as a Yoga Teacher; Prosocial Development; Existential Possibility; Genuine Positive Regard; Value and Respect for Others (highest importance); Presence, Acceptance, and Competence; Service and Trust; Non-judgment and Emotion Regulation (lowest importance); Engagement and Connection; Interpersonal Effectiveness; Psychosocial Functioning; and Physical Competence and Security. Teachers perceived the AYP as facilitating change across physical, mental, and spiritual domains. Additional research is needed to quantify and compare this change to other health promotion program outcomes.

  5. Investigations of Cu, Pb and Zn partitioning by sequential extraction in harbour sediments after electrodialytic remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation was used to remove Cu, Zn and Pb from three different contaminated harbour sediments. Electrodialytic experiments lasting 2 and 4 weeks were performed and 48-86% Cu, 74-90% Zn and 62-88% Pb were removed from the different sediments and the removal increased with longer....... Zn and Pb were found in the exchangeable and reducible phases before remediation. Zn was still found in the exchangeable and reducible phases after remediation, whereas most Pb was removed from these phases during electrodialytic remediation....

  6. WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indira S. Jayaweera; Jordi Diaz-Ferraro

    2000-02-28

    SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices generally fail (or are cost prohibitive) to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites or they require the use of organic solvents to achieve removal, at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. Initial work is being conducted at SRI to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene) in water, using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. Preliminary results with pyrene and fluoranthene in water clearly indicate a significant enhancement of solubility with increase in temperature. During this quarter, we conducted experiments with pyrene in the temperature range 200 to 300 C and observed a great enhancement in solubility with an increase in temperature. We also started experiments with real-world soil samples purchased from the subcontractor.

  7. A Simple and Effective Remedial Learning System with a Fuzzy Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C.-C.; Guo, K.-H.; Lin, Y.-C.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at implementing a simple and effective remedial learning system. Based on fuzzy inference, a remedial learning material selection system is proposed for a digital logic course. Two learning concepts of the course have been used in the proposed system: number systems and combinational logic. We conducted an experiment to validate…

  8. Acidification of Harbour sediment and removal of heavy metals induced by water splitting in electrodialytic remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrøm, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2005-01-01

    of compartments and ion exchange membranes differed. Totally, 14 electrodialytic experiments were made, with varying remediation time, current densities, and liquid to solid ratio (L/S). pH in the sediment decreased slightly after 1 day of remediation, even if the sediment had a high buffering capacity...

  9. Interdisciplinary Project-Based Learning: An Online Wiki Experience in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele; EL-Deghaidy, Heba

    2015-01-01

    In the current research study the use of Wikis as an online didactic tool to apply project-based learning in higher education was reported. The study was conducted in university teacher education programmes. During the online activities, participants developed interdisciplinary projects for the primary school working collaboratively in small…

  10. IN15 ultra-high-resolution spin-echo project. First experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleger, P.; Hayes, C. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Kollmar, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    The IN15 project is a collaboration between the ILL, HMI (Berlin), and FZ (Juelich) to construct a spin-echo spectrometer with a fourier time-range surpassing half a microsecond. Three different operational modes are possible: normal, with neutron focusing, and time-of-flight. Present status of the project is described. (author). 3 refs.

  11. "Trees and Things That Live in Trees": Three Children with Special Needs Experience the Project Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebling, Susan; Elgas, Peg; Konerman, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The authors report on research conducted during a project investigation undertaken with preschool children, ages 3-5. The report focuses on three children with special needs and the positive outcomes for each child as they engaged in the project Trees and Things That Live in Trees. Two of the children were diagnosed with developmental delays, and…

  12. ALTERNATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT AT 200-PO-1 OPERABLE UNIT AT HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DADO MA

    2008-07-31

    This study focuses on the remediation methods and technologies applicable for use at 200-PO-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site. The 200-PO-I Groundwater au requires groundwater remediation because of the existence of contaminants of potential concern (COPC). A screening was conducted on alternative technologies and methods of remediation to determine which show the most potential for remediation of groundwater contaminants. The possible technologies were screened to determine which would be suggested for further study and which were not applicable for groundwater remediation. COPCs determined by the Hanford Site groundwater monitoring were grouped into categories based on properties linking them by remediation methods applicable to each COPC group. The screening considered the following criteria. (1) Determine if the suggested method or technology can be used for the specific contaminants found in groundwater and if the technology can be applied at the 200-PO-I Groundwater au, based on physical characteristics such as geology and depth to groundwater. (2) Evaluate screened technologies based on testing and development stages, effectiveness, implementability, cost, and time. This report documents the results of an intern research project conducted by Mathew Dado for Central Plateau Remediation in the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The study was conducted under the technical supervision of Gloria Cummins and management supervision of Theresa Bergman and Becky Austin.

  13. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Main Body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    US DOE/NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  14. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    USDOE/NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  15. Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    USDOE NV

    1999-09-01

    This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the

  16. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

  17. Actinide speciation in environmental remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaue, Jon; Czerwinski, Ken R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Nuclear Engineering Dept., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2002-11-01

    Environmental actinide remediation is often performed in the absence of a clear understanding of the contaminant chemical forms. Remediation efforts are more concerned with the initial and final concentration of the contaminant actinides. Allowable final concentrations of actinides in remediation sites are mainly based on expected dose or prenegotiated levels. However, understanding the chemical forms of actinides in the environment is key to assessing their long-term behavior and developing enhanced analytical methods for their environmental detection. The dominant environmental chemical form will dictate the actinide transport behavior through solubility, colloid formation, or the interaction with natural ligands. This information can be used to evaluate the fate and potential transport of actinides. If the dominant environmental chemical species are understood, analytical methods for enhanced counting statistics and a reduction of counting error can be developed. A reduction in counting error will increase the fraction of verifiable waste below a given threshold, thereby increasing the rate of site clean up while reducing the cost. The impact of actinide speciation is presented in 2 sites contaminated with Am and Pu undergoing remediation. Actinide speciation has affected remediation strategies, regulatory response, and costs. (author)

  18. Synthesizing R&D Data: Experiences from the Integrated Manufacturing Technology Roadmap (IMTR) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    merrell, m.a.

    1999-05-05

    IMTR is a tremendous undertaking to assess the current state and future needs of Manufacturing Technology R&D. A follow-on project to the roadmaps is the development and populating of a Gap Analysis database containing current R&D abstracts related to the roadmaps' technical elements. Efficiently identifying the R&D projects within scope presents many travails of synthesizing data from across a wide spectrum. Challenges to this project were directly proportional to the lack of single-source data collections.

  19. Improving Quality Assurance with CDIO Self-Evaluation: Experiences From a Nordic Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontio, Juha; Roslöf, Janne; Edström, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the Nordic project Quality Assurance in Higher Education was to develop and implement a self-evaluation model in the participating Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) to support their quality assurance work and continuous curriculum development. Furthermore, the project aimed......-evaluations of the participating degree programmes, and the identification of the main development areas and actions in each participating degree programme. Furthermore, the project has increased the partners’ understanding of other partners and their challenges. Finally, quality assurance has been enhanced in each participating...

  20. Integration and Testing Challenges of Small Satellite Missions: Experiences from the Space Technology 5 Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerwein, Timothy A.; Gostomski, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The Space Technology 5(ST5) payload was successfully carried into orbit on an OSC Pegasus XL launch vehicle, which was carried aloft and dropped from the OSC Lockheed L-1011 from Vandenberg Air Force Base March 22,2006, at 9:03 am Eastern time, 6:03 am Pacific time. In order to reach the completion of the development and successful launch of ST 5, the systems integration and test(I&T) team determined that a different approach was required to meet the project requirements rather than the standard I&T approach used for single, room-sized satellites. The ST5 payload, part of NASA's New Millennium Program headquartered at JPL, consisted of three micro satellites (approximately 30 kg each) and the Pegasus Support Structure (PSS), the system that connected the spacecrafts to the launch vehicle and deployed the spacecrafts into orbit from the Pegasus XL launch vehicle. ST5 was a technology demonstration payload, intended to test six (6) new technologies for potential use for future space flights along with demonstrating the ability of small satellites to perform quality science. The main technology was a science grade magnetometer designed to take measurements of the earth's magnetic field. The three spacecraft were designed, integrated, and tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with integration and environmental testing occurring in the Bldg. 7-1 0-15-29. The three spacecraft were integrated and tested by the same I&T team. The I&T Manager determined that there was insufficient time in the schedule to perform the three I&T spacecraft activities in series used standard approaches. The solution was for spacecraft #1 to undergo integration and test first, followed by spacecraft #2 and #3 simultaneously. This simultaneous integration was successful for several reasons. Each spacecraft had a Lead Test Conductor who planned and coordinated their spacecraft through its integration and test activities. One team of engineers and technicians executed the integration of all

  1. Towards sustainable infrastructure development through integrated contracts : Experiences with inclusiveness in Dutch infrastructure projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenferink, Sander; Tillema, Taede; Arts, Jos

    Current complex society necessitates finding inclusive arrangements for delivering sustainable road infrastructure integrating design, construction and maintenance stages of the project lifecycle. In this article we investigate whether linking stages by integrated contracts can lead to more

  2. Transportation research synthesis : state DOT experiences with Primavera P6 project management software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    The eight agencies we interviewed all reported general satisfaction with Primavera P6 as a project management tool within their organizations, although they noted that a significant commitment to training is required. Most states have not implemented...

  3. Translational Science Project Team Managers: Qualitative Insights and Implications from Current and Previous Postdoctoral Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Kevin C; Dann, Sara M; Finnerty, Celeste C; Kotarba, Joseph A

    2014-07-01

    The development of leadership and project management skills is increasingly important to the evolution of translational science and team-based endeavors. Team science is dependent upon individuals at various stages in their careers, inclusive of postdocs. Data from case histories, as well as from interviews with current and former postdocs, and those supervising postdocs, indicate six essential tasks required of project managers in multidisciplinary translational teams, along with eight skill-related themes critical to their success. To optimize the opportunities available and to ensure sequential development of team project management skills, a life cycle model for the development of translational team skills is proposed, ranging from graduate trainees, postdocs, assistant professors, and finally to mature scientists. Specific goals, challenges and project management roles and tasks are recommended for each stage for the life cycle.

  4. MILITARY CONSTRUCTION: Kaiserslautern Military Community Center Project Continues to Experience Problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kutz, Gregory D; Causseaux, Bruce A; Dorn, Terrell G

    2008-01-01

    The Kaiserslautern Military Community Center (KMCC) is one of many projects initiated at Ramstein Air Base to upgrade capabilities of the base as a result of the consolidation of military bases in Europe...

  5. Athens automation and control experiment project review meeting, Knoxville, Tennessee, December 3-5, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braithwait, S.D.; Broadaway, E.R.; Fortson, N.D.; Gellings, C.W.; Hu, P.S.; Lawler, J.S.; Markel, L.C.; McKinley, K.F.; Monteen, L.D.; Newton, B.K.

    1986-08-01

    The AACE is an electric power distribution automation project involving research and development of both hardware and software. Equipment for the project is being installed on the electric distribution system in Athens, Tennessee. Purposes of the AACE are to develop and test load control, volt/var control, and system reconfiguration capabilities on an electric distribution system and to transfer what is learned to the electric utility industry. Expected benefits include deferral of costly power generation plants and increased electric service reliability.

  6. Documenting Reproductive Phenology using Herbarium Specimens: Experiences from the New England Vascular Plants Project

    OpenAIRE

    Sweeney,Patrick; Gilbert,Edward

    2017-01-01

    Herbarium specimens and associated label data are valuable sources of phenological data. They can provide information about the phenological state of the specimen and information about how phenology varies in space and time. In an effort to leverage this tremendous phenological resource, the New England Vascular Plants project (NEVP) has worked over the past few years to create a data set catered to the study of the effects of climate change in New England. This project has focused on capturi...

  7. Telemedical Support in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: Experience from Different Projects in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Müller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The great epidemiological significance and costs associated with chronic heart failure pose a challenge to health systems in Western industrial countries. In the past few years, controlled randomised studies have shown that patients with chronic heart failure benefit from telemedical monitoring; specifically, telemonitoring of various vital parameters combined with a review of the symptoms, drug compliance and patient education. In Germany, various telemedical monitoring projects for patients with chronic heart failure have been initiated in the past few years; seven of them are presented here. Currently 7220 patients are being monitored in the seven selected projects. Most patients (51.1% are in NYHA stage II, 26.3% in NYHA stage III, 14.5% in NYHA stage I and only 6.6% in NYHA stage IV respectively. Most projects are primarily regional. Their structure of telemedical monitoring tends to be modular and uses stratification according to the NYHA stages. All projects include medical or health economics assessments. The future of telemedical monitoring projects for patients with chronic heart failure will depend on the outcome of these assessments. Only of there is statistical evidence for medical benefit to the individual patient as well as cost savings will these projects continue.

  8. Remediation of Acid Mine Drainage with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, James F.; Schaider, Laurel A.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria have been shown to be effective at treating acid mine drainage through sulfide production and subsequent precipitation of metal sulfides. In this laboratory experiment for undergraduate environmental chemistry courses, students design and implement a set of bioreactors to remediate acid mine drainage and explain observed…

  9. Effect of remediation on growth parameters, grain and dry matter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effectiveness of cow dung, poultry manure, NPK (mineral fertilizers) and municipal waste compost which were the easily accessible materials in the remediation of crude oil polluted soils in Ogoni, Rivers state was assessed using soybean as a test crop. A simple factorial field experiment arranged into a randomized ...

  10. Longitudinal effects of disaster-related experiences on mental health among Fukushima nuclear plant workers: The Fukushima NEWS Project Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, A; Tanigawa, T; Charvat, H; Wada, H; Shigemura, J; Kawachi, I

    2017-08-01

    The Fukushima Nuclear Energy Workers' Support (NEWS) Project Study previously showed that experiences related to the Fukushima nuclear disaster on 11 March 2011 had a great impact on psychological states, including post-traumatic stress response (PTSR) and general psychological distress (GPD), among the Fukushima nuclear plant workers. To determine the causal relationship between disaster-related experiences and levels of psychological states, we conducted a 3-year longitudinal study from 2011 to 2014. PTSR and GPD of the nuclear plant workers were assessed by annual questionnaires conducted from 2011 to 2014. The present study included a total of 1417 workers who provided an assessment at baseline (2011). A total of 4160 observations were used in the present analysis. The relationship between disaster-related experiences and psychological states over time was analysed using mixed-effects logistic regression models. A declining influence of disaster-related experiences on PTSR over time was found. However, the impact on PTSR remained significantly elevated even 3 years after the disaster in several categories of exposure including the experience of life-threatening danger, experiences of discrimination, the witnessing of plant explosion, the death of a colleague and home evacuation. The associations between GPD and disaster-related experiences showed similar effects. The effects of disaster-related experiences on psychological states among the nuclear plant workers reduced over time, but remained significantly high even 3 years after the event.

  11. Assessing the Potential of Social Networks as a Means for Information Diffusion the Weatherization Experiences (WE) Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Erin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hawkins, Beth A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    In April 2009, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formally tasked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with conducting two impact and process evaluations of DOE’s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), known as the retrospective and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) period evaluations, respectively. The former focused on WAP Program Year (PY) 2008, which covers the period from April 2008 to June 2009. The latter focused on PY 2010. This report presents in-depth analyses from ORNL’s social network study, the Weatherization Experiences (WE) Project, an exploratory study conducted as part of the ARRA period WAP evaluation. The WE Project explored the potential for WAP recipients and staff to influence energy savings beyond their homes and day jobs. Several studies conducted through ORNL’s evaluation of WAP found that the program has the ability to profoundly impact the lives of the people it serves (Tonn et al. 2014b). Recipients of WAP provided statements ranging from the newfound ability to pay utility bills and prescription medication to reduced emergency department visits for asthma and medical conditions associated with thermal stress. Through this exploratory research project, the stories of hundreds of weatherization recipients and providers were documented. The WE Project was designed to further investigate whether or not shared experiences with weatherization have the power to stimulate home energy saving action within an individual’s social network.

  12. Encouraging contact with the business world through the final year project: an ex-perience applied to the outsourcing field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Blanco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an experience of how a final year project can be designed in order to encourage contact with the business world. This paper the general structure of the final year proyect, whose main topic is outsourcing, the main abilities and competencies developed by students while doing it, and the opinion of the students who have already done it.

  13. REMEDIATION FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Arakali; E. Faillace

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel in the Remediation Facility performing operations to receive, prepare, open, repair, recover, disposition, and correct off-normal and non-standard conditions with casks, canisters, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, and waste packages (WP). The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Remediation Facility and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  14. Approaches for assessing sustainable remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Gitte Lemming; Binning, Philip John; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    remediation strategies for a contaminated site. Most approaches use multi-criteria assessment methods (MCA) to structure a decision support process. Different combinations of environmental, social and economic criteria are employed, and are assessed either in qualitative or quantitative forms with various...... tools such as life cycle assessment and cost benefit analysis. Stakeholder involvement, which is a key component of sustainable remediation, is conducted in various ways. Some approaches involve stakeholders directly in the evaluation or weighting of criteria, whereas other approaches only indirectly...

  15. Learning through projects in the training of biomedical engineers: an application experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambi, José Antonio Li; Peme, Carmen

    2011-09-01

    Learning through Projects in the curriculum consists of both the identification and analysis of a problem, and the design of solution, execution and evaluation strategies, with teams of students. The project is conceived as the creation of a set of strategies articulated and developed during a certain amount of time to solve a problem contextualized in situations continually changing, where the constant evaluation provides feedback to make adjustments. In 2009, Learning through Projects was applied on the subject Hospital Facilities and three intervention projects were developed in health centers. This first stage is restricted to the analysis of the aspects that are considered to be basic to the professional training: a) Context knowledge: The future biomedical engineers must be familiarized with the complex health system where they will develop their profession; b) Team work: This is one of the essential skills in the training of students, since Biomedical Engineering connects the knowledge of sciences of life with the knowledge of exact sciences and technology; c) Regulations: The activities related to the profession require the implementation of regulations; therefore, to be aware of and to apply these regulations is a fundamental aspect to be analyzed in this stage; d) Project evaluation: It refers to the elaboration and studying of co-evaluation reports, which helps to find out if Learning through Projects contributes to the training. This new line of investigation has the purpose of discovering if the application of this learning strategy makes changes in the training of students in relation to their future professional career. The findings of this ongoing investigation will allow for the analysis of the possibility of extending its application. Key words: engineering, biomedical, learning, projects, strategies.

  16. Exploring the experiences of female students in introductory project-based engineering courses at two- and four-year institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Amy K.

    2011-12-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiential and contextual factors that shaped female students' pathways into introductory project-based engineering classes at two community colleges and one four-year institution, as well as female students' experiences within and outside of these classes. The study was framed by Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) (Lent, Brown & Hackett, 1996) and Bronfenbrenner's (1979) ecological systems theory. Findings were based on analyses of data gathered through multiple methods: observations; individual interviews with female students; focus group interviews with project teams; and document collection. The findings of this study revealed that while positive experiences with math or science were a likely pre-cursor to engineering interest, experiential learning appeared to be a more powerful force in fostering students' engineering interest. Specifically, participants developed an interest in engineering through academic, professional, and extracurricular engineering- and design-related activities that familiarized them with the tasks and skills involved in engineering work and helped them develop a sense of selfefficacy with regard to this work. Interest and self-efficacy, in turn, played a role in students' postsecondary educational decision-making processes, as did contextual factors including families and finances. This study's findings also showed that participants' project teams were a critically important microsystem within participants' ecological environments. Within this sometimes "chilly" microsystem, female students negotiated intrateam processes, which were in some cases affected by gender norms. Intrateam processes that influenced female students' project-based learning experiences included: interpersonal dynamics; leadership; and division of labor. This study also identified several ways in which the lived experiences of participants at the community colleges were different from, or similar to, those of participants

  17. A Learning Proposal Based on a Project and Collaborative Work: An Online Course Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Cenich

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic necessities for education in the future is to prepare learners to participate in a computer network, since in the information society knowledge is the most critical resource for social and economic development. This paper addresses how project-based learning was designed and implemented in a course on computer science at the National University of Central Argentina. The objective of the course was to engage students in the production of projects that were authentic, meaningful, and intended for future teaching and professional use. Two types of interaction have been considered in computer-mediated learning: individual interaction (interaction with the content, and social or interpersonal interaction. This paper describes the course design, provides an overview of the processes involved in developing the project-based learning activities, and reports the responses of students to the course.

  18. From Project to Program: Tupange's Experience with Scaling Up Family Planning Interventions in Urban Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyonzo, Nelson; Nyachae, Paul; Kagwe, Peter; Kilonzo, Margaret; Mumba, Feddis; Owino, Kenneth; Kichamu, George; Kigen, Bartilol; Fajans, Peter; Ghiron, Laura; Simmons, Ruth

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative in Kenya, the Tupange Project (2010-2015), successfully applied the ExpandNet approach to sustainably scale up family planning interventions, first in Machakos and Kakamega, and subsequently also in its three core cities, Nairobi, Kisumu and Mombasa. This new focus meant shifting from a "project" to a "program" approach, which required paying attention to government leadership and ownership, limiting external inputs, institutionalizing interventions in existing structures and emphasizing sustainability. The paper also highlights the project's efforts to prepare for the future scale up of Tupange's interventions in other counties to support continuing and improved access to family planning services in the new context of devolution (decentralization) in Kenya. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Project Overview of the Naval Postgraduate School Spacecraft Architecture and Technology Demonstration Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reuer, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's current attempt at getting another spacecraft into orbit is focusing on Naval Postgraduate School Spacecraft Architecture and Technology Demonstration Experiment (NPSAT1...

  20. Six Best Practices for Delivering a Successful Customer Experience Transformation Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raymond Gerber

    2008-01-01

    .... When rolling out new customer experience strategies and their related technology implementations, companies face intense pressure to complete the implementation in an acceptable time frame with rapid ROI...

  1. Local construction of small wind turbines : the EOLSenegal Project experience; Vers la construction locale de petits aerogenerateurs : l'experience du projet EOLSenegal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulain, C.; Kebe, C.M.F. [Centre International de Formation et de Recherche en Energie Solaire (Senegal); Zambeaux, N. [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, Paris (France); Galy, S. [La Fondation Nicola Hulot pour la Nature et l' Homme (France)

    2008-04-15

    The Centre International de Formation et de Recherche en Energie Solaire (CIFRES) is working to set-up a local branch of manufacturers and maintenance staff for small wind turbines destined for producing electricity in Senegal. The EOLSenegal Project stipulates that a minimum of 95 per cent of local materials must be used to manufacture the wind turbines and that all production and maintenance must occur in Senegal. The purpose of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of rural electrification projects while determining which technology among wind power, solar photovoltaic or biofuel is best suited for contributing to energy independence and the industrial development of the country through job creation. There are multiple applications for wind energy, including domestic lighting; electrification of community buildings; electrification of district housing; pumping for drinking water; the transformation and conservation of agricultural products; driving force for local crafts such as woodworking, metals, sewing, and hairdressing; and, battery recharging for small food appliances. Wind power and solar energy were touted as being the best solution for meeting the electricity needs of rural populations. The first phase of the EOLSenegal Project involves a feasibility study and site selection followed by phase 2 in which the equipment will be installed. The last industrial phase of the project will be based on the experience gained during the first 2 phases with a market study and financial estimate to draw investors. It was concluded that while small wind turbines may solve some of Senegal's electricity needs, they cannot meet the needs alone and should be used in conjunction with other forms of energy such as solar, thermal, biomass or biogas. 4 figs.

  2. Steam Injection For Soil And Aquifer Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this Issue Paper is to provide to those involved in assessing remediation technologies for specific sites basic technical information on the use of steam injection for the remediation of soils and aquifers that are contaminated by...

  3. A research capacity strengthening project for infectious diseases in Honduras: experience and lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ana Lourdes; Canales, Maritza; Enriquez, Lourdes; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Zelaya, Ada Argentina; Espinoza, Vilma Esther; Fontecha, Gustavo Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Background In Honduras, research capacity strengthening (RCS) has not received sufficient attention, but an increase in research competencies would enable local scientists to advance knowledge and contribute to national priorities, including the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Objective This project aimed at strengthening research capacity in infectious diseases in Honduras, focusing on the School of Microbiology of the National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH). The primary objective was the creation of a research-based graduate program for the continued training of researchers. Parallel objectives included institutional strengthening and the facilitation of partnerships and networks. Methods Based on a multi-stakeholder consultation, an RCS workplan was designed and undertaken from 2007 to 2012. Due to unexpected adverse circumstances, the first 2 years were heavily dedicated to implementing the project's flagship, an MSc program in infectious and zoonotic diseases (MEIZ). In addition, infrastructure improvements and demand-driven continuing education opportunities were facilitated; biosafety and research ethics knowledge and practices were enhanced, and networks fostering collaborative work were created or expanded. Results The project coincided with the peak of UNAH's radical administrative reform and an unprecedented constitutional crisis. Challenges notwithstanding, in September 2009, MEIZ admitted the first cohort of students, all of whom undertook MDG-related projects graduating successfully by 2012. Importantly, MEIZ has been helpful in expanding the School of Microbiology's traditional etiology-based, disciplinary model to infectious disease teaching and research. By fulfilling its objectives, the project contributed to a stronger research culture upholding safety and ethical values at the university. Conclusions The resources and strategic vision afforded by the project enhanced UNAH's overall research capacity and its potential contribution

  4. A research capacity strengthening project for infectious diseases in Honduras: experience and lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lourdes Sanchez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Honduras, research capacity strengthening (RCS has not received sufficient attention, but an increase in research competencies would enable local scientists to advance knowledge and contribute to national priorities, including the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. Objective: This project aimed at strengthening research capacity in infectious diseases in Honduras, focusing on the School of Microbiology of the National Autonomous University of Honduras (UNAH. The primary objective was the creation of a research-based graduate program for the continued training of researchers. Parallel objectives included institutional strengthening and the facilitation of partnerships and networks. Methods: Based on a multi-stakeholder consultation, an RCS workplan was designed and undertaken from 2007 to 2012. Due to unexpected adverse circumstances, the first 2 years were heavily dedicated to implementing the project's flagship, an MSc program in infectious and zoonotic diseases (MEIZ. In addition, infrastructure improvements and demand-driven continuing education opportunities were facilitated; biosafety and research ethics knowledge and practices were enhanced, and networks fostering collaborative work were created or expanded. Results: The project coincided with the peak of UNAH's radical administrative reform and an unprecedented constitutional crisis. Challenges notwithstanding, in September 2009, MEIZ admitted the first cohort of students, all of whom undertook MDG-related projects graduating successfully by 2012. Importantly, MEIZ has been helpful in expanding the School of Microbiology's traditional etiology-based, disciplinary model to infectious disease teaching and research. By fulfilling its objectives, the project contributed to a stronger research culture upholding safety and ethical values at the university. Conclusions: The resources and strategic vision afforded by the project enhanced UNAH's overall research capacity and its

  5. Characterization of materials for a reactive transport model validation experiment: Interim report on the caisson experiment. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, M.D.; Cheng, W.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    1995-08-01

    Models used in performance assessment and site characterization activities related to nuclear waste disposal rely on simplified representations of solute/rock interactions, hydrologic flow field and the material properties of the rock layers surrounding the repository. A crucial element in the design of these models is the validity of these simplifying assumptions. An intermediate-scale experiment is being carried out at the Experimental Engineered Test Facility at Los Alamos Laboratory by the Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories to develop a strategy to validate key geochemical and hydrological assumptions in performance assessment models used by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  6. Open-Source Development Experiences in Scientific Software: The HANDE Quantum Monte Carlo Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Spencer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The HANDE quantum Monte Carlo project offers accessible stochastic algorithms for general use for scientists in the field of quantum chemistry. HANDE is an ambitious and general high-performance code developed by a geographically-dispersed team with a variety of backgrounds in computational science. In the course of preparing a public, open-source release, we have taken this opportunity to step back and look at what we have done and what we hope to do in the future. We pay particular attention to development processes, the approach taken to train students joining the project, and how a flat hierarchical structure aids communication.

  7. Taking Libraries’ Cultural Content to the User – Approaches and Experiences from the EEXCESS Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Borst

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Before the advent of the internet users had to physically visit libraries and other cultural institutions in order to search, find and access content. With the emergence and massive use of the World Wide Web and associated tools and technologies this situation has changed drastically. If content is to be found and used, it must be present where users do their daily digital work. The aim of the EU project EEXCESS (http://eexcess.eu/ is to inject the content into the working environments of the users. In this paper, we show some of the approaches, use cases and technical implementations we developed in the project.

  8. Ultrasonographic projection of a pathologic site on the anterior abdominal wall. Our own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedev, Petko I; Nedeva, Antonia I; Uchikov, Angel P

    2003-01-01

    The success of any operation depends to a great extent on how well the optimal surgical approach is chosen. The purpose of the present study was to propose a method of sonographic projection of an abdominal pathologic site on the anterior abdominal wall which can facilitate the selection of an optimal surgical approach. The study included 26 patients aged 20 to 65 years operated on in the Clinic of Thoracic and Abdominal Surgery in the Medical University, Plovdiv between January 1996 and December 2001. Using ultrasonography we projected a pathologic site located in the abdomen on the anterior abdominal wall. A strip of adhesive band was placed on the scanning surface of a 3.5 MHz linear transducer to cast an acoustic shadow and thus draw the outlines of the site on to the anterior abdominal wall. Patients with liver hydatid cysts (primary and recurrent) and with recurrent calculous cholecystitis were predominant (20/26, 76.9%). The surgical approach in the cases of primary liver hydatid cysts was in the right hypochondriac region; after laparotomy it was extended in both directions. In the patients with recurrent liver hydatid cysts (6/26, 23.07%) the incision was made on the projected image, directly over the site; it was less traumatic and associated with less blood loss. In eight patients with chronic calculous cholecystitis (30.7%) the projection was used for minilaparotomy (up to 6 cm); in two patients the projection suggested that we should use the transrectal approach as optimal instead of the subcostal approach. The right subcostal approach was used in one patient with chronic calculous cholecystitis and retroperitoneal cyst instead of median laparotomy. In patients with retroperitoneal tumours and intra-abdominal non-organ echinococcosis the projection had confirmatory character. According to the review of the literature we made, such sonographic projection of pathologic sites on the anterior front wall for the purpose of selecting an optimal surgical

  9. The Remediation of Nosferatu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghellal, Sabiha; Morrison, Ann; Hassenzahl, Marc

    2014-01-01

    at sunset. Focusing on the phenomenological world of 21 participants, we analyse triangulated data by distinguishing between a range of more ‘open’ and ‘closed’ styles of interactions. Our study illustrates how speculative play may enable non-linear storytelling elements within a transmedia fictional...... universe. We believe our approach can be more generally useful for designing future rich, enjoyable and meaningful transmedia experiences....

  10. Green Chemistry and Environmental Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Nutrient remediation and recovery is a growing concern for two key reasons: (i) the prevention of harmful algal bloom proliferation, and (ii) the recycling of nutrients (e.g., phosphates) as they are non-renewable resources which are quickly being depleted. A wide range...

  11. The Meta-Analysis of Clinical Judgment Project: Effects of Experience on Judgment Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Paul M.; White, Michael J.; Aegisdottir, Stefania; Maugherman, Alan S.; Anderson, Linda A.; Cook, Robert S.; Nichols, Cassandra N.; Lampropoulos, Georgios K.; Walker, Blain S.; Cohen, Genna R.; Rush, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and educational experience is one of the most commonly studied variables in clinical judgment research. Contrary to clinicians' perceptions, clinical judgment researchers have generally concluded that accuracy does not improve with increased education, training, or clinical experience. In this meta-analysis, the authors synthesized…

  12. Building International Experiences into an Engineering Curriculum--A Design Project-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Victor; Castillo, Luciano; Carbajal, Gerardo; Hajela, Prabhat

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a descriptive account of how short-term international and multicultural experiences can be integrated into early design experiences in an aerospace engineering curriculum. Such approaches are considered as important not only in fostering a student's interest in the engineering curriculum, but also exposing them to a multicultural…

  13. Sustainable Remediation for Enhanced NAPL Recovery from Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaher, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sustainable remediation relates to the achievement of balance between environmental, social, and economic elements throughout the remedial lifecycle. A significant contributor to this balance is the use of green and sustainable technologies which minimize environmental impacts, while maximizing social and economic benefits of remedial implementation. To this end, a patented mobile vapor energy generation (VEG) technology has been developed targeting variable applications, including onsite soil remediation for unrestricted reuse and enhanced non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) recover at the water table. At the core of the mobile VEG technology is a compact, high efficiency vapor generator, which utilizes recycled water and propane within an entirely enclosed system to generate steam as high as 1100°F. Operating within a fully enclosed system and capturing all heat that is generated within this portable system, the VEG technology eliminates all emissions to the atmosphere and yields an undetected carbon footprint with resulting carbon dioxide concentrations that are below ambient levels. Introduction of the steam to the subsurface via existing wells results in a desired change in the NAPL viscosity and the interfacial tension at the soil, water, NAPL interface; in turn, this results in mobilization and capture of the otherwise trapped, weathered NAPL. Approved by the California Air Resources Control Board (and underlying Air Quality Management Districts) and applied in California's San Joaquin Valley, in-well heating of NAPLs trapped at the water table using the VEG technology has proven as effective as electrical resistivity heating (ERH) in changing the viscosity of and mobilizing NAPLs in groundwater in support of recovery, but has achieved these results while minimizing the remedial carbon footprint by 90%, reducing energy use by 99%, and reducing remedial costs by more than 95%. NAPL recovery using VEG has also allowed for completion of source removal historically

  14. UPS CNG Truck Fleet Start Up Experience: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2001-08-14

    UPS operates 140 Freightliner Custom Chassis compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles with Cummins B5.9G engines. Fifteen are participating in the Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project being funded by DOE's Office of Transportation Technologies and the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies.

  15. Becoming a Heavily Tattooed Young Body: From a Bodily Experience to a Body Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Vitor Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Why some young people start to tattoo their bodies? And why some of them keep going on with this practice, until having all body tattooed? What doing so means to them? These are some of the questions that underlie a qualitative research project carried out in Portugal on heavily tattooed young people. In this article, the author discusses their…

  16. An Audit Learning Experience: A Pilot Project through Cooperation with a Third Sector Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Richard; Willett, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a critical evaluation of a pilot cooperative education project conducted with a charitable organization in the UK. An action research approach was adopted. Final level students who are studying auditing have had the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills they are developing through their studies to a real-life situation in the…

  17. The Measures of Effective Teaching Project: An Experiment to Build Evidence and Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The Measures of Effective Teaching project has collected performance data using multiple indicators from over three thousand teachers across six urban districts. In the second year of the study, classes of students were randomly assigned to teachers in order to assess the impact of assignment bias on performance judgments. This article discusses…

  18. Description of historical crop calendar data bases developed to support foreign commodity production forecasting project experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, W. L., III (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The content, format, and storage of data bases developed for the Foreign Commodity Production Forecasting project and used to produce normal crop calendars are described. In addition, the data bases may be used for agricultural meteorology, modeling of stage sequences and planting dates, and as indicators of possible drought and famine.

  19. Knowledge Translation of Interprofessional Collaborative Patient-Centred Practice: The Working Together Project Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Colla J.; Archibald, Douglas; Stodel, Emma; Chambers, Larry W.; Hall, Pippa

    2008-01-01

    The Working Together (WT) project involved the design and delivery of an online learning resource for healthcare teams in long-term care (LTC) so that knowledge regarding interprofessional collaborative patient-centred practice (ICPCP) could be readily accessed and then transferred to the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to better…

  20. Deploying TSP on a National Scale: An Experience Report from Pilot Projects in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    available to answer ques - tions provide clarifications, and assist interpreting data. • Spend significant one-on-one time with project participants...Revised Edition. HarperBusiness, 1999 [Presot! 2008] United Mexican States. Programa de Desarrollo del Sector de Servicios de Tecnologias de, March

  1. The Data Aggregation Project: Free Software that Transforms the Student Laboratory Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Steven D.; Hoogendky, Tom; Hoagland, Donald B.

    2003-01-01

    Found that in an introductory biology course at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, adoption of the Data Aggregation Project (free software that allows students in a course to aggregate a large body of data for some particular problem) resulted in an increase in the number of data points students analyzed per semester by a factor of almost…

  2. Uncertainty in greenhouse-gas emission scenario projections: Experiences from Mexico and South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig, Daniel

    This report outlines approaches to quantify the uncertainty associated with national greenhouse-gas emission scenario projections. It does so by describing practical applications of those approaches in two countries – Mexico and South Africa. The goal of the report is to promote uncertainty...

  3. Critical Race Media Projects: Counterstories and Praxis (Re)Claim Chicana/o Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Sonya M.; Alemán, Enrique, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    This article maps out two critical race media projects -- a documentary and a Chicana/o-centric student newspaper--developed by Chicana/o scholars seeking to fulfilll the promise of praxis hailed by critical race theorists. Fortified and guided by the quintessential tenets of critical race theory and Latino critical race theory, these critical…

  4. Quality in E-Learning--A Conceptual Framework Based on Experiences from Three International Benchmarking Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossiannilsson, E.; Landgren, L.

    2012-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2010, Lund University took part in three international benchmarking projects, "E-xcellence+," the "eLearning Benchmarking Exercise 2009," and the "First Dual-Mode Distance Learning Benchmarking Club." A comparison of these models revealed a rather high level of correspondence. From this finding and…

  5. Operation and performance of Time Projection Chambers of SHINE / NA61 experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Aduszkiewicz, Antoni

    This paper characterizes the Time Projection Chambers (TPC) in the SHINE / NA61 exper- iment at CERN and their operation during the first run in 2007. An analysis of a change of the gas mixture in the TPCs for SHINE is included. Also the gas system of the TPCs is described.

  6. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, Vol. 18. Part 2. Indexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This bibliography contains 3638 citations with abstracts of documents relevant to environmental restoration, nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. This report is the eighteenth in a series of bibliographies prepared annually for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - have been included in Part 1 of the report. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, financial, and regulatory information that pertains to DOE environmental restoration programs. The citations are separated by topic into 16 sections, including (1) DOE Environmental Restoration Program; (2) DOE D&D Program; (3) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (4) DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs; (5) NORM-Contaminated Site Restoration; (6) DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) DOE Site-Wide Remedial Actions; (9) DOE Onsite Remedial Action Projects; (10) Contaminated Site Remedial Actions; (11) DOE Underground Storage Tank Remediation; (12) DOE Technology Development, Demonstration, and Evaluations; (13) Soil Remediation; (14) Groundwater Remediation; (15) Environmental Measurements, Analysis, and Decision-Making; and (16) Environmental Management Issues. Within the 16 sections, the citations are sorted by geographic location. If a geographic location is not specified, the citations are sorted according to the document title. In Part 2 of the report, indexes are provided for author, author affiliation, selected title phrase, selected title word, publication description, geographic location, and keyword.

  7. New Mexico English Remediation Taskforce Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Higher Education Department, 2016

    2016-01-01

    In March, 2016, the state of New Mexico established a Remediation Task Force to examine remediation reform efforts across the state's higher education institutions. On March 11, the Task Force met for the "New Mexico Corequisite Remediation at Scale Policy Institute" in order to learn about the results of the latest national reform…

  8. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (ECRTS) DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ElectroChemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) process was developed by P2-Soil Remediation, Inc. P-2 Soil Remediation, Inc. formed a partnership with Weiss Associates and ElectroPetroleum, Inc. to apply the technology to contaminated sites. The ECRTs process was evaluated ...

  9. Toward Elimination of Dog-Mediated Human Rabies: Experiences from Implementing a Large-scale Demonstration Project in Southern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpolya, Emmanuel Abraham; Lembo, Tiziana; Lushasi, Kennedy; Mancy, Rebecca; Mbunda, Eberhard M.; Makungu, Selemani; Maziku, Matthew; Sikana, Lwitiko; Jaswant, Gurdeep; Townsend, Sunny; Meslin, François-Xavier; Abela-Ridder, Bernadette; Ngeleja, Chanasa; Changalucha, Joel; Mtema, Zacharia; Sambo, Maganga; Mchau, Geofrey; Rysava, Kristyna; Nanai, Alphoncina; Kazwala, Rudovick; Cleaveland, Sarah; Hampson, Katie

    2017-01-01

    A Rabies Elimination Demonstration Project was implemented in Tanzania from 2010 through to 2015, bringing together government ministries from the health and veterinary sectors, the World Health Organization, and national and international research institutions. Detailed data on mass dog vaccination campaigns, bite exposures, use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), and human rabies deaths were collected throughout the project duration and project areas. Despite no previous experience in dog vaccination within the project areas, district veterinary officers were able to implement district-wide vaccination campaigns that, for most part, progressively increased the numbers of dogs vaccinated with each phase of the project. Bite exposures declined, particularly in the southernmost districts with the smallest dog populations, and health workers successfully transitioned from primarily intramuscular administration of PEP to intradermal administration, resulting in major cost savings. However, even with improved PEP provision, vaccine shortages still occurred in some districts. In laboratory diagnosis, there were several logistical challenges in sample handling and submission but compared to the situation before the project started, there was a moderate increase in the number of laboratory samples submitted and tested for rabies in the project areas with a decrease in the proportion of rabies-positive samples over time. The project had a major impact on public health policy and practice with the formation of a One Health Coordination Unit at the Prime Minister’s Office and development of the Tanzania National Rabies Control Strategy, which lays a roadmap for elimination of rabies in Tanzania by 2030 by following the Stepwise Approach towards Rabies Elimination (SARE). Overall, the project generated many important lessons relevant to rabies prevention and control in particular and disease surveillance in general. Lessons include the need for (1) a specific unit in the

  10. Toward Elimination of Dog-Mediated Human Rabies: Experiences from Implementing a Large-scale Demonstration Project in Southern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpolya, Emmanuel Abraham; Lembo, Tiziana; Lushasi, Kennedy; Mancy, Rebecca; Mbunda, Eberhard M; Makungu, Selemani; Maziku, Matthew; Sikana, Lwitiko; Jaswant, Gurdeep; Townsend, Sunny; Meslin, François-Xavier; Abela-Ridder, Bernadette; Ngeleja, Chanasa; Changalucha, Joel; Mtema, Zacharia; Sambo, Maganga; Mchau, Geofrey; Rysava, Kristyna; Nanai, Alphoncina; Kazwala, Rudovick; Cleaveland, Sarah; Hampson, Katie

    2017-01-01

    A Rabies Elimination Demonstration Project was implemented in Tanzania from 2010 through to 2015, bringing together government ministries from the health and veterinary sectors, the World Health Organization, and national and international research institutions. Detailed data on mass dog vaccination campaigns, bite exposures, use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), and human rabies deaths were collected throughout the project duration and project areas. Despite no previous experience in dog vaccination within the project areas, district veterinary officers were able to implement district-wide vaccination campaigns that, for most part, progressively increased the numbers of dogs vaccinated with each phase of the project. Bite exposures declined, particularly in the southernmost districts with the smallest dog populations, and health workers successfully transitioned from primarily intramuscular administration of PEP to intradermal administration, resulting in major cost savings. However, even with improved PEP provision, vaccine shortages still occurred in some districts. In laboratory diagnosis, there were several logistical challenges in sample handling and submission but compared to the situation before the project started, there was a moderate increase in the number of laboratory samples submitted and tested for rabies in the project areas with a decrease in the proportion of rabies-positive samples over time. The project had a major impact on public health policy and practice with the formation of a One Health Coordination Unit at the Prime Minister's Office and development of the Tanzania National Rabies Control Strategy, which lays a roadmap for elimination of rabies in Tanzania by 2030 by following the Stepwise Approach towards Rabies Elimination (SARE). Overall, the project generated many important lessons relevant to rabies prevention and control in particular and disease surveillance in general. Lessons include the need for (1) a specific unit in the

  11. Effects of cognitive remediation on cognitive dysfunction in partially or fully remitted patients with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Kirsa M; Almer, Glennie Marie; Vinberg, Maj

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of patients with bipolar disorder experience persistent cognitive dysfunction, such as memory, attention and planning difficulties, even during periods of full remission. The aim of this trial is to investigate whether cognitive remediation, a new psychological treatment...

  12. EPRTM project experience: selection of partners and supply chain; Experiencia en Proyectos de EPTTM: seleccion de socios y cadena de suministros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzo, D. de

    2012-07-01

    With 4 EPRTM units under construction, the new plants to be built in the following years will benefit from the return on experience of the work already performed. The knowledge about licensing processes, detail engineering, supply chain, logistics and on-site work gathered from the Olkiluoto 3 and Flamanville 3 projects has already been used in the Taishan 1 and 2 project, resulting in a project that is on schedule and on budget. This article will show how the advantage of such broad experience gained will be used to benefit future projects to ensure certainty of completion, leaving few and limited unresolved issues even before the beginning of the project. Several areas that are not usually tackled when speaking of a New Build project will be covered by this text from the point of view of a nuclear vendor: Project Partnership Selection and the Gate Review Process applied by AREVA in the supply chain of the main components. (Author)

  13. The statistical support in the research projects, university-community. Reflections of an Experience with Seedbeds of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubia Yaneth Gómez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Connect Academy with research , is one of the current demands of the University institutions and society. It is expected that the teaching and research are activities articulated , since when teachers are actively involved in it, it can induce students to a critical and reflective atmosphere, moreover, when research is carried out in your environment, student appropriates the reality that surrounds it. The article seeks to encourage the reflection of the importance of linking research projects at universities connected in a practical manner with the objectives of a sector of the community and where the seedbeds of researchmake an active part of the project, thus strengthens the triad University- Community - Research. The type of analysis is exploratory descriptive in order to characterize and understand issues of interest around the experiences of the seedbeds of researchand their experiences. Methodologically, the planning and development it is focused on three moments: information and documentation, statistical design of the proposal, development and application. This project enabled the breakdown of classical roles between teachers and students, generating greater confidence and dynamism to the proposed activities. Were strengthened processes of teaching and learning between the seedbeds, strengthening research, argumentative, communicative and social competences.

  14. Timeslice experiments for understanding regional climate projections: applications to the tropical hydrological cycle and European winter circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Robin; Douville, Hervé; Skinner, Christopher B.

    2017-11-01

    A set of atmosphere-only timeslice experiments are described, designed to examine the processes that cause regional climate change and inter-model uncertainty in coupled climate model responses to CO_2 forcing. The timeslice experiments are able to reproduce the pattern of regional climate change in the coupled models, and are applied here to two cases where inter-model uncertainty in future projections is large: the tropical hydrological cycle, and European winter circulation. In tropical forest regions, the plant physiological effect is the largest cause of hydrological cycle change in the two models that represent this process. This suggests that the CMIP5 ensemble mean may be underestimating the magnitude of water cycle change in these regions, due to the inclusion of models without the plant effect. SST pattern change is the dominant cause of precipitation and circulation change over the tropical oceans, and also appears to contribute to inter-model uncertainty in precipitation change over tropical land regions. Over Europe and the North Atlantic, uniform SST increases drive a poleward shift of the storm-track. However this does not consistently translate into an overall polewards storm-track shift, due to large circulation responses to SST pattern change, which varies across the models. Coupled model SST biases influence regional rainfall projections in regions such as the Maritime Continent, and so projections in these regions should be treated with caution.

  15. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy

  16. Balancing risk: site remediation outside the environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankovich, T.L.; Klyashtorin, A.; Guo, Z.; Muldoon, J.; Lysohirka, S.; Petelina, E.; Gergely, E. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Jacklin, T.; Heffron, T. [AECOM, Calgary, AB (Canada); Smith, R. [R.S. Management Services Inc., Prince Albert, SK (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In Canada, an environmental assessment (EA) is typically required for physical works or physical activities that are to be undertaken at a given site, such as those that would be required when performing environmental remediation at an abandoned mine site. In general, the type of EA required under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) tends to be commensurate with risk, whereby a comprehensive study is required for projects with the potential to cause significant adverse environmental effects. Remediation of the Gunnar Mine Site, an abandoned uranium mine/mill in Northern Saskatchewan, is currently undergoing a comprehensive EA to develop plans for the sustainable remediation of the Gunnar pit, two waste rock piles, three areas of unconfined tailings and the mine site itself. The site was abandoned in 1964, with little to no remediation. As a result, buildings and structures present on the site deteriorated over time due to scavenging of building materials that had taken place and exposure to the harsh northern conditions. To address the risks associated with buildings and structures in a timely manner, on July 23, 2010, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) issued an Order to address those that have failed a structural safety assessment to be taken down by no later than October 31, 2011 (prior to approval of the Gunnar EA). To accomplish this, it was necessary for the Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) to plan the work in a safe and cost-effective manner, with consideration of both the short-term mitigative measures required under the Order and the long-term end-state of the Gunnar Mine Site following remediation. Work is proceeding on budget and ahead of schedule on the abatement and demolition of buildings and structures at Gunnar. An overview of the considerations taken, the project accomplishments and the lessons learned will be provided. (author)

  17. Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE`s preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public`s role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy.

  18. [About experience of producing city health profile as a part of the international who healthy cities project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilenko, E L; Gomerova, N I; Zakharova, M A; L'vov, A A; Shalygina, L S

    2012-01-01

    The article presents information about the international project "Healthy cities", knowledge about principles and axioms of the project. The authors have analyzed the experience of producing the "City Health Profile" under the project WHO "Healthy cities". The authors believe that the "Health Profile" of each individual city varies depending on specific conditions, both physical (the size of the territory, the state of the environment, its location) and political, and socio-economic. However, the formation of the "City Health Profile" is universally, regardless of geographical location or structure. It was noted that the "City Health Profile" has reflected all aspects of the life of the city, facilitates or barriers the promotion of inhabitants' health and their well-being. For producing of "City Health Profile" additional data are needed: survey, sociological polls of the city population (self-assessment of their health status, lifestyle and quality of life). The advantage of these researches, carried out in the framework of the project "Healthy Cities", is implementation of complex sociological survey with a focused multi-purpose monitoring, covering all spheres of life in the city, to present a versatile, complete and objective evidences to illustrate the city as a territory of health and make up the holistic picture and the centre of which is the citizen and his/her health according to the WHO recommendations.

  19. X-Culture: An International Project in the Light of Experience Gained over the Years (2010-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Poór

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The X-Culture project is an innovative modern form of experiential learning predominantly in International Management and International Business. Although experiential learning has some advantages, namely, developing cross-cultural competencies, cultural intelligence, intercultural communication and management skills, differences in personality or conditions also arise as a downside. X-Culture has been evolving throughout the years since 2010 when the original objective was to supplement the theoretical material and in-class teaching. Nowadays more than 4000 master, bachelor and MBA students, mostly of management and economics from more than 37 countries, take part in the project every semester. X-Culture is aimed at students of International Business college courses and training programs with the task of writing a business report or consulting propositions by offering business solutions for a hypothetical client.  This paper outlines the theoretical background of the X-culture project. It describes the evolution and practical and theoretical experience of this project since 2010.

  20. Transformative learning experience for physical therapy students through a community health promotion project for mothers of hearing-challenged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokogawa, Masami; Notoya, Masako; Madokoro, Sachiko

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this project was to expose physical therapy students to transformative learning through a community health promotion project for mothers of hearing-challenged children. [Subjects and Methods] The participants were three mothers with their respective hearing-challenged child and twenty physical therapy students. The project consisted of seven sessions supervised throughout by a physical therapy instructor. The students participated in seven sessions, while the mothers were required to attend only two sessions of a health checkup and exercise program. [Results] Through the interaction between the mothers and students, the former felt physically and mentally refreshed, and the latter experienced transformative learning. The mother's physical status showed that all parameters for health variables were within normal range. However, it was found that mothers had little time for their personal mental or physical well-being because their focus was on planning and executing daily assignments for development of the child's verbal skills. [Conclusion] This project contributed to the students' learning experience and provided them with tools for possible future interest and involvement in community activity. The exercise session appeared to stimulate in the mothers an awareness and importance of their own personal and mental well-being.

  1. Microgravity Multi-Phase Flow Experiment for Suborbital Testing (MFEST) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD), had previously developed an orbital flight experiment to 1) test the feasibility of a...

  2. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed "Observation platform for dynamic biomedical and biotechnology experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module" consists of a platen sized to fit the...

  3. Lightweight Design of an HTS Coil for the VASIMR Experiment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tai-Yang Research of Delaware proposes to design and fabricate an HTS double-pancake coil in support of the VASIMR experiment. The proposed HTS coil will implement...

  4. Ecological educational projects of public organizations: experience of regions of the Privolzhsky Federal region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Kiselyeva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological educational activity of public organizations in the Privolzhsky federal district is considered in the article, proceeding from experience of making the federal directory « Public resources of education » (2003 .

  5. Cloud Experiment. View inside the chamber with Jasper Kirkby, Head leader of the project.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    CLOUD, the cutting-edge physics experiment that will shed light on climate-related matters, has finished its assembly phase and is starting taking data using a beam of protons from the Proton Synchrotron.

  6. Participation experiences and civic concepts, attitudes and engagement: implications for citizenship education projects

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Menezes

    2003-01-01

    This article considers participation experiences of 14 year-old and upper secondary students in six European countries that were involved in the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) Civic Education Study: the Czech Republic, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, Sweden and Switzerland, countries that vary in their history of institution of democratic regimes. Participation has been considered as a crucial dimension of citizenship, and experiences within civil so...

  7. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  8. Study on the extension of experiment resources in the MAUS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderle, H.; Boerchers, G.; Fechner, G.; Groth, V.; Haase, B.; Stolze, H.; Vits, P.

    1984-12-01

    Concepts for the extensions of the MAUS-experiment-resource-limits were analyzed. The limits for the experiment parameters such as volume, mass, energy and dissipation are increased by connecting several get away special (GAS) containers to MAUS-clusters. The analyzed concepts are discussed and for one selected concept the development phase are prepared by the design of hardware, by electronic layouts and by planning of the procurement (with working scheme and schedule).

  9. Rocket experiments and payloads for Super CAMP. [Cold Arctic Mesopause Project (CAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, E.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The super Cold Arctic Mesopause Project (CAMP) follow-up project in the summer of 1990 is outlined. In situ measurements of appropriate height resolution are needed in the summer mesosphere at high latitudes to investigate structures and formation processes of polar mesospheric clouds. The rocket measurements from the high latitude site Thule AB in Greenland (76.6 N) are decisive for the understanding of the cold Arctic mesopause. Similar rocket measurements from the European ranges Andenes and Esrange (68 to 69 N) are needed to investigate the latitudinal variability of the parameters relevant for the formation, transport, and loss of mesospheric ice particles. An important aspect of Super CAMP is the study of the heterogeneous chemistry, the loss of electrons on aggregates, and the build-up of horizontal and vertical electric fields in the presence of charged ice particles. Instruments, measurements, and purpose are listed.

  10. Madagascar: open-source software project for multidimensional data analysis and reproducible computational experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Fomel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Madagascar software package is designed for analysis of large-scale multidimensional data, such as those occurring in exploration geophysics. Madagascar provides a framework for reproducible research. By “reproducible research” we refer to the discipline of attaching software codes and data to computational results reported in publications. The package contains a collection of (a computational modules, (b data-processing scripts, and (c research papers. Madagascar is distributed on SourceForge under a GPL v2 license https://sourceforge.net/projects/rsf/. By October 2013, more than 70 people from different organizations around the world have contributed to the project, with increasing year-to-year activity. The Madagascar website is http://www.ahay.org/.

  11. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE COLLABORATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM PODIO IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii V. Semenets

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Information Technologies role in the medical university management is analyzed. The importance of the application of the electronic document management in the medical universities is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. A Podio collaboration and project management cloud service features overview is presented. The methodology of the Podio capabilities usage to the medical university task management solving is developed. An approaches to the Podio Workspaces and Applications development for the faculties collaboration and project management in the departments of the medical universities are presented. The examples of the Podio features usage to the work-flow automation of the information-analytical and hardware and software support departments of the Ternopil State Medical University named after I. Ja. Horbachevsky are shown.

  12. The TAPin electronic libraries project and the experience at the University of Birmingham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K. Mulvaney

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The TAPin Project and its implementation at the University of Birmingham is described. Local issues and key features of a hybrid approach to Networked Learner Support are addressed. The methods of NLS adopted included electronic mail and the Internet. The key role in NLS played by subject librarians is stressed. Transfer of skills to learners by means of targeted individual training and a web guide is discussed.

  13. Accuracy and projection in perceptions of partners' recent emotional experiences: Both minds matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Margaret S; Von Culin, Katherine R; Clark-Polner, Elizabeth; Lemay, Edward P

    2017-03-01

    In 2 studies involving 96 married couples (Study 1) and 118 romantic couples (Study 2), we investigated partners' perceptions of each others' recently experienced emotions. In both studies, both individuals within each couple independently provided reports of (a) their own recently experienced emotions, (b) their perceptions of their partners' recently experienced emotions, and (c) the extent to which they had expressed the emotions they had experienced to their partner. We then assessed the extent to which perceptions of partners' emotions were (a) accurate (i.e., in agreement with partners' independent reports of their own feelings) and (b) a function of the perceiver's own emotions (i.e., projected). Significant evidence for both accuracy in perceiving emotions (4 of 7 emotions in Study 1; 8 of 9 emotions in Study 2) and for projection of perceivers' own emotions onto partners was obtained (5 of 7 emotions in Study 1; 9 of 9 emotions in Study 2). Effects for all remaining emotions trended in the same directions. There was almost no moderation of these effects by targets' having knowingly expressed the emotions. Implications of the patterning of findings for different emotions for the social functions of accuracy and projection in perceiving emotions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Community participation as an interactive learning process: experiences from a schistosomiasis control project in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndekha, Addmore; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Mølgaard, Per; Woelk, Godfrey; Furu, Peter

    2003-03-01

    A schistosomiasis control project was undertaken from 1994 to 1998 in Guruve District, Zimbabwe, based on the active involvement of local communities in the growing and application of the molluscicidal plant Phytolacca dodecandra as a supplement to other control measures such as chemotherapy and health education. The berries of P. dodecandra are highly molluscicidal to the intermediate host snails of schistosomiasis and is rapidly degradable in water. It was observed that plant care fluctuated during the study period. Only a few households participated in snail control activities, although 97% of respondents in a baseline survey had stated a willingness to take part. This invoked an investigation to explore the reality from a user perspective. Focus group discussions, semi-structured interviews and observations were used to solicit information. In spite of a cultural inclination for collective work, many reasons for low-level involvement emerged, inter alia the low perceived value of the project, demands for tangible benefits, inaccessible fields and weak leadership. This study shows that community participation is a complex process upon which a multiplicity of social and cultural determinants have an impact. If community participation is to become successful in development programmes it ought to be viewed as a mutual learning process where obstacles are identified and discussed and solutions shared among community members and project staff.

  15. Remediation of DNAPL through Sequential In Situ Chemical Oxidation and Bioaugmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    controller PLFA phospholipid fatty acid ppb parts per billion PTA pilot test area PVC polyvinyl chloride QAPP quality assurance project plan QA...remediation time, which ultimately reduces total lifecycle costs of remediation. The difficulty in removing PCE and TCE DNAPL from contaminated...implementation. Total lifecycle costs of each alternative were calculated as the net present value over the estimated operating period at a real discount

  16. Natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics, and radionuclides in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, G.; Pintauro, P.; O`Connor, S. [and others

    1996-05-02

    This project focuses on the chemical aspects of remediation, with the underlying theme that chemical remediation does occur naturally. Included are studies on the fate of heavy metal and organic contaminants discharged into aquatic environments; accurate assay metal contaminants partitioned into soils, water and tissue; development of novel polymeric membranes and microporous solids for the entrapment of heavy metals; and the development of hybrid chemo-enzymatic oxidative schemes for aromatics decontamination. 49 refs.

  17. An Environmental Management Experience Within the Project: Improvement of Educational Opportunities in Rural Environmental Management in Sarapiqui and Guapiles’ Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle León-León

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A very important aspect of worldwide education and, particularly for Costa Rican education, is the environmental management as an educational strategy. For this reason, this article describes the experience of the project Mejora de la Oferta Educativa en Gestión Ambiental Rural (MOE-GAR during its first stage in 2009. The population was comprised by teachers from different areas of the rural school districts of Guapiles and Sarapiquí. As a part of this project, we worked with teachers, different government and nongovernment institutions, throughout the 2009 school year; obtaining as a result, a process of knowledge development in environmental management. Based on this, several proposals were developed in different educational institutions.

  18. [No remedy for AIDS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M M

    1993-01-01

    Vila Mimosa, a site of street prostitution in Rio de Janeiro since the 1930s, is the place of work for over 2000 prostitution who charge an average of $3-4 per client. Several years ago the Association of Prostitutes of Rio de Janeiro (APRJ) was founded by Eunice Coelho Reis. APRJ membership has increased steadily and its list of accomplishments is impressive. A state hospital performs free medical examinations of APRJ members, and the Brazilian family planning association BEMFAM provides 180,000 condoms each month. AIDS control projects have also been successful, and no APRJ members have contracted HIV infection. In the country with the 4th highest rate of infection, the rigid norm of condom use adopted by the prostitutes of Vila Mimosa has led to effective prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. The prostitutes report however that a large proportion of their clients resist condom use, sometimes violently. The proportion of seropositive individuals who are women has been rising steadily. Family Health International estimates that the proportion of new cases among women has risen from 25% in 1990 to 40% at present. AIDS prevention campaigns are attempting to persuade women to "negotiate" condom use during sex. But power relations between the sexes place women at a disadvantage. Men often make the sexual decisions. Socialization patterns of females in Latin America are oriented to maternity. Passive sexual behavior has become a primary obstacle to adoption of safer sex practices. The World Health Organization estimates that currently 9-11 million persons are latent carriers of the HIV virus. Prostitution originating in poverty and unemployment, the vulnerability of adolescents who begin their sexual lives with little knowledge of contraception or sexually transmitted diseases, and the lack of sex education that transcends the biological to consider interpersonal relations are all factors that hinder AIDS prevention.

  19. "Applying anatomy to something I care about": Authentic inquiry learning and student experiences of an inquiry project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Lauren M

    2017-11-01

    Despite advances to move anatomy education away from its didactic history, there is a continued need for students to contextualize their studies to make learning more meaningful. This article investigates authentic learning in the context of an inquiry-based approach to learning human gross anatomy. Utilizing a case-study design with three groups of students (n = 18) and their facilitators (n = 3), methods of classroom observations, interviews, and artifact collection were utilized to investigate students' experiences of learning through an inquiry project. Qualitative data analysis through open and selective coding produced common meaningful themes of group and student experiences. Overall results demonstrate how the project served as a unique learning experience where learners engaged in the opportunity to make sense of anatomy in context of their interests and wider interdisciplinary considerations through collaborative, group-based investigation. Results were further considered in context of theoretical frameworks of inquiry-based and authentic learning. Results from this study demonstrate how students can engage anatomical understandings to inquire and apply disciplinary considerations to their personal lives and the world around them. Anat Sci Educ 10: 538-548. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  20. Remediation of Petroleum-contaminated Soil Using Bulrush Straw Powder, Biochar and Nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjie; Li, Fayun; Rong, Xiangmin; Song, Haixing; Chen, Jiabo

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the remediation efficiency of petroleum-contaminated soil from an oilfield using different types of remediation treatments under laboratory conditions. Compared with unamended soil as the control treatment (T1), soil samples were amended with bulrush straw powder (T2), with biochar alone (T3) and in combination with nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) (T4). The remediation experiment was carried out for 8 weeks. The extent of hydrocarbon degradation was monitored gravimetrically, and the residual oil fractions were analyzed by gas chromatography. The characteristics of the polluted soil (water-holding capacity and nutrients) were improved significantly by biochar addition (p soil can be remediated efficiently by adding biochar and nutrients simultaneously, and this combination of remediation was superior to that observed with added bulrush straw powder.

  1. Dark matter search in the Milano Double Beta experiment and prospects for the CUORE project

    CERN Document Server

    Guiliani, A; Brofferio, C; Bucci, C; Capelli, S; Cremonesi, O; Fiorini, Ettore; Nucciotti, A; Pavan, M M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Pirro, S; Pobes, C; Previtali, E; Sisti, M; Vanzini, M; Zanotti, L

    2002-01-01

    A Double Beta Decay experiment performed by the Milano group at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Mi DBD experiment) consists of 20 TeO sub 2 crystals operated as bolometers at T approx = 10mK. An 89-day low-threshold background spectrum, collected with two 340 g bolometers, was selected and analyzed to search for a possible WIMP signal. The exclusion plot in a WIMP mass -- cross section plane was evaluated, assuming WIMP-nucleus spin-independent interaction. WIMP-nucleon cross sections larger than 10 sup - sup 4 pb are excluded between 30 and 100 GeV WIMP masses. The planned expansions of the present experiment, named CUORICINO and CUORE, are presented in terms of sensitivity to WIMP search, considering also the seasonal modulation approach, made possible by the large masses of the future arrays (40 kg for CUORICINO and 760 kg for CUORE).

  2. Dark matter search in the Milano Double Beta experiment and prospects for the CUORE project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiliani, A.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Capelli, S.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Pobes, C.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.; Vanzini, M.; Zanotti, L

    2002-07-01

    A Double Beta Decay experiment performed by the Milano group at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Mi DBD experiment) consists of 20 TeO{sub 2} crystals operated as bolometers at T {approx_equal} 10mK. An 89-day low-threshold background spectrum, collected with two 340 g bolometers, was selected and analyzed to search for a possible WIMP signal. The exclusion plot in a WIMP mass -- cross section plane was evaluated, assuming WIMP-nucleus spin-independent interaction. WIMP-nucleon cross sections larger than 10{sup -4} pb are excluded between 30 and 100 GeV WIMP masses. The planned expansions of the present experiment, named CUORICINO and CUORE, are presented in terms of sensitivity to WIMP search, considering also the seasonal modulation approach, made possible by the large masses of the future arrays (40 kg for CUORICINO and 760 kg for CUORE)

  3. Dark matter search in the Milano Double Beta experiment and prospects for the CUORE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiliani, A.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Capelli, S.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Pobes, C.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.; Vanzini, M.; Zanotti, L.

    2002-07-01

    A Double Beta Decay experiment performed by the Milano group at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Mi DBD experiment) consists of 20 TeO 2 crystals operated as bolometers at T ⋍ 10mK. An 89-day low-threshold background spectrum, collected with two 340 g bolometers, was selected and analyzed to search for a possible WIMP signal. The exclusion plot in a WIMP mass — cross section plane was evaluated, assuming WIMP-nucleus spin-independent interaction. WIMP-nucleon cross sections larger than 10 -4 pb are excluded between 30 and 100 GeV WIMP masses. The planned expansions of the present experiment, named CUORICINO and CUORE, are presented in terms of sensitivity to WIMP search, considering also the seasonal modulation approach, made possible by the large masses of the future arrays (40 kg for CUORICINO and 760 kg for CUORE).

  4. Human dimension in scientific models in high-mountain climate change and risk projects: Peruvian-Swiss experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicuña, Luis; Jurt, Christine; Minan, Fiorella; Huggel, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Models in a range of scientific disciplines are increasingly seen as indispensable for successful adaptation. Governments as well as international organizations and cooperations put their efforts in basing their adaptation projects on scientific results. Thereby, it is critical that scientific models are first put into the particular context in which they will be applied. This paper addresses the experience of the project 'Glaciers 513- Climate change adaptation and disaster risk management for glacier retreat in the Andes' conducted in the districts of Carhuaz (Ancash region) and Santa Teresa (Cusco region) in Peru. The Peruvian and the Swiss governments put their joint efforts in an adaptation project in the context of climate change and the retreat of the glaciers. The project is led by a consortium of Care Peru and the University of Zurich with additional Swiss partners and its principal aim is to improve the capacity for integral adaptation and reduce the risk of disasters from glaciers and high-mountain areas, and effects of climate change, particularly in the regions of Cusco and Ancash. The paper shows how the so called "human dimension" on the one hand, and models from a range of disciplines, including climatology, glaciology, and hydrology on the other hand, were conceptualized and perceived by the different actors involved in the project. Important aspects have been, among others, the role of local knowledge including ancestral knowledge, demographic information, socio-economic indicators as well as the social, political and cultural framework and the historical background. Here we analyze the role and context of local knowledge and the historical background. The analysis of the implications of the differences and similarities of the perceptions of a range of actors contributes to the discussion about how, and to what extent scientific models can be contextualized, what kind of information can be helpful for the contextualization and how it can be

  5. Experiments in the HAW project. Data report ECN contribution July - December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonka, V.; Middleton, D.W.; Ruiter, A. de

    1993-12-01

    This data report is the eighth of a series intended to document the data obtained from the HAW in situ experiment (at Asse) and to make these data available to potential users. During this experiment a considerable number of thermocouples was damaged so that their signals are lost. In some cases it resulted in plots with no signal but empty frames. In the previous report we tried to change our procedure and remove these frames from the report. This action was not completely successful because, as it turned out, also some of the not empty plots were removed wrongly as well. (orig.)

  6. Sustainability of mega water diversion projects: Experience and lessons from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Wang, Chaoran; Liu, Yi; Olsson, Gustaf; Wang, Chunyan

    2017-11-18

    Water availability and water demand are not evenly distributed in time and space. Many mega water diversion projects have been launched to alleviate water shortages in China. This paper analyzes the temporal and spatial features of 59 mega water diversion projects in China using statistical analysis. The relationship between nine major basins is measured using a network analysis method, and the associated economic, environmental and social impacts are explored using an impact analysis method. The study finds the development of water diversion has experienced four stages in China, from a starting period through to a period of high-speed development. Both the length of water diversion channels and the amount of transferred water have increased significantly in the past 50years. As of 2015, over 100billionm3 of water was transferred in China through 16,000km in channels. These projects reached over half of China's provinces. The Yangtze River Basin is now the largest source of transferred water. Through inter-basin water diversion, China gains the opportunity to increase Gross Domestic Product by 4%. However, the construction costs exceed 150 billion US dollars, larger than in any other country. The average cost per unit of transferred water has increased with time and scale but decreased from western to eastern China. Furthermore, annual total energy consumption for pumping exceeded 50billionkilowatt-hours and the related greenhouse gas emissions are estimated to be 48milliontons. It is worth noting that ecological problems caused by water diversion affect the Han River and Yellow River Basins. Over 500 thousand people have been relocated away from their homes due to water diversion. To improve the sustainability of water diversion, four kinds of innovative measures have been provided for decision makers: national diversion guidelines, integrated water basin management, economic incentives and ex-post evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Topography of the complete corticopontine projection: From experiments to principal maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve B Leergaard

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian brain is characterized by orderly spatial distribution of its cellular components, commonly referred to as topographical organization. The topography of cortical and subcortical maps is thought to represent functional or computational properties. In the present investigation, we have studied map transformations and organizing principles in the projections from the cerebral cortex to the pontine nuclei, with emphasis on the mapping of the cortex as a whole onto the pontine nuclei. Following single or multiple axonal tracer injections into different cortical regions, three-dimensional (3-D distributions of anterogradely labeled axons in the pontine nuclei were mapped. All 3-D reconstructed data sets were normalized to a standardized local coordinate system for the pontine nuclei and uploaded in a database application (FACCS, Functional Anatomy of the Cerebro-Cerebellar System, available via The Rodent Brain Workbench, http://www.rbwb.org. The database application allowed flexible use of the data in novel combinations, and use of a previously published data sets. Visualization of different combinations of data was used to explore alternative principles of organization. As a result of these analyses, a principal map of the topography of corticopontine projections was developed. This map followed the organization of early spatiotemporal gradients present in the cerebral cortex and the pontine nuclei. With the principal map for corticopontine projections, a fairly accurate prediction of pontine target area can be made for any site of origin in the cerebral cortex. The map and the underlying shared data sets represent a basis for modeling of topographical organization and structure-function relationships in this system.

  8. Ethical challenges and innovations in the dissemination of genomic data: the experience of the PERSPECTIVE project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque E

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emmanuelle Lévesque,1 Bartha Maria Knoppers,1 Jacques Simard,2 1Department of Human Genetics, Centre for Genomics and Policy, McGill University, Montréal, 2Genomics Centre, CHU de Québec Research Center, Department of Molecular Medicine, Laval University, Québec City, QC, Canada Abstract: The importance of making genomic data available for future research is now widely recognized among the scientific community and policymakers. In this era of shared responsibility for data dissemination, improved patient care through research depends on the development of powerful and secure data-sharing systems. As part of the concerted effort to share research resources, the project entitled Personalized Risk Stratification for Prevention and Early Detection of Breast Cancer (PERSPECTIVE makes effective data sharing through the development of a data-sharing framework, one of its goals. The secondary uses of data from PERSPECTIVE for future research promise to enhance our knowledge of breast cancer etiologies without duplicating data-gathering efforts. Despite its benefit for research, we recognize the ethical challenges of data sharing on the local, national, and international levels. The effective management of ethical approvals for projects spanning across jurisdictions, the return of results to research participants, and research incentives and recognition for data production, are but a few pressing issues that need to be properly addressed. We discuss how we managed these issues and suggest how ongoing innovations might help to facilitate data sharing in future genomic research projects. Keywords: data sharing, research ethics, cancer

  9. Librarians as Part of Cross-Disciplinary, Multi-Institutional Team Projects: Experiences from the VIVO Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Norton, Hannah F; Auten, Beth; Davis, Valrie I; Holmes, Kristi L; Johnson, Margeaux; Tennant, Michele R

    2013-01-01

    Cross-disciplinary, team-based collaboration is essential for addressing today's complex research questions, and librarians are increasingly entering into such collaborations. This study identifies skills needed as librarians integrate into cross-disciplinary teams, based on the experiences of librarians involved in the development and implementation of VIVO, a research discovery and collaboration platform. Participants discussed the challenges, skills gained, and lessons learned throughout the project. Their responses were analyzed in the light of the science of team science literature, and factors affecting collaboration on the VIVO team were identified. Skills in inclusive thinking, communication, perseverance, adaptability, and leadership were found to be essential.

  10. Librarians as Part of Cross-Disciplinary, Multi-Institutional Team Projects: Experiences from the VIVO Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Norton, Hannah F.; Auten, Beth; Davis, Valrie I.; Holmes, Kristi L.; Johnson, Margeaux; Tennant, Michele R.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-disciplinary, team-based collaboration is essential for addressing today’s complex research questions, and librarians are increasingly entering into such collaborations. This study identifies skills needed as librarians integrate into cross-disciplinary teams, based on the experiences of librarians involved in the development and implementation of VIVO, a research discovery and collaboration platform. Participants discussed the challenges, skills gained, and lessons learned throughout the project. Their responses were analyzed in the light of the science of team science literature, and factors affecting collaboration on the VIVO team were identified. Skills in inclusive thinking, communication, perseverance, adaptability, and leadership were found to be essential. PMID:23833333

  11. Experiences of operational costs of HPV vaccine delivery strategies in Gavi-supported demonstration projects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan Botwright

    Full Text Available From 2012 to 2016, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, provided support for countries to conduct small-scale demonstration projects for the introduction of the human papillomavirus vaccine, with the aim of determining which human papillomavirus vaccine delivery strategies might be effective and sustainable upon national scale-up. This study reports on the operational costs and cost determinants of different vaccination delivery strategies within these projects across twelve countries using a standardized micro-costing tool. The World Health Organization Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing Tool was used to collect costing data, which were then aggregated and analyzed to assess the costs and cost determinants of vaccination. Across the one-year demonstration projects, the average economic and financial costs per dose amounted to US$19.98 (standard deviation ±12.5 and US$8.74 (standard deviation ±5.8, respectively. The greatest activities representing the greatest share of financial costs were social mobilization at approximately 30% (range, 6-67% and service delivery at about 25% (range, 3-46%. Districts implemented varying combinations of school-based, facility-based, or outreach delivery strategies and experienced wide variation in vaccine coverage, drop-out rates, and service delivery costs, including transportation costs and per diems. Size of target population, number of students per school, and average length of time to reach an outreach post influenced cost per dose. Although the operational costs from demonstration projects are much higher than those of other routine vaccine immunization programs, findings from our analysis suggest that HPV vaccination operational costs will decrease substantially for national introduction. Vaccination costs may be decreased further by annual vaccination, high initial investment in social mobilization, or introducing/strengthening school health programs. Our analysis shows that drivers of cost are

  12. Emigration as an emancipatory project. Narratives on experiences of Polish women in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Herzberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Feminine migration might be considered as a way to emancipation and a great possibility to achieve both professional and private fulfillment. Migration can radically change the meaning of femininity and can strongly affect the traditional role of women. The correlation between migration and gender roles cannot be ignored when analyzing the migratory project due to their mutual influence. The main aim of the research was to find out if Polish women in Norway consider their migration as a way to emancipation.

  13. Designing an intranet from scratch to sketch: experiences from techniques used in the IDEnet project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berndtsson, Johan

    1999-01-01

    The choice of techniques to support system design is important in order to achieve a satisfactory result with regard to the quality of the future system. In the IDEnet development project, we chose to work with techniques used within, or inspired by, three different research areas: sociology......, participatory design and human-computer interaction. This paper discusses the use of one technique from each of these research areas in the development of an intranet (IDEnet) from `scratch to sketch' at the Department of Computer Science and Business Administration (IDE) in the University College of Karlskrona...

  14. Experiences of operational costs of HPV vaccine delivery strategies in Gavi-supported demonstration projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botwright, Siobhan; Holroyd, Taylor; Nanda, Shreya; Bloem, Paul; Griffiths, Ulla K; Sidibe, Anissa; Hutubessy, Raymond C W

    2017-01-01

    From 2012 to 2016, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, provided support for countries to conduct small-scale demonstration projects for the introduction of the human papillomavirus vaccine, with the aim of determining which human papillomavirus vaccine delivery strategies might be effective and sustainable upon national scale-up. This study reports on the operational costs and cost determinants of different vaccination delivery strategies within these projects across twelve countries using a standardized micro-costing tool. The World Health Organization Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Costing Tool was used to collect costing data, which were then aggregated and analyzed to assess the costs and cost determinants of vaccination. Across the one-year demonstration projects, the average economic and financial costs per dose amounted to US$19.98 (standard deviation ±12.5) and US$8.74 (standard deviation ±5.8), respectively. The greatest activities representing the greatest share of financial costs were social mobilization at approximately 30% (range, 6-67%) and service delivery at about 25% (range, 3-46%). Districts implemented varying combinations of school-based, facility-based, or outreach delivery strategies and experienced wide variation in vaccine coverage, drop-out rates, and service delivery costs, including transportation costs and per diems. Size of target population, number of students per school, and average length of time to reach an outreach post influenced cost per dose. Although the operational costs from demonstration projects are much higher than those of other routine vaccine immunization programs, findings from our analysis suggest that HPV vaccination operational costs will decrease substantially for national introduction. Vaccination costs may be decreased further by annual vaccination, high initial investment in social mobilization, or introducing/strengthening school health programs. Our analysis shows that drivers of cost are dependent on

  15. STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION RESEARCH FOR DNAPL IN FRACTURED ROCK, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, LIMESTONE, MAINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report details a research project on Steam Enhanced Remediation (SER) for the recovery of volatile organic compounds from fractured limestone that was carried out at the Quarry at the former Loring Air Force Base in Limestone, Maine. This project was carried out by USEPA, Ma...

  16. Functional Remediation for Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Arán, Anabel; Torrent, Carla; Solé, Brisa; Bonnín, C. Mar; Rosa, Adriane R; Sánchez-Moreno, José; Vieta, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment constitutes a core feature of bipolar illness. The main domains affected are verbal memory, attention, and executive functions. Deficits in these areas as well as difficulties to get functional remission seem to be increased associated with illness progression. Several studies have found a strong relationship between neurocognitive impairment and low functioning in bipolar disorder, as previously reported in other illnesses such as schizophrenia. Cognitive remediation strategies, adapted from work conducted with traumatic brain injury patients and applied to patients with schizophrenia, also need to be adapted to individuals with bipolar disorders. Early intervention using functional remediation, involves neurocognitive techniques and training, but also psychoeducation on cognition-related issues and problem-solving within an ecological framework. PMID:21687565

  17. Innovative Vitrification for Soil Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnat, James G.; Patten, John S.; Jetta, Norman W.

    1996-12-31

    Vortec has successfully completed Phases 1 and 2 of a technology demonstration program for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation.'' The principal objective of the program is to demonstrate the ability of a Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS) to remediate DOE contaminated soils and other waste forms containing TM RCRA hazardous materials, low levels of radionuclides and TSCA (PCB) containing wastes. The demonstration program will verify the ability of this vitrification process to produce a chemically stable glass final waste form which passes both TCLP and PCT quality control requirements, while meeting all federal and state emission control regulations. The demonstration system is designed to process 36 ton/day of as-received drummed or bulk wastes. The processing capacity equates to approximately 160 barrels/day of waste materials containing 30% moisture at an average weight of 450 lbs./barrel.

  18. A Co-Mentoring Project: An Intergenerational Service-Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchero, Renee A.

    2011-01-01

    Intergenerational service-learning between college students and older adults is a commonly used in educational gerontology. Service-learning is believed to enhance student learning through an equivalent focus on service and learning, reflection, and linking course content with the service experience. This article describes a comentoring project…

  19. Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

  20. Progress report of the ECN contribution to the experiments in the HAW project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijves, K.A.; Vonka, V.

    1991-08-01

    This report documents the progress of the ECN contribution in the High Active Waste Experiment, a large-scale in-situ test being performed underground in the Asse salt mine, Remlingen, FRG, during the period January 1st through March 31st, 1991. (A.S.). 3 refs.; 10 figs.