WorldWideScience

Sample records for experiment phase ii

  1. LHC Experiments Phase II - TDRs Approval Process

    CERN Document Server

    Forti, F

    2017-01-01

    The overall review process and steps of Phase II were described in CERN-LHCC-2015-077. As experiments submit detailed technical design reports (TDRs), the LHCC and UCG work in close connection to ensure a timely review of the scientific and technical feasibility as well as of the budget and schedule of the upgrade programme.

  2. The TGV II Experiment (Phase I Results)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneš, P.; Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalik, A.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Šimkovic, F.; Štekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.

    2007-10-01

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of 106Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of Cd-106 enriched to 75% (total mass about 10 g). In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture (g.s.→g.s.) in 106Cd as 2.0×1020 years. This limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  3. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment - Getting Ready for Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Carsten B.; Picasso Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PICASSO is a dark matter search experiment that uses the superheated droplet technique to find spin-dependently interacting WIMPs. A set of 1 l detectors with a total active mass of 19.4 g was used to prove the validity of the technique. The data from this run disfavors WIMP-proton cross sections larger than 1.3 pb for a WIMP mass of 29 GeV. Currently phase II of PICASSO is getting started. It will consist of 32 4.5 l detectors with a projected active mass of 2.5 kg and improved detectors.

  4. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment - Getting Ready for Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Carsten B., E-mail: ckrauss@owl.phy.queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Physics, Kingston, ON, K7L 2N6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    PICASSO is a dark matter search experiment that uses the superheated droplet technique to find spin-dependently interacting WIMPs. A set of 1 l detectors with a total active mass of 19.4 g was used to prove the validity of the technique. The data from this run disfavors WIMP-proton cross sections larger than 1.3 pb for a WIMP mass of 29 GeV. Currently phase II of PICASSO is getting started. It will consist of 32 4.5 l detectors with a projected active mass of 2.5 kg and improved detectors.

  5. Experiment TGV II—results of Phases I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalík, A.; Mamedov, F.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Sandukovski, V. G.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Šimkovic, F.; Stekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Zinatulina, D. R.

    2009-11-01

    Currently, the TGV collaboration is investigating the two-neutrino double electron capture (2vEC/EC) of 106Cd at the Modane underground laboratory. The study is performed with low-background multi-HPGe detector TGV II, which has been constructed for measurements of the rare processes. The half-life limits of T1/2>2.6×1020 years (for Phase I, 8687 hours) and T1/2>3.6×1020 years (for Phase II, 9003 hours) were obtained for the ground state to ground state 2vEC/EC of 106Cd. The results already allow to rule out some of the previous nuclear structure calculations.

  6. Pleiades Experiments on the NIF: Phase II-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benstead, James [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Morton, John [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Guymer, Thomas [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Garbett, Warren [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Stevenson, Mark [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Moore, Alastair [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kline, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schmidt, Derek [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Ted [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lanier, Nick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Workman, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Pleiades was a radiation transport campaign fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) between 2011 and 2014. The primary goals of the campaign were to develop and characterise a reproducible ~350eV x-ray drive and to constrain a number of material data properties required to successfully model the propagation of radiation through two low-density foam materials. A further goal involved the development and qualification of diagnostics for future radiation transport experiments at NIF. Pleiades was a collaborative campaign involving teams from both AWE and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  7. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, Emily [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Snelson, Catherine M [NSTec; Chipman, Veraun D [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Emer, Dudley [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); White, Bob [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Emmit, Ryan [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Wright, Al [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Drellack, Sigmund [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Huckins-Gang, Heather [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Mercadante, Jennifer [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Floyd, Michael [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); McGowin, Chris [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Cothrun, Chris [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Bonal, Nedra [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  8. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, E. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; Emer, D. F.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Wright, A. A.; Drellack, S.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Mercadante, J.; Floyd, M.; McGowin, C.; Cothrun, C.; Bonal, N.

    2013-12-01

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined. For Phase II of the experiment, characterization of the location is required to develop the geologic/geophysical models for the execution of the experiment. Criteria for the location are alluvium thickness of approximately 170 m and a water table below 170 m; minimal fracturing would be ideal. A P-wave mini-vibroseis survey was conducted at a potential site in alluvium to map out the subsurface geology. The seismic reflection profile consisted of 168 geophone stations, spaced 5 m apart. The mini-vibe was a 7,000-lb peak-force source, starting 57.5 m off the north end of the profile and ending 57.5 m past the southern-most geophone. The length of the profile was 835 m. The source points were placed every 5 m, equally spaced between geophones to reduce clipping. The vibroseis sweep was from 20 Hz down to 180 Hz over 8 seconds, and four sweeps were stacked at each shot location. The shot gathers show high signal-to-noise ratios with clear first arrivals across the entire spread and the suggestion of some shallow reflectors. The data were

  9. Large-N Over the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Phase I and Phase II Test Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelson, C. M.; Carmichael, J. D.; Mellors, R. J.; Abbott, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    One of the current challenges in the field of monitoring and verification is source discrimination of low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity, both natural and anthropogenic. Work is underway at the Nevada National Security Site to conduct a series of chemical explosion experiments using a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary approach. The goal of this series of experiments, called the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is to refine the understanding of the effect of earth structures on source phenomenology and energy partitioning in the source region, the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field, and the development of S waves observed in the far field. To fully explore these problems, the SPE series includes tests in both hard and soft rock geologic environments. The project comprises a number of activities, which range from characterizing the shallow subsurface to acquiring new explosion data from both the near field (100 m). SPE includes a series of planned explosions (with different yields and depths of burials), which are conducted in the same hole and monitored by a diverse set of sensors recording characteristics of the explosions, ground-shock, seismo-acoustic energy propagation. This presentation focuses on imaging the full 3D wavefield over hard rock and soft rock test beds using a large number of seismic sensors. This overview presents statistical analyses of optimal sensor layout required to estimate wavefield discriminants and the planned deployment for the upcoming experiments. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Optical link card design for the phase II upgrade of TileCal experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F; Ferrer, A; Gonzalez, V; Higon, E; Marin, C; Moreno, P; Sanchis, E; Solans, C; Valero, A; Valls, J

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an optical link card developed in the frame of the R&D activities for the phase 2 upgrade of the TileCal experiment. This board, that is part of the evaluation of different technologies for the final choice in the next years, is designed as a mezzanine that can work independently or be plugged in the optical multiplexer board of the TileCal backend electronics. It includes two SNAP 12 optical connectors able to transmit and receive up to 75 Gb/s and one SFP optical connector for lower speeds and compatibility with existing hardware as the read out driver. All processing is done in a Stratix II GX field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Details are given on the hardware design, including signal and power integrity ana lysis, needed when working with these high data rates and on firmware development to obtain the best performance of the FPGA signal transceivers and for the use of the GBT protocol.

  11. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, S., E-mail: susanne.kuehn@cern.ch

    2016-07-11

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will be carried out. Due to increased luminosity, a severe radiation dose and high particle rates will occur for the experiments. In consequence, several detector components will have to be upgraded. In the ATLAS experiment, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracking detector with the goal of at least delivering the present detector performance also in the harsh Phase-II LHC conditions. This report presents the current planning and results from first prototype measurements of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector. - Highlights: • Upgrade of current inner detector of the ATLAS experiment foreseen for High-Luminosity-LHC. • Silicon strip tracker for the upgrade has a modular design, single units are built and tested standalone before assembly in larger structures. • The prototyping is well advanced and approaching maturity. • Several integrated objects have been built, e.g. 70 barrel and 40 endcap prototype modules show low noise test results. • Many additional R & D tasks are ongoing and the collaboration is planning for preparing a technical design report before the end of 2016.

  12. Search for solar axions with the X-ray telescope of the CAST experiment (phase II); Suche nach solaren Axionen mit dem Roentgenteleskop des CAST-Experiments (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordt, Annika

    2009-10-14

    The CAST (CERN Solar Axion Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside a transverse magnetic field. So far, no solar axionsignal has been detected, but a new upper limit could be given (CAST Phase I). Since 2005, CAST entered in its second phase where it operates with a buffer gas ({sup 4}He) in the conversion region to extend the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axionmasses. For the first time it is possible to enter the theoretically favored axion massrange and to give an upper limit for this solar axion mass-range (>0.02 eV). This thesis is about the analysis of the X-ray telescope data Phase II with {sup 4}He inside the magnet. The result for the coupling constant of axions to photons is: g{sub {alpha}}{sub {gamma}}{sub {gamma}}<1.6-6.0 x 10{sup -10} GeV{sup -1} (95%C.L.) for m{sub a}=0.02-0.4 eV. (2) This result is better than any result that has been given before in this mass range for solar axions. (orig.)

  13. The Belle II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, J

    2017-01-01

    Set to begin data taking at the end of 2018, the Belle II experiment is the next-generation B-factory experiment hosted at KEK in Tsukuba, Japan. The experiment represents the cumulative effort from the collaboration of experimental and detector physics, computing, and software development. Taking everything learned from the previous Belle experiment, which ran from 1998 to 2010, Belle II aims to probe deeper than ever before into the field of heavy quark physics. By achieving an integrated luminosity of 50 ab−1 and accumulating 50 times more data than the previous experiment across its lifetime, along with a rewritten analysis framework, the Belle II experiment will push the high precision frontier of high energy physics. This paper will give an overview of the key components and development activities that make the Belle II experiment possible.

  14. The Layout and Performance of the Phase-II upgrade of the tracking detector of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Xiaocong; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    HL-LHC will deliver about 3000 fb-1 of integrated luminosity in over 10 year. This will present an extremely challenging environment to the ATLAS experiment, well beyond that for which it was designed. In ATLAS Phase II upgrade, the Inner Detector will be replace by a new all-silicon Inner Tracker to maintain tracking performance in this high-occupancy environment and to cope with the increase of approximately a factor of ten in the integrated radiation dose. The ITk Detector layout is designed to meet the requirement for identifying charged particles with high efficiency and measuring their properties with high precision in the denser environment. The Layout and performance of the ITk is presented.

  15. Options Study - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  16. Solid phase transformations II

    CERN Document Server

    Čermák, J

    2009-01-01

    This topical volume includes ten invited papers that cover selected areas of the field of solid phase transformations. The first two contributions represent a burgeoning branch; that of the computer simulation of physical phenomena. The following three articles deal with the thermodynamics of phase transformations as a basic theory for describing the phenomenology of phase changes in matter. The next paper describes the interconnections between structural stability and the electronic structure of phases. Two further articles are devoted to displacive transformations; a field where there are ma

  17. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  18. A phase II experience with neoadjuvant irinotecan (CPT-11, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and leucovorin (LV for colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigam David

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemotherapy may improve survival in patients undergoing resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may help identify patients with occult extrahepatic disease (averting unnecessary metastasectomy, and it provides in vivo chemosensitivity data. Methods A phase II trial was initiated in which patients with resectable CLM received CPT-11, 5-FU and LV for 12 weeks. Metastasectomy was performed unless extrahepatic disease appeared. Postoperatively, patients with stable or responsive disease received the same regimen for 12 weeks. Patients with progressive disease received either second-line chemotherapy or best supportive care. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS; secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS and safety. Results 35 patients were accrued. During preoperative chemotherapy, 16 patients (46% had grade 3/4 toxicities. Resection was not possible in 5 patients. One patient died of arrhythmia following surgery, and 1 patient had transient liver failure. During the postoperative treatment phase, 12 patients (55% had grade 3/4 toxicities. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT occurred in 11 patients (34% at various times during treatment. Of those who underwent resection, median DFS was 23.0 mo. and median OS has not been reached. The overall survival from time of diagnosis of liver metastases was 51.6 mo for the entire cohort. Conclusion A short course of chemotherapy prior to hepatic metastasectomy may serve to select candidates best suited for resection and it may also direct postoperative systemic treatment. Given the significant incidence of DVT, alternative systemic neoadjuvant regimens should be investigated, particularly those that avoid the use of a central venous line. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00168155.

  19. Experiment Tgv II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čermák, P.; Štekl, I.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Egorov, V. G.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Salamatin, A. V.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Briancon, Ch.; Šimkovic, F.

    2004-07-01

    The project aims at the measurement of very rare processes of double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca. The experimental facility TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) makes use of 32 HPGe planar detectors mounted in one common cryostat. The detectors are interleaved with thin foils containing ββ sources. Besides passive shielding against background radiation made of pure copper, lead and boron dopped polyethylene additional techniques for background suppression based on digital pulse shape analysis are used. The experimental setup is located in Modane underground laboratory (France). A review of the TGV II facility, its performance parameters and capabilities are presented.

  20. Experiment, modeling and optimization of liquid phase adsorption of Cu(II) using dried and carbonized biomass of Lyngbya majuscula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Deepika; Dutta, Susmita

    2017-05-01

    The present work aims at evaluation of the potential of cyanobacterial biomass to remove Cu(II) from simulated wastewater. Both dried and carbonized forms of Lyngbya majuscula, a cyanobacterial strain, have been used for such purpose. The influences of different experimental parameters viz., initial Cu(II) concentration, solution pH and adsorbent dose have been examined on sorption of Cu(II). Kinetic and equilibrium studies on Cu(II) removal from simulated wastewater have been done using both dried and carbonized biomass individually. Pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm have been found to fit most satisfactorily to the kinetic and equilibrium data, respectively. Maximum 87.99 and 99.15 % of Cu(II) removal have been achieved with initial Cu(II) concentration of 10 and 25 mg/L for dried and carbonized algae, respectively, at an adsorbent dose of 10 g/L for 20 min of contact time and optimum pH 6. To optimize the removal process, Response Surface Methodology has been employed using both the dried and carbonized biomass. Removal with initial Cu(II) concentration of 20 mg/L, with 0.25 g adsorbent dose in 50 mL solution at pH 6 has been found to be optimum with both the adsorbents. This is the first ever attempt to make a comparative study on Cu(II) removal using both dried algal biomass and its activated carbon. Furthermore, regeneration of matrix was attempted and more than 70% and 80% of the adsorbent has been regenerated successfully in the case of dried and carbonized biomass respectively upto the 3rd cycle of regeneration study.

  1. PAN Localization - phase II | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Outputs. Reports. Phase II - Research Synthesis Phase - 1st May 2010 to 31st March 2012. Papers. Outcome mapping learning community : newsletter no. 2, 2009. Journal articles. Maria Ng conferred medal by Cambodian government ...

  2. Performance of GERDA phase II BEGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Victoria [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 76}Ge. GERDA uses HPGe detectors enriched in {sup 76}Ge as source and detection material. The experiment proceeds in two phases. In Phase I a background index of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached and a new lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of {sup 76}Ge was set to 2.1.10{sup 25} yr (at 95% C.L.). In Phase II the background index will be lowered by an order of magnitude and a sensitivity of 10{sup 26} yr will be reached. In order to achieve this goal 30 new custom-made broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors and a liquid argon scintillation light veto will be deployed. Five BEGe detectors have been operated successfully in Phase I and demonstrated their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination (PSD) against background events. Special designed electronics will further improve energy resolution and PSD performance. The first results from commissioning of the new BEGe detectors are presented in this talk.

  3. Prototyping of larger structures for the Phase-II upgrade of the pixel detector of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez Feito, Diego; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    For the high luminosity era of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) it is forseen to replace the current inner tracker of the ATLAS experiment with a new detector to cope with the occuring increase in occupancy, bandwidth and radiation damage. It will consist of an inner pixel and outer strip detector aiming to provide tracking coverage up to |η|<4. The layout of the pixel detector is foreseen to consist of five layers of pixel silicon sensor modules in the central region and several ring-shaped layers in the forward region. It results in up to 14 m² of silicon depending on the selected layout. Beside the challenge of radiation hardness and high-rate capable silicon sensors and readout electronics many system aspects have to be considered for a fully functional detector. Both stable and low mass mechanical structures and services are important. Within the collaboration a large effort is started to prototype larger detector structures for both the central and forward region of the detector. The aspect of sy...

  4. Hardware Demonstrator of a Level-1 Track Finding Algorithm with FPGAs for the Phase II CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090481

    2016-01-01

    At the HL-LHC, proton bunches collide every 25\\,ns, producing an average of 140 pp interactions per bunch crossing. To operate in such an environment, the CMS experiment will need a Level-1 (L1) hardware trigger, able to identify interesting events within a latency of 12.5\\,$\\mu$s. This novel L1 trigger will make use of data coming from the silicon tracker to constrain the trigger rate. Goal of this new \\textit{track trigger} will be to build L1 tracks from the tracker information. The architecture that will be implemented in future to process tracker data is still under discussion. One possibility is to adopt a system entirely based on FPGA electronic. The proposed track finding algorithm is based on the Hough transform method. The algorithm has been tested using simulated pp collision data and it is currently being demonstrated in hardware, using the ``MP7'', which is a $\\mu$TCA board with a powerful FPGA capable of handling data rates approaching 1 Tb/s. Two different implementations of the Hough tran...

  5. ATLAS Phase-II trigger upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sankey, Dave; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This talk for ACES summarises the current status of the ATLAS Phase-II trigger upgrade, describing and comparing the two architectures under consideration, namely the two hardware level system described in the Phase-II Upgrade Scoping Document and the more recent single hardware level system.

  6. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  7. Phase II clinical development of new drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Ting, Naitee; Ho, Shuyen; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on how to appropriately plan and develop a Phase II program, and how to design Phase II clinical trials and analyze their data. It provides a comprehensive overview of the entire drug development process and highlights key questions that need to be addressed for the successful execution of Phase II, so as to increase its success in Phase III and for drug approval. Lastly it warns project team members of the common potential pitfalls and offers tips on how to avoid them.

  8. Pavement performance evaluation, phase II : data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Phase I and II of this study tested approximately 1500 rehabilitated pavements (asphalt and PCC) : throughout the State. These pavements ranged from 5 to 15 years old and were intended to develop a : snapshot of how various rehabilitations were perfo...

  9. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  10. Toward an Integrated Psychological Approach - Phase II

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Trauma, Development and Peacebuilding : Toward an Integrated Psychological Approach - Phase II. Over the past decade, the peace, conflict and development community has begun to question the value of medicalized approaches such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in dealing with aftermath of political violence ...

  11. The Phase II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the "ITk" (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m$^2$ , depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as $|\\eta| < 4$. Supporting structures will be ...

  12. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 3; Material Model Development and Simulation of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J.; Erlich, D.; Shockey, D.

    2009-01-01

    A team consisting of Arizona State University, Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center, and SRI International collaborated to develop computational models and verification testing for designing and evaluating turbine engine fan blade fabric containment structures. This research was conducted under the Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence and was sponsored by the Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program. The research was directed toward improving the modeling of a turbine engine fabric containment structure for an engine blade-out containment demonstration test required for certification of aircraft engines. The research conducted in Phase II began a new level of capability to design and develop fan blade containment systems for turbine engines. Significant progress was made in three areas: (1) further development of the ballistic fabric model to increase confidence and robustness in the material models for the Kevlar(TradeName) and Zylon(TradeName) material models developed in Phase I, (2) the capability was improved for finite element modeling of multiple layers of fabric using multiple layers of shell elements, and (3) large-scale simulations were performed. This report concentrates on the material model development and simulations of the impact tests.

  13. System analysis, design and proof-of-concept experiment of a total energy system. Phase II: final report, September 16, 1977--May 15, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziph, B.

    1978-07-01

    In Phase I of this program, Philips Laboratories investigated the application of Stirling cycle prime movers to total energy power generation systems. Electrical, heating, and cooling demand profiles for a typical residential complex, hospital, and office building were studied, and alternative Stirling total energy systems were conceptualized for each site. These were analyzed in detail and constrasted with purchased-power systems for these sites to determine fuel-energy savings and investment attractiveness. The residential complex and hospital were shown to be excellent candidates for total energy systems, and prime movers in the 1000 kW output range would be required. While Stirling engines with so large an output have not been built to date, there would be no fundamental technical barrier to prevent this. In Phase II, alternative candidate Stirling engine configurations for a 1000 kW prime mover were evaluated to determine the configuration showing the most desirable combination of pertinent characteristics. Both single-cylinder and multi-cylinder, and single-acting and double-acting configurations were considered. Having expressed all characteristics in terms of cost-of-ownership, the multi-cylinder (8), single-acting configuration was shown to be optimum.

  14. 78 FR 76789 - Additional Connect America Fund Phase II Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 54 Additional Connect America Fund Phase II Issues AGENCY: Federal Communications... further develop the record on several implementation issues regarding the transition from Connect America... implementation issues regarding the transition from Connect America Phase I to Phase II. 2. Timing of Phase II...

  15. Present Status of the Experiment TGV II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štekl, I.; Čermák, P.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Egorov, V. G.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Salamatin, A. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Šimkovic, F.

    2002-04-01

    Present status of the experiment TGV II is given. The experiment TGV II is devoted to the measurement of double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca. The new HPGe multi-detector TGV spectrometer has been constructed and installed in the Modane underground laboratory (in France). Preliminary results of the first background measurement are presented.

  16. Robotic dry stripping of airframes - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Robert A.; Wittenberg, Art M.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes a program for the development of a dust-free closed-cycle robotic system for dry stripping of airframes, designed to insure dust-free work environment and reduce plastic-media loss, the contamination risk, and the media inventory requirement. Phase I of the program involved building a prototype of the proposed robotic arm and its dust enclosure to prove basic automation concepts, showing reasonable paint removal rate from a curved surface, and establishing that the process is dust-free and recovers plastic media in a closed-cycle fashion. This paper contains calculations on the effect of different blasting parameters in order to determine optimum values required for the completion of Phase I. Also presented is the progress achieved by the Phase II of the program, which is to prove the total concept by building the complete system and demonstrating its capability.

  17. High Temperature Superconducting Space Experiment II (HTSSE II) cryogenic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawecki, T. G.; Chappie, S. S.; Mahony, D. R.

    At 60 to 80 K large performance gains are possible from high temperature superconducting (HTS) microwave devices for communications applications. The High Temperature Superconducting Space Experiment II (HTSSE II) will demonstrate eight HTS experiments in space for up to 3 years of operation. HTSSE II is the first application of HTS technology to space. In addition to demonstrating HTS devices, an important secondary goal is to demonstrate the cryogenic technologies required for long life HTS space applications. HTSSE II utilizes a British Aerospace 80 K Stirling cycle cryocooler to refrigerate a central cryogenic bus of seven HTS experiments and has an additional stand-alone TRW HTS experiment cooled by a TRW Stirling cycle cryocooler. The HTSSE II flight unit has been assembled and has successfully passed vibration and thermal vacuum environmental tests. HTSSE II was developed on a fixed budget and a fast track schedule of 24 months and is due to launch in March 1997 on the ARGOS spacecraft. This paper presents the design and test results of the cryogenic subsystem, cryocooler integration and a cryogenic coaxial cable I/O assembly.

  18. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  19. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Girard, T. A.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-01

    We report results of a 14.1kgd measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30kgd Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |ap|PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3×10-5pb at MW=45GeV/c2 is obtained.

  20. Search for neutrinoless double beta decay with GERDA phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; Di Marco, N.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gooch, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hakenmüller, J.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Csáthy, J. Janicskó; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Kish, A.; Klimenko, A.; Kneißl, R.; Knies, J.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Marissens, G.; Miloradovic, M.; Mingazheva, R.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Ransom, C.; Reissfelder, M.; Riboldi, S.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salamida, F.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Seitz, H.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-10-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (gerda) experiment, located at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy, is one of the leading experiments for the search of 0νββ decay. In Phase II of the experiment 35.6 kg of enriched germanium detectors are operated. The application of active background rejection methods, such as a liquid argon scintillation light read-out and pulse shape discrimination of germanium detector signals, allowed to reduce the background index to the intended level of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr). In the first five month of data taking 10.8 kg yr of exposure were accumulated. No signal has been found and together with data from Phase I a new limit for the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life of 76Ge of 5.3 . 1025 yr at 90% C.L. was established in June 2016. Phase II data taking is ongoing and will allow the exploration of half-lifes in the 1026 yr regime. The current status of data taking and an update on the background index are presented.

  1. Flatland optics. II. Basic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, A W; Wang, D; Pe'er, A; Friesem, A A

    2001-05-01

    In "Flatland optics: fundamentals" [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 1755 (2000)] we described the basic principles of two-dimensional (2D) optics and showed that a wavelength lambda in three-dimensional (3D) space (x,y,z) may appear in Flatland (x,z) as a wave with another wavelength, lambda = lambda/cosalpha. The tilt angle alpha can be modified by a 3D (Spaceland) individual who then is able to influence the 2D optics in a way that must appear to be magical to 2D Flatland individuals-in the spirit of E. A. Abbott's science fiction story [Flatland, a Romance of Many Dimensions, 6th ed. (Dover, New York, 1952)] of 1884. We now want to establish the reality or objectivity of the 2D wavelength lambda by some basic experiments similar to those that demonstrated roughly 200 years ago the wave nature of light. Specifically, we describe how to measure the 2D wavelength lambda by mean of five different arrangements that involve Young's biprism configuration, Talbot's self-imaging effect, measuring the focal length of a Fresnel zone plate, and letting light be diffracted by a double slit and by a grating. We also performed experiments with most of these arrangements. The results reveal that the theoretical wavelength, as predicted by our Flatland optics theory, does indeed coincide with the wavelength lambda as measured by Flatland experiments. Finally, we present an alternative way to understand Flatland optics in the spatial frequency domains of Flatland and Spaceland.

  2. Status report of the Gerda Phase II startup

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Valerio; Gerda Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) of INFN, searches for 0νββ of 76Ge . Germanium diodes enriched to ˜ 86 % in the double beta emitter 76Ge ( enrGe are exposed being both source and detector of 0νββ decay. This process is considered a powerful probe to address still open issues in the neutrino sector of the (beyond) Standard Model of particle Physics. Since 2013, at the completion of the first experimental phase (Phase I), the GERDA setup has been upgraded to perform its next step (Phase II). The aim is to reach a sensitivity to the 0νββ decay half-life larger than 10^{26} yr in about 3 years of physics data taking, exposing a detector mass of about 35 kg of enrGe with a background index of about 10^{-3} cts/(keV . kg . yr). One of the main new implementations is the liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light read-out, to veto those events that only partially deposit their energy both in Ge and in the surrounding LAr. In this paper the GERDA Phase II expected goals, the upgraded items and few selected features from the first 2016 physics and calibration runs will be presented. The main Phase I achievements will be also reviewed.

  3. Belle-II Experiment Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bell, Greg [ESnet; Carlson, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cowley, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [ESnet; Erwin, Brock [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Godang, Romulus [Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States); Hara, Takanori [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Johnson, Jerry [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Ron [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [ESnet; Dam, Kerstin Kleese-van [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kaneko, Toshiaki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Kubota, Yoshihiro [NII; Kuhr, Thomas [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany); McCoy, John [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miyake, Hideki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Monga, Inder [ESnet; Nakamura, Motonori [NII; Piilonen, Leo [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Pordes, Ruth [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ray, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Russell, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schram, Malachi [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schroeder, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sevior, Martin [Univ. of Melbourne (Australia); Singh, Surya [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suzuki, Soh [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Sasaki, Takashi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Williams, Jim [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2013-05-28

    The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of ~400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1 ab-1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle-II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and neworking requirements of the Belle-II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle-II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work.

  4. Training experience at Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, J.W.; McCormick, R.P.; McCreery, H.I.

    1978-01-01

    The EBR-II Training Group develops, maintains,and oversees training programs and activities associated with the EBR-II Project. The group originally spent all its time on EBR-II plant-operations training, but has gradually spread its work into other areas. These other areas of training now include mechanical maintenance, fuel manufacturing facility, instrumentation and control, fissile fuel handling, and emergency activities. This report describes each of the programs and gives a statistical breakdown of the time spent by the Training Group for each program. The major training programs for the EBR-II Project are presented by multimedia methods at a pace controlled by the student. The Training Group has much experience in the use of audio-visual techniques and equipment, including video-tapes, 35 mm slides, Super 8 and 16 mm film, models, and filmstrips. The effectiveness of these techniques is evaluated in this report.

  5. FEBEX II Project THG Laboratory Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missana, T.

    2004-07-01

    The main roles of the bentonite in a radioactive waste repository is to act as a geochemical barrier against the radionuclides migration. The effectiveness of this geochemical barrier depends on the surface properties of the solid phases and on the physico-chemical environment generated by the interaction of the solid phases with the groundwater. Within the FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barriers Experiment) project, a program of laboratory tests was designed to study and to understand the processes taking place in the clay barrier. Since the first stages of the project, these laboratory tests enabled to isolate different processes, making easier their interpretation, and provided fundamental parameters to be used in the Thermo Hydro Mechanical (THM) and Thermo Hydro Geochemical (THG) models. Additionally, experimental data enabled to check the predictive capability of these models. In the second phase of the project, laboratory tests focused on all those relevant aspects not sufficiently covered during FEBEX I. Particularly, the following main objectives were proposed for the THG investigations during FEBEX II : Attainment of a reliable description of the pore water chemistry at different geochemical conditions. Identification of the different types of water present in the bentonite and to determine the amount of available water for the solute transport.Evaluation of the potential effects of the extraction pressure in the chemical composition of the water obtained by squeezing methods.Study of the effects of the exchange complex in the rheological properties of the clay.Identification and modelling of the surface processes occurring in smectite, determination of the solubility constants of smectite and the formation constants of the surface complexes.Understanding of the mechanisms involved in the sorption of different radionuclides in the bentonite. Investigation of the diffusion mechanisms of conservative neutral and anionic species to have a deeper insight on the

  6. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  7. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getaneh, Mesfin

    2003-09-05

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run.

  8. Contraceptive use in women enrolled into preventive HIV vaccine trials: experience from a phase I/II trial in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Kibuuka

    Full Text Available HIV vaccine trials generally require that pregnant women are excluded from participation, and contraceptive methods must be used to prevent pregnancy during the trial. However, access to quality services and misconceptions associated with contraceptive methods may impact on their effective use in developing countries. We describe the pattern of contraceptive use in a multi-site phase I/IIa HIV Vaccine trial in East Africa (Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania and factors that may have influenced their use during the trial.Pregnancy prevention counseling was provided to female participants during informed consent process and at each study visit. Participants' methods of contraception used were documented. Methods of contraceptives were provided on site. Pregnancy testing was done at designated visits during the trial. Obstacles to contraceptive use were identified and addressed at each visit.Overall, 103 (31.8% of a total of 324 enrolled volunteers were females. Female participants were generally young with a mean age of 29(+/-7.2, married (49.5% and had less than high school education (62.1%. Hormonal contraceptives were the most common method of contraception (58.3% followed by condom use (22.3%. The distribution of methods of contraception among the three sites was similar except for more condom use and less abstinence in Uganda. The majority of women (85.4% reported to contraceptive use prior to screening. The reasons for not using contraception included access to quality services, insufficient knowledge of certain methods, and misconceptions.Although hormonal contraceptives were frequently used by females participating in the vaccine trial, misconceptions and their incorrect use might have led to inconsistent use resulting in undesired pregnancies. The study underscores the need for an integrated approach to pregnancy prevention counseling during HIV vaccine trials.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00123968.

  9. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: An application in rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Röver, Christian; Friede, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases are challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug-approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncertainty of between-trial heterogeneity can be dealt with probabilistically, which is critical if the number of studies is small. Furthermore, it allows quantifying and discounting the phase II data through the predictive distribution relevant for phase III. A phase III design is proposed which uses the phase II data and considers approval based on a phase III interim analysis. The design is illustrated with a non-inferiority case study from a Food and Drug Administration approval in herpetic keratitis (an orphan disease). Design operating characteristics are compared to those of a traditional design, which ignores the phase II data. An analysis of the phase II data reveals good but insufficient evidence for non-inferiority, highlighting the need for a phase III study. For the phase III study supported by phase II data, the interim analysis is based on half of the patients. For this design, the meta-analytic interim results are conclusive and would justify approval. In contrast, based on the phase III data only, interim results are inconclusive and require further evidence. To accelerate drug development for orphan diseases, innovative study designs and appropriate methodology are needed. Taking advantage of randomized phase II data when analyzing phase III studies looks promising because the evidence from phase II supports informed decision-making. The implementation of the Bayesian design is straightforward with public software such as R.

  10. BADD phase II: DDS information management architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Thomas P.; DeCleene, Brian T.; Speckert, Glen; Voorhees, Harry L.

    1997-06-01

    The DARPA Battlefield Awareness and Data Dissemination (BADD) Phase II Program will provide the next generation multimedia information management architecture to support the warfighter. One goal of this architecture is proactive dissemination of information to the warfighter through strategies such as multicast and 'smart push and pull' designed to minimize latency and make maximum use of available communications bandwidth. Another goal is to support integration of information from widely distributed legacy repositories. This will enable the next generation of battlefield awareness applications to form a common operational view of the battlefield to aid joint service and/or multi-national peacekeeping forces. This paper discusses the approach we are taking to realize such an architecture for BADD. Our architecture and its implementation, known as the Distributed Dissemination Serivces (DDS) are based on two key concepts: a global database schema and an intelligent, proactive caching scheme. A global schema provides a common logical view of the information space in which the warfighter operates. This schema (or subsets of it) is shared by all warfighters through a distributed object database providing local access to all relevant metadata. This approach provides both scalability to a large number of warfighters, and it supports tethered as well as autonomous operations. By utilizing DDS information integration services that provide transparent access to legacy databases, related information from multiple 'stovepipe' systems are now available to battlefield awareness applications. The second key concept embedded in our architecture is an intelligent, hierarchical caching system supported by proactive dissemination management services which push both lightweight and heavyweight data such as imagery and video to warfighters based on their information profiles. The goal of this approach is to transparently and proactively stage data which is likely to be requested by

  11. The NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence - Phase I Lessons and Phase II Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Peter [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa (Canada). Uranium and Radioactive Waste Div.; Pescatore, Claudio [Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France)

    2006-09-15

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was created under a mandate from the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) to facilitate the sharing of international experience in addressing the societal dimension of radioactive waste management. It explores means of ensuring an effective dialogue with the public, and considers ways to strengthen confidence in decision-making processes. The Forum was launched in August 2000 and completed its first phase in 00 . Major findings and principles for action were published under the title of 'Learning and Adapting to Societal Requirements'. Activities of the FSC were also reported at Valdor 2003. In the second mandate of the FSC, there is continued use of a variety of tools and formats to allow dialogue among stakeholders in an atmosphere of mutual trust: national workshops and community visits, topical sessions, and desk and interview studies. In Phase II, the FSC is exploring: the link between research, development and demonstration and stakeholder confidence; cultural and organisational changes in RWM institutions; the role of media relations and outreach opportunities; tools and processes to help society prepare and manage decisions through stakeholder involvement; and increasing the value of waste management facilities to local communities. Workshops have been held in Germany and Spain. A large set of publications makes both Phase I and Phase II findings widely available.

  12. EBR-II fuel slug casting experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, C. W.; Batte`, G. L.; Tracy, D. B.; Griffiths, V.

    1987-07-01

    The following paper presents a chronology of EBR-II fuel slug casting experience. Starting with the early vendor campaigns, the paper explains how production of EBR-II fuel, as well as fuel for off-site reactors, has evolved. The production facilities (i.e., EFL, Room 20, FMF, etc.) and casting techniques are discussed in detail. The paper also presents how the original casting operations have improved and the problems encountered as the techniques were developed. Extensive descriptions and data are given on the major experimental programs currently ongoing at EBR-II. Major programs include the IFR lead subassemblies, large diameter slugs, IFR metal fuel RBCB, and the FFTF subassembly program. Concluding the paper is a brief description of future development projects being considered and a summation of how EBR-II Fuels and Materials has been able to overcome various administration obstacles (i.e., improved security and safeguards measures) to continue to meet the increasing demands of fuel production while maintaining an aggressive and active research and development program in fuel slug production.

  13. Raft River Geothermal Aquaculture Experiment. Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.K.; Rose, F.L.; Kent, J.C.; Watson, L.R.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1979-08-01

    Channel catfish, tilapia and Malaysian prawns were cultured directly in geothermal water for approximately seven months at the Department of Energy, Raft River Geothermal Site, to evaluate the organisms throughout a grow-out cycle. Parameters evaluated included survival, growth, bioaccumulation of metals and fluoride, collagen synthesis, and bone calcium levels. Growth at Raft River was slightly lower than at a companion commercial facility at Buhl, Idaho, but was attributed to facility differences rather than an adverse impact of geothermal water. No significant differences were recorded between Raft River and Buhl fish for bone calcium or collagen concentrations. No significant accumulation of heavy metals by fish or prawns was recorded.

  14. Adaptive Processing Experiment (APE) Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    90 *32.. .4*b63 .447S N.ET PEDUCTInN 11F klSmATCII FkRIiR5 86?YDOI 156 pI~ nGRAM FuR PAiiA T I N ?I.?LTCR M4ATCH4 FiTERH C(FPTCY1tNf5 0,000.3 ,0000 *lu...Q410,0 3 -60,b% NkT p~.l~uCyjfiN 01. MlSmATLH F1kPORB~ ),6f4 169 P~ nGRAm FtJR EVALHiATIN(i rTLTkR MATCH 0 *:UJf O:OO~fl :03 ()on:os000000 s 060000

  15. Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, C.; Adli, E.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Corde, S.; Gessner, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; O’shea, B.; Xu, Xinlu; White, G.; Yakimenko, V.

    2018-03-01

    During the past two decades of research, the ultra-relativistic beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has achieved many significant milestones. These include the demonstration of ultra-high gradient acceleration of electrons over meter-scale plasma accelerator structures, efficient acceleration of a narrow energy spread electron bunch at high-gradients, positron acceleration using wakes in uniform plasmas and in hollow plasma channels, and demonstrating that highly nonlinear wakes in the ‘blow-out regime’ have the electric field structure necessary for preserving the emittance of the accelerating bunch. A new 10 GeV electron beam facility, Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test (FACET) II, is currently under construction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the next generation of PWFA research and development. The FACET II beams will enable the simultaneous demonstration of substantial energy gain of a small emittance electron bunch while demonstrating an efficient transfer of energy from the drive to the trailing bunch. In this paper we first describe the capabilities of the FACET II facility. We then describe a series of PWFA experiments supported by numerical and particle-in-cell simulations designed to demonstrate plasma wake generation where the drive beam is nearly depleted of its energy, high efficiency acceleration of the trailing bunch while doubling its energy and ultimately, quantifying the emittance growth in a single stage of a PWFA that has optimally designed matching sections. We then briefly discuss other FACET II plasma-based experiments including in situ positron generation and acceleration, and several schemes that are promising for generating sub-micron emittance bunches that will ultimately be needed for both an early application of a PWFA and for a plasma-based future linear collider.

  16. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  17. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration, Phase II at Ravenswood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project: Phase II Construction at Ravenswood, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  18. Improving traffic safety culture in Iowa : phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Phase II of Improving Traffic Safety Culture in Iowa focuses on producing actions that will improve the traffic safety culture across the state, and involves collaboration among the three large public universities in Iowa: Iowa State University, Univ...

  19. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-11-12

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  20. Vapor phase transformer drying – Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Steeves, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Vapor phase drying is the most effective method for drying transformer insulation in a manufacturing setting. The process does not lend itself well to transformer drying in the field for a variety of reasons, including the difficulty of removing residual kerosene which can cause a potential change in transformer oil flash point. Several techniques are available for transformer insulation drying in both the field and in manufacturing. Vapor phase drying as part of transformer manufacturing is ...

  1. Modular microfluidic system for emulation of human phase I/phase II metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampe, Thomas; König, Anna; Schroeder, Hendrik; Hengstler, Jan G; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2014-03-18

    We present a microfluidic device for coupled phase I/phase II metabolic reactions in vitro. The chip consists of microchannels, which are used as packed bed reactor compartments, filled with superparamagnetic microparticles bearing recombinant microsomal phase I cytochrome P450 or phase II conjugating enzymes (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase). Online coupling of the microfluidic device with LC/MS enabled the quantitative assessment of coupled phase I/phase II transformations, as demonstrated for two different substrates, 7-benzyloxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin (BFC) and dextromethorphan (DEX). In contrast, conventional sequential one-pot incubations did not generate measurable amounts of phase II metabolites. Because the microfluidic device is readily assembled from standard parts and can be equipped with a variety of recombinant enzymes, it provides a modular platform to emulate and investigate hepatic metabolism processes, with particular potential for targeted small-scale synthesis and identification of metabolites formed by sequential action of specific enzymes.

  2. Comparisons in the behavior of stable copper(II), silver(II), and gold(II) complexes in the gas phase: are there implications for condensed-phase chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, N R; Wright, R R; Barran, P E; Murrell, J N; Stace, A J

    2001-05-09

    Experiments conducted in the gas phase have led to the formation of a series of stable gold(II) complexes with nitrogen- and oxygen-containing ligands. Such complexes are very rare in condensed-phase chemistry. However, there is also a significant group of potential ligands, for example, H2O and NH3, for which stable complexes could not be formed. There are strong similarities between these observations and earlier results presented for silver(II), but both metal ions behave markedly different from copper(II). As a group the majority of successful gold(II) ligands are characterized by being good sigma donor-pi acceptor molecules; however, it is also possible to understand the ability of individual ligands to stabilize the metal ion in terms of a simple electrostatic model. Application of the latter reveals a semiquantitative trend between the physical properties of a ligand, e.g. ionization energy, dipole moment, and polarizability, and the ligand's ability to stabilize either Cu(II), Ag(II), or Au(II). The model successfully accounts for the preference of Cu(II) for aqueous chemistry, in comparison to the complete absence of such behavior on the part of Ag(II) and Au(II). Ligands from recent examples of stable condensed-phase gold(II) complexes appear to meet at least one of the criteria identified from the model.

  3. Preliminary CALS Phase II Architecture. Volume 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-03

    in each life cycle phase. Program Plans and Bu¢ EkoS I Wealon and TechnologyeDesan und irrrrig Prototyppe oesjie’nni andiemrn IanclRqieetMaleriaCM pon...asubvigcntractor, fo exampoloer may bechncee responsible for nglinge designwa manufacturing d tawhile anothersugcntrco has, read-nlacestthU landingeat gea

  4. Conditions Database for the Belle II Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, L.; Elsethagen, T.; Schram, M.; Stephan, E.

    2017-10-01

    The Belle II experiment at KEK is preparing for first collisions in 2017. Processing the large amounts of data that will be produced will require conditions data to be readily available to systems worldwide in a fast and efficient manner that is straightforward for both the user and maintainer. The Belle II conditions database was designed with a straightforward goal: make it as easily maintainable as possible. To this end, HEP-specific software tools were avoided as much as possible and industry standard tools used instead. HTTP REST services were selected as the application interface, which provide a high-level interface to users through the use of standard libraries such as curl. The application interface itself is written in Java and runs in an embedded Payara-Micro Java EE application server. Scalability at the application interface is provided by use of Hazelcast, an open source In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) providing distributed in-memory computing and supporting the creation and clustering of new application interface instances as demand increases. The IMDG provides fast and efficient access to conditions data via in-memory caching.

  5. NDCX-II target experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J.J., E-mail: jjbarnard@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); More, R.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Terry, M.; Friedman, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Henestroza, E.; Koniges, A.; Kwan, J.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ng, A. [University of British Columbia, BC (Canada); Ni, P.A.; Liu, W.; Logan, B.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Startsev, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Yuen, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The ion accelerator NDCX-II is undergoing commissioning at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Its principal mission is to explore ion-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) especially in the Warm Dense Matter (WDM) regime. We have carried out hydrodynamic simulations of beam-heated targets for parameters expected for the initial configuration of NDCX-II. For metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets), the beam is predicted to heat the target in a timescale comparable to the hydrodynamic expansion time for experiments that infer material properties from measurements of the resulting rarefaction wave. We have also carried out hydrodynamic simulations of beam heating of metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets) in which the ion range is shorter than the areal density of the material. In this case shock waves will form and we derive simple scaling laws for the efficiency of conversion of ion energy into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Geometries with a tamping layer may also be used to study the merging of a tamper shock with the end-of-range shock. This process can occur in tamped, direct drive IFE targets.

  6. The SafeBoosC Phase II Randomised Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellicer, Adelina; Greisen, Gorm; Benders, Manon

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rStO2) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rStO2 can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises that the bur......Near-infrared spectroscopy-derived regional tissue oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (rStO2) reflects venous oxygen saturation. If cerebral metabolism is stable, rStO2 can be used as an estimate of cerebral oxygen delivery. The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial hypothesises....... The treatment guideline is presented to assist neonatologists in making decisions in relation to cerebral oximetry readings in preterm infants within the SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial. The evidence grades were relatively low and the guideline cannot be recommended outside a research setting....... © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel....

  7. The HypHI Phase 0 experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, T. R.; Bianchin, S.; Borodina, O.; Bozkurt, V.; Gokuzum, B.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kim, E.; Minami, S.; Nakajima, D.; Oezel-Tashenov, B.; Rappold, C.; Achenbach, P.; Ajimura, S.; Aumann, T.; Caesar, C.; Erturk, S.; Fukuda, T.; Guliyev, Elmaddin; Hayashi, Y.; Hiraiwa, T.; Hoffmann, J.; Ickert, G.; Ketenci, Z. S.; Khaneft, D.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Koch, K.; Kurz, N.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.; Mizoi, S.; Moritsu, M.; Nagae, T.; Okamura, A.; Ott, W.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sako, M.; Schmidt, C. J.; Sekimoto, M.; Simon, H.; Sugimura, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanida, K.; Tamura, K.; Traeger, M.; Trautmann, W.; Voltz, S.; Yoon, C. J.; Yoshida, K.

    2010-01-01

    The HypHI Phase 0 experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of precise hypernuclear spectroscopy with induced reactions of heavy ion beams was performed at GSI in August and October in 2009, with a projectile of (6)Li at 2 A GeV impinged on carbon graphite target with a thickness of 8 g/cm(2). The

  8. The Economics of Shipyard Painting, Phase II (Of Three Phases) Bid Stage Estimating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    George, Daryl

    1988-01-01

    ...% of the time the Paint Department personnel were performing support operations. Phase II looks at how the additional operations involved in laying paint can be organized and incorporated into an automated bid estimating process...

  9. 78 FR 8184 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review (Phase II ERP/ER) describing the second set of... availability of the Phase II ERP/ER. ADDRESSES: Obtaining Documents: You may download the Phase II ERP/ER and... the Phase II ERP/ER at any of the public repositories listed at http://www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa...

  10. Microbicide trials for preventing HIV/AIDS in South Africa: Phase II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    2004-08-02

    Aug 2, 2004 ... trial participants' experiences and psychological needs. A G Pistorius, J H H M van de Wijgert, M Sebola, B Friedland, E Nagel, C Bokaba,. A A Hoosen. ABSTRACT. The Microbicide Division of the Department of Medical Microbiology at MEDUNSA, South Africa, recently completed a phase II expanded ...

  11. Fuel element failure detection experiments, evaluation of the experiments at KNK II/1 (Intermediate Report)

    CERN Document Server

    Bruetsch, D

    1983-01-01

    In the frame of the fuel element failure detection experiments at KNK II with its first core the measurement devices of INTERATOM were taken into operation in August 1981 and were in operation almost continuously. Since the start-up until the end of the first KNK II core operation plugs with different fuel test areas were inserted in order to test the efficiency of the different measuring devices. The experimental results determined during this test phase and the gained experiences are described in this report and valuated. All three measuring techniques (Xenon adsorption line XAS, gas-chromatograph GC and precipitator PIT) could fulfil the expectations concerning their susceptibility. For XAS and GC the nuclide specific sensitivities as determined during the preliminary tests could be confirmed. For PIT the influences of different parameters on the signal yield could be determined. The sensitivity of the device could not be measured due to a missing reference measuring point.

  12. Poverty and Family Structure - Phase II | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Poverty and Family Structure - Phase II. In developing countries, and in Sénégal in particular, the makeup of the family is constantly changing as new members arrive (through marriage, placement of children in the family's care, etc.) and others leave (through divorce, migration, placement of children with another family, etc.) ...

  13. The STAR beam energy scan phase II physics and upgrades

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Vértési, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 967, č. 11 (2017), s. 800-803 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * BES-II * detector upgrade * QCD phase diagram * physics oppotrunity Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  14. Caelyx (TM) in malignant mesothelioma : A phase II EORTC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P; van Meerbeeck, J; Groen, H; Schouwink, H; Burgers, S; Daamen, S; Giaccone, G

    Background: The use of doxorubicin has shown some activity in malignant mesothelioma but prolonged administration is hampered by cardiotoxicity. Caelyx(TM), a new liposomal and pegylated form of doxorubicin has shown a better pharmacokinetic and toxic profile then doxorubicin. In a phase II study,

  15. The Phase II ATLAS Pixel Upgrade: The Inner Tracker (ITk)

    CERN Document Server

    Flick, Tobias; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ITk (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. The total surface area of silicon in the new pixel system could measure up to 14 m^2, depending on the final layout choice, which is expected to take place in early 2017. Four layout options are being investigated at the moment, two with forward coverage to eta < 3.2 and two to eta < 4. For each coverage option, a layout with long barrel staves and a layout with novel inclined support structures in the barrel-endcap overlap region are considered. All potential layouts include modules mounted on ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. Support...

  16. Functional Super Read Out Driver Demonstrator for the Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Carrió, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Ferrer, A; Fiorini, L; González, V; Hernández, Y; Higón, E; Moreno, P; Sanchis, E; Solans, C; Valero, A; Valls, J

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the implementation of a functional super Read Out Driver (sROD) demonstrator for the Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) in the LHC experiment. The proposed front-end for the Phase II Upgrade communicates with back-end electronics using a multifiber optical connector with a data rate of 57.6 Gbps using the GBT protocol. This functional sROD demonstrator aims to help in the understanding of the problems that could arise in the upgrade of back-end electronics. The demonstrator is composed of three different boards that have been developed in the framework of ATLAS activities: the Optical Multiplexer Board (OMB), the Read-Out Driver (ROD) and the Optical Link Card (OLC). This functional sROD demonstrator will be used to develop a prototype, in ATCA format, of the new ROD for the Phase II.

  17. Mechanical Engineering and Design of the LHC Phase II Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Gentini, L; Mariani, N; Perret, R; Timmins, M A

    2010-01-01

    Phase II collimators will complement the existing system to improve the expected high RF impedance and limited efficiency of Phase I jaws. An international collaborative effort has been launched to identify novel advanced materials responding to the very challenging requirements of the new collimators. Complex numerical calculations simulating extreme conditions and experimental tests are in progress. In parallel, an innovative modular design concept of the jaw assembly is being developed to allow fitting in alternative materials, minimizing the thermally induced deformations, withstanding accidents and accepting high radiation doses. Phase II jaw assembly is made up of a molybdenum back-stiffener ensuring high geometrical stability and a modular jaw split in threes sectors. Each sector is equipped with a high-efficiency independent cooling circuit. Beam position monitors (BPM) are embedded in the jaws to fasten setup time and improve beam monitoring. An adjustment system will permit to fine-tune the jaw flat...

  18. Assessing the success probability of a Phase III clinical trial based on Phase II data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng

    2010-11-01

    Assessing the probability that a Phase III clinical trial will demonstrate clinically relevant efficacy based on Phase II data is an important topic in clinical drug development. An accurate estimate of how likely a Phase III trial will succeed based on available data will inform the decision on whether to move an experimental medicine forward to Phase III testing. Bayesian and likelihood methodologies have been developed in the literature to assess the probability of reproducibility in clinical trials for parametric models. A class of approaches that combines the Bayesian and likelihood approaches is proposed to evaluate the success probability of a Phase III trial based on Phase II data, which applies to the parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric settings and includes the Bayesian and likelihood approaches as special cases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiences of social harm and changes in sexual practices among volunteers who had completed a phase I/II HIV vaccine trial employing HIV-1 DNA priming and HIV-1 MVA boosting in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith A M Tarimo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Volunteers in phase I/II HIV vaccine trials are assumed to be at low risk of acquiring HIV infection and are expected to have normal lives in the community. However, during participation in the trials, volunteers may encounter social harm and changes in their sexual behaviours. The current study aimed to study persistence of social harm and changes in sexual practices over time among phase I/II HIV vaccine immunogenicity (HIVIS03 trial volunteers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. METHODS AND RESULTS: A descriptive prospective cohort study was conducted among 33 out of 60 volunteers of HIVIS03 trial in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, who had received three HIV-1 DNA injections boosted with two HIV-1 MVA doses. A structured interview was administered to collect data. Analysis was carried out using SPSS and McNemars' chi-square (χ2 was used to test the association within-subjects. Participants reported experiencing negative comments from their colleagues about the trial; but such comments were less severe during the second follow up visits (χ2 = 8.72; P<0.001. Most of the comments were associated with discrimination (χ2 = 26.72; P<0.001, stigma (χ2 = 6.06; P<0.05, and mistrust towards the HIV vaccine trial (χ2 = 4.9; P<0.05. Having a regular sexual partner other than spouse or cohabitant declined over the two follow-up periods (χ2 = 4.45; P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Participants in the phase I/II HIV vaccine trial were likely to face negative comments from relatives and colleagues after the end of the trial, but those comments decreased over time. In this study, the inherent sexual practice of having extra sexual partners other than spouse declined over time. Therefore, prolonged counselling and support appears important to minimize risky sexual behaviour among volunteers after participation in HIV Vaccine trials.

  20. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gasparini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery and phase II (orthognathic surgery procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP and those who accepted phase II (IIP. To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation.

  1. Microbial Dark Matter Phase II: Stepping deeper into unknown territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter; Peura, Sari; Wielen, Paul van der; Hedlund, Brian; Elshahed, Mostafa; Kormas, Konstantinos; Stott, Andreas Teske8, Matt; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Zhang, Chuanlun; Rengefors, Karin; Lindemann, Stephen; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Spear, John; Hallam, Steven; Crowe, Sean; Steele, Jillian; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Kyrpides, Nikos; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-10-27

    Currently available microbial genomes are of limited phylogenetic breadth due to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. The first phase of the Microbial Dark Matter project used single-cell genomics to sequence 201 single cells from uncultivated lineages, and was able to resolve new superphyla and reveal novel metabolic features in bacteria and archaea. However, many fundamental questions about the evolution and function of microbes remain unanswered, and many candidate phyla remain uncharacterized. Phase II of the Microbial Dark Matter project will target candidate phyla with no sequenced representatives at a variety of new sites using a combination of single-cell sequencing and shotgun metagenomics approaches.

  2. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  3. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  4. The Phase-II ATLAS ITk pixel upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzo, S.

    2017-07-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase-II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ``ITk'' (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and ring-shaped supports in the end-cap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation levels. The new pixel system could include up to 14 m2 of silicon, depending on the final layout, which is expected to be decided in 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel end-cap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as |eta| chip. The pixel off-detector readout electronics will be implemented in the framework of the general ATLAS trigger and DAQ system. A readout speed of up to 5 Gb/s per data link will be needed in the innermost layers going down to 640 Mb/s for the outermost. Because of the very high radiation level inside the detector, the first part of the transmission has to be implemented electrically, with signals converted for optical transmission at larger radii. Extensive tests are being carried out to prove the feasibility of implementing serial powering, which has been chosen as the baseline for the ITk pixel system due to the reduced material in the servicing cables foreseen for this option.

  5. Experiments with the HORUS-II test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, S.; Lischke, W. [Univ. for Applied Sciences Zittau/Goerlitz, Zittau (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Within the scope of the German reactor safety research the thermohydraulic computer code ATHLET which was developed for accident analyses of western nuclear power plants is more and more used for the accident analysis of VVER-plants particularly for VVER-440,V-213. The experiments with the HORUS-facilities and the analyses with the ATHLET-code have been realized at the Technical University Zittau/Goerlitz since 1991. The aim of the investigations was to improve and verify the condensation model particularly the correlations for the calculation of the heat transfer coefficients in the ATHLET-code for pure steam and steam-noncondensing gas mixtures in horizontal tubes. About 130 condensation experiments have been performed at the HORUS-II facility. The experiments have been carried out with pure steam as well as with noncondensing gas injections into the steam mass flow. The experimental simulations are characterized as accident simulation tests for SBLOCA for VVER-conditions. The simulation conditions had been adjusted correspondingly to the parameters of a postulated SBLOCA`s fourth phase at the original plant. 4 refs.

  6. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-05-01

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  8. Identification of 14 quercetin phase II mono- and mixed conjugates and their formation by rat and human phase II in vitro model systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woude, van der H.; Boersma, M.G.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the HPLC, T TV-vis, LC-MS, and H-1 NMR characteristics of 14 different phase II mono- and mixed conjugates of quercetin were determined, providing a useful tool in the identification of quercetin phase II metabolite patterns in various biological systems. Using these data, the phase

  9. Hydraulic Behaviour of He II in Stratified Counter-Current Two-Phase Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Rousset, B; Jäger, B; Van Weelderen, R; Weisend, J G

    1998-01-01

    Future large devices using superconducting magnets or RF cavities (e.g. LHC or TESLA) need He II two-phase flow for cooling. The research carried out into counter-current superfluid two-phase flow was the continuation of work on co-current flow and benefited from all the knowledge acquired both experimentally and theoretically. Experiments were conducted on two different pipe diameters (40 and 65 m m I.D. tube) for slopes ranging between 0 and 2%, and for temperatures ranging between 1.8 and 2 K. This paper introduces the theoretical model, describes the tests, and provides a critical review of the results obtained in He II counter current two-phase flow.

  10. 48 CFR 1852.219-81 - Limitation on subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... subcontracting-SBIR Phase II program. 1852.219-81 Section 1852.219-81 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.219-81 Limitation on subcontracting—SBIR Phase II program. As prescribed in 1819.7302(b), insert the following clause: Limitation on Subcontracting—SBIR Phase II Program...

  11. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement. Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    deliver to our sponsors the First Progress Report of Phase 2 of the Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium. This report describes all major research...experiments in diverse fields of home automation and healthcare research, ranging from human physiological modeling, patient monitoring, and

  12. Outcome Mapping Virtual Learning Community - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The first phase of the project (103520) focused on developing the Outcome Mapping Learning Community (OMLC), setting up an online platform, facilitating debate and funding small-scale studies to support sharing experiences between Outcome Mapping users. This project seeks to strengthen and consolidate the OMLC ...

  13. Timing of Class II treatment: skeletal changes comparing 1-phase and 2-phase treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Calogero; McGorray, Susan P; Brazeau, Lisamarie; King, Gregory J; Wheeler, Timothy T

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies reported small but significant skeletal changes as a result of early treatment of Class II malocclusion with headgear and functional appliances. In this study, we report on the skeletal changes for 1-phase and 2-phase treatment of Class II malocclusion. This was a prospective randomized clinical trial conducted sy the Department of Orthodontics at the University of Florida between 1990 and 2000. A total of 261 subjects demonstrating at least a one half-cusp Class II molar relationship and meeting the inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study and had at least 1 follow-up visit. During phase 1, 86 subjects were treated with a bionator, 95 were treated with a headgear/biteplane, and 80 served as the observation group. For phase 2, all subjects were then treated with full orthodontics appliances. Skeletal changes were monitored with cephalograms taken at baseline, at the end of early Class II treatment or observation baseline, at the beginning of fixed appliances, and at end of orthodontic treatment. Overall skeletal changes at the end of phase 1 treatment were as follows: (1) SNA angle increased in the bionator (0.51) and the observation groups (0.67), whereas it decreased (-0.50) in the headgear/biteplane group; (2) SNB angle increased in the bionator (1.36) and the observation groups (0.84), whereas it remained unchanged (0.19) in the headgear/biteplane group; (3) ANB angle decreased in the bionator (-0.85) and the headgear/biteplane groups (-0.72), and was unchanged in the observation group; and (4) the mandibular plane angle increased (1.30) only in the headgear/biteplane group. By the end of full orthodontic treatment, the skeletal differences in all measurements for all 3 groups were within 1 degrees . Linear regression models showed that, during phase 1, baseline value and treatment group were significant. However, when the entire treatment period was considered, treatment group had no effect. There is temporary skeletal change as a result

  14. Purification and H-1 NMR spectroscopic characterization of phase II metabolites of tolfenamic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, U. G.; Christiansen, E.; Krogh, L.

    1997-01-01

    Tolfenamic acid, an anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is metabolized in vivo to form several oxidative metabolites which are all conjugated with beta-D-glucuronic acid, In this study, the metabolites of tolfenamic acid were identified by H-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in urine sa...... method was developed that simultaneously separates all the phase II metabolites identified as well as some phase I metabolites in urine samples obtained after intake of tolfenamic acid....... the endogenous polar compounds that are present in the urine. The individual metabolites were purified by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then identified using H-1 NMR, Both one- and two-dimensional NMR experiments were performed to identify the phase II metabolites of tolfenamic......), and N-(2-methyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)-anthranilic acid (11) were identified. The phase II metabolites (5-11) had not previously been identified in urine from humans administered tolfenamic acid. The phase I metabolites of the glucuronides 7, 8, 10, and 11 were identified here for the first time. An HPLC...

  15. Combined experiment Phase 2 data characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.S.; Shipley, D.E.; Young, T.S.; Robinson, M.C.; Luttges, M.W. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States); Simms, D.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s ``Combined Experiment`` has yielded a large quantity of experimental data on the operation of a downwind horizontal axis wind turbine under field conditions. To fully utilize this valuable resource and identify particular episodes of interest, a number of databases were created that characterize individual data events and rotational cycles over a wide range of parameters. Each of the 59 five-minute data episodes collected during Phase 11 of the Combined Experiment have been characterized by the mean, minimum, maximum, and standard deviation of all data channels, except the blade surface pressures. Inflow condition, aerodynamic force coefficient, and minimum leading edge pressure coefficient databases have also been established, characterizing each of nearly 21,000 blade rotational cycles. In addition, a number of tools have been developed for searching these databases for particular episodes of interest. Due to their extensive size, only a portion of the episode characterization databases are included in an appendix, and examples of the cycle characterization databases are given. The search tools are discussed and the FORTRAN or C code for each is included in appendices.

  16. Assessment of the efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate in acute mania and prevention of recurrence: experience from multicentre, double-blind, randomised phase II clinical studies in patients with bipolar disorder I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunze, Heinz; Kotlik, Eduardo; Costa, Raquel; Nunes, Teresa; Falcão, Amílcar; Almeida, Luis; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2015-03-15

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is an anticonvulsant approved as an adjunctive therapy in adults with partial-onset seizures. To evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of ESL in the treatment of acute mania and prevention of recurrence in bipolar disorder I. Two 3-week multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled studies in acute mania (study BIA-2093-203: dose titrated by response, ESL 600-1800mg or 800-2400mg, once-daily; study BIA-2093-204: fixed doses of 600, 1200 and 1800mg, once-daily) were followed by a recurrence prevention study consisting of a 2-week open-label period (900mg, once-daily) continued by a double-blind, parallel-group, fixed dose (300, 900 and 1800mg, once-daily) period for a minimum of 6 months. The primary endpoint was changed from baseline until the end of the 3-week treatment period in Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) in studies BIA-2093-203 and BIA-2093-204, and the proportion of patients showing no worsening according to the Clinical Global Impressions - Bipolar Version (CGI-BP) over Part II in study BIA-2093-205. In study BIA-2093-203 (n=160, ITT), neither dose group was statistically different from placebo in the primary endpoint, though the ESL 800-2400mg showed a greater reduction in YMRS score (p=0.0523). CGI-BP score changes for mania and overall bipolar illness indicate a significant improvement in patient symptomatology for the ESL 800-2400mg group (from preceding and worst phase) and for ESL 600-1800mg group (from worst phase only) when compared to placebo. Study BIA-2093-204 (n=38) results were inconclusive due to premature termination caused by recruitment difficulties. In study BIA-2093-205 (n=85, ITT), at least 50% of patients showed no worsening in all treatment groups (p=0.250). ESL adverse events were mostly of mild and moderate intensities and consistent with previously reported observations for ESL. ESL treatment was not significantly different from placebo in manic patients in the primary outcome

  17. First results of the Auroral Turbulance II rocket experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielides, M.A.; Ranta, A.; Ivchenco, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Auroral Turbulance II sounding rocket was launched on February 11, 1997 into moderately active nightside aurora from the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, US. The experiment consisted of three independent, completely instrumented payloads launched by a single vehicle. The aim of the experiment...

  18. The DESI Experiment Part II: Instrument Design

    OpenAIRE

    DESI Collaboration; Aghamousa, Amir; Aguilar, Jessica; Ahlen, Steve; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Annis, James; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Ballester, Otger; Baltay, Charles; Beaufore, Lucas; Bebek, Chris; Beers, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    DESI (Dark Energy Spectropic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. The DESI instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking up to 5,000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 360 nm to 980 nm. The fibers feed ten three-arm spectrographs with resolution $R= \\lambda/\\Delta...

  19. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  20. The Belle II experiment: fundamental physics at the flavor frontier

    CERN Document Server

    de la Cruz, Ivan Heredia

    2016-01-01

    After the major success of B-factories to establish the CKM mechanism and its proven potential to search for new physics, the Belle II experiment will continue exploring the physics at the flavor frontier over the next years. Belle II will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor, Belle, and allow for various precision measurements and searches of rare decays and particles. This paper introduces the B-factory concept and the flavor frontier approach to search for new physics. It then describes the SuperKEKB accelerator and the Belle II detector, as well as some of the physics that will be analyzed in Belle II, concluding with the experiment status and schedule.

  1. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Freedman, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bott, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murray, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rockhold, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, A. [LBNL; Steefel, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waichler, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-28

    quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  2. Inability of positive phase II clinical trials of investigational treatments to subsequently predict positive phase III clinical trials in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jacob J; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Patel, Akash J; Cachia, David; Liu, Diane; Park, Minjeong; Yuan, Ying; Kent, Thomas A; de Groot, John F

    2018-01-10

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, but effective therapies are lacking. With the scarcity of positive phase III trials, which are increasing in cost, we examined the ability of positive phase II trials to predict statistically significant improvement in clinical outcomes of phase III trials. A PubMed search was conducted to identify phase III clinical trials performed in the past 25 years for patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent glioblastoma. Trials were excluded if they did not examine an investigational chemotherapy or agent, if they were stopped early owing to toxicity, if they lacked prior phase II studies, or if a prior phase II study was negative. Seven phase III clinical trials in newly diagnosed glioblastoma and 4 phase III clinical trials in recurrent glioblastoma met the inclusion criteria. Only 1 (9%) phase III study documented an improvement in overall survival and changed the standard of care. The high failure rate of phase III trials demonstrates the urgent need to increase the reliability of phase II trials of treatments for glioblastoma. Strategies such as the use of adaptive trial designs, Bayesian statistics, biomarkers, volumetric imaging, and mathematical modeling warrant testing. Additionally, it is critical to increase our expectations of phase II trials so that positive findings increase the probability that a phase III trial will be successful.

  3. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I & II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. However, POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a new series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016, and described herein, were done in two phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I and II, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  4. Future physics potential of CMS Phase II detector

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzobon, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    To extend the LHC physics program, it is foreseen to operate the LHC in the future with an unprecedented high luminosity. To maintain the experiment’s physics potential in such harsh environment, the detector will need to be upgraded. At the same time the detector acceptance will be extended and new features such as a L1 track trigger will be implemented. Simulation studies evaluated the performance of the new, proposed detector components in comparison to the present detector with the expected aging after 1000 fb$^{-1}$. The impact of the expected Phase II performance on representative physics channels is studied. The sensitivity to find new physics beyond the SM is significantly improved and will allow to extend the SUSY reach, search for dark matter and exotic long-lived signatures. Precision Higgs and standard model measurements will gain substantially due to the improved performance.

  5. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-01

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  6. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Van Der Schaaf, Laura; Van Den Brand, Jo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser

  7. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  8. Phase II drugs under investigation for allergic conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiula, Monica; Spampinato, Santi

    2014-12-01

    Ocular allergies comprise a spectrum of conditions that are underreported and underdiagnosed, and are frequently associated with rhinoconjunctivitis. Although allergic conjunctivitis is often not a sight-threatening condition, it could have a significant impact on a person's quality of life, morbidity and productivity. A variety of agents are available for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis, including antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, dual action agents, glucocorticoids, calcineurin inhibitors and immunotherapy. The goal of this review is to investigate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of ocular allergy. Within, the authors analyze the pharmacological management of allergic conjunctivitis and highlight Phase II clinical trial studies. Recent findings about the pathophysiology of allergic conjunctivitis have enabled us to gain a better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ocular disease. This, in turn, has led to the identification of novel targets, which, in turn, has led to the development of new therapeutic agents that are currently under evaluation in the first phases of clinical development. The most interesting agents, under development, are the new topical glucocorticoids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, resolvins, interleukin-1 receptor antagonists and integrin antagonists. The authors now await promising results, which can confirm the therapeutic value of these novel emerging drugs for treating allergic conjunctivitis.

  9. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  10. Alternate Reductant Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace Phase II Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste

  11. MHD seed recovery and regeneration, Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by the Space and Technology Division of the TRW Space and Electronics Group for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for the Econoseed process. This process involves the economical recovery and regeneration of potassium seed used in the MHD channel. The contract period of performance extended from 1987 through 1994 and was divided into two phases. The Phase II test results are the subject of this Final Report. However, the Phase I test results are presented in summary form in Section 2.3 of this Final Report. The Econoseed process involves the treatment of the potassium sulfate in spent MHD seed with an aqueous calcium formate solution in a continuously stirred reactor system to solubilize, as potassium formate, the potassium content of the seed and to precipitate and recover the sulfate as calcium sulfate. The slurry product from this reaction is centrifuged to separate the calcium sulfate and insoluble seed constituents from the potassium formate solution. The dilute solids-free potassium formate solution is then concentrated in an evaporator. The concentrated potassium formate product is a liquid which can be recycled as a spray into the MHD channel. Calcium formate is the seed regenerant used in the Econoseed process. Since calcium formate is produced in the United States in relatively small quantities, a new route to the continuous production of large quantities of calcium formate needed to support an MHD power industry was investigated. This route involves the reaction of carbon monoxide gas with lime solids in an aqueous medium.

  12. Promising investigational drug candidates in phase I and phase II clinical trials for mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzelli, Alice; Bakker, Emyr; Tian, Kun; Demonacos, Constantinos; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Mutti, Luciano

    2017-08-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a rare and lethal malignancy primarily affecting the pleura and peritoneum. Mesothelioma incidence is expected to increase worldwide and current treatments remain ineffective, leading to poor prognosis. Within this article potential targets to improve the quality of life of the patients and assessment of further avenues for research are discussed. Areas covered: This review highlights emerging therapies currently under investigation for malignant mesothelioma with a specific focus on phase I and phase II clinical trials. Three main areas are discussed: immunotherapy (immune checkpoint blockade and cancer vaccines, among others), multitargeted therapy (such as targeting pro-angiogenic genes) and gene therapy (such as suicide gene therapy). For each, clinical trials are described to detail the current or past investigations at phase I and II. Expert opinion: The approach of applying existing treatments from other cancers does not show significant benefit, with the most promising outcome being an increase in survival of 2.7 months following combination of chemotherapy with bevacizumab. It is our opinion that the hypoxic microenvironment, the role of the stroma, and the metabolic status of mesothelioma should all be assessed and characterised to aid in the development of new treatments to improve patient outcomes.

  13. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II: Shallow Plus Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, K. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Parker, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Martin, E. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Chasar, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Amos, B. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-02-03

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013. A full account of Phase I of this project, including detailed home details and characterization, is found in Parker et al, 2015 (currently in draft). Phase II of this project, which is the focus of this report, applied the following additional retrofit measures to select homes that received a shallow retrofit in Phase I: a) Supplemental mini-split heat pump (MSHP) (6 homes); b) Ducted and space coupled Heat Pump Water Heater (8 homes); c) Exterior insulation finish system (EIFS) (1 homes); d) Window retrofit (3 homes); e) Smart thermostat (21 homes: 19 NESTs; 2 Lyrics); f) Heat pump clothes dryer (8 homes); g) Variable speed pool pump (5 homes).

  14. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    Phase I Due to the growing interest in establishing a domestic hydrogen infrastructure, several hydrogen fueling stations already have been established around the country as demonstration units. While these stations help build familiarity with hydrogen fuel in their respective communities, hydrogen vehicles are still several years from mass production. This limited number of hydrogen vehicles translates to a limited demand for hydrogen fuel, a significant hurdle for the near-term establishment of commercially viable hydrogen fueling stations. By incorporating a fuel cell and cogeneration system with a hydrogen fueling station, the resulting energy station can compensate for low hydrogen demand by providing both hydrogen dispensing and combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The electrical power generated by the energy station can be fed back into the power grid or a nearby facility, which in turn helps offset station costs. Hydrogen production capacity not used by vehicles can be used to support building heat and power loads. In this way, an energy station can experience greater station utility while more rapidly recovering capital costs, providing an increased market potential relative to a hydrogen fueling station. At an energy station, hydrogen is generated on-site. Part of the hydrogen is used for vehicle refueling and part of the hydrogen is consumed by a fuel cell. As the fuel cell generates electricity and sends it to the power grid, excess heat is reclaimed through a cogeneration system for use in a nearby facility. Both the electrical generation and heat reclamation serve to offset the cost of purchasing the equivalent amount of energy for nearby facilities and the energy station itself. This two-phase project assessed the costs and feasibility of developing a hydrogen vehicle fueling station in conjunction with electricity and cogenerative heat generation for nearby Federal buildings. In order to determine which system configurations and operational

  15. Halon Replacement Program for Aviation, Aircraft Engine Nacelle Application Phase II - Operational Comparison of Selected Extinguishants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bennett, John A

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the work performed under Phase II - Operational Comparison of Selected Extinguishants - of the Halon Replacement Program for Aviation for the Aircraft Engine Nacelle Application...

  16. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States). Sludge and Salt Planning; Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-25

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  17. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  18. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase I and Phase II Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights nine of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and Phase II projects that emphasize one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high temperature environmental barrier coating systems, deployable space structures, solid oxide fuel cells, and self-lubricating hard coatings for extreme temperatures. Each featured technology describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  19. On-sky Testing of the Active Phasing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonté, Frédéric; Araujo, Constanza; Bourtembourg, Reynald; Brast, Roland; Derie, Frédéric; Duhoux, Philippe; Dupuy, Christophe; Frank, Christophe; Karban, Robert; Mazzoleni, Ruben; Noethe, Lothar; Sedghi, Babak; Surdej, Isabelle; Yaitskova, Natalia; Luong, Bruno; Chueca, Sergio; Reyes, Marcos; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Quiros Pacheco, Fernando; Dohlen, Kjetil; Vigan, Arthur

    2009-06-01

    The Active Phasing Experiment (APE) has been used by ESO to gain experience in controlling segmented primary mirrors in preparation for the European Extremely Large Telescope. The experiment tested various phasing techniques and explored their advantages and limitations. Four optical phasing sensors were developed using different techniques — a curvature sensor, a pyramid sensor, a Shack-Hartmann sensor and a sensor based on a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The design of the APE instrument is described. APE was installed at the VLT visitor focus for on-sky testing and a brief summary of the results of the experiment is given.

  20. Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment II (SHERE II) Microgravity Rheology with Non-Newtonian Polymeric Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Aditya; Haward, Simon; Hall, Nancy Rabel; Magee, Kevin; McKinley, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of SHERE II is to study the effect of torsional preshear on the subsequent extensional behavior of filled viscoelastic suspensions. Microgravity environment eliminates gravitational sagging that makes Earth-based experiments of extensional rheology challenging. Experiments may serve as an idealized model system to study the properties of lunar regolith-polymeric binder based construction materials. Filled polymeric suspensions are ubiquitous in foods, cosmetics, detergents, biomedical materials, etc.

  1. A Neutron Scattering Kernel of Solid Methane in phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yunchang; Snow, William Michael; Liu, Cnen-Yu; Lavelle, Christopher M.; Baxter, David V.

    2008-04-01

    A neutron scattering cross section model of solid methane was studied for the cold neutron moderator of Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at IUCF/Indiana University especially in temperature range of 20.4 4K. The analytical scattering kernel was adapted from Ozaki.et al .[1][2] to describe molecular rotation in this temperature range. This model includes a molecular translation and intra-molecular vibration as well as the rotational degree of freedom in effective ways. For more broad applications into monte carlo simulations, neutron scattering libraries for MCNP were produced from the frequency spectrums using NJOY code. We have tested this newly- developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron spectral intensity expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP. The predictions are compared to the measured energy spectra. The simulations agree with the measurement data at both temperatures. The simulation results show good agreement with measurement data in different temperatures. [1] Y. Ozaki, Y. Kataoka, and T. Yamamoto, The Journal of Chemical Physics 73, 3442 (1980). [2] Y. Ozaki, Y. Kataoka, K. Otaka, and T. Yamamoto, Can. J. Physics. 59, 275 (1981).

  2. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behl Susanne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0 with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01, a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage in addition to response to thymostimulin, while an invasive HCC phenotype had no influence in the multivariate analysis. Thymostimulin could therefore be considered a safe and promising candidate for palliative treatment in a selected target population with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, in particular as component of a multimodal therapy concept. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29319366.

  3. The SafeBoosC phase II clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riera, Joan; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Bravo, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    ), clinical data at discrete time points and interventions prompted by the alarms were recorded. RESULTS: Sixty-seven infants had data that fulfilled the requirements for this analysis. 1107 alarm episodes were analysed. The alarm triggered a treatment guideline intervention in 25% of the cases; the type......BACKGROUND: The SafeBoosC phase II randomised clinical trial recently demonstrated the benefits of a combination of cerebral regional tissue oxygen saturation (rStO2) by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and a treatment guideline to reduce the oxygen imbalance in extremely preterm infants. AIMS......: To analyse rStO2-alarm-related clinical decisions and their heterogeneity in the NIRS experimental group (NIRS monitoring visible) and their impact on rStO2 and SpO2. METHODS: Continuous data from NIRS devices and the alarms (area under the curve of the rStO2 out of range had accumulated 0.2%h during 10 min...

  4. Micromegas R&D for ATLAS MUON PHASE II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Farina, Edoardo Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade, a proposal to extend the detector acceptance of the muon system to high η has been put forward (namely up to | η| ~ 4). Extension of the muon coverage has been demonstrated to enhance physics performance. The proposed location for the new detector is in between the end-cap calorimeter cryostat and the JD shielding; in this region there is no magnetic field applied, the aim of the new detector is therefore to only tag muons without performing any momentum measurement. The new η tagger should cope with extremely high particle rate, that has been calculated, by means of simulations, to be 9 MHz at R = 25 cm and 0.4 MHz at R = 60 cm for μ = 200, where μ stands for the number of pp collisions per bunch crossing. The required spatial resolution at the inner edge of the detector has been estimated in few hundreds micrometres. One of the most promising candidate technology for the new detector is the MicroMegaS one, which has already been adopted for the NSW upgrad...

  5. Testing Numerical Modeling of Phase Coarsening by Microgravity Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K. G.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Quantitative understanding of the morphological evolution that occurs during phase coarsening is crucial for optimization of processing procedures to control the final structure and properties of multiphase materials. Generally, ground-based experimental studies of phase coarsening in solids are limited to model alloy systems. Data from microgravity experiments on phase coarsening in Sn-Pb solid-liquid mixtures, executed on the International Space Station, are archived in NASA's Physical Sciences Informatics (PSI) system. In such microgravity experiments, it is expected that the rate of sedimentation will be greatly reduced compared with terrestrial conditions, allowing the kinetics of phase coarsening to be followed more carefully and accurately. In this work we tested existing numerical models of phase coarsening using NASA's PSI microgravity data. Specially, we compared the microstructures derived from phase-field and multiparticle diffusion simulations with those observed in microgravity experiments.

  6. Operational experience from LCLS-II cryomodule testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Hansen, B.; White, M.; Hurd, J.; Atassi, O. Al; Bossert, R.; Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Makara, J.; Theilacker, J.; Kaluzny, J.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the initial operational experience gained from testing Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) cryomodules at Fermilab’s Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF). Strategies for a controlled slow cooldown to 100 K and a fast cooldown past the niobium superconducting transition temperature of 9.2 K will be described. The test stand for the cryomodules at CMTF is sloped to match gradient in the LCLS-II tunnel at Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) laboratory, which adds an additional challenge to stable liquid level control. Control valve regulation, Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) power compensation, and other methods of stabilizing liquid level and pressure in the cryomodule 2.0 K SRF cavity circuit will be discussed. Several different pumping configurations using cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps have been used on the cryomodule 2.0 K return line and the associated results will be described.

  7. Operational Experience from LCLS-II Cryomodule Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Renzhuo [Fermilab; Hansen, Benjamin [Fermilab; White, Michael [Fermilab; Hurd, Joseph [Fermilab; Atassi, Omar Al [Fermilab; Bossert, Richard [Fermilab; Pei, Liujin [Fermilab; Klebaner, Arkadiy [Fermilab; Makara, Jerry [Fermilab; Theilacker, Jay [Fermilab; Kaluzny, Joshua [Fermilab; Wu, Genfa [Fermilab; Harms, Elvin [Fermilab

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the initial operational experience gained from testing Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) cryomodules at Fermilab’s Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF). Strategies for a controlled slow cooldown to 100 K and a fast cooldown past the niobium superconducting transition temperature of 9.2 K will be described. The test stand for the cryomodules at CMTF is sloped to match gradient in the LCLS-II tunnel at Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) laboratory, which adds an additional challenge to stable liquid level control. Control valve regulation, Superconducting Radio-Frequency (SRF) power compensation, and other methods of stabilizing liquid level and pressure in the cryomodule 2.0 K SRF cavity circuit will be discussed. Several different pumping configurations using cold compressors and warm vacuum pumps have been used on the cryomodule 2.0 K return line and the associated results will be described.

  8. Perturbative Heat Transport Experiments on TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguilor, S.; Castejon, F.; Luna, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Likin, K.; Fernandez, A.; Tj-II, T.

    2002-07-01

    Heat wave experiments are performed on TJ-II stellarator plasmas to estimate both heat diffusivity and power deposition profiles. High frequency ECRH modulation experiments are used to obtain the power deposition profiles, which is observed to be wider and duller than estimated by tracing techniques. The causes of this difference are discussed in the paper. Fourier analysis techniques are used to estimate the heat diffusivity in low frequency ECRH modulation experiments. This include the power deposition profile as a new ingredient. ECHR switch on/off experiments are exploited to obtain power deposition and heat diffusivities profile. Those quantities are compared with the obtained by modulation experiments and transport analysis, showing a good agreement. (Author) 18 refs.

  9. Mineralizing urban net-zero water treatment: Phase II field ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Net-zero water (NZW) systems, or water management systems achieving high recycling rates and low residuals generation so as to avoid water import and export, can also conserve energy used to heat and convey water, while economically restoring local eco-hydrology. However, design and operating experience are extremely limited. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the second phase of operation of an advanced oxidation-based NZW pilot system designed, constructed, and operated for a period of two years, serving an occupied four-person apartment. System water was monitored, either continuously or thrice daily, for routine water quality parameters, minerals, and MicroTox® in-vitro toxicity, and intermittently for somatic and male-specific coliphage, adenovirus, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, emerging organic constituents (non-quantitative), and the Florida drinking water standards. All 115 drinking water standards with the exception of bromate were met in this phase. Neither virus nor protozoa were detected in the treated water, with the exception of measurement of adenovirus genome copies attributed to accumulation of inactive genetic material in hydraulic dead zones. Chemical oxygen demand was mineralized to 90% in treatment. Total dissolved solids were maintained at ∼500 mg/L at steady state, partially through aerated aluminum electrocoagulation. Bromate accumulation is projected to be controlled by aluminum electrocoagulation with separate dispo

  10. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.; Ferreira, Fabio F.; Costa, Fanny N.; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  11. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C., E-mail: mccribei@iq.usp.br [Laboratório de Espectroscopia Molecular, Departamento de Química Fundamental, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 26077, CEP 05513-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, Fabio F.; Costa, Fanny N. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Giles, Carlos [Depto. de Física da Matéria Condensada, Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2016-06-14

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N{sub 1114}][NTf{sub 2}], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N{sub 1444}][NTf{sub 2}] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N{sub 1114}][NTf{sub 2}] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  12. Spin crossover properties of the [Fe(PM-BiA) sub 2 (NCS) sub 2] complex - phases I and II

    CERN Document Server

    Letard, J F; Nguyen, O; Marcen, S; Marchivie, M; Guionneau, P; Chasseau, D; Guetlich, P

    2003-01-01

    In the present review, we reexamine the photomagnetic properties of the [Fe (PM-BiA) sub 2 (NCS) sub 2], cis-bis(thiocyanato)-bis[(N-2'-pyridylmethylene)-4-(aminobiphenyl)] iron(II), compound which exhibits, depending on the synthetic method, an exceptionally abrupt spin transition (phase 1) with a very narrow hysteresis (T sub 1 sub / sub 2 arrow down = 168 K and T sub 1 sub / sub 2 arrow up = 173 K) or a gradual spin conversion (phase II) occurring at 190 K. In both cases, light irradiation in the tail of the sup 1 MLCT-LS absorption band, at 830 nm, results in the population of the high-spin state according to the light-induced excited spin-state trapping (LIESST) effect. The capacity of a compound to retain the light-induced HS information, estimated through the T(LIESST) experiment, is determined for both phases. Interestingly, the shape of the T(LIESST) curve is more gradual for the phase II than for the phase I and the T(LIESST) value is found considerably lower in the case of the phase II. The kinetic...

  13. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  14. 76 FR 55947 - Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... of the Secretary Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam AGENCY: Bureau of... implementing a program to strengthen compliance with international labor standards in Vietnam, focusing... has the recognized authority and capacity to fulfill the intent of the IRRP Phase II in Vietnam. DAI...

  15. Investigations of the radiation hardness of DEPFET sensors and the BEAST II experiment at Belle II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinohl, Tobias; Marinas, Carlos; Luetticke, Florian; Wermes, Norbert [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    An upgrade of the existing Japanese flavour factory (KEK, Tsukuba) is foreseen by 2014. The new machine (SuperKEKB) will deliver an instantaneous luminosity 40 times higher than the current machine. To exploit the huge number of events that are expected, the detector (Belle) has to be also updated. To make the high precision measurements needed for the reconstruction of the B meson decay vertices in such a harsh environment, the innermost subdetector of the new experiment, Belle II, will equipped with highly pixelated DEPFET sensors. With the increased luminosity, not only higher number of physics events will be created, but also much larger background levels are expected. Under these conditions, with expected doses of up to 1 Mrad (10 kGy) per year, the radiation damage of the DEPFET sensors is an issue that has to be deeply investigated. In addition, a safe environment has to be ensured before the installation of the DEPFET vertex detector. In order to study the conditions of the surrounding volume close to the beam pipe under different configurations of the accelerator, a detector able to measure doses and background sources (BEAST II) will be operated before the final Belle II experiment, until a stable beam configuration is found. In this talk, the performance of DEPFET sensors irradiated with different dose levels and the detector concepts for the BEAST II experiment is presented.

  16. Gouy phase and visibility in the double-slit experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C.J.S.; Marinho, L.S. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, CEP 64049-550, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Brazil, T.B. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cabral, L.A. [Curso de Física, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Caixa Postal 132, CEP 77804-970, Araguaína, TO (Brazil); Oliveira Jr, J.G.G. de [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Caixa Postal 45662-900, Ilhéus, BA (Brazil); Sampaio, M.D.R. [Departamento de Física, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, CEP 30161-970, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Centre for Particle Theory CM310 Durham University - St. John’s College B6 (United States); Paz, I.G. da, E-mail: irismarpaz@ufpi.edu.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portela, CEP 64049-550, Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    We study a matter wave double-slit experiment with unequal aperture widths in order to evaluate the effect of the Gouy phase on the visibility/predictability. While the predictability changes as one increases the width of one of the slits, the visibility receives a contribution from the Gouy phase at a specific point in the detection screen. Consequently such apparatus constitutes a simple device for measuring the Gouy phase of matter waves. We illustrate it numerically for neutrons.

  17. Outflow-confined H ii Regions. II. The Early Break-out Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Staff, Jan E.; Zhang, Yichen

    2017-11-01

    In this series of papers, we model the formation and evolution of the photoionized region and its observational signatures during massive star formation. Here, we focus on the early breakout of the photoionized region into the outflow cavity. Using results of 3D magnetohydrodynamic-outflow simulations and protostellar evolution calculations, we perform a post-processing radiative transfer. The photoionized region first appears at a protostellar mass of {m}* =10 {M}ȯ in our fiducial model and is confined to within 10–100 au by the dense inner outflow, which is similar to some of the observed very small hypercompact H ii regions. Since the ionizing luminosity of the massive protostar increases dramatically as the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) contraction proceeds, the photoionized region breaks out to the entire outflow region in ≲10,000 year. Accordingly, the radio free–free emission brightens significantly in this stage. In our fiducial model, the radio luminosity at 10 GHz changes from 0.1 {mJy} {{kpc}}2 at {m}* =11 {M}ȯ to 100 {mJy} {{kpc}}2 at {m}* =16 {M}ȯ , while the infrared luminosity increases by less than a factor of two. The radio spectral index also changes in the break-out phase from the optically thick value of ∼2 to the partially optically thin value of ∼0.6. Additionally, we demonstrate that short-timescale variation in the free–free flux would be induced by an accretion burst. The outflow density is enhanced in the accretion burst phase, which leads to a smaller ionized region and weaker free–free emission. The radio luminosity may decrease by one order of magnitude during such bursts, while the infrared luminosity is much less affected because internal protostellar luminosity dominates over accretion luminosity after the KH contraction starts. Such a variability may be observable on timescales as short 10–100 year if accretion bursts are driven by disk instabilities.

  18. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Sumit [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Krok, Michael [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  19. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranta Antoniou

    Full Text Available Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient's biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker's clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible.We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design.Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs.

  20. The Phase-II ATLAS ITk Pixel Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00349918; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase~2 shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ``ITk'' (Inner Tracker). The innermost portion of ITk will consist of a pixel detector with five layers in the barrel region and ring-shaped supports in the end-cap regions. It will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation levels. The new pixel system could include up to 14 $\\mathrm{m^2}$ of silicon, depending on the final layout, which is expected to be decided in 2017. Several layout options are being investigated at the moment, including some with novel inclined support structures in the barrel end-cap overlap region and others with very long innermost barrel layers. Forward coverage could be as high as |eta| $<4$. Supporting structures will be based on low mass, highly stabl...

  1. Database usage and performance for the Fermilab Run II experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonham, D.; Box, D.; Gallas, E.; Guo, Y.; Jetton, R.; Kovich, S.; Kowalkowski, J.; Kumar, A.; Litvintsev, D.; Lueking, L.; Stanfield, N.; Trumbo, J.; Vittone-Wiersma, M.; White, S.P.; Wicklund, E.; Yasuda, T.; /Fermilab; Maksimovic, P.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2004-12-01

    The Run II experiments at Fermilab, CDF and D0, have extensive database needs covering many areas of their online and offline operations. Delivering data to users and processing farms worldwide has represented major challenges to both experiments. The range of applications employing databases includes, calibration (conditions), trigger information, run configuration, run quality, luminosity, data management, and others. Oracle is the primary database product being used for these applications at Fermilab and some of its advanced features have been employed, such as table partitioning and replication. There is also experience with open source database products such as MySQL for secondary databases used, for example, in monitoring. Tools employed for monitoring the operation and diagnosing problems are also described.

  2. Dark matter search results from the CDMS II experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Z; Akerib, D S; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; Cushman, P; Daal, M; DeJongh, F; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Grant, D R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S A; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moore, D; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Phipps, A; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tarka, M; Wikus, P; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2010-03-26

    Astrophysical observations indicate that dark matter constitutes most of the mass in our universe, but its nature remains unknown. Over the past decade, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment has provided world-leading sensitivity for the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. The final exposure of our low-temperature germanium particle detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory yielded two candidate events, with an expected background of 0.9 +/- 0.2 events. This is not statistically significant evidence for a WIMP signal. The combined CDMS II data place the strongest constraints on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross section for a wide range of WIMP masses and exclude new parameter space in inelastic dark matter models.

  3. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  4. The sROD Module for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F; Ferrer, A; Fiorini, L; Hernandez, Y; Higon, E; Mellado, B; March, L; Moreno, P; Reed, R; Solans, C; Valero, A; Valls, J A

    2014-01-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main upgrade of the LHC to increase the instantaneous luminosity is scheduled for 2022. The High Luminosity LHC, also called upgrade Phase-II, will imply a complete redesign of the read-out electronics in TileCal. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics aims to transmit full digitized information to the back-end system in the counting rooms. Thus, the back-end system will provide digital calibrated information with en- hanced precision and granularity to the first level trigger to improve the trigger efficiencies. The demonstrator project is envisaged to qualify this new proposed architecture. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be upgraded with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions. The upgraded Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II The sROD module is des...

  5. Functional Super Read Out Driver Demonstrator for the Phase II Upgrade of the Atlas Tile Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Carrió, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Ferrer, A; González, V; Higón, E; Moreno, P; Sanchis, E; Solans, C; Valero, A; Valls, J

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the implementation of a functional super Read Out Driver (sROD) demonstrator for the Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) in the LHC experiment. The proposed front-end for the Phase II Upgrade communicates with back-end electronics using a multifiber optical connector with a data rate of 57.6 Gbps using the GBT protocol. This functional sROD demonstrator aims to help in the understanding of the problems that could arise in the upgrade of back-end electronics. The demonstrator is composed of three different boards that have been developed in the framework of ATLAS activities: the Optical Multiplexer Board (OMB), the Read-Out Driver (ROD) and the Optical Link Card (OLC). The first two boards, OMB and ROD, are part of the current back-end system where OMB receives two optical fibers with redundant data from front-end, performs online CRC for data and send to ROD the data from the error-free fiber; and ROD is the main element of the back-end electronics and it is responsible...

  6. Simulations, Diagnostics and Recent Results of the VISA II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Andonian, G; Pellegrini, C; Reiche, S; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    The VISA II experiment entails use of a chirped beam to drive a high gain SASE FEL. The output radiation is diagnosed with a modified frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) technique. Sextupoles are implemented to correct the lonigtudinal aberrations affecting the high energy spread chirped beam during transport to the undulator. The double differential energy spectrum is measured with a pair of slits and a set of gratings. In this paper, we report on start-to-end simulations, radiation diagnostics, as well as intial experimental results; experimental methods are described.

  7. Application of 'Six Sigma{sup TM}' and 'Design of Experiment' for Cementation - Recipe Development for Evaporator Concentrate for NPP Ling AO, Phase II (China) - 12555

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehrmann, Henning [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH (Germany); Perdue, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Company (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Cementation of radioactive waste is a common technology. The waste is mixed with cement and water and forms a stable, solid block. The physical properties like compression strength or low leach ability depends strongly on the cement recipe. Due to the fact that this waste cement mixture has to fulfill special requirements, a recipe development is necessary. The Six Sigma{sup TM}' DMAIC methodology, together with the Design of experiment (DoE) approach, was employed to optimize the process of a recipe development for cementation at the Ling Ao nuclear power plant (NPP) in China. The DMAIC offers a structured, systematical and traceable process to derive test parameters. The DoE test plans and statistical analysis is efficient regarding the amount of test runs and the benefit gain by getting a transfer function. A transfer function enables simulation which is useful to optimize the later process and being responsive to changes. The DoE method was successfully applied for developing a cementation recipe for both evaporator concentrate and resin waste in the plant. The key input parameters were determined, evaluated and the control of these parameters were included into the design. The applied Six Sigma{sup TM} tools can help to organize the thinking during the engineering process. Data are organized and clearly presented. Various variables can be limited to the most important ones. The Six Sigma{sup TM} tools help to make the thinking and decision process trace able. The tools can help to make data driven decisions (e.g. C and E Matrix). But the tools are not the only golden way. Results from scoring tools like the C and E Matrix need close review before using them. The DoE is an effective tool for generating test plans. DoE can be used with a small number of tests runs, but gives a valuable result from an engineering perspective in terms of a transfer function. The DoE prediction results, however, are only valid in the tested area. So a careful selection of

  8. Online Data Reduction for the Belle II Experiment using DATCON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernlochner, Florian; Deschamps, Bruno; Dingfelder, Jochen; Marinas, Carlos; Wessel, Christian

    2017-08-01

    The new Belle II experiment at the asymmetric e+e-accelerator SuperKEKB at KEK in Japan is designed to deliver a peak luminosity of 8 × 1035cm-2s-1. To perform high-precision track reconstruction, e.g. for measurements of time-dependent CP-violating decays and secondary vertices, the Belle II detector is equipped with a highly segmented pixel detector (PXD). The high instantaneous luminosity and short bunch crossing times result in a large stream of data in the PXD, which needs to be significantly reduced for offline storage. The data reduction is performed using an FPGA-based Data Acquisition Tracking and Concentrator Online Node (DATCON), which uses information from the Belle II silicon strip vertex detector (SVD) surrounding the PXD to carry out online track reconstruction, extrapolation to the PXD, and Region of Interest (ROI) determination on the PXD. The data stream is reduced by a factor of ten with an ROI finding efficiency of >90% for PXD hits inside the ROI down to 50MeV in pT of the stable particles. We will present the current status of the implementation of the track reconstruction using Hough transformations, and the results obtained for simulated ϒ(4S) → BB¯ events.

  9. Onboard Photo: Astronauts Use Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment II (SAREX-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-56) onboard photo of Pilot Stephen S. Oswald (wearing a headset) uses the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment II (SAREX-II) while sitting at the pilot's station on the forward flight deck. Oswald smiled from behind the microphone as he talks to amateur radio operators on Earth via the SAREX equipment. SAREX cables and the interface module freefloat in front of Oswald. The anterna located in the forward flight deck window is visible in the background. SAREX was established by NASA, the American Radio League/Amateur Radio Satellite Corporation and the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Amateur Radio Club to encourage public participation in the space program through a program to demonstrate the effectiveness of conducting short-wave radio transmissions between the Shuttle and ground-based radio operators at low-cost ground stations with amateur and digital techniques.

  10. Latin American Centre for Outcome Mapping - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The first phase of the project (102267) allowed the International Institute for Facilitation and Consensus (IIFAC), Cuernavaca, México, to serve as a regional hub for Outcome Mapping information, materials, training and facilitation in Spanish and Portuguese. Drawing on lessons learned from Phase I, this project will ...

  11. On-line solid phase selective separation and preconcentration of Cd(II) by solid-phase extraction using carbon active modified with methyl thymol blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ensafi, Ali A. [College of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Ensafi@cc.iut.ac.ir; Ghaderi, Ali R. [College of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-09-05

    An on-line flow system was used to develop a selective and efficient on-line sorbent extraction preconcentration system for cadmium. The method is based on adsorption of cadmium ions onto the activated carbon modified with methyl thymol blue. Then the adsorbed ions were washed using 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} and the eluent was used to determine the Cd(II) ions using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained show that the modified activated carbon has the greatest adsorption capacity of 80 {mu}g of Cd(II) per 1.0 g of the solid phase. The optimal pH value for the quantitative preconcentration was 9.0 and full desorption is achieved by using 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} solution. It is established that the solid phase can be used repeatedly without a considerable adsorption capacity loss. The detection limit was less than 1 ng mL{sup -1} Cd(II), with an enrichment factor of 1000. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 1-2000 ng mL{sup -1} Cd(II). The developed method has been applied to the determination of trace cadmium (II) in water samples and in the following reference materials: sewage sludge (CRM144R), and sea water (CASS.4) with satisfactory results. The accuracy was assessed through recovery experiments.

  12. High-Lift Flight Tunnel - Phase II Report. Phase 2 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofftus, David; Lund, Thomas; Rote, Donald; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The High-Lift Flight Tunnel (HiLiFT) concept is a revolutionary approach to aerodynamic ground testing. This concept utilizes magnetic levitation and linear motors to propel an aerodynamic model through a tube containing a quiescent test medium. This medium (nitrogen) is cryogenic and pressurized to achieve full flight Reynolds numbers higher than any existing ground test facility world-wide for the range of 0.05 to 0.50 Mach. The results of the Phase II study provide excellent assurance that the HiLiFT concept will provide a valuable low-speed, high Reynolds number ground test facility. The design studies concluded that the HiLiFT facility is feasible to build and operate and the analytical studies revealed no insurmountable difficulties to realizing a practical high Reynolds number ground test facility. It was determined that a national HiLiFT facility, including development, would cost approximately $400M and could be operational by 2013 if fully funded. Study participants included National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center as the Program Manager and MSE Technology Applications, Inc., (MSE) of Butte, Montana as the prime contractor and study integrator. MSE#s subcontractors included the University of Texas at Arlington for aerodynamic analyses and the Argonne National Laboratory for magnetic levitation and linear motor technology support.

  13. System design and architecture for the IDTO prototype : phase II demonstration site (central Florida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report documents the System Design and Architecture for the Phase II implementation of the : Integrated Dynamic Transit Operations (IDTO) Prototype bundle within the Dynamic Mobility Applications : (DMA) portion of the Connected Vehicle Program....

  14. Double blind randomized phase II study with radiation + 5-fluorouracil ± celecoxib for resectable rectal cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Debucquoy, Annelies; Roels, Sarah; Goethals, Laurence; Libbrecht, Louis; Cutsem, Eric Van; Geboes, Karel; Penninckx, Freddy; D’Hoore, André; McBride, William H; Haustermans, Karin

    2009-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and efficacy of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib in conjunction with preoperative chemoradiation for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer in a double blind randomized phase II study...

  15. Phenology for Resource Management and Decision Making: Phase I and II Program Evaluation and Final Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the work completed on Phase I and II of the Project from September 1, 2014 through February 14, 2017. Included are the Goals and Objectives...

  16. Trimodality therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma: Results from an EORTC phase II multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); P. Baas (Paul); R.M. Gaafar (Rabab); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F. Van De Pol (Francien); B. Hasane (B.); H.M. Klomp (Houke); A.M. Abdelrahman (A.); J. Welche (J.); J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC; protocol 08031) phase II trial investigated the feasibility of trimodality therapy consisting of induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and post-operative radiotherapy in patients with malignant

  17. Partially Reconstructed Beauty Decays at LHCb for the Phase-II Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, Iwan Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Semileptonic beauty decays provide a theoretically clean probe of CKM Unitarity since their decay rates factorise into leptonic and hadronic currents. At hadron colliders the full kinematic properties of these decays cannot be determined due to the unreconstructable neutrino. The kinematics can however be inferred through the conservation of momentum perpendicular to the flight direction that can be resolved by the LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO). The RF foil is an essential component of the LHCb vertex locator (VELO), separating the secondary vacuum of the VELO from the primary vacuum of the LHC. The foil protects the VELO modules from beam induced effects such as RF waves, and protects the LHC vacuum from hardware effects such as outgassing. The RF foil contributes to the material budget of the experiment and degrades the quality of tracks resulting in a worsened resolution for the reconstructed production and decay vertices. The phase-II upgrade can greatly improve the performance of semileptonic measurements a...

  18. The phase-II ATLAS pixel tracker upgrade: layout and mechanics.

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Abhishek; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment will upgrade its tracking detector during the Phase-II LHC shutdown, to better take advantage of the increased luminosity of the HL-LHC. The upgraded tracker will consist of silicon-strip modules surrounding a pixel detector, and will likely cover an extended eta range, perhaps as far as |eta|<4.0. A number of layout and supporting-structure options are being considered for the pixel detector, with the final choice expected to be made in early 2017. The proposed supporting structures are based on lightweight, highly-thermally-conductive carbon-based materials and are cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide. The various layouts will be described and a description of the supporting structures will be presented, along with results from testing of prototypes.

  19. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  20. Search for dark photons using data from CRESST-II Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütlein, A.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Defay, X.; Erb, A.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Gorla, P.; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; Kiefer, M.; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Loebell, J.; Mancuso, M.; Münster, A.; Pagliarone, C.; Petricca, F.; Potzel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Puig, R.; Reindl, F.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; Stahlberg, M.; Stodolsky, L.; Strandhagen, C.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Trinh Thi, H. H.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Uffinger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Wüstrich, M.; Zöller, A.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the nature and origin of dark matter is one of the most important challenges for modern particle physics. During the previous decade the sensitivities of direct dark matter searches have improved by several orders of magnitude. These experiments focus their work mainly on the search for dark-matter particles interacting with nuclei (e.g. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, WIMPs). However, there exists a large variety of different candidates for dark-matter particles. One of these candidates, the so-called dark photon, is a long-lived vector boson with a kinetic mixing to the standard-model photon. In this work we present the preliminary results of our search for dark photons. Using data from the direct dark matter search CRESST-II Phase 2 we can improve the existing constraints for the kinetic mixing for dark-photon masses between 0.3 and 0.5 keV/c2. In addition, we also present projected sensitivities for the next phases of the CRESST-III experiment showing great potential to improve the sensitivity for dark-photon masses below 1 keV.

  1. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) analysis : Phase II field evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    "The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and value of expanding the MDT's Ground : Penetrating Radar (GPR) program to pavement design and rehabilitation, and to network level : evaluation. Phase I of this project concluded that in ...

  2. SMALL MAIN-BELT ASTEROID SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY, PHASE II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains visible-wavelength (0.435-0.925 micron) spectra for 1341 main-belt asteroids observed during the second phase of the Small Main-belt Asteroid...

  3. Viet Nam Economic Research Network (VERN) - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    VERN I (101273) constituted the first network for young economic researchers in Viet Nam, where previously there had been no modality for cooperation or peer review. Guided by the philosophy of "understanding and managing globalization" that underpinned the earlier project, VERN II proposes to expand the network, ...

  4. Viet Nam Economic Research Network (VERN) - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    VERN I (101273) constituted the first network for young economic researchers in Viet Nam, where previously there had been no modality for cooperation or peer review. Guided by the philosophy of "understanding and managing globalization" that underpinned the earlier project, VERN II proposes to expand the network, ...

  5. An Acoustic Plate Mode Sensor for Biowarfare Toxins, Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Mathcad ® model of the structure has been constructed, which is also being applied to signal processing problems in cooperation with a quartz crystal...longevity / regeneration test...................................................... 50 II.F. 1 .d) Perform initial study of thioalkene process ...the rapid (ɝ minutes) detection of minute quantities (-10 ng/ml) of antigen, antibody or DNA- employs a piezoelectric biosensor ( array ) for the

  6. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

  7. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN DEEP AQUIFER MEDIA - PHASE II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeraj Gupta; Bruce Sass; Jennifer Ickes

    2000-11-28

    In 1998 Battelle was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under a Novel Concepts project grant to continue Phase II research on the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline formations. The focus of this investigation is to conduct detailed laboratory experiments to examine factors that may affect chemical sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations. Reactions between sandstone and other geologic media from potential host reservoirs, brine solutions, and CO{sub 2} are being investigated under high-pressure conditions. Some experiments also include sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) gases to evaluate the potential for co-injection of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} related gases in the deep formations. In addition, an assessment of engineering and economic aspects is being conducted. This current Technical Progress Report describes the status of the project as of September 2000. The major activities undertaken during the quarter included several experiments conducted to investigate the effects of pressure, temperature, time, and brine composition on rock samples from potential host reservoirs. Samples (both powder and slab) were taken from the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO{sub 2} host formation in the Ohio, the Eau Claire Shale, and Rome Dolomite samples that form the caprock for Mt. Simon Sandstone. Also, a sample with high calcium plagioclase content from Frio Formation in Texas was used. In addition, mineral samples for relatively pure Anorthite and glauconite were experimented on with and without the presence of additional clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The experiments were run for one to two months at pressures similar to deep reservoirs and temperatures set at 50 C or 150 C. Several enhancements were made to the experimental equipment to allow for mixing of reactants and to improve sample collection methods. The resulting fluids (gases and liquids

  9. Phase II Audit Report - Energy & Water Audits of LLNL Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, B I; Jacobs, P C; Pierce, S M

    2005-08-03

    This report describes Phase II of a project conducted for the Mechanical Utilities Division (UTel), Energy Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The overall project covers energy efficiency and water conservation auditing services for 215 modular and prefabricated buildings at LLNL. The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate compliance with DOE Order 430.2A, Contractor Requirements Document section 2.d (2) Document, to demonstrate annual progress of at least 10 percent toward completing energy and water audits of all facilities. Although this project covers numerous buildings, they are all similar in design and use. The approach employed for completing audits for these facilities involves a ''model-similar building'' approach. In the model-similar building approach, similarities between groups of buildings are established and quantified. A model (or test case) building is selected and analyzed for each model-similar group using a detailed DOE-2 simulation. The results are extended to the group of similar buildings based on careful application of quantified similarities, or ''extension measures''. This approach leverages the relatively minor effort required to evaluate one building in some detail to a much larger population of similar buildings. The facility wide energy savings potential was calculated for a select set of measures that have reasonable payback based on the detailed building analysis and are otherwise desirable to the LLNL facilities staff. The selected measures are: (1) HVAC Tune-up. This is considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and the impact on thermal comfort. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be tuned up under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (2) HVAC system scheduling. This is also considered to be a &apos

  10. Grassmann phase space methods for fermions. II. Field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, B.J., E-mail: bdalton@swin.edu.au [Centre for Quantum and Optical Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Jeffers, J. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4ONG (United Kingdom); Barnett, S.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    In both quantum optics and cold atom physics, the behaviour of bosonic photons and atoms is often treated using phase space methods, where mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator equivalent to a distribution function of these variables. The anti-commutation rules for fermion annihilation, creation operators suggests the possibility of using anti-commuting Grassmann variables to represent these operators. However, in spite of the seminal work by Cahill and Glauber and a few applications, the use of Grassmann phase space methods in quantum-atom optics to treat fermionic systems is rather rare, though fermion coherent states using Grassmann variables are widely used in particle physics. This paper presents a phase space theory for fermion systems based on distribution functionals, which replace the density operator and involve Grassmann fields representing anti-commuting fermion field annihilation, creation operators. It is an extension of a previous phase space theory paper for fermions (Paper I) based on separate modes, in which the density operator is replaced by a distribution function depending on Grassmann phase space variables which represent the mode annihilation and creation operators. This further development of the theory is important for the situation when large numbers of fermions are involved, resulting in too many modes to treat separately. Here Grassmann fields, distribution functionals, functional Fokker–Planck equations and Ito stochastic field equations are involved. Typical applications to a trapped Fermi gas of interacting spin 1/2 fermionic atoms and to multi-component Fermi gases with non-zero range interactions are presented, showing that the Ito stochastic field equations are local in these cases. For the spin 1/2 case we also show how simple solutions can be obtained both for the untrapped case and for an optical lattice trapping potential.

  11. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, K. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Angelini, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Aziz, T.; Babu, V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bacher, S. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); Bahinipati, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Satya Nagar (India); Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Basith, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bauer, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Behera, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Bergauer, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Bettarini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhuyan, B. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam 781039 (India); Bilka, T. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Bosi, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); INFN Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bozek, A. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow 31-342 (Poland); and others

    2016-07-11

    The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment, structured in a lantern shape, consists of four layers of ladders, fabricated from two to five silicon sensors. The APV25 readout ASIC chips are mounted on one side of the ladder to minimize the signal path for reducing the capacitive noise; signals from the sensor backside are transmitted to the chip by bent flexible fan-out circuits. The ladder is assembled using several dedicated jigs. Sensor motion on the jig is minimized by vacuum chucking. The gluing procedure provides such a rigid foundation that later leads to the desired wire bonding performance. The full ladder with electrically functional sensors is consistently completed with a fully developed assembly procedure, and its sensor offsets from the design values are found to be less than 200 μm. The potential functionality of the ladder is also demonstrated by the radioactive source test.

  12. Modifications in the glycerophospholipid composition between the Coxiella burnetii phase I and phase II cells suggest an association with phase variation of the bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimmelová, M; Toman, R; Pompach, P; Škultéty, L

    2016-03-01

    Glycerophospholipids (GP) extracted from the Coxiella burnetii strain Nine Mile in virulent phase I (NM I) and low virulent phase II (NM II) were analyzed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) that gave a superior mass resolution and mass accuracy allowing unambiguous peak recognition and precise assignment of ions. We showed that GP present in the pathogen's outer membrane underwent considerable modifications during the phase variation that might be related to impact of various environmental factors. It was found that GP from phase I cells were much more complex than those from phase II cells. While glycerophosphoethanolamines (PE), glycerophosphocholines (PC) and glycerophosphoglycerols (PG) were present in both phases of C. burnetii, major differences were observed in the presence of glycerophosphates (PA) and glycerophosphoserines (PS). Thus, PA but no PS were detected in NM I variant in contrast with NM II cells where PS but no PA were identified. It is suggested that enzymes for PA head group modifications to form PS, PE, and PG become active during the phase variation of the bacterium.

  13. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  14. Rapport public sur la santé (Inde) - phase II | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Public Report on Health (India) - Phase II. Although India has made significant progress in increasing life expectancy and in reducing infant and child mortality, health indicators in the less progressive states remain unacceptably poor. View morePublic Report on Health (India) - Phase II ...

  15. Proteomic comparison of phase I and II coxiella burnetii cells reveals potential virulence biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxiella burnetii, a category B biological warfare agent, causes several worldwide outbreaks of zoonotic disease each year. In order to identify C. burnetii virulence factors, the virulent phase I and avirulent phase II variants of the Nine Mile RSA strains, were propagated in embryonated hen eggs ...

  16. Career Ladders and Core Curriculum in Human Services. Phase II Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Robert K.

    This portion of Phase II of the Social Service Aide Project, a program of exemplary education for the career development of paraprofessionals in social and/or human services, represented an attempt to broaden the career ladders developed during Phase I and to extend the core curriculum above and below the Associate in Arts degree. The scheme of…

  17. The active phasing experiment: Part I. Concept and objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaitskova, Natalia; Gonte, Frederic; Derie, Frederic; Noethe, Lothar; Surdej, Isabelle; Karban, Robert; Dohlen, Kjetil; Langlois, Maud; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Reyes, Marcos; Montoya, Lusma; Terrett, David

    2006-06-01

    In a framework of ELT design study our group is building an Active Phasing Experiment (APE), the main goals of which is to demonstrate the non-adaptive wavefront control scheme and technology for Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). The experiment includes verification and test of different phasing sensors and integration of a phasing wavefront sensor into a global scheme of segmented telescope active control. After a sufficient number of tests in the laboratory APE will be mounted and tested on sky at a Nasmyth focus of a VLT unit telescope. The paper presents APE as a demonstrator of particular aspects of ELT and provides a general understanding concerning the strategy of segmented mirrors active control.

  18. Differential roles of phase I and phase II enzymes in 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine-induced cytotoxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antolino Lobo, I.; Meulenbelt, J.; Nijmeijer, S.M.; Scherpenisse, P.; van den Berg, M.; van Duursen, M.B.M.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolism plays an important role in the toxic effects caused by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Most research has focused on the involvement of CYP2D6 enzyme in MDMA bioactivation, and less is known about the contribution of other cytochrome P450 (P450) and phase II metabolism. In this

  19. China Public Budget Reform Program (CPBR) - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Government of China has adopted a national reform program aimed at making budgeting more transparent and accountable through public involvement and enhanced oversight. Building on work carried out under Phase I (102965), the China Development Research Foundation (CDRF) will analyze China's current ...

  20. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  1. China Public Budget Reform Program (CPBR) - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Government of China has adopted a national reform program aimed at making budgeting more transparent and accountable through public involvement and enhanced oversight. Building on work carried out under Phase I (102965), the China Development Research Foundation (CDRF) will analyze China's current ...

  2. A spatial assessment of ecosystem services in Europe - Phase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maes, Joachim; Hauck, Jennifer; Paracchini,, Maria Luisa

    Mainstreaming ecosystem services in EU decision making processes requires a solid conceptual and methodological framework for mapping and assessing ecosystem services that serve the multiple objectives addressed by policies. The PRESS-2 study (PEER Research on Ecosystem Service – Phase 2) provide...

  3. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  4. The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Carmack; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; H. Tsai

    2008-01-01

    The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR II as part of the Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few MA bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide, and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MAs. Of primary interest are the effect of the MAs on fuel cladding chemical interaction and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995–1996 and, currently, represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This report provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

  5. Background Characterization and Discrimination in the Final Analysis of the CDMS II Phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritts, Matthew C. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is designed to detectWeakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in the Milky Way halo. The phase known as CDMS II was performed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory. The final set of CDMS II data, collected in 2007-8 and referred to as Runs 125-8, represents the largest exposure to date for the experiment. We seek collisions between WIMPs and atomic nuclei in disk-shaped germanium and silicon detectors. A key design feature is to keep the rate of collisions from known particles producing WIMP-like signals very small. The largest category of such background is interactions with electrons in the detectors that occur very close to one of the faces of the detector. The next largest category is collisions between energetic neutrons that bypass the experimental shielding and nuclei in the detectors. Analytical efforts to discriminate these backgrounds and to estimate the rate at which such discrimination fails have been refined and improved throughout each phase of CDMS. Next-generation detectors for future phases of CDMS require testing at cryogenic test facilities. One such facility was developed at the University of Minnesota in 2007 and has been used continuously since then to test detectors for the next phase of the experiment, known as SuperCDMS.

  6. Catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Phase II. Final research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooverman, R.H.

    1979-05-01

    The Wright-Malta gasification process is characterized by low-temperature, catalyzed steam gasification in a pressurized rotary kiln. Fresh biomass moves slowly and continuously through the kiln, where it is gradually heated to around 1200/sup 0/F in an atmosphere of 300 psi steam. During its traverse, pyrolysis and reaction of steam with the nascent char convert nearly all of the organic solids to the gaseous phase. The volatile pyrolysis products pass through the kiln co-currently with the solids and are similarly cracked and steam-reformed within the kiln to fixed gases. Heat for the gasification process is provided by sensible heat recovered from the product gas and the wood decomposition exotherm, making the process inherently very energy-efficient. This report summarizes the work done during the experimental, laboratory-scale phase of development of the W-M biomass gasification process. Two bench-scale experimental gasifiers were constructed and tested: the ''minikiln'', a batch-feed, rotating autoclave; and the ''biogasser'', a stationary, continuous-feed, tubular reactor with zone heating and auger transport. Studies were carried out in these reactors to determine the extent of conversion of biomass solids to gas, and the makeup of the product gas, over a wide range of process conditions. The process variables that were investigated included reactor pressure and temperature, catalyst type and concentration, moisture content and type of biomass feed.

  7. Low energy threshold analysis of the phase I and phase II data sets of the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, S R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, S R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rielage, K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is T{sub eff} = 3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved with water Cherenkov detector data. In units of 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup =1}, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from {sup 8}B decay in the Sun measured using the neutral current (NC) reaction of neutrinos on deuterons, with no constraint on the {sup 8}B neutrino energy spectrum, is found to be {Phi}{sub NC} = 5.140{sub -0.158}{sup +0.160}(stat){sub -0.117}{sup +0.132}(syst). These uncertainties are more than a factor of two smaller than previously published results. Also presented are the spectra of recoil electrons from the charged current reaction of neutrinos on deuterons and the elastic scattering of electrons. A fit to the SNO data in which the free parameters directly describe the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux and the energy-dependent Ve survival probability provides a measure of the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux {Phi}{sub 8{sub B}} = 5.046{sub -0.152}{sup +0.159}(stat){sub -0.123}{sup +0.107}(syst). Combining these new results with results of all other solar experiments and the KamLAND reactor experiment yields best-fit values of the mixing parameters of {theta}{sub 12} = 34.06{sub -0.84}{sup +1.16} degrees and {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} = 7.59{sub -0.21}{sup +0.20} x 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2}. The global value of {Phi}{sub 8{sub B}} is extracted to a precision of {sub -2.95}{sup +2.38}%. In a three-flavor analysis the best fit value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} is 2.00{sub -1.63}{sup +2.09} x 10{sup -2}. Interpreting this as a limit implies an upper bound of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} < 0.057 (95% C. L.).

  8. Theory of multiple phase separations in binary mixtures: Phase diagrams, thermodynamic properties, and comparisons with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.; Walker, James S.

    1983-02-01

    The lattice-gas models of phase separating binary liquid mixtures, introduced by Walker and Vause, are studied in detail and generalized within a high-temperature series expansion. This approximation allows for a straightforward study of rather complex, orientationally specific pair interactions, like those found in real systems. These theories can predict much of the complex miscibility phenomena often found in these mixtures, which are characterized by hydrogen-bonding interactions. Such phenomena include up to five critical solution points as a function of temperature. By comparisons with experiments, we determine the model parameters, thus mapping these experiments onto the global phase diagrams. These experiments include studies of the dependence of liquid/liquid miscibility on temperature, pressure, concentration of electrolytes, and addition of a dilute third component. Specifically, we make direct comparison with various experiments on the binary systems 2-butanol+H2O, 3-methyl pyridine+H2O(D2O), gylcerol +o- methoxy phenol and ethanol+H2O+electrolytes. Very simple and often easily interpreted trends in the parameters are found and quantitative agreement with experiments is possible with minimum parametric freedom. Explicit predictions of critical exponent renormalization in several systems are made. In addition, suggestions are made for a number of light scattering and specific heat experiments, some of which may demonstrate incipient critical behavior, such as the onset of long range correlations, in systems not undergoing phase separation.

  9. Hawaii Geothermal Project: initial Phase II progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-02-01

    Results of Phase I of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP), which consisted of a two-year study on the potential of geothermal energy for the Big Island of Hawaii, are reviewed. One conclusion from Phase I was that preliminary results looked sufficiently encouraging to warrant the drilling of the first experimental geothermal well in the Puna area of the Big Island. During the first two months of drilling, parallel activity has continued in all research and support areas. Additional gravity, seismic, and electrical surveys were conducted; water and rock samples were collected; and analysis and interpretation of data has proceeded. Earlier work on mathematical and physical modeling of geothermal reservoirs was expanded; analysis of liquid-dominated geothermal systems continued; and studies on testing of geothermal wells were initiated. An environmental assessment statement of HGP No. 1 was prepared and baselines established for crucial environmental parameters. Economic, legal, and regulatory studies were completed and alternatives identified for the development of geothermal power in Hawaii. Early stages of the drilling program proceeded slowly. The initial 9 7/8-inch drill hole to 400 feet, as well as each of the three passes required to open the hole to 26 inches, were quite time consuming. Cementing of the 20-inch surface casing to a depth of 400 feet was successfully accomplished, and drilling beyond that depth has proceeded at a reasonable rate. Penetration below the surface casing to a depth of 1050 feet was accomplished at a drilling rate in excess of 150 feet per day, with partial circulation over the entire range.

  10. Study of the use of personal equipment in low coal. Experiments on personal equipment for low seam coal miners: II. Effect of size and weight of battery pack on performance. Phase II report, number 3. Open file report 1 Jan 79-1 Sep 79

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, M.; Krohn, G.; Wick, D.; Volkmer, K.; Beith, B.

    1980-01-31

    The objective of this study was to determine optimal personal equipment design for use in low coal based on ergonomic, biomechanic, and safety considerations. This report describes three experiments that were conducted to determine the effects of size and weight of battery packs. The first experiment tested the sensitivity of task measures; that is, workers performed locomotion, shoveling, cart pushing, and timbering tasks to detect variations in the size and weight of battery packs. The second experiment focused on locomotion tasks and tested the effects of varying size and weight on task completion time. The third experiment compared the battery pack presently in use with a radically different configuration of power cells.

  11. Experiments with radioactive nuclear beams II; Experimentos con haces nucleares radiactivos II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera R, E.F.; Martinez Q, E.; Gomez C, A.; Lizcano C, D.; Garcia M, H.; Rosales M, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-12-15

    The studies of nuclear reactions with heavy ions have been carried out for years for the group of heavy ions of the laboratory of the Accelerator of the ININ. Especially in the last years the group has intruded in the studies of nuclear reactions with radioactive beams, frontier theme at world level. Presently Technical Report is presented in detailed form the experimental methods and the analysis procedures of the research activities carried out by the group. The chpater II is dedicated to the procedures used in the analysis of the last two experiments with radioactive beams carried out by the group. In the chapter III is presented the procedure followed to carrying out an extended analysis with the CCDEF code, to consider the transfer channel of nucleons in the description of the fusion excitation functions of a good number of previously measured systems by the group. Finally, in the chapter IV the more important steps to continue in the study of the reaction {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C experiment drifted to be carried out using the available resources of the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory of the ININ are described. At the end of each chapter some of the more representative results obtained in the analysis are presented and emphasis on the scientific production generated by the group for each case is made. (Author)

  12. Phase II Report for SERRI Project No. 80037: Investigation of surge and wave reduction by vegetation (Phase II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better understand and quantify the effectiveness of wetland vegetation in mitigating the impact of hurricane and storm surges, this SERRI project (No. 80037) examined surge and wave attenuation by vegetation through laboratory experiments, field observations and computational modeling. It was a c...

  13. ATLAS Calorimeters: Run-2 performance and Phase-II upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to 10^{34} cm^{−2} s^{−1}. A liquid argon (LAr)-lead sampling calorimeter is employed as electromagnetic calorimeter and hadronic calorimter, except in the barrel region, where a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter (TileCal) is used as hadronic calorimter. This presentation will give first an overview of the detector operation and data quality, as well as the achieved performance of the ATLAS calorimetry system. Additionally, the upgrade projects of the ATLAS calorimeter system for the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) will be presented. For the HL-LHC, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase up to L ≃ 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2} s^{−1} and the average pile-up up to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The major R&D item is the upgrade of the electronics for both LAr and Tile calorimeters in order to cope wit...

  14. ATLAS calorimeters: Run-2 performances and Phase-II upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to $10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$. A Liquid Argon-lead sampling (LAr) calorimeter is employed as electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, except in the barrel region, where a scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter (TileCal) is used as hadronic calorimeter. This presentation gives first an overview of the detector operation and data quality, as well as of the achieved performances of the ATLAS calorimetry system. Additionally the upgrade projects of the ATLAS calorimeter system for the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) are presented. For the HL-LHC, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase up to $L \\simeq 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ and the average pile-up up to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The major R&D item is the upgrade of the electronics for both LAr and Tile calorimeters in order to cope with longer latenc...

  15. The Phase II Upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will show the status of the upgrade projects of the ATLAS calorimeter system for the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC). For the HL-LHC, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to increase up to L ≃ 7.5 × 1034 cm−2 s−1 and the average pile-up up to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter electronics will need to be replaced to cope with these challenging conditions: the expected radiation doses will indeed exceed the qualification range of the current readout system, and the upgraded trigger system will require much longer data storage in the electronics (up to 60 us), that the current system cannot sustain. The status of the R&D of the low-power ASICs (pre-amplifier, shaper, ADC, serializer and transmitters) and of the readout electronics design will be discussed. Moreover, a High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed to be added in front of the LAr calorimeters in the end-cap region (2.4 <|eta|< 4.2) for pile-up mitigation a...

  16. A Designer Fluid For Aluminum Phase Change Devices: Aluminum Inorganic Aqueous Solutions (IAS) Chemistry and Experiments. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-17

    Aluminum Inorganic Aqueous Solutions (IAS) Chemistry and Experiments Qi Yao and Ivan Catton University of California, Los Angeles 420 Westwood Plaza...FLUID FOR ALUMINUM PHASE CHANGE DEVICES, Vol II of III Aluminum Inorganic Aqueous Solutions (IAS) Chemistry and Experiments 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...results demonstrate that while there is good evidence that inorganic inhibitors can significantly reduce the production of NCG in an aluminum-water

  17. ONKALO POSE experiment. Phase 1 and 2: execution and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, E. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Siren, T. [Posiva Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Hakala, M. [KMS-Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Kantia, P. [Geofcon Oy, Rovaniemi (Finland)

    2014-02-15

    Posiva has conducted in the ONKALO rock characterisation facility during 2010 - 2011 an in situ experiment named POSE (Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment). The POSE experiment had three objectives: to establish the in situ spalling/damage strength of Olkiluoto migmatitic gneiss, to establish the state of in situ stress at the -345 m depth level, and to act as a Prediction-Outcome (P-O) exercise. The POSE experiment consisted of drilling with full-face boring machine two near fullscale deposition holes, diameter 1.52 m (compared to 1.75 m for the actual deposition holes), to a depth of 7.2 m, leaving a 0.9 m pillar between the holes. The holes were planned to be located in such way that maximum excavation-induced stresses could act in the pillar and damage could then take place. Boring of the two holes in 2010 was called Phase 1 (Pillar test). This was followed in 2011 by Phase 2 (Pillar heating test) where four heaters with a length of 7.5 m heated the test area to increase the stresses around the experimental holes. In the heating phase the other hole was back-filled with sand. The test was extensively monitored during the execution using temperature monitoring, strain gauge monitoring, video monitoring, microseismic monitoring and pressure monitoring. In addition, the holes were after the test measured using ground penetration radar (GPR) and 3D photogrammetry for detailed modelling. The outcomes from the test showed that no damage, except for three opened/sheared fractures, was noticed during the boring of the holes (Phase 1). Surface damage was, though, induced by heating (Phase 2). The damage was well localized around the holes and controlled by the foliation (mica rich layers) and rock type contacts which were known to be relatively weak. Surface type failures were not observed in the gneiss, but it was noticed in limited areas in the pegmatite-granite. The depths of the damaged areas due to heating were less than 100 mm. The depths and sizes of the

  18. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Tracy A [ORNL; Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  19. OCCIDENTAL VERTICAL MODIFIED IN SITU PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF OIL FROM OIL SHALE. PHASE II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Reid M.

    1980-09-01

    The progress presented in this report covers the period June 1, 1980 through August 31, 1980 under the work scope for.Phase II of the DOE/Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) Cooperative Agreement. The major activities at OOSI 1s Logan Wash site during the quarter were: mining the voids at all levels for Retorts 7, 8 and 8x; completing Mini-Retort (MR) construction; continuing surface facility construction; tracer testing the MR 1 s; conducting Retorts 7 & 8 related Rock Fragmentation tests; setting up and debugging the Sandia B-61 trailer; and preparing the Phase II instrumentation plan.

  20. The Potential Economic Impact of Electricity Restructuring in the State of Oklahoma: Phase II Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, SW

    2001-10-30

    Because of the recent experiences of several states undergoing restructuring (e.g., higher prices, greater volatility, lower reliability), concerns have been raised in states currently considering restructuring as to whether their systems are equally vulnerable. Factors such as local generation costs, transmission constraints, market concentration, and market design can all play a role in the success or failure of the market. These factors along with the mix of generation capacity supplying the state will influence the relative prices paid by consumers. The purpose of this project is to provide a model and process to evaluate the potential price and economic impacts of restructuring the Oklahoma electric industry. The Phase I report concentrated on providing an analysis of the Oklahoma system in the near-term, using only present generation resources and customer demands. This Phase II study analyzed the Oklahoma power market in 2010, incorporating the potential of new generation resources and customer responses. Five key findings of this Phase II were made: (1) Projected expansion in generating capacity exceeds by over 3,000 MW the demands within the state plus the amount that could be exported with the current transmission system. (2) Even with reduced new plant construction, most new plants could lose money (although residential consumers would see lower rates) unless they have sufficient market power to raise their prices without losing significant market share (Figure S-1). (3) If new plants can raise prices to stay profitable, existing low-cost coal and hydro plants will have very high profits. Average prices to customers could be 5% to 25% higher than regulated rates (Figure S-1). If the coal and hydro plants are priced at cost-based rates (through long-term contracts or continued regulation) while all other plants use market-based rates then prices are lower. (4) Customer response to real-time prices can lower the peak capacity requirements by around 9

  1. Quality of reporting in oncology phase II trials: A 5-year assessment through systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langrand-Escure, Julien; Rivoirard, Romain; Oriol, Mathieu; Tinquaut, Fabien; Rancoule, Chloé; Chauvin, Frank; Magné, Nicolas; Bourmaud, Aurélie

    2017-01-01

    Phase II clinical trials are a cornerstone of the development in experimental treatments They work as a "filter" for phase III trials confirmation. Surprisingly the attrition ratio in Phase III trials in oncology is significantly higher than in any other medical specialty. This suggests phase II trials in oncology fail to achieve their goal. Objective The present study aims at estimating the quality of reporting in published oncology phase II clinical trials. A literature review was conducted among all phase II and phase II/III clinical trials published during a 5-year period (2010-2015). All articles electronically published by three randomly-selected oncology journals with Impact-Factors>4 were included: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology and British Journal of Cancer. Quality of reporting was assessed using the Key Methodological Score. 557 articles were included. 315 trials were single-arm studies (56.6%), 193 (34.6%) were randomized and 49 (8.8%) were non-randomized multiple-arm studies. The Methodological Score was equal to 0 (lowest level), 1, 2, 3 (highest level) respectively for 22 (3.9%), 119 (21.4%), 270 (48.5%) and 146 (26.2%) articles. The primary end point is almost systematically reported (90.5%), while sample size calculation is missing in 66% of the articles. 3 variables were independently associated with reporting of a high standard: presence of statistical design (p-value <0.001), multicenter trial (p-value = 0.012), per-protocol analysis (p-value <0.001). Screening was mainly performed by a sole author. The Key Methodological Score was based on only 3 items, making grey zones difficult to translate. This literature review highlights the existence of gaps concerning the quality of reporting. It therefore raised the question of the suitability of the methodology as well as the quality of these trials, reporting being incomplete in the corresponding articles.

  2. ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade Pixel Data Transmission Development

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Jason; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The current tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced by an all-silicon detector (ITk) in the course of the planned HL-LHC accelerator upgrade around 2025. The readout of the ITk pixel system will be most challenging in terms of data rate and readout speed. Simulation of the on-detector electronics indicates that the planned trigger rate of 1 MHz will require readout speeds up to 5.12 Gb/s per data link. The high-radiation environment precludes optical data transmission, so the first part of the data transmission has to be implemented electrically, over a 6-m distance between the pixel modules and the optical transceivers. Several high-speed electrical data transmission solutions involving small-gauge wire cables or flexible circuits have been prototyped and characterized. A combination of carefully-selected physical layers and aggressive signal conditioning are required to achieve the proposed specifications.

  3. [Orthodontics in general practice 3. Angle Class II/1 malocclusion: one-phase treatment treatment preferred to two-phase treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    With regard to the optimal treatment timing for children with an Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion, there is an ongoing controversy on the effectiveness of a two-phase or a one-phase therapy. Two-phase treatment involves a first phase to correct the jaw relationship starting at the age of 7 to

  4. Curriculum for Evidence Based Medicine for MBBS II phase Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based medicine is the training of health care professionals to access, assess and apply the best scientific evidence to clinical practice. EBM is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence along with clinical expertise and patient values in making decisions about the case of individual patients. The current undergraduate curriculum of health profession is based on past knowledge accumulated for years. The scientific relevance of the mostly outdated information has never been questioned. The students passively absorb this available knowledge and apply it in their future professional life. There is no active learning on their part, by way of positive enquiry and critical analysis of the curriculum imposed on them. This has an undesirable impact on their competency as health professionals and the quality of the health care imparted by them. Hence there is need for emphasis on the teaching of EBM skills in undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing medical education programs. Early introduction of EBM in the undergraduate medical curriculum, in the form of a short course, using various modes of instruction, enhances the competence of critical thinking and also influences change in attitude towards EBM positively in medical students. The EBM course is planned to introduce in the curriculum of medical undergraduates at the beginning of second phase when they enter clinical posting. Total number of student would be 100 per batch and the course duration will be of 1 year. Educational methods program incorporates multiple teaching methods like lectures, discussion sessions, demonstration, case based learning, timely feedback, real life exposure, role modeling and peer evaluation.

  5. Gas-phase experiments on Au(III) photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Jesse C; Kaufman, Sydney H; Weber, J Mathias

    2011-04-14

    Irradiation of AuCl(4)(-) and AuCl(2)(OH)(2)(-) in the gas-phase using ultraviolet light (220-415 nm) leads to their dissociation. Observed fragment ions for AuCl(4)(-) are AuCl(3)(-) and AuCl(2)(-) and for AuCl(2)(OH)(2)(-) are AuCl(2)(-) and AuClOH(-). All fragment channels correspond to photoreduction of the gold atom to either Au(II) or Au(I) depending on the number of neutral ligands lost. Fragment branching ratios of AuCl(4)(-) are observed to be highly energy dependent and can be explained by comparison of the experimental data to calculated threshold energies obtained using density functional theory. The main observed spectral features are attributed to ligand-to-metal charge transfer transitions. These results are discussed in the context of the molecular-level mechanisms of Au(III) photochemistry.

  6. Phase II -- Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA). Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale (US) photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in PV module technology. This report updates the project`s progress, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1994, summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions for the year, and outlines future work. The PVUSA project has five objectives. These are designed to narrow the gap between a large utility industry that is unfamiliar with PV and a small PV industry that is aware of a potentially large utility market but unfamiliar with how to meet its requirements. The objectives are: Evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of promising PV modules and balance-of-system (BOS) components side by side at a single location; Assess PV system operation and maintenance in a utility setting; Compare US utilities hands-on experience in designing, procuring, and operating PV systems; and, Document and disseminate knowledge gained from the project.

  7. Ultramylonite generation via phase mixing in high-strain experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A. J.; Skemer, P.

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic recrystallization and phase mixing are considered to be important processes in ductile shear zone formation, as they collectively enable a permanent transition to the strain-weakening, grain-size sensitive deformation regime. While dynamic recrystallization is well understood, the underlying physical processes and timescales required for phase mixing remain enigmatic. Here, we present results from high-strain phase mixing experiments on calcite-anhydrite composites. A poorly mixed starting material was synthesized from fine-grained calcite and anhydrite powders. Samples were deformed in the Large Volume Torsion apparatus at 500°C and shear strain rates of 5 × 10-5 to 5 × 10-4 s-1, to finite shear strains of up to γ = 57. Microstructural evolution is quantified through analysis of backscattered electron images and electron backscatter diffraction data. During deformation, polycrystalline domains of the individual phases are geometrically stretched and thinned, causing an increase in the spatial density of interphase boundaries. At moderate shear strains (γ ≥ 6), domains are so severely thinned that they become "monolayers" of only one or two grain's width and form a thin compositional layering. Monolayer formation is accompanied by a critical increase in the degree of grain boundary pinning and, consequently, grain-size reduction below the theoretical limit established by the grain-size piezometer or deformation mechanism field boundary. Ultimately, monolayers neck and disaggregate at high strains (17 <γ <57) to complete the phase mixing process. This "geometric" phase mixing mechanism is consistent with observations of mylonites, where layer (i.e., foliation) formation is associated with strain localization, and layers are ultimately destroyed at the mylonite-ultramylonite transition.

  8. The ITk Strip Tracker for the phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector of the HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutoulaki, A.

    2017-04-01

    The current Inner Detector in the ATLAS experiment does not meet the requirements of the High Luminosity-LHC upgrade. A new detector, known as the Inner Tracker, will be built in place of the current Inner Detector and will consist exclusively of silicon based sensors, pixels and strips. This contribution summarizes the on-going R&D activities within the different institutes involved in the phase II upgrade of the Strip Tracker. An update on the current status of testing and prototyping is given as well as the next steps before the submission of the ITk Strips Technical Design Report by the end of 2016.

  9. The ITk Strip Tracker for the phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS detector of the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)745849; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The current Inner Detector in the ATLAS experiment does not meet the requirements of the High Luminosity-LHC upgrade. A new detector, known as the Inner Tracker, will be built in place of the current Inner Detector and will consist exclusively of silicon based sensors. This contribution summarizes the on-going R&D activities within the different institutes involved in the phase II upgrade of the Strip Tracker. An update on the current status of testing and prototyping is given as well as the next steps before the submission of the ITk Strips Technical Design Report by the end of 2016.

  10. Compendium of Phase-I Mini-SHINE Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youker, Amanda J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kalensky, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, Thad A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, David A [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Krebs, John F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alford, Kurt [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Byrnes, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hafenrichter, Lohman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hebden, Andrew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jerden, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jonah, Charles [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Micklich, Brad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schneider, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wesolowski, Kenneth [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Zaijing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in their efforts to develop the technology to become a domestic Mo-99 producer using low-enriched uranium (LEU). Mini-SHINE experiments are being performed with the high-current electron linear accelerator (linac) at Argonne. The target solution is a 90-150 g-U/L LEU uranyl sulfate at pH 1. In Phase 1, the convertor was tantalum with a maximum beam power on the convertor of 10 kW, and the target solution was limited to 5 L. This configuration generated a peak fission power density of 0.05 W/mL. Nine experiments were performed between February and October 2015. Results are reported and discussed for each experiment regarding the off-gas analysis system, the sampling and Mo-recovery operation, and the Mo-product concentration and purification system. In Phase 2, the convertor will be depleted uranium; beam power will increase to 20 kW; and the solution volume will be 18 L. This configuration will generate a fission power density of up to 1 W/mL.

  11. A Silicon Strip Detector for the Phase II High Luminosity Upgrade of the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00425747; McMahon, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that detects proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 14 TeV. The Semiconductor Tracker is part of the Inner Detector, implemented using silicon microstrip detectors with binary read-out, providing momentum measurement of charged particles with excellent resolution. The operation of the LHC and the ATLAS experiment started in 2010, with ten years of operation expected until major upgrades are needed in the accelerator and the experiments. The ATLAS tracker will need to be completely replaced due to the radiation damage and occupancy of some detector elements and the data links at high luminosities. These upgrades after the first ten years of operation are named the Phase-II Upgrade and involve a re-design of the LHC, resulting in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). This thesis presents the work carried out in the testing of the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade electronic systems in the future strips tracker a...

  12. Removal of Cadmium(II and Lead(II ions from aqueous phase on sodic bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Stella Gaona Galindo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the adsorption of Cd2+and Pb2+ions using sodic bentonite clay type Fluidgel modified. The Fluidgelbefore and after chemical modification and thermal activation was characterized by different techniques including X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared, surface area, helium pycnometry, cation exchange capacity and scanning electron microscopy. Pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intra-particle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic curves. Equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic study indicated that lead adsorption process is endothermic and interactions between clays and solutions of lead occurred spontaneously, while cadmium adsorption revealed an exothermic and spontaneous nature. The maximum removal efficiencies were 97.62% for Cd(II using Fluidgelmodified chemically and 91.08% for lead by Fluidgel modified chemical and thermally.

  13. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, S.L.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1999-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the Yakima River.

  14. Phase II study of ACNU in non-small-cell lung cancer: EORTC study 08872

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S.Th. Planting (André); A. Ardizzoni (A.); J. Estapé (J.); G. Giaccone (Giuseppe); G.V. Scagliotti (Giorgio); T.A.W. Splinter (Ted); A. Kirkpatrick (A.); O. Dalesio (O.); J.G. Mcvie (John Gordon)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractA total of 62 patients with metastatic or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were entered in a phase II study of ACNU. Initially, the drug was given i. v. at a dose of 100 mg/m2 every 6 weeks, but due to observed haematological side effects in chemotherapy-pretreated patients,

  15. TENIPOSIDE FOR BRAIN METASTASES OF SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER - A PHASE-II STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTMUS, PE; SMIT, EF; HAAXMAREICHE, H; VANZANDWIJK, N; ARDIZZONI, A; QUOIX, E; KIRKPATRICK, A; SAHMOUD, T; GIACCONE, G

    Purpose: Here we report the results of a phase II study of teniposide, one of the most active drugs against small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), in patients with brain metastases. Patients and Methods: Patients with SCLC who presented with brain metastases at diagnosis (n = 11) or during follow-up

  16. Deconjugation Kinetics of Glucuronidated Phase II Flavonoid Metabolites by B-glucuronidase from Neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomé, R.; Haenen, G.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Bast, A.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Roos, D.; Keijer, J.; Kroon, P.A.; Needs, P.W.; Arts, I.C.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flavonoids are inactivated by phase II metabolism and occur in the body as glucuronides. Mammalian ß-glucuronidase released from neutrophils at inflammatory sites may be able to deconjugate and thus activate flavonoid glucuronides. We have studied deconjugation kinetics and pH optimum for four

  17. Deconjugation Kinetics of Glucuronidated Phase II Flavonoid Metabolites by beta-glucuronidase from Neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomé, R.; Haenen, G.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Bast, A.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Roos, D.; Keijer, J.; Kroon, P.A.; Needs, P.W.; Arts, I.C.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flavonoids are inactivated by phase II metabolism and occur in the body as glucuronides. Mammalian beta-glucuronidase released from neutrophils at inflammatory sites may be able to deconjugate and thus activate flavonoid glucuronides. We have studied deconjugation kinetics and pH optimum for four

  18. Deconjugation kinetics of glucuronidated phase II flavonoid metabolites by beta-glucuronidase from neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomé, Roger; Haenen, Guido; Hollman, C. H.; Bast, Aalt; Dagnelie, Pieter C.; Roos, Dirk; Keijer, Jaap; Kroon, Paul A.; Needs, Paul W.; Arts, Ilja C. W.

    2010-01-01

    Flavonoids are inactivated by phase II metabolism and occur in the body as glucuronides. Mammalian beta-glucuronidase released from neutrophils at inflammatory sites may be able to deconjugate and thus activate flavonoid glucuronides. We have studied deconjugation kinetics and pH optimum for four

  19. Definition of the Semisubmersible Floating System for Phase II of OC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Masciola, M.; Song, H.; Goupee, A.; Coulling, A.; Luan, C.

    2014-09-01

    Phase II of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) project involved modeling of a semisubmersible floating offshore wind system as shown below. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which were needed by the OC4 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  20. Evaluation of Phase II of the SDC/IDRC/GEH Research Matters ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Helen

    2009-05-11

    May 11, 2009 ... SDC/IDRC/GEH Research Matters Project. Final Report authors: Andrew Barnett. Christina Wille. Anna Khakee. Gareth Williams project no: 104024 ..... The Phase II RM Project appears to have been guided by the plan only in a general way. 12 ...... RM technical and financial reports over the active period.

  1. Mechanisms of toxic action of the flavonoid quercetin and its phase II metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woude, van der H.

    2006-01-01

    During and after absorption in the intestine, quercetin is extensively metabolised by the phase II biotransformation system. Because the biological activity of flavonoids is dependent on the number and position of free hydroxyl groups, a first objective of this thesis was to investigate the

  2. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per

    2013-01-01

    studies that exclusively enrolled patients with CRPC receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ie, testosterone (T) levels #50 ng/dL), this phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of ENZA monotherapy in patients who had never received hormone therapy; presenting with non-castrate T levels ($230 ng...

  3. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... design intake flow of 50 million gallons per day (MGD) or more to withdraw cooling water from waters of..., only that portion of the combined cooling water intake flow that is used by the Phase II facility to... system or using treated effluent as cooling water does not constitute use of a cooling water intake...

  4. TA 55 Reinvestment Project II Phase C Update Project Status May 23, 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, Anthony P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-25

    The TA-55 Reinvestment Project (TRP) II Phase C is a critical infrastructure project focused on improving safety and reliability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TA-55 Complex. The Project recapitalizes and revitalizes aging and obsolete facility and safety systems providing a sustainable nuclear facility for National Security Missions.

  5. Final Analysis and Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felizardo, M.; Girard, T. A.; Morlat, Thomas; Fernandes, A. C.; Ramos, A. R.; Marques, J. G.; Kling, Andreas; Puibasset, Joel; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Miley, Harry S.; Payne, Rosara F.; Carvalho, F. P.; Prudencio, M. I.; Gouveia, A.; Marques, R.

    2012-05-18

    We report the final results of the Phase II SIMPLE measurements, comprising two run stages of 15 superheated droplet detectors each, with the second stage including an improved neutron shielding. The analyses include a refined signal analysis, and revised nucleation efficiency based on a reanalysis of previously reported monochromatic neutron irradiations.

  6. LED street lighting evaluation -- phase II : LED specification and life-cycle cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Phase II of this study focused on developing a draft specification for LED luminaires to be used by IDOT : and a life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA) tool for solid state lighting technologies. The team also researched the : latest developments related to...

  7. Kilowatt isotope power system, Phase II Plan. Volume IV. Teledyne FSCD vs GDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-15

    This Volume contains Teledyne's input to the Kilowatt Isotope Power System Phase II Plan. Included is a description of the Flight System Heat Generation System, Flight System Radiator, Thermal Insulation Stability, GDS Heat Generation System and GDS Radiator.

  8. A phase II study of gemcitabine in the treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeChevalier, T; Gottfried, M; Gatzemeier, U; Shepherd, F; Weynants, P; Cottier, B; Groen, HJM; Rosso, R; Mattson, K; CortesFunes, H; Tonato, M; Burkes, RL; Voi, M; Ponzio, A

    Gemcitabine is a novel pyrimidine nucleoside whose activity has been demonstrated on solid tumors. We report here the results of a multicentre phase II trial of gemcitabine in chemonaive patients with inoperable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gemcitabine was given weekly at a dose of 1,250

  9. Life cycle and economic efficiency analysis phase II : durable pavement markings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This report details the Phase II analysis of the life cycle and economic efficiency of inlaid tape : and thermoplastic. Waterborne paint was included as a non-durable for comparison purposes : only. In order to find the most economical product for sp...

  10. Microbicide trials for preventing HIV/AIDS in South Africa: Phase II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Microbicide Division of the Department of Medical Microbiology at MEDUNSA, South Africa, recently completed a phase II expanded safety trial of the candidate microbicide Carraguard. A microbicide is a ... Mots clés: Prévention de VIH, Afrique du Sud, microbicide, défis éthiques dans des épreuves de microbicide ...

  11. Human Rights and Peace Audit on Partition in South Asia - Phase II ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    3 févr. 2009 ... Human Rights and Peace Audit on Partition in South Asia - Phase II. In South Asia, people's social, political and cultural aspirations often get articulated as movements for territorially defined political change. Very often, these movements find resolution in partition or in an ethnic group/nationality getting ...

  12. Paclitaxel for malignant pleural mesothelioma : A phase II study of the EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanMeerbeeck, J; Debruyne, C; vanZandwijk, N; Postmus, PE; Pennucci, MC; vanBreukelen, F; Galdermans, D; Groen, H; Pinson, P; vanGlabbeke, M; vanMarck, E; Giaccone, G

    The EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group undertook a phase II study of paclitaxel in 25 chemotherapy-naive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Paclitaxel was given intravenously at a dose of 200 mg m(-2), as a 3 h infusion every 3 weeks, after standard premedication with corticosteroids and

  13. A phase II study of gemcitabine in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meerbeeck, JP; Bass, P; Debruyne, C; Groen, HJ; Manegold, C; Ardizzoni, A; Gridelli, C; van Marck, EA; Lentz, M; Giaccone, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND, Gemcitabine has shown activity in patients with less chemosensitive solid tumors. Phase II screening of novel drugs is an accepted method with which to investigate new therapies in malignant mesothelioma. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Lung Cancer

  14. Etoposide in malignant pleural mesothelioma : Two phase II trials of the EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahmoud, T; Postmus, PE; van Pottelsberghe, C; Mattson, K; Tammilehto, L; Splinter, TAW; Planting, AST; Sutedja, T; van Pawel, J; van Zandwijk, N; Baas, P; Roozendaal, KJ; Schrijver, M; Kirkpatrick, A; Van Glabbeke, M; Ardizzoni, A; Giaccone, G

    1997-01-01

    Intravenous and oral etoposide (VP 16-213) were tested in two sequential phase II trials in chemotherapy-naive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. In the first trial, etoposide was given intravenously (i.v.) at a dose of 150 mg/m(2) on days 1, 3 and 5 every 3 weeks. The second trial

  15. Phase II de Prospera Digital : Inclusion financière des femmes à ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Phase II de Prospera Digital : Inclusion financière des femmes à faible revenu au Mexique. Les transferts monétaires conditionnels constituent un nouvel outil prometteur de lutte contre la pauvreté, qui permet de verser une allocation aux plus démunis s'ils remplissent certaines conditions, par exemple, en veillant à ce que ...

  16. Prospera Digital Phase II: Financial inclusion for low-income women ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Prospera Digital Phase II: Financial inclusion for low-income women in Mexico. Conditional cash transfers are a promising new anti-poverty device that give stipends to the poorest if they meet certain conditions, such as their children attending school. Prospera in Mexico was one of the first conditional cash transfer ...

  17. Silicon Sensor Prototypes for the Phase II Upgrade of the CMS Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068606

    2015-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) has been identified as the highest priority program in High Energy Physics in the mid-term future. It will provide the experiments an additional integrated luminosity of about 2500 fb$^{−1}$ over 10 years of operation, starting in 2025. In order to meet the experimental challenges of unprecedented p–p luminosity, especially in terms of radiation levels and occupancy, the CMS collaboration will need to replace its entire strip tracker by a new one. In this paper the baseline layout option for this new Phase-II tracker is shown, together with two variants using a tilted barrel geometry or larger modules from 8-inch silicon wafers. Moreover, the two module concepts are discussed, which consist either of two strip sensors (2S) or of one strip and one pixel sensor (PS). These two designs allow $p_{T}$ discrimination at module level enabling the tracker to contribute to the L1 trigger decision. The paper presents testing results of the macro-pixel-light sensor for the PS module...

  18. ONKALO POSE experiment. Phase 3: execution and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valli, J. [Poeyry Finland Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Hakala, M. [KMS-Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Wanne, T. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Kantia, P. [Geofcon Oy, Rovaniemi (Finland); Siren, T.

    2014-01-15

    In-depth knowledge of the in situ stress state at the Olkiluoto site is critical for stability assessment both prior to and after deposition of spent nuclear fuel in order to understand and avoid potential damage to the rock at the site. Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment (POSE) was designed specifically for this purpose with three primary goals: establish the in situ spalling/damage strength of Olkiluoto migmatitic gneiss, establish the state of in situ stress at the -345 m depth level and act as a Prediction-Outcome (P-O) exercise. Phases 1 and 2 of POSE are outlined in WR 2012-60. The objectives of the third phase of the POSE experiment are the same as the original objectives outlined above. This report outlines the execution and results of the third phase of the POSE experiment. The third phase of the experiment involved internally heating the third experimental hole (ONK-EH3) of the POSE niche in order to cause a symmetrical thermal stress increase around the hole due to the thermal expansion of rock. This thermomechanically induced stress increase, coupled with the estimated existing in situ stress state, should cause the maximum principal stress around the hole to exceed the predicted spalling strength of the rock around the hole. ONK-EH3 is located almost completely in pegmatitic granite. Four fractures near the top of the hole were mapped after boring ONK-EH3, and a tensile failure located at the contact between mica-rich gneiss and pegmatitic granite was observed 18 months after boring, prior to the experiment. Based on predictive calculations and the estimated in situ state of stress, the maximum principal stress magnitude should reach ca. 100 MPa when the temperature was just below 100 deg C after 12 weeks of heating. There were problems with the heater control unit at the beginning of the experiment, after which heating proceeded according to plan. The crack damage threshold of pegmatitic granite has been determined to be 85 ±17 MPa at

  19. Crystal structure of the monoclinic phase (phase IV of bis(tetramethylammonium tetrachloridocuprate(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgui Awa Seck

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the low-temperature monoclinic phase of the title compound, [(CH34N]2[CuCl4], was determined at 120 K. The structure of the room-temperature phase has been determined in the orthorhombic space group Pmcm [Morosin & Lingafelter (1961. J. Phys. Chem. 50–51; Clay et al. (1975. Acta Cryst. B31 289–290]. The asymmetric unit consists of one discrete tetrachloridocuprate anion with a distorted tetrahedral geometry and two tetramethylammonium cations. In the crystal, the cations and the anions are linked via weak C—H...Cl hydrogen bonds.

  20. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II. Shallow Plus Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, K. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Parker, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Martin, E. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Chasar, D. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States); Amos, B. [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013.

  1. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  2. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  3. phase II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Thermodynamic structure of the marine atmosphere in the region between 80 and 87◦E along. 13◦N over the Bay of Bengal was studied using 13 high resolution radiosonde profiles from sur- face −400 hPa collected onboard ORV Sagar Kanya during the period 27th – 30th August, during. BOBMEX-99. Saturation point ...

  4. The extraction of Zn(II in aqueous PEG (1550 – (NH42SO4 two-phase system using Cl– ions as extracting agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUMITRU BULGARIU

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of Zn(II in an aqueous PEG (1550 – (NH42SO4 two-phase system as a function of several experimental parameters was studied. PEG-based aqueous two-phase systems are composed of two immiscible phases: a polymer-rich phase and a salt-rich phase, which can be used for extraction experiments. In the absence of a suitable extracting agent, for the system consisting of a mixture of equal volumes of 40 mass% PEG and 40 mass% (NH42SO4 aqueous solutions, Zn(II remained predominantly in the salt-rich phase. Variation of the pH of the salt stock solution did not change very much the extraction efficiency. By adding chloride ions, an enhancement of the Zn(II extraction was observed. The Zn(II extraction efficiency in presence of Cl- depends on the acidity of the salt stock solution and on the concentration of chloride ions added into the system.

  5. 77 FR 23228 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program-Phase II...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... Public Law 106-554, the ``Small Business Reauthorization Act of 2000, H.R. 5667'' enacted on December 21... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program--Phase II--Grant Application Package SUMMARY: This application package invites small business concerns to submit a Phase II...

  6. Entdeckung elektroschwacher Produktion einzelner Top-Quarks mit dem CDF II Experiment; Discovery electroweak production of single top quarks with the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, Jan [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a neural network search for combined as well as separate s- and t-channel single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron using 3.2 fb-1 of collision data. It is the twelfth thesis dealing with single top-quark production performed within the CDF Collaboration, whereas three have been done in Run I [53–55] and eight in Run II [23, 25, 28, 39, 56–59].

  7. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Novel therapies for resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FONT phase II clinical trial: study design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Melanie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lack of adequate randomized clinical trials (RCT has hindered identification of new therapies that are safe and effective for patients with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, especially in patients who fail to respond to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapies. Recent basic science advances have led to development of alternative treatments that specifically target aberrant pathways of fibrosis which are relevant to disease progression in FSGS. There is a need for a flexible Phase II study design which will test such novel antifibrotic strategies in order to identify agents suitable for phase III testing. Methods/Design The Novel Therapies for Resistant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FONT project is a multicenter Phase I/II RCT designed to investigate the potential efficacy of novel therapies for resistant FSGS. Adalimumab and galactose will be evaluated against conservative therapy consisting of the combination of lisinopril, losartan and atorvastatin. The sample size is defined to assure that if one of the treatments has a superior response rate compared to that of the other treatments, it will be selected with high probability for further evaluation. Comparison of primary and secondary endpoints in each study arm will enable a choice to be made of which treatments are worthy of further study in future Phase III RCT. Discussion This report highlights the key features of the FONT II RCT including the two-step outcome analysis that will expedite achievement of the study objectives. The proposed phase II study design will help to identify promising agents for further testing while excluding ineffective agents. This staged approach can help to prevent large expenditures on unworthy therapeutic agents in the management of serious but rare kidney diseases Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00814255

  9. Functional design criteria for Project W-252, Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, C.E.

    1994-11-10

    This document provides the functional design criteria required for the Phase 2 Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Project, Project W-252. Project W-252 shall provide new facilities and existing facility modifications required to implement Best Available Technology/All Known, Available, and Reasonable Methods of Prevention, Control, and Treatment (BAT/AKART) for the 200 East Phase II Liquid Effluent Streams. The project will also provide a 200 East Area Phase II Effluent Collection System (PTECS) for connection to a disposal system for relevant effluent streams to which BAT/AKART has been applied. Liquid wastestreams generated in the 200 East Area are currently discharged to the soil column. Included in these wastestreams are cooling water, steam condensate, raw water, and sanitary wastewaters. It is the policy of the DOE that the use of soil columns to treat and retain radionuclides and nonradioactive contaminants be discontinued at the earliest practical time in favor of wastewater treatment and waste minimization. In 1989, the DOE entered into an interagency agreement with Ecology and EPA. This agreement is referred to as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Project W-252 is one of the projects required to achieve the milestones set forth in the Tri-Party Agreement. One of the milestones requires BAT/AKART implementation for Phase II streams by October 1997. This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document provides the technical baseline required to initiate Project W-252 to meet the Tri-Party Agreement milestone for the application of BAT/AKART to the Phase II effluents.

  10. The FIGARO II experiment - A general outline of the mission and the principal scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, E.; Matt, G.; Agrinier, B.; Parlier, B.; Barouch, E.; Christy, J. C.; Comte, R.; Sacco, B.; Scarsi, L.; Mineo, T.

    1992-10-01

    The FIGARO II (French Italian Gamma-Ray Observatory) experiment has been launched successfully three times: in July 1986 from Milo (Trapani), in November 1988 from Charleville (Australia) and in July 1990 again from Milo. In the first flight the observational program was limited to the Crab pulsar PSR0531 + 21 only because of a telemetry failure: the high sensitivity of FIGARO II allowed an accurate study of the pulse shape as well as a phase-resolved spectroscopy. It was also possible to evaluate the dispersion measure of the Crab pulsar at the flight date from the time delay between gamma-ray and radio pulses. The major results of the second flight were a stringent upper limit to the low-energy gamma-ray flux from PSR 0833-45 (Vela pulsar) - well below the detection claimed by the UCR group - and the observation of a strong emission in the 0.511 MeV annihilation line from the inner region of our Galaxy. The data acquired in the third flight are still under analysis, but preliminary results suggest changes in the shape of the pulse profile.

  11. Hardening in Two-Phase Materials. II. Plastic Strain and Mean Stress Hardening Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans

    1977-01-01

    The strain parameters which are relevant in a tensile experiment, are analysed and related to the geometry of deformation and to the mean stress of two-phase materials. The hardening rate of the mean stress with respect to plastic strain is found to be useful in comparison between experiments...

  12. Phase III (and maybe IV of the SIMPLE dark matter search experiment at the LSBB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girard T.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available with the recent conclusion of Phase II, SIMPLE has ended its use of Superheated Droplet Detectors (SDD in the WIMP search effort. An in-progress Phase III comprises a transition to larger mass bubble chamber technology, using many of the lessons gained from the previous phase since the underlying physics is identical. We describe the progress of the activities, to include several ∼1 kg prototype chambers, each 4× the total Phase II active mass, which are undergoing testing, prior to a rescaling to a 50 kg capacity within a Phase IV modular 1 ton detector for a definitive astroparticle search effort.

  13. Effect of timing on the outcomes of 1-phase nonextraction therapy of Class II malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Kim, Ludia H

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this cephalometric study was to evaluate the role of timing in relation to skeletal maturity on the outcomes of nonextraction comprehensive Class II therapy. Three samples of patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion were treated with headgear combined with fixed appliances and Class II elastics. Lateral cephalograms were taken of all subjects before therapy (T1) and at an average interval of 6 months after therapy (T2). The first sample (23 subjects) was treated before the pubertal growth spurt, the second sample (24 subjects) received therapy during the pubertal growth spurt, and the third sample (13 subjects) was treated at a postpubertal stage of development. The average T1 to T2 interval was approximately 30 months for all patients, with an average treatment duration of 24 months. Longitudinal observations of a group of 17 subjects with untreated Class II malocclusions were compared with the treated groups at the 3 skeletal maturation intervals with nonparametric statistics. Class II treatment before or during the pubertal growth spurt induced significant favorable skeletal changes (restricted maxillary advancement in prepubertal patients and enhanced mandibular growth in pubertal patients). Patients treated after the pubertal growth spurt had only significant dentoalveolar changes. The greatest amount of dentoskeletal correction of Class II malocclusion with 1-phase nonextraction treatment occurred in patients treated during the pubertal growth spurt.

  14. Solid Phase Extraction of Trace Copper(II Using Modified Nano Polyacrylonitrile Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moghimi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple method has been developed for the preconcentration of copper(II based on the adsorption of its Modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber. Modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber (PANF was prepared by adding of acrylic fibers to mSethanolamine (MMA with different concentration solutions. The stability of a chemically Modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber especially in concentrated hydrochloric acid which was then used as a recycling and pre-concentration reagent for further uses of modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber. The application of this Modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber for sorption of a series of metal ions was performed by using different controlling factors such as the pH of metal ion solution and the equilibration shaking time by the static technique. Cu (II was found to exhibit the highest affinity towards extraction by these Modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber phases. The pronounced selectivity was also confirmed from the determined distribution coefficient (Kd of all the metal ions, showing the highest value reported for Cu (II to occur by Modified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber. The potential applications ofModified nano polyacrylonitrile fiber for selective extraction of Cu(II to occur from aqueous solution were successfully accomplished as well as pre- concentration of low concentration of Cu(II (60 pg ml-1 from natural tap water with a pre-concentration factor of 100 for Cu(II off-line analysis by flame atomic absorption analysis.

  15. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium (II) biosorption by Dried Biomass Aphanothece sp. from aqueous phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awalina; Harimawan, A.; Haryani, G. S.; Setiadi, T.

    2017-05-01

    The Biosorption of cadmium (II) ions on dried biomass of Aphanothece sp.which previously grown in a photobioreactor system with atmospheric carbon dioxide fed input, was studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, biomass concentration, contact time, and temperature. The biomass exhibited the highest cadmium (II) uptake capacity at 30ºC, initial pH of 8.0±0.2 in 60 minute and initial cadmium (II) ion concentration of 7.76 mg/L. Maximum biosorption capacities were 16.47 mg/g, 54.95 mg/g and 119.05 mg/g at range of initial cadmium (II) 0.96-3.63 mg/L, 1.99-8.10 mg/L and 6.48-54.38 mg/L, respectively. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second order model while equilibrium is best described by Langmuir isotherm model. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameter process (free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change). FTIR analysis of microalgae biomass revealed the presence of amino acids, carboxyl, hydroxyl, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles, the ratio of Cd (II) desorption to biosorption decreased from 81% (at first cycle) to only 27% (at the third cycle). Nevertheless, due to its higher biosorption capability than other adsorbent, Aphanothece sp appears to be a good biosorbent for removing metal Cd (II) ions from aqueous phase.

  16. Dynamical phase separation using a microfluidic device: experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, Benjamin; Vaes, Urbain; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Pradas, Marc; Gavriilidis, Asterios; Kalliadasis, Serafim; Complex Multiscale Systems Team

    2017-11-01

    We study the dynamical phase separation of a binary fluid by a microfluidic device both from the experimental and from the modeling points of view. The experimental device consists of a main channel (600 μm wide) leading into an array of 276 trapezoidal capillaries of 5 μm width arranged on both sides and separating the lateral channels from the main channel. Due to geometrical effects as well as wetting properties of the substrate, and under well chosen pressure boundary conditions, a multiphase flow introduced into the main channel gets separated at the capillaries. Understanding this dynamics via modeling and numerical simulation is a crucial step in designing future efficient micro-separators. We propose a diffuse-interface model, based on the classical Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes system, with a new nonlinear mobility and new wetting boundary conditions. We also propose a novel numerical method using a finite-element approach, together with an adaptive mesh refinement strategy. The complex geometry is captured using the same computer-aided design files as the ones adopted in the fabrication of the actual device. Numerical simulations reveal a very good qualitative agreement between model and experiments, demonstrating also a clear separation of phases.

  17. Tracking Gas Phase Composition in Oil evaporation and Oxidation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador-Muñoz, O.; Zhang, H.; Misztal, P. K.; Worton, D.; Drozd, G.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Primary Organic Aerosol (POA) is emitted directly by anthropogenic or natural sources, whereas Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) is formed in the atmosphere through chemical reactions that result from conversion of more volatile species into lower volatility oxidized products and their subsequent condensation to the particulate phase. We studied SOA formation from evaporation of Macondo crude oil (MC 252) using a wind tunnel coupled to a flow tube oxidation reactor. Ozone, UV lights, and water vapor were used to make OH radicals. Organic compounds in the gas phase, both those evaporated from the wind tunnel and those formed in the flow tube oxidation experiments, were monitored using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-qMS and PTR-TOF-MS). We observed approximately 400 different species. Compounds with less than C10 were mostly evaporated in the first 5 hours when maximum SOA formation was also obtained. Hydrocarbons with carbon number (11-14) were still present in the oil after 12 h of continuous evaporation at wind speed of 2 m s-1. We will show the implications of these results for the production of SOA related to the range of evaporated chemical size and reactivity.

  18. GEM Detectors for the DarkLight Phase-1 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Prem Nazeer, Sahara Jesmin; DarkLight Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The DarkLight experiment has been proposed to search for a heavy photon A' in the mass range of 10-100 MeV/c2 produced in electron-proton collisions. Phase-I of DarkLight has started to take place in 2016 at the Low Energy Recirculator Facility (LERF) at Jefferson Lab. LERF delivered a 100 MeV electron beam onto a windowless hydrogen gas target. The phase-I detector tracks leptons inside the DarkLight solenoid with a set of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, combined with segmented scintillators for triggering. The GEM telescope consists of four 10 × 10 cm2 triple layer GEM chambers with 2D readout strips, mounted in a slightly angled fixed frame about 12 cm tall. The GEM data are read out with analog pipeline front-end cards (APV-25) each of which can process 128 readout channels. Each GEM chamber has 250 channels for each coordinate axis, read out with two APVs on each side, resulting in 2000 readout channels for the GEM stack, processed by 16 APVs. One Multi Purpose Digitizer (MPD) module is used to read out all of the 16 APV-25 cards. Details of the design and the readout of the GEM detectors will be presented, as well as discussion of their performance in the August run. This work has been supported by NSF PHY-1436680 and PHY-1505934.

  19. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Power System, Phase II Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Gary; Stanley, John

    2016-01-01

    In Phase II, the manufacture and testing of two 6-kW(sub e)Stirling engines was completed. The engines were delivered in an opposed 12-kW(sub e) arrangement with a common expansion space heater head. As described in the Phase I report, the engines were designed to be sealed both hermetically and with a bolted O-ring seal. The completed Phase II convertor is in the bolted configuration to allow future disassembly. By the end of Phase II, the convertor had passed all of the final testing requirements in preparation for delivery to the NASA Glenn Research Center. The electronic controller also was fabricated and tested during Phase II. The controller sets both piston amplitudes and maintains the phasing between them. It also sets the operating frequency of the machine. Details of the controller are described in the Phase I final report. Fabrication of the direct-current to direct-current (DC-DC) output stage, which would have stepped down the main controller output voltage from 700 to 120 V(sub DC), was omitted from this phase of the project for budgetary reasons. However, the main controller was successfully built, tested with the engines, and delivered. We experienced very few development issues with this high-power controller. The project extended significantly longer than originally planned because of yearly funding delays. The team also experienced several hardware difficulties along the development path. Most of these were related to the different thermal expansions of adjacent parts constructed of different materials. This issue was made worse by the large size of the machine. Thermal expansion problems also caused difficulties in the brazing of the opposed stainless steel sodium-potassium (NaK) heater head. Despite repeated attempts Sunpower was not able to successfully braze the opposed head under this project. Near the end of the project, Glenn fabricated an opposed Inconel NaK head, which was installed prior to delivery for testing at Glenn. Engine

  20. Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E.; SCHMIDT,C.O.

    1999-10-01

    This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.

  1. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio Argos, Fernando; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor (TilePPr) demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) Demonstrator Project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived for receiving and processing the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as for configuring it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  2. Unmanned Systems: A Lab Based Robotic Arm for Grasping Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Leap Motion Controller RML Robotic Manipulation Laboratory SDK Software Development Kit USB Universal Serial Bus xvi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY...Department has implemented a robotic manipulation laboratory (RML) to explore learning opportunities for student lab experiments [4]. To date an intuitive... manipulating objects with precision. 3 II. THEORY In this chapter, we will look at the fundamental physics that govern our

  3. The first preparative solution phase synthesis of melanotan II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Melanotan II is a synthetic cyclic heptapeptide used to prevent a sunlight-induced skin cancer by stimulating the skin tanning process. In this paper we report the first solution phase synthesis of the title compound. The hexapeptide sequence has been assembled by [(2+2+1+1] scheme. After removing the orthogonal protection, a carbodiimide mediated lactamization, involving the ε-amino group of lysine and γ-carboxy group of aspartic acid, led to a cyclic intermediate. Appending N-acetylnorleucine concluded the assembly of melanotan II molecule. Protection of the lateral groups in arginine and tryptophan was omitted for atom and step economy reasons. The total synthesis of melanotan II was accomplished in 12 steps with 2.6% overall yield, affording >90% pure peptide without using preparative chromatography.

  4. Influence of testosterone on phase II metabolism and availability of soy isoflavones in male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Sebastian T; Müller, Dennis R; Kurrat, Anne; Diel, Patrick; Kulling, Sabine E

    2017-04-01

    Genistein and daidzein are the main isoflavones in soy. Their potential beneficial or adverse effects in males like the prevention of prostate cancer or the impact on reproductive functions are controversially discussed. Major determinants of their bioactivity are the absorption and biotransformation of isoflavones. In this study, we focused on the influence of testosterone on plasma availability and phase II metabolism of isoflavones. Male Wistar rats, receiving an isoflavones rich diet, were randomized into three groups: Two groups were orchiectomized (ORX) at postnatal day (PND) 80 and treated for 11 days with testosterone propionate (TP) (ORX TP group) or a vehicle (ORX group) after a 7 days lasting hormonal decline. The third group served as control and remained intact. Rats were sacrificed at PND 98. ORX rats had reduced isoflavones plasma levels. Differently regulated mRNA expressions of transporters relevant for transport of phase II metabolites in liver and kidney may be responsible for this reduction, more precisely Slc10a1 and Slc21a1 in kidney as well as Slc22a8 in liver. While main phase II metabolites in intact rats were disulfates and sulfoglucuronides, the amount of sulfate conjugates was significantly diminished by ORX. In accordance with that, mRNA expression of different sulfotransferases was reduced in liver by ORX. The observed effects could be almost restored by TP treatment. In conclusion, testosterone, and likely further androgens, has a huge impact on phase II metabolism and availability of isoflavones by influencing the expression of different sulfotransferases and transporters.

  5. Réforme des budgets publics en Chine - phase II | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Réforme des budgets publics en Chine - phase II. Le gouvernement chinois a lancé récemment une série de réformes visant à rendre l'élaboration des budgets publics plus conforme aux principes de transparence et de reddition de comptes, grâce à une surveillance accrue et à la participation des citoyens. Dans le ...

  6. Réseau africain de recherche sur la justice transitoire - phase II ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... la personne en Afrique. La phase II accroîtra la capacité des chercheurs qui se consacrent à la justice transitoire par l'entremise de diverses activités, dont des réunions régionales et une formation pratique sur le terrain. Elle aura également pour but d'élargir le réseau afin d'y intégrer davantage de partenaires africains.

  7. Development and Testing of a Jet Assisted Polycrystalline Diamond Drilling Bit. Phase II Development Efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David S. Pixton

    1999-09-20

    Phase II efforts to develop a jet-assisted rotary-percussion drill bit are discussed. Key developments under this contract include: (1) a design for a more robust polycrystalline diamond drag cutter; (2) a new drilling mechanism which improves penetration and life of cutters; and (3) a means of creating a high-pressure mud jet inside of a percussion drill bit. Field tests of the new drill bit and the new robust cutter are forthcoming.

  8. An adaptive design for phase II non-oncology dose selection clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    A non-oncology dose selection phase II trial tests multiple active doses in a controlled fashion, and it not only needs to determine whether the treatment is effective but also to select the 'lowest efficacious' dose if the treatment is indeed efficacious. Few approaches exist in the literature for designing phase II non-oncology dose selection trials, and the standard design with a fixed sample size has been widely used. The objective of this study was to develop a more efficient design for phase II dose selection trials that terminates the trial early for futility and adjusts the sample size and number of doses at interim analyses when appropriate. One-sided statistical tests and confidence intervals were used to develop an adaptive design for non-oncology phase II dose selection trials. With several interim analyses built in, the adaptive design uses accumulated data to determine, at each interim analysis, whether the highest dose is efficacious and whether the low doses are as efficacious as the highest dose. Once a confident answer to either or both of these questions can be obtained, the trial may either be terminated early or some of the lower doses may be dropped to prevent assigning more patients to inferior doses and thus reduce the total sample size needed. Theoretical analyses and simulation studies show that the proposed adaptive design significantly outperforms the standard design with a fixed sample size. The proposed adaptive design should be preferred over the standard design especially in cases where enrolment is slow and efficacy can be measured after a relatively short period of time.

  9. Noncollinear parametric amplification in the near-infrared based on type-II phase matching

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Christian; Bühler, Johannes; Heinrich, Alexander-Cornelius; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Brida, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Noncollinear parametric amplification based on type-II phase matching for the generation of ultrabroadband and tunable spectra in the near infrared is investigated. In a noncollinear geometry the group velocity matching condition between signal and idler can be obtained in frequently used crystals such as β-barium borate (BBO) even for wavelengths fully located in the anomalous dispersion region. The extremely broadband operation, peculiar tuning possibilities and straightforward experimental...

  10. An unusual zig-zag 1D copper(ii) coordination polymer displaying magnetic phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Bao-Hong; Lu, Lu; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Sakiyama, Hiroshi; Kumar, Abhinav

    2017-11-14

    An unusual Cu(ii) coordination polymer [Cu(Him)2(L)] (1) having a 4,4'-{[1,2-phenylene bis-(methylene)]bis(oxy)}dibenzoic acid ligand and an imidazole ligand possessing a 1D zig-zag chain was constructed and its magnetic behaviour was investigated, which indicated a magnetic phase transition below 25 K as well as long-range magnetic ordering.

  11. On the Use of the K-Chart for Phase II Monitoring of Simple Linear Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Gani, Walid; Limam, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Control charts for monitoring linear profiles are used to control quality processes which are characterized by a relationship between a response variable and one or more explanatory variables. In the literature, the majority of control charts deal with phase II analysis of linear profiles, where the objective is to assess the performance of control charts in detecting shifts in the parameters of linear profiles. Recently, the kernel distance-based multivariate control chart, also known as the...

  12. Aerosols at the Poles: An AeroCom Phase II Multi-Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, M.; Samset, B. H.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic and natural sources reach the Polar Regions through long-range transport. By scattering and absorbing solar radiation, aerosols perturb the energy balance in the region and may have played a significant role in recent Arctic warming. Aerosols in Polar regions are however, poorly constrained in present day global climate models. Here we compare aerosol burdens from simulations with 16 global aerosol models from the Aerocom phase II model inter-comparison project with available observations at both Poles. We show that the annual mean multi-model median Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is not a bad representation of the measured AOD in Arctic, even though the model spread is large. The models tend to underestimate the spring maximum and overestimate the summer/autumn minimum. We also document the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of aerosol burdens and shortwave anthropogenic direct radiative forcing (DRF) of the total aerosol and the individual aerosol species; black carbon (BC), sulfate, and primary organic aerosols from fossil/bio fuel and biomass burning, dust and sea-salt. A subset of models has also reported nitrate and secondary organic aerosols. The models produce an annual mean median AOD 0.07 in the Arctic and 0.01 the Antarctic. The Arctic modeled annual mean DRF is slightly negative -0.12 Wm-2, dominated by a positive black carbon DRF during spring and a negative sulfate DRF during summer. We perform sensitivity experiments with one of the Aerocom models (GISS modelE) to investigate how regional emissions of BC and sulfate and the lifetime of BC influence the Arctic and Antarctic aerosol burdens.

  13. Murine Alveolar Macrophages Are Highly Susceptible to Replication of Coxiella burnetii Phase II In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Talita D.; Cunha, Larissa D.; Ribeiro, Juliana M.; Massis, Liliana M.; Lima-Junior, Djalma S.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes Q fever in humans. Q fever is an atypical pneumonia transmitted through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In mammalian lungs, C. burnetii infects and replicates in several cell types, including alveolar macrophages (AMs). The innate immunity and signaling pathways operating during infection are still poorly understood, in part because of the lack of relevant host cell models for infection in vitro. In the study described here, we investigated and characterized the infection of primary murine AMs by C. burnetii phase II in vitro. Our data reveal that AMs show a pronounced M2 polarization and are highly permissive to C. burnetii multiplication in vitro. Murine AMs present an increased susceptibility to infection in comparison to primary bone marrow-derived macrophages. AMs support more than 2 logs of bacterial replication during 12 days of infection in culture, similar to highly susceptible host cells, such as Vero and THP-1 cells. As a proof of principle that AMs are useful for investigation of C. burnetii replication, we performed experiments with AMs from Nos2−/− or Ifng−/− mice. In the absence of gamma interferon and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2), AMs were significantly more permissive than wild-type cells. In contrast, AMs from Il4−/− mice were more restrictive to C. burnetii replication, supporting the importance of M2 polarization for the permissiveness of AMs to C. burnetii replication. Collectively, our data account for understanding the high susceptibility of alveolar macrophages to bacterial replication and support the use of AMs as a relevant model of C. burnetii growth in primary macrophages. PMID:27297388

  14. Experiments on Quantum Hall Topological Phases in Ultra Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Rui-Rui [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2015-02-14

    This project is to cool electrons in semiconductors to extremely low temperatures and to study new states of matter formed by low-dimensional electrons (or holes). At such low temperatures (and with an intense magnetic field), electronic behavior differs completely from ordinary ones observed at room temperatures or regular low temperature. Studies of electrons at such low temperatures would open the door for fundamental discoveries in condensed matter physics. Present studies have been focused on topological phases in the fractional quantum Hall effect in GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor heterostructures, and the newly discovered (by this group) quantum spin Hall effect in InAs/GaSb materials. This project consists of the following components: 1) Development of efficient sample cooling techniques and electron thermometry: Our goal is to reach 1 mK electron temperature and reasonable determination of electron temperature; 2) Experiments at ultra-low temperatures: Our goal is to understand the energy scale of competing quantum phases, by measuring the temperature-dependence of transport features. Focus will be placed on such issues as the energy gap of the 5/2 state, and those of 12/5 (and possible 13/5); resistive signature of instability near 1/2 at ultra-low temperatures; 3) Measurement of the 5/2 gaps in the limit of small or large Zeeman energies: Our goal is to gain physics insight of 5/2 state at limiting experimental parameters, especially those properties concerning the spin polarization; 4) Experiments on tuning the electron-electron interaction in a screened quantum Hall system: Our goal is to gain understanding of the formation of paired fractional quantum Hall state as the interaction pseudo-potential is being modified by a nearby screening electron layer; 5) Experiments on the quantized helical edge states under a strong magnetic field and ultralow temperatures: our goal is to investigate both the bulk and edge states in a quantum spin Hall insulator under

  15. Loetschberg low-level tunnel: thermal use of tunnel water at the south portal - Feasibility study, phase II; Waermenutzung Tunnelwasser Basistunnel Loetschberg, Suedportal. Machbarkeitsstudie Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dups, Ch.

    2004-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the results obtained from phase II of a feasibility study on the thermal use of drainage water from the Loetschberg basis railway tunnel under the Swiss Alps. The potential for the use of the drainage water is discussed and the possible use of the heat in the industrial estates in Raron and Niedergesteln is looked at. The report recommends the further investigation of the use of the water as a source of heat for heat-pumps and its treatment for further use as drinking water. Other possible uses examined include the heating of greenhouses, in fish farms, as a water supply for a gravel and concrete works and for keeping local roads and motorways frost-free.

  16. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  17. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Myhre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC and organic aerosols (OA from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA. The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from −0.58 to −0.02 Wm−2, with a mean of −0.27 Wm−2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of −0.35 Wm−2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006 we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive BC RF to also have strong (negative sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC, and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  18. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) - II Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, J.W.

    2009-10-01

    LBNL has received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to construct a new accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to significantly increase the energy on target, which will allow both the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) and Warm Dense Matter (WDM) research communities to explore scientific conditions that have not been available in any other device. For NDCX-II, a new induction linear accelerator (linac) will be constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). NDCX-II will produce nano-second long ion beam bunches to hit thin foil targets. The final kinetic energy of the ions arriving at the target varies according to the ion mass. For atomic mass unit of 6 or 7 (Lithium ions), useful kinetic energies range from 1.5 to 5 or more MeV. The expected beam charge in the 1 ns (or shorter) pulse is about 20 nanoCoulombs. The pulse repetition rate will be about once or twice per minute (of course, target considerations will often reduce this rate). Our approach to building the NDCX-II ion accelerator is to make use of the available induction modules and 200 kV pulsers from the retired ATA electron linac at LLNL. Reusing this hardware will maximize the ion energy on target at a minimum cost. Some modification of the cells (e.g., reduce the bore diameter and replace with higher field pulsed solenoids) are needed in order to meet the requirements of this project. The NDCX-II project will include the following tasks: (1) Physics design to determine the required ion current density at the ion source, the injector beam optics, the layout of accelerator cells along the beam line, the voltage waveforms for beam acceleration and compression, the solenoid focusing, the neutralized drift compression and the final focus on target; (2) Engineering design and fabrication of the accelerator components, pulsed power system, diagnostic system, and control and data acquisition system; (3) Conventional facilities; and (4) Installation and integration

  19. In vivo induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, glutathione transferase and quinone reductase by citrus triterpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hassan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cell culture and animal studies demonstrated that citrus bioactive compounds have protective effects against certain types of cancer. Among several classes of citrus bioactive compounds, limonoids were reported to prevent different types of cancer. Furthermore, the structures of citrus limonoids were reported to influence the activity of phase II detoxifying enzymes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how variations in the structures of citrus limonoids (namely nomilin, deacetyl nomilin, and isoobacunoic acid and a mixture of limonoids would influence phase II enzyme activity in excised tissues from a mouse model. Methods In the current study, defatted sour orange seed powder was extracted with ethyl acetate and subjected to silica gel chromatography. The HPLC, NMR and mass spectra were used to elucidate the purity and structure of compounds. Female A/J mice were treated with three limonoids and a mixture in order to evaluate their effect on phase II enzymes in four different tissues. Assays for glutathione S-transferase and NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR were used to evaluate induction of phase II enzymatic activity. Results The highest induction of GST against 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB was observed in stomach (whole, 58% by nomilin, followed by 25% isoobacunoic acid and 19% deacetyl nomilin. Deacetyl nomilin in intestine (small as well as liver significantly reduced GST activity against CDNB. Additionally isoobacunoic acid and the limonoid mixture in liver demonstrated a significant reduction of GST activity against CDNB. Nomilin significantly induced GST activity against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO, intestine (280% and stomach (75% while deacetyl nomilin showed significant induction only in intestine (73%. Induction of GST activity was also observed in intestine (93% and stomach (45% treated with the limonoid mixture. Finally, a significant induction of NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR activity was

  20. Phase II Trial of Angiotensin-(1-7) for the Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Paul D; Lovato, James; Brosnihan, K Bridget; Miller, Antonius A; Petty, W Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] is an endogenous antiangiogenic hormone with anticancer activity. In a phase I study of Ang-(1-7), two of three patients with metastatic sarcoma experienced disease stabilization. This phase II study examined clinical and biomarker outcomes for patients with metastatic sarcoma. Methods. Ang-(1-7) was administered by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 20 mg daily. If excessive toxicities occurred in the first cohort, a dose deescalation cohort was allowed. Blood samples were obtained to measure changes in biomarkers. Results. Treatment was well-tolerated and the dose deescalation cohort was not required. Plasma PlGF concentrations following treatment were not statistically significantly changed. A significant increase in plasma Ang-(1-7) was observed at 4 hours after injection. The median progression-free survival was 2.7 months (95% CI; 1.4 to 4.1 months), and the median overall survival was 10.2 months (95% CI; 5.3 to 18.3 months). Two patients with vascular sarcomas demonstrated prolonged disease stabilization of 10 months (hemangiopericytoma) and 19 months (epithelioid hemangioendothelioma). Conclusions. Ang-(1-7) at a dose of 20 mg daily was well-tolerated. This prospective phase II study failed to confirm the PlGF biomarker effect identified in the prior phase I study. Prolonged disease stabilization in hemangiopericytoma and epithelioid hemangioendothelioma may warrant further investigation.

  1. Phase II Trial of Angiotensin-(1-7 for the Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Savage

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7] is an endogenous antiangiogenic hormone with anticancer activity. In a phase I study of Ang-(1-7, two of three patients with metastatic sarcoma experienced disease stabilization. This phase II study examined clinical and biomarker outcomes for patients with metastatic sarcoma. Methods. Ang-(1-7 was administered by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 20 mg daily. If excessive toxicities occurred in the first cohort, a dose deescalation cohort was allowed. Blood samples were obtained to measure changes in biomarkers. Results. Treatment was well-tolerated and the dose deescalation cohort was not required. Plasma PlGF concentrations following treatment were not statistically significantly changed. A significant increase in plasma Ang-(1-7 was observed at 4 hours after injection. The median progression-free survival was 2.7 months (95% CI; 1.4 to 4.1 months, and the median overall survival was 10.2 months (95% CI; 5.3 to 18.3 months. Two patients with vascular sarcomas demonstrated prolonged disease stabilization of 10 months (hemangiopericytoma and 19 months (epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. Conclusions. Ang-(1-7 at a dose of 20 mg daily was well-tolerated. This prospective phase II study failed to confirm the PlGF biomarker effect identified in the prior phase I study. Prolonged disease stabilization in hemangiopericytoma and epithelioid hemangioendothelioma may warrant further investigation.

  2. NASA's GeneLab Phase II: Federated Search and Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Tran, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    GeneLab is currently being developed by NASA to accelerate 'open science' biomedical research in support of the human exploration of space and the improvement of life on earth. Phase I of the four-phase GeneLab Data Systems (GLDS) project emphasized capabilities for submission, curation, search, and retrieval of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics ('omics') data from biomedical research of space environments. The focus of development of the GLDS for Phase II has been federated data search for and retrieval of these kinds of data across other open-access systems, so that users are able to conduct biological meta-investigations using data from a variety of sources. Such meta-investigations are key to corroborating findings from many kinds of assays and translating them into systems biology knowledge and, eventually, therapeutics.

  3. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  4. The first results of He II boiling visualization experiment conducted under 4.7 seconds microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, S.; Kimura, N.; Pietrowicz, S.; Grunt, K.

    2017-09-01

    An experiment regarding boiling of superfluid helium (He II) has been carried out under conditions of microgravity, in order to investigate the dynamics of the phase transition. A small cryostat equipped with visualization setup has been utilized for this purpose. Presence of two orthogonal optical axes allowed for registering of 3-dimensional images of a vapor bubble induced by a micro heater. Microgravity environment has been produced for about 4.7 s using the 122 m high drop tower facility at ZARM (Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity), University of Bremen, Germany. The experimental campaign consisting of 32 drops has been successfully conducted, while avoiding any damage to the equipment.

  5. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume II. Detailed description of the model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the second of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with detailed descriptions of the structure of each program member (subroutines and functions), the interrelation between the members of a submodel, and the interrelation between the various submodels as such. The systems model for fluidized bed combustors (FBC-II) consists of a systematic combination of the following interrelated areas: fluid mechanics and bubble growth, char combustion and associated kinetics for particle burnout, sulfur capture, NO/sub x/ formation and reduction, freeboard reactions, and heat transfer. Program outline is shown in Figure 1.1. Input variables (supplied by the user are inspected to check that they lie inside the allowed range of values and are input to the various routines as needed. The necessary physical and fluid mechanical properties are calculated and utilized in estimating char combustion and sulfur capture in the bed and the freeboard. NO/sub x/ and CO emissions are estimated by taking into account all relevant chemical reactions. A material and energy balance is made over the bed. Figure 1.1 shows a block diagram of the systems program. In this diagram, the overall structure of the FBC program is illustrated in terms of the various submodels that together constitute the systems program. A more detailed outline of the systems program is shown in Figure 1.2. In this figure, all important subroutine members of the FBC program are shown, and their linkage to each other, as well as to the main program is indicated. A description of the exact sequence in which these various routines are called at time of program execution is provided in Chapter 8 under the executive routine MAIN.

  6. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Markus; Bergauer, Thomas; Gfall, Immanuel; Irmler, Christian; Valentan, Manfred

    2011-02-01

    After 10 years of successful operation, the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will be completed in 2010. Thereafter, a major upgrade of the KEK-B machine is foreseen until 2014, aiming at a final luminosity of 8×10 35 cm -2 s -1, which is about 40 times higher than the present peak value. Consequently, also the Belle experiment needs to be changed and the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) in particular will be completely replaced as it already operates close to its limits in the present system. The future SVD (a.k.a. SuperSVD) will consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors like the present one, but at larger radii, because it will be complemented by a two-layer pixel detector as the innermost sensing device. The SuperSVD will be entirely composed of silicon sensors made from 6 in. wafers read out by APV25 front-end chips that were originally developed for the CMS experiment at the LHC. Several years of R&D effort led to innovations such as the Origami chip-on-sensor concept and readout electronics with hit time finding which were successfully demonstrated on prototypes. These features will be included in the final system which is presently being designed. This paper will give an overview of the SuperSVD and present results from prototype tests ranging from detector modules to back-end electronics.

  7. Advanced Distributed Simulation Technology II (ADST II) High Level Architecture Support Experiments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the High Level Architecture (HLA) Support Experiments (HSE) project was to perform experimentation and research in HLA technology to support the evolution and further implementation of the HLA specifications...

  8. High-intensity-discharger 400-W sodium ballast. Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felper, G.

    1981-10-01

    A research and development program directed toward design, test, and evaluation of an energy efficient High Intensity Discharge (HID) Solid-State 400 Watt Ballast lighting system was undertaken. Under Phase I of the project, the existing ballast was modified, performance characteristics were measured, efficiency was compared with a core/coil ballast including energy loss analysis. Six (6) prototype 400 W High Pressure Sodium Ballasts were built, for verification tests by an independent test facility prior to follow-on performance and life tests. This report covers Phase II of the project which was designed to make test data comparisons on results received from the independent test laboratory, determine methods to increase ballast efficiency, determine the importance of power factors, conduct bulb life tests, perform specification review, performance versus cost analysis, investigate the ballast to determine compliance with new FCC requirement, and determine a line transient specification in respect to solid state ballasting. In addition, Phase II required reliability testing, a manufacturing test plan, a marketing study for solid-state ballast, and the manufacture and delivery of fifteen (15) demonstration ballast units to LBL. These requirements are discussed.

  9. Turnable Semiconductor Laser Spectroscopy in Hollow Optical Waveguides, Phase II SBIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory J. Fetzer, Ph.D.

    2001-12-24

    In this study a novel optical trace gas sensor based on a perforated hollow waveguide (PHW) was proposed. The sensor has been given the acronym ESHOW for Environmental Sensor using Hollow Optical Waveguides. Realizations of the sensor have demonstrated rapid response time (<2s), low minimum detection limits (typically around 3 x 10-5 absorbance). Operation of the PHW technology has been demonstrated in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid0infrared (MIR) regions of the spectrum. Simulation of sensor performance provided in depth understanding of the signals and signal processing required to provide high sensitivity yet retain rapid response to gas changes. A dedicated sensor electronics and software foundation were developed during the course of the Phase II effort. Commercial applications of the sensor are ambient air and continuous emissions monitoring, industrial process control and hazardous waste site monitoring. There are numerous other applications for such a sensor including medical diagnosis and treatment, breath analysis for legal purposes, water quality assessment, combustion diagnostics, and chemical process control. The successful completion of Phase II resulted in additional funding of instrument development by the Nations Institute of Heath through a Phase I SBIR grant and a strategic teaming relationship with a commercial manufacture of medical instrumentation. The purpose of the NIH grant and teaming relationship is to further develop the sensor to monitor NO in exhaled breath for the purposes of asthma diagnosis.

  10. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  11. Casein Kinase 1 Coordinates Cohesin Cleavage, Gametogenesis, and Exit from M Phase in Meiosis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello-Miranda, Orlando; Zagoriy, Ievgeniia; Mengoli, Valentina; Rojas, Julie; Jonak, Katarzyna; Oz, Tugce; Graf, Peter; Zachariae, Wolfgang

    2017-01-09

    Meiosis consists of DNA replication followed by two consecutive nuclear divisions and gametogenesis or spore formation. While meiosis I has been studied extensively, less is known about the regulation of meiosis II. Here we show that Hrr25, the conserved casein kinase 1δ of budding yeast, links three mutually independent key processes of meiosis II. First, Hrr25 induces nuclear division by priming centromeric cohesin for cleavage by separase. Hrr25 simultaneously phosphorylates Rec8, the cleavable subunit of cohesin, and removes from centromeres the cohesin protector composed of shugoshin and the phosphatase PP2A. Second, Hrr25 initiates the sporulation program by inducing the synthesis of membranes that engulf the emerging nuclei at anaphase II. Third, Hrr25 mediates exit from meiosis II by activating pathways that trigger the destruction of M-phase-promoting kinases. Thus, Hrr25 synchronizes formation of the single-copy genome with gamete differentiation and termination of meiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene expression profiling reveals a regulatory role for ROR alpha and ROR gamma in phase I and phase II metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong Soon; Angers, Martin; Beak, Ju Youn; Wu, Xiying; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Wada, Taira; Xie, Wen; Collins, Jennifer B; Grissom, Sherry F; Jetten, Anton M

    2007-10-22

    Retinoid-related orphan receptors alpha (ROR alpha) and gamma (ROR gamma) are both expressed in liver; however, their physiological functions in this tissue have not yet been clearly defined. The ROR alpha1 and ROR gamma 1 isoforms, but not ROR alpha 4, show an oscillatory pattern of expression during circadian rhythm. To obtain insight into the physiological functions of ROR receptors in liver, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of livers from WT, ROR alpha-deficient staggerer (sg) mice (ROR alpha(sg/sg)), ROR gamma(-/-), and ROR alpha(sg/sg)ROR gamma(-/-) double knockout (DKO) mice by microarray analysis. DKO mice were generated to study functional redundancy between ROR alpha and ROR gamma. These analyses demonstrated that ROR alpha and ROR gamma affect the expression of a number of genes. ROR alpha and ROR gamma are particularly important in the regulation of genes encoding several phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes, including several 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, cytochrome P450 enzymes, and sulfotransferases. In addition, our results indicate that ROR alpha and ROR gamma each affect the expression of a specific set of genes but also exhibit functional redundancy. Our study shows that ROR alpha and ROR gamma receptors influence the regulation of several metabolic pathways, including those involved in the metabolism of steroids, bile acids, and xenobiotics, suggesting that RORs are important in the control of metabolic homeostasis.

  13. A phase II study of combination chemotherapy in early relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer using gemcitabine and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Lund, Bente; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting....

  14. Fish impacts in the Atigun River from Prudhoe Bay crude oil: Investigations of Phase I and II

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes Phase I and II, Environmental Protection Agency funded damage assessment investigation on fish observation in the Atigun River associated with...

  15. Caltrans WeatherShare Phase II System: An Application of Systems and Software Engineering Process to Project Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-25

    In cooperation with the California Department of Transportation, Montana State University's Western Transportation Institute has developed the WeatherShare Phase II system by applying Systems Engineering and Software Engineering processes. The system...

  16. Spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon cross section limits from first data of PandaX-II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Changbo; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yunhua; Fang, Deqing; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Han, Ke; Huang, Xingtao; Ji, Xiangdong; Ju, Yonglin; Lei, Siao; Li, Shaoli; Liu, Huaxuan; Liu, Jianglai; Ma, Yugang; Mao, Yajun; Ren, Xiangxiang; Tan, Andi; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Jiming; Wang, Meng; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Xuming; Wang, Zhou; Wu, Shiyong; Xiao, Mengjiao; Xie, Pengwei; Yan, Binbin; Yang, Yong; Yue, Jianfeng; Zhang, Hongguang; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Ning

    2016-01-01

    We report new constrains on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron and WIMP-proton cross sections using recently released data from the PandaX-II experiment, a dual phase liquid xenon dark matter experiment at the China JinPing Underground Laboratory, with a total exposure of 3.3$\\times10^4$ kg-day. Assuming a standard axial-vector spin-dependent WIMP interaction with $^{129}$Xe and $^{131}$Xe nuclei, the most stringent upper limits on WIMP-neutron cross sections for WIMPs with masses above 10 GeV/c$^{2}$ are set in all direct detection experiments, with a minimum upper limit of $4.1\\times 10^{-41}$ cm$^2$ at 90\\% confidence level for a WIMP mass of 40 GeV/c$^{2}$, representing more than a factor of two improvement on the best available limits at high masses.

  17. Research on radionuclide migration under subsurface geochemical conditions. JAERI/AECL Phase II Collaborative Program Year 1 (joint research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    A radionuclide migration experiment program for fractured rocks was performed under the JAERI/AECL Phase-II Collaborative Program on research and development in radioactive waste management. The program started in the fiscal year 1993, as a five-year program consists of Quarried block radionuclide migration program, Speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, Isotopic hydrogeology and Groundwater flow model development. During the first year of the program (Program Year 1: March 18, 1994 - September 30, 1994), a plan was developed to take out granite blocks containing part of natural water-bearing fracture from the wall of the experimental gallery at the depth of 240 m, and literature reviews were done in the area of the speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, isotopic hydrogeology and the groundwater flow model development to proceed further work for the Program Year 2. (author)

  18. Statistical tests for quantum state reconstruction II: Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Philipp; Monz, Thomas [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Kleinmann, Matthias; Guehne, Otfried [Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultaet, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Moroder, Tobias [Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Innsbruck (Austria); Blatt, Rainer [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Institut fuer Quantenoptik und Quanteninformation, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    Quantum state tomography is nowadays routinely used in many experiments, for instance to characterize entangled quantum states or to determine input and output states of a quantum processor. Tomography reconstruction algorithms are designed to restrict the results onto physical states. These methods will always return a valid quantum state for any data and therefore it seems necessary to test the recorded data prior to reconstructing the quantum state. We directly apply statistical tests on our experimental data taken in an ion trap quantum computer. In particular, we analyze the sensitivity of these tests to various experimental imperfections like crosstalk and rotated bases.

  19. Electron beam injection during active experiments. II - Collisional effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    During active beam experiments, the presence of high neutral densities at low altitudes and/or during thruster firings has been observed to modify the spacecraft charging and the properties of the beam. Two-dimensional (three-velocity) electromagnetic particle simulations with ionizing collisions incorporated are used to investigate the modification of the beam-plasma interaction as the neutral density is increased. It is shown that when the spacecraft is uniformly immersed in a neutral cloud, most of the ionization is produced by direct ionization by the beam and its secondaries, rather than via vehicle-induced or wave-induced ionization for the neutral densities considered.

  20. A phase II study of combination chemotherapy in early relapsed epithelial ovarian cancer using gemcitabine and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Lund, Bente; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting.......Treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer patients relapsing with a short treatment-free interval (TFI) after prior chemotherapy is unsatisfactory. This phase II trial evaluated the activity and feasibility of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) plus gemcitabine in this setting....

  1. The Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Link Experiment (MGS/KaBLE-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, launched on November 7, 1996, carries an experimental space-to-ground telecommunications link at Ka-band (32 GHz) along with the primary X-band (8.4-GHz) downlink. The signals are simultaneously transmitted from a 1.5-m-diameter parabolic antenna on MGS and received by a beam-waveguide (BWG) research and development (R&D) 34-meter a ntenna located in NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network (DSN) complex near Barstow, California. This Ka-band link experiment (KaBLE-II) allows the performances of the Ka-band and X-band signals to be compared under nearly identical conditions. The two signals have been regularly tracked during the past 2 years. This article presents carrier-signal-level data (P_c/N_o) for both X-band and Ka-band acquired over a wide range of station elevation angles, weather conditions, and solar elongation angles. The cruise phase of the mission covered the period from launch (November 7, 1996) to Mars orbit capture (September 12, 1997). Since September 12, 1997, MGS has been in orbit around Mars. The measurements confirm that Ka-band could increase data capacity by at least a factor of three (5 dB) as compared with X-band. During May 1998, the solar corona experiment, in which the effects of solar plasma on the X-band and Ka-band links were studied, was conducted. In addition, frequency and difference frequency (f_x - f_(Ka)/3.8), ranging, and telemetry data results are presented. MGS/KaBLE-II measured signal strengths (for 54 percent of the experiments conducted) that were in reasonable agreement with predicted values based on preflight knowledge, and frequency residuals that agreed between bands and whose statistics were consistent with expected noise sources. For passes in which measured signal strengths disagreed with predicted values, the problems were traced to known deficiencies, for example, equipment operating under certain conditions, such as a cold Ka-band solid-state power amplifier (SSPA

  2. Defective amplification of the late phase insulin response to glucose by GIP in obese Type II diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Krarup, T; Madsbad, S

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) is strongly insulinotropic in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus, whereas glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is less effective. Our investigation evaluated "early" (protocol 1) - and "late phase" (protocol 2) insulin and C......-peptide responses to GLP-1 and GIP stimulation in patients with Type II diabetes....

  3. Thinking in Nursing Education. Part I: A Student's Experience in Learning To Think. Part II: A Teacher's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironside, Pamela Magnussen

    1999-01-01

    Part I describes a nursing student's experience learning to think in clinical practice, illustrating the need for a variety of approaches to critical thinking. Part II shows how nursing teachers and students are challenging conventional approaches and creating more responsive pedagogies. (SK)

  4. Weekly pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and paclitaxel in patients with metastatic breast carcinoma: A phase II study

    OpenAIRE

    LEONARDI, VITA; PALMISANO, VALENTINA; PEPE, ALESSIO; USSET, ANTONELLA; MANUGUERRA, GIOVANNA; SAVIO, GIUSEPPINA; DE BELLA, MANUELA TAMBURO; LAUDANI, AGATA; ALÙ, MASSIMO; CUSIMANO, MARIA PIA; SCIANNA, CATERINA; GIRESI, ARMANDO; AGOSTARA, BIAGIO

    2010-01-01

    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) has the advantage of delivering active anthracycline directly to the tumor site, while exposing the patient to a lesser degree of doxorubicin-associated toxicities. Recently, a regimen in which paclitaxel is infused weekly over 1 h produced substantial antitumor activity with little myelosuppression. We designed a phase II trial to study the efficacy and toxicity of 10 mg/m2 PLD on Days 1, 8 and 15, plus 70 mg/m2 paclitaxel weekly in patients with untreat...

  5. Phase-II study on stereotactic radiotherapy of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis and are not amenable for surgery. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be an alternative treatment for patients with locally advanced disease. The effect of SRT was investigated......, unacceptable toxicity and questionable palliative effect and cannot be recommended for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma....... in the present phase-II trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-two patients with locally advanced and surgically non-resectable, histological proven pancreatic carcinoma were included into the trial. The patients were immobilized by the Elekta stereotactic body frame (SBF) or a custom made body frame. SRT was given...

  6. Development of BPM calibrator and its application for phase II in HLS

    CERN Document Server

    Shen Lian Guan; Zhao Jian Bin; Li Xiao Guang; Yao Jian Ping; Zhu Yang Bin; Wang Jun Hua; Wang Gui Cheng

    2002-01-01

    The author presents a BPM (Beam Position Monitor) calibration system developed for phase II of HLS (Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Light Source). The author describes the development of the test stand and emphasizes key technique that guarantees mechanical accuracy of the system. The test equipment is of erect type and the geometric accuracy of +-0.01 mm is obtained. The system has been served for calibrating BPM pickups, which are mounted in vacuum chambers of inject section. The electrical center of the BPMs is measured with respect to the geometrical center in the calibration machine. The eligible vacuum chambers have been installed in the storage ring

  7. A phase II study of thalidomide in patients with brain metastases from malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestermark, Lene; Larsen, Susanne; Lindeløv, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Brain metastases develop in nearly half of the patients with advanced melanoma and in 15 to 20% of these patients CNS is the first site of relapse. Overall median survival is short, ranging from 2 to 4 months. Thalidomide has antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory effects. Results...... obtained in prior trials indicate that Thalidomide acts as a cytostatic agent in metastatic melanoma. We evaluated single agent antitumour activity and toxicity of Thalidomide in a phase II setting in patients with brain metastases associated with metastatic melanoma. Material and methods. Patients...

  8. Solar heating and cooling of mobile homes, Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, A.A.

    1976-12-01

    The specific objectives of the Phase II program were: (1) through system testing, confirm the feasibility of a solar heated and cooled mobile home; (2) update system performance analysis and provide solar heating and cooling computer model verification; (3) evaluate the performance of both an absorption and a Rankine air conditioning system; (4) perform a consumer demand analysis through field survey to ascertain the acceptance of solar energy into the mobile home market; and (5) while at field locations to conduct the consumer demand analysis, gather test data from various U.S. climatic zones. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  9. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  10. Summary of WPT FOA phase II demonstration performed on July 21, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Perry T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Onar, Omer C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This summary provides details of the activities, presentations and hardware demonstrations performed at the International Transportation Innovation Center (iTiC) in Greenville, South Carolina as deliverables for the wireless power transfer (WPT) FOA #000667 phase II gateway. This report does not attempt to identify all encompassing efforts from each of the partners leading up to the demonstration, but will attempt to provide a record which briefly describes the project deliverables met and expectations from the Department of Energy (DOE) as action items agreed to during the wrap-up session on July 21, 2015.

  11. Noncollinear parametric amplification in the near-infrared based on type-II phase matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, C.; Bühler, J.; Heinrich, A.-C.; Leitenstorfer, A.; Brida, D.

    2015-09-01

    Noncollinear parametric amplification based on type-II phase matching for the generation of ultrabroadband and tunable spectra in the near infrared is investigated. In a noncollinear geometry the group velocity matching condition between signal and idler can be obtained in frequently used crystals such as β-barium borate (BBO) even for wavelengths fully located in the anomalous dispersion region. The extremely broadband operation, peculiar tuning possibilities and straightforward experimental implementation with the standard BBO crystal pave the way for a versatile NIR source in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  12. Treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma with carboplatin, liposomized doxorubicin, and gemcitabine: a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerdal, G.; Sundstrom, S.; Riska, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malignant pleural mesothelioma has a poor prognosis and there is limited effect of treatment. The Nordic Mesothelioma groups decided in the year 2000 to investigate a combination of liposomized doxorubicin, carboplatin, and gemcitabine for this disease in a phase II study. METHODS: From...... January 2001, to December 2003, 173 evaluable patients with biopsy-verified malignant mesothelioma were included. Two patients were lost to follow-up, but all the others were followed for at least 4 years or until death. RESULTS: Toxicity was fairly low. There were 56 responses (32.4%), of which 2 were...

  13. Nine-year change in statistical design, profile, and success rates of Phase II oncology trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Paul, Barry; Marchenko, Olga; Song, Guochen; Patel, Neerali; Moschos, Stergios J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated nine-year trends in statistical design and other features of Phase II oncology clinical trials published in 2005, 2010, and 2014 in five leading oncology journals: Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, and Lancet Oncology. The features analyzed included cancer type, multicenter vs. single-institution, statistical design, primary endpoint, number of treatment arms, number of patients per treatment arm, whether or not statistical methods were well described, whether the drug was found effective based on rigorous statistical testing of the null hypothesis, and whether the drug was recommended for future studies.

  14. Statistical issues for design and analysis of single-arm multi-stage phase II cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sin-Ho

    2015-05-01

    Phase II trials have been very widely conducted and published every year for cancer clinical research. In spite of the fast progress in design and analysis methods, single-arm two-stage design is still the most popular for phase II cancer clinical trials. Because of their small sample sizes, statistical methods based on large sample approximation are not appropriate for design and analysis of phase II trials. As a prospective clinical research, the analysis method of a phase II trial is predetermined at the design stage and it is analyzed during and at the end of the trial as planned by the design. The analysis method of a trial should be matched with the design method. For two-stage single arm phase II trials, Simon's method has been the standards for choosing an optimal design, but the resulting data have been analyzed and published ignoring the two-stage design aspect with small sample sizes. In this article, we review analysis methods that exactly get along with the exact two-stage design method. We also discuss some statistical methods to improve the existing design and analysis methods for single-arm two-stage phase II trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aerosols at the poles: an AeroCom Phase II multi-model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sand

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic and natural sources reach the polar regions through long-range transport and affect the local radiation balance. Such transport is, however, poorly constrained in present-day global climate models, and few multi-model evaluations of polar anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing exist. Here we compare the aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm from simulations with 16 global aerosol models from the AeroCom Phase II model intercomparison project with available observations at both poles. We show that the annual mean multi-model median is representative of the observations in Arctic, but that the intermodel spread is large. We also document the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of the AOD for the individual aerosol species: black carbon (BC from fossil fuel and biomass burning, sulfate, organic aerosols (OAs, dust, and sea-salt. For a subset of models that represent nitrate and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs, we document the role of these aerosols at high latitudes.The seasonal dependence of natural and anthropogenic aerosols differs with natural aerosols peaking in winter (sea-salt and spring (dust, whereas AOD from anthropogenic aerosols peaks in late spring and summer. The models produce a median annual mean AOD of 0.07 in the Arctic (defined here as north of 60° N. The models also predict a noteworthy aerosol transport to the Antarctic (south of 70° S with a resulting AOD varying between 0.01 and 0.02. The models have estimated the shortwave anthropogenic radiative forcing contributions to the direct aerosol effect (DAE associated with BC and OA from fossil fuel and biofuel (FF, sulfate, SOAs, nitrate, and biomass burning from BC and OA emissions combined. The Arctic modelled annual mean DAE is slightly negative (−0.12 W m−2, dominated by a positive BC FF DAE in spring and a negative sulfate DAE in summer. The Antarctic DAE is governed by BC FF. We perform sensitivity

  16. Aerosols at the poles: an AeroCom Phase II multi-model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Maria; Samset, Bjørn H.; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje K.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Lamarque, Jean-François; Lin, Guangxing; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; Myhre, Gunnar; van Noije, Twan; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Yu, Fangqun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Hua

    2017-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic and natural sources reach the polar regions through long-range transport and affect the local radiation balance. Such transport is, however, poorly constrained in present-day global climate models, and few multi-model evaluations of polar anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing exist. Here we compare the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm from simulations with 16 global aerosol models from the AeroCom Phase II model intercomparison project with available observations at both poles. We show that the annual mean multi-model median is representative of the observations in Arctic, but that the intermodel spread is large. We also document the geographical distribution and seasonal cycle of the AOD for the individual aerosol species: black carbon (BC) from fossil fuel and biomass burning, sulfate, organic aerosols (OAs), dust, and sea-salt. For a subset of models that represent nitrate and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), we document the role of these aerosols at high latitudes.The seasonal dependence of natural and anthropogenic aerosols differs with natural aerosols peaking in winter (sea-salt) and spring (dust), whereas AOD from anthropogenic aerosols peaks in late spring and summer. The models produce a median annual mean AOD of 0.07 in the Arctic (defined here as north of 60° N). The models also predict a noteworthy aerosol transport to the Antarctic (south of 70° S) with a resulting AOD varying between 0.01 and 0.02. The models have estimated the shortwave anthropogenic radiative forcing contributions to the direct aerosol effect (DAE) associated with BC and OA from fossil fuel and biofuel (FF), sulfate, SOAs, nitrate, and biomass burning from BC and OA emissions combined. The Arctic modelled annual mean DAE is slightly negative (-0.12 W m-2), dominated by a positive BC FF DAE in spring and a negative sulfate DAE in summer. The Antarctic DAE is governed by BC FF. We perform sensitivity experiments with one of the Aero

  17. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE II STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-11-21

    Twenty five glass compositions were selected for a Phase II study to assess the potential for reducing the conservatism in the nepheline discriminator. The glass compositions were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the liquidus temperature model was used to restrict the glass compositions so that they could all be melted at the same temperature. The nepheline discriminator was used to force the glass compositions into regions where nepheline formation was predicted to occur. The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized for crystallization and chemical durability after both quenching and slow cooling. Chemical analysis showed that the fabricated glasses met the target compositions. Nepheline was identified in one of the quenched glasses and several of the CCC glasses. There was no clear relationship between the types of crystallization that occurred in a particular glass and its location on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} ternary diagram. A partitioning algorithm was used to identify trends in crystallization behavior based on glass composition. Generally, for the CCC glasses MnO influenced the crystallization of spinels and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} influenced the crystallization of nepheline. Measured durability responses varied from acceptable to unacceptable depending on the glass composition and type and extent of crystallization that occurred. It was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator at this time. It is recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where acceptable glasses are predicted to be

  18. Participation in two phase II prophylactic HIV vaccine trials in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kimberly; Legg, K; Sharp, A; Mackie, N; Olarinde, F; De Souza, C; Weber, J; Peters, B

    2008-06-02

    There will be a continued imperative to recruit large numbers of healthy volunteers to early phase prophylactic HIV vaccine (PHV) trials. We studied mechanisms associated with participation in two related phase II PHV trials. The most cited reasons for volunteering were altruism and a personal connection to HIV. The most successful recruiting strategies targeted organisations dealing with HIV, health or social issues, or were directed to large audiences through the mass media. However, circulated emails and word of mouth were the most resource-effective approaches. Group discussions and the collection of a pool of potential volunteers were much less effective than one-to-one discussions and immediate screening after recruitment. We utilised our findings to devise key recommendations to assist PHV trial teams who are planning future studies.

  19. A phase II flexible screening design allowing for interim analysis and comparison with historical control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenting; Bot, Brian; Hu, Yan; Geyer, Susan M; Sargent, Daniel J

    2013-07-01

    Sargent and Goldberg [1] proposed a randomized phase II flexible screening design (SG design) which took multiple characteristics of candidate regimens into consideration in selecting a regimen for further phase III testing. In this paper, we extend the SG design by including provisions for an interim analysis and/or a comparison to a historical control. By including a comparison with a historical control, a modified SG design not only identifies a more promising treatment but also assures that the regimen has a clinically meaningful level of efficacy as compared to a historical control. By including an interim analysis, a modified SG design could reduce the number of patients exposed to inferior treatment regimens. When compared to the original SG design, the modified designs increase the sample size moderately, but expand the utility of the flexible screening design substantially. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phase II open-label study of nintedanib in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Mau-Sørensen, Paul Morten

    2013-01-01

    Nintedanib (BIBF 1120) is a small, orally available, triple angiokinase inhibitor in phase III development (various indications) that targets VEGFR 1-3, FGFR 1-3, and PDGFR-α/β. This open-label, uncontrolled, phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of nintedanib in patients with recurrent....... Nintedanib had an acceptable safety profile, with no CTCAE grade 3-4 adverse events. Common adverse events were CTCAE grade 1-2 fatigue, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and nausea. Single-agent nintedanib (200 mg bid) demonstrated limited, but clinically non-relevant antitumor activity in patients with recurrent...... glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who had previously failed radiotherapy plus temozolomide as first-line therapy (STUPP), or the same regimen with subsequent bevacizumab-based therapy as second-line treatment (BEV). Patients with a performance status of 0-1, histologically proven GBM, and measurable disease (by...

  1. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    In Phase I a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase II (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA-8511, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, 800HT, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy will be exposed for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The results will be presented for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 4000 hours of exposure.

  2. Near-term electric-vehicle program. Phase II. Mid-term review summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-27

    The general objective of the Near-Term Electric Vehicle Program is to confirm that, in fact, the complete spectrum of requirements placed on the automobile (e.g., safety, producibility, utility, etc.) can still be satisfied if electric power train concepts are incorporated in lieu of contemporary power train concepts, and that the resultant set of vehicle characteristics are mutually compatible, technologically achievable, and economically achievable. The focus of the approach to meeting this general objective involves the design, development, and fabrication of complete electric vehicles incorporating, where necessary, extensive technological advancements. A mid-term summary is presented of Phase II which is a continuation of the preliminary design study conducted in Phase I of the program. Information is included on vehicle performance and performance simulation models; battery subsystems; control equipment; power systems; vehicle design and components for suspension, steering, and braking; scale model testing; structural analysis; and vehicle dynamics analysis. (LCL)

  3. The multifaceted Type II-L supernova 2014G from pre-maximum to nebular phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreran, G.; Jerkstrand, A.; Benetti, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Ochner, P.; Tomasella, L.; Howell, D. A.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Kankare, E.; Arcavi, I.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kangas, T.; Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Wiggins, P.; Yuan, F.

    2016-10-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry, along with visual-wavelength spectroscopy, of supernova (SN) 2014G in the nearby galaxy NGC 3448 (25 Mpc). The early-phase spectra show strong emission lines of the high ionization species He II/N IV/C IV during the first 2-3 d after explosion, traces of a metal-rich circumstellar material (CSM) probably due to pre-explosion mass-loss events. These disappear by day 9 and the spectral evolution then continues matching that of normal Type II SNe. The post-maximum light curve declines at a rate typical of Type II-L class. The extensive photometric coverage tracks the drop from the photospheric stage and constrains the radioactive tail, with a steeper decline rate than that expected from the 56Co decay if γ-rays are fully trapped by the ejecta. We report the appearance of an unusual feature on the blue side of H α after 100 d, which evolves to appear as a flat spectral feature linking H α and the [O I] doublet. This may be due to interaction of the ejecta with a strongly asymmetric, and possibly bipolar CSM. Finally, we report two deep spectra at ˜190 and 340 d after explosion, the latter being arguably one of the latest spectra for a Type II-L SN. By modelling the spectral region around the [Ca II], we find a supersolar Ni/Fe production. The strength of the [O I] λλ6300,6363 doublet, compared with synthetic nebular spectra, suggests a progenitor with a zero-age main-sequence mass between 15 and 19 M⊙.

  4. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  5. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume II. Chapters 6-10)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  6. Hazardous Materials Routing Study Phase II: Analysis of Hazardous Materials Truck Routes in Proximity to the Dallas Central Business District

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    This report summarizes the findings from the second phase of a two-part analysis of hazardous materials truck routes in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Phase II of this study analyzes the risk of transporting hazardous materials on freeways and arterial ...

  7. Climatepipes: User-friendly data access, data manipulation, data analysis and visualization of community climate models Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Aashish [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    In Phase I, we successfully developed a web-based tool that provides workflow and form-based interfaces for accessing, querying, and visualizing interesting datasets from one or more sources. For Phase II of the project, we have implemented mechanisms for supporting more elaborate and relevant queries.

  8. BOP2: Bayesian optimal design for phase II clinical trials with simple and complex endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Heng; Lee, J Jack; Yuan, Ying

    2017-09-20

    We propose a flexible Bayesian optimal phase II (BOP2) design that is capable of handling simple (e.g., binary) and complicated (e.g., ordinal, nested, and co-primary) endpoints under a unified framework. We use a Dirichlet-multinomial model to accommodate different types of endpoints. At each interim, the go/no-go decision is made by evaluating a set of posterior probabilities of the events of interest, which is optimized to maximize power or minimize the number of patients under the null hypothesis. Unlike other existing Bayesian designs, the BOP2 design explicitly controls the type I error rate, thereby bridging the gap between Bayesian designs and frequentist designs. In addition, the stopping boundary of the BOP2 design can be enumerated prior to the onset of the trial. These features make the BOP2 design accessible to a wide range of users and regulatory agencies and particularly easy to implement in practice. Simulation studies show that the BOP2 design has favorable operating characteristics with higher power and lower risk of incorrectly terminating the trial than some existing Bayesian phase II designs. The software to implement the BOP2 design is freely available at www.trialdesign.org. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Failsafe automation of Phase II clinical trial interim monitoring for stopping rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Roger S

    2010-02-01

    In Phase II clinical trials in cancer, preventing the treatment of patients on a study when current data demonstrate that the treatment is insufficiently active or too toxic has obvious benefits, both in protecting patients and in reducing sponsor costs. Considerable efforts have gone into experimental designs for Phase II clinical trials with flexible sample size, usually implemented by early stopping rules. The intended benefits will not ensue, however, if the design is not followed. Despite the best intentions, failures can occur for many reasons. The main goal is to develop an automated system for interim monitoring, as a backup system supplementing the protocol team, to ensure that patients are protected. A secondary goal is to stimulate timely recording of patient assessments. We developed key concepts and performance needs, then designed, implemented, and deployed a software solution embedded in the clinical trials database system. The system has been in place since October 2007. One clinical trial tripped the automated monitor, resulting in e-mails that initiated statistician/investigator review in timely fashion. Several essential contributing activities still require human intervention, institutional policy decisions, and institutional commitment of resources. We believe that implementing the concepts presented here will provide greater assurance that interim monitoring plans are followed and that patients are protected from inadequate response or excessive toxicity. This approach may also facilitate wider acceptance and quicker implementation of new interim monitoring algorithms.

  11. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Seiji [Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Wakasa Seikatsu Co., Ltd., 134 Chudoujiminami-cho, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan); Kobayashi, Saori [Wakasa Seikatsu Co., Ltd., 134 Chudoujiminami-cho, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan); Tsubota, Kazuo [Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Ozawa, Yoko, E-mail: ozawa@a5.keio.jp [Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Lutein reduced ROS levels in a PC12D neuronal cell line. • Lutein induced mRNAs of phase II antioxidative enzymes in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein increased protein levels of HO-1, SOD2, and NQO-1 in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein had no effect on intranuclear Nrf2 levels in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein did not activate potential upstream Nrf2 nuclear translocation pathways. - Abstract: The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  12. Nutrikinetic modeling reveals order of genistein phase II metabolites appearance in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Suzanne; Szymańska, Ewa; Kunz, Iris; Gomez Roldan, Victoria; van Tilborg, Marcel W E M; Weber, Peter; Prudence, Kevin; van der Kloet, Frans M; van Duynhoven, John P M; Smilde, Age K; de Vos, Ric C H; Bendik, Igor

    2014-11-01

    Genistein from foods or supplements is metabolized by the gut microbiota and the human body, thereby releasing many different metabolites into systemic circulation. The order of their appearance in plasma and the possible influence of food format are still unknown. This study compared the nutrikinetic profiles of genistein metabolites. In a randomized cross-over trial, 12 healthy young volunteers were administered a single dose of 30 mg genistein provided as a genistein tablet, a genistein tablet in low fat milk, and soy milk containing genistein glycosides. A high mass resolution LC-LTQ-Orbitrap FTMS platform detected and quantified in human plasma: free genistein, seven of its phase-II metabolites and 15 gut-derived metabolites. Interestingly, a novel metabolite, genistein-4'-glucuronide-7-sulfate (G-4'G-7S) was identified. Nutrikinetic analysis using population-based modeling revealed the order of appearance of five genistein phase II metabolites in plasma: (1) genistein-4',7-diglucuronide, (2) genistein-7-sulfate, (3) genistein-4'-sulfate-7-glucuronide, (4) genistein-4'-glucuronide, and (5) genistein-7-glucuronide, independent of the food matrix. The conjugated genistein metabolites appear in a distinct order in human plasma. The specific early appearance of G-4',7-diG suggests a multistep formation process for the mono and hetero genistein conjugates, involving one or two deglucuronidation steps. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. DoE Phase II SBIR: Spectrally-Assisted Vehicle Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve, Pierre V. [Space Computer Corporation, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-02-28

    The goal of this Phase II SBIR is to develop a prototype software package to demonstrate spectrally-aided vehicle tracking performance. The primary application is to demonstrate improved target vehicle tracking performance in complex environments where traditional spatial tracker systems may show reduced performance. Example scenarios in Figure 1 include a) the target vehicle obscured by a large structure for an extended period of time, or b), the target engaging in extreme maneuvers amongst other civilian vehicles. The target information derived from spatial processing is unable to differentiate between the green versus the red vehicle. Spectral signature exploitation enables comparison of new candidate targets with existing track signatures. The ambiguity in this confusing scenario is resolved by folding spectral analysis results into each target nomination and association processes. Figure 3 shows a number of example spectral signatures from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The work performed over the two-year effort was divided into three general areas: algorithm refinement, software prototype development, and prototype performance demonstration. The tasks performed under this Phase II to accomplish the program goals were as follows: 1. Acquire relevant vehicle target datasets to support prototype. 2. Refine algorithms for target spectral feature exploitation. 3. Implement a prototype multi-hypothesis target tracking software package. 4. Demonstrate and quantify tracking performance using relevant data.

  14. Research and Development for the ATLAS Forward Calorimetry at the Phase-II LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cheplakov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    During the LHC Run-1 data taking period the ATLAS calorimeter system demonstrated an excellent performance of the electron and photon reconstruction as well as the hadronic jets and missing transverse energy measurements. These precision measurements played a major role in the discovery of the Higgs boson. Further study of the Higgs properties and SUSY searches should be performed at Phase-II LHC which will run at 5-7 times higher luminosity aiming to provide statistics of 3000fb-1 by 2037. A total irradiation doses will be more than doubled compared to the original design, taking into account a safety factor of 2 representing our confidence in radiation background simulations. Moreover, the increased instantaneous luminosity will result in a much higher detector occupancy. The ATLAS Forward Calorimeters (FCal) will be affected by these factors. A rich R&D program is ongoing to evaluate the consequences of the LHC modernization and to investigate different scenarios proposed for the Phase-II detector upgr...

  15. Source Physics Experiment Phase II, Dry Alluvium Geology (DAG) Experiments Using Nitromethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeger, Scott R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-21

    Need to provide briefing to the State of Nevada as part of the Permitting process for the Nevada Chemical Accident Prevention Program (CAPP) for use of nitromethane at the NNSS. This document will be accessible to the public as part of the CAPP program.

  16. Purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing of an engineered single-chain PvuII restriction endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meramveliotaki, Chrysi [Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Department of Biology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Kotsifaki, Dina [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Androulaki, Maria [Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Department of Biology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Hountas, Athanasios [Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Eliopoulos, Elias [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Kokkinidis, Michael, E-mail: kokkinid@imbb.forth.gr [Department of Biology, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), PO Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2007-10-01

    PvuII is the first type II restriction endonuclease to be converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into an enzymatically active single-chain variant. The enzyme was crystallized and phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement. The restriction endonuclease PvuII from Proteus vulgaris has been converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into the enzymatically active single-chain variant scPvuII by tandemly joining the two subunits through the peptide linker Gly-Ser-Gly-Gly. scPvuII, which is suitable for the development of programmed restriction endonucleases for highly specific DNA cleavage, was purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a resolution of 2.35 Å and belong to space group P4{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.92, c = 100.28 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement.

  17. In-step Two-phase Flow (TPF) Thermal Control Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Two-Phase Flow Thermal Control Experiment is part of the NASA/OAST In-Space Technology Experiments (In-STEP) Program. The experiment is configured for the Hitchhiker Shuttle payload system and consists of a capillary pumped loop, heatpipe radiator, and two-phase flow heat exchanger. The flight experiment design approach, test plan, payload design, and test components are described in outline and graphic form.

  18. [Lunar phases and incidence of spontaneous deliveries. Our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periti, E; Biagiotti, R

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between lunar phases and birthrate. We examined 7842 spontaneous deliveries at Obstetric and Gynaecologic Clinic of University of Florence, between January 1988 and November 1992, covering 58 synodic lunar months. A lunar month was considered to be a period of 29.5 days and comprised four lunar phases: the full moon, the last quarter, the new moon and the first quarter. We compared the median number of births in each day of synodic month and in the periods of seven days centered on the first day of each moon phase. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis by ranks. Non significant differences were found in the incidence of spontaneous birth throughout the lunar cycle. These results do not support the hypothesis of a relationship between moon-phase changes and the incidence of spontaneous deliveries.

  19. Mechanochemical and Conventional Synthesis of Zn(II)/Cd(II) Luminescent Coordination Polymers: Dual Sensing Probe for Selective Detection of Chromate Anions and TNP in Aqueous Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Bhavesh; Rachuri, Yadagiri; Bisht, Kamal Kumar; Laiya, Ridhdhi; Suresh, Eringathodi

    2017-03-06

    Isostructural Zn(II)/Cd(II) mixed ligand coordination polymers (CPs) {[M(IPA)(L)]}n (CP1 and CP2) built from isophthalic acid (H2IPA) and 3-pyridylcarboxaldehyde nicotinoylhydrazone (L) were prepared using versatile synthetic routes: viz., diffusion of precursor solutions, conventional reflux methods, and green mechanochemical (grinding) reactions. Both robust CPs synthesized by different routes were characterized by various analytical methods, and their thermal and chemical stability as well as the phase purity was established. Crystallographic studies revealed that CP1 and CP2 are isostructural frameworks and feature a double-lined two-dimensional network composed of Zn2+/Cd2+ nodes connected through IPA and pillared by the Schiff base ligand L with a double-walled edge. The photoluminescent (PL) properties of CP1 and CP2 have been exploited as dual detection fluorosensors for hexavalent chromate anions (CrO42-/Cr2O72-) and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) because it was observed that the emission intensity of aqueous suspensions of CPs selectively quenches by chromate anions or TNP among large pools of different anions or nitro compounds, respectively. Competitive experiments in the presence of interfering anions/other nitro compounds also revealed no major effect in the quenching efficiency, suggesting the selective detection of hexavalent chromate anions as well as TNP by the LCPs. The limits of detection by CP1 for CrO42-/Cr2O72- and TNP are 4 ppm/4 ppm and 28 ppb, respectively, whereas the limits of detection by CP2 for the same analytes are 1 ppm/1 ppm and 14 ppb, respectively. A probable mechanism for the quenching phenomena is also discussed.

  20. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume IV. FBC-Model-II manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the fourth of the seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. The purpose of this manual is to describe how to access and use M.I.T.'s Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC) System Program. Presently, the FBC program is stored in a Honeywell Computer System and can be accessed using the Multics interactive system. The intention in writing this manual is to answer the questions that may arise regarding the mechanics of operating the system program, as well as warn the user of possible pitfalls and mistakes that could be made. No attempt is made here to describe the internals of the systems program. The manual describes the procedures an individual would follow to become an active user of the system program. It then explains the various options available for reaching the Multics interactive system on Honeywell 6180 computer on which the program runs. For users outside the Metropolitan Boston area, a public network for data communications is described which is relatively inexpensive. As the system program is approached through Multics using a special command facility TPSA, a separate introduction is provided for Multics TPSA. This facility allows commands appropriate for testing the program and carrying out parametric studies to be executed in a convenient way. Multics TPSA was formulated to meet the needs of the FBC project in particular. Finally, some sample sessions are presented which illustrate the login and logout procedures, the command language, and the data manipulation features of the FBC program. The use of commands helpful in debugging the program is also illustrated.

  1. Pegylated arginine deiminase treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma: results from phase I and II studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascierto, Paolo A; Scala, Stefania; Castello, Giuseppe; Daponte, Antonio; Simeone, Ester; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Beneduce, Gerardo; De Rosa, Vincenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Melucci, Maria Teresa; Ensor, C Mark; Prestayko, Archie W; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Bomalaski, John S; Clark, Mike A; Savaraj, Niramol; Feun, Lynn G; Logan, Theodore F

    2005-10-20

    Individuals with metastatic melanoma have a poor prognosis. Many human melanomas are auxotrophic for arginine, and arginine is not an essential amino acid in humans. We hypothesized that this auxotrophy may be therapeutically exploited. A novel amino acid-degrading enzyme (arginine deiminase) conjugated to polyethylene glycol (ADI-SS PEG 20,000 mw) was used to lower plasma arginine in individuals with metastatic melanoma. Two cohort dose-escalation studies were performed. A phase I study in the United States enrolled 15 patients, and a phase I to II study in Italy enrolled 24 patients. The Italian patients also received two subsequent cycles of treatment, each consisting of four once-weekly injections of 160 U/m2. The goals of these studies were to determine pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), safety, and the antitumor activity of ADI-SS PEG 20,000 mw. PK and PD studies indicated that a dose of 160 U/m2 lowered plasma arginine from a resting level of approximately 130 micromol/L to less than 2 micromol/L for at least 7 days; nitric oxide levels also were lowered. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities directly attributable to the drug. Six of 24 phase I to II patients responded to treatment (five partial responses and one complete response; 25% response rate) and also had prolonged survival. CONCLUSION Elimination of all detectable plasma arginine in patients with metastatic melanoma was well tolerated and may be effective in the treatment of this cancer. Further testing of ADI-SS PEG 20,000 mw in a larger population of individuals with metastatic melanoma is warranted.

  2. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  3. Radioembolisation for liver metastases: results from a prospective 151 patient multi-institutional phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Al B; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Mulcahy, Mary F; Rilling, William; Siskin, Gary; Wiseman, Greg; Cunningham, James; Houghton, Bonny; Ross, Mason; Memon, Khairuddin; Andrews, James; Fleming, Chad J; Herman, Joseph; Nimeiri, Halla; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the safety, response rate, progression-free and overall survival of patients with liver metastases treated with (90)Y (glass) radioembolisation in a prospective, multicenter phase II study. 151 patients with liver metastases (colorectal n=61, neuroendocrine n=43 and other tumour types n=47) refractory to standard of care therapies were enrolled in this prospective, multicenter, phase II study under an investigational device exemption. Clinical/laboratory/imaging follow-up were obtained at 30 days followed by 3-month intervals for 1 year and every 6 months thereafter. The primary end-point was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end-points included safety, hepatic progression-free survival (HPFS), response rate and overall survival. Median age was 66 (range 25-88). Grade 3/4 adverse events included pain (12.8%), elevated alkaline phospatase (8.1%), hyperbilirubinemia (5.3%), lymphopaenia (4.1%), ascites (3.4%) and vomiting (3.4%). Treatment parameters including dose delivery were reproducible among centers. Disease control rates were 59%, 93% and 63% for colorectal, neuroendocrine and other primaries, respectively. Median PFS was 2.9 and 2.8 months for colorectal and other primaries, respectively. PFS was not achieved in the neuroendocrine group. Median survival from (90)Y treatment was 8.8 months for colorectal and 10.4 months for other primaries. Median survival for neuroendocrine patients has not been reached. Patients with liver metastases can be safely treated with (90)Y microspheres. This study is the first to demonstrate technical and dose reproducibility of (90)Y glass microspheres between centers in a prospective setting. Based on these promising data, three international, multicenter, randomised phase III studies in colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma have been initiated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Feasibility study of $B_s \\rightarrow \\phi \\phi \\rightarrow$ 4K with L1 Tracks at the CMS Phase-II Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Rajarshi

    2017-01-01

    $B_s \\rightarrow \\phi \\phi \\rightarrow$ 4 Kaons is an important physics process to study during the LHC Phase-II which is expected to start in 2024. In this process, the CP violating weak phase arises due to the CP violation of the $B_s - \\bar{B_s}$ mixing and the gluonic penguin decay of b $\\rightarrow$ s$\\bar s$s. The penguin decay of the b-quark makes it a rare process also. The CMS experiment is planning to include tracker information at Level-1 Trigger to keep event rate manageable in the high luminosity regime of the LHC PhaseII. The aim of the present study is to understand whether CMS will be able to trigger on the $B_s \\rightarrow \\phi \\phi \\rightarrow$ 4 Kaons events and be competitive with LHCb during LHC PhaseII. We shall discuss about signal efficiency and event rate both at the trigger as well as physics analysis levels and also look at several ways of optimization of efficiency and event rate.

  5. A multi-institutional survey evaluating patient related QA – phase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichmann Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In phase I of the survey a planning intercomparison of patient-related QA was performed at 12 institutions. The participating clinics created phantom based IMRT and VMAT plans which were measured utilizing the ArcCheck diode array. Mobius3D (M3D was used in phase II. It acts as a secondary dose verification tool for patient-specific QA based on average linac beam data collected by Mobius Medical Systems. All Quasimodo linac plans will be analyzed for the continuation of the intercomparison. We aim to determine if Mobius3D is suited for use with diverse treatment techniques, if beam model customization is needed. Initially we computed first Mobius3D results by transferring all plans from phase I to our Mobius3D server. Because of some larger PTV mean dose differences we checked if output factor customization would be beneficial. We performed measurements and output factor correction to account for discrepancies in reference conditions. Compared to Mobius3D's preconfigured average beam data values, these corrected output factors differed by ±1.5% for field sizes between 7x7cm2 and 30x30cm2 and to −3.9% for 3x3cm2. Our method of correcting the output factors turns out good congruence to M3D's reference values for these medium field sizes.

  6. Membrane/distillation hybrid process research and development. Final report, phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazanec, T.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report covers work conducted under the grant awarded to BP by DOE in late 1991 entitled {open_quotes}Membrane/Distillation Hybrid Process Research and Development.{close_quotes} The program was directed towards development and commercialization of the BP process for separation of vapor phase olefins from non-olefins via facilitated transport using an aqueous facilitator. The program has come to a very successful conclusion, with formation of a partnership between BP and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) to market and commercialize the technology. The focus of this report is the final portion of the program, during which engineering re-design, facilitator optimization, economic analysis, and marketing have been the primary activities. At the end of Phase II BP was looking to partner with an engineering firm to advance the selective olefin recovery (SOR) technology from the lab/demo stage to full commercialization. In August 1995 BP and SWEC reached an agreement to advance the technology by completing additional Phase III work with DOE and beginning marketing activities.

  7. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  8. Trans-Pacific HDR Satellite Communications Experiment Phase-2 Project Plan and Experimental Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eddie; Kadowaki, Naoto; Yoshimura, Naoko; Takahashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Bergman, Larry; Bhasin, Kul

    2000-01-01

    The trans-Pacific high data rate (TP-HDR) satellite communications experiment was proposed at the Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Space (JUCS) Program Workshop held in Hawaii in 1993 and remote high definition video post-production was demonstrated as the first phase trial. ATM-based 45 Mbps trans-Pacific link was established in the first phase, and the following experiments with 155 Mbps was planned as the phase 2. This paper describes the experimental network configuration and project plan of TP-HDR experiment phase 2. Additional information is provided in the original.

  9. Final Phase II report : QuickSite(R) investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Research)

    2003-11-01

    this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation to determine the source(s) and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to assess whether the contamination requires remedial action. The investigation at Everest is being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. At these facilities, Argonne is applying its QuickSite{reg_sign} environmental site characterization methodology. This methodology has been applied successfully at a number of former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and Nebraska and has been adopted by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM 1998) as standard practice for environmental site characterization. Phase I of the QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation examined the key geologic, hydrogeologic, and hydrogeochemical relationships that define potential contaminant migration pathways at Everest (Argonne 2001). Phase II of the QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation at Everest was undertaken with the primary goal of delineating and improving understanding of the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at this site and the potential source area(s) that might have contributed to this contamination. To address this goal, four specific technical objectives were developed to guide the Phase II field studies. Sampling of near-surface soils at the former Everest CCC/USDA facility that was originally planned for Phase I had to be postponed until October 2000 because of access restrictions. Viable vegetation was not available for sampling then. This period is termed the first session of Phase II

  10. The new JET phased ICRH array: first experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bures, M.; Bhatnagar, V.; Brown, T.; Fechner, B.; Gormezano, C.; Kaye, A.; Lennholm, M.; Righi, E.; Rimini, F.; Sibley, A.; Start, D.; Wade, T. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Goulding, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lamalle, P. [Ecole Royale Militaire, Brussels (Belgium). Lab. de Physique des Plasmas; Nguyen, F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1994-07-01

    New ICRH antennas on JET were designed to couple to the new JET divertor plasma configurations and to improve the Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) capabilities. The A2 antenna consists of 4 straps whose currents can be phased at arbitrary angles. The real time automatic tuning acts on frequency, line length (line phase shifters) and stub length. Provision is made for the coupling resistance/plasma position feedback to accommodate the fast changes in antenna loading. The first coupling, tuning and heating results are reported in 0{pi}0{pi}, 0000 and 00{pi}{pi} phasing. A new antenna model is described, which was developed to simulate the measured antenna loading in terms of plasma parameters and to provide a starting point for the real time automatic tuning. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  11. The "Chugakuryoko" and Hogan's Heroes: The Experience Gap between U.S. and Japanese Students' Knowledge of World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwell, Russ

    2011-01-01

    Based on his own teaching experiences and findings, the author discusses the experience gap between U.S. and Japanese students' knowledge of World War II. He compares and contrasts how the subject of World War II is taught in the United States versus Japan. While it takes teacher effort to enrich the history experiences of U.S. students, the…

  12. Phase I/II trial of 2-weekly docetaxel combined with cisplatin plus fluorouracil in metastatic esophageal cancer (JCOG0807)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironaka, Shuichi; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Mizusawa, Junki; Kii, Takayuki; Kato, Ken; Tsushima, Takahiro; Chin, Keisho; Tomori, Akihisa; Okuno, Tatsuya; Taniki, Toshikatsu; Ura, Takashi; Matsushita, Hisayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Doki, Yuichiro; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Fujitani, Kazumasa; Taira, Koichi; Seki, Shiko; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a phase I/II trial of adding 2-weekly docetaxel to cisplatin plus fluorouracil (CF) therapy (2-weekly DCF regimen) in esophageal cancer patients to investigate its safety and antimetastatic activity. Patients received 2-weekly docetaxel (30 mg/m2 [dose level (DL)1] or 40 mg/m2 [DL2] with a 3 + 3 design in phase I, on days 1 and 15) in combination with fixed-dose CF (80 mg/m2 cisplatin, day 1; 800 mg/m2 fluorouracil, days 1–5) repeated every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in phase I and central peer review-based response rate in phase II. At least 22 responders among 50 patients were required to satisfy the primary endpoint with a threshold of 35%. Sixty-two patients were enrolled in phase I and II. In phase I, 10 patients were enrolled with DLT of 0/3 at DL1 and 2/7 in DL2. Considering DLT and treatment compliance, the recommended phase II dose was determined as DL1. In phase II, the response rate was 62% (P < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval, 48–75%); median overall survival and progression-free survival were 11.1 and 5.8 months, respectively. Common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (25%), anemia (36%), hyponatremia (29%), anorexia (24%), and nausea (11%). No febrile neutropenia was observed. Pneumonitis caused treatment-related death in one patient. The 2-weekly DCF regimen showed promising antimetastatic activity and tolerability. A phase III study comparing this regimen with CF therapy is planned by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group. This study was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000001737. PMID:25041052

  13. The Cryogenic Test Bed experiments: Cryogenic heat pipe flight experiment CRYOHP (STS-53). Cryogenic two phase flight experiment CRYOTP (STS-62). Cryogenic flexible diode flight experiment CRYOFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienel, Lee; Stouffer, Chuck

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cryogenic Test Bed (CTB) experiments including experiment results, integration techniques used, and lessons learned during integration, test and flight phases of the Cryogenic Heat Pipe Flight Experiment (STS-53) and the Cryogenic Two Phase Flight Experiment (OAST-2, STS-62). We will also discuss the Cryogenic Flexible Diode Heat Pipe (CRYOFD) experiment which will fly in the 1996/97 time frame and the fourth flight of the CTB which will fly in the 1997/98 time frame. The two missions tested two oxygen axially grooved heat pipes, a nitrogen fibrous wick heat pipe and a 2-methylpentane phase change material thermal storage unit. Techniques were found for solving problems with vibration from the cryo-collers transmitted through the compressors and the cold heads, and mounting the heat pipe without introducing parasitic heat leaks. A thermally conductive interface material was selected that would meet the requirements and perform over the temperature range of 55 to 300 K. Problems are discussed with the bi-metallic thermostats used for heater circuit protection and the S-Glass suspension straps originally used to secure the BETSU PCM in the CRYOTP mission. Flight results will be compared to 1-g test results and differences will be discussed.

  14. Experiments on phase retrapping in φ Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldobin, Edward; Menditto, Rosina; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold [University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Weides, Martin [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We experimentally study retrapping of the phase in φ Josephson junctions (JJs) based on superconductor-insulator-ferromagnet-superconductor (SIFS) 0-π heterostructures. Such φ JJs have a doubly degenerate ground state (two potential energy wells) with the phases ±φ (0 < φ < π). We study in which of these two wells the phase is trapped upon return of the JJ to the zero voltage state. We find that for T>T* ∼ 2.4 K (large damping) the phase is always trapped in the +φ state. However, for lower T (small damping) the trapping result is a statistical mixture of the +φ and the -φ states due to the presence of noise in the system. The probability for retrapping to the -φ state increases and oscillates as T is decreasing below T*, reaching a saturation value of ∝ 30% for T

  15. Determining material parameters using phase-field simulations and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jin; Poulsen, Stefan O.; Gibbs, John W.

    2017-01-01

    as an initial condition in a phase-field simulation, the computed structure is compared to that measured experimentally at a later time. An optimization technique is used to find the material parameters that yield the best match of the simulated microstructure to the measured microstructure in a global manner...

  16. EMERGENCE OF A LYOTROPIC LAMELLAR PHASE - SURFACTANT-AQUEOUS PHASE CONTACT EXPERIMENTS EXAMINED WITH A CRYO-TRANSMISSION ELECTRON-MICROSCOPE : Surfactant-Aqueous Phase Contact Experiments Examined with a Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sein, A; van Breemen, J.F.L.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    A phase penetration experiment has been conducted, employing a cryo-transmission electron microscope (cryo-TEM). With this technique, the phase transitions and the molecular rearrangement that result from the phase penetration can be studied on almost the molecular level. The technique has been

  17. Optimization of Pb(II) biosorption by Robinia tree leaves using statistical design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharnein, Javad; Shahmoradi, Ali; Sangi, Mohammad Reza

    2008-07-30

    The present study introduces Robinia tree leaves as a novel and efficient biosorbent for removing Pb(II) from aqueous solutions. In order to reduce the large number of experiments and find the highest removal efficiency of Pb(II), a set of full 2(3) factorial design with two blocks were performed in duplicate (16 experiments). In all experiments, the contact time was fixed at 25 min. The main interaction effects of the three factors including sorbent mass, pH and initial concentration of metal-ion were considered. By using Student's t-test and analysis of variances (ANOVA), the main factors, which had the highest effect on the removal process, were identified. Twenty-six experiments were designed according to Doehlert response surface design to obtain a mathematical model describing functional relationship between response and main independent variables. The most suitable regression model, that fitted the experimental data extremely well, was chosen according to the lack-of-fit-test and adjusted R(2) value. Finally, after checking for possible outliers, the optimum conditions for maximum removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution were obtained. The best conditions were calculated to be as: initial concentration of Pb(II)=40 mg L(-1), pH 4.6 and concentration of sorbet equal to 27.3 g L(-1).

  18. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  19. SRNL PHASE II SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SERIES 1 ROOM TEMPERATURE AND HIGH RELATIVE HUMIDITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2012-09-12

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Phase II, Series 1 shelf-life corrosion testing for the Department of Energy Standard 3013 container is presented and discussed in terms of the localized corrosion behavior of Type 304 stainless steel in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures and the potential impact to the 3013 inner container. This testing was designed to address the influence of temperature, salt composition, initial salt moisture, residual stress and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and the initiation and propagation of localized corrosion, especially stress corrosion cracking. The integrated plan is being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and SRNL. SRNL is responsible for conducting a corrosion study in small scale vessels containing plutonium oxide and chloride salts under conditions of humidity, temperature and oxide/salt compositions both within the limits of 3013 storage conditions as well as beyond the 3013 storage requirements to identify margins for minimizing the initiation of stress corrosion cracking. These worst case conditions provide data that bound the material packaged in 3013 containers. Phase I of this testing was completed in 2010. The Phase II, Series 1 testing was performed to verify previous results from Phase I testing and extend our understanding about the initiation of stress corrosion cracking and pitting that occur in 304L under conditions of room temperature, high humidity, and a specific plutonium oxide/salt chemistry. These results will aid in bounding the safe storage conditions of plutonium oxides in 3013 containers. A substantial change in the testing was the addition of the capability to monitor relative humidity during test exposure. The results show that under conditions of high initial moisture ({approx}0.5 wt%) and room temperature stress corrosion cracking occurred in 304L teardrop coupons in contact with the oxide/salt mixture at times

  20. Critical phenomena experiments in space. [for fluid phase-equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengers, J. V.; Moldover, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper analyzes several types of critical phenomena in fluids, shows how they are affected by the presence of gravity, and describes how experiments conducted in an orbiting laboratory under low gravity conditions could extend the range of measurements needed to study critical phenomena. Future experiments are proposed. One would be a careful measurement of the dielectric constant in a low gravity environment. Two basic problems that can benefit especially from space experiments are the specific heat near the critical point and the shear viscosity at the gas-liquid critical point.

  1. Performance of the TilePPr demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio Argos, Fernando; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter Pre-processor (TilePPr) demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) Demonstrator Project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the off-detector electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived for receiving and processing the data coming from the on-detector electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as for configuring it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the on-detector electronics.

  2. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per

    2013-01-01

    response rate (.80% PSA decline at wk 25) was 93%, with a median (range) decrease of 299% (2100, 257) at wk 25. Serum T and estrogen levels increased by a median (range) of 113% (232, 300) and 58% (249, 321) at wk 25, respectively, compared with baseline. 82% of men reported drug-related AEs (mostly Grade...... studies that exclusively enrolled patients with CRPC receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ie, testosterone (T) levels #50 ng/dL), this phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of ENZA monotherapy in patients who had never received hormone therapy; presenting with non-castrate T levels ($230 ng...... was PSA response (.80% decrease at wk 25). Secondary endpoints included changes in endocrine levels and safety/tolerability. Results: Among 67 men enrolled, the median (range) age was 73 (48, 86) y; 39% had metastases; 36% and 24% had undergone prostatectomy or radiotherapy before study entry. The PSA...

  3. Near-Term Electric Vehicle Program. Phase II: Mid-Term Summary Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-08-01

    The Near Term Electric Vehicle (NTEV) Program is a constituent elements of the overall national Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program that is being implemented by the Department of Energy in accordance with the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. Phase II of the NTEV Program is focused on the detailed design and development, of complete electric integrated test vehicles that incorporate current and near-term technology, and meet specified DOE objectives. The activities described in this Mid-Term Summary Report are being carried out by two contractor teams. The prime contractors for these contractor teams are the General Electric Company and the Garrett Corporation. This report is divided into two discrete parts. Part 1 describes the progress of the General Electric team and Part 2 describes the progress of the Garrett team.

  4. Dark-photon search using data from CRESST-II Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angloher, G.; Bauer, P.; Iachellini, N.F.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Mancuso, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bento, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Gorla, P.; Pagliarone, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Canonica, L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Defay, X.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Muenster, A.; Potzel, W.; Schoenert, S.; Thi, H.H.T.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Erb, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department and Excellence Cluster Universe, Garching (Germany); Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperaturforschung, Garching (Germany); Guetlein, A.; Kluck, H.; Puig, R.; Schieck, J.; Tuerkoglu, C. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Reindl, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); INFN-Sezione di Roma, Rome (Italy); Schaeffner, K. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); GSSI-Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    Identifying the nature and origin of dark matter is one of the major challenges for modern astro and particle physics. Direct dark-matter searches aim at an observation of dark-matter particles interacting within detectors. The focus of several such searches is on interactions with nuclei as provided e.g. by weakly interacting massive particles. However, there is a variety of dark-matter candidates favoring interactions with electrons rather than with nuclei. One example are dark photons, i.e., long-lived vector particles with a kinetic mixing to standard-model photons. In this work we present constraints on this kinetic mixing based on data from CRESST-II Phase 2 corresponding to an exposure before cuts of 52 kg-days. These constraints improve the existing ones for dark-photon masses between 0.3 and 0.7 keV/c{sup 2}. (orig.)

  5. Coexistence of type-II Dirac point and weak topological phase in Pt3Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minsung; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Intriguing topological phases may appear in both insulating and semimetallic states. Topological insulators exhibit topologically nontrivial band inversion, while topological Dirac/Weyl semimetals show "relativistic" linear band crossings. Here, we report an unusual topological state of Pt3Sn , where the two topological features appear simultaneously. Based on first-principles calculations, we show that Pt3Sn is a three-dimensional weak topological semimetal with topologically nontrivial band inversion between the valence and conduction bands, where the band structure also possesses type-II Dirac points at the boundary of two electron pockets. The formation of the Dirac points can be understood in terms of the representations of relevant symmetry groups and the compatibility relations. The topological surface states appear in accordance with the nontrivial bulk band topology. The unique coexistence of the two distinct topological features in Pt3Sn enlarges the material scope in topological physics, and is potentially useful for spintronics.

  6. Enzalutamide monotherapy: Phase II study results in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tombal, Bertrand; Borre, Michael; Rathenborg, Per Zier

    2013-01-01

    studies that exclusively enrolled patients with CRPC receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ie, testosterone (T) levels #50 ng/dL), this phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of ENZA monotherapy in patients who had never received hormone therapy; presenting with non-castrate T levels ($230 ng......Background: Enzalutamide (ENZA) is an oral androgen receptor inhibitor that has been approved in the US and shown to increase overall survival by 4.8 months over a placebo (HR,0.63) in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) previously treated with docetaxel (Scher et....../dL). Methods: This was a 25-wk, open-label, single-arm study of patients with hormone-naïve, histologically confirmed prostate cancer (all stages) requiring hormonal treatment, an ECOG PS score of 0,and a life expectancy .1 y. All patients received ENZA 160 mg/d without concomitment castration. Primary endpoint...

  7. New fuzzy EWMA control charts for monitoring phase II fuzzy profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazale Moghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In many quality control applications, the quality of a process or product is explained by the relationship between response variable and one or more explanatory variables, called a profile. In this paper, a new fuzzy EWMA control chart for phase II fuzzy profile monitoring is proposed. To this end, we extend EWMA control charts to its equivalent Fuzzy type and then implement fuzzy ranking methods to determine whether the process fuzzy profile is under or out of control. The proposed method is capable of identifying small changes in process under condition of process profile explaining parameters vagueness, roughness and uncertainty. Determining the source of changes, this method provides us with the possibility of recognizing the causes of process transition from stable mode, removing these causes and restoring the process stable mode.

  8. Bayesian phase II adaptive randomization by jointly modeling time-to-event efficacy and binary toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiudong; Yuan, Ying; Yin, Guosheng

    2011-01-01

    In oncology, toxicity is typically observable shortly after a chemotherapy treatment, whereas efficacy, often characterized by tumor shrinkage, is observable after a relatively long period of time. In a phase II clinical trial design, we propose a Bayesian adaptive randomization procedure that accounts for both efficacy and toxicity outcomes. We model efficacy as a time-to-event endpoint and toxicity as a binary endpoint, sharing common random effects in order to induce dependence between the bivariate outcomes. More generally, we allow the randomization probability to depend on patients' specific covariates, such as prognostic factors. Early stopping boundaries are constructed for toxicity and futility, and a superior treatment arm is recommended at the end of the trial. Following the setup of a recent renal cancer clinical trial at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, we conduct extensive simulation studies under various scenarios to investigate the performance of the proposed method, and compare it with available Bayesian adaptive randomization procedures.

  9. APE: the Active Phasing Experiment to test new control system and phasing technology for a European Extremely Large Optical Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Constanza, A.; Brast, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Esteves, R.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Koenig, E.; Kolb, J.; Nylund, M.; Noethe, L.; Surdej, I.; Courteville, A.; Wilhelm, R.; Montoya, L.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Dohlen, K.; Ferrari, M.; Langlois, M.

    2005-08-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope will be composed of one or two giant segmented mirrors (up to 100 m of diameter) and of several large monolithic mirrors (up to 8 m in diameter). To limit the aberrations due to misalignments and defective surface quality it is necessary to have a proper active optics system. This active optics system must include a phasing system to limit the degradation of the PSF due to misphasing of the segmented mirrors. We will present the lastest design and development of the Active Phasing Experiment that will be tested in laboratory and on-sky connected to a VLT at Paranal in Chile. It includes an active segmented mirror, a static piston plate to simulate a secondary segmented mirror and of four phasing wavefront sensors to measure the piston, tip and tilt of the segments and the aberrations of the VLT. The four phasing sensors are the Diffraction Image Phase Sensing Instrument developed by Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Pyramid Phasing Sensor developed by Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, the Shack-Hartmann Phasing Sensor developed by the European Southern Observatory and the Zernike Unit for Segment phasing developed by Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. A reference measurement of the segmented mirror is made by an internal metrology developed by Fogale Nanotech. The control system of Active Phasing Experiment will perform the phasing of the segments, the guiding of the VLT and the active optics of the VLT. These activities are included in the Framework Programme 6 of the European Union.

  10. PAH biotransformation in terrestrial invertebrates--a new phase II metabolite in isopods and springtails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroomberg, Gerard J; Zappey, Herman; Steen, Ruud J C A; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Ariese, Freek; Velthorst, Nel H; van Straalen, Nico M

    2004-06-01

    Soil-living invertebrates are exposed to high concentrations of contaminants accumulating in dead organic matter, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The capacity for PAH biotransformation is not equally developed in all invertebrates. In this paper, we compare three species of invertebrates, Porcellio scaber (Isopoda), Eisenia andrei (Lumbricidae) and Folsomia candida (Collembola), for the metabolites formed upon exposure to pyrene. Metabolic products of pyrene biotransformation in extracts from whole animals or isopod hepatopancreas were compared to those found in fish bile (flounder and plaice). An optimized HPLC method was used with fluorescence detection; excitation/emission spectra were compared to reference samples of 1-hydroxypyrene and enzymatically synthesized conjugates. Enzymatic hydrolysis after fractionation was used to demonstrate that the conjugates originated from 1-hydroxypyrene. All three invertebrates were able to oxidize pyrene to 1-hydroxypyrene, however, isopods and collembolans stood out as more efficient metabolizers compared to earthworms. In contrast to fish, none of the invertebrates produced pyrene-1-glucuronide as a phase II conjugate. Both Collembola and Isopoda produced significant amounts of pyrene-1-glucoside, whereas isopods also produced pyrene-1-sulfate. A third, previously unknown, conjugate was found in both isopods and springtails, and was analysed further using electrospray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. Based on the obtained mass spectra, a new conjugate is proposed: pyrene-1-O-(6"-O-malonyl)glucoside. The use of glucose-malonate as a conjugant in animal phase II biotransformation has not been described before, but is understandable in the microenvironment of soil-living invertebrates. In the earthworm, three other pyrene metabolites were observed, none of which was shared with the arthropods, although two were conjugates of 1-hydroxypyrene. Our study illustrates the great

  11. Doxycycline in early CJD: a double-blinded randomised phase II and observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varges, Daniela; Manthey, Henrike; Heinemann, Uta; Ponto, Claudia; Schmitz, Matthias; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Krasnianski, Anna; Breithaupt, Maren; Fincke, Fabian; Kramer, Katharina; Friede, Tim; Zerr, Inga

    2017-02-01

    The main objective of the present study is to study the therapeutic efficiency of doxycycline in a double-blinded randomised phase II study in a cohort of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD). From the National Reference Center of TSE Surveillance in Germany, patients with probable or definite sCJD were recruited for a double-blinded randomised study with oral doxycycline (EudraCT 2006-003934-14). In addition, we analysed the data from patients with CJD who received compassionate treatment with doxycycline in a separate group. Potential factors which influence survival such as age at onset, gender, codon 129 polymorphism and cognitive functions were evaluated. The primary outcome measure was survival. Group 1: in the double-blinded randomised phase II study, 7 patients in the treatment group were compared with 5 controls. Group 2: 55 patients with sCJD treated with oral doxycycline were analysed and compared with 33 controls by a stratified propensity score applied to a Cox proportional hazard analysis. The results of both studies were combined by means of a random-effects meta-analysis. A slight increase in survival time in the doxycycline treatment group was observed (p=0.049, HR=0.63 (95% CI 0.402 to 0.999)). On the basis of our studies, a larger trial of doxycycline should be performed in persons in the earliest stages of CJD. EudraCT 2006-003934-14; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Phase II stopping rules that employ response rates and early progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, John R; Tu, Dongsheng

    2008-08-01

    Phase II oncology trials traditionally have used response rate (RR) as the primary end point, but newer targeted agents require the consideration of alternative end points. High rates of early progressive disease (EPD) suggest inadequate drug activity and may be useful in the early stopping of trials. This study used a simulation to define a set of rules to assess a combined end point of RR and EPD. The simulation assumed a two-stage trial with a specified alpha error and power. It randomly generated the true response rate, r, of the agent under study and its true rate of early progressive disease, epd, for each run of the simulation. Two pairs of parameters were specified: (r(nul), epd(nul)) and (r(alt), epd(alt)). A drug was considered uninteresting for further development if r was less than or equal to r(nul) and epd was greater than or equal to epd(nul) (ie, the null hypothesis) and interesting for further development if r was greater than or equal to r(alt) or epd was less than or equal to epd(alt) (ie, the alternate hypotheses). Thresholds for the required number of patients with responses, n(r) and EPD, n(p), were generated for each set of parameters. Thresholds for n(r) and n(p) that satisfied the specified error rates were generated. There was at least an 89% likelihood that a study would be stopped at the first stage of accrual if r and epd were uninteresting. The simulation was able to establish stopping rules by combining the RR and the EPD that achieved the desired error rates. High rates of early stopping suggest that this design could shorten phase II trials of inactive agents.

  13. An Overview of Materials Structures for Extreme Environments Efforts for 2015 SBIR Phases I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2017-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for Agency projects. This report highlights innovative SBIR 2015 Phase I and II projects that specifically address areas in Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments, one of six core competencies at NASA Glenn Research Center. Each article describes an innovation, defines its technical objective, and highlights NASA applications as well as commercial and industrial applications. Ten technologies are featured: metamaterials-inspired aerospace structures, metallic joining to advanced ceramic composites, multifunctional polyolefin matrix composite structures, integrated reacting fluid dynamics and predictive materials degradation models for propulsion system conditions, lightweight inflatable structural airlock (LISA), copolymer materials for fused deposition modeling 3-D printing of nonstandard plastics, Type II strained layer superlattice materials development for space-based focal plane array applications, hydrogenous polymer-regolith composites for radiation-shielding materials, a ceramic matrix composite environmental barrier coating durability model, and advanced composite truss printing for large solar array structures. This report serves as an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, program managers, and other personnel to learn about innovations in this technology area as well as possibilities for collaboration with innovative small businesses that could benefit NASA programs and projects.

  14. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Naturita site, Naturita, Colorado. Phase II, Title I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-11-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has performed an engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Naturita, Colorado. The Phase II, Title I services include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings, the performance of radiometric measurements to determine the extent of radium contamination, the evaluation of resulting radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigation of site hydrology and meteorology, and the costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 704,000 tons of tailings at the Naturita site constitutes the most significant environmental impact although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. Ranchers Exploration and Development Company has been licensed by the State of Colorado to reprocess the tailings at a location 3 mi from the present site where they will be stabilized for long-term storage. The remedial action options include remedial action for structures in Naturita and Nucla (Option I) at an estimated cost of $270,000 and remedial action for structures and open land adjacent to the tailings site (Option II) at an estimated cost of $950,000.

  15. Cu–Ni nanoalloy phase diagram – Prediction and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Sopoušek Jiří; Vřešťál Jan; Pinkas Jiří; Brož Pavel; Buršík Jiří; Stýskalík Aleš; Škoda David; Zobač Ondřej; Lee Joonho

    2014-01-01

    The Cu-Ni nanoalloy phase diagram respecting the nanoparticle size as an extra variable was calculated by the CALPHAD method. The samples of the Cu-Ni nanoalloys were prepared by the solvothermal synthesis from metal precursors. The samples were characterized by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), infrared spectroscopy (IR), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP/OES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HRTEM), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The n...

  16. A phase II study of flavopiridol (Alvocidib) in combination with docetaxel in refractory, metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Richard D; Tse, Archie; Shah, Manish A; Lefkowitz, Robert A; Gonen, Mithat; Gilman-Rosen, Lisa; Kortmansky, Jeremy; Kelsen, David P; Schwartz, Gary K; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) harbors frequent alterations in p16, resulting in cell cycle dysregulation. A phase I study of docetaxel and flavopiridol, a pan-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, demonstrated encouraging clinical activity in PC. This phase II study was designed to further define the efficacy and toxicity of this regimen in patients with previously treated PC. Patients with gemcitabine-refractory, metastatic PC were treated with docetaxel 35 mg/m(2) followed by flavopiridol 80 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Tumor measurements were performed every two cycles. A Simon two-stage design was used to evaluate the primary endpoint of response. Ten patients were enrolled, and 9 were evaluable for response. No objective responses were observed; however, 3 patients (33%) achieved transient stable disease, with one of these patients achieving a 20% reduction in tumor size. Median survival was 4.2 months, with no patients alive at the time of analysis. Adverse events were significant, with 7 patients (78%) requiring >or=1 dose reduction for transaminitis (11%), grade 4 neutropenia (33%), grade 3 fatigue (44%), and grade 3 diarrhea (22%). The combination of flavopiridol and docetaxel has minimal activity and significant toxicity in this patient population. These results reflect the challenges of treating patients with PC in a second-line setting where the risk/benefit equation is tightly balanced. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Phase II trial of a depression self-care intervention for adult cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Yaffe, Mark; Faria, Rosana; Lambert, Sylvie; Li, Madeline; Poirier-Bisson, Joannie; Magalhaes, Mona; de Raad, Manon

    2017-10-06

    Supported self-care interventions are a low-intensity treatment for depression that has received little research attention in the cancer population. This is a phase II intervention only study to test the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of a depression self-care intervention for cancer patients who have completed their primary treatment and have moderate depressive symptoms. The self-care intervention was adapted from a successful model for people with chronic physical conditions, following focus groups with cancer care professionals and patients. The support was delivered by telephone by a trained lay coach who provided up to 8 weekly coaching contacts. A variety of recruitment methods were tested; those with the highest yield of eligible subjects per research staff time were electronic mailings to community support group members and social media posting. Sixty-eight people were contacted about the study over an 11-month period, of whom 34 (49%) were eligible; 32 were enrolled (94% recruitment rate); and 25 completed 2-month follow-up (78% retention). The mean severity of PHQ-9 depression decreased significantly from screening to 2 months (12.8 to 7.0, p < .0001). The intervention is a promising treatment option for cancer survivors, demonstrating sufficient effectiveness and feasibility to proceed with a phase III clinical trial. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Investigational glucagon receptor antagonists in Phase I and II clinical trials for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J; Paquot, Nicolas; Lefèbvre, Pierre J

    2017-12-01

    Despite type 2 diabetes (T2D) being recognized as a bihormonal pancreatic disease, current therapies are mainly focusing on insulin, while targeting glucagon has been long dismissed. However, glucagon receptor (GCGr) antagonists are currently investigated in clinical trials. Area covered: Following a brief description of the rationale for antagonizing GCGr in T2D, lessons from GCGr knock-out mice and pharmacological means to antagonize GCGr, a detailed description of the main results obtained with GCGr antagonists in Phase I-II clinical trials is provided. The development of several small molecules has been discontinued, while new ones are currently considered as well as innovative approaches such as monoclonal antibodies or antisense oligonucleotides inhibiting GCGr gene expression. Their potential benefits but also limitations are discussed. Expert opinion: The proof-of-concept that antagonizing GCGr improves glucose control in T2D has been confirmed in humans. Nevertheless, some adverse events led to stopping the development of some of these GCGr antagonists. New approaches seem to have a better benefit/risk balance, although none has progressed to Phase III clinical trials so far. Pharmacotherapy of T2D is becoming a highly competitive field so that GCGr antagonists should provide clear advantages over numerous existing glucose-lowering medications before eventually reaching clinical practice.

  19. Interaction-induced phase transitions of type-II Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang; Li, Fuxiang; Bian, Baoan

    2017-10-01

    The study of Weyl semimetals (WSMs) lies at the forefront of the nontrivial topological phenomena in condensed-matter physics. In this work, we study the effect of on-site repulsive Hubbard interaction on the WSM system with a nonzero tilt at half filling. Within the Hartree-Fock mean-field approximation, we treat the Hubbard interaction self-consistently and find that the Fock exchange field vanishes, while the Hartree field can renormalize the topological mass, the tilt, and the Fermi velocity of the Weyl cones. When the renormalized tilt is larger than the renormalized Fermi velocity, the Hubbard interaction will induce the quantum phase transition from a type-I WSM to a type-II WSM. We then provide the interaction-induced phase diagrams of WSMs in different parametric spaces, in which the antiferromagnetic order at strong interaction is also considered. In addition, we analyze another model hosting two pairs of Weyl nodes, and similar results are obtained. The implications of these results are discussed.

  20. Materials information for science and technology (MIST): Project overview: Phases I and II and general considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattidge, W.; Westbrook, J.; McCarthy, J.; Northrup, C. Jr.; Rumble, J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents the initial phases of the Materials Information for Science and Technology (MIST) project jointly supported by the Department of Energy and the National Bureau of Standards. The purpose of MIST is to demonstrate the power and utility of computer access to materials property data. The initial goals include: to exercise the concept of a computer network of materials databases and to build a demonstration of such a system suitable for use as the core of operational systems in the future. Phases I and II are described in detail herein. In addition, a discussion is given of the expected usage of the system. The primary MIST prototype project is running on an IBM 3084 under STS at the Stanford University's Information Technology Services (ITS). Users can access the Stanford system via ARPANET, TELENET, and TYMNET, as well as via commercial telephone lines. For fastest response time and use of the full screen PRISM interface, direct connection using a 2400 baud modem with the MNP error-correcting protocol over standard telephone lines gives the best results - though slower speed connections and a line-oriented interface are also available. This report gives detailed plans regarding the properties to be enterend and the materials to be entered into the system.

  1. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  2. Oral fingolimod (FTY720) in multiple sclerosis: two-year results of a phase II extension study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, P; Comi, G; Montalban, X

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a 24-month extension of a phase II trial assessing the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of the once-daily oral sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator, fingolimod (FTY720), in relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: In the randomized, double-blind, pla......OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a 24-month extension of a phase II trial assessing the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of the once-daily oral sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulator, fingolimod (FTY720), in relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: In the randomized, double...

  3. 75 FR 32773 - Auction of 218-219 MHz Service and Phase II 220 MHz Service Licenses Scheduled for December 7...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... licenses covering a total of 727 Cellular Market Areas (CMAs). ii. Phase II 220 MHz Service Licenses 4... three percent will be more effective in deterring defaults. Given the history of these services and the...

  4. The First Year of the BABAR Experiment at PEP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-12-18

    The BABAR detector, situated at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, has been recording data at energies on and around the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance since May 1999. In this paper, we briefly describe the PEP-II B Factory and the BABAR detector. The performance presently achieved by the experiment in the areas of tracking, vertexing, calorimetry and particle identification is reviewed. Analysis concepts that are used in the various papers submitted to this conference are also discussed.

  5. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163 (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The Orion MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a single-piece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment were the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  6. Cancer Research Campaign phase II trial of temozolomide in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleehen, N M; Newlands, E S; Lee, S M; Thatcher, N; Selby, P; Calvert, A H; Rustin, G J; Brampton, M; Stevens, M F

    1995-04-01

    Sixty patients with metastatic melanoma were treated in a phase II study with the imidazotetrazine derivative temozolamide to assess further the efficacy demonstrated in previous phase I studies. Fifty-five of 56 eligible patients were assessable for toxicity and 49 for response. The patients received temozolomide 150 mg/m2/d over 5 successive days orally (total dose, 750 mg/m2) in the first course. Courses were repeated every 4 weeks and the dose was escalated to 200 mg/m2/d x 5 (total dose, 1 g/m2) after the first course if toxicity was acceptable. Patients were all chemotherapy-naive, except for two who had previously received interferon alfa and one who had received interleukin-2 (the latter patient had also received two phase I drugs some time previously). A complete response (CR) was documented in three patients (all with lung metastases) and a partial response (PR) in nine patients (21% CR plus PR rate). Seven of 56 patients were not assessable for response because of early death or deterioration. The overall response rate excluding these patients is 12 of 49 (24%). The median response duration was 6 months (range, 2.5 to 22+). Toxicity of the regimen, which was mainly hematopoietic, was low. The median survival duration for all patients was 5.5 months (range, 0.5 to 29.5). For responders, the median survival duration was 14.5 months (range, 3 to 28+), with four patients still alive. Temozolomide in the schedule used has as good activity in chemotherapy-naive metastatic melanoma as the other most active agents currently in use. Further studies of the drug on its own and in combination with other agents is recommended.

  7. Phase Equilibrium, Chemical Equilibrium, and a Test of the Third Law: Experiments for Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, Walter

    1980-01-01

    Described is an experiment designed to provide an experimental basis for a unifying point of view (utilizing theoretical framework and chemistry laboratory experiments) for physical chemistry students. Three experiments are described: phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, and a test of the third law of thermodynamics. (Author/DS)

  8. Assessment of the MARS Code Using the Two-Phase Natural Circulation Experiments at a Core Catcher Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A core catcher has been developed to maintain the integrity of nuclear reactor containment from molten corium during a severe accident. It uses a two-phase natural circulation for cooling molten corium. Flow in a typical core catcher is unique because (i it has an inclined cooling channel with downwards-facing heating surface, of which flow processes are not fully exploited, (ii it is usually exposed to a low-pressure condition, where phase change causes dramatic changes in the flow, and (iii the effects of a multidimensional flow are very large in the upper part of the core catcher. These features make computational analysis more difficult. In this study, the MARS code is assessed using the two-phase natural circulation experiments that had been conducted at the CE-PECS facility to verify the cooling performance of a core catcher. The code is a system-scale thermal-hydraulic (TH code and has a multidimensional TH component. The facility was modeled by using both one- and three-dimensional components. Six experiments at the facility were selected to investigate the parametric effects of heat flux, pressure, and form loss. The results show that MARS can predict the two-phase flow at the facility reasonably well. However, some limitations are obviously revealed.

  9. Eriochrome Blue Black modified activated carbon as solid phase extractor for removal of Pb(II ions from water samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan M. Albishri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, a sensitive and simple method for the removal of lead Pb(II, from water samples prior to its determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, was investigated. The method utilized activated carbon (AC physically modified with Eriochrome Blue Black (EBB as a solid-phase extractant. Surface properties of the AC-EBB phase were characterized by FT-IR and SEM. The separation parameters for effective adsorption of lead Pb(II, including effects of pH, initial concentration of Pb(II, coexisting ions and shaking time using batch method were studied. The optimum pH value for the separation of Pb(II on the new sorbent was 7.0, and the maximum static adsorption capacity of Pb(II onto the AC-EBB was 127.896 mg/g at this pH and after 1 h contact time. The Pb(II adsorption data were modeled using Langmuir adsorption isotherms. Results demonstrated that the adsorption of Pb(II onto activated carbon followed pseudo second-order kinetic model.

  10. A Coal-Use Economics Methodology for Navy Bases. Phase II of Engineering Services for Coal Conversion Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    and coal-water mixtures are prepared with comercially available processes and equipment. It is feasible to design and construct - facilities at Navy...to the private sector economics described in the Phase I report A user manual for the Phase II computer program has been prepared as a separate...alternative of installing new coal-fired boilers, particularly since competitively priced plentiful eastern coals could be used. 3.2.3 Comercialization

  11. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting, I-35W Bridge, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Phase II Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, B. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, R. G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    On the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the GATEWAY program conducted a two-phase demonstration of LED roadway lighting on the main span, which is one of the country's oldest continuously operated exterior LED lighting installations. The Phase II report documents longer-term performance of the LED lighting system that was installed in 2008, and is the first report on the longer-term performance of LED lighting in the field.

  12. Abbreviated Environmental Assessment for the Northwest Infrastructure, Phase II Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Lehm und Ton Eoz&ne relne Tone Oberer M liSChetkalk (Trochiten-Schlchlen) Mlaleter Musch&lkalk Uc’ltcrol’ M usehelkalk J reglonal Oberer...II Hohe uber NN: 350 m II II X Relief : 13 Hang ; X Neigung: 22 mittel, 23 flach; X Exposit ion : 32 Ost; X !I II Bodenar t : 4 2 Lehm , 43 Sand; X

  13. The cryogenic photon detection system for the ALPS II experiment. Characterization, optimization and background rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastidon, Noemi Alice Chloe

    2017-01-12

    The search for new fundamental bosons at very low mass is the central objective of the ALPS II experiment which is currently set up at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY, Hamburg). This experiment follows the light-shining-through-the-wall concept where photons could oscillate into weakly interacting light bosons in front of a wall and back into photons behind the wall, giving the impression that light can shine through a light tight barrier. In this concept, the background-free detection of near-infrared photons is required to fully exploit the sensitivity of the apparatus. The high efficiency single-photon detection in the near-infrared is challenging and requires a cryogenic detector. In this project, a Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) operated below 100mK will be used to detect single photons. This thesis focuses on the characterization and optimization of the ALPS II detector system including an Adiabatic Demagnetisation Refrigerator (ADR) with its two-stage pulse-tube cooler, two TES detectors and their Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) read-out system. Stability of the detection system over time is a priority in the ALPS II experiment. It is in this context that the cooling system has been subjected to many upgrades. In the framework of this thesis, the cooling setup has been studied in detail in order to optimize its cooling performances. Furthermore, the stability of the detector has been studied according to various criteria. Other essential parameters of the ALPS II experiment are its detection efficiency and its background rate. Indeed, the sensitivity of the experiment directly depends on these two characteristics. Both elements have been studied in depth in order to define if the chosen TES detector will meet ALPS IIc specifications.

  14. Solar photovoltaic/thermal residential experiment. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkazalli, G.

    1980-07-01

    Month-by-month energy transfer data between an occupied residence and its energy supply systems are presented. The data were obtained during the first phase of photovoltaic/thermal residential research conducted at the University of Texas at Arlington/Solar Energy Research Facility. This research was part of the US Department of Energy Photovoltaic/Thermal Project managed by the M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory. Energy transfer data are divided into different categories depending on how the energy is consumed. Energy transfers between some system components are also categorized. These components include a flat-plate thermal collector array, a flat-plate photovoltaic array, a dc-to-ac inverter, thermal storage tanks, and a series heat pump. System operations included directing surplus electrical energy (generated by the photovoltaic array) into the local utility grid. The heat pump used off-peak utility power to chill water during the cooling season.

  15. Coupled Cluster in Condensed Phase. Part II: Liquid Hydrogen Fluoride from Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spickermann, Christian; Perlt, Eva; von Domaros, Michael; Roatsch, Martin; Friedrich, Joachim; Kirchner, Barbara

    2011-04-12

    Treating the bulk phase with high-level ab initio methods, such as coupled cluster, is a nontrivial task because of the computational costs of these electronic structure methods. In this part of our hydrogen fluoride study we make use of the quantum cluster equilibrium method, which employs electronic structure input of small clusters and combines it with simple statistical mechanics in order to describe condensed phase phenomena. If no parameter adjustment is applied, then the lower quantum chemical methods, such as density functional theory in conjunction with the generalized gradient approximation, provide wrong results in accordance with the description of the strength of the interaction in the clusters. While density functional theory describes the liquid phase too dense due to overbinding of the clusters, the coupled cluster method and the perturbation theory at the complete basis set limit agree well with experimental observations. If we allow the two parameters in the quantum cluster equilibrium method to vary, then these are able to compensate the overbinding, thereby leading to very good agreement with experiment. Correlated methods in combination with small basis sets giving rise to too weakly bound clusters cannot reach this accuracy even if the parameters are flexible. Only at the complete basis set limit, the performance of the correlated methods is again excellent.

  16. Using the continual reassessment method to estimate the minimum effective dose in phase II dose-finding studies: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Sarah; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Chevret, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The Continual Reassessment Method typically is presented as the method of choice for the purpose of dose-finding based on a toxicity scale in phase I clinical trials. However, this adaptive statistical approach also can be applied easily to dose-finding experiments in phase II trials. To provide a case study from a real clinical trial to illustrate the use of the Continual Reassessment Method in the context of phase II dose finding. The Continual Reassessment Method was used to model the dose-failure relationship in order to estimate the minimal effective dose. This approach was retrospectively used to determine the minimal effective dose of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood stem cell collection in allografted patients following chemotherapy. After the inclusion of 25 patients, the minimal effective dose was estimated to be the third dose level tested in the study. The main limitation of the Continual Reassessment Method, which is not specific to the method but to the dose-finding setting, is that the empirical choice of the dose range can be either under or over-estimated. The method requires a calibration study prior to trial onset. Assuming that a dose-effect relationship is monotonically increasing, the use of the Continual Reassessment Method in phase II dose-finding studies allows the estimation of the minimum effective dose for further studies. Modeling the dose-failure relationship allows the direct use of available software developed for the Continual Reassessment Method in the context of phase I clinical trials.

  17. Advanced Start of Combustion Sensor Phases I and II-A: Feasibility Demonstration, Design and Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Smutzer

    2010-01-31

    Homogeneous Compressed Charge Ignition (HCCI) has elevated the need for Start of Combustion (SOC) sensors. HCCI engines have been the exciting focus of engine research recently, primarily because HCCI offers higher thermal efficiency than the conventional Spark Ignition (SI) engines and significantly lower NOx and soot emissions than conventional Compression Ignition (CI) engines, and could be fuel neutral. HCCI has the potential to unify all the internal combustion engine technology to achieve the high-efficiency, low-emission goal. However, these advantages do not come easy. It is well known that the problems encountered with HCCI combustion center on the difficulty of controlling the Start of Combustion. TIAX has an SOC sensor under development which has shown promise. In previous work, including a DOE-sponsored SBIR project, TIAX has developed an accelerometer-based method which was able to determine SOC within a few degrees crank angle for a range of operating conditions. A signal processing protocol allows reconstruction of the combustion pressure event signal imbedded in the background engine vibration recorded by the accelerometer. From this reconstructed pressure trace, an algorithm locates the SOC. This SOC sensor approach is nonintrusive, rugged, and is particularly robust when the pressure event is strong relative to background engine vibration (at medium to high engine load). Phase I of this project refined the previously developed technology with an engine-generic and robust algorithm. The objective of the Phase I research was to answer two fundamental questions: Can the accelerometer-based SOC sensor provide adequate SOC event capture to control an HCCI engine in a feedback loop? And, will the sensor system meet cost, durability, and software efficiency (speed) targets? Based upon the results, the answer to both questions was 'YES'. The objective of Phase II-A was to complete the parameter optimization of the SOC sensor prototype in order

  18. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  19. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe Lederman

    2007-01-08

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (“Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections”) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank™ filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30

  20. Local Treatment of Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Coevorden, Frits; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E. N.; Borel-Rinkes, Inne; Ledermann, Jonathan A.; Poston, Graeme; Bechstein, Wolf; Lentz, Marie-Ange; Mauer, Murielle; Folprecht, Gunnar; Van Cutsem, Eric; Ducreux, Michel; Nordlinger, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tumor ablation is often employed for unresectable colorectal liver metastases. However, no survival benefit has ever been demonstrated in prospective randomized studies. Here, we investigate the long-term benefits of such an aggressive approach. Methods: In this randomized phase II trial, 119 patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases (n  38%) was met. We now report on long-term OS results. All statistical tests were two-sided. The analyses were according to intention to treat. Results: At a median follow up of 9.7 years, 92 of 119 (77.3%) patients had died: 39 of 60 (65.0%) in the combined modality arm and 53 of 59 (89.8%) in the systemic treatment arm. Almost all patients died of progressive disease (35 patients in the combined modality arm, 49 patients in the systemic treatment arm). There was a statistically significant difference in OS in favor of the combined modality arm (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.38 to 0.88, P = .01). Three-, five-, and eight-year OS were 56.9% (95% CI = 43.3% to 68.5%), 43.1% (95% CI = 30.3% to 55.3%), 35.9% (95% CI = 23.8% to 48.2%), respectively, in the combined modality arm and 55.2% (95% CI = 41.6% to 66.9%), 30.3% (95% CI = 19.0% to 42.4%), 8.9% (95% CI = 3.3% to 18.1%), respectively, in the systemic treatment arm. Median OS was 45.6 months (95% CI = 30.3 to 67.8 months) in the combined modality arm vs 40.5 months (95% CI = 27.5 to 47.7 months) in the systemic treatment arm. Conclusions: This phase II trial is the first randomized study demonstrating that aggressive local treatment can prolong OS in patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases. PMID:28376151

  1. Ultra-secure RF Tags for Safeguards and Security - SBIR Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twogood, Richard E [Dirac Solutions Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    2015-01-27

    This is the Final Report for the DOE Phase II SBIR project “Ultra-secure RF Tags for Safeguards and Security.” The topics covered herein include technical progress made, progress against the planned milestones and deliverables, project outcomes (results, collaborations, intellectual property, etc.), and a discussion on future expectations of deployment and impacts of the results of this work. In brief, all planned work for the project was successfully completed, on or ahead of schedule and on budget. The major accomplishment was the successful development of a very advanced passive ultra-secure RFID tag system with combined security features unmatched by any commercially available ones. These tags have high-level dynamic encrypted authentication, a novel tamper-proofing mechanism, system software including graphical user interfaces and networking, and integration with a fiber-optic seal mechanism. This is all accomplished passively (with no battery) by incorporating sophisticated hardware in the tag which harvests the energy from the RFID readers that are interrogating the tag. Based on initial feedback (and deployments) at DOE’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), it is anticipated these tags and their offspring will meet DOE and international community needs for highly secure RFID systems. Beyond the accomplishment of those original objectives for the ultra-secure RF tags, major new spin-off thrusts from the original work were identified and successfully pursued with the cognizance of the DOE sponsor office. In particular, new classes of less sophisticated RFID tags were developed whose lineage derives from the core R&D thrusts of this SBIR. These RF “tag variants” have some, but not necessarily all, of the advanced characteristics described above and can therefore be less expensive and meet far wider markets. With customer pull from the DOE and its national laboratories, new RFID tags and systems (including custom readers and software) for

  2. Two-color experiments in the gas phase at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M., E-mail: michael.meyer@u-psud.f [LIXAM/CNRS, UMR 8624, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 350, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Cubaynes, D. [LIXAM/CNRS, UMR 8624, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 350, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dardis, J.; Hayden, P.; Hough, P.; Richardson, V.; Kennedy, E.T.; Costello, J.T. [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Duesterer, S.; Li, W.B.; Radcliffe, P.; Redlin, H.; Feldhaus, J. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Strakhova, S.I.; Gryzlova, E.V.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A.N. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Taieb, R.; Maquet, A. [UPMC, Universite Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7614, LCPMR, 11 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2010-08-15

    Intense ultra-short XUV-pulses from the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) were used in combination with the synchronized near-infrared (NIR) radiation from a femtosecond laser to perform two-color experiments on rare gas atoms and small molecules. Results of atomic photoionization in the presence of a NIR dressing field are presented and discussed for the low field regime, i.e. for intensities of less than 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}. In particular, the analysis of two-color Above Threshold Ionization (ATI) as a function of the relative orientation of the polarization vectors of both photon beams provided detailed information about the partial photoionization crosssections by comparing the experimental results with theoretical values obtained by employing second-order perturbation theory and the 'soft-photon' approximation. Furthermore, a first time-resolved study was performed on the photodissociation of molecular hydrogen. In this proof-of-principle experiment, the excited atomic fragments, produced in the primary interaction with the intense XUV pulse, are probed by a time delayed NIR laser pulse that ionizes these fragments.

  3. Manifestation of the geometric phase in neutron spin-echo experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, W.H.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Rekveldt, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    We show how the geometric (Berry’s) phase becomes manifest on adiabatic rotation of the polarization vector in the magnetic field configuration in the arms in a neutron spin echo (NSE) experiment.When the neutron beam used is monochromatic, a geometric phase collected in one spin-echo arm can be

  4. Phase II trial to evaluate the ActiGait implanted drop-foot stimulator in established hemiplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burridge, Jane H; Haugland, Morten; Larsen, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a selective implantable drop foot stimulator (ActiGait) in terms of effect on walking and safety. DESIGN: A phase II trial in which a consecutive sample of participants acted as their own controls. SUBJECTS: People who had suffered a stroke at least 6 months prior to recrui...

  5. Alpha-galactosylceramide in chronic hepatitis B infection: results from a randomized placebo-controlled Phase I/II trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltman, A.M.; Borg, M.J. Ter; Binda, R.S.; Sprengers, D.; Blomberg, B.M.E. von; Scheper, R.J.; Hayashi, K.; Nishi, N.; Boonstra, A.; Molen, R.G. van der; Janssen, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The glycosphingolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) is known to stimulate invariant natural killer T-cells (iNKTs) and is able to induce powerful antiviral immune responses. The present dose-escalating randomized placebo-controlled Phase I/II trial aimed to investigate

  6. Advanced Physics-Based Modeling of Discrete Clutter and Diffuse Reverberation in the Littoral Environment Phase II Preliminary Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-02

    suitable to the problem of directly modeling reverberation time series in the low to mid frequency range. The approach developed by Kevin LePage relies...will be used under the Phase II model evaluation/development effort. Criteria for selecting the data sets include: measured reverberation time series

  7. Phase II study of 3-AP Triapine in patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nutting, C.M.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Miah, A.B.; Bhide, S.A.; Machiels, J.P.; Buter, J.; Kelly, C.; Raucourt, D. de; Harrington, K.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment options for recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are limited with response rates to cytotoxic chemotherapy of approximately 30% and median survival of 6 months. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a multicentre phase II study, 32 patients with recurrent or

  8. Pooled analysis of phase II trials evaluating weekly or conventional cisplatin as first-line therapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Agarwal, Neeraj; Hussain, Syed A

    2013-01-01

    Weekly gemcitabine with GC every 3-4 weeks is considered conventional first-line chemotherapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC). Weekly split-dose cisplatin with wGC might be less toxic and have similar activity, but has not been compared with GC. We pooled published phase II trials of GC...

  9. A phase II trial with bevacizumab and irinotecan for patients with primary brain tumors and progression after standard therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Grunnet, Kirsten; Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2012-01-01

    The combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab has shown efficacy in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A prospective, phase II study of 85 patients with various recurrent brain tumors was carried out. Primary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and response rate....

  10. Temoporfin improves efficacy of photodynamic therapy in advanced biliary tract carcinoma: A multicenter prospective phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Andrej; Denzer, Ulrike W.; Neureiter, Daniel; Kiesslich, Tobias; Puespoeck, Andreas; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Emmanuel, Klaus; Degenhardt, Nora; Frick, Ulrich; Beuers, Ulrich; Lohse, Ansgar W.; Berr, Frieder; Wolkersdörfer, Gernot W.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy using porfimer (P-PDT) improves palliation and survival in nonresectable hilar bile duct cancer. Tumoricidal penetration depth of temoporfin-PDT (T-PDT) is twice that of P-PDT. In a single-arm phase II study we investigated the safety, efficacy, survival time, and adverse events

  11. Clinical phase I/II research on ultrasound thermo-chemotherapy in oral and maxillofacial-head and neck carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guofeng; Ren, Guoxin; Guo, Wei; Chen, Yazhu

    2012-11-01

    The principle of a ultrasound thermo-chemotherapy instrument and the clinical phase I/II research on short-term and long-term therapeutic effect and main side-effect of ultrasound hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy in oral and maxillofacial-head & neck carcinoma by the instrument will be presented in this paper.

  12. Two randomised phase II trials of subcutaneous interleukin-2 and histamine dihydrochloride in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donskov, F; Middleton, M; Fode, K

    2005-01-01

    Histamine inhibits formation and release of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species, and thereby protects natural killer and T cells against oxidative damage. Thus, the addition of histamine may potentially improve the efficacy of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Two randomised phase II trials of IL-2 wit...

  13. OC5 Project Phase II: Validation of Global Loads of the DeepCwind Floating Semisubmersible Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Wendt, Fabian; Jonkman, Jason M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings from Phase II of the Offshore Code Comparison, Collaboration, Continued, with Correlation project. The project is run under the International Energy Agency Wind Research Task 30, and is focused on validating the tools used for modeling offshore wind systems thro...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, C. LEE COOK DIVISION, DOVER CORPORATION, STATIC PAC (TM) SYSTEM, PHASE II REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Static Pac System, Phase II, natural gas reciprocating compressor rod packing manufactured by the C. Lee Cook Division, Dover Corporation. The Static Pac System is designed to seal th...

  15. ALICE Diffractive Detector Control System for RUN-II in the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00522336; Martinez, M.I.; Monzon, I. Leon

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes general characteristics of the deployment and commissioned of the Detector Control System (DCS) AD0 for the second phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The AD0 detector is installed in the ALICE experiment to provide a better selection of diffractive events.

  16. Observation of the X-ray pulsar A0535 + 26 with the FIGARO II experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J. F.; Agrinier, B.; Barouch, E.; Comte, R.; Costa, E.; Cusumano, G. C.; Gerardi, G.; Mandrou, P.; Masnou, J. L.; Massaro, E.; Matt, G.; Mineo, T.; Niel, M.; Parlier, B.; Sacco, B.; Salvati, M.; Scarsi, L.

    1993-01-01

    The FIGARO II experiment observed the transient X-ray pulsar A0535 + 26 in the 0.15-4 MeV range, only 11.1 +/- 4 days after an expected outburst. We found evidence for periodicity at 103.2 sec close to the extrapolated value. The light-curve and the spectral shape of this low energy gamma-ray emission are presented here.

  17. VAC chemotherapy with valproic acid for refractory/relapsing small cell lung cancer: a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Berghmans

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvage chemotherapy (CT for relapsing or refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC remains disappointing. In vitro experiments showed that valproic acid increases apoptosis of SCLC cell lines exposed to doxorubicin, vindesine and bis(2-chloroethylamine. The primary objective of this phase II study was to determine whether epigenetic modulation with valproic acid in addition to a doxorubicin, vindesine and cyclophosphamide (VAC regimen improves 6-month progression-free survival (PFS. Patients with pathologically proven SCLC refractory to prior platinum derivatives and etoposide were eligible. After central registration, patients received VAC plus daily oral valproic acid. 64 patients were registered, of whom six were ineligible. Seven patients did not receive any CT, leaving 51 patients assessable for the primary end-point. The objective response rate was 19.6%. Median PFS was 2.8 months (95% CI 2.5–3.6 months and 6-month PFS was 6%. Median survival time was 5.9 months (95% CI 4.7–7.5 months. Toxicity was mainly haematological, with 88% and 26% grade 3–4 neutropenia and thrombopenia, respectively. Despite an interesting response rate, the addition of valproic acid to VAC did not translate into adequate PFS in relapsing SCLC or SCLC refractory to platinum–etoposide.

  18. A detector module with highly efficient surface-alpha event rejection operated in CRESST-II Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Angloher, G.; Ferreiro, N.; Hauff, D.; Kiefer, M.; Petricca, F.; Proebst, F.; Reindl, F.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Tanzke, A.; Wuestrich, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bento, A. [Universidade de Coimbra, CIUC, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Gorla, P.; Schaeffner, K. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy); Erb, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Walther-Meissner-Institut fuer Tieftemperaturforschung, Garching (Germany); Feilitzsch, F. von; Guetlein, A.; Lanfranchi, J.C.; Muenster, A.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Schoenert, S.; Stanger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Zoeller, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Jochum, J.; Loebell, J.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Scholl, S.; Strandhagen, C.; Uffinger, M.; Usherov, I. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Physikalisches Institut, Tuebingen (Germany); Kluck, H. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Wien (Austria); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Schieck, J. [Institut fuer Hochenergiephysik der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien (Austria); Sivers, M. von [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    The cryogenic dark matter experiment CRESSTII aims at the direct detection of WIMPs via elastic scattering off nuclei in scintillating CaWO{sub 4} crystals. We present a new, highly improved, detector design installed in the current run of CRESST-II Phase 2 with an efficient active rejection of surface-alpha backgrounds. Using CaWO{sub 4} sticks instead of metal clamps to hold the target crystal, a detector housing with fully-scintillating inner surface could be realized. The presented detector (TUM40) provides an excellent threshold of ∝0.60 keV and a resolution of σ ∼ 0.090 keV (at 2.60 keV).With significantly reduced background levels, TUM40 sets stringent limits on the spin-independent WIMP nucleon scattering cross section and probes a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 3GeV/c{sup 2}. In this paper, we discuss the novel detector design and the surface-alpha event rejection in detail. (orig.)

  19. Intermittent Chemotherapy and Erlotinib for Nonsmokers or Light Smokers with Advanced Adenocarcinoma of the Lung: A Phase II Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaz Zwitter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intermittent application of chemotherapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors may avoid antagonism between the two classes of drugs. This hypothesis was tested in a Phase II clinical trial. Patients and Methods. Eligible patients were nonsmokers or light smokers, chemo-naïve, with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung. Treatment: 4 to 6 cycles of gemcitabine 1250 mg/m2 on days 1 and 4, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 2, and erlotnib 150 mg daily on days 5–15, followed by erlotinib as maintenance. Results. 24 patients entered the trial. Four pts had grade 3 toxicity. Complete remission (CR and partial remission (PR were seen in 5 pts and 9 pts, respectively (response rate 58%. Median time to progression (TTP was 13.4 months and median overall survival (OS was 23 months. When compared to patients with negative or unknown status of EGFR mutations, 8 patients with EGFR gene activating mutations had significantly superior experience: 4 CR and 4 PR, with median TTP 21.5 months and OS 24.2 months (P  <  .05. Conclusions. Intermittent schedule with gemcitabine, cisplatin and erlotinib has mild toxicity. For patients who are positive for EGFR gene activating mutations, this treatment offers excellent response rate, time to progression and survival.

  20. Phase II clinical trial of robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery for metastatic gynecologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eKunos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Recurrent gynecologic cancers are often difficult to manage without significant morbidity. We conducted a phase II study to assess the safety and the efficacy of ablative robotic stereotactic body radiosurgery (SBRT in women with metastatic gynecologic cancers. Methods A total of 50 patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer who had single or multiple (≤4 metastases underwent robotic-armed Cyberknife SBRT (24Gy/3 daily doses. Toxicities were graded prospectively by common toxicity criteria for adverse events (version 4.0. SBRT target responses were recorded following RECIST criteria (version 1.0. Rates of clinical benefit for SBRT and non-radiosurgical disease relapse were calculated. Disease-free and overall survivals were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to control for prognostic variables.Findings SBRT was safely delivered, with 49 (98% of 50 patients completing three prescribed fractions. The most frequent grade 2 or higher adverse events attributed to SBRT included fatigue (16%, nausea (8% and diarrhea (4%. One (2% grade 4 hyperbilirubinemia occurred. SBRT target response was 96% (48 of 50 patients. A 6-month clinical benefit was recorded in 34 (68% [95% CI, 53.2, 80.1] patients. No SBRT-targeted disease progressed. Non-radiosurgical disease relapse occurred in 31 (62% patients. Median disease-free survival was 7.8 months (95% CI, 4.0, 11.6. Median overall survival was 20.2 months (95% CI, 10.9, 29.5.Interpretation SBRT safely controlled metastatic gynecologic cancer targets. Given an observed high rate of non-radiosurgical disease relapse, a phase I trial assessing co-administration of SBRT and cytotoxic chemotherapy is underway.Funding Case Comprehensive Cancer Center

  1. Phase II study of temozolomide and veliparib combination therapy for sorafenib-refractory advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielson, Andrew; Tesfaye, Anteneh A; Marshall, John L; Pishvaian, Michael J; Smaglo, Brandon; Jha, Reena; Dorsch-Vogel, Karen; Wang, Hongkun; He, Aiwu Ruth

    2015-11-01

    To determine the antitumor efficacy and tolerability of combination temozolomide (TMZ) and veliparib (ABT-888) in patients with advanced, sorafenib-refractory hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This single-arm phase II trial enrolled patients with pathologically confirmed, sorafenib-refractory HCC. All patients received 40 mg ABT-888 PO daily on days 1-7 and 150 mg/m(2) TMZ PO daily on days 1-5 of a 28-day cycle. The primary endpoint was objective response rate (ORR) at 2 months. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and toxicity profile. Tumor response was assessed every 2 cycles using RECIST criteria, and toxicities were assessed using CTCAE v4.03. We enrolled 16 patients in the first phase of the trial, but the study was discontinued due to a poor ORR; only four patients (25 %) had SD after 2 cycles. Twelve patients (75 %) were taken off study after 2 months of treatment; 10 of these had disease progression. Two patients (13 %) were taken off study due to severe toxicity, and one patient (6 %) died from non-treatment-related liver failure. One patient had SD for 16 months, receiving 11 cycles of therapy before being taken off study. The most common grade 3 treatment-related toxicities included vomiting (n = 2), thrombocytopenia (n = 2), nausea (n = 1), and anemia (n = 1). The median PFS was 1.9 months, and median OS was 13.1 months. The combination of TMZ and ABT-888 is well tolerated in patients with advanced HCC. However, the regimen failed to show survival benefit. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT01205828.

  2. Nivolumab for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motzer, Robert J.; Rini, Brian I.; McDermott, David F.; Redman, Bruce G.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Harrison, Michael R.; Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Drabkin, Harry A.; George, Saby; Logan, Theodore F.; Margolin, Kim A.; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Lambert, Alexandre M.; Waxman, Ian M.; Hammers, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nivolumab is a fully human immunoglobulin G4 programmed death–1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody that restores T-cell immune activity. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity, dose-response relationship, and safety of nivolumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Patients and Methods Patients with clear-cell mRCC previously treated with agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway were randomly assigned (blinded ratio of 1:1:1) to nivolumab 0.3, 2, or 10 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. The primary objective was to evaluate the dose-response relationship as measured by progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results A total of 168 patients were randomly assigned to the nivolumab 0.3- (n = 60), 2- (n = 54), and 10-mg/kg (n = 54) cohorts. One hundred eighteen patients (70%) had received more than one prior systemic regimen. Median PFS was 2.7, 4.0, and 4.2 months, respectively (P = .9). Respective ORRs were 20%, 22%, and 20%. Median OS was 18.2 months (80% CI, 16.2 to 24.0 months), 25.5 months (80% CI, 19.8 to 28.8 months), and 24.7 months (80% CI, 15.3 to 26.0 months), respectively. The most common treatment-related adverse event (AE) was fatigue (24%, 22%, and 35%, respectively). Nineteen patients (11%) experienced grade 3 to 4 treatment-related AEs. Conclusion Nivolumab demonstrated antitumor activity with a manageable safety profile across the three doses studied in mRCC. No dose-response relationship was detected as measured by PFS. These efficacy and safety results in mRCC support study in the phase III setting. PMID:25452452

  3. Phase II trial of hul4.18-IL2 for patients with metastatic melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Mark R; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; Gadbaw, Brian; Kostlevy, Jordan; Haldeman, Jennifer; Schalch, Heidi; Gan, Jacek; Kim, KyungMann; Eickhoff, Jens; Gillies, Stephen D.; Sondel, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase I testing of the hu14.18-IL2 immunocytokine in melanoma patients (pts) showed immune activation, reversible toxicities, and a maximal tolerated dose of 7.5 mg/m2/day. In this phase II study, fourteen pts with measurable metastatic melanoma were scheduled to receive hu14.18-IL2 at 6 mg/m2/day as 4-hour intravenous infusions on days 1, 2 and 3 of each 28 day cycle. Pts with stable disease (SD) or regression following cycle 2 could receive 2 additional treatment cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate anti-tumor activity and response duration. Secondary objectives evaluated adverse events and immunologic activation. All pts received 2 cycles of treatment. One pt had a partial response (PR) [1 PR of 14 pts = response rate of 7.1%; confidence interval 0.2%−33.9%] and 4 pts had SD and received cycles 3 & 4. The PR and SD responses lasted 3–4 months. All toxicities were reversible and those resulting in dose reduction included grade 3 hypotension (2 pts) and grade 2 renal insufficiency with oliguria (1 pt). Pts had a peripheral blood lymphocytosis on day 8 and increased C-reactive protein. While one PR in 14 pts met protocol criteria to proceed to stage 2 and enter 16 additional pts, we suspended stage 2 due to limited availability of hul 4.18-IL2 at that time and the brief duration of PR and SD. We conclude that subsequent testing of hu14.18-IL2 should involve melanoma patients with minimal residual disease based on compelling preclinical data and the confirmed immune activation with some antitumor activity in this study. PMID:22678096

  4. Phase II trial of hu14.18-IL2 for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Mark R; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Gadbaw, Brian; Kostlevy, Jordan; Haldeman, Jennifer; Schalch, Heidi; Gan, Jacek; Kim, KyungMann; Eickhoff, Jens; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M

    2012-12-01

    Phase I testing of the hu14.18-IL2 immunocytokine in melanoma patients showed immune activation, reversible toxicities, and a maximal tolerated dose of 7.5 mg/m(2)/day. In this phase II study, 14 patients with measurable metastatic melanoma were scheduled to receive hu14.18-IL2 at 6 mg/m(2)/day as 4-h intravenous infusions on Days 1, 2, and 3 of each 28 day cycle. Patients with stable disease (SD) or regression following cycle 2 could receive two additional treatment cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate antitumor activity and response duration. Secondary objectives evaluated adverse events and immunologic activation. All patients received two cycles of treatment. One patient had a partial response (PR) [1 PR of 14 patients = response rate of 7.1 %; confidence interval, 0.2-33.9 %], and 4 patients had SD and received cycles 3 and 4. The PR and SD responses lasted 3-4 months. All toxicities were reversible and those resulting in dose reduction included grade 3 hypotension (2 patients) and grade 2 renal insufficiency with oliguria (1 patient). Patients had a peripheral blood lymphocytosis on Day 8 and increased C-reactive protein. While one PR in 14 patients met protocol criteria to proceed to stage 2 and enter 16 additional patients, we suspended stage 2 due to limited availability of hu14.18-IL2 at that time and the brief duration of PR and SD. We conclude that subsequent testing of hu14.18-IL2 should involve melanoma patients with minimal residual disease based on compelling preclinical data and the confirmed immune activation with some antitumor activity in this study.

  5. A phase II study of cixutumumab (IMC-A12, NSC742460) in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Capanu, Marinela; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Ma, Jennifer; Chou, Joanne F; Gansukh, Bolorsukh; Shia, Jinru; Kalin, Marcia; Katz, Seth; Abad, Leslie; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane L; Kelsen, David P; Chen, Helen X; Saltz, Leonard B

    2014-02-01

    IGF-IR is implicated in hepatic carcinogenesis. This and preliminary evidence of biological activity of anti-IGF-1R monoclonal antibody cixutumumab in phase I trials prompted this phase II study. Patients with advanced HCC, Child-Pugh A-B8, received cixutumumab 6mg/kg weekly, in a Simon two-stage design study, with the primary endpoints being 4-month PFS and RECIST-defined response rate. Tissue and circulating markers plus different HCC scoring systems were evaluated for correlation with PFS and OS. As a result of pre-specified futility criteria, only stage 1 was accrued: N=24: median age 67.5 years (range 49-83), KPS 80% (70-90%), 20 males (83%), 9 stage III (37%)/15 stage IV (63%), 18 Child-Pugh A (75%), 11 HBV (46%)/10 HCV (42%)/11 alcoholic cirrhosis (46%)/2 NASH (8%), 11 (46%) diabetic. Median number of doses: 7 (range 1-140). Grade 3/4 toxicities >10% included: diabetes, elevated liver function tests, hyponatremia, and lymphopenia. Four-month PFS was 30% (95% CI 13-48), and there were no objective responses. Median overall survival was 8 months (95% CI 5.8-14). IGF-R1 staining did not correlate with outcome. Elevated IGFBP-1 correlated with improved PFS (1.2 [95% CI 1-1.4]; p 0.009) and OS (1.2 [95% CI 1.1-1.4]; p 0.003). Cixutumumab monotherapy did not have clinically meaningful activity in this unselected HCC population. Grade 3-4 hyperglycemia occurred in 46% of patients. Elevated IGFBP-1 correlated with improved PFS and OS. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Cannell (EMTEC); Adrian S. Sabau (ORNL)

    2005-09-30

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The first part of the project involved preparation of reports on the state of the art at that time for all the areas under consideration (die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy). The primary R&D focus during Phase I was on the wax material since the least was known about it. The main R&D accomplishments during this phase were determination of procedures for obtaining the thermal conductivity and viscoelastic properties of an unfilled wax and validating those procedures. Phase II focused on die-wax and shell-alloy systems. A wax material model was developed based on results obtained during the previous R&D phase, and a die-wax model was successfully incorporated into and used in commercial computer programs. Current computer simulation programs have complementary features. A viscoelastic module was available in ABAQUS but unavailable in ProCAST, while the mold-filling module was available in ProCAST but unavailable in ABAQUS. Thus, the numerical simulation results were only in good qualitative agreement with experimental results, the predicted shrinkage factors being approximately 2.5 times larger than those measured. Significant progress was made, and results showed that the testing and modeling of wax material had great potential for industrial applications. Additional R&D focus was placed on one shell-alloy system. The fused-silica shell mold and A356 aluminum alloy were considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. It was very important to obtain accurate temperature data from actual castings, and significant effort was made to obtain temperature profiles in

  7. Exemestane as neoadjuvant hormonotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer: results of a phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana-Hulin, Michele; Becette, Veronique; Bieche, Ivan; Mauriac, Louis; Romieu, Gilles; Bibeau, Frederic; Macgrogan, Gaetan; Bourgeois, Hugues; Chollet, Philippe; Defrance, Remy; Spyratos, Frederique

    2007-01-01

    Neoadjuvant hormonotherapy has recently been used for downstaging large or locally advanced (LA) breast cancer in postmenopausal women. A phase II study was conducted in postmenopausal, hormone-receptor (HR) positive, T2-T4 patients, receiving 25 mg/day exemestane for 16 weeks. Among 42 patients, 57.1% underwent conservative surgery. The clinical objective response rate (ORR) was 73.3%, without progression. A pathological partial response was achieved in 16.7% of the patients. Exemestane significantly reduced the expression of Ki-67 and progesterone receptors (PgR) (p<0.001). A significant decrease in PgR was correlated with clinical ORR (p=0.028). The responders presented higher baseline PgR levels (p=0.017). No relationship was found between ORR and mRNA expression of aromatase or oestrogen receptors beta (ER-beta). Neoadjuvant exemestane provided satisfactory efficacy and safety profiles in LA breast cancer. The main biological effects consisted of a reduction in PgR expression for responders and a decrease in Ki-67 expression.

  8. Efficacy of hydralazine and valproate in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, a phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Zamora, Jose Ramiro; Labardini-Méndez, Juan; Sosa-Espinoza, Alejandro; López-González, Celia; Vieyra-García, Magnolia; Candelaria, Myrna; Lozano-Zavaleta, Valentin; Toledano-Cuevas, Diana Vanesa; Zapata-Canto, Nidia; Cervera, Eduardo; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the activity and safety of hydralazine and valproate (Transkrip) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Previously untreated and progressive/refractory CTCL patients received hydralazine at 83 mg or 182 mg/day for slow and rapid acetylators respectively plus magnesium valproate at a total dose of 30 mg/Kg t.i.d daily in continuous 28-day cycles in this phase II study. The primary objective was overall response rate (ORR) measured by the modified severity weighted assessment tool (m-SWAT), secondary end-points were time to response (TTR), time to progression (TTP), duration of response (DOR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety. Fourteen patients were enrolled (7 untreated and 7 pretreated). ORR was 71% with 50% complete and 21% partial. Two had stable disease and two progressed. At a median follow-up of 36 months (5-52), median TTR was 2 months (1-4); median DOR was 28 months (5-45); median PFS 36 and not reached for OS. There were no differences in median TTR, DOR, and PFS between treated and pretreated patients. Pruritus relieve was complete in 13 out of 14 patients. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. The combination of hydralazine and valproate is safe, very well tolerated and effective in CTCL.

  9. Tests with beam setup of the TileCal phase-II upgrade electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reward Hlaluku, Dingane

    2017-09-01

    The LHC has planned a series of upgrades culminating in the High Luminosity LHC which will have an average luminosity 5-7 times larger than the nominal Run-2 value. The ATLAS Tile calorimeter plans to introduce a new readout architecture by completely replacing the back-end and front-end electronics for the High Luminosity LHC. The photomultiplier signals will be fully digitized and transferred for every bunch crossing to the off-detector Tile PreProcessor. The Tile PreProcessor will further provide preprocessed digital data to the first level of trigger with improved spatial granularity and energy resolution in contrast to the current analog trigger signals. A single super-drawer module commissioned with the phase-II upgrade electronics is to be inserted into the real detector to evaluate and qualify the new readout and trigger concepts in the overall ATLAS data acquisition system. This new super-drawer, so-called hybrid Demonstrator, must provide analog trigger signals for backward compatibility with the current system. This Demonstrator drawer has been inserted into a Tile calorimeter module prototype to evaluate the performance in the lab. In parallel, one more module has been instrumented with two other front-end electronics options based on custom ASICs (QIE and FATALIC) which are under evaluation. These two modules together with three other modules composed of the current system electronics were exposed to different particles and energies in three test-beam campaigns during 2015 and 2016.

  10. A Phase II Study of Flavopiridol in Patients With Previously Untreated Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don G. Morris

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Flavopiridol is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor that has preclinical activity in many tumours. This synthetic flavonoid was tested in a phase II nonrandomized, nonblinded multicentre clinical trial to determine its activity and toxicity in patients with previously untreated metastatic or locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma. Methods. A total of 18 patients with histologically confirmed nonoperable soft tissue was treated with flavopiridol administered at a dose of 50 mg/m2 IV over 1 hour daily ×3 days every 3 weeks. Results. Eighteen patients were accrued to the study over a period of 6 months. No objective responses were noted in the seventeen evaluable patients. Eight patients (47% exhibited stable disease after 2 cycles (median duration of 4.3 months (range 1.4–6.9 months. Kaplan-Meier estimates for 3- and 6-month progression-free survivial rates were 44 percent and 22 percent, respectively. The only grade 3 toxicities were diarrhea (N=2, nausea (N=2, gastritis (N=1, and fatigue (N=1. Ninety-four percent of patients received ≥ 90% of the planned dose intensity, during 55 treatment cycles. Conclusions. Flavopiridol was well tolerated at the dose and schedule used in this study, however, no objective treatment responses were seen and thus our results do not support further exploration of flavopiridol as a monotherapy at this dose and schedule in soft tissue sarcomas.

  11. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  12. Phase II trial of dolastatin-10 in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Edith A; Hillman, David W; Fishkin, Paul A; Krook, James E; Tan, Winston W; Kuriakose, Phillip A; Alberts, Steven R; Dakhil, Shaker R

    2005-06-01

    Phase II multicenter cooperative group study investigated the efficacy and toxicity of the novel anti-microtubule agent dolastatin-10 in patients with advanced breast cancer. Twenty-one patients with measurable metastatic breast cancer were treated with dolastatin-10 at a dose of 400 mcg/m2 by intravenous bolus once every 3 weeks. Patients must have received a total of 1 or 2 prior chemotherapy regimens and have an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-2. Patients received this treatment as either a first (n = 11) or second-line (n = 10) chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Eighteen patients (86%) had received a prior anthracycline. The National Cancer Institute provided the dolastatin-10. One out of 21 patients (5%; 95% CI: 0-24%) achieved a partial remission for a duration of 113 days. Four patients maintained stable disease for a median of 87 days. A total of 58 courses of dolastatin-10 were administered. Patients received a median of two cycles of dolastatin-10. Hematologic toxicity was moderate, with 8 patients developing grade 4 neutropenia, and 5 with grade 3 neutropenia; one grade 3 febrile neutropenia was observed. These episodes of grade 3 and 4 neutropenia were experienced on 36% of the treatment cycles. Non-hematologic toxicity was uncommon. While the toxicity profile of dolastatin-10 was acceptable, it had minimal activity in this advanced breast cancer study. We are not pursuing further clinical trials of this agent in the setting of advanced breast cancer.

  13. Non-thermal Plasma Activates Human Keratinocytes by Stimulation of Antioxidant and Phase II Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application. PMID:25589789

  14. Anti-angiogenic drugs currently in Phase II clinical trials for gynecological cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xia-wei; Zhang, Zhi-rong; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2013-09-01

    Numerous female patients suffer from gynecological cancers every year. When it comes to recurrent or chemoresistant cancers, there are limited treatment options. For decades, much enthusiasm has been shown for novel therapeutic strategies for cancers, and anti-angiogenesis agents appear to be a potential option. Since several promising angiogenesis inhibitors for certain cancers have been approved by Food and Drug Administration, more and more anti-angiogenic drugs are put into clinical trials. In this review, the anti-angiogenic agents in Phase II clinical trials for gynecological cancer treatment are highlighted. This review mainly focuses on 5-year reports on angiogenesis inhibitors concerning ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, uterine leiomysarcoma and endometrial cancer. Inhibitors reviewed in this paper include bevacizumab, volociximab, aflibercept, temsirolimus, enzastaurin, trebananib, sunitinib, imatinib, pazopanib, sorafenib and nintedanib. These anti-angiogenic drugs while used either alone or in combination with chemotherapy, presented mixed results in treating gynecological cancers. The real challenge is how to take best advantage of the anti-angiogenesis hypothesis for therapeutic benefit. Much remains to be done before these molecules work efficaciously in treating gynecological cancer.

  15. Phase II drugs under clinical investigation for the treatment of chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Shilan; Didari, Tina; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Chronic constipation (CC) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorder that significantly impairs the quality of life in affected subjects. As almost half of the patients suffering from CC are not satisfied with currently available medicines, there is a need to develop new molecules with better effectiveness and tolerability. The authors include all experimental and clinical trials (up to Phase II) about new investigational drugs for the treatment of CC. The article identifies nine new agents: mitemcinal, TD-8954, YKP10811, itopride, RM-131, KWA-0711, elobixibat, velusetrag, and naronapride. All nine agents have shown prokinetic effects in different stages of the development. The mechanisms of new developing drugs include: the activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine type-4 (5-HT4), ghrelin and motilin receptors, antagonizing dopamine type-2 (D2) receptors, inhibition of ileal bile acid reabsorption and acetylcholine esterase, as well as water absorption from the GI tract. At this current point in time, new generations of 5-HT4 receptor agonists (velusetrag, noranopride and YKP10811) are hoped to progress, further in the future, due to better efficiency and safety. However, it is not possible to make a concise conclusion at this current time due to a lack of evidence. Further clinical trials with a longer duration and a larger sample size are warranted.

  16. Thalidomide in systemic mastocytosis: results from an open-label, multicentre, phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruson, Bérengère; Lortholary, Olivier; Canioni, Danielle; Chandesris, Olivia; Lanternier, Fanny; Bruneau, Julie; Grosbois, Bernard; Livideanu, Cristina; Larroche, Claire; Durieu, Isabelle; Barete, Stéphane; Sevestre, Henri; Diouf, Momar; Chaby, Guillaume; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Dubreuil, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2013-05-01

    Mastocytosis can lead to organ failure as well as systemic symptoms that can be disabling, with considerable deterioration in quality of life. Beside symptomatic treatments, interferon-α and purine analogues have been shown to be effective but complete or long-term remission is rarely obtained with these drugs. We conducted a phase II, multicentre, study to investigate thalidomide in severely symptomatic indolent and aggressive systemic mastocytosis. Twenty patients were enrolled of whom 16 were analysed for response. The overall response rate was 56%. Responses were observed in the skin in 61% of patients with a significant decrease in the pruritus score. Mast cell mediator-related symptoms responded in 71% of cases and 25% of aggressive systemic mastocytosis patients had a response in terms of B/C findings (borderline/cytoreduction needed). Bone marrow mast cell infiltration decreased in five of the eight evaluable patients. There was no significant improvement in the AFIRMM (Association Française pour les Initiatives de Recherche sur le Mastocyte et Les Mastocytoses), Quality of Life or Hamilton scores. Grade 3-4 toxicities consisted of peripheral neuropathy (11%) and myelosuppression (neutropenia: 5%; thrombocytopenia: 11%). In conclusion, thalidomide might be useful in mastocytosis and in the treatment of mast cell-related symptoms. It might be considered in selected patients, taking into account the benefit/risk balance and the individual patient evaluation. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. A phase II study of irofulven in women with recurrent and heavily pretreated ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiden, Michael V; Gordon, Alan N; Bodurka, Diane C; Matulonis, Ursula A; Penson, Richard T; Reed, Eddie; Alberts, Dave S; Weems, Garry; Cullen, Michael; McGuire, William P

    2006-04-01

    To determine the safety and efficacy of a novel illudin S derivative, irofulven (MGI-114), in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer who had received extensive prior chemotherapy. The trial was an open label phase II study. Patients initially enrolled in this study were treated every 14 days with a dose of 24 mg/m2. Unexpected retinal toxicity associated with this dose and schedule lead to modification of the dosing to 0.55 mg/kg on the same schedule with a maximum individual dose of 50 mg. Dose reductions were permitted based on both hematologic and non-hematologic toxicities. Seventy-four women were accrued and stratified into two cohorts including 58 women with platinum-resistant disease and 16 with platinum-sensitive disease. Non-hematologic toxicities included nausea, vomiting, and fatigue. Thirty-one women had between one and six visual symptoms, most were Grade 1 and 2 in nature. The majority of visual toxicities resolved either during treatment or post-treatment with irofulven. There was one partial response in each cohort with 19 (33%) and 8 (50%) of women having stable disease in the platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive cohorts, respectively. Irofulven at 24 mg/m2 on every 14-day schedule is associated with significant retinal toxicity in this patient population. Dosing at 0.55 mg/kg has persistent retinal toxicity, yet demonstrated only limited anti-tumor activity in a population of women who had received extensive prior chemotherapy.

  18. Technical Design Report for the Phase-II Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Collaboration, ATLAS

    2017-01-01

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector will be significantly upgraded during the Phase-II upgrade in LS3 in order to cope with the operational conditions at the HL-LHC in Run 4 and beyond. A large fraction of the frontend and on- and off-detector readout and trigger electronics for the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC), Thin Gap Chambers (TGC), and Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers will be replaced to make them compatible with the higher trigger rates and longer latencies necessary for the new level-0 trigger. The MDT chambers will be integrated into the level-0 trigger in order to sharpen the momentum threshold. Additional RPC chambers will be installed in the inner barrel layer to increase the acceptance and robustness of the trigger, and some chambers in high-rate regions will be refurbished. Some of the MDT chambers in the inner barrel layer will be replaced with new small-diameter MDTs. New TGC triplet chambers in the barrel-endcap transition region will replace the current TGC doublets to suppress t...

  19. An Overview of Power, Energy Storage, and Conversion Efforts for 2014 SBIR Phases I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    Technological innovation is the overall focus of NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The program invests in the development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA's mission directorates address critical research and development needs for agency projects. NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights 15 of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and II projects that focus on one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Power, Energy Storage and Conversion. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high-radiation-tolerant ceramic voltage isolators, development of hermetic sealing glasses for solid oxide fuel cells, rechargeable lithium metal cells, high-efficiency direct methane solid oxide fuel cell systems, Li metal protection for high-energy space batteries, isolated bidirectional direct current converters for distributed battery energy applications, and high-efficiency rad-hard ultrathin Si photovoltaic cell technology for space. Each article describes an innovation and technical objective and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  20. Construction of the new silicon microstrips tracker for the Phase-II ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Zhijun; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The inner detector of the present ATLAS detector has been designed and developed to function in the environment of the present Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the next-generation tracking detector proposed for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the so-called ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade, the particle densities and radiation levels will be higher by as much as a factor of ten. The new detectors must be faster, they need to be more highly segmented, and covering more area. They also need to be more resistant to radiation, and they require much greater power delivery to the front-end systems. For those reasons, the inner tracker of the ATLAS detector must be redesigned and rebuilt completely. The design of the ATLAS Upgrade inner tracker (ITk) has already been defined. It consists of several layers of silicon particle detectors. The innermost layers will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, and the outer layers will consist of silicon microstrip sensors. This paper will focus on the latest research and development act...

  1. A phase II trial of a biweekly combination of paclitaxel and gemcitabine in metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinelli Gian

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many emerging new drugs have recently been trialled for treatment of early and advanced breast cancer. Among these new agents paclitaxel and gemcitabine play a crucial role, mostly in patients with relapsed and metastatic disease after failure of chemotherapy with antracyclines. Methods A phase II study was started in order to evaluate the activity and toxicity of a combination of paclitaxel and gemcitabine in a biweekly schedule on metastatic breast cancer patients previously treated with antracyclines. Results Twenty-five patients received paclitaxel (150 mg/mq by 3-hours infusion, followed by gemcitabine (2000 mg/mq given as a 60 min i.v. infusion (day 1–14 for a maximum of eight cycles. In all patients treatment was evaluated for toxicity and efficacy; four patients (16% achieved a complete response, 12 (48% a partial response giving an overall objective response rate of 64%. Stable disease was documented in 5 patients (20% and progressive disease occurred in 4 patients (16%. Conclusion The schedule of treatment was safe and tolerable from a haematological and non-haematological point of view. These data confirm that the combination of gemcitabine and paclitaxel on a biweekly basis is an effective and well-tolerated regimen in breast cancer patients with prior therapeutic exposure to antracyclines.

  2. OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II SUPPLEMENTAL TESTING REPORT URANIUM ADSORPTION AND SHELF-LIFE MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D

    2008-01-01

    The DOE Office of Waste Processing recently funded supplemental Phase II testing to further investigate the uranium affinity and shelf-life of modified monosodium titanate (mMST). Testing results confirmed earlier findings that the mMST exhibits much lower affinity for uranium than the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) material. The loading of uranium onto the mMST sample measured more than an order of magnitude lower than that of the MST. This finding indicates that the use of mMST provides a significant advantage over MST in that the mMST will not concentrate enriched uranium to the degree that MST does. The reduced affinity of mMST for uranium allows more operational flexibility in treating waste solutions from a nuclear criticality safety perspective. Testing results also indicate that the mMST exhibits good shelf-life with no measurable loss in plutonium and neptunium removal upon storage of samples at ambient laboratory temperatures for up to 30-months. Testing did exhibit a change in strontium removal performance for both the mMST and MST samples at the most recent testing event. However, the decrease in strontium removal performance proved lower for the mMST than the MST sample. Given these positive findings SRNL recommends continued development of mMST as a replacement for MST in pretreatment facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  3. The PreProcessors for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)713745; The ATLAS collaboration; Castillo, V.; Cerda, L.; Ferrer, A.; Fiorini, L.; Hernandez, Y.; Higon, E.; Moreno, P.; Solans, C.; Valero, A.; Valls, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has envisaged a series of upgrades towards a High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) delivering five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity. The ATLAS Phase II upgrade will accommodate the detector and data acquisition system for the HL-LHC. In particular, the Tile Hadronic Calorimeter (TileCal) will replace completely front-end and back-end electronics using a new readout architecture. The digitized detector data will be transferred for every beam crossing to the PreProcessors (TilePPr) located in off-detector counting rooms with a total data bandwidth of roughly 80 Tbps. The TilePPr implements increased pipelines memories and must provide pre-processed digital trigger information to Level 0 trigger systems. The TilePPr system represents the link between the front-end electronics and the overall ATLAS data acquisition system. It also implements the interface between the Detector Control System (DCS) and the front-end electronics which is used to control and monitor the high volta...

  4. Integrated safety analysis of rolapitant with coadministered drugs from phase II/III trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbour, S; Smit, T.; Wang, X

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rolapitant, a long-acting neurokinin (NK) 1 receptor antagonist (RA), has demonstrated efficacy in prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients administered moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Unlike other NK 1 RAs, rolapitant does not inhibit or induce...... the safety of rolapitant as part of an antiemetic triple-drug regimen in patients receiving emetogenic chemotherapy, including those administered concomitant medications that are substrates of CYP2D6 or BCRP, such as ondansetron, docetaxel, or irinotecan.......Background: Rolapitant, a long-acting neurokinin (NK) 1 receptor antagonist (RA), has demonstrated efficacy in prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients administered moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Unlike other NK 1 RAs, rolapitant does not inhibit or induce...... cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, but it does inhibit CYP2D6 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). To analyze potential drug-drug interactions between rolapitant and concomitant medications, this integrated safety analysis of four double-blind, randomized phase II or III studies of rolapitant examined...

  5. Investigation of HV/HR-CMOS technology for the ATLAS Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadeyev, V., E-mail: fadeyev@ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Galloway, Z.; Grabas, H.; Grillo, A.A.; Liang, Z.; Martinez-Mckinney, F.; Seiden, A.; Volk, J. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Affolder, A.; Buckland, M.; Meng, L. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, O. Lodge Laboratory, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Arndt, K.; Bortoletto, D.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; McMahon, S.; Nickerson, R.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Shipsey, I. [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-21

    ATLAS has formed strip CMOS project to study the use of CMOS MAPS devices as silicon strip sensors for the Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade. This choice of sensors promises several advantages over the conventional baseline design, such as better resolution, less material in the tracking volume, and faster construction speed. At the same time, many design features of the sensors are driven by the requirement of minimizing the impact on the rest of the detector. Hence the target devices feature long pixels which are grouped to form a virtual strip with binary-encoded z position. The key performance aspects are radiation hardness compatibility with HL-LHC environment, as well as extraction of the full hit position with full-reticle readout architecture. To date, several test chips have been submitted using two different CMOS technologies. The AMS 350 nm is a high voltage CMOS process (HV-CMOS), that features the sensor bias of up to 120 V. The TowerJazz 180 nm high resistivity CMOS process (HR-CMOS) uses a high resistivity epitaxial layer to provide the depletion region on top of the substrate. We have evaluated passive pixel performance, and charge collection projections. The results strongly support the radiation tolerance of these devices to radiation dose of the HL-LHC in the strip tracker region. We also describe design features for the next chip submission that are motivated by our technology evaluation.

  6. Panitumumab added to docetaxel, cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine in oesophagogastric cancer: ATTAX3 phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbutt, Niall C; Price, Timothy J; Ferraro, Danielle A; Wong, Nicole; Veillard, Anne-Sophie; Hall, Merryn; Sjoquist, Katrin M; Pavlakis, Nick; Strickland, Andrew; Varma, Suresh C; Cooray, Prasad; Young, Rosemary; Underhill, Craig; Shannon, Jennifer A; Ganju, Vinod; Gebski, Val

    2016-03-01

    This randomised phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of panitumumab added to docetaxel-based chemotherapy in advanced oesophagogastric cancer. Patients with metastatic or locally recurrent cancer of the oesophagus, oesophagogastric junction or stomach received docetaxel and a fluoropyrimidine with or without panitumumab for 8 cycles or until progression. The primary end point was response rate (RECIST1.1). We planned to enrol 100 patients, with 50% expected response rate for combination therapy. A total of 77 patients were enrolled. A safety alert from the REAL3 trial prompted a review of data that found no evidence of adverse outcomes associated with panitumumab but questionable efficacy, and new enrolment was ceased. Enrolled patients were treated according to protocol. Response rates were 49% (95% CI 34-64%) in the chemotherapy arm and 58% (95% CI 42-72%) in the combination arm. Common grade 3 and 4 toxicities included infection, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhoea and fatigue. At 23.7 months of median follow-up, median progression-free survival was 6.9 months vs 6.0 months and median overall survival was 11.7 months vs 10.0 months in the chemotherapy arm and the combination arm, respectively. Adding panitumumab to docetaxel-based chemotherapy for advanced oesophagogastric cancer did not improve efficacy and increased toxicities.

  7. The PreProcessors for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio Argos, Fernando; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has envisaged a series of upgrades towards a High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) delivering five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity. The ATLAS Phase II upgrade will accommodate the detector and data acquisition system for the HL-LHC. In particular, the Tile Hadronic Calorimeter (TileCal) will replace completely on- and off-detector electronics using a new read-out architecture. The digitized detector data will be transferred for every beam crossing to the super Read Out Drivers (sRODs) located in off-detector counting rooms with a total data bandwidth of roughly 80 Tbps. The sROD implements increased pipelines memories and must provide pre-processed digital trigger information to Level 0/1 systems. The sROD module represents the link between the on-detector electronics and the overall ATLAS data acquisition system. It also implements the interface between the Detector Control System (DCS) and the on-detector electronics which is used to control and monitor the high voltage...

  8. Phase II Study of Temozolomide and Thalidomide in Patients with Unresectable or Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S. Boyar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the efficacy of combined temozolomide and thalidomide in patients with unresectable or metastatic leiomyosarcoma in a phase II single-institution trial. Twenty-four patients were enrolled. Temozolomide (150 mg/m2/day for 7 days every other week was administered with concomitant thalidomide (200 mg/day, and continued until unacceptable toxicity or disease progression. There were no complete responses and two (10% partial responses. Five patients (24% had stable disease for at least six months. Fourteen patients (67% progressed after a median of two-month treatment. The median overall survival (twenty-two assessable patients was 9.5 months [95% CI 7–28 months]. There were no treatment-related deaths or CTC grade 4 toxicities. Thirteen patients were dose-reduced or discontinued thalidomide due to toxicity. In conclusion, this combination of temozolomide and thalidomide provided disease stabilization in a subset of patients with advanced leiomyosarcoma. We hypothesize that temozolomide is the active agent in this regimen, and should be further studied.

  9. High-Dose Erythropoietin and Hypothermia for Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy: A Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yvonne W; Mathur, Amit M; Chang, Taeun; McKinstry, Robert C; Mulkey, Sarah B; Mayock, Dennis E; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Gonzalez, Fernando F; Comstock, Bryan A; Juul, Sandra E; Msall, Michael E; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C; Massaro, An N; Dong, Lawrence; Tan, Katherine W; Heagerty, Patrick J; Ballard, Roberta A

    2016-06-01

    To determine if multiple doses of erythropoietin (Epo) administered with hypothermia improve neuroradiographic and short-term outcomes of newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In a phase II double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, we randomized newborns to receive Epo (1000 U/kg intravenously; n = 24) or placebo (n = 26) at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days of age. All infants had moderate/severe encephalopathy; perinatal depression (10 minute Apgar score in Epo-treated infants (median, 2 vs 11, P = .01). Moderate/severe brain injury (4% vs 44%, P = .002), subcortical (30% vs 68%, P = .02), and cerebellar injury (0% vs 20%, P = .05) were less frequent in the Epo than placebo group. At mean age 12.7 months (SD, 0.9), motor performance in Epo-treated (n = 21) versus placebo-treated (n = 20) infants were as follows: Alberta Infant Motor Scale (53.2 vs 42.8, P = .03); Warner Initial Developmental Evaluation (28.6 vs 23.8, P = .05). High doses of Epo given with hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy may result in less MRI brain injury and improved 1-year motor function. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Experiment TGV II: results on double electron capture in {sup 106}Cd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermak, P; Benes, P; Stekl, I [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Briancon, C [CSNSM Orsay (France); Brudanin, V B; Egorov, V G; Gusev, K N; Klimenko, A A; Kovalenko, V E; Kovalik, A; Rukhadze, N I; Salamatin, A V; Timkin, V V; Vylov, T [JINR Dubna (Russian Federation); Simkovic, F [CU Bratislave (Slovakia)], E-mail: Pavel.Cermak@utef.cvut.cz

    2008-06-15

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of {sup 106}Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of {sup 106}Cd enriched to 75%. In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture in {sup 106}Cd as 2.0x10{sup 20}y. The new limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  11. Experiment TGV II: results on double electron capture in 106Cd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, P.; Benes, P.; Briançon, C.; Brudanin, V. B.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalik, A.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Simkovic, F.; Stekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, T.

    2008-06-01

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of 106Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of 106Cd enriched to 75%. In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture in 106Cd as 2.0x1020y. The new limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  12. Stord Orographic Precipitation Experiment (STOPEX: an overview of phase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sandvik

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available STOPEX (Stord Orographic Precipitation Experiment is a research project of the Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Norway, dedicated to the investigation of orographic effects on fine scale precipitation patterns by a combination of numerical modelling and tailored measurement campaigns. Between 24 September and 16 November 2005 the first field campaign STOPEX I has been performed at and around the island of Stord at the west coast of Norway, about 50 km south of Bergen. 12 rain gauges and 3 autonomous weather stations have been installed to measure the variability of precipitation and the corresponding meteorological conditions. This paper gives an overview of the projects motivation, a description of the campaign and a presentation of the precipitation measurements performed. In addition, the extreme precipitation event around 14 November with precipitation amounts up to 240 mm in less than 24 h, is described and briefly discussed. In this context preliminary results of corresponding MM5 simulations are presented, that indicate the problems as well as potential improvement strategies with respect to modelling of fine scale orographic precipitation.

  13. A level set approach for computing solutions to incompressible two- phase flow II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Fatemi, E.; Osher, S. [Univ. of California , Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Math; Smereka, P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Math

    1995-06-01

    A level set method for capturing the interface between two fluids is combined with a variable density projection method to allow for computation of two-phase flow where the interface can merge/break and the flow can have a high Reynolds number. A distance function formulation of the level set method enables one to compute flows with large density ratios (1000/1) and flows that are surface tension driven; with no emotional involvement. Recent work has improved the accuracy of the distance function formulation and the accuracy of the advection scheme. We compute flows involving air bubbles and water drops, to name a few. We validate our code against experiments and theory.

  14. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, G., E-mail: geetikajain.hep@gmail.com [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R. [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Eber, R. [Institute fur Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Eichorn, T. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (Germany); Fernandez, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (Spain); Lalwani, K. [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Messineo, A. [Universita di Pisa & INFN sez. di Pisa (Italy); Palomo, F.R. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Peltola, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland); Printz, M. [Institute fur Experimentelle Kernphysik (Germany); Ranjan, K. [CDRST, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi (India); Villa, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (Spain); Hidalgo, S. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (Spain)

    2016-07-11

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  15. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, G.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichorn, T.; Fernandez, M.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Palomo, F. R.; Peltola, T.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.; Villa, I.; Hidalgo, S.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  16. A phase II randomized trial comparing radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin or weekly paclitaxel in patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charafeddine Maya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose/Objective This is a prospective comparison of weekly cisplatin to weekly paclitaxel as concurrent chemotherapy with standard radiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Materials/Methods Between May 2000 and May 2004, 31 women with FIGO stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer or with postsurgical pelvic recurrence were enrolled into this phase II study and randomized to receive on a weekly basis either 40 mg/m2 Cisplatin (group I; 16 patients or 50 mg/m2 paclitaxel (group II; 15 patients concurrently with radiotherapy. Median total dose to point A was 74 Gy (range: 66-92 Gy for group I and 66 Gy (range: 40-98 Gy for group II. Median follow-up time was 46 months. Results Patient and tumor characteristics were similar in both groups. The mean number of chemotherapy cycles was also comparable with 87% and 80% of patients receiving at least 4 doses in groups I and II, respectively. Seven patients (44% of group I and 8 patients (53% of group II developed tumor recurrence. The Median Survival time was not reached for Group I and 53 months for group II. The proportion of patients surviving at 2 and 5 years was 78% and 54% for group I and 73% and 43% for group II respectively. Conclusions This small prospective study shows that weekly paclitaxel does not provide any clinical advantage over weekly cisplatin for concurrent chemoradiation for advanced carcinoma of the cervix.

  17. Preliminary results obtained with the ZEUS phasing sensor within the APE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdej, I.; Luong, B.; Vigan, A.; Araujo, C.; Bourtembourg, R.; Brast, R.; Duhoux, P.; Dupuy, C.; Frank, C.; Gonte, F.; Karban, R.; Mazzoleni, R.; Noethe, L.; Yaitskova, N.; Dohlen, K.

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of the Active Phasing Experiment (APE), four different phasing techniques are tested. The ZErnike Unit for Segment phasing sensor (ZEUS) is integrated on the APE bench. APE has been tested in the laboratory before it will be installed on one of the Nasmyth platform of a Very Large Telescope (VLT) Unit Telescope to perform on sky tests. The ZEUS phasing sensor concept has its origins in the Mach-Zehnder interferometer equipped with a spatial filter in its focal plane. In this paper, the ZEUS phasing sensor is described together with its theoretical background and deployment within the APE experiment. The algorithms and its elements used to reconstruct the wavefront are described. Finally, the preliminary results obtained in the laboratory are presented.

  18. Introducing Students to Surface Modification and Phase Transfer of Nanoparticles with a Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkilany, Alaaldin M.; Mansour, Sara; Amro, Hamza M.; Pelaz, Beatriz; Soliman, Mahmoud G.; Hinman, Joshua G.; Dennison, Jordan M.; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Murphy, Catherine J.

    2017-01-01

    A simple, reliable, and cost-effective experiment is presented in which students synthesized citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (GNPs), functionalized them with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and transferred the PEG-GNPs from water to the organic phase dichloromethane. The experiment introduces students to nanotechnology with foci on important…

  19. Phase I/II Trial of 5-Fluorouracil and a Noncytotoxic Dose Level of Suramin in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Saby; Dreicer, Robert; Au, Jessie J. L.; Shen, Tong; Rini, Brian I.; Roman, Susan; Cooney, Matthew M.; Mekhail, Tarek; Elson, Paul; Wientjes, Guillaume M.; Ganapathi, Ram; Bukowski, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is recognized as a neoplasm resistant to chemotherapy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that suramin, at noncytotoxic doses, enhanced the activity of chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in xenograft models. Patients and Methods A phase I/II trial of noncytotoxic suramin in combination with weekly 5-FU in patients with metastatic RCC was conducted. The treatment consisted of intravenous (I.V.) suramin followed by a 500 mg/m2 I.V. bolus of 5-FU given 4.5 hours after starting suramin. In the phase I portion, a cohort of 6 patients received a suramin dose calculated to achieve a plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L. Therapy was administered once weekly for 6 doses, followed by 2 weeks off. This was followed by a phase II portion in which the primary goal was to determine the objective response rate. Results Twenty-three patients were enrolled in the study: 6 in the phase I portion and 17 in phase II. Seventy-eight percent of patients were men, the mean age was 58.8 years, 96% had previous nephrectomy, and 70% had received previous systemic therapy. Histologic subtype was clear cell in 91%. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 of 6 patients (grade 3 hypersensitivity related to suramin infusion). The suramin dosing nomogram used in phase I and II portions of the trial yielded the desired plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L from 4.5 hours to 48 hours after infusion in 94 of 115 treatments. No objective responses were noted, and the median time to treatment failure was 2.5 months. The major toxicities (all grades) were fatigue (83%), nausea/vomiting (78%), diarrhea (61%), and chills (61%). Conclusion Suramin levels expected to reverse fibroblast growth factor–induced resistance can be achieved with the dosing regimen used in this study. The toxicity observed with suramin and 5-FU was acceptable. The combination does not have clinical activity in patients with metastatic RCC. PMID:18824429

  20. Expression of Interest for a Phase-II LHCb Upgrade: Opportunities in flavour physics, and beyond, in the HL-LHC era

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Anelli, Mario; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Balla, Alessandro; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carletti, Maurizio; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Casu, Luigi; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Citterio, Mauro; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Coelli, Simone; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Su{á}rez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; D{é}l{é}age, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Felici, Giulietto; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fresch, Paolo; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; F{ä}rber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; Garc{í}a Pardi{ñ}as, Juli{á}n; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gatta, Maurizio; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gian{ì}, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier G{ö}ran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graug{é}s, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Gr{ü}nberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; G{ö}bel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adl{è}ne; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Leflat, Alexander; Lefran{ç}ois, Jacques; Lef{è}vre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean Fran{ç}ois; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, J{ö}rg; Marras, Davide; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, Andr{é}; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; M{ü}ller, Dominik; M{ü}ller, Janine; M{ü}ller, Katharina; M{ü}ller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, C{é}dric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Chen; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Gonzalo, David; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Saputi, Alessandro; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevens, Holger; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh T{â}m; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Van Dijk, Maarten; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; V{á}zquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano; CERN. Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2017-01-01

    A Phase-II Upgrade is proposed for the LHCb experiment in order to take full advantage of the flavour-physics opportunities at the HL-LHC, and other topics that can be studied with a forward spectrometer. This Upgrade, which will be installed in Long Shutdown 4 of the LHC (2030), will build on the strengths of the current experiment and the Phase-I Upgrade, but will consist of re-designed sub-systems that can operate at a luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{34}\\,{\\rm cm}^{-2} s^{-1}$, ten times that of the Phase-I Upgrade detector. New and improved detector components will increase the intrinsic performance of the experiment in certain key areas. In particular the installation of a tungsten sampling electromagnetic calorimeter will widen LHCb's capabilities for decays involving $\\pi^0$ and $\\eta$ mesons, electrons, and photons from loop-level penguin processes. The physics motivation is presented, and the prospects for operating the LHCb Interaction Point at high luminosity are assessed. The challenges for the detect...

  1. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  2. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John McCord

    2004-12-01

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  3. Phase II study of biweekly cetuximab in combination with irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with platinum-resistant gastro-oesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønnemann, K R; Yilmaz, Mette Karen; Bjerregaard, J K

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma.......The purpose of this phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cetuximab and irinotecan as second-line treatment in patients with gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma....

  4. The Slow Control and Data Quality Monitoring System for the Belle II Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Ryosuke; Nakao, Mikihiko; Suzuki, Soh Y.; Yamada, Satoru

    2015-06-01

    The Belle II experiment will start physics data taking in 2016 at the SuperKEKB factory to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model from flavor physics channels. The Belle II data acquisition (DAQ) system consists of a large number of subsystems to handle the high trigger rate and huge data bandwidth, where each subsystem can be considered as a network-accessible component distributed in a control network. A software control and monitoring system for the Belle II experiment was newly developed to manage the data flow and the subsystems. A slow control system handles with the operations of the DAQ subsystems, including parameter management with relational databases while a data quality monitor system analyzes event sample in the online data flow to monitor status of the detector and data taking. Graphical user interfaces were also developed for both of the software systems. We report designs of the slow control and the DQM system and results of operation of a beam test with prototypes of the Belle detector components in the DESY test beam facility in January, 2014.

  5. In-Space technology experiments program. A high efficiency thermal interface (using condensation heat transfer) between a 2-phase fluid loop and heatpipe radiator: Experiment definition phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohner, John A.; Dempsey, Brian P.; Herold, Leroy M.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station elements and advanced military spacecraft will require rejection of tens of kilowatts of waste heat. Large space radiators and two-phase heat transport loops will be required. To minimize radiator size and weight, it is critical to minimize the temperature drop between the heat source and sink. Under an Air Force contract, a unique, high-performance heat exchanger is developed for coupling the radiator to the transport loop. Since fluid flow through the heat exchanger is driven by capillary forces which are easily dominated by gravity forces in ground testing, it is necessary to perform microgravity thermal testing to verify the design. This contract consists of an experiment definition phase leading to a preliminary design and cost estimate for a shuttle-based flight experiment of this heat exchanger design. This program will utilize modified hardware from a ground test program for the heat exchanger.

  6. Exploring the statistical and clinical impact of two interim analyses on the Phase II design with option for direct assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ming-Wen; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Edelman, Martin J; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-07-01

    The primary goal of Phase II clinical trials is to understand better a treatment's safety and efficacy to inform a Phase III go/no-go decision. Many Phase II designs have been proposed, incorporating randomization, interim analyses, adaptation, and patient selection. The Phase II design with an option for direct assignment (i.e. stop randomization and assign all patients to the experimental arm based on a single interim analysis (IA) at 50% accrual) was recently proposed [An et al., 2012]. We discuss this design in the context of existing designs, and extend it from a single-IA to a two-IA design. We compared the statistical properties and clinical relevance of the direct assignment design with two IA (DAD-2) versus a balanced randomized design with two IA (BRD-2) and a direct assignment design with one IA (DAD-1), over a range of response rate ratios (2.0-3.0). The DAD-2 has minimal loss in power (designs, the direct assignment design, especially with two IA, provides a middle ground with desirable statistical properties and likely appeal to both clinicians and patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Charge exchange contamination of CRIT-II barium CIV experiment. [critical ionization velocity in ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Meyerott, R. E.; Rairden, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have been recently performed which attempted to confirm critical ionization velocity (CIV) ionization by deploying chemicals at high velocity in the ionosphere. Specifically, the CRIT-II rocket performed a barium release in the ionosphere, where observations of Ba(+) resonant emissions following the release are believed to have resulted from the CIV process. Calculations are presented which suggest a significant fraction (if not all) of the Ba(+) observed likely resulted from charge exchange with the thermosphere ions and not through CIV processes. The results presented here are pertinent to other CIV experiments performed in the ionosphere. It is recommended that laboratory measurements should be made of the charge exchange cross section between O(+) and Ba as well as other metal vapors used in CIV experiments.

  8. Action of Halowax 1051 on Enzymes of Phase I (CYP1A1 and Phase II (SULT1A and COMT Metabolism in the Pig Ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Barć

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs are a group of organochlorinated compounds exhibiting dioxin-like properties. Previously published data showed the direct action of PCN-rich Halowax 1051 on ovarian follicular steroidogenesis. Taking into consideration that the observed biological effects of PCNs may be frequently side effects of metabolites generated by their detoxification, the aim of this study was to determine the activity and expression of enzymes involved in phase I (cytochrome P450, family 1 (CYP1A1 and phase II (sulfotransferase (SULT1A and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT detoxification metabolism. Cocultures of granulosa and theca interna cells collected from sexually mature pigs were exposed to 1 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL of Halowax 1051 for 1 to 48 hours, after which levels and activities of CYP1A1, SULT1A, and COMT were measured. Dose-dependent increases of CYP1A1 activity and expression were observed. High doses of Halowax 1051 were inhibitory to COMT and SULT1A activity and reduced their protein levels. In conclusion, fast activation of phase I enzymes with simultaneous inhibition of phase II enzymes indicates that the previously observed effect of Halowax 1051 on follicular steroidogenesis may partially result from metabolite action occurring locally in ovarian follicles.

  9. Phase II trial of gemcitabine as prolonged infusion in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P; Akrivakis, K; Flath, B; Grosse, Y; Sezer, O; Mergenthaler, H G; Possinger, K

    1999-08-01

    Gemcitabine is an active agent in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. The phosphorylation of gemcitabine into the active gemcitabine triphosphate (dFdCTP) is catalyzed by deoxycytidine kinase. This enzyme is saturated at plasma concentrations achieved after an infusion over 30 min. Therefore accumulation of higher intracellular dFdCTP concentrations, which may result in an enhanced antineoplastic activity, cannot be achieved by higher dosage, but only by prolonged infusion time. In a previous phase I trial the maximum tolerated dose of gemcitabine given as a 6 h i.v. infusion was 250 mg/m2. The objective of this phase II trial was to determine the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine as prolonged infusion in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Twenty patients [median age 50.4 years, range 35-63 years; performance status EORTC 0 (17 patients), 1 (two patients), 2 (one patient)] with metastatic breast cancer were treated with 250 mg/m2 gemcitabine as infusion over 6 h on days 1, 8 and 15 q3 weeks for up to six courses (median 3.9 courses). Treatment was first line for four patients, second line for five patients and third line or higher for 11 patients. Metastatic sites were liver in 14 patients, bone in 12 patients, lung in eight patients and lymph nodes in nine patients. Nine patients presented two metastatic sites, three patients three and five patients four. All patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. One patient (5%) achieved a complete remission (CR) and four patients (20%) a partial remission (PR) (one patient with CR of visceral metastases but stable bone metastases), for an overall response rate of 25% (five of 20). In addition, six patients (30%) had stable disease and nine (45%) failed to respond to the treatment. Time to progression ranged from 2 to 23 months with a median of 6.3 months. Hematologic toxicity was mild with leukopenia grade 3 in only three patients (15%) and no grade 3 thrombocytopenia. Moderate elevations of liver

  10. Bumper and grille airbags concept for enhanced vehicle compatibility in side impact: phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbat, Saeed; Li, Xiaowei; Prasad, Priya

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental physics and numerous field studies have shown a higher injury and fatality risk for occupants in smaller and lighter vehicles when struck by heavier, taller and higher vehicles. The consensus is that the significant parameters influencing compatibility in front-to-side crashes are geometric interaction, vehicle stiffness, and vehicle mass. The objective of this research is to develop a concept of deployable bumper and grille airbags for improved vehicle compatibility in side impact. The external airbags, deployed upon signals from sensors, may help mitigate the effect of weight, geometry and stiffness differences and reduce side intrusions. However, a highly reliable pre-crash sensing system is required to enable the reliable deployment, which is currently not technologically feasible. Analytical and numerical methods and hardware testing were used to help develop the deployable external airbags concept. Various Finite Element (FE) models at different stages were developed and an extensive number of iterations were conducted to help optimize airbag and inflator parameters to achieve desired targets. The concept development was executed and validated in two phases. This paper covers Phase II ONLY, which includes: (1) Re-design of the airbag geometry, pressure, and deployment strategies; (2) Further validation using a Via sled test of a 48 kph perpendicular side impact of an SUV-type impactor against a stationary car with US-SID-H3 crash dummy in the struck side; (3) Design of the reaction surface necessary for the bumper airbag functionality. The concept was demonstrated through live deployment of external airbags with a reaction surface in a full-scale perpendicular side impact of an SUV against a stationary passenger car at 48 kph. This research investigated only the concept of the inflatable devices since pre-crash sensing development was beyond the scope of this research. The concept design parameters of the bumper and grille airbags are presented in

  11. A Bayesian adaptive Phase I-II clinical trial for evaluating efficacy and toxicity with delayed outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Modiano, Jaime

    2014-02-01

    In traditional Phase-I oncology trials, the safety of a new chemotherapeutic agent is tested in a dose escalation study to identify the maximum tolerated dose, which is defined as the highest dose with acceptable toxicity. An alternate approach is to jointly model toxicity and efficacy and allow dose finding to be directed by a prespecified trade-off between efficacy and toxicity. With this goal in mind, several designs have been proposed to jointly model toxicity and efficacy in a Phase I-II dose escalation study. A factor limiting the use of these designs is that toxicity and efficacy must be observed in a timely manner. One approach to overcoming this problem is to model toxicity and efficacy as time-to-event outcomes. This would allow new subjects to be enrolled before full information is available for previous subjects while incorporating partial information when adaptively assigning new subjects to a dose level. We propose a Phase I-II dose escalation study for evaluating toxicity and efficacy with delayed outcomes by jointly modeling toxicity and efficacy as time-to-event outcomes. We apply our proposed design to a Phase I-II clinical trial of a novel targeted toxin for canine hemangiosarcoma. Our simulation results show that our design identifies the optimal dose at a similar rate to dose finding that treats toxicity and efficacy as binary outcomes, but with substantial savings in study duration. Our proposed design has acceptable operating characteristics and dramatically reduces the trial duration compared to a design that considers toxicity and efficacy as binary outcomes, but comes at the cost of enrolling additional subjects when all dose levels are unacceptable. We developed a novel Phase I-II design that accounts for delayed outcomes by modeling toxicity and efficacy as time-to-event outcomes. Our design has similar operating characteristics to efficacy/toxicity trade-off designs that consider efficacy and toxicity as binary outcomes, but with a

  12. A.c. commutator motors. Part II. Three-phase shunt motors; Wechselstrom-Kommutatormotoren. Teil II. Drehstrom-Nebenschlussmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunze, G.

    2002-04-01

    Three-phase commutator motors are speed-controlled motors which have been used for many years in application where exact electronic contro is not required, although they are more complex than d.c. shunt motors. [German] Als drehzahlsteuerbarer Motor hat sich insbesondere in Anwendungen, bei denen es nicht auf exakte elektronische Steuerung ankommt, ueber viele Jahre hinweg auch der Drehstrom-Kommutatormotor einen Namen gemacht. Dessen Innenleben ist allerdings komplizierter als das des vergleichbaren Gleichstrom-Nebenschlussmotors. (orig.)

  13. Phase II trial of RAD001 and bicalutamide for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Mari; Werner, Lilian; Courtney, Kevin D; Buckle, Geoffrey; Oh, William K; Bubley, Glen J; Hayes, Julia H; Weckstein, Douglas; Elfiky, Aymen; Sims, Danny M; Kantoff, Philip W; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2012-12-01

    Study Type--Therapy (cohort) Level of Evidence 2a. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Despite expanding treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), therapies with long response duration remain intangible due to prostate cancer cells' natural ability to develop iterative resistance. Androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been shown to play a critical role in CRPC and its expression is regulated by the PI3K-Akt pathway. Thus inhibition of AR signalling and PI3K-Akt-mTOR (a downstream mediator of the PI3K-Akt pathway) pathway is a logical combination in CRPC and we report a phase II trial of RAD001 and bicalutamide. Our study is the first clinical trial report of an AR inhibitor of PI3K-Akt-mTOR. The AR pathway and the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway are two of the most relevant growth pathway for CRPC. Despite low efficacy results from our trial there will be significant interest in the field for these data (dose, schedule, response, toxicity, trial design) as newer generations of both AR inhibitors and PI3K-Akt-mTOR inhibitors are in development and likely will be tested in combination in CRPC. • To determine best overall response and duration of response of RAD001, a selective inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin, in combination with bicalutamide in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). • To characterize the toxicity profile of RAD001 in combination with bicalutamide in patients with CRPC. • A phase II study was conducted to explore the efficacy and tolerability of RAD001 (10 mg daily) in combination with bicalutamide (50 mg daily) in men with progressive CRPC. • The primary endpoint was a composite of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and measurable disease response by standard criteria. • This single-stage trial with a sample size of 38 eligible patients provided 90% power to differentiate a response rate of ≥ 40% from a response rate of ≤ 20%, as expected for bicalutamide alone (α= 0.10, power = 0

  14. Characterization of thin irradiated epitaxial silicon sensors for the CMS phase II pixel 2 upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centis Vignali, Matteo; Garutti, Erika; Junkes, Alexandra; Steinbrueck, Georg [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider foreseen around 2023 resulted in the decision to replace the entire tracking system of the CMS experiment. The new pixel detector will be exposed to severe radiation corresponding to 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence up to φ{sub eq} ∼ 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and ionizing dose of ∼ 5 MGy after 3000 fb{sup -1}. Thin planar silicon sensors are good candidates to build the pixel detector since the degradation of the signal is less severe than for thicker devices. A study has been carried out in order to characterize highly irradiated planar epitaxial silicon sensors with an active thickness of 100 μm, in addition other silicon materials with a thickness of 200 μm have been studied. The investigation includes pad diodes and strip detectors irradiated up to a fluence of φ{sub eq} = 1.3 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The diodes have been characterized using laboratory measurements, while measurements have been carried out at the DESY II test beam facility to characterize the charge collection of the strip detectors. In this talk, the results obtained for p-bulk sensors are shown.

  15. Characterization of irradiated thin silicon sensors for the CMS phase II pixel upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centis Vignali, Matteo; Garutti, Erika; Junkes, Alexandra; Steinbrueck, Georg [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany); Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider, foreseen for 2025, necessitates the replacement of the tracker of the CMS experiment. The innermost layer of the new pixel detector will be exposed to severe radiation corresponding to a 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence up to Φ{sub eq} = 2 . 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and an ionizing dose of ∼ 10 MGy after an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb{sup -1}. Silicon crystals grown with different methods and sensor designs are under investigation in order to optimize the sensors for such high fluences. Thin planar silicon sensors are good candidates to achieve this goal, since the degradation of the signal produced by traversing particles is less severe than for thicker devices. Epitaxial pad diodes and strip sensors irradiated up to fluences of Φ{sub eq} = 1.3 . 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} have been characterized in laboratory measurements and beam tests at the DESY II facility. The active thickness of the strip sensors and pad diodes is 100 μm. In addition, strip sensors produced using other growth techniques with a thickness of 200 μm have been studied. In this talk, the results obtained for p-bulk sensors are shown.

  16. Auto-inhibitory regulation of angiotensin II functionality in hamster aorta during the early phases of dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Priscila Cristina; Pernomian, Larissa; Côco, Hariane; Gomes, Mayara Santos; Franco, João José; Marchi, Kátia Colombo; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; Uyemura, Sergio Akira; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato; de Oliveira, Ana Maria

    2016-06-15

    Emerging data point the crosstalk between dyslipidemia and renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Advanced dyslipidemia is described to induce RAS activation in the vasculature. However, the interplay between early dyslipidemia and the RAS remains unexplored. Knowing that hamsters and humans have a similar lipid profile, we investigated the effects of early and advanced dyslipidemia on angiotensin II-induced contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II (1.0pmol/l to 1.0µmol/l) were obtained in the hamster thoracic aorta. We also investigated the modulatory action of NAD(P)H oxidase on angiotensin II-induced contraction using ML171 (Nox-1 inhibitor, 0.5µmol/l) and VAS2870 (Nox-4 inhibitor, 5µmol/l). Early dyslipidemia was detected in hamsters treated with a cholesterol-rich diet for 15 days. Early dyslipidemia decreased the contraction induced by angiotensin II and the concentration of Nox-4-derived hydrogen peroxide. Advanced dyslipidemia, observed in hamsters treated with cholesterol-rich diet for 30 days, restored the contractile response induced by angiotensin II by compensatory mechanism that involves Nox-4-mediated oxidative stress. The hyporresponsiveness to angiotensin II may be an auto-inhibitory regulation of the angiotensinergic function during early dyslipidemia in an attempt to reduce the effects of the upregulation of the vascular RAS during the advanced stages of atherogenesis. The recovery of vascular angiotensin II functionality during the advanced phases of dyslipidemia is the result of the upregulation of redox-pro-inflammatory pathway that might be most likely involved in atherogenesis progression rather than in the recovery of vascular function. Taken together, our findings show the early phase of dyslipidemia may be the most favorable moment for effective atheroprotective therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: preliminary study of a Phase II clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jun Liang,1 Mingyan E,2 Gang Wu,3 Lujun Zhao,4 Xia Li,5 Xia Xiu,6 Ning Li,1 Bo Chen,1 Zhouguang Hui,1 Jima Lv,1 Hui Fang,1 Yu Tang,1 Nan Bi,1 Wenqing Wang,1 Yirui Zhai,1 Tao Li,1 Dongfu Chen,1 Shuangmei Zou,7 Ning Lu,7 Rolando Perez-Rodríguez,8 Junqi Zheng,9 Luhua Wang11Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Radiotherapy, Tongji Cancer Center Hospital, Wuhan, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 5Department of Radiotherapy, LiaoNing Province Cancer Hospital, Shenyang, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Radiotherapy, Beijing Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 7Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 8Center of Molecular Immunology, Havana, Cuba; 9School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaObjective: To determine the safety and therapeutic effects of nimotuzumab (h-R3 combined with radiotherapy in esophageal cancer.Methods: This Phase II clinical trial involved 42 patients with stage II (inoperable or refused surgery to stage IV (supraclavicular lymph node metastasis only esophageal cancers treated between November 2008 and July 2010. All patients had squamous cell carcinomas, and all received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 200 mg nimotuzumab per week during radiotherapy.Results: There were 9, 25, and 8 patients with stage II, III and IV disease, respectively. All except two patients received 50–70 Gy radiation; 37 patients (88.1% received more than five nimotuzumab doses. Grade III toxicities (21.4% of all adverse events included esophagitis and gastrointestinal, dermatological and hematological

  18. PHASE II STUDY OF HIGH DOSE PHOTON/PROTON RADIOTHERAPY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SPINE SARCOMAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, Thomas F.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Adams, Judith; Dean, Susan; Yeap, Beow Y.; McManus, Patricia; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Nielsen, G. Petur; Harmon, David C.; Spiro, Ira J.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Suit, Herman D.; Yoon, Sam S.; Hornicek, Francis J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy (XRT) for spine sarcomas is constrained by spinal cord, nerve, and viscera tolerance. Negative surgical margins are uncommon; hence, doses of ≥ 66 Gy are recommended. A Phase II clinical trial evaluated high dose photon/proton XRT for spine sarcomas. Materials/Methods Eligible patients had non-metastatic, thoracic, lumbar, and/or sacral spine/paraspinal sarcomas. Treatment included pre- and/or post-op photon/proton XRT +/- radical resection; patients with osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma received chemotherapy. Shrinking fields delivered 50.4 cobalt Gray equivalent (GyRBE) to subclinical disease, 70.2 GyRBE to microscopic disease in the tumor bed, and 77.4 GyRBE to gross disease at 1.8 GyRBE q.d. Doses were reduced for radiosensitive histologies, concurrent chemoradiation, or when diabetes or autoimmune disease present. Spinal cord dose was limited to 63/54 GyRBE to surface/center. Intra-operative boost doses of 7.5-10 Gy could be given by dural plaque. Results 50 patients (29 chordoma, 14 chondrosarcoma, 7 other) underwent gross total (n=25) or subtotal (n=12) resection or biopsy (n=13). With 48 month median follow-up, five-year actuarial local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival are: 78%, 63%, and 87% respectively. Two of 36 (5.6%) patients treated for primary versus 7/14 (50%) for recurrent tumor developed local recurrence, p<0.001. Five patients developed late radiation-associated complications; no myelopathy developed but three sacral neuropathies appeared following 77.12-77.4 GyRBE. Conclusions Local control with this treatment is high in patients radiated at the time of primary presentation. Spinal cord dose constraints appear to be safe. Sacral nerves receiving 77.12-77.4 GyRBE are at risk for late toxicity. PMID:19095372

  19. A Phase II study of the safety and efficacy of teriflunomide in multiple sclerosis with relapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, P W; Li, D; Freedman, M S; Bar-Or, A; Rice, G P A; Confavreux, C; Paty, D W; Stewart, J A; Scheyer, R

    2006-03-28

    Teriflunomide, a dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase inhibitor, has immunomodulatory effects, including the ability to suppress experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase II study, the authors examined the safety and efficacy of oral teriflunomide in multiple sclerosis (MS) with relapses. Patients (n = 179) with relapsing-remitting MS (n = 157) or secondary progressive MS with relapses (n = 22) were randomized to receive placebo, teriflunomide 7 mg/day, or teriflunomide 14 mg/day for 36 weeks. MRI brain scans were performed every 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was the number of combined unique active lesions per MRI scan. Secondary endpoints included MRI-defined disease burden, relapse frequency, and disability increase. The median number of combined unique active lesions per scan was 0.5, 0.2, and 0.3 in the placebo, teriflunomide 7 mg/day (p teriflunomide 14 mg/day (p Teriflunomide-treated patients also had significantly fewer T1 enhancing lesions per scan, new or enlarging T2 lesions per scan, and new T2 lesions. Patients receiving teriflunomide 14 mg/day had significantly reduced T2 disease burden. Teriflunomide treatment resulted in trends toward a lower annualized relapse rate and fewer relapsing patients (14 mg/day only) vs placebo. Significantly fewer patients receiving teriflunomide 14 mg/day vs placebo demonstrated disability increase. Treatment was well tolerated; numbers of adverse events and serious adverse events were similar in all treatment groups. Oral teriflunomide was effective in reducing MRI lesions and was well tolerated in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis.

  20. Radical radiation therapy for oligometastatic breast cancer: Results of a prospective phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovo, Marco; Furlan, Carlo; Polesel, Jerry; Fiorica, Francesco; Arcangeli, Stefano; Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Alongi, Filippo; Del Conte, Alessandro; Militello, Loredana; Muraro, Elena; Martorelli, Debora; Spazzapan, Simon; Berretta, Massimiliano

    2017-09-21

    We conducted a prospective phase II multicentric trial to determine if radical radiation therapy to all metastatic sites might improve the progression-free survival (PFS) in oligometastatic breast cancer patients. Secondary endpoints were local control (LC), overall survival (OS) and toxicity. Inclusion criteria were the following: oligometastatic breast cancer with ≤5 metastatic sites, FDG-PET/CT staging, no brain metastases, primary tumor controlled. Radiotherapy could be delivered using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) technique or fractionated intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). SBRT consisted of 30-45Gy in 3 fractions, while IMRT was delivered to a total dose of 60Gy in 25 fractions. We hypothesized that radical radiation therapy could increase the PFS from 30% (according to the published literature) to 50% at two years. 54 Patients with 92 metastatic lesions were enrolled. Forty-four were treated with SBRT, and 10 with IMRT. Forty-eight (89%) patients received a form of systemic therapy concomitantly to radiation therapy. Sites of metastatic disease were the following: bones 60 lesions, lymph nodes 23 lesions, lung 4 lesions, liver 5 lesions. After a median follow-up of 30months (range, 6-55months), 1- and 2-year PFS was 75% and 53%, respectively. Two-year LC and OS were 97% and 95%, respectively. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and no Grade ≥3 toxicity was documented. Grade 2 toxicity were pain and fatigue in 2 cases. Patients with oligometastatic breast cancer treated with radical radiotherapy to all metastatic sites may achieve long-term progression-free survival, without significant treatment-related toxicity. While waiting for data from randomized trials, the use of radical radiation therapy to all metastatic sites in patients with oligometastatic breast cancer should be considered a valuable option, and its recommendation should be individualized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancing physical activity in older adults receiving hospital based rehabilitation: a phase II feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Catherine M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation have low activity levels and poor mobility outcomes. Increased physical activity may improve mobility. The objective of this Phase II study was to evaluate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT of enhanced physical activity in older adults receiving rehabilitation. Methods Patients admitted to aged care rehabilitation with reduced mobility were randomized to receive usual care or usual care plus additional physical activity, which was delivered by a physiotherapist or physiotherapy assistant. The feasibility and safety of the proposed RCT protocol was evaluated. The primary clinical outcome was mobility, which was assessed on hospital admission and discharge by an assessor blinded to group assignment. To determine the most appropriate measure of mobility, three measures were trialled; the Timed Up and Go, the Elderly Mobility Scale and the de Morton Mobility Index. Results The protocol was feasible. Thirty-four percent of people admitted to the ward were recruited, with 47 participants randomised to a control (n = 25 or intervention group (n = 22. The rates of adverse events (death, falls and readmission to an acute service did not differ between the groups. Usual care therapists remained blind to group allocation, with no change in usual practice. Physical activity targets were met on weekdays but not weekends and the intervention was acceptable to participants. The de Morton Mobility Index was the most appropriate measure of mobility. Conclusions The proposed RCT of enhanced physical activity in older adults receiving rehabilitation was feasible. A larger multi-centre RCT to establish whether this intervention is cost effective and improves mobility is warranted. Trial registration The trial was registered with the ANZTCR (ACTRN12608000427370.

  2. Phase-II conjugation ability for PAH metabolism in amphibians: characteristics and inter-species differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Haruki; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Tanaka-Ueno, Tomoko; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2011-10-01

    The present study examines amphibian metabolic activity - particularly conjugation - by analysis of pyrene (a four ring, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector (FD), a mass spectrometry detector (MS) system and kinetic analysis of conjugation enzymes. Six amphibian species were exposed to pyrene (dissolved in water): African claw frog (Xenopus laevis); Tago's brown frog (Rana tagoi); Montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris); Wrinkled frog (Rana rugosa); Japanese newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster); and Clouded salamander (Hynobius nebulosus); plus one fish species, medaka (Oryzias latipes); and a fresh water snail (Clithon retropictus), and the resultant metabolites were collected. Identification of pyrene metabolites by HPLC and ion-trap MS system indicated that medaka mainly excreted pyrene-1-glucuronide (PYOG), while pyrene-1-sulfate (PYOS) was the main metabolite in all amphibian species. Pyrene metabolites in amphibians were different from those in invertebrate fresh water snails. Inter-species differences were also observed in pyrene metabolism among amphibians. Metabolite analysis showed that frogs relied more strongly on sulfate conjugation than did Japanese newts and clouded salamanders. Furthermore, urodelan amphibians, newts and salamanders, excreted glucose conjugates of pyrene that were not detected in the anuran amphibians. Kinetic analysis of conjugation by hepatic microsomes and cytosols indicated that differences in excreted metabolites reflected differences in enzymatic activities. Furthermore, pyrenediol (PYDOH) glucoside sulfate was detected in the Japanese newt sample. This novel metabolite has not been reported previously to this report, in which we have identified unique characteristics of amphibians in phase II pyrene metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethanol production via fungal decomposition and fermentation of biomass. Phase II (FY 1981) annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonopoulos, A. A.; Wene, E. G.

    1981-10-01

    This program has as its main goal the isolation and development of Fusarium strains that can efficiently and economically decompose plant polysaccharides to pentoses and hexoses and ferment them to ethanol for fuel purposes. During Phase II (FY 1981) of this program, more than 800 new Fusarium isolates were isolated and screened. All showed cellulolytic activity. The Fusarium mutant ANL 3-72181 (derived after uv exposure of ANL 22 isolate) produced 2.45 iu cellulase after 14 days. This cellulase activity was achieved in the presence of 0.7 mg/mL extracellular protein. In separate tests, the use of both proteose peptone and yeast extract with 1% cellulose increased the production of extracellular protein three times over that on cellulose alone. Initial fermentation by Fusarium strains on 1% glucose produced up to 4.2 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. All Fusarium isolates and mutants found during this period were screened for xylose fermentation. Ethanol production during early experimentation required from 120 to 144 hours to yield 4.0 to 4.5 mg/mL ethanol from 1% xylose solutions. Through continuous selection of isolates, this time was reduced to 66 hours. By recycling Fusarium cell mass, fermentations of 1% xylose yielded 4.0 to 4.3 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. Consecutive fermentations of 2% xylose produced an average of 8.1 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. Fermentation of a 4.5% xylose + 2% glucose solution produced 21 mg/mL ethanol and 0.8 mg/mL acetic acid, while fermentation of a 7% xylose + 2% glucose solution yielded 25.5 mg/mL ethanol and 0.85 mg/mL acetic acid; these fermentations were aerated at a rate of 0.03 v/v-min.

  4. Preventing childhood obesity, phase II feasibility study focusing on South Asians: BEACHeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adab, Peymané; Pallan, Miranda J; Cade, Janet; Ekelund, Ulf; Barrett, Timothy; Daley, Amanda; Deeks, Jonathan; Duda, Joan; Gill, Paramjit; Parry, Jayne; Bhopal, Raj; Cheng, K K

    2014-04-10

    To assess feasibility and acceptability of a multifaceted, culturally appropriate intervention for preventing obesity in South Asian children, and to obtain data to inform sample size for a definitive trial. Phase II feasibility study of a complex intervention. 8 primary schools in inner city Birmingham, UK, within populations that are predominantly South Asian. 1090 children aged 6-8 years took part in the intervention. 571 (85.9% from South Asian background) underwent baseline measures. 85.5% (n=488) were followed up 2 years later. The 1-year intervention consisted of school-based and family-based activities, targeting dietary and physical activity behaviours. The intervention was modified and refined throughout the period of delivery. Acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and of measurements required to assess outcomes in a definitive trial. The difference in body mass index (BMI) z-score between arms was used to inform sample size calculations for a definitive trial. Some intervention components (increasing school physical activity opportunities, family cooking skills workshops, signposting of local leisure facilities and attending day event at a football club) were feasible and acceptable. Other components were acceptable, but not feasible. Promoting walking groups was neither acceptable nor feasible. At follow-up, children in the intervention compared with the control group were less likely to be obese (OR 0.41; 0.19 to 0.89), and had lower adjusted BMI z-score (-0.15 kg/m(2); 95% CI -0.27 to -0.03). The feasibility study informed components for an intervention programme. The favourable direction of outcome for weight status in the intervention group supports the need for a definitive trial. A cluster randomised controlled trial is now underway to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. ISRCTN51016370.

  5. Induction therapy for esophageal cancer with paclitaxel and hyperfractionated radiotherapy: a phase I and II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C D; Wain, J C; Lynch, T J; Choi, N C; Grossbard, M L; Carey, R W; Moncure, A C; Grillo, H C; Mathisen, D J

    1997-11-01

    Induction chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery may improve survival rates among patients with esophageal carcinoma. We designed a novel intense induction regimen with paclitaxel and high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy to maximize complete response rates. Forty patients with esophageal cancer were treated in a phase I and II trial of induction chemotherapy (cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel) at three dosage levels (75, 125, and 100 mg/m2) and concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy (45 Gy to the mediastinum, 58.5 Gy to the tumor). The mean age was 62 years, and 32 patients (80%) had adenocarcinoma. Twenty-eight of 40 (70%) patients had locally advanced tumors (T3, or stage IIB or greater). The average hospitalization for induction treatment was 17 days. Toxicity was substantial, with esophagitis necessitating nutritional support the most common complication. The maximum tolerated dose of paclitaxel was 100 mg/m2. Two patients died during induction treatment. Thirty-six patients (90%) underwent resection. The median length of stay was 10 days, and two patients died after the operation. Fourteen of 36 patients (39%) had a pathologic complete response. Patients who received all prescribed chemotherapy had a higher pathologic complete response rate (50%) than did patients who required dose reduction (17%; p = 0.076). The 2-year survival rate was 61% (95% CI 35% to 86%) with a median follow-up of 11.9 months. Paclitaxel at a dose of 100 mg/m2 appears to have acceptable toxicity. The high pathologic complete response rate in this regimen is encouraging, but it is associated with substantial toxicity. The toxicity of this regimen is not acceptable and will require substantial reduction in the radiation component. Survival data are too short-term to confirm enhanced survival.

  6. Multicenter phase II study of nivolumab in Japanese patients with relapsed or refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Dai; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Fukuhara, Noriko; Choi, Ilseung; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Terui, Yasuhito; Higuchi, Yusuke; Onishi, Yasushi; Abe, Yasunobu; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Shirasugi, Yukari; Tobinai, Kensei

    2017-05-01

    Overexpression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) ligands contributes to an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Nivolumab is a PD-1-blocking antibody that inhibits the PD-1 pathway and showed good efficacy in several types of malignancy. This phase II study examined the efficacy and safety of nivolumab in 17 Japanese patients with refractory/relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma previously treated with brentuximab vedotin. Sixteen patients were included in efficacy analyses and 17 in safety analyses. The primary endpoint was the centrally assessed objective response rate (ORR). The study was commenced in March 2015. We report data obtained at a cutoff of 16 March 2016, at which time 11 patients were still receiving nivolumab. The median (range) duration of treatment and follow-up were 7.0 (1.4-10.6) months and 9.8 (6.0-11.1) months, respectively. All 17 patients had previously received brentuximab vedotin. The ORR was 81.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 54.4-96.0%; 13/16 patients), with complete remission and partial remission in 4 and 9 patients, respectively. The overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates at 6 months were 100 and 60.0% (95% CI: 31.8-79.7%), respectively; the median OS and PFS were not reached. The most common adverse events (AE) were pyrexia (41.2%), pruritus (35.3%), rash (35.3%) and hypothyroidism (29.4%). Four patients (23.5%) experienced grade 3 or 4 AE, but most AE were of grade 1 or 2. In conclusion, nivolumab is a potentially effective and tolerable treatment option for Japanese patients with relapsed/refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma previously treated with brentuximab vedotin. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. A phase II clinical trial to assess the safety of clonidine in acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunatilake Harindra

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated 2–3 million people are acutely poisoned by organophosphorus pesticides each year, mostly in the developing world. There is a pressing need for new affordable antidotes and clonidine has been shown to be effective in animal studies. Our aim was to determine the safety of clonidine given as an antidote in adult patients presenting with signs or symptoms of acute organophosphate ingestion. Methods This study was a dose finding, open-label, multicentre, phase II trial. Forty eight patients with acute organophosphate poisoning were randomized to receive either clonidine or placebo: Four to receive placebo and twelve to receive clonidine at each dose level. The first dose level was an initial loading dose of 0.15 mg followed by an infusion of 0.5 mg of clonidine over 24 hours. The initial loading dose was increased to 0.3 mg, 0.45 and 0.6 mg. at all dosing levels however the subsequent infusion remained at 0.5 mg of clonidine over 24 hours. Results The baseline characteristics of both groups were similar. The trial was stopped after completion of the 3rd dosing level. At the 1st and 2nd dosing level there were no reported adverse drug reactions. At the 3rd dosing level 5 patients (42% developed significant hypotension during clonidine treatment that responded to intravenous fluids. There were no statistical differences in ventilation rate, pre and post GCS, and mortality rates over all levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest use of moderate doses of clonidine in acute organophosphate poisoning can be used without causing frequent clinical problems but that higher doses are associated with a high incidence of hypotension requiring intervention. Further studies are needed to study the efficacy of clonidine as an antidote in organophosphate poisoning. Trial registration Current Controlled Trial ISRCTN89917816.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest for dementia: a naturalistic, multicenter phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ana

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Available screening tests for dementia are of limited usefulness because they are influenced by the patient's culture and educational level. The Eurotest, an instrument based on the knowledge and handling of money, was designed to overcome these limitations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest in identifying dementia in customary clinical practice. Methods A cross-sectional, multi-center, naturalistic phase II study was conducted. The Eurotest was administered to consecutive patients, older than 60 years, in general neurology clinics. The patients' condition was classified as dementia or no dementia according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. We calculated sensitivity (Sn, specificity (Sp and area under the ROC curves (aROC with 95% confidence intervals. The influence of social and educational factors on scores was evaluated with multiple linear regression analysis, and the influence of these factors on diagnostic accuracy was evaluated with logistic regression. Results Sixteen neurologists recruited a total of 516 participants: 101 with dementia, 380 without dementia, and 35 who were excluded. Of the 481 participants who took the Eurotest, 38.7% were totally or functionally illiterate and 45.5% had received no formal education. Mean time needed to administer the test was 8.2+/-2.0 minutes. The best cut-off point was 20/21, with Sn = 0.91 (0.84–0.96, Sp = 0.82 (0.77–0.85, and aROC = 0.93 (0.91–0.95. Neither the scores on the Eurotest nor its diagnostic accuracy were influenced by social or educational factors. Conclusion This naturalistic and pragmatic study shows that the Eurotest is a rapid, simple and useful screening instrument, which is free from educational influences, and has appropriate internal and external validity.

  9. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment standard for patients with rectal cancer depends on the initial staging and includes surgical resection, radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy. For stage II and III tumors, radiochemotherapy should be performed in addition to surgery, preferentially as preoperative radiochemotherapy or as short-course hypofractionated radiation. Advances in surgical approaches, especially the establishment of the total mesorectal excision (TME in combination with sophisticated radiation and chemotherapy have reduced local recurrence rates to only few percent. However, due to the high incidence of rectal cancer, still a high absolute number of patients present with recurrent rectal carcinomas, and effective treatment is therefore needed. Carbon ions offer physical and biological advantages. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increase relative biological effectiveness (RBE, which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese data on the treatment of patients with recurrent rectal cancer previously not treated with radiation therapy have shown local control rates of carbon ion treatment superior to those of surgery. Therefore, this treatment concept should also be evaluated for recurrences after radiotherapy, when dose application using conventional photons is limited. Moreover, these patients are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological efficacy of carbon ions. Methods and design In the current Phase I/II-PANDORA-01-Study the recommended dose of carbon ion radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer will be determined in the Phase I part, and feasibilty and progression-free survival will be assessed in the Phase II part of the study. Within the Phase I part, increasing doses from 12 × 3 Gy E to 18

  10. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Kieser, Meinhard; Habermehl, Daniel; Weitz, Jürgen; Jäger, Dirk; Fossati, Piero; Orrechia, Roberto; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Pötter, Richard; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jäkel, Oliver; Büchler, Markus W; Debus, Jürgen

    2012-04-03

    Treatment standard for patients with rectal cancer depends on the initial staging and includes surgical resection, radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy. For stage II and III tumors, radiochemotherapy should be performed in addition to surgery, preferentially as preoperative radiochemotherapy or as short-course hypofractionated radiation. Advances in surgical approaches, especially the establishment of the total mesorectal excision (TME) in combination with sophisticated radiation and chemotherapy have reduced local recurrence rates to only few percent. However, due to the high incidence of rectal cancer, still a high absolute number of patients present with recurrent rectal carcinomas, and effective treatment is therefore needed.Carbon ions offer physical and biological advantages. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increase relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed.Japanese data on the treatment of patients with recurrent rectal cancer previously not treated with radiation therapy have shown local control rates of carbon ion treatment superior to those of surgery. Therefore, this treatment concept should also be evaluated for recurrences after radiotherapy, when dose application using conventional photons is limited. Moreover, these patients are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological efficacy of carbon ions. In the current Phase I/II-PANDORA-01-Study the recommended dose of carbon ion radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer will be determined in the Phase I part, and feasibilty and progression-free survival will be assessed in the Phase II part of the study.Within the Phase I part, increasing doses from 12 × 3 Gy E to 18 × 3 Gy E will be applied.The primary endpoint in the Phase

  11. Study of the use of personal equipment in low coal. Experiments on personal equipment for low seam coal miners: IV. Incorporating coiled cord into cap lamp battery cords. Phase II report number 4. Open file report 1 Jan 79-1 Sep 79

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, T.; Sanders, M.; Krohn, G.; Wick, D.; Volkmer, K.

    1980-01-31

    The objective of this study was to determine optimal personal equipment design for use in low coal based on ergonomic, biomechanic, and safety considerations. This report describes a study designed to evaluate a proposed modification in the cap lamp battery cord intended to reduce the incidence of snagging and catching of the cord. A three-phase evaluation was performed comparing a prototype with the standard, currently available cord.

  12. Phase II Investigation at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility in Savannah, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Environmental Science Division. Applied Geosciences and Environmental Management Section

    2012-05-01

    contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The investigation is being conducted in phases, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. Phase II objectives: Investigate the more detailed characteristics of groundwater flow in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility and the contaminated Morgan and MoDOT private wells; Obtain additional information on the vertical and lateral distribution and concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility and the contaminated Morgan and MoDOT private wells; Investigate further for possible evidence of carbon tetrachloride in the subsurface (vadose zone) and deeper soils beneath the former CCC/USDA facility, as well as in the vicinity of the contaminated MoDOT private well.

  13. Generalized optimal design for two-arm, randomized phase II clinical trials with endpoints from the exponential dispersion family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Mahnken, Jonathan D; He, Jianghua; Mayo, Matthew S

    2016-11-01

    For two-arm randomized phase II clinical trials, previous literature proposed an optimal design that minimizes the total sample sizes subject to multiple constraints on the standard errors of the estimated event rates and their difference. The original design is limited to trials with dichotomous endpoints. This paper extends the original approach to be applicable to phase II clinical trials with endpoints from the exponential dispersion family distributions. The proposed optimal design minimizes the total sample sizes needed to provide estimates of population means of both arms and their difference with pre-specified precision. Its applications on data from specific distribution families are discussed under multiple design considerations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Nontrivial Berry phase and type-II Dirac transport in the layered material PdT e2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Fucong; Bo, Xiangyan; Wang, Rui; Wu, Bin; Jiang, Juan; Fu, Dongzhi; Gao, Ming; Zheng, Hao; Chen, Yulin; Wang, Xuefeng; Bu, Haijun; Song, Fengqi; Wan, Xiangang; Wang, Baigeng; Wang, Guanghou

    2017-07-01

    We report on a systematic study of type-II Dirac fermions in a layered crystal of PdT e2 . De Haas-van Alphen oscillations show a small Fermi-surface pocket with a cross section of 0.077 n m-2 with a nontrivial Berry phase. First-principles calculation reveals that the nontrivial Berry phase originates from a hole pocket formed by the tilted Dirac cone. In addition, the band dispersion measured with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is found to be consistent with that of a type-II Dirac cone dispersion. We propose that PdT e2 is an improved platform to host topological superconductors.

  15. Automated energy management systems for small buildings. Volume II: market assessment reports, Phase I and II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-08-01

    Marketec, Inc., as part of a Honeywell research project sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), studied the major marketing influences affecting purchasing decisions for a new product concept - an Automated Energy Management System (AEMS). The first part of this study, designated Phase One, deals with four broad assessments of market need for an AEMS within the market segment generally defined as small buildings (75,000 square feet or less). Thus, determinations were made, using carefully selected focus groups, of the following issues: (1) market perception of the market segment in particular; (2) attitudinal statements concerning the solution of these problems; (3) current and projected energy-saving practices by the respondents from the market segment; and (4) an estimate of market potential of an AEMS from an analysis of the focus groups. The second phase of this investigation deals with larger national samplings from the same market segments and uses a questionnaire technique. Three small building sectors were chosen to represent the total small-building market: (1) apartments, (2) schools, and (3) offices. In the aggregate, these three sectors represent 50% or more of the energy consumed, square footage, and number of buildings of that total market.

  16. A phase II study investigating the re-induction of endocrine sensitivity following chemotherapy in androgen-independent prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shamash, J; Davies, A; Ansell, W; McFaul, S; Wilson, P.; Oliver, T.; Powles, T

    2008-01-01

    When chemotherapy is used in androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC), androgen deprivation is continued despite its failure. In this study, we investigated whether it was possible to re-induce hormone sensitivity in previously castrate patients by stopping endocrine therapy during chemotherapy. A phase II prospective study investigated the effects of reintroduction of endocrine therapy after oral chemotherapy in 56 patients with AIPC, which was given without concurrent androgen deprivatio...

  17. Systemic versus local responses in melanoma patients treated with talimogene laherparepvec from a multi-institutional phase II study

    OpenAIRE

    Howard L. Kaufman; Amatruda, Thomas; Reid, Tony; Gonzalez, Rene; Glaspy, John; Whitman, Eric; Harrington, Kevin; Nemunaitis, John; Zloza, Andrew; Wolf, Michael; Senzer, Neil N.

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously reported that talimogene laherparepvec, an oncolytic herpes virus encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), resulted in an objective response rate of 26?% in patients with advanced melanoma in a phase II clinical trial. The response of individual lesions, however, was not reported. Since talimogene laherparepvec is thought to mediate anti-tumor activity through both direct tumor cytolysis and induction of systemic tumor-specific immunity, we ...

  18. Development of a highway incident management operational and training guide : phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The overall goal of both phases of this project was to reduce responder fatalities and injuries, as well as to prevent : secondary crashes, especially those involving incident responders. The phases of this project worked toward this goal : by creati...

  19. Emergent Power-Law Phase in the 2D Heisenberg Windmill Antiferromagnet: A Computational Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanesan, Bhilahari; Chandra, Premala; Coleman, Piers; Orth, Peter P.

    2015-10-01

    In an extensive computational experiment, we test Polyakov's conjecture that under certain circumstances an isotropic Heisenberg model can develop algebraic spin correlations. We demonstrate the emergence of a multispin U(1) order parameter in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The correlations of this relative phase angle are observed to decay algebraically at intermediate temperatures in an extended critical phase. Using finite-size scaling we show that both phase transitions are of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type, and at lower temperatures we find long-range Z6 order.

  20. A Bayesian adaptive phase I-II trial design for optimizing the schedule of therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunanan, Kristen M; Koopmeiners, Joseph S

    2017-01-15

    Phase I-II clinical trials refer to the class of designs that evaluate both the safety and efficacy of a novel therapeutic agent in a single trial. Typically, Phase I-II oncology trials take the form of dose-escalation studies, where initial subjects are treated at the lowest dose level and subsequent subjects are treated at progressively higher doses until the optimal dose is identified. While dose-escalation designs are well-motivated in the case of traditional chemotherapeutic agents, an alternate approach may be considered for therapeutic cancer vaccines, where an investigator's main objective is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a set of dosing schedules or adjuvant combinations rather than to compare the safety and efficacy of progressively higher dose levels. We present a two-stage, Bayesian adaptive Phase I-II trial design to evaluate the safety and efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines. In the first stage, we determine whether a vaccination schedule achieves a minimum level of performance by comparing the toxicity and immune response rates to historical benchmarks. Vaccination schedules that achieve a minimum level of performance are compared using their magnitudes of immune response. If the superiority of a single schedule cannot be established after the first stage, Bayesian posterior predictive probabilities are used to determine the additional sample size required to identify the optimal vaccination schedule in a second stage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.