WorldWideScience

Sample records for experiment fitting program

  1. FATAL, General Experiment Fitting Program by Nonlinear Regression Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, L.; Budd, T.; Marshall, M.

    1982-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: A generalized fitting program with a free-format keyword interface to the user. It permits experimental data to be fitted by non-linear regression methods to any function describable by the user. The user requires the minimum of computer experience but needs to provide a subroutine to define his function. Some statistical output is included as well as 'best' estimates of the function's parameters. 2 - Method of solution: The regression method used is based on a minimization technique devised by Powell (Harwell Subroutine Library VA05A, 1972) which does not require the use of analytical derivatives. The method employs a quasi-Newton procedure balanced with a steepest descent correction. Experience shows this to be efficient for a very wide range of application. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The current version of the program permits functions to be defined with up to 20 parameters. The function may be fitted to a maximum of 400 points, preferably with estimated values of weight given

  2. FITS: a function-fitting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Chezem, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    FITS is an iterating computer program that adjusts the parameters of a function to fit a set of data points according to the least squares criterion and then lists and plots the results. The function can be programmed or chosen from a library that is provided. The library can be expanded to include up to 99 functions. A general plotting routine, contained in the program but useful in its own right, is described separately in an Appendix.

  3. FITS: a function-fitting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Chezem, C.G.

    1982-08-01

    FITS is an iterating computer program that adjusts the parameters of a function to fit a set of data points according to the least squares criterion and then lists and plots the results. The function can be programmed or chosen from a library that is provided. The library can be expanded to include up to 99 functions. A general plotting routine, contained in the program but useful in its own right, is described separately in Appendix A. An example problem file and its solution is given in Appendix B.

  4. A Qualitative Study of Fitness Instructors' Experiences Leading an Exercise Program for Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzal, Carolyn E.; Wright, F. Virginia; Stephens, Samantha; Schneiderman-Walker, Jane; Feldman, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Children with arthritis face challenges when they try to increase their physical activity. The study's objective was to identify elements of a successful community-based exercise program for children with arthritis by investigating the perspectives of fitness instructors who led the program. This qualitative study used a phenomenological approach.…

  5. Children's Fitness. Managing a Running Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, J. Scott; Tuckman, Bruce W.

    1987-01-01

    A running program to increase the cardiovascular fitness levels of fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade children is described. Discussed are the running environment, implementation of a running program, feedback, and reinforcement. (MT)

  6. Fitting the datum of SANS with Pxy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Liangwei; Peng, Mei; Chen, Liang

    2009-04-01

    The thesis introduces the basic theory of Small-Angle neutron scattering, enumerates several approximate law. It simply describes the components of Small-Angle neutron spectrometer (SANS) and the parameters of SANS of Budapest Neutron Center (BNC) in Hungary. During the period of studying at Budapest Neutron Center in Hungary, the experiments of wavelength calibration was carried out with SIBE and the SANS experiments of sample Micelles. The experiments are briefly introduced. Pxy program is used to fit these datum, and the results of wavelength and sizes of sample Micelles are presented. (authors)

  7. Review of track-fitting methods in counter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regler, M.; Eichinger, H.

    1981-01-01

    We review track-fitting methods recently used in high-energy physics experiments. Assuming that the problem of pattern recognition, i.e. of grouping the often ambiguous coordinate information (as frequently measured by wire chambers) together to form track candidates, has already been solved, we try to point out the way to obtain the ultimate geometrical resolution with the smallest and fastest possible program; owing to the wide variety of detectors and experimental set-ups, no universal method has been found. Some applications will serve as examples, and based on the experience gained we will try to indicate when and under which conditions a known algorithm could be used, and this might even help in designing future experiments. (orig.)

  8. Physical fitness and health education program at NASA Headquarters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angotti, Cathy

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: policy procedures to enter the NASA Headquarters Physical Fitness and Health Program; eligibility; TDY eligibility; health promotions offered; and general facility management.

  9. Fitting program for linear regressions according to Mahon (1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2018-01-09

    This program takes the users' Input data and fits a linear regression to it using the prescription presented by Mahon (1996). Compared to the commonly used York fit, this method has the correct prescription for measurement error propagation. This software should facilitate the proper fitting of measurements with a simple Interface.

  10. Marine Corps Semper Fit Program Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-08

    issue, badminton , basketball, boxing, calisthenics, cardiovascular training, gymnastics, handball, jogging, martial arts, physical fitness training...cooler Hunting & Fishing Equipment - bow & arrows - quiver - rifle - shotgun - rod & reel - tacklebox - creel Sports Equipment - badminton set

  11. How Programming Fits with Technology Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoffrey A.; Rich, Peter; Leatham, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Programming is a fundamental component of modern society. Programming and its applications influence much of how people work and interact. Because of people's reliance on programming in one or many of its applications, there is a need to teach students to be programming literate. Because the purpose of the International Technology and Engineering…

  12. Employee Fitness and Wellness Programs in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Deborah L.; Crump, Carolyn E.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews literature on worksite fitness and health promotion programs. Examines their impact on employees and the sponsoring organization. Discusses beneficial effects such as increased fitness, and reduction in health care costs, risk factors of heart disease, absenteeism, and turnover. Addresses issues related to participation rates, program…

  13. A FORTRAN program for a least-square fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Tetsuo

    1978-01-01

    A practical FORTRAN program for a least-squares fitting is presented. Although the method is quite usual, the program calculates not only the most satisfactory set of values of unknowns but also the plausible errors associated with them. As an example, a measured lateral absorbed-dose distribution in water for a narrow 25-MeV electron beam is fitted to a Gaussian distribution. (auth.)

  14. Progress report: qualitative differences between first and second order fit of pressure data - 1/5 scale Mk I BWR pressure suppression experiment and analysis program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, E.; Lai, W.; McCauley, E.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for the 1/5-scale Mark I boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment. The objective of this study is to calculate the hydrodynamic vertical load function (HVLF) and the maximum download and maximum upload ratios for the 90 0 sector to 7.5 0 section (i.e., the 3D to 2D ratios) together with their associated error bounds. Special graphs are presented of the pressure data that are useful in diagnostic studies of the HVLF. These graphs are three dimensional plots which depict the spatially dependent pressure as a function of time. These plots are qualitative but present an overview, not available by other means, which permits grasp of the subtle complex pattern of transient spatial changes in pressure excited by the dynamics in the pool. Sufficient text is included to describe the general feature of each plot

  15. Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Fitness Fitness Want to look and feel your best? Physical ... are? Check out this info: What is physical fitness? top Physical fitness means you can do everyday ...

  16. Physical Fitness Programs in the Workplace. WBGH Worksite Wellness Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knadler, Gary F.; And Others

    Because sedentary living creates health consequences that ultimately affect employees' productivity, many companies are sponsoring worksite physical fitness programs for their employees. The cost-effectiveness of such programs and the resulting reduction in employees' absenteeism rates and medical and health care costs have been well documented.…

  17. Employee Fitness Programs: Exploring Relationships between Perceived Organizational Support toward Employee Fitness and Organizational Sustainability Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of employee fitness programs on organizational sustainability performance from the perspective of organizational support as perceived by employees. Organizational sustainability performance was specified as a second-order factor, which was affected by three first-order factors: financial performance, social performance, and environmental performance. A snowball sampling method was employed to conduct an online survey of working adults in Shanghai to test the proposed hypotheses. Results show that perceived organizational support toward employee fitness has a positive and significant effect on organizational sustainability performance, and the positive effect is mediated by job satisfaction and organizational commitment. This study also provides theoretical and managerial implications.

  18. Evaluation of a Health and Fitness Social Media Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimming, Renee E.; Polsgrove, Myles Jay; Bower, Glenna G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: University health and fitness faculty members are continually striving to enhance the health knowledge of their students. Purpose: The purpose of this case study was to survey student reflections of a social media experience. Methods: Students were placed into one of two groups: Learners (N = 92) or Pre-Service Health and Fitness…

  19. PLOTnFIT: A BASIC program for data plotting and curve fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffgens, J O

    1989-10-01

    PLOTnFIT is a BASIC program to be used with an IBM or IBM-compatible personal computer (PC) for plotting and fitting curves to measured or observed data for both extrapolation and interpolation. It uses the Least Squares method to calculate the coefficients of nth degree polynomials (e.g., up to 10th degree) of Basis Functions so that each polynomial fits the data in a Least Squares sense, then plots the data and the polynomial that a user decides best represents them. PLOTnFIT is very versatile. It can be used to generate linear, semilog, and log-log graphs and can automatically scale the coordinate axes to suit the data. It can plot more than one data set on a graph (e.g., up to 8 data sets) and more data points than a user is likely to put on one graph (e.g., up to 225 points). A PC diskette containing (1) READIST.PNF (a summary of this NUREG), (2) INI06891.SIS and FOL06891.SIS (two data files), and 3) PLOTNFIT.4TH (the latest version of the program) may be obtained from the National Energy Software Center, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439. (author)

  20. Improvements in Spectrum's fit to program data tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiane, Severin G; Marsh, Kimberly; Grantham, Kelsey; Crichlow, Shawna; Caceres, Karen; Stover, John

    2017-04-01

    The Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS-supported Spectrum software package (Glastonbury, Connecticut, USA) is used by most countries worldwide to monitor the HIV epidemic. In Spectrum, HIV incidence trends among adults (aged 15-49 years) are derived by either fitting to seroprevalence surveillance and survey data or generating curves consistent with program and vital registration data, such as historical trends in the number of newly diagnosed infections or people living with HIV and AIDS related deaths. This article describes development and application of the fit to program data (FPD) tool in Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS' 2016 estimates round. In the FPD tool, HIV incidence trends are described as a simple or double logistic function. Function parameters are estimated from historical program data on newly reported HIV cases, people living with HIV or AIDS-related deaths. Inputs can be adjusted for proportions undiagnosed or misclassified deaths. Maximum likelihood estimation or minimum chi-squared distance methods are used to identify the best fitting curve. Asymptotic properties of the estimators from these fits are used to estimate uncertainty. The FPD tool was used to fit incidence for 62 countries in 2016. Maximum likelihood and minimum chi-squared distance methods gave similar results. A double logistic curve adequately described observed trends in all but four countries where a simple logistic curve performed better. Robust HIV-related program and vital registration data are routinely available in many middle-income and high-income countries, whereas HIV seroprevalence surveillance and survey data may be scarce. In these countries, the FPD tool offers a simpler, improved approach to estimating HIV incidence trends.

  1. 'Feel better/work better' epitomizes employee fitness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molidor, C

    1979-01-01

    It stands to reason that employees who feel better will take less time off because of illness and, consequently, improve their productivity. Rather than leave the health of their employees to chance, the Mercy Center for Health Care Services in Aurora, IL, put together a program that develops the total fitness of individual employees.

  2. Is the Nintendo Wii Fit really acceptable to older people?: a discrete choice experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Interactive video games such as the Nintendo Wii Fit are increasingly used as a therapeutic tool in health and aged care settings however, their acceptability to older people is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of the Nintendo Wii Fit as a therapy tool for hospitalised older people using a discrete choice experiment (DCE) before and after exposure to the intervention. Methods A DCE was administered to 21 participants in an interview style format prior to, and following several sessions of using the Wii Fit in physiotherapy. The physiotherapist prescribed the Wii Fit activities, supervised and supported the patient during the therapy sessions. Attributes included in the DCE were: mode of therapy (traditional or using the Wii Fit), amount of therapy, cost of therapy program and percentage of recovery made. Data was analysed using conditional (fixed-effects) logistic regression. Results Prior to commencing the therapy program participants were most concerned about therapy time (avoiding programs that were too intensive), and the amount of recovery they would make. Following the therapy program, participants were more concerned with the mode of therapy and preferred traditional therapy programs over programs using the Wii Fit. Conclusions The usefulness of the Wii Fit as a therapy tool with hospitalised older people is limited not only by the small proportion of older people who are able to use it, but by older people's preferences for traditional approaches to therapy. Mainstream media portrayals of the popularity of the Wii Fit with older people may not reflect the true acceptability in the older hospitalised population. PMID:22011360

  3. Is the Nintendo Wii Fit really acceptable to older people?: a discrete choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Leonie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactive video games such as the Nintendo Wii Fit are increasingly used as a therapeutic tool in health and aged care settings however, their acceptability to older people is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of the Nintendo Wii Fit as a therapy tool for hospitalised older people using a discrete choice experiment (DCE before and after exposure to the intervention. Methods A DCE was administered to 21 participants in an interview style format prior to, and following several sessions of using the Wii Fit in physiotherapy. The physiotherapist prescribed the Wii Fit activities, supervised and supported the patient during the therapy sessions. Attributes included in the DCE were: mode of therapy (traditional or using the Wii Fit, amount of therapy, cost of therapy program and percentage of recovery made. Data was analysed using conditional (fixed-effects logistic regression. Results Prior to commencing the therapy program participants were most concerned about therapy time (avoiding programs that were too intensive, and the amount of recovery they would make. Following the therapy program, participants were more concerned with the mode of therapy and preferred traditional therapy programs over programs using the Wii Fit. Conclusions The usefulness of the Wii Fit as a therapy tool with hospitalised older people is limited not only by the small proportion of older people who are able to use it, but by older people's preferences for traditional approaches to therapy. Mainstream media portrayals of the popularity of the Wii Fit with older people may not reflect the true acceptability in the older hospitalised population.

  4. ParFit: A Python-Based Object-Oriented Program for Fitting Molecular Mechanics Parameters to ab Initio Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahariev, Federico; De Silva, Nuwan; Gordon, Mark S; Windus, Theresa L; Dick-Perez, Marilu

    2017-03-27

    A newly created object-oriented program for automating the process of fitting molecular-mechanics parameters to ab initio data, termed ParFit, is presented. ParFit uses a hybrid of deterministic and stochastic genetic algorithms. ParFit can simultaneously handle several molecular-mechanics parameters in multiple molecules and can also apply symmetric and antisymmetric constraints on the optimized parameters. The simultaneous handling of several molecules enhances the transferability of the fitted parameters. ParFit is written in Python, uses a rich set of standard and nonstandard Python libraries, and can be run in parallel on multicore computer systems. As an example, a series of phosphine oxides, important for metal extraction chemistry, are parametrized using ParFit. ParFit is in an open source program available for free on GitHub ( https://github.com/fzahari/ParFit ).

  5. Lessons learned from health and fitness prescription: a Malaysian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalib A. Latiff

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Proportion of chronic diseases sufferers are increased by age. The usual control measures are therapeutic prescription and clinical counseling. However, its low compliance rate has interfered this effort. Therefore, community intervention can be a suitable prescriptive option to provide a long lasting effect. For that, a package of community intervention has been established in one sub-urban area in Malaysia to observe its acceptability, thus it can be acted as a social instrumentation to bring both biological and social benefits to this group of community. This study used quasi-experimental design on a cohort of elderly citizen aged 45 and above. Respondents are exposed to a mixed and planned prescribed fitness activity using participatory approach. Process involved in program implementation is closely observed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Community participation occurred in a positive and fast mode, with 78% being the elderly people aged above 45 years old. Initial observation revealed that about 47.6% suffering hypertension, while 38.4% hypercholesterolemia, 16.8% obese and 7.1% diabetes mellitus. Physically active members were moderate - about 31.0%. In term of process, participatory approach seems to be very effective to mobilize community towards health and fitness. A planned community fitness program is a form of social instrumentation to bring biological and social benefits to chronic diseases sufferers. It has also useful to promote favorable lifestyle and quality of life of this group of people. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:39-46 Keywords: community intervention, community participation, fitness program, disease burden

  6. Passerine birds breeding under chronic noise experience reduced fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schroeder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fitness in birds has been shown to be negatively associated with anthropogenic noise, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. It is however crucial to understand the mechanisms of how urban noise impinges on fitness to obtain a better understanding of the role of chronic noise in urban ecology. Here, we examine three hypotheses on how noise might reduce reproductive output in passerine birds: (H1 by impairing mate choice, (H2 by reducing territory quality and (H3 by impeding chick development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used long-term data from an island population of house sparrows, Passer domesticus, in which we can precisely estimate fitness. We found that nests in an area affected by the noise from large generators produced fewer young, of lower body mass, and fewer recruits, even when we corrected statistically for parental genetic quality using a cross-fostering set-up, supporting H3. Also, individual females provided their young with food less often when they bred in the noisy area compared to breeding attempts by the same females elsewhere. Furthermore, we show that females reacted flexibly to increased noise levels by adjusting their provisioning rate in the short term, which suggests that noise may be a causal factor that reduces reproductive output. We rejected H1 and H2 because nestbox occupancy, parental body mass, age and reproductive investment did not differ significantly between noisy and quiet areas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: OUR RESULTS SUGGEST A PREVIOUSLY UNDESCRIBED MECHANISM TO EXPLAIN HOW ENVIRONMENTAL NOISE CAN REDUCE FITNESS IN PASSERINE BIRDS: by acoustically masking parent-offspring communication. More importantly, using a cross-fostering set-up, our results demonstrate that birds breeding in a noisy environment experience significant fitness costs. Chronic noise is omnipresent around human habitation and may produces similar fitness consequences in a wide range of urban bird species.

  7. Physical Fitness Reference Standards in French Youth: The BOUGE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhelst, Jérémy; Labreuche, Julien; Béghin, Laurent; Drumez, Elodie; Fardy, Paul S; Chapelot, Didier; Mikulovic, Jacques; Ulmer, Zékya

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish sex- and age-specific physical fitness percentiles in French youth. A sample of 11,186 children and adolescents (5,546 boys and 5,640 girls), aged between 10 and 15 years, was assessed in the French national BOUGE study. Participants were tested for their cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular endurance, speed, flexibility, and agility using the following tests: 20-m shuttle run tests, curl-ups test, 50-m sprint test, back-saver sit and reach test, and 10 × 5-m shuttle run test. Percentile values were estimated for French youth as a function of age stratified by sex using the generalized additive model for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS). In general, physical fitness was better in boys than in girls, except for the back-saver sit and reach test, in which girls performed better. Except for the back-saver sit and reach test and 10 × 5-m shuttle run test, physical fitness performance was significantly associated with age. Sex- and age-specific normative values for physical fitness tests in French youth expressed as percentiles from the fifth to the 95th are provided. Reference values provide normative data for French youth. The data are useful in identifying special needs for appropriate intervention programs.

  8. Moessfit. A free Mössbauer fitting program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamusella, Sirko; Klauss, Hans-Henning

    2016-12-01

    A free data analysis program for Mössbauer spectroscopy was developed to solve commonly faced problems such as simultaneous fitting of multiple data sets, Maximum Entropy Method and a proper error estimation. The program is written in C++ using the Qt application framework and the Gnu Scientific Library. Moessfit makes use of multithreading to reasonably apply the multi core CPU capacities of modern PC. The whole fit is specified in a text input file issued to simplify work flow for the user and provide a simple start in the Mössbauer data analysis for beginners. However, the possibility to define arbitrary parameter dependencies and distributions as well as relaxation spectra makes Moessfit interesting for advanced user as well.

  9. IMFIT: A FAST, FLEXIBLE NEW PROGRAM FOR ASTRONOMICAL IMAGE FITTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erwin, Peter [Max-Planck-Insitut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching, GermanyAND (Germany); Universitäts-Sternwarte München, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 München (Germany)

    2015-02-01

    I describe a new, open-source astronomical image-fitting program called IMFIT, specialized for galaxies but potentially useful for other sources, which is fast, flexible, and highly extensible. A key characteristic of the program is an object-oriented design that allows new types of image components (two-dimensional surface-brightness functions) to be easily written and added to the program. Image functions provided with IMFIT include the usual suspects for galaxy decompositions (Sérsic, exponential, Gaussian), along with Core-Sérsic and broken-exponential profiles, elliptical rings, and three components that perform line-of-sight integration through three-dimensional luminosity-density models of disks and rings seen at arbitrary inclinations. Available minimization algorithms include Levenberg-Marquardt, Nelder-Mead simplex, and Differential Evolution, allowing trade-offs between speed and decreased sensitivity to local minima in the fit landscape. Minimization can be done using the standard χ{sup 2} statistic (using either data or model values to estimate per-pixel Gaussian errors, or else user-supplied error images) or Poisson-based maximum-likelihood statistics; the latter approach is particularly appropriate for cases of Poisson data in the low-count regime. I show that fitting low-signal-to-noise ratio galaxy images using χ{sup 2} minimization and individual-pixel Gaussian uncertainties can lead to significant biases in fitted parameter values, which are avoided if a Poisson-based statistic is used; this is true even when Gaussian read noise is present.

  10. The JRC experiment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworschak, H.

    1993-01-01

    JRC-ETHEL has chosen as the principle objective of its research program the improvement of protection measures in facilities handling large amounts of tritium. Technically, this involves investigating and assessing tritium propagation modes and transfer pathways in materials, components, equipment, and process plants. The experiment research work to be performed in ETHEL will basically aim at investigating: (1) Loss mechanisms by identifying physico-chemical parameters such as adsorption/desorption rates, permeation rates, leakages of materials for fusion reactors and the effects of potential remedies like permeation barriers under process-like conditions. (2) Multiple containment systems and fluid clean-up concepts under normal and accidental conditions. (3) Methods for solid waste handling, treatment, conditioning, and final disposal. (4) Techniques for tritium control, monitoring, and surveillance over the whole concentration range during both normal and accidental conditions and maintenance activities. With the availability of two open-quotes climate chambers,close quotes the small and large caissons of 5 and 350 m 3 volume respectively, ETHEL is especially suited for benchmark and scale-up tests of many kinds of large gas volumes treatment system. This will help to close the gap between laboratory-scale results and plant-size design specifications and represents an important source of information for designers (NET, ITER) and regulatory authorities

  11. Texas Employee Health and Fitness Program. An Example of Unique Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Donald F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Texas State Employee Health Fitness and Education Act of 1983 enables state agencies and educational institutions to finance employee health and fitness programs. This legislation is discussed and an example of the state-supported program is given. (MT)

  12. Format of Basic Instruction Program Resistance Training Classes: Effect on Fitness Change in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Channell, Brian; Pugh, Chip; Tuck, Matt; Pendel, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    New resistance training programs such as CrossFit are gaining favor among college-aged students. CrossFit and related commercial resistance training programs may provide a valuable elective option within basic instruction program (BIP) curricula, but the fitness benefits of this course have not been compared with those of existing BIP resistance…

  13. The development and application of the AstroFit program for complementary dark matter studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan Nelly

    2013-02-01

    This doctoral thesis describes the development and application of the AstroFit program. Many studies have shown the existence of dark matter (DM), a mass component that constitutes over eighty percent of the entire matter in the Universe. From historical astrophysical evidence to latest reconstructions with sophisticated methods, the gravitational effect of DM can be shown, but its nature remains unknown. Many theoretical explanations aim at describing DM, for example as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), within particular frameworks. The majority of these frameworks extend the existing standard model of particle physics (SM), so that new particles are added to the known set of elementary particles. One of these frameworks is the constrained supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) that naturally introduces a DM candidate in form of the lightest supersymmetric particle(LSP). Searches for DM particles are undertaken in three different ways. First, directly with fixed-target experiments that measure WIMPs coming towards the Earth with nuclei of the target material. Second, indirectly by reconstructing DM signatures in particle spectra of known particles observed with ground-based telescopes, spaceborne satellites or balloon-borne experiments. And third, indirectly via direct production of DM at particle colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and energy reconstructions where missing transverse energy is presumably carried away by the DM particles. Global fit programs used in particle physics, such as Fittino, are designed to fit parameters of theories beyond the SM simultaneously that are in accordance with the experimental and observed data in order to probe models and constrain the parameter space. To explore complementarity in DM research, the AstroFit interface program has been developed to combine all available information from direct and indirect searches for DM as well as collider searches for new physics in such global fits. To demonstrate

  14. The development and application of the AstroFit program for complementary dark matter studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan Nelly

    2013-02-15

    This doctoral thesis describes the development and application of the AstroFit program. Many studies have shown the existence of dark matter (DM), a mass component that constitutes over eighty percent of the entire matter in the Universe. From historical astrophysical evidence to latest reconstructions with sophisticated methods, the gravitational effect of DM can be shown, but its nature remains unknown. Many theoretical explanations aim at describing DM, for example as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), within particular frameworks. The majority of these frameworks extend the existing standard model of particle physics (SM), so that new particles are added to the known set of elementary particles. One of these frameworks is the constrained supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM) that naturally introduces a DM candidate in form of the lightest supersymmetric particle(LSP). Searches for DM particles are undertaken in three different ways. First, directly with fixed-target experiments that measure WIMPs coming towards the Earth with nuclei of the target material. Second, indirectly by reconstructing DM signatures in particle spectra of known particles observed with ground-based telescopes, spaceborne satellites or balloon-borne experiments. And third, indirectly via direct production of DM at particle colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and energy reconstructions where missing transverse energy is presumably carried away by the DM particles. Global fit programs used in particle physics, such as Fittino, are designed to fit parameters of theories beyond the SM simultaneously that are in accordance with the experimental and observed data in order to probe models and constrain the parameter space. To explore complementarity in DM research, the AstroFit interface program has been developed to combine all available information from direct and indirect searches for DM as well as collider searches for new physics in such global fits. To demonstrate

  15. The Intersections of Science and Practice: Examples From FitnessGram® Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Gregory J

    2017-12-01

    The FitnessGram® program has provided teachers with practical tools to enhance physical education programming. A key to the success of the program has been the systematic application of science to practice. Strong research methods have been used to develop assessments and standards for use in physical education, but consideration has also been given to ensure that programming meets the needs of teachers, students, parents, and other stakeholders. This essay summarizes some of these complex and nuanced intersections between science and practice with the FitnessGram® program. The commentaries are organized into 5 brief themes: science informing practice; practice informing science; balancing science and practice; promoting evidence-based practice; and the integration of science and practice. The article draws on personal experiences with the FitnessGram® program and is prepared based on comments shared during the 37th Annual C. H. McCloy Research Lecture at the 2017 SHAPE America - Society of Health and Physical Educators Convention.

  16. Fun & Fit, Phase I: A Program for Overweight African American and Hispanic American Children from Low-Income Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Karen S.; Hart, Melanie A.; Griffin, L. Kent

    2009-01-01

    Fun & Fit is a program designed to create positive physical activity experiences and to promote healthy lifestyle choices among overweight children from low-income African American and Hispanic American families. The program is a collaborative project between Texas Tech University and the Lubbock Independent School District funded through a…

  17. vFitness: a web-based computing tool for improving estimation of in vitro HIV-1 fitness experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeter Lisa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The replication rate (or fitness between viral variants has been investigated in vivo and in vitro for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. HIV fitness plays an important role in the development and persistence of drug resistance. The accurate estimation of viral fitness relies on complicated computations based on statistical methods. This calls for tools that are easy to access and intuitive to use for various experiments of viral fitness. Results Based on a mathematical model and several statistical methods (least-squares approach and measurement error models, a Web-based computing tool has been developed for improving estimation of virus fitness in growth competition assays of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. Conclusions Unlike the two-point calculation used in previous studies, the estimation here uses linear regression methods with all observed data in the competition experiment to more accurately estimate relative viral fitness parameters. The dilution factor is introduced for making the computational tool more flexible to accommodate various experimental conditions. This Web-based tool is implemented in C# language with Microsoft ASP.NET, and is publicly available on the Web at http://bis.urmc.rochester.edu/vFitness/.

  18. Geothermal FIT Design: International Experience and U.S. Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickerson, W.; Gifford, J.; Grace, R.; Cory, K.

    2012-08-01

    Developing power plants is a risky endeavor, whether conventional or renewable generation. Feed-in tariff (FIT) policies can be designed to address some of these risks, and their design can be tailored to geothermal electric plant development. Geothermal projects face risks similar to other generation project development, including finding buyers for power, ensuring adequate transmission capacity, competing to supply electricity and/or renewable energy certificates (RECs), securing reliable revenue streams, navigating the legal issues related to project development, and reacting to changes in existing regulations or incentives. Although FITs have not been created specifically for geothermal in the United States to date, a variety of FIT design options could reduce geothermal power plant development risks and are explored. This analysis focuses on the design of FIT incentive policies for geothermal electric projects and how FITs can be used to reduce risks (excluding drilling unproductive exploratory wells).

  19. Measuring microbial fitness in a field reciprocal transplant experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, Primrose J; Stelkens, Rike; Kowallik, Vienna; Greig, Duncan

    2017-05-01

    Microbial fitness is easy to measure in the laboratory, but difficult to measure in the field. Laboratory fitness assays make use of controlled conditions and genetically modified organisms, neither of which are available in the field. Among other applications, fitness assays can help researchers detect adaptation to different habitats or locations. We designed a competitive fitness assay to detect adaptation of Saccharomyces paradoxus isolates to the habitat they were isolated from (oak or larch leaf litter). The assay accurately measures relative fitness by tracking genotype frequency changes in the field using digital droplet PCR (DDPCR). We expected locally adapted S. paradoxus strains to increase in frequency over time when growing on the leaf litter type from which they were isolated. The DDPCR assay successfully detected fitness differences among S. paradoxus strains, but did not find a tendency for strains to be adapted to the habitat they were isolated from. Instead, we found that the natural alleles of the hexose transport gene we used to distinguish S. paradoxus strains had significant effects on fitness. The origin of a strain also affected its fitness: strains isolated from oak litter were generally fitter than strains from larch litter. Our results suggest that dispersal limitation and genetic drift shape S. paradoxus populations in the forest more than local selection does, although further research is needed to confirm this. Tracking genotype frequency changes using DDPCR is a practical and accurate microbial fitness assay for natural environments. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Resources Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Fitness in the Workplace: A Corporate Challenge. A Handbook on Employee Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

    This handbook on employee fitness program describes the benefits of developing physical recreation programs in the workplace. Descriptions are offered of various successful programs and their impact on employee health and job performance. (JD)

  1. Fitting boxes to Manhattan scenes using linear integer programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Minglei

    2016-02-19

    We propose an approach for automatic generation of building models by assembling a set of boxes using a Manhattan-world assumption. The method first aligns the point cloud with a per-building local coordinate system, and then fits axis-aligned planes to the point cloud through an iterative regularization process. The refined planes partition the space of the data into a series of compact cubic cells (candidate boxes) spanning the entire 3D space of the input data. We then choose to approximate the target building by the assembly of a subset of these candidate boxes using a binary linear programming formulation. The objective function is designed to maximize the point cloud coverage and the compactness of the final model. Finally, all selected boxes are merged into a lightweight polygonal mesh model, which is suitable for interactive visualization of large scale urban scenes. Experimental results and a comparison with state-of-the-art methods demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  2. The Benefits of High Intensity Functional Training (HIFT) Fitness Programs for Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Christopher K.; Poston, Walker S.C.; Heinrich, Katie M.; Jahnke, Sara A.; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2016-01-01

    High intensity functional training (HIFT) programs are designed to address multiple fitness domains, potentially providing improved physical and mental readiness in a changing operational environment. Programs consistent with HIFT principals such as CrossFit, SEALFIT and the US Marine Corps’ High Intensity Tactical Training (HITT) program are increasingly popular among military personnel. This article reviews the practical, health, body composition, and military fitness implications of HIFT exercise programs. We conclude that, given the unique benefits of HIFT, the military should consider evaluating whether these programs should be the standard for military fitness training. PMID:27849484

  3. Strongwomen® Program Evaluation: Effect of Strength Training Exercises on Physical Fitness of Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Van Horn, Beth; Corbin, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The Strongwomen® Program (SWP) is a nationally disseminated group strength-training exercise and nutrition education program delivered by Extension. The study reported here examined the effect of strength training exercises in SWP on improvement in physical fitness of program participants. Senior Fitness Test was used to collect data. Upon…

  4. Experiences of fitting isotherms to data from batch sorption experiments for radionuclides on tuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.

    1989-11-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the sorption of radionuclides on tuff as site characterization information for the Yucca Mountain Project. This paper presents general observations on the results of curve-fitting of sorption data by isotherm equations and the effects of experimental variables on their regressional analysis. Observations are specific to the effectiveness and problems associated with fitting isotherms, the calculation and value of isotherm parameters, and the significance of experimental variables such as replication, particle size, mode of sorption, and mineralogy. These observations are important in the design of laboratory experiments to ensure that collected data are adequate for effectively characterizing sorption of radionuclides on tuffs or other materials. 13 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Starting participation in an employee fitness program: attitudes, social influence, and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, L; De Vries, H

    1995-11-01

    This article presents a study of the determinants of starting participation in an employee fitness program. Information from 488 employees, recruited from two worksites, was obtained. From these employees the determinants of participation were studied. A questionnaire based on two theoretical models was used. The Stages of Change model was used to measure the health behavior, consisting of precontemplation (no intention to participate), contemplation (considering participation), preparation (intending to participate within a short period), and action (participating in fitness). The possible determinants were measured according to the ASE model, including the attitude toward an employee fitness program, social influence, and self-efficacy expectations. Subjects in action stage were most convinced of the benefits of participation in the employee fitness program and of their own skills to participate in a fitness program. Subjects in precontemplation stage were least convinced of the advantages of participation and had the lowest self-efficacy scores. Subjects in action stage experienced the most social support to participate in the employee fitness program. Health education for employees within industrial fitness programs can be tailored toward their motivational stage. Promotional activities for industrial fitness programs should concentrate on persons in the precontemplation and contemplation stages, since people in these stages are insufficiently convinced of the advantages of a fitness program and expect many problems with regard to their ability to participate in the program.

  6. The Air Force Fitness Program and the Challenge of Creating a More Fit Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    Health benefits from an active lifestyle will increase productivity, optimize health, and decrease absenteeism while maintaining a higher level of...come their way. That being said, fitness does not cure all mental 23 problems; neither APFRI, Cooper, nor I would ascribe to that. The condition...the business of life. These workout standards as stated in the AFI “will increase productivity, optimize health, and decrease absenteeism while

  7. LOGISTIC FUNCTION PROFILE FIT: A least-squares program for fitting interface profiles to an extended logistic function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchhoff, William H.

    2012-01-01

    The extended logistic function provides a physically reasonable description of interfaces such as depth profiles or line scans of surface topological or compositional features. It describes these interfaces with the minimum number of parameters, namely, position, width, and asymmetry. Logistic Function Profile Fit (LFPF) is a robust, least-squares fitting program in which the nonlinear extended logistic function is linearized by a Taylor series expansion (equivalent to a Newton–Raphson approach) with no apparent introduction of bias in the analysis. The program provides reliable confidence limits for the parameters when systematic errors are minimal and provides a display of the residuals from the fit for the detection of systematic errors. The program will aid researchers in applying ASTM E1636-10, “Standard practice for analytically describing sputter-depth-profile and linescan-profile data by an extended logistic function,” and may also prove useful in applying ISO 18516: 2006, “Surface chemical analysis—Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy—determination of lateral resolution.” Examples are given of LFPF fits to a secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profile, an Auger surface line scan, and synthetic data generated to exhibit known systematic errors for examining the significance of such errors to the extrapolation of partial profiles.

  8. Fitting boxes to Manhattan scenes using linear integer programming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Minglei; Nan, Liangliang; Liu, Shaochuang

    2016-01-01

    We propose an approach for automatic generation of building models by assembling a set of boxes using a Manhattan-world assumption. The method first aligns the point cloud with a per-building local coordinate system, and then fits axis

  9. Segmentation of Portuguese customers’ expectations from fitness programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gouveia Rodrigues

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Expectations towards fitness exercises are the major factor in customer satisfaction in the service sector in question. The purpose of this study is to present a segmentation framework for fitness customers, based on their individual expectations. The survey was designed and validated to evaluate individual expectations towards exercises. The study included a randomly recruited sample of 723 subjects (53% males; 47% females; 42.1±19.7 years. Factor analysis and cluster analysis with Ward’s cluster method with squared Euclidean distance were used to analyse the data obtained. Four components were extracted (performance, enjoyment, beauty and health explaining 68.7% of the total variance and three distinct segments were found: Exercise Lovers (n=312, Disinterested (n=161 and Beauty Seekers (n=250. All the factors identified have a significant contribution to differentiate the clusters, the first and third clusters being most similar. The segmentation framework obtained based on customer expectations allows better understanding of customers’ profiles, thus helping the fitness industry develop services more suitable for each type of customers. A follow-up study was conducted 5 years later and the results concur with the initial study.

  10. Adaptive Test Selection for Factorization-based Surrogate Fitness in Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawiec Krzysztof

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic programming (GP is a variant of evolutionary algorithm where the entities undergoing simulated evolution are computer programs. A fitness function in GP is usually based on a set of tests, each of which defines the desired output a correct program should return for an exemplary input. The outcomes of interactions between programs and tests in GP can be represented as an interaction matrix, with rows corresponding to programs in the current population and columns corresponding to tests. In previous work, we proposed SFIMX, a method that performs only a fraction of interactions and employs non-negative matrix factorization to estimate the outcomes of remaining ones, shortening GP’s runtime. In this paper, we build upon that work and propose three extensions of SFIMX, in which the subset of tests drawn to perform interactions is selected with respect to test difficulty. The conducted experiment indicates that the proposed extensions surpass the original SFIMX on a suite of discrete GP benchmarks.

  11. Design of spatial experiments: Model fitting and prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, V.V.

    1996-03-01

    The main objective of the paper is to describe and develop model oriented methods and algorithms for the design of spatial experiments. Unlike many other publications in this area, the approach proposed here is essentially based on the ideas of convex design theory.

  12. A fitting program for potential energy surfaces of bent triatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searles, D.J.; Nagy-Felsobuki, E.I. von

    1992-01-01

    A program has been developed in order to fit analytical power series expansions (Dunham, Simon-Parr-Finlan, Ogilvie and their exponential variants) and Pade approximants to discrete ab initio potential energy surfaces of non-linear triatomic molecules. The program employs standard least-squares fitting techniques using the singular decomposition method in order to dampen the higher-order coefficients (if deemed necessary) without significantly degrading the fit. The program makes full use of the symmetry of a triatomic molecule and so addresses the D 3h , C 2v and C S cases. (orig.)

  13. Fabrication Process for Machined and Shrink-Fitted Impactor-Type Liners for the LOS Alamos Hedp Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, B.

    2004-11-01

    Composite liners have been fabricated for the Los Alamos liner-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments using impactors formed by physical vapor deposition, and by machining and shrink fitting. Chemical vapor deposition has been proposed for some ATLAS liner applications. This paper describes the processes used to fabricate machined and shrink-fitted impactors; these processes have been used for copper impactors in 1100 aluminum liners and for 6061 T-6 aluminum impactors in 1100 aluminum liners. The most successful processes have been largely empirically developed and rely upon a combination of shrink-fitting and light press fitting. The processes used to date will be described along with some considerations for future composite liners for the HEDP Program.

  14. Aerobic fitness, maturation, and training experience in youth basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Humberto M; Coelho-e-Silva, Manuel J; Eisenmann, Joey C; Malina, Robert M

    2013-07-01

    Relationships among chronological age (CA), maturation, training experience, and body dimensions with peak oxygen uptake (VO2max) were considered in male basketball players 14-16 y of age. Data for all players included maturity status estimated as percentage of predicted adult height attained at the time of the study (Khamis-Roche protocol), years of training, body dimensions, and VO2max (incremental maximal test on a treadmill). Proportional allometric models derived from stepwise regressions were used to incorporate either CA or maturity status and to incorporate years of formal training in basketball. Estimates for size exponents (95% CI) from the separate allometric models for VO2max were height 2.16 (1.23-3.09), body mass 0.65 (0.37-0.93), and fat-free mass 0.73 (0.46-1.02). Body dimensions explained 39% to 44% of variance. The independent variables in the proportional allometric models explained 47% to 60% of variance in VO2max. Estimated maturity status (11-16% of explained variance) and training experience (7-11% of explained variance) were significant predictors with either body mass or estimated fat-free mass (P ≤ .01) but not with height. Biological maturity status and training experience in basketball had a significant contribution to VO2max via body mass and fat-free fat mass and also had an independent positive relation with aerobic performance. The results highlight the importance of considering variation associated with biological maturation in aerobic performance of late-adolescent boys.

  15. Improving the composition of voluntary programs in the category of Women in fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Bilenka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to reveal the basic directions of perfection of construction of compositions of voluntary programs in the category of Women in fitness. Material & Methods: judges-experts analyzed the structure and content of voluntary competitive programs of performances of six female athletes'-finalists of the championship of Ukraine on bodybuilding and fitness in 2016. Results: voluntary programs include elements of structural groups of varying complexity: "acrobatic", "choreographic", "strength" and "flexibility"; female athletes with better indicators in the quantitative analysis of competitive compositions received higher grades for performance; the results of athletes for an arbitrary program are directly proportional to the number of complex elements in the composition. Conclusions: in an voluntary program in women's fitness for a competitive result affects the saturation of the program, the variety and complexity of the elements.

  16. Theoretical bases and possibilities of program BRASIER for experimental data fitting and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero, B.; Santos, J.; Garcia Yip, F.; Lopez, I.

    1992-01-01

    In the paper the theoretical bases and primary possibilities of the program BRASIER are shown. It was performed for the management and fitting of experimental data. Relevant characteristics are: Utilization of several regression methods, errors treatment, P oint-Drop Technique , multidimensional fitting, friendly interactivity, graphical possibilities and file management. The fact of using various regression methods has resulted in greater convergence possibility with respect to other similar programs that use an unique algorithm

  17. Potential errors when fitting experience curves by means of spreadsheet software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Alsema, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    Progress ratios (PRs) are widely used in forecasting development of many technologies; they are derived from historical data represented in experience curves. Fitting the double logarithmic graphs is easily done with spreadsheet software like Microsoft Excel, by adding a trend line to the graph. However, it is unknown to many that these data are transformed to linear data before a fit is performed. This leads to erroneous results or a transformation bias in the PR, as we demonstrate using the experience curve for photovoltaic technology: logarithmic transformation leads to overestimates of progress ratios and underestimates of goodness of fit. Therefore, other graphing and analysis software is recommended.

  18. Genetics Education in Nurse Residency Programs: A Natural Fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nalo M; Stenman, Christina W; Sang, Elaine; Palmer, Christina

    2017-08-01

    Scientific advances are shedding light on the genetic underpinning of common diseases. With such insight, the entire health care team is faced with the need to address patient questions regarding genetic risk, testing, and the psychosocial aspects of genetics information. Nurses are in a prime position to help with patient education about genetic conditions, yet they often lack adequate genetics education within their nursing curriculum to address patient questions and provide resources. One mechanism to address this knowledge deficit is the incorporation of a genetics-based curriculum into nurse residency programs. This article describes a novel genetics-based curriculum designed and implemented in the UCLA Health System Nurse Residency Program. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(8):379-384. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. An after-school exercise program improves fitness, and body composition in elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Aaron L; Logue, Julie; Deininger, Heidi; Clark, R Randall; Curtis, Vanessa; Montague, Paul; Baldwin, Sharon

    2011-07-01

    Reduced cardiovascular fitness (CVF) is a risk factor for obesity and cardiovascular disease. It has previously shown that a school-based fitness curriculum can improve CVF, and other health indicators in middle school aged children. Whether an afterschool program improves CVF and other health markers in elementary-school children is unresolved. The objective of this study was therefore to determine whether an on-site afterschool-based fitness program improves body composition, cardiovascular fitness level, in elementary school children. 80 elementary school children were evaluated in a "fitness-oriented" afterschool program managed by the local YMCA. Children underwent evaluation of cardiovascular fitness by maximal VO 2 treadmill testing and body composition by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), at baseline (prior to the school-year) and again at end of the school year. Findings revealed that, at baseline, children had a mean age of 8.8 years, BMI of 18.7± 3, with a maximal VO 2 of 40.03 ± 7.6 ml/kg/min, and percent body fat of 28.7 ± 7%. After a 9-month intervention, children maximal VO 2 increased to 44.8 ± 7.5 ml/kg/min (p=0.04) and percent body fat decreased to 25.8 ± 6.2% (p=0.033). The study concluded that on-site afterschool programming focusing on fitness improved body composition and cardiovascular fitness, in elementary school children. Combined with prior studies, these data demonstrate that afterschool-based fitness curricula can benefit both obese and non-obese children. It was therefore recommended that, partnerships with schools to promote fitness even outside of school time should be a part of a school approach to improving children's health.

  20. Engaging Overweight Adolescents in a Health and Fitness Program Using Wearable Activity Trackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marian; Ramsay, Samantha; Young, Kimberly J

    Our objectives were to (a) examine feasibility and receptivity of overweight adolescents joining a community-based group fitness program and (b) test preliminary efficacy of a 12-week pilot intervention designed to promote health, fitness, and self-efficacy for the identified teens. The 12-week fitness program for overweight adolescents was developed and included planned physical activities, nutrition classes, and goal-setting sessions. A one-group pre-/posttest study design evaluated 20 participants from grades 10 through 12 who enrolled in the program pilot study. Participants were given a wearable activity tracker that captured data using an Internet-based platform. Outcome measures included body mass index, screen time, fitness, and cardiovascular measures. A community fitness program for overweight adolescents was successfully implemented. High school students were receptive to the intervention and reported high program satisfaction. Positive effects included measurements of strength, systolic blood pressure, weight, and screen time behaviors. This study provides evidence to support the feasibility, acceptance, and preliminary effects of the pilot program with overweight adolescents. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. How Packaging Fleet Renewal Fits French CEA Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumesnil, J.; Malvache, P.; Hugon, F.C.; Sollacaro, M.

    2006-01-01

    CEA's (French Atomic Energy Agency) packaging fleet is dedicated to transportation of test irradiated fuels, of research reactors fuels, of navy propulsion fuels, and of waste coming from and to nuclear plants or facilities. This fleet encompasses more than 30 types of casks ranging from 5 to 30 tons, with either recent designs or other dating back to the seventies. A study has been launched in order to perform a global analysis of the life expectancy of the existing CEA and COGEMA Logistics cask fleets with respect to a 2015 target, in order to anticipate its renewal, while limiting the number of type of cask. Key elements like periodical evolutions of design and transport regulations, lessons learnt of existing casks (design, approval and extensions, operational feedback, maintenance and dismantling) are taken into account in order to ensure compliance and availability of the fleet. Moreover, from design to cask delivery, including regulatory tests, safety analysis report/ CoC, and manufacturing, 3 to 5 years is needed. Therefore cask development should be taken into account earlier of invest and research's programs. The paper will address the current life expectancy study of CEA and COGEMA Logistics packaging fleet, based on lessons learnt and regulation evolution and on general R and D plans by user facilities. It will show how a comprehensive optimized fleet is made available to CEA and other customers. Such a fleet combines optimized investment and uses, thus entailing synergies for well-mastered costs of transports. (authors)

  2. Keep Your Brain Fit! A Psychoeducational Training Program for Healthy Cognitive Aging: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Jennifer; van Heugten, Caroline; van Boxtel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A psychoeducational face-to-face training program (Keep Your Brain Fit!) was developed to support the working population in coping with age-related cognitive changes and taking proactive preventive measures to maintain cognitive health. A feasibility study was conducted to test the training program presented in a workshop format. Participants…

  3. An intervention program to promote health-related physical fitness in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Su-Chuan; Chou, Ming-Chih; Hwu, Lien-Jen; Chang, Yin-O; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Kuo, Hsien-Wen

    2009-05-01

    To assess the effects of exercise intervention on nurses' health-related physical fitness. Regular exercise that includes gymnastics or aerobics has a positive effect on fitness. In Taiwan, there are not much data which assess the effects of exercise intervention on nurses' health-related physical fitness. Many studies have reported the high incidence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in nurses However, there has been limited research on intervention programs that are designed to improve the general physical fitness of nurses. A quasi-experimental study was conducted at a medical centre in central Taiwan. Ninety nurses from five different units of a hospital volunteered to participate in this study and participated in an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group engaged in a three-month intervention program consisting of treadmill exercise. Indicators of the health-related physical fitness of both groups were established and assessed before and after the intervention. Before intervention, the control group had significantly better grasp strength, flexibility and durability of abdominal muscles than the experimental group (p work duration, regular exercise and workload and found that the experimental group performed significantly better (p flexibility, durability of abdominal and back muscles and cardiopulmonary function. This study demonstrates that the development and implementation of an intervention program can promote and improve the health-related physical fitness of nurses. It is suggested that nurses engage in an exercise program while in the workplace to lower the risk of MSDs and to promote working efficiency.

  4. Weighted curve-fitting program for the HP 67/97 calculator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    The HP 67/97 calculator provides in its standard equipment a curve-fit program for linear, logarithmic, exponential and power functions that is quite useful and popular. However, in more sophisticated applications, proper weights for data are often essential. For this purpose a program package was created which is very similar to the standard curve-fit program but which includes the weights of the data for proper statistical analysis. This allows accurate calculation of the uncertainties of the fitted curve parameters as well as the uncertainties of interpolations or extrapolations, or optionally the uncertainties can be normalized with chi-square. The program is very versatile and allows one to perform quite difficult data analysis in a convenient way with the pocket calculator HP 67/97

  5. The Benefits of High-Intensity Functional Training Fitness Programs for Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Christopher K; Poston, Walker S C; Heinrich, Katie M; Jahnke, Sara A; Jitnarin, Nattinee

    2016-11-01

    High intensity functional training (HIFT) programs are designed to address multiple fitness domains, potentially providing improved physical and mental readiness in a changing operational environment. Programs consistent with HIFT principals such as CrossFit, SEALFIT and the US Marine Corps' High Intensity Tactical Training (HITT) are increasingly popular among military personnel. The goal of HIFT programs is to produce high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, endurance and strength that exceed those achieved by following current physical activity recommendations. Given the investment in and popularity of HIFT in the military, it is important to consider the potential impact of this approach to fitness training for the health of military personnel and their risk of training injury. In a previous report in this journal, we addressed the question of whether HIFT was associated with higher injury rates compared to other exercise programs. We argued that concerns about the injury potential of HIFT exercise programs were not supported by the scientific literature to date, although additional research was needed to directly compare injury rates in approaches such as CrossFit to traditional military fitness programs. In this article we will review the scientific data on the practical, health and fitness benefits of HIFT exercise programs for military populations. Practical benefits to HIFT exercise programs include shorter training times and volumes, exercises which simulate combat tasks, lower equipment costs, reduced potential for boredom and adaptation as a result of constant variation, less injury potential compared to high volume endurance training, and scalability to all fitness levels and rehabilitation needs. For instance, HIFT training volumes are typically between 25% to nearly 80% less than traditional military fitness programs without reductions in fitness outcomes. HIFT program also provide an impressive range of health benefits such as the promotion of

  6. Fit Families Program Improves Self-Perception in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archuleta, Martha; VanLeeuwen, Dawn; Turner, Carol

    2016-06-01

    To determine the impact of the Fit Families youth weight management program on self-perception of participants. Fit Families was delivered through Cooperative Extension and provided education to overweight and obese children and their families on healthful eating and physical activity along with building self-esteem and social competence. At the beginning and end of the 7-week program, a convenience sample of 46 youth completed the Self-Perception Profile for Children questionnaire to evaluate changes in self-perception. Youth had improved self-perception in the areas of athletic competence (P = .04) and physical appearance (P = .007) after participating in Fit Families. Fit Families provides a holistic approach to weight management that promotes positive self-perception, which may decrease the burden of depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem obese youth face. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The FITS model office ergonomics program: a model for best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Justine M Y

    2014-01-01

    An effective office ergonomics program can predict positive results in reducing musculoskeletal injury rates, enhancing productivity, and improving staff well-being and job satisfaction. Its objective is to provide a systematic solution to manage the potential risk of musculoskeletal disorders among computer users in an office setting. A FITS Model office ergonomics program is developed. The FITS Model Office Ergonomics Program has been developed which draws on the legislative requirements for promoting the health and safety of workers using computers for extended periods as well as previous research findings. The Model is developed according to the practical industrial knowledge in ergonomics, occupational health and safety management, and human resources management in Hong Kong and overseas. This paper proposes a comprehensive office ergonomics program, the FITS Model, which considers (1) Furniture Evaluation and Selection; (2) Individual Workstation Assessment; (3) Training and Education; (4) Stretching Exercises and Rest Break as elements of an effective program. An experienced ergonomics practitioner should be included in the program design and implementation. Through the FITS Model Office Ergonomics Program, the risk of musculoskeletal disorders among computer users can be eliminated or minimized, and workplace health and safety and employees' wellness enhanced.

  8. Health effects and usage of the training program CrossFit

    OpenAIRE

    RAJTMAJER, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Bachelor thesis is focused on modern CrossFit training system and its impact on fitness and overall health of men in the age group 20-40 years. In the theoretical part, I described the very essence of this modern practice, potential benefits and health risks. I drew from the available literature and trusted electronic resources related to the topic. At the beginning of the practical part of the intervention motion program was carried entrance investigation aimed at identifying the physical an...

  9. The disconnected values model improves mental well-being and fitness in an employee wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshel, Mark H; Brinthaupt, Thomas M; Kang, Minsoo

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a 10-week wellness program on changes in physical fitness and mental well-being. The conceptual framework for this study was the Disconnected Values Model (DVM). According to the DVM, detecting the inconsistencies between negative habits and values (e.g., health, family, faith, character) and concluding that these "disconnects" are unacceptable promotes the need for health behavior change. Participants were 164 full-time employees at a university in the southeastern U.S. The program included fitness coaching and a 90-minute orientation based on the DVM. Multivariate Mixed Model analyses indicated significantly improved scores from pre- to post-intervention on selected measures of physical fitness and mental well-being. The results suggest that the Disconnected Values Model provides an effective cognitive-behavioral approach to generating health behavior change in a 10-week workplace wellness program.

  10. CABAS: A freely available PC program for fitting calibration curves in chromosome aberration dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deperas, J.; Szluiska, M.; Deperas-Kaminska, M.; Edwards, A.; Lloyd, D.; Lindholm, C.; Romm, H.; Roy, L.; Moss, R.; Morand, J.; Wojcik, A.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of biological dosimetry is to estimate the dose and the associated uncertainty to which an accident victim was exposed. This process requires the use of the maximum-likelihood method for fitting a calibration curve, a procedure that is not implemented in most statistical computer programs. Several laboratories have produced their own programs, but these are frequently not user-friendly and not available to outside users. We developed a software for fitting a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship by the method of maximum-likelihood and for estimating a dose from the number of aberrations observed. The program called as CABAS consists of the main curve-fitting and dose estimating module and modules for calculating the dose in cases of partial body exposure, for estimating the minimum number of cells necessary to detect a given dose of radiation and for calculating the dose in the case of a protracted exposure. (authors)

  11. The IAEA neutron coincidence counting (INCC) and the DEMING least-squares fitting programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Harker, W.C.; Rinard, P.M.; Wenz, T.R.; Lewis, W.; Pham, P.; Ridder, P. de

    1998-01-01

    Two computer programs are described: (1) the INCC (IAEA or International Neutron Coincidence Counting) program and (2) the DEMING curve-fitting program. The INCC program is an IAEA version of the Los Alamos NCC (Neutron Coincidence Counting) code. The DEMING program is an upgrade of earlier Windows reg-sign and DOS codes with the same name. The versions described are INCC 3.00 and DEMING 1.11. The INCC and DEMING codes provide inspectors with the software support needed to perform calibration and verification measurements with all of the neutron coincidence counting systems used in IAEA inspections for the nondestructive assay of plutonium and uranium

  12. FitKids360: Design, Conduct, and Outcomes of a Stage 2 Pediatric Obesity Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M. Tucker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes FitKids360, a stage 2 pediatric weight management program. FitKids360 is a physician-referred, multicomponent, low-cost healthy lifestyle program for overweight and obese youth 5–16 years of age and their families. FitKids360 provides an evidence-based approach to the treatment of pediatric overweight by targeting patients’ physical activity, screen time, and dietary behaviors using a family-centered approach. The intervention begins with a two-hour orientation and assessment period followed by six weekly sessions. Assessments include lifestyle behaviors, anthropometry, and the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity (FNPA survey, which screens for obesogenic risk factors in the home environment. Outcomes are presented from 258 patients who completed one of 33 FitKids360 classes. After completing FitKids360, patients increased moderate to vigorous physical activity by 14 minutes (P=0.019, reduced screen time by 44 minutes (P<0.001, and improved key dietary behaviors. Overall, FNPA scores increased by 9% (P<0.001 and 69% of patients with “high risk” FNPA scores at baseline dropped below the “high risk” range by followup. Patients also lowered BMIs (P=0.011 and age- and sex-adjusted BMI z-scores (P<0.001 after completing the 7-week program. We hope this report will be useful to medical and public health professionals seeking to develop stage 2 pediatric obesity programs.

  13. Improved physical fitness among older female participants in a nationally disseminated, community-based exercise program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Rebecca A; Heidkamp-Young, Eleanor; Kuder, Julia; Nelson, Miriam E

    2012-04-01

    Strength training (ST) is an important health behavior for aging women; it helps maintain strength and function and reduces risk for chronic diseases. This study assessed change in physical fitness following participation in a ST program implemented and evaluated by community leaders. The StrongWomen Program is a nationally disseminated, research-based, community ST program active in 40 states. The Senior Fitness Test is used to assess upper and lower body strength, upper and lower body flexibility, aerobic fitness, and agility; data are collected prior to and following program participation. For these analyses, five states provided deidentified data for 367 female participants, mean age 63 (±11) years. Attendance in approximately 10 weeks of twice-weekly classes was 69.4%. Paired t tests were used to analyze pre-post change. Significant improvements were observed (p age-group and compared with published, age-based norms. This study demonstrates that it is feasible for community leaders to conduct pre-post physical fitness evaluations with participants and that participants experienced improvements across several important domains of physical fitness.

  14. Can Programmed or Self-Selected Physical Activity Affect Physical Fitness of Adolescents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Cláudio F.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the effects of programmed and self-selected physical activities on the physical fitness of adolescents. High school adolescents, aged between 15 and 17 years, were divided into two experimental groups: a a self-selected physical activity group (PAS with 55 students (aged 15.7 ± 0.7 years, who performed physical activities with self-selected rhythm at the following sports: basketball, volleyball, handball, futsal and swimming; and b a physical fitness training group (PFT with 53 students (aged 16.0 ± 0.7 years, who performed programmed physical fitness exercises. Both types of activity were developed during 60 min classes. To assess physical fitness the PROESP-BR protocol was used. The statistical analysis was performed by repeated measures ANOVA. The measurements of pre and post-tests showed significantly different values after PFT in: 9 minute running test, medicine ball throw, horizontal jump, abdominal endurance, running speed and flexibility. After PAS differences were detected in abdominal endurance, agility, running speed and flexibility. The intervention with programmed physical activity promoted more changes in the physical abilities; however, in the self-selected program, agility was improved probably because of the practice of sports. Therefore, physical education teachers can use PFT to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and power of lower and upper limbs and PAS to improve agility of high school adolescents.

  15. Can programmed or self-selected physical activity affect physical fitness of adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Cláudio F; Neto, Gabriel R; Araújo, Adenilson T; Sousa, Maria S C; Sousa, Juliana B C; Batista, Gilmário R; Reis, Victor M M R

    2014-09-29

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of programmed and self-selected physical activities on the physical fitness of adolescents. High school adolescents, aged between 15 and 17 years, were divided into two experimental groups: a) a self-selected physical activity group (PAS) with 55 students (aged 15.7 ± 0.7 years), who performed physical activities with self-selected rhythm at the following sports: basketball, volleyball, handball, futsal and swimming; and b) a physical fitness training group (PFT) with 53 students (aged 16.0 ± 0.7 years), who performed programmed physical fitness exercises. Both types of activity were developed during 60 min classes. To assess physical fitness the PROESP-BR protocol was used. The statistical analysis was performed by repeated measures ANOVA. The measurements of pre and post-tests showed significantly different values after PFT in: 9 minute running test, medicine ball throw, horizontal jump, abdominal endurance, running speed and flexibility. After PAS differences were detected in abdominal endurance, agility, running speed and flexibility. The intervention with programmed physical activity promoted more changes in the physical abilities; however, in the self-selected program, agility was improved probably because of the practice of sports. Therefore, physical education teachers can use PFT to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and power of lower and upper limbs and PAS to improve agility of high school adolescents.

  16. Using a qualitative approach for understanding hospital-affiliated integrated clinical and fitness facilities: characteristics and members' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingzhen; Kingsbury, Diana; Nichols, Matthew; Grimm, Kristin; Ding, Kele; Hallam, Jeffrey

    2015-06-19

    With health care shifting away from the traditional sick care model, many hospitals are integrating fitness facilities and programs into their clinical services in order to support health promotion and disease prevention at the community level. Through a series of focus groups, the present study assessed characteristics of hospital-affiliated integrated facilities located in Northeast Ohio, United States and members' experiences with respect to these facilities. Adult members were invited to participate in a focus group using a recruitment flyer. A total of 6 focus groups were conducted in 2013, each lasting one hour, ranging from 5 to 12 participants per group. The responses and discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim, then analyzed independently by research team members. Major themes were identified after consensus was reached. The participants' average age was 57, with 56.8% currently under a doctor's care. Four major themes associated with integrated facilities and members' experiences emerged across the six focus groups: 1) facility/program, 2) social atmosphere, 3) provider, and 4) member. Within each theme, several sub-themes were also identified. A key feature of integrated facilities is the availability of clinical and fitness services "under one roof". Many participants remarked that they initially attended physical therapy, becoming members of the fitness facility afterwards, or vice versa. The participants had favorable views of and experiences with the superior physical environment and atmosphere, personal attention, tailored programs, and knowledgeable, friendly, and attentive staff. In particular, participants favored the emphasis on preventive care and the promotion of holistic health and wellness. These results support the integration of wellness promotion and programming with traditional medical care and call for the further evaluation of such a model with regard to participants' health outcomes.

  17. New approach in the evaluation of a fitness program at a worksite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaya, K; Miyakawa, M; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, C; Shimada, N; Kondo, T

    1999-03-01

    The most common methods for the economic evaluation of a fitness program at a worksite are cost-effectiveness, cost-benefit, and cost-utility analyses. In this study, we applied a basic microeconomic theory, "neoclassical firm's problems," as the new approach for it. The optimal number of physical-exercise classes that constitute the core of the fitness program are determined using the cubic health production function. The optimal number is defined as the number that maximizes the profit of the program. The optimal number corresponding to any willingness-to-pay amount of the participants for the effectiveness of the program is presented using a graph. For example, if the willingness-to-pay is $800, the optimal number of classes is 23. Our method can be applied to the evaluation of any health care program if the health production function can be estimated.

  18. Sustained fitness gains and variability in fitness trajectories in the long-term evolution experiment with Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Richard E.; Wiser, Michael J.; Ribeck, Noah; Blount, Zachary D.; Nahum, Joshua R.; Morris, J. Jeffrey; Zaman, Luis; Turner, Caroline B.; Wade, Brian D.; Maddamsetti, Rohan; Burmeister, Alita R.; Baird, Elizabeth J.; Bundy, Jay; Grant, Nkrumah A.; Card, Kyle J.; Rowles, Maia; Weatherspoon, Kiyana; Papoulis, Spiridon E.; Sullivan, Rachel; Clark, Colleen; Mulka, Joseph S.; Hajela, Neerja

    2015-01-01

    Many populations live in environments subject to frequent biotic and abiotic changes. Nonetheless, it is interesting to ask whether an evolving population's mean fitness can increase indefinitely, and potentially without any limit, even in a constant environment. A recent study showed that fitness trajectories of Escherichia coli populations over 50 000 generations were better described by a power-law model than by a hyperbolic model. According to the power-law model, the rate of fitness gain declines over time but fitness has no upper limit, whereas the hyperbolic model implies a hard limit. Here, we examine whether the previously estimated power-law model predicts the fitness trajectory for an additional 10 000 generations. To that end, we conducted more than 1100 new competitive fitness assays. Consistent with the previous study, the power-law model fits the new data better than the hyperbolic model. We also analysed the variability in fitness among populations, finding subtle, but significant, heterogeneity in mean fitness. Some, but not all, of this variation reflects differences in mutation rate that evolved over time. Taken together, our results imply that both adaptation and divergence can continue indefinitely—or at least for a long time—even in a constant environment. PMID:26674951

  19. Repair models of cell survival and corresponding computer program for survival curve fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xun; Hu Yiwei

    1992-01-01

    Some basic concepts and formulations of two repair models of survival, the incomplete repair (IR) model and the lethal-potentially lethal (LPL) model, are introduced. An IBM-PC computer program for survival curve fitting with these models was developed and applied to fit the survivals of human melanoma cells HX118 irradiated at different dose rates. Comparison was made between the repair models and two non-repair models, the multitar get-single hit model and the linear-quadratic model, in the fitting and analysis of the survival-dose curves. It was shown that either IR model or LPL model can fit a set of survival curves of different dose rates with same parameters and provide information on the repair capacity of cells. These two mathematical models could be very useful in quantitative study on the radiosensitivity and repair capacity of cells

  20. Intellectual differences of adult men related to age and physical fitness before and after an exercise program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, M; Ismail, A H; Young, R J

    1980-05-01

    Fluid and crystalized intelligence differences among high-fit, young; high-fit, old; low-fit, young, and low-fit, old groups were investigated before and after an exercise program. The high-fit group had higher fluid intelligence than the low-fit group. Likewise, the young group scored higher than the old group. The four groups scored higher at the posttest on two of the fluid intelligence subtests of the Cattell Culture. Fair Intelligence Test. No differences were observed on crystallized intelligence. It is uncertain how biological factors and psychological changes, either individually or in combination, produce differences in cognitive functioning due to physical fitness.

  1. Potential errors when fitting experience curves by means of spreadsheet software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074628526; Alsema, E.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073416258

    2010-01-01

    Progress ratios (PRs) are widely used in forecasting development of many technologies; they are derived from historical data represented in experience curves. Fitting the double logarithmic graphs is easily done with spreadsheet software like Microsoft Excel, by adding a trend line to the graph.

  2. FREQFIT: Computer program which performs numerical regression and statistical chi-squared goodness of fit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofland, G.S.; Barton, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The computer program FREQFIT is designed to perform regression and statistical chi-squared goodness of fit analysis on one-dimensional or two-dimensional data. The program features an interactive user dialogue, numerous help messages, an option for screen or line printer output, and the flexibility to use practically any commercially available graphics package to create plots of the program's results. FREQFIT is written in Microsoft QuickBASIC, for IBM-PC compatible computers. A listing of the QuickBASIC source code for the FREQFIT program, a user manual, and sample input data, output, and plots are included. 6 refs., 1 fig

  3. Effect of programmed physical activity on the physical fitness of adolescent students

    OpenAIRE

    Edson Dos Santos Farias; Wellington Roberto Gomes Carvalho; Ezequiel Moreira Gonçalves; Gil Guerra Guerra-Júnior

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of programmed physical activity on the physical fitness of adolescent students over one school year. The sample consisted of 383 students (age range: 10 to 14 years) divided into two groups: 186 cases (96 boys and 90 girls) and 197 controls (108 boys and 89 girls). An intervention study with pre- and post-tests was conducted, in which the intervention group was submitted to programmed physical activity, while the control group underwe...

  4. SigrafW: An Easy-to-Use Program for Fitting Enzyme Kinetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Francisco Assis; Baranauskas, Jose Augusto; Furriel, Rosa Prazeres Melo; Borin, Ivana Aparecida

    2005-01-01

    SigrafW is Windows-compatible software developed using the Microsoft[R] Visual Basic Studio program that uses the simplified Hill equation for fitting kinetic data from allosteric and Michaelian enzymes. SigrafW uses a modified Fibonacci search to calculate maximal velocity (V), the Hill coefficient (n), and the enzyme-substrate apparent…

  5. The effectiveness of worksite physical activity programs on physical activity, physical fitness, and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proper, K.I.; Koning, M.; Beek, A.J. van der; Hildebrandt, V.H.; Bosscher, R.J.; Mechelen, W. van

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To critically review the literature with respect to the effectiveness of worksite physical activity programs on physical activity, physical fitness, and health. Data Sources: A search for relevant English-written papers published between 1980 and 2000 was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE,

  6. Use of Self-Management with the CW-FIT Group Contingency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Debra; Conklin, Carl; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of self-management as a tier two enhancement to the group contingency intervention, Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams Program (CW-FIT). Two classrooms, first and fourth grade, and two students in each of the classrooms participated in the intervention. The group contingency…

  7. Fit 5 Kids TV reduction program for Latino preschoolers: A cluster randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reducing Latino preschoolers' TV viewing is needed to reduce their risk of obesity and other chronic diseases. This study's objective was to evaluate the Fit 5 Kids (F5K) TV reduction program's impact on Latino preschooler's TV viewing. The study design was a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT...

  8. The Effects Of An Exercise Physiology Program on Physical Fitness Variables, Body Satisfaction, and Physiology Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Arlette C.; Rosenblatt, Evelyn S.; Kempner, Lani; Feldman, Brandon B.; Paolercio, Maria A.; Van Bemden, Angie L.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of an exercise physiology program on high school students' physical fitness, body satisfaction, and physiology knowledge. Intervention students received exercise physiology theory and active aerobic and resistance exercise within their biology course. Data from student surveys and measurements indicated that the integrated…

  9. Policy, environment, and worksite fitness program participation among financial enterprise employees in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheu-Jen; Hung, Wen-Chi

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the intertwined effects between the policies and regulations of the companies and personal background on participation in the physical fitness programs and leisure-time activities in financial enterprises. A total of 823 employees were selected as the sample with the multilevel stratification random-sampling technique. The response rate was 52.0%. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and hierarchical linear logistic regression. Thirty-two percent and 39% of the employees participated in the physical fitness programs and leisure-time activities, respectively. The factors affecting participation were categorized into intrapersonal factors, interpersonal processes, and primary groups, as well as institutional factors. In the interpersonal processes and primary groups level, higher family social support, more equipment in health promotion was associated with more participation in the programs. With the influence from the institutional level, it was found that health promotion policy amplified the relationship between employees' age and participation, but attenuated the relationship between education level and participation. Health promotion equipment in the institutes attenuated the relationship between colleague social support, family social support, and education level with program participation. Physical activity equipment in the community attenuated the relationship between family social support and program participation. The influential factors of social support and worksite environment could predict the employees' participation in the physical fitness programs and leisure-time physical activities. Health promotion policy and equipment attenuated the negative effects of nonparticipation as well as amplified the positive effects of participation.

  10. Barriers to Enrollment in a Pharmacist-Led Fitness, Nutrition, and Weight Management Coaching Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Lengel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate barriers to utilization of a pharmacist-led fitness, nutrition, and weight management coaching program, as well as describe patient reported expectations and explore the patient characteristics potentially associated with a higher willingness to participate in the future. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive study using an anonymous, electronic survey. Setting: A large, national, grocery store chain. Participants: Employee benefit plan members, eligible for a pharmacist-led fitness, nutrition, and weight management (FNWM coaching program, who were not currently or previously enrolled in the program, and met coaching program qualifications. Intervention: Peer-reviewed, electronic survey administered and collected using an Internet survey analysis software. Main Outcome Measures: Barriers to enrollment in the pharmacist-led fitness, nutrition, and weight management coaching program. Results: Of 1,130 emailed employees, 352 responded and 133 met study inclusion criteria and completed the whole survey. Of those who fit inclusion criteria, the majority (53.4% of the respondents were aware of the coaching program (75.2% and expressed interest in future participation (53.4%. “I am already taking steps to improve my health” and “I do not have time to participate in the program” were the highest rated barriers for both those interested and not interested in participating in the coaching program. The majority of participants believed pharmacists were qualified to provide the coaching service (78.2% and preferred one-on-one coaching with the pharmacist (67.7%. Key topics respondents wanted the pharmacist to cover included general diet and nutrition, weight management strategies, and vitamins and supplements. Conclusion: The two major barriers reported in the study were lack of time and the use of other health improvement methods; however, a large number of respondents indicated future interest in participating. Future

  11. Effect of a 5-Month Worksite Physical Activity Program on Tertiary Employees Overall Health and Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Pauline Manon; Degoutte, Fabrice; Finaud, Julien; Pereira, Bruno; Thivel, David; Duclos, Martine

    2017-02-01

    This pilot study questions the effects of a worksite physical activity program on health and fitness in tertiary employees. Ninety-five employees were randomly assigned to Control (CON); Novice (NOV); Experienced group (EXP). The NOV and EXP groups followed a 5-month worksite physical activity program (at least two sessions/week). Body composition, physical activity level and physical fitness, eating habits, health perception, sleep quality, pain, and quality of life were assessed. Fat mass decreased in NOV and EXP; the distance covered during the 6-minute walking test, push-ups, squat jump increased for NOV and EXP group. Physical activity level, health perception, quality of sleep, and eating habits were improved in NOV. This study underlines for the first time the beneficial effects of such worksite programs among tertiary employees on overall health and the feasibility of its design.

  12. A comparison of fitness-case sampling methods for genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Yuliana; Naredo, Enrique; Trujillo, Leonardo; Legrand, Pierrick; López, Uriel

    2017-11-01

    Genetic programming (GP) is an evolutionary computation paradigm for automatic program induction. GP has produced impressive results but it still needs to overcome some practical limitations, particularly its high computational cost, overfitting and excessive code growth. Recently, many researchers have proposed fitness-case sampling methods to overcome some of these problems, with mixed results in several limited tests. This paper presents an extensive comparative study of four fitness-case sampling methods, namely: Interleaved Sampling, Random Interleaved Sampling, Lexicase Selection and Keep-Worst Interleaved Sampling. The algorithms are compared on 11 symbolic regression problems and 11 supervised classification problems, using 10 synthetic benchmarks and 12 real-world data-sets. They are evaluated based on test performance, overfitting and average program size, comparing them with a standard GP search. Comparisons are carried out using non-parametric multigroup tests and post hoc pairwise statistical tests. The experimental results suggest that fitness-case sampling methods are particularly useful for difficult real-world symbolic regression problems, improving performance, reducing overfitting and limiting code growth. On the other hand, it seems that fitness-case sampling cannot improve upon GP performance when considering supervised binary classification.

  13. Fight-fitness in the program of student's physical education in higher educational institutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntian V.S.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It is introduced the new author 's program / new area of physical, technical, tactical, moral and volitional and aesthetic development - Fight-fitness. It is singled out the basic components: martial arts / self-defence, physical training, kick- boxing aerobics, special moral and volitional / psychological training. Justified by the positive influence of employment Fight-fitness on the organism involved, the effectiveness of the impact on the development of physical and intellectual qualities (using suggestive method of teaching and special sports terminology in English, the need for education of practical skills / practical skills.

  14. Operating experience feedback program at Olkiluoto NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosonen, Mikko

    2002-01-01

    Recent review and development of the operating experience feedback program will be described. The development of the program has been based on several reviews by outside organizations. Main conclusions from these review reports and from the self assessment of safety performance, safety problems and safety culture on the basis of the operational events made by ASSET-method will be described. An approach to gather and analyze small events - so-called near misses - will be described. The operating experience program has been divided into internal and external operating experience. ASSET-methodology and a computer program assisting the analysis are used for the internal operating experience events. Noteworthy incidents occurred during outage are analyzed also by ASSET-method. Screening and pre analysis of the external operating experience relies on co-operation with ERFATOM, an organization of Nordic utilities for the exchange of nuclear industry experience. A short presentation on the performance of the Olkiluoto units will conclude the presentation. (author)

  15. Air Force Fitness Program. Case Studies on the Impact on Aircraft Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    reduced or avoided pain after childbirth if one is muscularly fit. Also, in menopausal women, exercise reduces the effects of osteoporosis. Post ...workforce, show that exercise and increased productivity are directly linked. The first case, covered in the New Zealand Dominion Post , directly...menopausal depression has shown to greatly reduce with participation in a regular exercise program.20 While benefits of regular exercise and healthy

  16. Track reconstruction for the Mu3e experiment based on a novel Multiple Scattering fit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlinskiy Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mu3e experiment is designed to search for the lepton flavor violating decay μ+ → e+e+e−. The aim of the experiment is to reach a branching ratio sensitivity of 10−16. In a first phase the experiment will be performed at an existing beam line at the Paul-Scherrer Institute (Switzerland providing 108 muons per second, which will allow to reach a sensitivity of 2 · 10−15. The muons with a momentum of about 28 MeV/c are stopped and decay at rest on a target. The decay products (positrons and electrons with energies below 53MeV are measured by a tracking detector consisting of two double layers of 50 μm thin silicon pixel sensors. The high granularity of the pixel detector with a pixel size of 80 μm × 80 μm allows for a precise track reconstruction in the high multiplicity environment of the Mu3e experiment, reaching 100 tracks per reconstruction frame of 50 ns in the final phase of the experiment. To deal with such high rates and combinatorics, the Mu3e track reconstruction uses a novel fit algorithm that in the simplest case takes into account only the multiple scattering, which allows for a fast online tracking on a GPU based filter farm. An implementation of the 3-dimensional multiple scattering fit based on hit triplets is described. The extension of the fit that takes into account energy losses and pixel size is used for offline track reconstruction. The algorithm and performance of the offline track reconstruction based on a full Geant4 simulation of the Mu3e detector are presented.

  17. A computer program for fitting smooth surfaces to an aircraft configuration and other three dimensional geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craidon, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program that uses a three-dimensional geometric technique for fitting a smooth surface to the component parts of an aircraft configuration is presented. The resulting surface equations are useful in performing various kinds of calculations in which a three-dimensional mathematical description is necessary. Programs options may be used to compute information for three-view and orthographic projections of the configuration as well as cross-section plots at any orientation through the configuration. The aircraft geometry input section of the program may be easily replaced with a surface point description in a different form so that the program could be of use for any three-dimensional surface equations.

  18. FIT: Computer Program that Interactively Determines Polynomial Equations for Data which are a Function of Two Independent Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.; Roy, M. L.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program for interactively developing least-squares polynomial equations to fit user-supplied data is described. The program is characterized by the ability to compute the polynomial equations of a surface fit through data that are a function of two independent variables. The program utilizes the Langley Research Center graphics packages to display polynomial equation curves and data points, facilitating a qualitative evaluation of the effectiveness of the fit. An explanation of the fundamental principles and features of the program, as well as sample input and corresponding output, are included.

  19. The Commander's Wellness Program: Assessing the Association Between Health Measures and Physical Fitness Assessment Scores, Fitness Assessment Exemptions, and Duration of Limited Duty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvaryanas, Col Anthony P; Greenwell, Brandon; Vicen, Gloria J; Maupin, Genny M

    2018-03-26

    Air Force Medical Service health promotions staff have identified a set of evidenced-based interventions targeting tobacco use, sleep habits, obesity/healthy weight, and physical activity that could be integrated, packaged, and deployed as a Commander's Wellness Program. The premise of the program is that improvements in the aforementioned aspects of the health of unit members will directly benefit commanders in terms of members' fitness assessment scores and the duration of periods of limited duty. The purpose of this study is to validate the Commander's Wellness Program assumption that body mass index (BMI), physical activity habits, tobacco use, sleep, and nutritional habits are associated with physical fitness assessment scores, fitness assessment exemptions, and aggregate days of limited duty in the population of active duty U.S. Air Force personnel. This study used a cross-sectional analysis of active duty U.S. Air Force personnel with an Air Force Web-based Health Assessment and fitness assessment data during fiscal year 2013. Predictor variables included age, BMI, gender, physical activity level (moderate physical activity, vigorous activity, and muscle activity), tobacco use, sleep, and dietary habits (consumption of a variety of foods, daily servings of fruits and vegetables, consumption of high-fiber foods, and consumption of high-fat foods). Nonparametric methods were used for the exploratory analysis and parametric methods were used for model building and statistical inference. The study population comprised 221,239 participants. Increasing BMI and tobacco use were negatively associated with the outcome of composite fitness score. Increasing BMI and tobacco use and decreasing sleep were associated with an increased likelihood for the outcome of fitness assessment exemption status. Increasing BMI and tobacco use and decreasing composite fitness score and sleep were associated with an increased likelihood for the outcome of limited duty status, whereas

  20. The Loyalty of older people in fitness centers: Managing customers for physical activity programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerónimo García Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The fitness centers are now places where partners perform «controlled» physical activity, which improves their physical and mental state, and where they socialize with other partners of all ages. These centers have been typically managed by people without training in this subject and with the only interest of obtaining partners without taking into account the long-term impact. This problem, together with management problems of the center and personal problems of the members, have meant that there are high desertion rates in this type of indoor facilities, with the consequent increase in expenditure on marketing and a non-sustainable profitability. We propose a program of physical activity that could improve the rate of loyalty, being the central point of management of sports centers today, the satisfaction and loyalty to the fitness centers.

  1. Replicating the EnhanceFitness physical activity program in Hawai`i's multicultural population, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Michiyo; Sugihara, Naomi; Braun, Kathryn L

    2012-01-01

    Despite evidence of the benefits of regular physical activity, many older adults are not physically active. Health professionals are challenged to replicate evidence-based programs to address low levels of physical activity among members of their communities. EnhanceFitness is an evidence-based group exercise program developed in Seattle to increase the strength, flexibility, and balance of older adults. Hawai`i's Healthy Aging Partnership supported the rural island of Kaua`i to select, adapt, implement, and evaluate EnhanceFitness to increase physical activity among older adult residents (75% Asian/Pacific Islander [API]). Evaluation measures of the replication of EnhanceFitness included fidelity of EnhanceFitness delivery and participants' attendance, satisfaction with the program, confidence to exercise regularly, and pre-post fitness check measures of physical performance (chair stands, arm curls, and the up-and-go test). Between July 2007 and December 2010, 223 Kaua`i residents enrolled in EnhanceFitness; 178 (80%) participated at least 4 months and completed the 4-month fitness checks. EnhanceFitness classes were offered with a high degree of fidelity, and both API and white participants significantly improved their physical performance (chair stands, t = -11.06, P program and instructors and high confidence to continue to exercise regularly. EnhanceFitness is replicable in Hawai`i and increased physical performance among API and white older adults. This case study outlines a replication process that other communities can follow.

  2. Effect of programmed physical activity on the physical fitness of adolescent students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Dos Santos Farias

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the influence of programmed physical activity on the physical fitness of adolescent students over one school year. The sample consisted of 383 students (age range: 10 to 14 years divided into two groups: 186 cases (96 boys and 90 girls and 197 controls (108 boys and 89 girls. An intervention study with pre- and post-tests was conducted, in which the intervention group was submitted to programmed physical activity, while the control group underwent conventional classes of school physical education. Physical fitness was assessed by sit-and-reach (flexibility, muscle endurance (elbow flexion and extension and aerobic endurance (run/walk, 9 min tests. Motor performance observed in the three tests (flexibility, strength and endurance did not improve from pre-test to post-test in either group, but comparison of the intervention and control groups showed significant improvement in the strength and endurance tests for both genders in the intervention group. Boys of the two groups also showed dominance in the strength and endurance tests. In general, higher muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness and lower flexibility were observed for boys when compared to girls, and all parameters increased in the post-test and were higher in the intervention group compared to control A significant difference in flexibility was only observed between genders. With respect to muscle strength, a significant difference was observed between genders and between the intervention and control group after adjustment for age and socioeconomic level. Cardiorespiratory fitness differed significantly between genders and between the intervention and control group.

  3. Structured behavioral observation techniques as components of an effective fitness-for-duty program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, J.T.; Barnes, V.E.; Moore, C.J.; Toquam, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Performance-based tests are designed to evaluate physical and cognitive performance and have several attractive features that may be useful in nuclear power plant fitness-for-duty programs. Three types of performance-based testing that may eventually be useful in the nuclear power industry are reviewed in this paper: (a) the Los Angeles Police Department's Drug Recognition Expert program, (b) performance assessment batteries, and (c) performance assessment devices. Each of these techniques is evaluated here in terms of the following measures of effectiveness: (1) scope, or the range of potential problems that can be detected; (2) reliability, or the consistency of results; (3) sensitivity, or the ability of the test to detect impairment or the presence of drugs at low levels; (4) specificity, or the ability of the test to correctly identify the source of impairment or the drug present; (5) implementation, or the practicality of using the technique in the nuclear power plant setting. This information analyzed in this paper indicates that although performance and cognitive assessment techniques currently lack the reliability, sensitivity, and specificity of random chemical screening to detect and deter substance abuse, they can address a variety of fitness-for-duty concerns that may not be adequately addressed by a urinalysis testing program alone. These include detection of drug use not detected by urinalysis, psychological stress, or physical injury or illness

  4. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in CrossFit exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellar, D; Hatchett, A; Judge, L W; Breaux, M E; Marcus, L

    2015-11-01

    CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time) with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete), VO2max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success.

  5. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in in CrossFit exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Bellar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete, VO 2 max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p<0.05 in the model. The second workout (repetitions, when examined similarly using regression, only resulted in CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p<0.05. The results of the study suggest that a history of participation in CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success.

  6. Long-term Evaluation of the "Get Fit for Active Living" Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathokostas, Liza; Speechley, Mark; Little, Robert M D; Doerksen, Shawna; Copeland, Jennifer; Paterson, Donald H

    2017-03-01

    This study examined six- and 12-month levels of adherence to physical activity, functional changes, and psychosocial determinants of physical activity in 176 older adults who participated in the "Get Fit for Active Living (GFAL)" pilot program. Functional and psychosocial measures were conducted in person at six months; psychosocial measures and physical activity participation were assessed by telephone interview at 12 months. Ninety-five per cent were retained in the study at the six-month follow-up, and 88 per cent at 12 months. The self-reported adherence rate to exercise at 12 months was 66 per cent. The main reason for continued exercise participation was to maintain health (45%). Reasons for nonadherence were illness (38%) and lack of motivation (32%). Results identify factors associated with positive behaviour change that health promoters can utilize when targeting the older adult population. The GFAL project results can serve as a model for sustainable, community-based older-adult exercise programs.

  7. Fitting of full Cobb-Douglas and full VRTS cost frontiers by solving goal programming problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, B.; Mahaboob, B.; Subbarami Reddy, C.; Madhusudhana Rao, B.

    2017-11-01

    The present research article first defines two popular production functions viz, Cobb-Douglas and VRTS production frontiers and their dual cost functions and then derives their cost limited maximal outputs. This paper tells us that the cost limited maximal output is cost efficient. Here the one side goal programming problem is proposed by which the full Cobb-Douglas cost frontier, full VRTS frontier can be fitted. This paper includes the framing of goal programming by which stochastic cost frontier and stochastic VRTS frontiers are fitted. Hasan et al. [1] used a parameter approach Stochastic Frontier Approach (SFA) to examine the technical efficiency of the Malaysian domestic banks listed in the Kuala Lumpur stock Exchange (KLSE) market over the period 2005-2010. AshkanHassani [2] exposed Cobb-Douglas Production Functions application in construction schedule crashing and project risk analysis related to the duration of construction projects. Nan Jiang [3] applied Stochastic Frontier analysis to a panel of New Zealand dairy forms in 1998/99-2006/2007.

  8. The Mentoring Experience: Leadership Development Program Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Kevan W.; Sapp, Rochelle; Lamm, Alexa J.

    2017-01-01

    Using a semi-structured interview approach, ten mentors from a leadership development program focused on building leaders in Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences across the nation provided insights regarding their mentoring method, process, and experiences. Mentors interviewed agreed the mentoring process was beneficial for themselves as well…

  9. Interprofessional SDM train-the-trainer program "Fit for SDM": provider satisfaction and impact on participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Mirjam; Ehrhardt, Heike; Steger, Anne-Kathrin; Bengel, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the interprofessional SDM training program "Fit for SDM" in medical rehabilitation, which was implemented in two steps: (1) university staff trained providers in executive positions as trainers and (2) the providers trained their staff. For the evaluation of the first step a questionnaire for shared decision-making (SDM) skills and satisfaction with the training was completed by the providers in executive positions. A staff survey was used in a cluster-randomized controlled study to determine the overall impact of the train-the-trainer program on internal and external participation in the team. The providers in the six clinics evaluated their SDM competences and satisfaction very positively after training (step 1). External participation was enhanced by application of the training content, with significant changes recorded for females and nurses in particular. However, it had no direct influence on internal participation. This is the first interprofessional SDM train-the-trainer program in Germany to bridge interprofessionalism (internal participation) and SDM (external participation); it was implemented successfully and evaluated positively. Establishing interprofessional SDM training programs should be encouraged for all health care professionals. Implementation in the interprofessional setting should consider interprofessional team factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pre-Participation Physical Fitness does not Influence Adherence to a Supervised Exercise Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Akio Nishijuka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation tends to reduce mortality. However, it requires medium/long-term adherence to regular physical exercise. It is relevant to identify the variables that affect adherence to an supervised exercise program (SEP. Objective: To evaluate the influence of pre-participation levels of aerobic and non-aerobic physical fitness components in medium-term adherence to SEP. Methods: A total of 567 SEP participants (65 ± 12 years (68% men were studied. Participants adherent to the program for less than 6 months (48% (non-adherent - NAD were compared with 52% of participants who were adherent for 6 months or more (adherents - AD. In the non-aerobic fitness, flexibility (FLX (Flexitest and muscle power (MPW/body weight in standing rowing (watts/kg were evaluated while aerobic fitness was obtained by direct measure of VO2max/body weight (VO2. These measurements were normatized for sex and age based on percentiles (P (P-FLX/P-MPW of reference data or percentages of predicted (P-VO2. Additionally, AD and NAD with extreme results (tertiles were simultaneously compared for the three variables. Results: There was no difference between AD and NAD for non-aerobic results, in median [P25-P75], P-FLX: 30 [13-56] and 31 [9-52], respectively, (p = 0.69 and P-MPW: 34 [17-58] and 36 [16-62], respectively (p = 0.96, and for aerobic results (mean ± standard error P-VO2 (75.9 ± 1.3% and 75.0 ± 1.3%, respectively (p = 0.83. When comparing extreme tertiles, a difference was found for P-MPW in the lower tertile only, with a slight advantage of AD over NAD- 9 [5-16] versus 4 [1-11] (p = 0.04. Conclusion: Although awareness of the pre-participation levels of aerobic and non-aerobic physical fitness components is useful for individualized exercise prescription, these variables do not seem to influence medium-term adherence to SEP.

  11. Results of the FIT-based National Colorectal Cancer Screening Program in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepeš, Bojan; Bracko, Matej; Novak Mlakar, Dominika; Stefanovic, Milan; Stabuc, Borut; Frkovic Grazio, Snjezana; Maucec Zakotnik, Jozica

    2017-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in the western world. We aimed to assess the first round of fecal immunochemical test (FIT)-based National CRC screening program (NCSP). In the NCSP conducted in Slovenia, a FIT and colonoscopy for those tested positive was used. The NCSP central unit sent 536,709 invitations to Slovenian residents age 50 to 69 years old between 2009 and 2011. The adherence rate was 56.9% (303,343 participants). FIT was positive in 6.2% (15,310) of the participants (men, 7.8%; women, 5.0%; P<0.01). A total of 13,919 unsedated colonoscopies were performed with the cecal intubation rate of 97.8%. The overall adenoma detection rate was 51.3% [95% confidence interval (CI), 50.5%-52.1%] of which 61.0% (95% CI, 59.9%-62.1%) was in men, and 39.1% (95% CI, 37.8%-40.3%) in women (P<0.01). The mean number of adenoma per positive colonoscopy was 1.94 (95% CI, 1.90-1.97). Adenoma, advanced adenoma, or cancer were found in 7732 (55.5%) colonoscopies. A total of 862 (6.2%) CRC cases were found. Only 161 (18.7%) carcinomas were situated in the right colon. A total of 597 (70.2%) patients with cancer were in the early clinical stages (N, negative; 194 22.8%) of all cancers were cured with only endoscopic resection. In the NCSP, CRC was found in 6.2% of those participants attending colonoscopy, with 81.3% of carcinomas found in the left colon. A localized clinical stage was found in 70.2% participants. In 22.8% of CRC patients, cancer was cured with endoscopic resection only.

  12. Finding the Right Fit: Understanding Health Tracking in Workplace Wellness Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Chia-Fang; Jensen, Nanna Gorm; Shklovski, Irina

    2017-01-01

    Workplace health and wellness programs are increasingly integrating personal health tracking technologies, such as Fitbit and Apple Watch. Many question whether these technologies truly support employees in their pursuit of better wellness levels, raising objections about workplace surveillance...... and further blurring of boundaries between work and personal life. We conducted a study to understand how tracking tools are adopted in wellness programs and employees' opinions about these programs. We find that employees are generally positive about incentivized health tracking in the workplace, as it helps...... raise awareness of activity levels. However, there is a gap between the intentions of the programs and individual experiences and health goals. This sometimes results in confusion and creates barriers to participation. Even if this gap can be addressed, health tracking in the workplace...

  13. [Relationship between exercise adherence and personality characteristics in persons experienced in the Medical Fitness program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yuko; Seki, Nao; Umeda, Kimie; Tanabe, Naohito; Shinoda, Kunihiko; Konishi, Isamu; Sekiya, Akiyoshi; Sekii, Akiko; Ohta, Tamaki

    2017-01-01

    Objective We examined effective exercise adherence support methods for persons experienced in the Medical Fitness (MF) program to clarify the relation of personality traits with exercise adherence and the factors that improve exercise adherence.Methods Subjects were 283 adults who had registered as members in the MF program at an affiliate of Hospital A. We implemented an anonymous self-administered questionnaire by postal mail. Using the Japanese version of the Ten Item Personality Inventory (which contains 10 items that measure the Big Five personality traits), we evaluated the following characteristics: "Extraversion", "Agreeableness", "Conscientiousness", "Neuroticism", and "Openness". The subjects who reported exercising regularly at the time of survey were considered persons with subjective exercise adherence.Results In persons with subjective exercise adherence, "Conscientiousness" was significantly lower (P=0.003) among men and "Neuroticism" was significantly higher (P=0.018) among women when compared to persons with subjective exercise adherence. There was no correlation between the things that emphasize exercise adherence and "Conscientiousness" among men. There was a negative correlation between "can achieve goal" and "Neuroticism" among women.Conclusions It is essential to consider personality and gender differences when devising exercise adherence support measures for the MF program. Our results suggest that women with high neuroticism do not need "can achieve goal" to maintain their exercise habits; therefore, it is necessary to examine teaching methods that do not focus on only goal achievement as part of exercise adherence support for MF.

  14. Effectiveness of cycle fit, a 6-week training program for novice cyclers, on increasing physical activity: a controlled study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, L.; Veenhof, C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the Netherlands, National Sports Federations were funded to develop “easily accessible” sporting programs aimed at inactive population groups. Cycle Fit, a 6-week training program for novice cyclers (i.e. mountain biking, race cycling), developed by the Dutch Cycle Federation, is

  15. An Evaluation of the Fitness, Academic, and Self-Esteem Training Program at Meridian School 1984-1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Samuel G.; Saccone, Peter P.

    This paper reports the results of a pilot program, "Fitness, Academics, and Self-Esteem Training" (FAST), conducted during the 1984/85 school year at Meridian School to test the hypotheses that a program of aerobic exercise with the focus on running, conducted by the classroom teacher, would result in a higher rate of academic achievement, better…

  16. A simulation program for the VIRGO experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, B.; Dominjon, A.; Flaminio, R.; Marion, F.; Massonet, L.; Morand, R.; Mours, B.; Verkindt, D.; Yvert, M.

    1994-07-01

    Within the VIRGO experiment a simulation program is developed providing an accurate description of the interferometric antenna behaviour, taking into account all sources of noise. Besides its future use as a tool for data analysis and for the commissioning of the apparatus, the simulation helps finalizing the design of the detector. Emphasis is put at the present time on the study of the stability of optical components implied in the global feedback control system of the interferometer. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs

  17. Using geometry to improve model fitting and experiment design for glacial isostasy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuck, S. B.; Cathles, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    As scientists we routinely deal with models, which are geometric objects at their core - the manifestation of a set of parameters as predictions for comparison with observations. When the number of observations exceeds the number of parameters, the model is a hypersurface (the model manifold) in the space of all possible predictions. The object of parameter fitting is to find the parameters corresponding to the point on the model manifold as close to the vector of observations as possible. But the geometry of the model manifold can make this difficult. By curving, ending abruptly (where, for instance, parameters go to zero or infinity), and by stretching and compressing the parameters together in unexpected directions, it can be difficult to design algorithms that efficiently adjust the parameters. Even at the optimal point on the model manifold, parameters might not be individually resolved well enough to be applied to new contexts. In our context of glacial isostatic adjustment, models of sparse surface observations have a broad spread of sensitivity to mixtures of the earth's viscous structure and the surface distribution of ice over the last glacial cycle. This impedes precise statements about crucial geophysical processes, such as the planet's thermal history or the climates that controlled the ice age. We employ geometric methods developed in the field of systems biology to improve the efficiency of fitting (geodesic accelerated Levenberg-Marquardt) and to identify the maximally informative sources of additional data to make better predictions of sea levels and ice configurations (optimal experiment design). We demonstrate this in particular in reconstructions of the Barents Sea Ice Sheet, where we show that only certain kinds of data from the central Barents have the power to distinguish between proposed models.

  18. FitMindKit: Randomised controlled trial of an automatically tailored online program for mood, anxiety, substance use and suicidality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Batterham

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Online mental health programs can be effective in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety disorders, substance use and suicidal ideation. However, most existing e-mental health programs focus on a single domain of mental health, neglecting comorbidity. Furthermore, few programs are tailored to the symptom patterns of the individual user. FitMindKit was designed to overcome the gaps of existing e-mental health programs, providing tailored, transdiagnostic therapeutic content to address a range of comorbid mental health symptoms. A trial was conducted to test the program's efficacy. Methods: Australian adults with elevated symptoms of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation and/or substance use were recruited through social media, with n=194 randomised into a fully-automated trial of a 10-day brief intervention. Participants were randomly allocated to receive FitMindKit tailored to their symptoms, an untailored generic version of FitMindKit, or an attention control. Results: Mixed model repeated measures ANOVA indicated that participants in both FitMindKit and the attention control had significant reductions in symptom composite scores. Effects were not significantly greater in the FitMindKit program relative to control, either at post-test or 3-month follow-up. No effects were detected for specific decreases in depression, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, panic, suicidal ideation or alcohol/substance use. There were no significant differences between the tailored and static versions in effectiveness or adherence. Participants in the tailored and static conditions were more satisfied than in the control condition, with some evidence favouring the tailored condition. High attrition reduced power to find effects. Conclusions: FitMindKit provides a model for addressing comorbid mental health symptoms in an online program, using automated tailoring to symptom patterns. Modifications to the program are recommended, along with the need for

  19. Optimization of the Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) weight loss and healthy lifestyle program for male hockey fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Wendy; Gill, Dawn P; Sibbald, Shannon L; Riggin, Brendan; Pulford, Roseanne W; Scott, Ryan; Danylchuk, Karen; Gray, Cindy M; Wyke, Sally; Bunn, Christopher; Petrella, Robert J

    2017-11-28

    The health outcomes of men continue to be poorer than women globally. Challenges in addressing this problem include difficulties engaging men in weight loss programs as they tend to view these programs as contrary to the masculine narrative of independence and self-reliance. Researchers have been turning towards sports fans to engage men in health promotion programs as sports fans are typically male, and tend to have poor health habits. Developed from the highly successful gender-sensitized Football Fans in Training program, Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) recruited 80 male hockey fans of the London Knights and Sarnia Sting who were overweight or obese into a weekly, 90-minute classroom education and group exercise program held over 12 weeks; a 40-week minimally-supported phase followed. A process evaluation of the Hockey FIT program was completed alongside a pragmatic randomized controlled trial and outcome evaluation in order to fully explore the acceptability of the Hockey FIT program from the perspectives of coaches delivering and participants engaged in the program. Data sources included attendance records, participant focus groups, coach interviews, assessment of fidelity (program observations and post-session coach reflections), and 12-month participant interviews. Coaches enjoyed delivering the program and found it simple to deliver. Men valued being among others of similar body shape and similar weight loss goals, and found the knowledge they gained through the program helped them to make and maintain health behaviour changes. Suggested improvements include having more hockey-related information and activities, greater flexibility with timing of program delivery, and greater promotion of technology support tools. We confirmed Hockey FIT was an acceptable "gender-sensitized" health promotion program for male hockey fans who were overweight or obese. Minor changes were required for optimization, which will be evaluated in a future definitive trial

  20. A Sports-Based Youth Development Program, Teen Mental Health, and Physical Fitness: An RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Frederick Ka Wing; Louie, Lobo Hung Tak; Wong, Wilfred Hing-Sang; Chan, Ko Ling; Tiwari, Agnes; Chow, Chun Bong; Ho, Walter; Wong, William; Chan, Meanne; Chen, Eric Yu Hai; Cheung, Yiu Fai; Ip, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a positive youth development (PYD)-based sports mentorship program on the physical and mental well-being of adolescents recruited in a community setting. This is a randomized controlled trial in which we recruited students from 12 secondary schools in Hong Kong, China. Participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to an intervention or a control arm after stratification for school from October 2013 to June 2014. Participants were not blinded to allocation because of the nature of the intervention. Students in the intervention arm received an after-school, PYD-based sports mentorship for 18 weeks. Each weekly session lasted 90 minutes. Students in the control arm received exclusive access to a health education Web site. Six hundred and sixty-four students (mean age 12.3 years [SD 0.76]; 386 girls [58.1%]) completed baseline and postintervention assessments. The intervention improved students' mental well-being (Cohen's d , 0.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10 to 0.40; P = .001), self-efficacy (Cohen's d , 0.22; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.37; P = .01), resilience (Cohen's d , 0.19; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.34; P = .02), physical fitness (flexibility [Cohen's d , 0.28; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.43; P = .02], lower limb muscle strength [Cohen's d , 0.18; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.33; P = .03], and dynamic balance [Cohen's d , 0.21; 95% CI, 0.06 to 0.37; P = .01]), and physical activity levels (Cohen's d , 0.39; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.55; P sports mentorship intervention improved healthy adolescents' mental well-being, psychological assets, physical fitness, and physical activity levels. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Workplace exercise and educational program for improving fitness outcomes related to health in workers: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Bianca Lima; Benedito Silva, Ana Amélia; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Andrade, Marília dos Santos

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of a workplace fitness and education program intervention on physical fitness of workers. Employees from a chemical plant (n = 60) participated in a 4-month longitudinal study. They were randomly distributed in control and experimental groups. The experimental group had 4 months of exercise training in 15-minute sessions. The following evaluations were performed before and after the training period: body composition, localized muscle strength, and flexibility. The experimental group showed a significant decrease in body fat (24.7%) and a significant increase in lean mass (6.1%), flexibility (17.9%), sit-up test performance (39.8%), and push-up test performance (29.8%) after the workplace fitness and education program compared with initial values. A structured program of physical exercise was effective in improving body composition, abdominal strength, upper limb strength, and flexibility in workers.

  2. Elderly’s Physical-Functional Fitness and Perceived Functional Capacity and Health after Participation in a Hydrotherapy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Cristina Sacramento Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated how physical activity in older people benefits their physical fitness, health and well-being. The relation between physical activity and perceived functional capacity and health is yet to be considered. This study is a quantitative research design that investigated the improvement of the physical-functional fitness and the perception of the functional capacity and health of an elderly group participating in a waterbased exercise program (hydrotherapy. The data was collected in three different moments of the exercise program through a battery of tests of physical-functional fitness established by Batista and Sardinha (2005 and a questionnaire adapted from SABE project (Lebrão and Duarte, 2003. Twenty-six elderly persons (23 women and 3 men aged between 60 and 84 years old participated in a 31-week hydrotherapy program (twice a week; 45 minutes by session. Friedman test was used for assessing statistical differences between the physical-functional fitness and the questionnaire responses in each of the three evaluation moments. Results revealed that this program was enough to improve the physical-functional fitness of the elderly, as well as the perception they had about their health and ability to perform activities of daily living.

  3. Towards happiness: Experiences of work-role fit, meaningfulness and work engagement of industrial/organisational psychologists in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llewellyn E. van Zyl

    2010-10-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this study was to determine how I/O psychologists experience the meaning of their work and to investigate the relationships between their experiences of work-role fit, meaning of work, psychological meaningfulness and work engagement, utilising the happiness framework proposed by Seligman (2002. Motivation for the study: I/O psychologists spend more than 88% of their working day with people, and they are primary role models for happiness in the workplace. Information about their work engagement and experiences of meaning is therefore needed. Research design, approach and method: A survey design was used. A convenience sample (n = 106 was taken of I/O psychologists in South Africa. A biographical questionnaire, the Work-Role Fit Scale, the Work-Life Questionnaire, the Psychological Meaningfulness Scale, the Work Engagement Scale and a survey measuring the actual and desired time spent on six broad categories of work were administered. Main findings: Work-role fit predicted psychological meaningfulness and work engagement. The calling orientation to work predicted both psychological meaningfulness and work engagement. Work-role fit mediated the relationship between the meaning of work and psychological meaningfulness. Work-role fit partially mediated the relationship between a calling orientation to work and work engagement. Practical implications: A calling orientation to work should be fostered in I/O psychologists because it contributes to experiences of work-role fit, psychological meaningfulness and work engagement. Contribution/value-add: The results of this study contribute to scientific knowledge about work-role fit, engagement and meaning as components of happiness of I/O psychologists.

  4. Experiences in Data-Parallel Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry W. Clark

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available To efficiently parallelize a scientific application with a data-parallel compiler requires certain structural properties in the source program, and conversely, the absence of others. A recent parallelization effort of ours reinforced this observation and motivated this correspondence. Specifically, we have transformed a Fortran 77 version of GROMOS, a popular dusty-deck program for molecular dynamics, into Fortran D, a data-parallel dialect of Fortran. During this transformation we have encountered a number of difficulties that probably are neither limited to this particular application nor do they seem likely to be addressed by improved compiler technology in the near future. Our experience with GROMOS suggests a number of points to keep in mind when developing software that may at some time in its life cycle be parallelized with a data-parallel compiler. This note presents some guidelines for engineering data-parallel applications that are compatible with Fortran D or High Performance Fortran compilers.

  5. Introduction to linear programming: Coalitional game experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, W.

    1994-12-31

    Many solution notions in the multiperson cooperative games (in characteristic function form) make use of linear programming (LP). The popular concept of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} of a coalitional game is a special type of LP. It can be introduced in a very simple and quite exciting manner by means of a group experiment. A total of fifty dollars will be given to three randomly selected attendees who will take part in an experiment during this talk, presuming they behave in a Pareto optimal manner. Furthermore, the dual of the particular LP for the core gives rise to the idea of {open_quotes}balanced sets{close_quotes} which is an interesting combinatorial structure in its own right.

  6. Meteorological Development Laboratory Student Career Experience Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalla, C., Sr.

    2007-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) provides weather, hydrologic, and climate forecasts and warnings for the protection of life and property and the enhancement of the national economy. The NWS's Meteorological Development Laboratory (MDL) supports this mission by developing meteorological prediction methods. Given this mission, NOAA, NWS, and MDL all have a need to continually recruit talented scientists. One avenue for recruiting such talented scientist is the Student Career Experience Program (SCEP). Through SCEP, MDL offers undergraduate and graduate students majoring in meteorology, computer science, mathematics, oceanography, physics, and statistics the opportunity to alternate full-time paid employment with periods of full-time study. Using SCEP as a recruiting vehicle, MDL has employed students who possess some of the very latest technical skills and knowledge needed to make meaningful contributions to projects within the lab. MDL has recently expanded its use of SCEP and has increased the number of students (sometimes called co- ops) in its program. As a co-op, a student can expect to develop and implement computer based scientific techniques, participate in the development of statistical algorithms, assist in the analysis of meteorological data, and verify forecasts. This presentation will focus on describing recruitment, projects, and the application process related to MDL's SCEP. In addition, this presentation will also briefly explore the career paths of students who successfully completed the program.

  7. Required courses for nuclear graduate programs - Could one fit for all?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canella, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This article does not seek to propose one ideal curriculum for Nuclear-related graduate programs. Researches in Nuclear arena may differ as black differs from white. Research itself has complex integrated activities using knowledge without regards for disciplines. Moreover, graduate programs themselves are not like discipline-based instruction. A unique-single model for graduate programs what fits for everyone probably never will exist, even in the future. Thus, this paper intends to exclusively increase discussions about this subject. Background U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower might be pleased to see how his 'Atoms for Peace' and the policies evolving from it, opened an era of extraordinary spread of Nuclear Knowledge to foster peace, health and prosperity. Both the level of research funding and the number of graduate students involved in Nuclear related (mostly on medical, agricultural and ecological applications) in graduate programs have grown significantly in recent years, specially in developing countries. Growing needs for professionals in specialized nuclear-based fields have provoking graduate programs into doing shifts on their curricula. Traditional school structure from the 50's 60's and 70's has been modified. That structure used to be very hermetic once it was designed mainly for physics, chemists and engineers, whose are expected solid foundations of Differential Calculus and Theoretical Physics. To encourage professionals from different arenas into the Nuclear world, graduate program curricula have been changing, resulting smaller number of required courses, and making disciplines more friendly comprehensible. Nowadays, it is possible to identify Nuclear/Nuclear related graduate programs having one only compulsory course - workload from 60 to 120 hours to introduce and to form the foundations of Nuclear Sciences for a wide range of professional backgrounds - biologists, physicians, dentists, pharmacists, veterinarians, agronomists

  8. Effect of a MAST Exercise Program on Anthropometric Parameters, Physical Fitness, and Serum Lipid Levels in Obese Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trabka Bartosz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine an influence of a mixed aerobic and strength training program (MAST on anthropometry, serum lipid levels, physical performance, and functional fitness in obese postmenopausal women. The MAST sessions were held three times per week, and the exercise program lasted for 10 weeks. The exercise group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in maximal oxygen uptake, a waist/hip ratio, and strength of the upper and lower body. An increase in LDL-C levels was observed in the control group. A 10-week MAST program encompassing Nordic-walking as an aerobic component, and strength exercises, induces positive changes in functional fitness, HDL-C, LDL-C and a waist/hip ratio in obese postmenopausal women. The observed changes implicate an increase in a health-related quality of life among the women administered to the physical exercise program

  9. Government Career Interests, Perceptions of Fit, and Degree Orientations: Exploring Their Relationship in Public Administration Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Leonard

    2018-01-01

    Scholars have long suggested that the degree orientations of public administration programs were related to the attitudes and behaviors of students, even though empirical research had failed to confirm this relationship. The purpose of this study was to re-examine this question from the standpoint of perceptions of fit. Using a sample of…

  10. A Fitness Intervention Program within a Physical Education Class on Cardiovascular Endurance among Malaysia Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, Shabeshan; Raju, Subramaniam; Lee, Wee Akina Sia Seng; Roa, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of a physical fitness intervention program within a physical education class on cardiovascular endurance of Malaysian secondary school boys and girls. A quasi experimental design was adopted for the study. Two schools in a district were randomly selected. In each school, two classes were randomly…

  11. Experiences of condom fit and feel among African-American men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Michael; Dodge, Brian; Herbenick, Debby; Fisher, Christopher; Alexander, Andreia; Satinsky, Sonya

    2007-10-01

    To offer an empirical understanding of characteristics associated with the fit and feel of condoms among African-American men who have sex with men (MSM), a particularly high-risk group for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) in the United States. Survey data were collected from 178 adult African-American MSM attending a community event in Atlanta, Georgia. Although the majority of participants reported that condoms generally fit properly and felt comfortable, a substantial number of men reported a variety of problems with the fit and feel of condoms. Specifically, 21% reported that condoms felt too tight, 18% reported that condoms felt too short, 10% reported that condoms felt too loose, and 7% reported that condoms felt too long. There were significant associations between men's reports of condom breakage and slippage, and their perceptions of condom fit and feel. Perceptions of condom fit and feel were also related to men's reports of seeking condoms for their size-specific properties. The fit and feel issues that men in this sample identified may be among those that contribute to their likelihood of using, or not using, condoms consistently and correctly. A better understanding of these factors will be beneficial to both condom manufacturers and sexual health professionals who share a common goal of increasing consistent and correct condom use and reducing the incidence of HIV and other STI among this and other communities.

  12. Model Fit and Item Factor Analysis: Overfactoring, Underfactoring, and a Program to Guide Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D Angus; Bowles, Ryan P

    2018-04-23

    In exploratory item factor analysis (IFA), researchers may use model fit statistics and commonly invoked fit thresholds to help determine the dimensionality of an assessment. However, these indices and thresholds may mislead as they were developed in a confirmatory framework for models with continuous, not categorical, indicators. The present study used Monte Carlo simulation methods to investigate the ability of popular model fit statistics (chi-square, root mean square error of approximation, the comparative fit index, and the Tucker-Lewis index) and their standard cutoff values to detect the optimal number of latent dimensions underlying sets of dichotomous items. Models were fit to data generated from three-factor population structures that varied in factor loading magnitude, factor intercorrelation magnitude, number of indicators, and whether cross loadings or minor factors were included. The effectiveness of the thresholds varied across fit statistics, and was conditional on many features of the underlying model. Together, results suggest that conventional fit thresholds offer questionable utility in the context of IFA.

  13. CFD Analysis of Experimental Wing and Winglet for FalconLAUNCH 8 and the ExFIT Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    the interaction of the winglet shock wave with the main wing. It is important to note here that the main wing has both aerodynamic and geometric twist...CFD Analysis of Experimental Wing and Winglet for FalconLAUNCH 8 and the ExFIT Program THESIS Benjamin P. Switzer, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT/GAE...to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT/GAE/ENY/10-M25 CFD Analysis of Experimental Wing and Winglet for FalconLAUNCH 8 and the ExFIT

  14. The effect of physical activity on psychological distress, cortisol and obesity: results of the Farming Fit intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumby, Susan; Chandrasekara, Ananda; Kremer, Peter; Torres, Susan; McCoombe, Scott; Lewandowski, Paul

    2013-10-28

    Rural and regional Australians have a higher likelihood of mental illness throughout their lifetime than people living in major cities, although the underlying reasons are not yet well defined. Additionally, rural populations experience more lifestyle associated co-morbidities including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Research conducted by the National Centre for Farmer Health between 2004 and 2009 revealed a positive correlation between obesity and psychological distress among the farming community. Chronic stress is known to overstimulate the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and cortisol secretion which are associated with abdominal adiposity. Increasing physical activity may normalise cortisol secretion and thereby positively impact both physical and mental health. This paper assesses the effects of increasing physical activity on obesity, health behaviors and mental health in Victorian farming men and women. Farming Fit was a six month quasi-experimental (convenience sample) longitudinal design control-intervention study. Overweight or obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) farm men (n = 43) and women (n = 29) were recruited with demographic, health behaviors, anthropometric, blood pressure and biochemistry data collected at baseline and at a six months. Salivary cortisol and depression anxiety stress scale results were collected at baseline, three and six months. The intervention group (n = 37) received a personalized exercise program and regular phone coaching to promote physical activity. The intervention group showed significant reductions in body weight and waist circumference. Results indicated that following the six month exercise program, the intervention group were 2.64 ± 0.65 kg lighter (p physical activity altered measures of obesity in farm men and women but did not affect mental health measures or cortisol secretion levels. ACTRN12610000827033.

  15. Identifying the Best-Fitting Factor Structure of the Experience of Close Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Breinholst, Sonja; Niclasen, Janni

    2015-01-01

    . The present study used a Danish sample with the purpose of addressing limitations in previous studies, such as the lack of diversity in cultural back- ground, restricted sample characteristics, and poorly fitting structure models. Participants consisted of 253 parents of children between the ages of 7 and 12...... years, 53% being moth- ers. The parents completed the paper version of the questionnaire. Confirmatory Factor Analyses were carried out to determine whether theoretically and empirically established models including one and two factors would also provide adequate fits in a Danish sample. A previous...... study using the original ECR suggested that Scandinavian samples may best be described using a five-factor solution. Our results indicated that the one- and two-factor models of the ECR-R did not fit the data well. Exploratory Factor Analysis revealed a five- factor model. Our study provides evidence...

  16. Development of robotic program: an Asian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahabudin, R M; Arni, T; Ashani, N; Arumuga, K; Rajenthran, S; Murali, S; Patel, V; Hemal, A; Menon, M

    2006-06-01

    Robotic surgery was started in the Department of Urology, Hospital Kuala Lumpur, in April 2004. We present our experience in developing the program and report the results of our first 50 cases of robotic radical prostatectomy. A three-arm da Vinci robotic system was installed in our hospital in March 2004. Prior to installation, the surgeons underwent training at various centers in the United States and Paris. The operating theatre was renovated to house the system. Subsequently, the initial few cases were done with the help of proctors. Data were prospectively collected on all patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Fifty patients underwent robot assisted radical prostatectomy from March 2004 to June 2005. Their ages ranged from 52 to 75 years, (average age 60.2 years). PSA levels ranged from 2.5 to 35 ng/ml (mean 10.6 ng/ml). Prostate volume ranged from 18 to 130 cc (average 32.4 cc). Average operating time for the first 20 cases was 4 h and for the next 30 cases was 2.5 h. Patients were discharged 1-3 days post-operatively. Catheters were removed on the fifth day following a cystogram. The positive margin rate as defined by the presence of cancer cells at the inked margin was 30%. Twenty-one patients had T1c disease and one had T1b on clinical staging. Of these, two were apical margin positive. Twenty-six patients had T2 disease and eight of them were apical margin positive. Two patients had T3 disease, one of whom was apical margin positive. Five patients (10%) had PSA recurrence. Five patients had a poorly differentiated carcinoma and the rest had Gleason 6 or 7. Eighty percent of the patients were continent on follow-up at 3 months. Of those who were potent before the surgery, 50% were potent at 3-6 months. The robotic surgery program was successfully implemented at our center on the lines of a structured program, developed at Vattikuti Urology Institute (VUI). We succeeded in creating a team and

  17. The process associated with motivation of a home-based Wii Fit exercise program among sedentary African American women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon K; Breland, Hazel L; Vogtle, Laura K; Holthaus, Katy; Kamen, Diane L; Sword, David

    2013-01-01

    To explore the process associated with the motivation for playing Wii Fit among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Individual in-depth semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 14 sedentary African American women with SLE to explore their experiences and reflect on their motivation for playing Wii Fit after completing a 10-week home-based Wii Fit exercise program. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using the constant comparative method to identify categories related to participants' motivation. Three authors independently sorted, organized and coded transcript text into categories, then combined the categories into themes and subthemes. In addition to the two themes (Ethical principal of keeping a commitment, and Don't want to let anyone down) generic to home-based exercise trials, we identified five themes (Enjoyment, Health Benefits, Sense of Accomplishment, Convenience, and Personalized) that revealed why the participants were motivated to play the Wii Fit. Enjoyment had three subthemes: Interactive, Challenging, and Competitive with an embedded social element. However, several participants commented they were not able to do many activities, master certain games, or figure out how to play some; as a result, they were bored with the limited selection of activities that they could do. The motivational elements of the Wii Fit may contribute to improved exercise motivation and adherence in select sedentary African American women with SLE. Results provide a better understanding on the important elements to incorporate in the development of sustainable home-based exercise programs with interactive health video games for this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Research Experiences in Community College Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, A.

    2011-12-01

    research with my community college students by partnering with a research oceanographer. Through this partnership, students have had access to an active oceanographic researcher through classroom visits, use of data in curriculum, and research/cruise progress updates. With very little research activity currently going on at the community college, this "window" into scientific research is invaluable. Another important aspect of this project is the development of a summer internship program that has allowed four community college students to work directly with an oceanographer in her lab for ten weeks. This connection of community college students with world-class scientists in the field promotes better understanding of research and potentially may encourage more students to major in the sciences. In either approach, the interaction with scientists at different stages of their careers, from undergraduate and graduate students at universities to post docs and research scientists, also provides community college students with the opportunity to gain insight into possible career pathways. For both majors and non-majors, a key outcome of such experiences will be gaining experience in using inquiry and reasoning through the scientific method and becoming comfortable with data and technology.

  19. The Impact of Experience and Technology Change on Task-Technology Fit of a Collaborative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Jakob H.; Eierman, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    This study continues a long running effort to examine collaborative writing and editing tools and the factors that impact Task-Technology Fit and Technology Acceptance. Previous studies found that MS Word/email performed better than technologies such as Twiki, Google Docs, and Office Live. The current study seeks to examine specifically the impact…

  20. The Texas Youth Fitness Study: Looking at School Policies as They Relate to Physical Fitness and Academic Variables. Program Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiden, Karyn

    2011-01-01

    In partnership with three universities, the Cooper Institute, Dallas, completed the Texas Youth Fitness Study from 2008 to 2009. The study explored three key questions: (1) Is physical fitness associated with academic performance?; (2) Can physical education teachers collect high-quality information on student fitness?; and (3) Are school policies…

  1. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry. Annual summary of program performance reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbernagel, M.; Brichoux, J.; Durbin, N.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the data from the semiannual reports on fitness-for-duty programs submitted to the NRC by utilities for two reporting periods: January 1-June 30, 1995, and July 1 -December 31, 1995. During 1995, licensees reported that they had conducted 150,121 tests for the presence of illegal drugs and alcohol. Of these tests, 1,476 (.98%) were confirmed positive. The majority of positive test results (1, 122) were obtained through pre-access testing. Of tests conducted on workers having access to the protected area, there were 180 positive tests from random testing and 139 positive tests from for-cause testing. Follow-up testing of workers who had previously tested positive resulted in 35 positive tests. For-cause testing resulted in the highest percentage of positive tests; about 18 percent of for-cause tests were positive. This compares with a positive test rate of 1.41 percent of pre-access tests and .27 percent of random tests. The positive test rate for workers with unescorted access was .50 percent. Positive test rates also varied by category of worker. When all types of tests are combined, short-term contractor personnel had the highest positive test rate at 1.44 percent. Licensee employees and long-term contractors had lower combined positive test rates (.34% and .40%, respectively). Of the substances tested, marijuana was responsible for the highest percentage of positive test results (53.08%), followed by cocaine (24.24%) and alcohol (17.17%). The overall positive test rate for 1995 (.98%) was higher than in 1994 (.84%). Several factors had an impact on the positive test rate across test categories for 1994 and 1995 compared to previous years. These factors include the NRC`s reduction in the mandatory random testing rate from 100 percent to 50 percent, effective in 1994, and initiatives by licensees such as lowered marijuana screening cutoff levels and reported improvements in licensees ability to detect subversion of the process.

  2. Fit in to stand out : An experience perspective on value creation

    OpenAIRE

    Högström, Claes

    2014-01-01

    In order to grow and survive, a firm must create value with consumers in ways that both fit in with consumer demands and stand out from competitors. Focusing on and understanding consumer and firm assessments of value and creation of value has become a central scope in the contemporary strategic management and marketing literature for understanding and explaining firm survival and success. Consequently, the overall aim of this thesis is to provide a conceptually and empirically grounded under...

  3. A Fortran program for the numerical integration of the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation using exponential and Bessel fitting methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, J.R.; Raptis, A.D.; Simos, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is described for the accurate numerical integration of the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation. This algorithm uses a high-order, variable step Runge-Kutta like method in the region where the potential term dominates, and an exponential or Bessel fitted method in the asymptotic region. This approach can be used to compute scattering phase shifts in an efficient and reliable manner. A Fortran program which implements this algorithm is provided and some test results are given. (orig.)

  4. Error estimation and global fitting in transverse-relaxation dispersion experiments to determine chemical-exchange parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishima, Rieko; Torchia, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    Off-resonance effects can introduce significant systematic errors in R 2 measurements in constant-time Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) transverse relaxation dispersion experiments. For an off-resonance chemical shift of 500 Hz, 15 N relaxation dispersion profiles obtained from experiment and computer simulation indicated a systematic error of ca. 3%. This error is three- to five-fold larger than the random error in R 2 caused by noise. Good estimates of total R 2 uncertainty are critical in order to obtain accurate estimates in optimized chemical exchange parameters and their uncertainties derived from χ 2 minimization of a target function. Here, we present a simple empirical approach that provides a good estimate of the total error (systematic + random) in 15 N R 2 values measured for the HIV protease. The advantage of this empirical error estimate is that it is applicable even when some of the factors that contribute to the off-resonance error are not known. These errors are incorporated into a χ 2 minimization protocol, in which the Carver-Richards equation is used fit the observed R 2 dispersion profiles, that yields optimized chemical exchange parameters and their confidence limits. Optimized parameters are also derived, using the same protein sample and data-fitting protocol, from 1 H R 2 measurements in which systematic errors are negligible. Although 1 H and 15 N relaxation profiles of individual residues were well fit, the optimized exchange parameters had large uncertainties (confidence limits). In contrast, when a single pair of exchange parameters (the exchange lifetime, τ ex , and the fractional population, p a ), were constrained to globally fit all R 2 profiles for residues in the dimer interface of the protein, confidence limits were less than 8% for all optimized exchange parameters. In addition, F-tests showed that quality of the fits obtained using τ ex , p a as global parameters were not improved when these parameters were free to fit the R

  5. Computer program to fit a hyperellipse to a set of phase-space points in as many as six dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program that will fit a hyperellipse to a set of phase-space points in as many as 6 dimensions was written and tested. The weight assigned to the phase-space points can be varied as a function of their distance from the centroid of the distribution. Varying the weight enables determination of whether there is a difference in ellipse orientation between inner and outer particles. This program should be useful in studying the effects of longitudinal and transverse phase-space couplings

  6. Do Fitness Apps Need Text Reminders? An Experiment Testing Goal-Setting Text Message Reminders to Promote Self-Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Willoughby, Jessica F

    2018-01-01

    Fitness tracking apps have the potential to change unhealthy lifestyles, but users' lack of compliance is an issue. The current intervention examined the effectiveness of using goal-setting theory-based text message reminders to promote tracking activities on fitness apps. We conducted a 2-week experiment with pre- and post-tests with young adults (n = 50). Participants were randomly assigned to two groups-a goal-setting text message reminder group and a generic text message reminder group. Participants were asked to use a fitness tracking app to log physical activity and diet for the duration of the study. Participants who received goal-setting reminders logged significantly more physical activities than those who only received generic reminders. Further, participants who received goal-setting reminders liked the messages and showed significantly increased self-efficacy, awareness of personal goals, motivation, and intention to use the app. The study shows that incorporating goal-setting theory-based text message reminders can be useful to boost user compliance with self-monitoring fitness apps by reinforcing users' personal goals and enhancing cognitive factors associated with health behavior change.

  7. The Effects Of Two Fitness Programs With Different Metabolic Demands On Oxidative Stress In The Blood Of Young Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djordjevic Dusica

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of two metabolically different exercise programs on the redox state of women who were physically inactive before the beginning of the study. For this purpose, participants (women 25±5 years old chose one of two popular fitness programs, Pilates or Tae Bo, and attended it 3 times a week for 12 weeks. At the beginning and end of the study, body composition analysis and venous blood sampling were performed. The levels of superoxide anion radical, hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation were measured in plasma, and the levels of reduced glutathione and the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase were measured in erythrocytes. Only the Tae Bo program induced changes (positive in body composition, whereas both exercise programs induced slight oxidative stress in exercisers. In the Tae Bo group, the levels of hydrogen peroxide were significantly increased, whereas the levels of reduced glutathione were decreased after three months of training. In the Pilates group, hydrogen peroxide and catalase activity were increased, and nitrites decreased. However, at the end of the study, those two groups had no significantly different values for any pro/antioxidant compared with the subjects who served as controls. This finding suggests that moderate physical activity, such as recreational fitness programs, may induce the increased production of reactive oxygen species but do not lead to a serious disturbance of the redox homeostasis of exercisers.

  8. FTO POLYMORPHISM AND PHYSICAL FITNESS IN OBESE SCHOOLCHILDREN AFTER AN INTERVENTION PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greice Graziela Moraes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Recent studies have shown that the association of FTO rs9939609 gene polymorphism with obesity depends on the level of the individual’s physical activity. However, there are some studies that evaluated physical fitness, health, and motor performance in relation to the rs9939609 FTO gene polymorphism. Objective: To evaluate how the rs9939609 FTO gene polymorphism affects the results of physical fitness tests related to health and athletic performance in schoolchildren after 4 months of intervention of physical exercise. Method: The rs9939609 FTO gene polymorphism was genotyped in a total of 36 schoolchildren from southern Brazil, aged 8 to 16 years. Body mass index (BMI, health-related physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, abdominal strength/endurance, and flexibility and motor performance (upper and lower limb strength, agility, and speed were evaluated. The intervention included exercise strategies based on Physical Education, healthy eating, and oral and postural care. Results: In the experimental group, after the intervention, significant differences were noted in individuals with the TT genotype. These individuals showed improvements in abdominal strength (p=0.025, lower limb strength (p=0.037 and agility (p=0.021. For individuals with the AA/AT genotype, improvements in flexibility (p=0.026, abdominal strength (p=0.002, upper limb strength (p=0.008 and lower limb strength (p=0.001 were observed. However, these differences were not statistically significant when comparing the TT and AT/AA genotypes. Conclusions: The experimental group showed improvements in abdominal strength, lower limb strength, and speed. Yet, individuals with different genotypes (AA/AT and TT for polymorphism rs9939609 exhibited similar values for indicators of physical fitness, health, and motor performance. Level of Evidence II; Lesser quality RCT.

  9. A compact led lidar system fitted for a mars rover - design and ground experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Prane Mariel B.; Shiina, Tatsuo; Manago, Naohiro; Kuze, Hiroaki; Senshu, Hiroki; Otobe, Naohito; Hashimoto, George; Kawabata, Yasuhiro

    2018-04-01

    A compact LED lidar was constructed and fieldtested with the aim to observe the Mars' dust devils. To be able to fit it on the Mars rover, a specialized Cassegrain telescope was designed to be within a 10 cm-cube, with a field of view of 3mrad. The transmitter has 385 nm LED light source with 3 cmϕ opening, 70mrad divergence, 0.75W (7.5nJ/10ns) pulse power, and 500 kHz repetition frequency. The configuration of the optical system is biaxial to easily configure the overlap between their optical axes.

  10. A compact led lidar system fitted for a mars rover – design and ground experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Prane Mariel B.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact LED lidar was constructed and fieldtested with the aim to observe the Mars’ dust devils. To be able to fit it on the Mars rover, a specialized Cassegrain telescope was designed to be within a 10 cm-cube, with a field of view of 3mrad. The transmitter has 385 nm LED light source with 3 cmϕ opening, 70mrad divergence, 0.75W (7.5nJ/10ns pulse power, and 500 kHz repetition frequency. The configuration of the optical system is biaxial to easily configure the overlap between their optical axes.

  11. A simulation program for electronics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, R.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansroul, M.; Lassalle, Jc.

    1978-01-01

    A general description of the GEANT program is given. The GEANT program has been designed to cover a wide variety of particle detectors. The program is separated into 4 independent parts: kinematics generation, trackina in space, tracks intersection with detectors and digitization of detector information. The tracking requires the introduction of the experimental set-up description in terms of media. The detectors are described independently of the media in a separate way. The media and detector description have to be furnished by the user. The implementation of the GEANT program is based on 2 sets of subprograms: a fixed set of subprograms, which are independent of the experimental situation and thus transparent to the user; a set of user subprograms which should be written by the user. The GEANT program produces results stored in data banks, which the user can convert into his own format. In addition the GEANT program provides printed and graphical outputs

  12. Graphical programming for pulse automated NMR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmonte, S.B.; Oliveira, I.S.; Guimaraes, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a software program designed to control a broadband pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer used in zero-field NMR studies of magnetic metals. The software is written in the graphical language LabVIEW. This type of programming allows modifications and the inclusion of new routines to be easily made by the non-specialist, without changing the basic structure of the program. The program corrects for differences in the gain of the two acquisition channels [U (phase) and V (quadrature)], and automatic baseline subtraction. We present examples of measurements of NMR spectra, spin-echo decay (T 2 ), and quadrupolar oscillations, performed in magnetic intermetallic compounds. (author)

  13. Exploring Environment-Intervention Fit: A Study of a Work Environment Intervention Program for the Care Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Birgit; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Targeting occupational health and safety interventions to different groups of employees and sectors is important. The aim of this study was to explore the environment-intervention fit of a Danish psychosocial work environment intervention program for the residential and home care sector. Focus group interviews with employees and interviews with mangers were conducted at 12 selected workplaces and a questionnaire survey was conducted with managers at all 115 workplaces. The interventions enhanced the probability of employees experiencing more “good” work days, where they could make a difference to the lives of clients. The interventions may therefore be characterized as culturally compelling and having a good fit with the immediate work environment of employees. The interventions furthermore seemed to fit well with the wider organizational environment and with recent changes in the societal and economic context of workplaces. However, some workplaces had difficulties with involving all employees and adapting the interventions to the organization of work. The findings suggest that flexibility and a variety of strategies to involve all employees are important aspects, if interventions are to fit well with the care sector. The focus on employees' conceptualization of a “good” work day may be useful for intervention research in other sectors. PMID:26380356

  14. Outcomes of a Peer Mentor Implemented Fitness Program in Older Adults: A Quasi-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgo, Sandor; King, George A.; Bader, Julia O.; Limon, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effectiveness of different applications of mentoring in an older adult exercise program, this study compared the physical fitness scores, the retention and participation rates of older adults trained by student mentors, peer mentors, peer mentors working independently of the researchers, and a non-exercising control group. Methods 106 older adults were recruited and assigned to one of the groups using quasi-randomization. All three experimental groups completed a 14-week intervention. Pre- and post-training assessments of fitness were completed, and retention and participation rates were compared. Results High retention and participation rates, as well as significant improvements in fitness scores from baseline to post-test were observed in all three mentored groups. While the control group showed improvement only in one fitness test, subjects in the mentored groups improved similarly in all measures, regardless of the type of mentoring received. Discussion These findings indicated effectiveness of the peer mentor model and suggested that with adequate preparation peer mentors may be capable of guiding older adult participants effectively without assistance from professional staff. PMID:23279966

  15. Exploring Environment-Intervention Fit: A Study of a Work Environment Intervention Program for the Care Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Hardman Smith

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting occupational health and safety interventions to different groups of employees and sectors is important. The aim of this study was to explore the environment-intervention fit of a Danish psychosocial work environment intervention program for the residential and home care sector. Focus group interviews with employees and interviews with mangers were conducted at 12 selected workplaces and a questionnaire survey was conducted with managers at all 115 workplaces. The interventions enhanced the probability of employees experiencing more “good” work days, where they could make a difference to the lives of clients. The interventions may therefore be characterized as culturally compelling and having a good fit with the immediate work environment of employees. The interventions furthermore seemed to fit well with the wider organizational environment and with recent changes in the societal and economic context of workplaces. However, some workplaces had difficulties with involving all employees and adapting the interventions to the organization of work. The findings suggest that flexibility and a variety of strategies to involve all employees are important aspects, if interventions are to fit well with the care sector. The focus on employees’ conceptualization of a “good” work day may be useful for intervention research in other sectors.

  16. Updating of the user-interface fitting program "CONFIT" to "CONFIT2000"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, Tomáš

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 7 (2001), s. 735-742 ISSN 0011-4626. [Mössbauer Spectroscopy in Material Science. Velké Losiny, 03.09.2001-08.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/0183 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Mössbauer spectroscopy * spectra fitting Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.345, year: 2001

  17. The effectiveness of a peer-mentored older adult fitness program on perceived physical, mental, and social function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgo, Sandor; Robinson, Kristynia M; Bader, Julia

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare changes in perceived physical, mental, and social function measured by the Short Form-36 (SF36vr2) in a group of older adults who were trained by peer mentors (PMs) versus a similar group trained by qualified kinesiology student mentors (SMs). We conducted a two-arm repeated measures longitudinal intervention and collected data for 87 PM and 44 SM participants. Pre- and post-training subscale scores were computed for all eight subscales and the two summary physical and mental component scores. The percentage differences in the 10 scores were used as the response variables. After a 14-week physical fitness intervention, perceived physical, mental, and social functioning improved significantly (p .06). Thus, older adults who participated in a physical fitness program with peer support perceived (a) overall improvement in physical and mental well-being; (b) better social functioning, (c) enhanced ability to carry out physical and emotional roles, (d) improved general health, and (e) increased level of vitality. Thus, we conclude that peer-mentored exercise programs for older adults are superior to programs mentored by young professionals and may lead to increased adherence. Nurse practitioners routinely prescribe exercise while educating older adults about the benefits of an active lifestyle; however, older adults often remain sedentary and exhibit poor adherence to exercise. One potential solution is to use peer support. Two factors that can improve adherence are availability of structured exercise programs for the older adult and peer mentoring.

  18. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  19. Guidelines for the fitting of anomalous diffusion mean square displacement graphs from single particle tracking experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldad Kepten

    Full Text Available Single particle tracking is an essential tool in the study of complex systems and biophysics and it is commonly analyzed by the time-averaged mean square displacement (MSD of the diffusive trajectories. However, past work has shown that MSDs are susceptible to significant errors and biases, preventing the comparison and assessment of experimental studies. Here, we attempt to extract practical guidelines for the estimation of anomalous time averaged MSDs through the simulation of multiple scenarios with fractional Brownian motion as a representative of a large class of fractional ergodic processes. We extract the precision and accuracy of the fitted MSD for various anomalous exponents and measurement errors with respect to measurement length and maximum time lags. Based on the calculated precision maps, we present guidelines to improve accuracy in single particle studies. Importantly, we find that in some experimental conditions, the time averaged MSD should not be used as an estimator.

  20. Experiment program and results of the TRACY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, K.; Nakajima, K.; Aizawa, E.; Arishima, H.; Morita, T.; Sakuraba, K.; Takahashi, T.; Ohno, A.

    1998-01-01

    JAERI started supercritical experiments with low enriched uranium nitrate solution with the TRACY in NUCEF. The purpose of the TRACY is to obtain the data on a postulated critical accident phenomena such as power, total number of fissions. In a supercritical experiment, excess reactivity can be inserted by withdrawal of a transient rod or continuous feed of the solution fuel. The TRACY carried out 77 runs including 26 supercritical experiments by the end of 1997. In the transient experiment with reactivity insertion of about 3$, the peak power and the maximum pressure of the core were obtained 1020 MW and 0.50 MPa, respectively. (author)

  1. An interactive graphics program to retrieve, display, compare, manipulate, curve fit, difference and cross plot wind tunnel data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, R. D.; Werner, N. M.; Baker, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Aerodynamic Data Analysis and Integration System (ADAIS), developed as a highly interactive computer graphics program capable of manipulating large quantities of data such that addressable elements of a data base can be called up for graphic display, compared, curve fit, stored, retrieved, differenced, etc., was described. The general nature of the system is evidenced by the fact that limited usage has already occurred with data bases consisting of thermodynamic, basic loads, and flight dynamics data. Productivity using ADAIS of five times that for conventional manual methods of wind tunnel data analysis is routinely achieved. In wind tunnel data analysis, data from one or more runs of a particular test may be called up and displayed along with data from one or more runs of a different test. Curves may be faired through the data points by any of four methods, including cubic spline and least squares polynomial fit up to seventh order.

  2. Effects of a 6-month football intervention program on bone mass and physical fitness in overweight children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabra, André; Serra, Hugo; Seabra, Ana

    2016-01-01

    , consisting of four weekly 60-90 min sessions with mean heart rate > 80%HRmax [football group (FG)]. A control group (CG) included eight boys of equivalent age from an obesity clinic located in the same area as the school. Both groups participated in two sessions of 45-90 min physical education per week......Introduction: Physical activity is an important medium for improving bone mass and physical fitness of children, and as such is often emphasized in intervention programs with overweight/obesity children. Only few studies have examined the impact of a specific team sport intervention on the bone...... at school. Bone mass indicators included whole-boy and lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC). Physical fitness tests included 5- and 30-m sprints, countermovement jump (CMJ), and Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test level 1 (Yo-Yo IE1). Body composition was evaluated using dual...

  3. Fitting a three-parameter lognormal distribution with applications to hydrogeochemical data from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, V.E.

    1979-10-01

    The standard maximum likelihood and moment estimation procedures are shown to have some undesirable characteristics for estimating the parameters in a three-parameter lognormal distribution. A class of goodness-of-fit estimators is found which provides a useful alternative to the standard methods. The class of goodness-of-fit tests considered include the Shapiro-Wilk and Shapiro-Francia tests which reduce to a weighted linear combination of the order statistics that can be maximized in estimation problems. The weighted-order statistic estimators are compared to the standard procedures in Monte Carlo simulations. Bias and robustness of the procedures are examined and example data sets analyzed including geochemical data from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

  4. Fitness Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2012-01-01

    Open to All: http://cern.ch/club-fitness  fitness.club@cern.ch Boxing Your supervisor makes your life too tough ! You really need to release the pressure you've been building up ! Come and join the fit-boxers. We train three times a week in Bd 216, classes for beginners and advanced available. Visit our website cern.ch/Boxing General Fitness Escape from your desk with our general fitness classes, to strengthen your heart, muscles and bones, improve you stamina, balance and flexibility, achieve new goals, be more productive and experience a sense of well-being, every Monday, Wednesday and Friday lunchtime, Tuesday mornings before work and Thursday evenings after work – join us for one of our monthly fitness workshops. Nordic Walking Enjoy the great outdoors; Nordic Walking is a great way to get your whole body moving and to significantly improve the condition of your muscles, heart and lungs. It will boost your energy levels no end. Pilates A body-conditioning technique de...

  5. First experience of programming a court decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey B. Polyakov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective Consideration of the computer program model for making a lawful and wellgrounded judicial act in order to reduce the times for making the court decision. Methods universal dialecticmaterialistic method which removes the contradictions of the professional training of judges and procedural controls the formal legal method for transferring the requirements of the law and jurisprudence for the lawenforcement activity into programs for judges and case participants the objectoriented modeling objectoriented programming methodology. Results a computer program was created that allows to adjudicate in a civil case if the claim is recognized by the defendant. The program does not resolve the judge from the decisionmaking process but creates conditions to move along the stages of lawenforcement procedure and legal reasoning in accordance with the requirements of the law and of legal science. Therefore filling forms manually in the trial should be simultaneous with writing the decision judgment sentence assessment. The program includes the following sections preparation of forms common to certain types of proceedings certain categories of cases courts in the above forms determination of the order to establish the actual circumstances the burden of proof distribution types of evidence methods of law interpretation characteristics of collisions and gaps in legislation and ways to overcome them the standard wording in the judicial act templates and in the forms mandatory and optional information in the form. Based on the above the article concludes that by analogy with the presented program it is possible to create software for making a lawful wellgrounded and fair judicial act for other categories of cases and as a consequence to reduce the period of making judicial decisions. Scientific novelty the first computer program is created for rendering and production of judicial decisions. Practical significance the model is made to create a mass tool of

  6. HTGR experience, programs, and future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.A.; Kantor, M.E.; Brey, H.L.; Olson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of the programs for the development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) in the major industrial countries of the world. Existing demonstration plants and facilities are briefly described, and national programs for exploiting the unique high-temperature capabilities of the HTGR for commercial production of electricity and in process steam/heat application are discussed. (orig.)

  7. User experience with HydroHelp programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verner, J.S. [Brookfield Power, Gatineau, PQ (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Advances in the field of geographical information systems (GIS) have simplified the process of finding suitable sites for new hydroelectric projects. However, estimating the construction cost remains a challenge. The HydroHelp program is a cost evaluation program developed specifically to determine if a project will be economically feasible. The program is made up of 4 programs, depending on the type of turbine suitable for the site. Once a turbine selection is made, users can choose the program according to Kaplan, Impulse or Francis turbines. Users must rely on GIS, since the program requires a thorough understanding of the site geology and topography. Knowledge of hydroelectric plants is also necessary in order to obtain a credible construction cost. This paper demonstrated the capacity and flexibility of the software along with its different functions and available options. A detailed cost breakdown can be obtained along with an energy estimate and project specifications. In addition, the software can be used to optimize the project through different options by changing the facility's layout in terms of the type of dam, spillway, conduit length and diameter, turbine type and flood level. 17 figs.

  8. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  9. Assessing prevalence of urinary incontinence in Scottish fitness instructors and experience of teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Kate; van Woerden, Hugo; MacRury, Sandra

    2018-06-18

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of urinary incontinence in fitness instructors, experience of teaching pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME), and attitudes to incorporating such exercises into classes. An online survey was undertaken of fitness instructors working in Scotland based on the Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICIQ-UI). The survey was at least partially completed by 106, of whom 73.6% (53/72) were female and 52.8% (38/72) were in the 35-54 years age group. Prevalence of UI was 28.2% (24/85), and severity based on ICIQ-UI scores was 'slight' 65.2% (15/23), or 'moderate' in 26.1% (6/23). Leakage of urine was associated with physical activity in 36% (9/25), of whom 31.8% (7/22) had not taken actions to reduce the impact, and 86.4% (19/22) had not sought professional advice or treatment. There was widespread willingness to incorporate PFME into classes if given appropriate training 86.1% (62/72), and 67.1% (49/73) would be happy to recommend a PFME app. A significant proportion of fitness instructors are in need of PFME and those who perform PFME do so at a level below that which is recommended. However, many have had some training on PFME or are willing to provide this.

  10. Flow experiences in everyday classes of Spanish college students: the fit between challenge and skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Escartin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the flow state as a high intrinsic motivation experience. Following Csikszenmihalyi´s theoretical model (1990, we analyze in which contents within the social psychology subject, students experience more flow. Participants were Spanish college students from a general course on Social Psychology. They completed a diary study during 12 master classes through the academic semester. The results showed that students experienced different states of consciousness in different sessions: relaxation, apathy, flow and anxiety, respectively. These findings provide new insight into the relationship between an academic subject and students, facilitating the creation of new and innovative strategies for learning. The ultimate goal is to modify and improve the dynamics and learning activities for the teaching course, increasing the experience of flow in class (and reducing the levels of anxiety, apathy or relaxation.

  11. Eating attitudes, self-esteem and social physique anxiety among Iranian females who participate in fitness programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargari, B P; Khadem-Haghighian, M; Taklifi, E; Hamed-Behzad, M; Shahraki, M

    2010-03-01

    Today, women's participation in sports has substantially increased. This growth has been accompanied by concerns about health risks, as eating disorders, and psychological features, as self-esteem (SE) and social physique anxiety (SPA). The purpose of this study was to determine disordered eating attitudes and their relation to SE, SPA, as well as body weight, and body mass index (BMI), in Iranian females who participate in fitness programs. Subjects were 250 females, aged 14-51 years, who participated in fitness programs. Eating attitude test-26 (EAT-26), Rosenberg's self esteem scale (RSES), and social physique anxiety scale (SPAS), were used. Body weight and height were measured, and then Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated. According to BMI cut-offs, 36% of subjects were overweight or obese. 28.4% and 19.6% of subjects were disordered eating attitudes (EAT-26>or=20) and low self-esteem (RSES<15), respectively. Disordered eating attitude subjects had lower SE and higher SPA, body weight and BMI than normal subjects (P<0.05). The low SE group had higher SPAS than normal one (P<0.02). In bivariate analysis, EAT-26 score was correlated negatively with RSES (r=-0.13, P<0.04) and positively with body weight, BMI, and SPAS (r=0.40, 0.42, and 0.47, respectively, P<0.001). SPAS had positive correlation with body weight and BMI (r=0.22, 0.19, It can be concluded that disordered eating attitudes are prevalent among Iranian females who participate in fitness programs. In this group, high SPA, body weight and BMI, and low SE accompany disordered eating attitudes.

  12. Self-reported disability and handicap after hearing-aid fitting and benefit of hearing aids: comparison of fitting procedures, degree of hearing loss, experience with hearing aids and uni- and bilateral fittings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, Mick; Maat, Bert; Krijnen, Pieta; Verschuure, Hans; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Feenstra, Louw

    2009-01-01

    Self-reported outcome on hearing disability and handicap as well as overall health-related quality of life were measured after hearing-aid fitting in a large-scale clinical population. Fitting was performed according to two different procedures in a double-blind study design. We used a comparative

  13. Self-reported disability and handicap after hearing-aid fitting and benefit of hearing aids : comparison of fitting procedures, degree of hearing loss, experience with hearing aids and uni- and bilateral fittings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, Mick; Maat, Bert; Krijnen, Pieta; Verschuure, Hans; Dreschler, Wouter A; Feenstra, Louw

    Self-reported outcome on hearing disability and handicap as well as overall health-related quality of life were measured after hearing-aid fitting in a large-scale clinical population. Fitting was performed according to two different procedures in a double-blind study design. We used a comparative

  14. Developing solar power programs : San Francisco's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, F.

    2006-01-01

    This keynote address discussed an array of solar programs initiated in government-owned buildings in San Francisco. The programs were strongly supported by the city's mayor,and the voting public. Known for its fog and varying microclimates, 11 monitoring stations were set up throughout the city to determine viable locations for the successful application of solar technologies. It was observed that 90 per cent of the available sunshine occurred in the central valley, whereas fog along the Pacific shore was problematic. Seven of the monitoring sites showed excellent results. Relationships with various city departments were described, as well as details of study loads, load profiles, electrical systems, roofs and the structural capabilities of the selected government buildings. There was a focus on developing good relations with the local utility. The Moscone Convention Center was selected for the program's flagship installation, a 675 kW solar project which eventually won the US EPA Green Power Award for 2004 and received high press coverage. Cost of the project was $4.2 million. 825,000 kWh solar electricity was generated, along with 4,500,000 kWh electricity saved annually from efficiency measures, resulting in a net reduction of 5,325,000 kWh. Savings on utilities bills for the center were an estimated $1,078,000. A pipeline of solar projects followed, with installations at a sewage treatment plant and a large recycling depot. A program of smaller sites included libraries, schools and health facilities. Details of plans to apply solar technology to a 500 acre redevelopment site in southeast San Francisco with an aging and inadequate electrical infrastructure were described. A model of efficient solar housing for the development was presented, with details of insulation, windows, heating ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC), water heating, lighting, appliances and a 1.2 kilowatt solar system. Peak demand reductions were also presented. tabs., figs

  15. Cs sorption to potential host rock of low-level radioactive waste repository in Taiwan: experiments and numerical fitting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Chen, Chin-Lung; Ou, Lu-Yen; Wei, Yuan-Yaw; Chang, Fu-Lin; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2011-09-15

    A reliable performance assessment of radioactive waste repository depends on better knowledge of interactions between nuclides and geological substances. Numerical fitting of acquired experimental results by the surface complexation model enables us to interpret sorption behavior at molecular scale and thus to build a solid basis for simulation study. A lack of consensus on a standard set of assessment criteria (such as determination of sorption site concentration, reaction formula) during numerical fitting, on the other hand, makes lower case comparison between various studies difficult. In this study we explored the sorption of cesium to argillite by conducting experiments under different pH and solid/liquid ratio (s/l) with two specific initial Cs concentrations (100mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-4)mol/L and 0.01 mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-8)mol/L). After this, numerical fitting was performed, focusing on assessment criteria and their consequences. It was found that both ion exchange and electrostatic interactions governed Cs sorption on argillite. At higher initial Cs concentration the Cs sorption showed an increasing dependence on pH as the solid/liquid ratio was lowered. In contrast at trace Cs levels, the Cs sorption was neither s/l dependent nor pH sensitive. It is therefore proposed that ion exchange mechanism dominates Cs sorption when the concentration of surface sorption site exceeds that of Cs, whereas surface complexation is attributed to Cs uptake under alkaline environments. Numerical fitting was conducted using two different strategies to determine concentration of surface sorption sites: the clay model (based on the cation exchange capacity plus surface titration results) and the iron oxide model (where the concentration of sorption sites is proportional to the surface area of argillite). It was found that the clay model led to better fitting than the iron oxide model, which is attributed to more amenable sorption sites (two specific sorption sites along with larger site

  16. Promoting physical activity and improving dietary quality of Singaporean adolescents: effectiveness of a school-based fitness and wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, Claudine; Leo, Latasha; Goh, Danielle; Lim, Pei Sin; Loke, Wai Mun

    2018-01-13

    Limited data are available on the effectiveness of the school-based structured fitness and wellness program to influence dietary quality and physical activity levels in Singaporean adolescents. The study examined if a 20-h (over 10 weeks) school-based structured fitness and wellness module affects the diet quality indices, energy intakes, physical activity levels and the associated energy expenditures in a group of healthy, male adolescents with low diet quality and physical activity levels. Participant demography, anthropometry, dietary intake and daily physical activity were obtained at the beginning, mid-point and end of the 10-week program. Physical activity levels were assessed accelerometrically over a 1-weekday period. Dietary intake were taken using a structured 7-day food diary, and diet quality assessed using the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I). The 31 enrolled participants (age 19.8 ± 0.6 years) with body mass index (BMI) (19.8 ± 0.6 kg/m2) followed diets of low diet quality scores (48.3 ± 9.6 out of 100) and engaged in 3.87 ± 2.00 h of physical activity daily before the start of the intervention. Their dietary quality and physical activity levels did not change significantly throughout the intervention period. They scored poorly in the moderation and overall balance components of the diet quality assessment. The physical activity duration correlated inversely to the diet quality scores. Our results suggest that the prescribed school-based fitness and wellness module was ineffective in influencing the diet quality and physical activity levels of Singaporean male adolescents with low diet quality and physical activity levels.

  17. Eight-Week Traditional Mat Pilates Training-Program Effects on Adult Fitness Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kate; Gibson, Ann L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated responses of adult, novice practitioners (n = 9) to an 8-week traditional mat Pilates program (P) that met 1 hr/day three times/week. Classes consisted primarily of beginner and intermediate level exercises. Compared to an active control group (C; n = 13) that showed no improvements, those in P significantly (p less than 0.05)…

  18. Exercise training program based on minimum weekly frequencies: effects on blood pressure and physical fitness in elderly hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Wilson M De; Souza, Pamella R M; Pinheiro, Mônica H N P; Irigoyen, Maria C; Medeiros, Alessandra; Koike, Marcia K

    2012-04-01

    Exercise training (ET) can reduce blood pressure (BP) and prevent functional disability. However, the effects of low volumes of training have been poorly studied, especially in elderly hypertensive patients. To investigate the effects of a multi-component ET program (aerobic training, strength, flexibility, and balance) on BP, physical fitness, and functional ability of elderly hypertensive patients. Thirty-six elderly hypertensive patients with optimal clinical treatment underwent a multi-component ET program: two 60-minute sessions a week for 12 weeks at a Basic Health Unit. Compared to pre-training values, systolic and diastolic BP were reduced by 3.6% and 1.2%, respectively (ptest and elbow flexor test; ptest (unipedal stance test; ptest; ptest). Moreover, there was a reduction in the time required to perform two functional ability tests: "put on sock" and "sit down, stand up, and move around the house" (p<0.001). Lower volumes of ET improved BP, metabolic parameters, and physical fitness and reflected in the functional ability of elderly hypertensive patients. Trial Registration RBR-2xgjh3.

  19. DYMAC demonstration program: Phase I experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustson, R.H.

    1978-02-01

    The DYnamic MAterials Control (DYMAC) project tested a prototype system at the DP Site LASL plutonium facility, which consisted of a computerized accounting system based on material balancing by unit process. Transactions were written to describe the movement of material from one unit process to another. In the DYMAC prototype a specially designed computer program handled transactions that operators entered into the system via a terminal in the processing area. The transactions contained the same information that is used in the present LASL paper accounting system to create an inventory. During a 6-week period the DYMAC system operated in parallel with the paper system. At the end of the period results showed the DYMAC system was able to keep an accurate and timely inventory. Concurrent with testing the transaction-handling program, the project operated several nondestructive assay instruments in a glovebox environment, specifically the electronic balance, solution assay instrument, and thermal-neutron coincidence counter. From the instrument operation logs, project personnel were able to identify operational problems and incorporate design changes in the instrumentation for the new facility

  20. Bridging Public Health and Education: Results of a School-Based Physical Activity Program to Increase Student Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett-Williams, Shannon L; Franks, Padra; Kay, Christi; Meyer, Adria; Cornett, Kelly; Mosier, Brian

    Power Up for 30 (PU30) is a schoolwide intervention that encourages schools to provide an additional 30 minutes of physical activity during the school day, beyond physical education. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of PU30 on Georgia public elementary schools and their students. A total of 719 of 1320 public elementary schools in Georgia that were sent a baseline survey about school physical activity during October 2013 to September 2014 completed the survey, 160 of which were asked to complete a second survey. In the interim (March to June 2015), half (80) of these schools implemented the PU30 program. The interim surveys, which were completed during March to June 2015, assessed opportunities for student physical activity and staff member professional development focused on student physical activity. Compared with schools that had not implemented the program, more schools using the PU30 program reported offering before- and after-school physical activity programs. Forty-four of 78 (57%) PU30 schools compared with 20 of 53 (38%) non-PU30 schools offered before-school physical activity programs. Likewise, more PU30 schools than non-PU30 schools offered after-school physical activity programs (35% vs 16%), and a greater proportion of students at PU30 schools compared with non-PU30 schools met fitness benchmarks: recess 5 days per week (91% [288 of 323] vs 80% [273 of 341]), offering ≥11 minutes per day of classroom-based physical activity (39% [53 of 136] vs 25% [47 of 189] for kindergarten through second grade; 20% [37 of 187] vs 6% [9 of 152] for grades 3 through 5), and receiving physical activity-related professional development time (42% [136 of 323] vs 14% [48 of 341]). The surveys provided a statewide picture of the physical activity opportunities offered to students and staff members in Georgia elementary schools and demonstrated the effective use of a comprehensive, multicomponent program to offer more school-based physical activity

  1. Programming the iPhone User Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Boudreaux, Toby

    2009-01-01

    Apple's iPhone and iPod Touch not only feature the world's most powerful mobile operating system, they also usher in a new standard of human-computer interaction through gestural interfaces and multi-touch navigation. This book provides you with a hands-on, example-driven tour of UIKit, Apple's user interface toolkit, and includes common design patterns to help you create new iPhone and iPod Touch user experiences. Using Apple's Cocoa Touch framework, you'll learn how to build applications that respond in unique ways when users tap, slide, swipe, tilt, shake, or pinch the screen. Programmin

  2. The effect of a multi-component camp-based weight-loss program on children's motor skills and physical fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian Traberg; Huang, Tao; Larsen, Lisbeth Runge

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many weight-loss programs in children are performed without specific foci on training both physical fitness and motor skills. The aim of this study was to describe the effect of a one-year weight-loss program on children's motor skills and physical fitness. METHODS: Participants......-respiratory fitness test. Motor skills were assessed by the Movement Assessment Battery for Children - second edition (M-ABC-2), age band 3. RESULTS: Loss to follow-up after 52 weeks was 19 % and 32 % in the DCIA and SIA, respectively. Balance skills were improved post-camp, but not after 52 weeks in children from....... CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the day-camp intervention led to improvements in physical fitness but not in motor skills compared to the standard intervention. Including both motor skills and physical fitness could advantageously be considered in future immersive intervention programmes. TRIAL REGISTRATION...

  3. NASA Child Fitness Promotion Program in Young Children in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jungwon; Kim, Gilsook; Lim, Hyunjung; Carvajal, Nubia A.; Lloyd, Charles W.; Wang, Youfa

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a serious global public health concern (WHO, 2015; Wang Y & Lobstein T, 2006). Low self-esteem and related mental health problems are common in obese children (Strauss RS, 2000) as well as poor academic performance and career development (Gurley-Calvez T, 2010).Westernized dietary habits and sedentary lifestyles are identified as the major risk factors of current alarming rate of obesity along with genetic susceptibility (Popkin BM, 1999). Children in many countries, including South Korea, have become increasingly sedentary due to urbanization changes in their respective societies (Ng SW, et al. 2009, Salmon J et al. 2011). In particular, South Korea had abundant dissemination of mobile technology, such as tablet and smart phone devices. Children have become reliant on mobile devices and are less likely to perform physical activities (Do, et al, 2013). Effective and sustainable intervention programs are needed to fight the global obesity epidemic (IOM, 2012; Wang Y et al, 2013; Wang Y et al, 2015). Previous studies suggested focus on prevention strategies that begin in early childhood, a period when children establish their life habits. (Salmon J et al. 2011). Recent systematic reviews and meta-analysis including ours found that obesity prevention programs for young children have a greater intervention effect (Waters E, et al, 2011; Wang Y et al, 2013; Wang Y et al, 2015). The NASA Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut (MX) program was developed to promote children's exercise and healthy eating with excitement for training like an astronaut (Lloyd C, 2012).At present, the NASA MX Program covered 28 countries, enrolled children through their teachers in school setting (MX report 2014, 2015). This pilot study adapted the NASA MX intervention program for young children in South Korea. We assessed its feasibility and effectiveness in promoting physical activity (PA) in children and in improving parents' perspectives. We also examined the status of PA

  4. CRPE: Cesium Return Program Experience FY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, E.P.

    1995-11-01

    Since 1945, the chemical reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels in the Hanford Chemical Separation areas has resulted in the generation of significant volumes of high-level, liquid, radioactive, by-product materials. However, because these materials were recognized to have beneficial uses, their disposal was delayed. To investigate the possibilities, the By-product Utilization Program (BUP) was initiated. The program mission was to develop a means for the application of radioactive-fission products for the benefit of society. Cs capsules were fabricated and distributed to private irradiation facilities for beneficial product sterilization. In June of 1988, a small leak developed in one of the Cs capsules at a private irradiator facility that is located in Decatur, Georgia. This leak prompted DOE to remove these capsules and to re-evaluate the BUP with the irradiator facilities that were currently using Cs capsules. As a result of this evaluation, a recall was issued to require that all remaining Cs capsules be returned to Hanford for safe management and storage pending final capsule disposition. The WHC completed the return of 309 capsules from a private irradiation facility, located in Northglenn, Colorado, to the Hanford Reservation. The DOE is also planning to remove 25 Cs capsules from a small, private irradiator facility located in Lynchburg, Virginia. This small irradiator facility is currently operational and uses the capsules for the underwater irradiation of wood-flooring products. This report discusses transportation-related activities that WHC has researched, developed, implemented, and is currently managing to ensure the safe and efficient movement of Cs-137 back to the Hanford Reservation

  5. Effects of a School-Based Sports Program on Physical Fitness, Physical Activity, and Cardiometabolic Health in Youth With Physical Disabilities : Data From the Sport-2-Stay-Fit Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinkels, Maremka; Verschuren, Olaf; Balemans, Astrid; Lankhorst, Kristel; Te Velde, Saskia; van Gaalen, Leendert; de Groot, Janke; Meilij, JMA; Takken, Tim

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of a school-based once-a-week sports program on physical fitness, physical activity, and cardiometabolic health in children and adolescents with a physical disability. Methods: This controlled clinical trial included 71 children and adolescents from four schools

  6. USA/FBR program status FFTF operations startup experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, W.C.; Izatt, R.D.

    1981-06-01

    This paper gives highlights of the major Operations evaluations and operational results of the startup acceptance testing program and initiation of normal operating cycles for experiment irradiation in the FFTF. 33 figures

  7. One Year Later: Beginning Teachers Revisit Their Preparation Program Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housego, Billie E.; Badali, Salvador J.

    1996-01-01

    Survey of 48 beginning teachers elicited assessment of their experiences in the elementary teacher education program at the University of British Columbia. Teachers assessed the importance of teaching particular knowledge, skills, and understandings and the program's potential and success in doing so. As in similar studies, findings indicate the…

  8. Fitting timeseries by continuous-time Markov chains: A quadratic programming approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crommelin, D.T.; Vanden-Eijnden, E.

    2006-01-01

    Construction of stochastic models that describe the effective dynamics of observables of interest is an useful instrument in various fields of application, such as physics, climate science, and finance. We present a new technique for the construction of such models. From the timeseries of an observable, we construct a discrete-in-time Markov chain and calculate the eigenspectrum of its transition probability (or stochastic) matrix. As a next step we aim to find the generator of a continuous-time Markov chain whose eigenspectrum resembles the observed eigenspectrum as closely as possible, using an appropriate norm. The generator is found by solving a minimization problem: the norm is chosen such that the object function is quadratic and convex, so that the minimization problem can be solved using quadratic programming techniques. The technique is illustrated on various toy problems as well as on datasets stemming from simulations of molecular dynamics and of atmospheric flows

  9. EFFECTS OF A MULTICOMPONENT EXERCISE PROGRAM ON THE FUNCTIONAL FITNESS IN ELDERLY WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Shiguemitsu Suzuki

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Aging is inevitable and irreversible, but with the advancement of technology, life expectancy is increasing every year, bringing proposals for various interventions to improve the quality of life. One such intervention is physical exercise programs. Objectives: To investigate the impact of multicomponent training in circuits on functional autonomy parameters in elderly women. Methods: Elderly were recruited and distributed in two groups: trained (N = 16 and non-trained (N = 15. Those in the trained group performed 75-minute training sessions twice a week over a 56-week period. The resistance training included upper and lower limbs with a relative intensity of 70% of 1RM, exercises using body weight, stretching and specific tasks for agility, performed in a circuit form and totaling three passages. Participants underwent functional autonomy (FA assessment by the protocol of the Latin American Developmental Group for Maturity, the 6-minute walk test (T6M, and the sit-and-reach (SR test. Results: The trained group had a significant decrease in body weight (p=0.02 and body mass index (p=0.015. Significant improvements (p=0,009 were also observed in FA, SR, and T6M after the intervention Compared with the untrained group, the trained group also obtained significant differences in all functional parameters analyzed. Conclusion: A long-term multicomponent training program conducted on a circuit and applied twice a week was enough to improve multiple components of the functional autonomy of elderly women. Level of Evidence II; Prognostic studies - Investigating the effect of a patient characteristic on the outcome of disease.

  10. Linking Experiences and Outcomes within a Postsecondary Leadership Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Kellie; McKim, Aaron J.; Velez, Jonathan J.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the leadership development outcomes associated with specific experiences in a one-year, intensive leadership development program at a large northwest research university. Students highlighted three programmatic experiences for their effectiveness: (a) faculty mentoring, (b) participation in a weekly seminar, and (c)…

  11. A model surveillance program based on regulatory experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    A model surveillance program is presented based on regulatory experience. The program consists of three phases: Program Delineation, Data Acquistion and Data Analysis. Each phase is described in terms of key quality assurance elements and some current philosophies is the United States Licensing Program. Other topics include the application of these ideas to test equipment used in the surveillance progam and audits of the established program. Program Delineation discusses the establishment of administrative controls for organization and the description of responsibilities using the 'Program Coordinator' concept, with assistance from Data Acquisition and Analysis Teams. Ideas regarding frequency of surveillance testing are also presented. The Data Acquisition Phase discusses various methods for acquiring data including operator observations, test procedures, operator logs, and computer output, for trending equipment performance. The Data Analysis Phase discusses the process for drawing conclusions regarding component/equipment service life, proper application, and generic problems through the use of trend analysis and failure rate data. (orig.)

  12. Strength Training: For Overall Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness Strength training is an important part of an overall fitness program. Here's what strength training can do for ... is a key component of overall health and fitness for everyone. Lean muscle mass naturally diminishes with ...

  13. Undergraduate Students' Experiences in Programming: Difficulties and Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Özmen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Programming courses become prominent as one of the courses in which undergraduate students are unsuccessful especially in departments which offer computer education. Students often state that these courses are quite difficult compared to other courses. Therefore, a qualitative phenomenological approach was used to reveal the reasons of the failures of the undergraduate students in programming courses and to examine the difficulties they confronted with programming. In this scope, the laboratory practices of the Internet Programming course were observed in fall term of the 2013-2014 academic year in a university at central Anatolia. Interviews were made with 12 undergraduate students taking this course. Finally, the difficulties students experienced in the programming were determined as programming knowledge, programming skills, understanding semantics of the program, and debugging. Students emphasized that the biggest causes of failure in programming languages are lack of practice, not using algorithms and lack of knowledge. In addition, it was seen that the students who had high programming experience possess higher programming success and self-efficacy related to programming

  14. "Plyo Play": A Novel Program of Short Bouts of Moderate and High Intensity Exercise Improves Physical Fitness in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Farrell, Anne C.; Radler, Tracy; Zbojovsky, Dan; Chu, Donald A.; Ratamess, Nicholas A.; Kang, Jie; Hoffman, Jay R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a school-based plyometric training program (i.e., Plyo Play) on children's fitness performance. Forty children (8 to 11 yrs) participated in the program and 34 age-matched children served as controls. Performance of the long jump, sit and reach flexibility, abdominal curl, push-up, shuttle…

  15. Development and Fit-for-Purpose Validation of a Soluble Human Programmed Death-1 Protein Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yan G; Yuan, Xiling; Newitt, John A; Peterson, Jon E; Gleason, Carol R; Haulenbeek, Jonathan; Santockyte, Rasa; Lafont, Virginie; Marsilio, Frank; Neely, Robert J; DeSilva, Binodh; Piccoli, Steven P

    2015-07-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) protein is a co-inhibitory receptor which negatively regulates immune cell activation and permits tumors to evade normal immune defense. Anti-PD-1 antibodies have been shown to restore immune cell activation and effector function-an exciting breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy. Recent reports have documented a soluble form of PD-1 (sPD-1) in the circulation of normal and disease state individuals. A clinical assay to quantify sPD-1 would contribute to the understanding of sPD-1-function and facilitate the development of anti-PD-1 drugs. Here, we report the development and validation of a sPD-1 protein assay. The assay validation followed the framework for full validation of a biotherapeutic pharmacokinetic assay. A purified recombinant human PD-1 protein was characterized extensively and was identified as the assay reference material which mimics the endogenous analyte in structure and function. The lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was determined to be 100 pg/mL, with a dynamic range spanning three logs to 10,000 pg/mL. The intra- and inter-assay imprecision were ≤15%, and the assay bias (percent deviation) was ≤10%. Potential matrix effects were investigated in sera from both normal healthy volunteers and selected cancer patients. Bulk-prepared frozen standards and pre-coated Streptavidin plates were used in the assay to ensure consistency in assay performance over time. This assay appears to specifically measure total sPD-1 protein since the human anti-PD-1 antibody, nivolumab, and the endogenous ligands of PD-1 protein, PDL-1 and PDL-2, do not interfere with the assay.

  16. Effects of a 6-Month Conditioning Program on Motor and Sport Performance in The Group of Children’s Fitness Competitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlsnová Gabriela

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to determine changes in sport and motor performance of competitors in the category of children’s fitness as a result of conditioning training intervention. We conducted a two-group simultaneous experiment. Experimental group (EG and control group (CG consisted of 18 girls competing in the 12 to 15 years old age categories. EG performed supervised conditioning program over a period of 25 weeks with training frequency 3 times per week. Based on the results of physical tests, competitive and expert assessments of sport performance in the children’s fitness category we found significant effect of our conditioning program to increase sport and motor performance in the experimental group. Subsequently, these improvements could lead to success in domestic and international competitions where they occupied the leading positions. Significant relationships (EG = 19; CG = 10 were found between competitive and expert assessments as well as physical tests results, between expert and competitive assessments of physiques and routines. These changes manifested positively not only in the competitive assessment of the physique but also in the expert “blind“ assessment in the competitive discipline of the physique presentation in quarter turns where we observed significant improvements in the EG. Based on the obtained results we recommend to increase the ratio of conditioning training to gymnastic-dance training to 50 %, inclusion of strengthening and plyometric exercises into the training process and monitor regularly the level of general and specific abilities of the competitors in the individual mezocycles of the annual training cycle.

  17. Computer code FIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmann, D.; Koehler, T.

    1987-02-01

    This is a description of the computer code FIT, written in FORTRAN-77 for a PDP 11/34. FIT is an interactive program to decude position, width and intensity of lines of X-ray spectra (max. length of 4K channels). The lines (max. 30 lines per fit) may have Gauss- or Voigt-profile, as well as exponential tails. Spectrum and fit can be displayed on a Tektronix terminal. (orig.) [de

  18. [International academic mobility program in nursing experience report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mariana Gonçalves; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2012-03-01

    An experience of studying abroad or of academic exchange, really adds value to the professional and personal development of exchange students. This report aims to describe a student's experience in an international academic mobility program. It was developed from 2008 to 2009 in Brazil and Spain. The experiences, observations and activities of the student were emphasized believing that the training of students and researchers is not only restricted to the university and the students' home country, and that it is important to have possibilities of new experiences and differentiated knowledge. The conclusion is that this opportunity promoted a profound effect on psychological, cultural social and scientific development of the exchange student.

  19. The Langley Fitness Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    NASA Langley recognizes the importance of healthy employees by committing itself to offering a complete fitness program. The scope of the program focuses on promoting overall health and wellness in an effort to reduce the risks of illness and disease and to increase productivity. This is accomplished through a comprehensive Health and Fitness Program offered to all NASA employees. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

  20. An optics education program designed around experiments with small telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.; Dokter, Erin F. C.

    2010-08-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory has led the development of a new telescope kit for kids as part of a strategic plan to interest young children in science. This telescope has been assembled by tens of thousands of children nationwide, who are now using this high-quality telescope to conduct optics experiments and to make astronomical observations. The Galileoscope telescope kit and its associated educational program are an outgrowth of the NSF sponsored "Hands-On Optics" (HOO) project, a collaboration of the SPIE, the Optical Society of America, and NOAO. This project developed optics kits and activities for upper elementary students and has reached over 20,000 middle school kids in afterschool programs. HOO is a highly flexible educational program and was featured as an exemplary informal science program by the National Science Teachers Association. Our new "Teaching with Telescopes" program builds on HOO, the Galileoscope and other successful optical education projects.

  1. Teacher Research Experience Programs = Increase in Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, J.

    2010-12-01

    Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers (SRP), founded in 1990, is one of the largest, best known university-based professional development programs for science teachers in the U.S. The program’s basic premise is simple: teachers cannot effectively teach science if they have not experienced it firsthand. For eight weeks in each of two consecutive summers, teachers participate as a member of a research team, led by a member of Columbia University’s research faculty. In addition to the laboratory experience, all teachers meet as a group one day each week during the summer for a series of pedagogical activities. A unique quality of the Summer Research Program is its focus on objective assessment of its impact on attitudes and instructional practices of participating teachers, on the performance of these teachers in their mentors’ laboratories, and most importantly, on the impact of their participation in the program on student interest and performance in science. SRP uses pass rate on the New York State Regents standardized science examinations as an objective measure of student achievement. SRP's data is the first scientific evidence of a connection between a research experience for teachers program and gains in student achievement. As a result of the research, findings were published in Science Magazine. The author will present an overview of Columbia's teacher research program and the results of the published program evaluation.

  2. Canadian CANDU fuel development program and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.K.; Inch, W.W.R.; Cox, D.S.; Steed, R.G.; Kohn, E.; Macici, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the CANDU fuel in the Canadian CANDU reactors in 1997 and 1998. The operating experience demonstrates that the CANDU fuel has performed very well. Over the 2-year period, the fuel-bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in the Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, at between 0.006% to 0.016%. On a fuel element basis, this represents an element defect rate of less than about 0.0005%. One of the reasons for the good fuel performance is the support provided by the Canadian fuel research and development programs. These programs address operational issues and provide evolutionary improvements to the fuel products. The programs consist of the Fuel Technology Program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, and the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycles Technology Program, funded by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. These 2 programs, which have been in place for many years, complement each other by sharing expert resources and experimental facilities. This paper describes the programs in 1999/2000, to provide an overview of the scope of the programs and the issues that these programs address. (author)

  3. Collaboration for cooperative work experience programs in biomedical engineering education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar

    2010-01-01

    Incorporating cooperative education modules as a segment of the undergraduate educational program is aimed to assist students in gaining real-life experience in the field of their choice. The cooperative work modules facilitate the students in exploring different realistic aspects of work processes in the field. The track records for cooperative learning modules are very positive. However, it is indeed a challenge for the faculty developing Biomedical Engineering (BME) curriculum to include cooperative work experience or internship requirements coupled with a heavy course load through the entire program. The objective of the present work is to develop a scheme for collaborative co-op work experience for the undergraduate training in the fast-growing BME programs. A few co-op/internship models are developed for the students pursuing undergraduate BME degree. The salient features of one co-op model are described. The results obtained support the proposed scheme. In conclusion, the cooperative work experience will be an invaluable segment in biomedical engineering education and an appropriate model has to be selected to blend with the overall training program.

  4. Mandatory Parent Education Programs Can Create Positive Youth Sport Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Jennifer; Strand, Bradford

    2016-01-01

    Youth sport leaders must not ignore the influence parents have on creating a positive developmental experience for young athletes. Therefore, expectations involving parental involvement and conduct must be addressed prior to athletes' participation. This article aims to examine the importance of creating mandatory parental training programs for…

  5. Ethical Decisions in Experience-Based Training and Development Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Michael A.; Wurdinger, Scott

    1993-01-01

    Illustrates how principle and virtue ethics can be applied to decision-making processes in experience-based training and development programs. Principle ethics is guided by predetermined rules and assumes that issues being examined are somewhat similar in context, whereas virtue ethics assumes that "correct behavior" is determined from…

  6. The Experiences of Latina Graduate Students in Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celaya, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the experience of Latinas in doctoral programs in psychology using a qualitative phenomenological methodology. Eleven women who self-identified as Latina and were in the process of working towards a doctoral degree in psychology participated in in-person interviews that were audio-recorded. Participants described experiences…

  7. Fitting PAC spectra with stochastic models: PolyPacFit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacate, M. O., E-mail: zacatem1@nku.edu [Northern Kentucky University, Department of Physics and Geology (United States); Evenson, W. E. [Utah Valley University, College of Science and Health (United States); Newhouse, R.; Collins, G. S. [Washington State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States)

    2010-04-15

    PolyPacFit is an advanced fitting program for time-differential perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. It incorporates stochastic models and provides robust options for customization of fits. Notable features of the program include platform independence and support for (1) fits to stochastic models of hyperfine interactions, (2) user-defined constraints among model parameters, (3) fits to multiple spectra simultaneously, and (4) any spin nuclear probe.

  8. Implementation lessons: the importance of assessing organizational "fit" and external factors when implementing evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demby, Hilary; Gregory, Alethia; Broussard, Marsha; Dickherber, Jennifer; Atkins, Shantice; Jenner, Lynne W

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, the demand for evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs has increased, but practitioners often struggle to replicate and implement them as designed in real-world community settings. The purpose of this article is to describe the barriers and facilitators encountered during pilot year attempts to implement an evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention program within three types of organizations: (1) small community-based organizations; (2) a school-based organization; and (3) a large decentralized city-sponsored summer youth program. We frame our discussion of these experiences within the context of a systemic, multilevel framework for implementation consisting of (1) core implementation components; (2) organizational components; and (3) external factors. This article explores the organizational and external implementation factors we experienced during the implementation process, describes our lessons learned throughout this process, and offers strategies for other practitioners to proactively address these factors from the start of program planning. These findings may provide useful insight for other organizations looking to implement multi-session, group-level interventions with fidelity. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Different Exercise Training Programs on Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Overweight/Obese Adults With Hypertension: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurio-Iriarte, Borja; Maldonado-Martín, Sara

    2018-05-01

    The goal of the study was to compare the effects of two supervised aerobic exercise programs (moderate-intensity continuous training [MICT] vs. high-intensity interval training [HIIT]) after 8-, 12-, and 16-week intervention periods on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in overweight/obese adults diagnosed with hypertension. Participants ( N = 64) were divided into three intervention cohorts (control group [CG], MICT, and HIIT) and each of these, in turn, into three intervention length cohorts (8, 12, and 16 weeks). Supervised groups exercised twice a week. There were no statistical changes in postintervention periods in CG ( g HIIT, 4.2 ± 4.7, g = 0.7). The effect of exercise interventions compared with CG was substantial ( p .8) and mostly consequence of HIIT-related effects. The improvements on CRF occurred after 12 and 16 weeks in exercise interventions, rather than in the 8-week group or CG, where Hedges's g index indicated small effect. This study may suggest that both MICT and HIIT exert cardioprotector effects on hypertension in the overweight/obese population. However, short-term training duration (HIIT intervention might generate higher aerobic capacity, which seems to grow as intervention lengthens.

  10. Mobility, strength, and fitness after a graded activity program for patients with subacute low back pain. A randomized prospective clinical study with a behavioral therapy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, I; Ohlund, C; Eek, C; Wallin, L; Peterson, L E; Nachemson, A

    1992-06-01

    Patients with nonspecific mechanical low back pain (n = 103), examined by an orthopaedic surgeon and a social worker, were randomized to an activity group (n = 51) and a control group (n = 52). Patients with defined orthopaedic, medical, or psychiatric diagnoses were excluded before randomization. No patients were excluded due to place of birth or difficulties in speaking or understanding the Swedish language. The purpose of the study was to compare mobility, strength and fitness after traditional care and after traditional care plus a graded activity program with a behavioral therapy approach. A graded activity program, with a behavioral therapy approach was given under the guidance of a physical therapist. The endpoint of the graded activity program was return to work. This program significantly increased mobility, strength, and fitness more than could be explained by only a time recovery effect, especially in males. The patients in the activity group returned to work earlier than did the patients in the control group. Spinal rotation, abdominal muscle endurance time and lifting capacity were significantly correlated to rate of return to work. Traditional care plus a graded activity program were superior to only traditional care, evaluated in terms of mobility, strength and fitness. The graded activity program proved to be a successful method of restoring occupational function and facilitating return to work in subacute low back pain patients. The patients in the graded activity program learned that it is safe to move, while regaining function.

  11. Influence of Two Different Exercise Programs on Physical Fitness and Cognitive Performance in Active Older Adults: Functional Resistance-Band Exercises vs. Recreational Oriented Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Bravo, Hernán; Ponce, Christian; Feriche, Belén; Padial, Paulino

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the impact of a resistance-band functional exercise program, compared with a recreational exercise program, on physical fitness and reaction times in persons older than 60 years. Fifty-four community-dwelling volunteers (71.76 ± 6.02 years) were assigned to a specific exercise program: Functional activity program (focused on resistance-band multi-joint activities; experimental group, EG), or recreational physical activity program (with gross motor activities of ludic content; control group, CG). Before and after the intervention, we determined cognitive capacity in terms of simple reaction time (S-RT), choice reaction time (C-RT) and fitness. In both groups physical performance improved, though this improvement was more marked in the EG for grip strength, arm strength and gross motor abilities (p program using a resistance band improves fitness and cognitive performance in healthy older adults. Key pointsBetter cognitive processes can be achieved as physical condition improvesExercise sessions of a more recreational type do not seem to constitute a stimulus able to improve both physical and cognitive performance in healthy active older adultsThe improvement of cognitive function, as assessed through reaction times, seems more linked to the workload and strength component of the training program.

  12. Quality assurance program plan for the Reactor Research Experiment Programs (RREP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipher, D.G.

    1982-05-01

    This document describes the Quality Assurance Program plans which will be applied to tasks on Reactor Research Experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories' reactors. The program provides for individual project or experiment quality plan development and allows for reasonable plan flexibility and maximum plan visibility. Various controls and requirements in this program plan are considered mandatory on all features which are identified as important to public health and safety (Level I). It is the intent of this document that the Quality Assurance program comprise those elements which will provide adequate assurance that all components, equipment, and systems of the experiments will perform as designed, and hence prevent delays and costs due to rejections or failures

  13. Experience in the application of erosion-corrosion prediction programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiella Villacampa, E.; Cacho Cordero, L.; Pascual Velazquez, A.; Casar Asuar, M.

    1994-01-01

    Recently the results of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's follow-on programme relating to the application of erosion-corrosion supervision and control programs were published. The main problems encountered in their practical application are highlighted, namely those associated with prediction, calculation of minimum thickness acceptable by code, results analyses of the thicknesses measured using ultrasound technology, cases of incorrect substitution, etc. A number of power plants in Spain are currently using a computerised prediction and monitoring program for the erosion-corrosion phenomenon. The experience gained in the application of this program has been such that it has led to a number or benefits: an improvement in the application of the program, proof of its suitability to real situation, the establishment of a series of criteria relative to the inclusion or exclusion of consideration during data input, the monitoring of the phenomenon, selection of elements for inspection, etc. The report describes these areas, using typical examples as illustrations. (Author)

  14. LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program and initial test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlestein, L.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Bloom, G.R.; McCormack, J.D.; Rahn, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program is described. The LACE program is being performed at the Hanford Engineer Development Laboratory (operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company) and the initial tests are sponsored by EPRI. The objectives of the LACE program are: to demonstrate, at large-scale, inherent radioactive aerosol retention behavior for postulated high consequence LWR accident situations; and to provide a data base to be used for aerosol behavior . Test results from the first phase of the LACE program are presented and discussed. Three large-scale scoping tests, simulating a containment bypass accident sequence, demonstrated the extent of agglomeration and deposition of aerosols occurring in the pipe pathway and vented auxiliary building under realistic accident conditions. Parameters varied during the scoping tests were aerosol type and steam condensation

  15. Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) pilot study protocol: a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program for overweight and obese male hockey fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Dawn P; Blunt, Wendy; De Cruz, Ashleigh; Riggin, Brendan; Hunt, Kate; Zou, Guangyong; Sibbald, Shannon; Danylchuk, Karen; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Gray, Cindy M; Wyke, Sally; Bunn, Christopher; Petrella, Robert J

    2016-10-19

    Effective approaches that engage men in weight loss and lifestyle change are important because of worldwide increases, including in Canada, in obesity and chronic diseases. Football Fans in Training (FFIT), developed in Scotland, successfully tackled these problems by engaging overweight/obese male football fans in sustained weight loss and positive health behaviours, through program deliveries at professional football stadia. Aims: 1) Adapt FFIT to hockey within the Canadian context and integrate with HealtheSteps™ (evidence-based lifestyle program) to develop Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT); 2) Explore potential for Hockey FIT to help overweight/obese men lose weight and improve other outcomes by 12 weeks, and retain these improvements to 12 months; 3) Evaluate feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight/obese men; 4) Evaluate acceptability of Hockey FIT; and 5) Conduct program optimization via a process evaluation. We conducted a two-arm pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial (pRCT) whereby 80 overweight/obese male hockey fans (35-65 years; body-mass index ≥28 kg/m 2 ) were recruited through their connection to two junior A hockey teams (London and Sarnia, ON) and randomized to Intervention (Hockey FIT) or Comparator (Wait-List Control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-week Active Phase (classroom instruction and exercise sessions delivered weekly by trained coaches) and a 40-week Maintenance Phase. Data collected at baseline and 12 weeks (both groups), and 12 months (Intervention only), will inform evaluation of the potential of Hockey FIT to help men lose weight and improve other health outcomes. Feasibility and acceptability will be assessed using data from self-reports at screening and baseline, program fidelity (program observations and coach reflections), participant focus group discussions, coach interviews, as well as program questionnaires and interviews with participants. This information will be analyzed to inform program

  16. Early experiences mediate distinct adult gene expression and reproductive programs in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Maria C.; Nichitean, Alexandra M.; Dorus, Steve; Hall, Sarah E.

    2018-01-01

    Environmental stress during early development in animals can have profound effects on adult phenotypes via programmed changes in gene expression. Using the nematode C. elegans, we demonstrated previously that adults retain a cellular memory of their developmental experience that is manifested by differences in gene expression and life history traits; however, the sophistication of this system in response to different environmental stresses, and how it dictates phenotypic plasticity in adults that contribute to increased fitness in response to distinct environmental challenges, was unknown. Using transcriptional profiling, we show here that C. elegans adults indeed retain distinct cellular memories of different environmental conditions. We identified approximately 500 genes in adults that entered dauer due to starvation that exhibit significant opposite (“seesaw”) transcriptional phenotypes compared to adults that entered dauer due to crowding, and are distinct from animals that bypassed dauer. Moreover, we show that two-thirds of the genes in the genome experience a 2-fold or greater seesaw trend in gene expression, and based upon the direction of change, are enriched in large, tightly linked regions on different chromosomes. Importantly, these transcriptional programs correspond to significant changes in brood size depending on the experienced stress. In addition, we demonstrate that while the observed seesaw gene expression changes occur in both somatic and germline tissue, only starvation-induced changes require a functional GLP-4 protein necessary for germline development, and both programs require the Argonaute CSR-1. Thus, our results suggest that signaling between the soma and the germ line can generate phenotypic plasticity as a result of early environmental experience, and likely contribute to increased fitness in adverse conditions and the evolution of the C. elegans genome. PMID:29447162

  17. Early experiences mediate distinct adult gene expression and reproductive programs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C Ow

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental stress during early development in animals can have profound effects on adult phenotypes via programmed changes in gene expression. Using the nematode C. elegans, we demonstrated previously that adults retain a cellular memory of their developmental experience that is manifested by differences in gene expression and life history traits; however, the sophistication of this system in response to different environmental stresses, and how it dictates phenotypic plasticity in adults that contribute to increased fitness in response to distinct environmental challenges, was unknown. Using transcriptional profiling, we show here that C. elegans adults indeed retain distinct cellular memories of different environmental conditions. We identified approximately 500 genes in adults that entered dauer due to starvation that exhibit significant opposite ("seesaw" transcriptional phenotypes compared to adults that entered dauer due to crowding, and are distinct from animals that bypassed dauer. Moreover, we show that two-thirds of the genes in the genome experience a 2-fold or greater seesaw trend in gene expression, and based upon the direction of change, are enriched in large, tightly linked regions on different chromosomes. Importantly, these transcriptional programs correspond to significant changes in brood size depending on the experienced stress. In addition, we demonstrate that while the observed seesaw gene expression changes occur in both somatic and germline tissue, only starvation-induced changes require a functional GLP-4 protein necessary for germline development, and both programs require the Argonaute CSR-1. Thus, our results suggest that signaling between the soma and the germ line can generate phenotypic plasticity as a result of early environmental experience, and likely contribute to increased fitness in adverse conditions and the evolution of the C. elegans genome.

  18. A retrospective analysis of compact fluorescent lamp experience curves and their correlations to deployment programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Sarah Josephine; Wei, Max; Sohn, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Experience curves are useful for understanding technology development and can aid in the design and analysis of market transformation programs. Here, we employ a novel approach to create experience curves, to examine both global and North American compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) data for the years 1990–2007. We move away from the prevailing method of fitting a single, constant, exponential curve to data and instead search for break points where changes in the learning rate may have occurred. Our analysis suggests a learning rate of approximately 21% for the period of 1990–1997, and 51% and 79% in global and North American datasets, respectively, after 1998. We use price data for this analysis; therefore our learning rates encompass developments beyond typical “learning by doing”, including supply chain impacts such as market competition. We examine correlations between North American learning rates and the initiation of new programs, abrupt technological advances, and economic and political events, and find an increased learning rate associated with design advancements and federal standards programs. Our findings support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective technology analysis, and may imply that investments in technology programs have contributed to an increase of the CFL learning rate. - Highlights: • We develop a segmented regression technique to estimate historical CFL learning curves. • CFL experience curves do not have a constant learning rate. • CFLs exhibited a learning rate of approximately 21% from 1990 to 1997. • The CFL learning rate significantly increased after 1998. • Increased CFL learning rate is correlated to technology deployment programs.

  19. Relationship between sports experience and executive function in 6-12-year-old children: independence from physical fitness and moderation by gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Toru; Sugasawa, Shigemi; Matsuda, Yusuke; Mizuno, Masao

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between sports experience (i.e., tennis experience) and executive function in children while controlling for physical activity and physical fitness. Sixty-eight participants (6-12 years old, 34 males and 34 females) were enrolled in regular tennis lessons (mean = 2.4 years, range = 0.1-7.3 years) prior to the study. Executive functions, including inhibitory control (the Stroop Color-Word Test), working memory (the 2-back Task), and cognitive flexibility (the Local-global Task) were evaluated. Participants' levels of daily physical activity, ranging from moderate to vigorous, were evaluated using triaxial accelerometers. The total score for physical fitness was assessed using the Tennis Field Test. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed interaction effects between gender and tennis experience on participants' reaction time (RT) on the switch cost of the Local-global Task after controlling for age, BMI, gender, physical activity, physical fitness, and tennis experience. Longer tennis experience was associated with shorter switch cost in males but not in females. Higher scores on physical fitness were positively associated with lower interference scores on the Stroop Color-Word Test, RT on the 2-back Task, and RT in the switching condition of the Local-global Task, after controlling for age, BMI, gender, and physical activity. In conclusion, all three foundational components of executive function (i.e., inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility) were more strongly related to physical fitness than to physical activity in males and females, whereas greater cognitive flexibility was related to tennis experience only in the males. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Effects of a Special Olympics Unified Sports Soccer Training Program on Anthropometry, Physical Fitness and Skilled Performance in Special Olympics Soccer Athletes and Non-Disabled Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Funda; Aktop, Abdurrahman; Ozer, Dilara; Nalbant, Sibel; Aglamis, Ece; Barak, Sharon; Hutzler, Yeshayahu

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of a Special Olympics (SO) Unified Sport (UNS) soccer program on anthropometry, physical fitness and soccer skills of male youth athletes with and without intellectual disabilities (ID) who participated in a training group (TRG) and in a comparison group (CG) without specific training. Youth with ID (WID) were…

  1. Evidence of the Adoption and Implementation of a Statewide Childhood Obesity Prevention Initiative in the New York State WIC Program: The "NY Fit WIC" Process Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhobo, Jackson P.; Egglefield, Katherine; Edmunds, Lynn S.; Shackman, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluations are critical in determining whether outcome evaluations are warranted. This study assessed the extent to which a childhood obesity prevention initiative, "NY Fit WIC", was adopted and implemented by the New York State Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). Process data came from…

  2. Canadian fuel development program and recent operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.S.; Kohn, E.; Lau, J.H.K.; Dicke, G.J.; Macici, N.N.; Sancton, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current Canadian CANDU fuel R and D programs and operational experience. The details of operational experience for fuel in Canadian reactors are summarized for the period 1991-1994; excellent fuel performance has been sustained, with steady-state bundle defect rates currently as low as 0.02%. The status of introducing long 37-element bundles, and bundles with rounded bearing pads is reviewed. These minor changes in fuel design have been selectively introduced in response to operational constraints (end-plate cracking and pressure-tube fretting) at Ontario Hydro's Bruce-B and Darlington stations. The R and D programs are generating a more complete understanding of CANDU fuel behaviour, while the CANDU Owners Group (COG) Fuel Technology Program is being re-aligned to a more exclusive focus on the needs of operating stations. Technical highlights and realized benefits from the COG program are summarized. Re-organization of AECL to provide a one-company focus, with an outward looking view to new CANDU markets, has strengthened R and D in advanced fuel cycles. Progress in AECL's key fuel cycle programs is also summarized. (author)

  3. The RERTR demonstration experiments program at the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehe, D K; King, J S [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan (United States)

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight a major part of the experimental work which is being carried out at the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR) in conjunction with the RERTR program. A demonstration experiments program has been developed to: 1) characterize the FNR in sufficient detail to discern and quantify neutronic differences between the high and low enriched cores; 2) provide the theoretical group with measurements to benchmark their calculations. As with any experimental program associated with a reactor, stringent constraints limit the experiments which can be performed. Some experiments are performed routinely on the FNR (such as control rod calibrations), and much data is already available. Unfortunately, the accuracy we demand precludes using much of this earlier data. And in many cases, the requirement of precise (and copious) data has led to either developing new techniques (as in the case of rhodium mapping and neutron diffraction) or to further refinements on existing methods (as in the case of spectral unfolding). Nevertheless, we have tried to stay within the realm of recognized, well-established experimental methods in order to assuage any doubts about measured differences between HEU and LEU core parameters. This paper describes the principal results of the experiments performed so far.

  4. Operating experience and corrective action program at Ontario Hydro Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingwood, Barry; Turner, David

    1998-01-01

    This is a slide-based talk given at the COG/IAEA: 5. Technical Committee Meeting on 'Exchange of operating experience of pressurized heavy water reactors'. In the introduction there are presented the operating experience (OPEX) program of OHN, and the OPEX Program Mission, ensuring that the right information gets to the right staff at the right time. The OPEX Processes are analysed. These are: - Internal Corrective Action; - Inter-site Lesson Transfer; - External Lesson Transfer; - External Posting of OHN Events; - Internalizing Operating Experience. Steps in solving the Corrective Action Program are described: - Identify the Problem; - Notify Immediate Supervision/Manager; - Evaluate the Problem; - Correct the Problem; Monitor/Report Status. The Internal Corrective Action is then presented as a flowchart. The internalizing operating experience is presented under three aspects: - Communication; - Interface; - Training. The following items are discussed, respectively: peer meetings, department/section meetings, safety meetings, e-mail folders, newsletters and bulletin boards; work planning, pre-job briefings, supervisors' briefing cards; classroom initial and refresher (case studies), simulator, management courses. A diagram is presented showing the flow and treatment of information within OHN, centered on the weekly screening meetings. Finally, the corrective action processes are depicted in a flowchart and analysed in details

  5. Influence of Two Different Exercise Programs on Physical Fitness and Cognitive Performance in Active Older Adults: Functional Resistance-Band Exercises vs. Recreational Oriented Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Ponce-Bravo, Christian Ponce, Belén Feriche, Paulino Padial

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impact of a resistance-band functional exercise program, compared with a recreational exercise program, on physical fitness and reaction times in persons older than 60 years. Fifty-four community-dwelling volunteers (71.76 ± 6.02 years were assigned to a specific exercise program: Functional activity program (focused on resistance-band multi-joint activities; experimental group, EG, or recreational physical activity program (with gross motor activities of ludic content; control group, CG. Before and after the intervention, we determined cognitive capacity in terms of simple reaction time (S-RT, choice reaction time (C-RT and fitness. In both groups physical performance improved, though this improvement was more marked in the EG for grip strength, arm strength and gross motor abilities (p < 0.05. Reaction times were better only in EG (S-RT = 10.70%, C-RT = 14.34%; p < 0.05 after the corresponding physical training intervention. The training period showed no effect on the moderate relationship between both RT and gross motor abilities in the CG, whereas the EG displayed an enhanced relationship between S-RT and grip-strength as well as the C-RT with arm strength and aerobic capacity (r ~ 0.457; p < 0.05. Our findings indicate that a functional exercise program using a resistance band improves fitness and cognitive performance in healthy older adults.

  6. The effects of senior brain health exercise program on basic physical fitness, cognitive function and BDNF of elderly women - a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jung-Eun; Kang, Eun-Bum

    2016-06-01

    This study was to investigate the impacts of senior brain heath exercise (SBHE) program for 12 weeks to basic active physical fitness, cognitive function and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in elderly women. Subject of this study is total of 24 women in the age of 65-79 who can conduct normal daily activity and communication but have not participated in regular exercise in recent 6 months. The study groups were divided into an exercise group (EG, n=13) and a control group (CG, n=11). The exercise program was consisted of SBHE, and training frequency was 4 times weekly, of which training time was a total of 50 minutes each time in level of intensity of 9-14 by rating of perceived exertion (RPE). First, 12-week SBHE program has shown statistical increase in basic physical fitness in the EG comparing with the CG, such as lower body strength, upper body strength and aerobic endurance, but not in flexibility, agility and dynamic balance. Second, in the case of Mini-mental state examination Korean version (MMSE-K) and BDNF, it showed that there was a statistically significant increase in the EG comparing with the CG. In this study, 12-week SBHE program has resulted in positive effect on change of basic physical fitness (strength and aerobic endurance), cognitive function and BDNF. If above program adds movements that can enhance flexibility, dynamic balance and agility, this can be practical exercise program to help seniors maintain overall healthy lifestyle.

  7. PBF/LOFT Lead Rod Test Program experiment predictions document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J.; Cox, W.R.; Niebruegge, D.A.; Seiber, S.J.; Brake, T.E.; Driskell, W.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Tolman, E.L.

    1978-12-01

    The PBF/LOFT Lead Rod (LLR) Test Program is being conducted to provide experimental information on the behavior of nuclear fuel under normal and accident conditions in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The PBF/LLR tests are designed to simulate the test conditions for the LOFT Power Ascension Tests L2-3 through L2-5. The test program has been designed to provide a parametric evaluation of the LOFT fuel (center and peripheral modules) over a wide range of power. This report presents the experiment predictions for the three four-rod LOCA tests

  8. Study of a Monte Carlo program for the Cello experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagraa, Mohamed.

    1979-01-01

    In the first part, the experimental Cello device is presented and the physics of the electron-positron collision rings in the Petra energy domain is discussed. In the second part, a detailed study is presented of the program that generates the e + e - reactions and simulates the answer of the detectors to these reactions. Such a program is necessary to make allowance for the true physical breaks due to the geometry of the detectors and in consequence is indispensable for the analysis of the rough data of the experiment [fr

  9. To the Extremes! A Teacher Research Experience Program in the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, J.; Bartholow, S.

    2014-12-01

    PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a teacher professional development program, began with the International Polar Year in 2004 and continues today in the United States. In 2007, the National Science Foundation designated PolarTREC as potentially transformative, meaning that the "research results often do not fit within established models or theories and may initially be unexpected or difficult to interpret; their transformative nature and utility might not be recognized until years later." PolarTREC brings U.S. K-12 educators and polar researchers together through an innovative teacher research experience model. Teachers spend three to six weeks in remote arctic and Antarctic field camps. Since 2007, over 100 teachers have been placed in field experiences throughout the Arctic and Antarctic and with half of them participating in field experiences in Antarctica. During their experience, teachers become research team members filling a variety of roles on the team. They also fulfil a unique role of public outreach officer, conducting live presentations about their field site and research as well as journaling, answering questions, and posting photos. Evaluation data collected over the past eight years on program participants shows that PolarTREC has clearly achieved it goals and strongly suggests programs that link teachers and researchers can have the potential to transform the nature of science education. By giving teachers the content knowledge, pedagogical tools, confidence, understanding of science in the broader society, and experiences with scientific inquiry, participating teachers are using authentic scientific research in their classrooms. Not surprisingly this has also led to increases in student interest and knowledge about the Polar Regions. In this presentation, we will highlight the best practices of teacher research experiences as well as discuss why it is vital to have teachers and researchers work together to communicate

  10. The effects of a Special Olympics Unified Sports Soccer training program on anthropometry, physical fitness and skilled performance in Special Olympics soccer athletes and non-disabled partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Funda; Aktop, Abdurrahman; Özer, Dilara; Nalbant, Sibel; Ağlamış, Ece; Barak, Sharon; Hutzler, Yeshayahu

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of a Special Olympics (SO) Unified Sport (UNS) soccer program on anthropometry, physical fitness and soccer skills of male youth athletes with and without intellectual disabilities (ID) who participated in a training group (TRG) and in a comparison group (CG) without specific training. Youth with ID (WID) were randomly selected out of all the students between the ages 12 and 15, with a diagnosis of educable mental retardation and no secondary disabilities, who were attending a special education school. Participants without ID (WoID) were randomly selected from a regular secondary school out of the same age groups of male students. All participants were given permission by their parents or guardians to participate in the study. Participants in the TRG included 23 youth WID and 23 youth WoID. Mean ages were = 14.1 (SD = 1.1) and 13.2 (SD = 0.79) respectively. Fifteen WID, and 15 WoID comprised the CG. Mean ages were 14.51 (SD = 0.81) and 13.78 (SD = 0.49) respectively. Prior to and following the program measurements were conducted, and data were collected on students' anthropometric and fitness components of the Brockport physical fitness test as well as a soccer skill performance based on the SO soccer skill test. Participants in the TRG trained 8 weeks, 1.5h per session, three times per week, in an after-school soccer program. CG did not participate in any sports program outside of the school physical education class. Dependent t tests and effect size calculations revealed that SO athletes and non-disabled partners scored significantly higher with regard to physical fitness and football skills in most variables compared with their CG. This Unified Program was successful in increasing fitness and soccer skill performance of youth WID as well as of those WoID. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Program of nuclear criticality safety experiment at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Tachimori, Shoichi; Takeshita, Isao; Suzaki, Takenori; Ohnishi, Nobuaki

    1983-11-01

    JAERI is promoting the nuclear criticality safety research program, in which a new facility for criticality safety experiments (Criticality Safety Experimental Facility : CSEF) is to be built for the experiments with solution fuel. One of the experimental researches is to measure, collect and evaluate the experimental data needed for evaluation of criticality safety of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Another research area is a study of the phenomena themselves which are incidental to postulated critical accidents. Investigation of the scale and characteristics of the influences caused by the accident is also included in this research. The result of the conceptual design of CSEF is summarized in this report. (author)

  12. Testing program for burning plasma experiment vacuum vessel bolted joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsueh, P.K.; Khan, M.Z.; Swanson, J.; Feng, T.; Dinkevich, S.; Warren, J.

    1992-01-01

    As presently designed, the Burning Plasma Experiment vacuum vessel will be segmentally fabricated and assembled by bolted joints in the field. Due to geometry constraints, most of the bolted joints have significant eccentricity which causes the joint behavior to be sensitive to joint clamping forces. Experience indicates that as a result of this eccentricity, the joint will tend to open at the side closest to the applied load with the extent of the opening being dependent on the initial preload. In this paper analytical models coupled with a confirmatory testing program are developed to investigate and predict the non-linear behavior of the vacuum vessel bolted joint

  13. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry: Annual summary of program performance reports CY 1994. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westra, C.; Durbin, N.; Field, I.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the data from the semiannual reports on fitness-for-duty programs submitted to the NRC by utilities for two reporting periods: January 1 through June 30, 1994, and July I through December 31, 1994. During 1994, licensees reported that they had conducted 163,241 tests for the presence of illegal drugs and alcohol. Of these tests, 1,372 (.84%) were confirmed positive. Positive test results varied by category of test and category of worker. The majority of positive test results (977) were obtained through pre-access testing. Of tests conducted on workers having access to the protected area, there were 223 positive tests from random testing and 122 positive tests from for-cause testing. Follow-up testing of workers who had previously tested positive resulted in 50 positive tests. For-cause testing resulted in the highest percentage of positive tests; about 16 percent of for-cause tests were positive. This compares with a positive test rate of 1.22 percent of pre-access tests and .28 percent of random tests. The positive test rate for badged workers (including only random, for-cause, and follow-up test results) was .48 percent. Positive test rates also varied by category of worker. When all types of tests are combined (pre-access, random, for-cause, and follow-up testing), short-term contractor personnel had the highest positive test rate at 1.22 percent. Licensee employees and long-term contractors had lower combined positive test rates (.33% and .49%, respectively). Of the substances tested, marijuana was responsible for the highest percentage of positive test results (52.07%), followed by cocaine (24.25%) and alcohol (17.45%)

  14. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry: Annual summary of program performance reports CY 1994. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, C.; Durbin, N.; Field, I. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States)]|[Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the data from the semiannual reports on fitness-for-duty programs submitted to the NRC by utilities for two reporting periods: January 1 through June 30, 1994, and July I through December 31, 1994. During 1994, licensees reported that they had conducted 163,241 tests for the presence of illegal drugs and alcohol. Of these tests, 1,372 (.84%) were confirmed positive. Positive test results varied by category of test and category of worker. The majority of positive test results (977) were obtained through pre-access testing. Of tests conducted on workers having access to the protected area, there were 223 positive tests from random testing and 122 positive tests from for-cause testing. Follow-up testing of workers who had previously tested positive resulted in 50 positive tests. For-cause testing resulted in the highest percentage of positive tests; about 16 percent of for-cause tests were positive. This compares with a positive test rate of 1.22 percent of pre-access tests and .28 percent of random tests. The positive test rate for badged workers (including only random, for-cause, and follow-up test results) was .48 percent. Positive test rates also varied by category of worker. When all types of tests are combined (pre-access, random, for-cause, and follow-up testing), short-term contractor personnel had the highest positive test rate at 1.22 percent. Licensee employees and long-term contractors had lower combined positive test rates (.33% and .49%, respectively). Of the substances tested, marijuana was responsible for the highest percentage of positive test results (52.07%), followed by cocaine (24.25%) and alcohol (17.45%).

  15. Fitness for duty in the nuclear power industry. Volume 3, Annual summary of program performance reports, CY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, T.; Westra, C.; Field, I.; Forslund, C.; Durbin, N.; Grant, T. [Battelle Human Affairs Research Centers, Seattle, WA (US); Moffitt, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the data from the semi-annual reports on fitness-for-duty programs submitted to the NRC by 52 utilities for two reporting periods: January 1 through June 30, 1992, and July 1 through December 31, 1992. During 1992, licensees reported that they had conducted 266,551 tests for the presence of illegal drugs and alcohol. Of these test, 1,818 (.68%) were confirmed positive. Positive test results varied by category of test and category of worker. The majority of positive test results (1,110) were obtained through pre-access testing. Of tests conducted on workers having access to the protected area, there were 461 positive tests from random testing and 178 positive tests from for-cause testing. Follow-up testing of workers who had previously tested positive resulted in 69 positive tests. For-cause testing resulted in the highest percentage of positive-tests; about 26% of for-cause tests were positive. This compares to a positive test rate of 1.06 percent of pre-access tests and .29 percent of random tests. Positive test rates also varied by category of worker. Overall, short-term contractor personnel had the highest positive test rate at 1.00 percent. Licensee employees and long-term contractors had lower positive test rates (.29% and .63%, respectively). Of the substances tested, marijuana was responsible for the highest percentage of positive test results (50.3%), followed by cocaine (24.8%) and alcohol (22.6%). Positive test results are also reported for NRC administrative regions and for plants located in areas with different rates of population density.

  16. Operating Experiences of a Loss of Voltage Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Chan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Loss of voltage (LOV) events continue to occur due to inadequate work management and random human errors. On February 26, 2015, regulators analyzed the root causes of LOV events and presented the results for the nuclear industry. Currently, KHNP uses a risk monitoring program, which is named 'LOV Monitor', for LOV prevention during pilot plant outages. This review introduces the operation experiences of LOV Monitor based on the evaluation results of a real event. The operation experiences of LOV Monitor in the pilot plants confirmed that this program could detect and reduce LOV possibilities from scheduling errors such as the simultaneous maintenance of energized trains and de-energized trains considering the physical conditions of the power circuit breakers. However, a maintenance culture that heeds the risk monitoring result must be strengthened in order to obtain substantial effects through applying LOV Monitor to the outage.

  17. Programming for time resolved spectrum in pulse radiolysis experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betty, C.A.; Panajkar, M.S.; Shirke, N.D.

    1993-01-01

    A user friendly program in Pascal has been developed for data acquisition and subsequent processing of time resolved spectra of transient species produced in pulse radiolysis experiments. The salient features of the program are (i) thiocyanate dosimetry and (ii) spectrum acquisition. The thiocyanate dosimetry is carried out to normalize experimental conditions to a standard value as determined by computing absorbance of the transient signal CNS -2 that is produced from thiocyanate solution by a 7 MeV electron pulse. Spectrum acquisition allows the acquisition of the time resolved data at 20 different times points and subsequent display of the plots of absorbance vs. wavelength for the desired time points during the experiment. It is also possible to plot single time point spectrum as well as superimposed spectra for different time points. Printing, editing and merging facilities are also provided. (author). 2 refs., 7 figs

  18. Usage of the Python programming language in the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, R; Hegner, B; Jones, C D

    2010-01-01

    Being a highly dynamic language and allowing reliable programming with quick turnarounds, Python is a widely used programming language in CMS. Most of the tools used in workflow management and the GRID interface tools are written in this language. Also most of the tools used in the context of release management: integration builds, release building and deploying, as well as performance measurements are in Python. With an interface to the CMS data formats, rapid prototyping of analyses and debugging is an additional use case. Finally in 2008 the CMS experiment switched to using Python as its configuration language. This paper will give an overview of the general usage of Python in the CMS experiment and discuss which features of the language make it well-suited for the existing use cases.

  19. Experience with a two-tier reflex gFOBT/FIT strategy in a national bowel screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Callum G; Digby, Jayne; McDonald, Paula J; Strachan, Judith A; Carey, Francis A; Steele, Robert J C

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate a two-tier reflex guaiac-based faecal occult blood test (gFOBT)/faecal immunochemical test (FIT) algorithm in screening for colorectal cancer. Fourth screening round in NHS Tayside (Scotland). gFOBT were sent to 50-74-year-olds. Participants with five or six windows positive were offered colonoscopy. Participants with one to four windows positive were sent a FIT and, if positive, were offered colonoscopy. Participants providing an untestable gFOBT were sent a FIT and, if positive, were offered colonoscopy. Outcomes following positive results, cancer stages and key performance indicators were assessed. Of 131,885 invited, 73,315 (55.6%) responded. There were 66,957 (91.3%) negative, 241 (0.3%) strong positive, 5230 (7.1%) weak positive and 887 (1.2%) untestable results. The 241 participants who had five or six windows positive had more cancers than those positive by other routes: only 3 of the 30 cancers (9.7%) were Dukes' A. Among the 983 positive results from the weak positive gFOBT then positive FIT route, there were fewer cancers and more normal colonoscopies, but more adenomas than in the group with a strong positive gFOBT. In those with an untestable gFOBT, 77 had a positive FIT result, with fewer true and more false positive results than in the other groups. Fewer males had cancer and stages were earlier than in females, but more had adenoma. The detection rate for cancer was 0.18% and the PPV for cancer and all adenomas was 41.3%. The algorithm and FIT following a weak positive gFOBT have advantages. FIT following an untestable gFOBT warrants review.

  20. The SUPER Program: A Research-based Undergraduate Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernakovich, J. G.; Boone, R. B.; Boot, C. M.; Denef, K.; Lavallee, J. M.; Moore, J. C.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Producing undergraduates capable of broad, independent thinking is one of the grand challenges in science education. Experience-based learning, specifically hands-on research, is one mechanism for increasing students' ability to think critically. With this in mind, we created a two-semester long research program called SUPER (Skills for Undergraduate Participation in Ecological Research) aimed at teaching students to think like scientists and enhancing the student research experience through instruction and active-learning about the scientific method. Our aim was for students to gain knowledge, skills, and experience, and to conduct their own research. In the first semester, we hosted active-learning workshops on "Forming Hypotheses", "Experimental Design", "Collecting and Managing Data", "Analysis of Data", "Communicating to a Scientific Audience", "Reading Literature Effectively", and "Ethical Approaches". Each lesson was taught by different scientists from one of many ecological disciplines so that students were exposed to the variation in approach that scientists have. In the second semester, students paired with a scientific mentor and began doing research. To ensure the continued growth of the undergraduate researcher, we continued the active-learning workshops and the students attended meetings with their mentors. Thus, the students gained technical and cognitive skills in parallel, enabling them to understand both "the how" and "the why" of what they were doing in their research. The program culminated with a research poster session presented by the students. The interest in the program has grown beyond our expectations, and we have now run the program successfully for two years. Many of the students have gone on to campus research jobs, internships and graduate school, and have attributed part of their success in obtaining their positions to their experience with the SUPER program. Although common in other sciences, undergraduate research experiences are

  1. Application of plant life management program and experience at NRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, J.; Dam, R.; Arnold, J.; See Hoye, D.

    2004-01-01

    The National Research Universal (NRU) reactor has seen extensive and excellent service since going into operation in 1957. During that time, significant investments in upgrading and improving the facility have been implemented. Recently, as part of the NRU Licenseability Extension (LE) program, AECL has developed a Plant Life Management (PLiM) program to support planned operation to at least 2012. The objective of the PLiM program is to systematically assess the various aging related degradation mechanisms in order to evaluate both current condition and the potential for further extending service life. Another objective is to identify the associated maintenance, surveillance and inspection strategy for service life extension of important Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs). The strategy uses approaches that build on AECL's PLiM/PLEx experience at CANDU plants, but also utilizes previous Age Management and refurbishment work performed at NRU. The program is multi-faceted, systematic and integrated, and involves the facility operations organization in the assessment process. The PLiM program has used a number of pilot studies in the initial stages to test out PLiM procedures, gain experience with the various aging assessment techniques and enhance effectiveness of interfaces between the aging assessment team and the facility staff. The aging assessment process begins with the screening and prioritization of the facility SSCs. Selection of the appropriate assessment technique is based on priority and component type. Life and condition assessment techniques used at other plants have been adapted to NRU and performed on important components and structures. For important systems, a combination of condition assessment and systematic maintenance assessment techniques are being used. Detailed PLiM procedures have been developed and are in trial use in pilot studies. These procedures are currently being updated with the experience gained during the pilot studies. In

  2. Java Decaffeinated: experiences building a programming language from components

    OpenAIRE

    Farragher, Linda; Dobson, Simon

    2000-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Most modern programming languages are complex and feature rich. Whilst this is (sometimes) an advantage for industrial-strength applications, it complicates both language teaching and language research. We describe our experiences in the design of a reduced sub-set of the Java language and its implementation using the Vanilla language development framework. We argue that Vanilla???s component-based approach allows the language???s feature set to be varied quickly and simp...

  3. Subseabed Disposal Program In-Situ Heat Transfer Experiment (ISHTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, C.M.

    1983-05-01

    A heat transfer experiment is being developed in support of the Subseabed Disposal Program. The primary objectives of this experiment are: to provide information on the in situ response of seabed sediment to localized heating; to provide an opportunity to evaluate theoretical models of the response and to observe any unanticipated phenomena which may occur; and to develop and demonstrate the technology necessary to perform waste isolation oriented experiments on the seafloor at depths up to 6000 m. As presently envisaged, the heat transfer experiment will be conducted at a location in the central North Pacific though it could be performed anywhere that the ocean bottom is of the type deemed suitable for the disposal of nuclear waste material. The experiment will be conducted of the seafloor from a recoverable space-frame platform at a depth of approximately 6000 m. A 400-W isotopic heat source will be implanted in the illite sediment and the subsequent response of the sediment to the induced thermal field evaluated. After remote initiation of the experiment, a permanent record of the data obtained will be recorded on board the platform, with selected information transmitted to a surface vessel by acoustic telemetry. The experiment will be operational for one year, after which the entire platform will be recovered. Current plans call for the deployment of the experiment in 1986. Specific activities which will be pursued during the course of the experiment include: measurement of the thermal field; determination of the effective thermal conductivity of the sediment; measurement of pore pressure; evaluation of radionuclide migration processes; pore water sampling; sediment chemistry studies; sediment shear strength measurements; and coring operations in the immediate vicinity of the experiment for postexperiment analysis

  4. A Rural South African Experience of an ESL Computer Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Dieperink

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a case study that explored the effect of an English-as-Second Language (ESL computer program at Tshwane University of Technology (TUT, South Africa. The case study explored participants’ perceptions, attitudes and beliefs regarding the ESL reading enhancement program, Reading Excellence™. The study found that participants experienced the program in a positive light. They experienced improved ESL reading as well as listening and writing proficiency. In addition, they experienced improved affective well-being in the sense that they generally felt more comfortable using ESL. This included feeling more self-confident in their experience of their academic environment. Interviews as well as document review resulted in dissonance, however: data pointed towards poor class attendance as well as a perturbing lack of progress in terms of reading comprehension and speed.

  5. The HOR core conversion program development and licensing experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.W. de; Gibcus, H.P.M.; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the experiences in the development of a fuel conversion program for a 2 MW university type research reactor, the HOR. It gives an overview of the technical and administrative aspects concerning the fuel conversion program development since the eighties, including the safety review and licensing process. The overall final safety report was submitted in 1995, together with the environmental impact report, and a licence application was submitted accordingly. The licence permitting the conversion was issued in 1996, coming into force at the beginning of this year, although an appeal case is still pending. At the moment the necessary preparations for starting the actual conversion of the HOR are made. The general program characteristics are addressed. (author)

  6. Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevitz, Daniel Wolf [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Key, Brian P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Garcia, Daniel B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-05

    The Fragment Impact Toolkit (FIT) is a software package used for probabilistic consequence evaluation of fragmenting sources. The typical use case for FIT is to simulate an exploding shell and evaluate the consequence on nearby objects. FIT is written in the programming language Python and is designed as a collection of interacting software modules. Each module has a function that interacts with the other modules to produce desired results.

  7. Multi-binding site model-based curve-fitting program for the computation of RIA data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malan, P.G.; Ekins, R.P.; Cox, M.G.; Long, E.M.R.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, a comparison will be made of model-based and empirical curve-fitting procedures. The implementation of a multiple binding-site curve-fitting model which will successfully fit a wide range of assay data, and which can be run on a mini-computer is described. The latter sophisticated model also provides estimates of binding site concentrations and the values of the respective equilibrium constants present: the latter have been used for refining assay conditions using computer optimisation techniques. (orig./AJ) [de

  8. Simultaneous measurement of top quark mass and jet energy scale using template fits at the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann-Emme, Sebastian

    2011-07-15

    In this thesis, pairs of top quarks produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and decaying in the muon+jets channel t anti t {yields} (b{mu}{nu})(bqq{sup '}) are analyzed using data that were recorded by the CMS detector in the year 2010 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 pb{sup -1}. A sample of 78 events is selected by requiring exactly one isolated muon and at least four jets, two of them being identified as jets from the decay of b quarks. Given these selection criteria, the expected fraction of t anti t events is 94%. The trijet mass, M3, and the dijet mass, M2, are reconstructed, taking into account the b-tagging information. M3 and M2 are estimators of the masses of hadronically decaying top quarks and the corresponding W bosons, respectively. Templates for M2 and for the event-wise mass difference {delta}M{sub 32}=M3-M2 are parametrized as linear functions of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and the jet energy scale (JES). Based on the precise knowledge of the W boson mass, M2 provides a strong handle on the energy scale of jets from light quarks. The reconstructed M2 and {delta}M{sub 32} in data are compared to the template functions from simulation in a combined likelihood fit. The overall JES in the selected sample is found to be 1.048{+-}0.040(stat){+-}0.015(syst) relative to the simulated JES and the measured m{sub t} is 167.8{+-}7.1(stat+JES){+-}3.1(syst) GeV. This is one of the first measurements of m{sub t} at the Large Hadron Collider. Furthermore, the JES measurement is an important input for the commissioning of the CMS experiment for the upcoming measurements with more data in the near future. (orig.)

  9. Simultaneous measurement of top quark mass and jet energy scale using template fits at the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumann-Emme, Sebastian

    2011-07-01

    In this thesis, pairs of top quarks produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and decaying in the muon+jets channel t anti t → (bμν)(bqq ' ) are analyzed using data that were recorded by the CMS detector in the year 2010 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 pb -1 . A sample of 78 events is selected by requiring exactly one isolated muon and at least four jets, two of them being identified as jets from the decay of b quarks. Given these selection criteria, the expected fraction of t anti t events is 94%. The trijet mass, M3, and the dijet mass, M2, are reconstructed, taking into account the b-tagging information. M3 and M2 are estimators of the masses of hadronically decaying top quarks and the corresponding W bosons, respectively. Templates for M2 and for the event-wise mass difference ΔM 32 =M3-M2 are parametrized as linear functions of the top quark mass, m t , and the jet energy scale (JES). Based on the precise knowledge of the W boson mass, M2 provides a strong handle on the energy scale of jets from light quarks. The reconstructed M2 and ΔM 32 in data are compared to the template functions from simulation in a combined likelihood fit. The overall JES in the selected sample is found to be 1.048±0.040(stat)±0.015(syst) relative to the simulated JES and the measured m t is 167.8±7.1(stat+JES)±3.1(syst) GeV. This is one of the first measurements of m t at the Large Hadron Collider. Furthermore, the JES measurement is an important input for the commissioning of the CMS experiment for the upcoming measurements with more data in the near future. (orig.)

  10. Ontario's emergency department process improvement program: the experience of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotteau, Leahora; Webster, Fiona; Salkeld, Erin; Hellings, Chelsea; Guttmann, Astrid; Vermeulen, Marian J; Bell, Robert S; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Rowe, Brian H; Nigam, Amit; Schull, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, Lean manufacturing principles have been applied to health care quality improvement efforts to improve wait times. In Ontario, an emergency department (ED) process improvement program based on Lean principles was introduced by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care as part of a strategy to reduce ED length of stay (LOS) and to improve patient flow. This article aims to describe the hospital-based teams' experiences during the ED process improvement program implementation and the teams' perceptions of the key factors that influenced the program's success or failure. A qualitative evaluation was conducted based on semistructured interviews with hospital implementation team members, such as team leads, medical leads, and executive sponsors, at 10 purposively selected hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Sites were selected based, in part, on their changes in median ED LOS following the implementation period. A thematic framework approach as used for interviews, and a standard thematic coding framework was developed. Twenty-four interviews were coded and analyzed. The results are organized according to participants' experience and are grouped into four themes that were identified as significantly affecting the implementation experience: local contextual factors, relationship between improvement team and support players, staff engagement, and success and sustainability. The results demonstrate the importance of the context of implementation, establishing strong relationships and communication strategies, and preparing for implementation and sustainability prior to the start of the project. Several key factors were identified as important to the success of the program, such as preparing for implementation, ensuring strong executive support, creation of implementation teams based on the tasks and outcomes of the initiative, and using multiple communication strategies throughout the implementation process. Explicit incorporation of these factors into the

  11. Fitness club

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness club

    2011-01-01

    General fitness Classes Enrolments are open for general fitness classes at CERN taking place on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday lunchtimes in the Pump Hall (building 216). There are shower facilities for both men and women. It is possible to pay for 1, 2 or 3 classes per week for a minimum of 1 month and up to 6 months. Check out our rates and enrol at: http://cern.ch/club-fitness Hope to see you among us! CERN Fitness Club fitness.club@cern.ch  

  12. The Jig Experiment: Development and Evaluation of a Cultural Dance Active Video Game for Promoting Youth Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincker, Meg; Misner, Susan

    2017-01-01

    School physical education teachers promote fitness by offering children a variety of aerobic activities. Our interdisciplinary team developed a cultural dance active video game (AVG) and tested whether the AVG was equivalent to traditional face-to-face instructor lessons or hybrid instruction at dance mastery, increasing heart rates, and student…

  13. Application of operating experience in environmental qualification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Wise, R.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental qualification (EQ) of equipment related to nuclear safety has been carried out in the nuclear community since the 70's. It started with electrical equipment and then expanded to include mechanical equipment. During this evolutionary process, the methods used for EQ have gone through a long period of refinement and clarification. Prior to 1971, qualification for equipment in licensed nuclear power plants was based on the use of electrical components of commonly accepted high industrial quality without the benefit of specific environmental qualification standards. Between 1971 and 1974, most plants used the criteria of IEEE Standard 323-1971 as the basis for demonstrating qualification. Also during this period related 'daughter' standards, mainly by IEEE, became available which addressed qualification for specific equipment items. After July 1974, plants were required to meet the more comprehensive guidelines specified in IEEE Standard 323-1974 and the related 'daughter' standards. IEEE Standard 323-1974 later evolved into IEEE Standard 323-1983. For nuclear power plants built in Ontario during the 70's, i.e. Pickering B and Bruce B, has included the environmental qualification requirements in their respective nuclear safety design guides. It is now recognized that they are not up to the current EQ standards. Darlington, constructed during the 80's, implemented the environmental qualification program in its project. An Environmental Qualification (EQ) Program is now under way in Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to formally implement the Environmental Qualification for Bruce B, Pickering B, and Pickering A and to preserve the Qualification for Darlington G.S. This paper makes a thorough a review of the standard methods used in the past by utilities for environmental qualification. These methods include type testing, analysis, and operating experience. Both type testing and analysis have been clearly defined in standards listed in References [2] to [6] and

  14. An academic program for experience-based seismic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, S.J.; Meyer, W.; Clemence, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have been involved in a project, sponsored by the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, to develop knowledge-based expert systems to aid in the implementation of the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) approach for the seismic qualification of equipment in operating nuclear power plants. This approach, being founded on the use of engineering judgment in the application of prior earthquake experience data, requires comprehensive training. There seems to be general consensus that the experience-based approach is a more cost-effective means of qualifying nuclear power plant equipment when compared to the more traditional analytical methods. The experience-based approach has a number of potential applications in civil engineering, including bridge evaluation and design, seismic adequacy of general structures, foundation design, and water and wastewater treatment plant design and operation. The objective of this paper is to outline an academic curriculum, at the master's level, to educate structural engineers to use and further develop the experience-based approach for seismic evaluation. In the long term, this could lead to the development of academic programs in experience-based assessment and design for a wide range of applications in maintaining the nation's infrastructure

  15. PandaEPL: a library for programming spatial navigation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solway, Alec; Miller, Jonathan F; Kahana, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging and neural recording techniques have enabled researchers to make significant progress in understanding the neural mechanisms underlying human spatial navigation. Because these techniques generally require participants to remain stationary, computer-generated virtual environments are used. We introduce PandaEPL, a programming library for the Python language designed to simplify the creation of computer-controlled spatial-navigation experiments. PandaEPL is built on top of Panda3D, a modern open-source game engine. It allows users to construct three-dimensional environments that participants can navigate from a first-person perspective. Sound playback and recording and also joystick support are provided through the use of additional optional libraries. PandaEPL also handles many tasks common to all cognitive experiments, including managing configuration files, logging all internal and participant-generated events, and keeping track of the experiment state. We describe how PandaEPL compares with other software for building spatial-navigation experiments and walk the reader through the process of creating a fully functional experiment.

  16. Analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment are presented. The experiment was performed in 1986 at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. It is the first of six experiments in this cooperative Japanese and American program in support of shielding designs for advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Six different shielding configurations and subconfigurations thereof were studied. The configurations were calculated with the DOT-IV two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport computer code using the R-Z geometry option, a symmetric S{sub 12} quadrature (96 directions), and cross sections from ENDF/B versions IV and V in either a 51- or 61-group structure. Auxiliary codes were used to compute detector responses and prepare cross sections and source input for the DOT-IV calculations. Calculated detector responses were compared with measured responses and the agreement was good to excellent in many cases. However, the agreement for configurations having thick steel or B{sub 4}C regions or for some very large configurations was fair to poor. The disagreement was attributed to cross-section data, broad-group structure, or high background in the measurements. In particular, it is shown that two cross-section sets for ``B give very different results for neutron transmission through the thick B{sub 4}C regions used in one set of experimental configurations. Implications for design calculations are given.

  17. Learning professional ethics: Student experiences in a health mentor program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Sylvia; Lymer, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The use of patient centred approaches to healthcare education is evolving, yet the effectiveness of these approaches in relation to professional ethics education is not well understood. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and learning of health profession students engaged in an ethics module as part of a Health Mentor Program at the University of Toronto. Students were assigned to interprofessional groups representing seven professional programs and matched with a health mentor. The health mentors, individuals living with chronic health conditions, shared their experiences of the healthcare system through 90 minute semi-structured interviews with the students. Following the interviews, students completed self-reflective papers and engaged in facilitated asynchronous online discussions. Thematic analysis of reflections and discussions was used to uncover pertaining to student experiences and learning regarding professional ethics. Five major themes emerged from the data: (1) Patient autonomy and expertise in care; (2) ethical complexity and its inevitable reality in the clinical practice setting; (3) patient advocacy as an essential component of day-to-day practice; (4) qualities of remarkable clinicians that informed personal ideals for future practice; (5) patients' perspectives on clinician error and how they enabled suggestions for improving future practice. The findings of a study in one university context suggest that engagement with the health mentor narratives facilitated students' critical reflection related to their understanding of the principles of healthcare ethics.

  18. New Jersey's residential radon remediation program - methods and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluta, T.A.; Cosolita, F.J.; Rothfuss, E.

    1986-01-01

    As part of a remedial action program to decontaminate over 200 residential properties, 12 typical properties were selected and a demonstration program was initiated in the spring of 1985. The residences selected represented a range of contamination levels and configurations and differing architectural styles representative of the age of construction. The physical limitations of the sites and the overall nature of a decontamination project in active residential communities imposed a number of severe restrictions on work methods and equipment. Regulations governing transportation and disposal set virtually zero defect standards for the condition of containers. The intrusive nature of the work in residential neighborhoods required continual interaction with local residents, public officials and citizen task forces. Media coverage was very high. Numerous briefings were held to allay fears and promote public understanding. Numerous issues ranging in content from public health and safety to engineering and construction methods arose during the remedial action program. These issues were resolved by a multi-disciplined management team which was knowledgeable in public administration, radiation physics, and engineering design and construction. This paper discusses the nature of the problem, the methods applied to resolve the problem and the experience gained as a result of a remedial action program

  19. Research Experience for Undergraduates Program in Multidisciplinary Environmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    During summers 2011 and 12 Montclair State University hosted a Research Experience for Undergraduates Program (REU) in transdisciplinary, hands-on, field-oriented research in environmental sciences. Participants were housed at the Montclair State University's field station situated in the middle of 30,000 acres of mature forest, mountain ridges and freshwater streams and lakes within the Kittatinny Mountains of Northwest New Jersey, Program emphases were placed on development of project planning skills, analytical skills, creativity, critical thinking and scientific report preparation. Ten students were recruited in spring with special focus on recruiting students from underrepresented groups and community colleges. Students were matched with their individual research interests including hydrology, erosion and sedimentation, environmental chemistry, and ecology. In addition to research activities, lectures, educational and recreational field trips, and discussion on environmental ethics and social justice played an important part of the program. The ultimate goal of the program is to facilitate participants' professional growth and to stimulate the participants' interests in pursuing Earth Science as the future career of the participants.

  20. Study protocol of European Fans in Training (EuroFIT): a four-country randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle program for men delivered in elite football clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nassau, Femke; van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Abrahamsen, Frank; Andersen, Eivind; Anderson, Annie S; Bosmans, Judith E; Bunn, Christopher; Chalmers, Matthew; Clissmann, Ciaran; Gill, Jason M R; Gray, Cindy M; Hunt, Kate; Jelsma, Judith G M; La Guardia, Jennifer G; Lemyre, Pierre N; Loudon, David W; Macaulay, Lisa; Maxwell, Douglas J; McConnachie, Alex; Martin, Anne; Mourselas, Nikos; Mutrie, Nanette; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Ria; O'Brien, Kylie; Pereira, Hugo V; Philpott, Matthew; Roberts, Glyn C; Rooksby, John; Rost, Mattias; Røynesdal, Øystein; Sattar, Naveed; Silva, Marlene N; Sorensen, Marit; Teixeira, Pedro J; Treweek, Shaun; van Achterberg, Theo; van de Glind, Irene; van Mechelen, Willem; Wyke, Sally

    2016-07-19

    Lifestyle interventions targeting physical activity, sedentary time and dietary behaviours have the potential to initiate and support behavioural change and result in public health gain. Although men have often been reluctant to engage in such lifestyle programs, many are at high risk of several chronic conditions. We have developed an evidence and theory-based, gender sensitised, health and lifestyle program (European Fans in Training (EuroFIT)), which is designed to attract men through the loyalty they feel to the football club they support. This paper describes the study protocol to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the EuroFIT program in supporting men to improve their level of physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour over 12 months. The EuroFIT study is a pragmatic, two-arm, randomised controlled trial conducted in 15 football clubs in the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal and the UK (England). One-thousand men, aged 30 to 65 years, with a self-reported Body Mass Index (BMI) ≥27 kg/m(2) will be recruited and individually randomised. The primary outcomes are objectively-assessed changes in total physical activity (steps per day) and total sedentary time (minutes per day) at 12 months after baseline assessment. Secondary outcomes are weight, BMI, waist circumference, resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure, cardio-metabolic blood biomarkers, food intake, self-reported physical activity and sedentary time, wellbeing, self-esteem, vitality and quality of life. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed and a process evaluation conducted. The EuroFIT program will be delivered over 12 weekly, 90-minute sessions that combine classroom discussion with graded physical activity in the setting of the football club. Classroom sessions provide participants with a toolbox of behaviour change techniques to initiate and sustain long-term lifestyle changes. The coaches will receive two days of training to enable them to create a positive social

  1. Study protocol of European Fans in Training (EuroFIT: a four-country randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle program for men delivered in elite football clubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke van Nassau

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lifestyle interventions targeting physical activity, sedentary time and dietary behaviours have the potential to initiate and support behavioural change and result in public health gain. Although men have often been reluctant to engage in such lifestyle programs, many are at high risk of several chronic conditions. We have developed an evidence and theory-based, gender sensitised, health and lifestyle program (European Fans in Training (EuroFIT, which is designed to attract men through the loyalty they feel to the football club they support. This paper describes the study protocol to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the EuroFIT program in supporting men to improve their level of physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour over 12 months. Methods The EuroFIT study is a pragmatic, two-arm, randomised controlled trial conducted in 15 football clubs in the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal and the UK (England. One-thousand men, aged 30 to 65 years, with a self-reported Body Mass Index (BMI ≥27 kg/m2 will be recruited and individually randomised. The primary outcomes are objectively-assessed changes in total physical activity (steps per day and total sedentary time (minutes per day at 12 months after baseline assessment. Secondary outcomes are weight, BMI, waist circumference, resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure, cardio-metabolic blood biomarkers, food intake, self-reported physical activity and sedentary time, wellbeing, self-esteem, vitality and quality of life. Cost-effectiveness will be assessed and a process evaluation conducted. The EuroFIT program will be delivered over 12 weekly, 90-minute sessions that combine classroom discussion with graded physical activity in the setting of the football club. Classroom sessions provide participants with a toolbox of behaviour change techniques to initiate and sustain long-term lifestyle changes. The coaches will receive two days of training to

  2. The FELIX program of experiments and code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental program and test bed called FELIX (Fusion Electromagnetic Induction Experiment) which is under construction at Argonne National Laboratory is described. The facility includes the following facilities; (a) a sizable constant field, analogous to a tokamak toroidal field or the confining field of a mirror reactor, (b) a pulsed field with a sizable rate of change, analogous to a pulsed poloidal field or to the changing field of a plasma disruption, perpendicular to the constant field, and (c) a sufficiently large volume to assure that large, complex test pieces can be tested, and that the forces, torques, currents, and field distortions which are developed are large enough to be measured accurately. The development of the necessary computer codes and the experimental program are examined. (U.K.)

  3. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems. Engineering simulation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo Program experience from early 1962 to July 1969 with respect to the engineering-simulation support and the problems encountered is summarized in this report. Engineering simulation in support of the Apollo guidance and control system is discussed in terms of design analysis and verification, certification of hardware in closed-loop operation, verification of hardware/software compatibility, and verification of both software and procedures for each mission. The magnitude, time, and cost of the engineering simulations are described with respect to hardware availability, NASA and contractor facilities (for verification of the command module, the lunar module, and the primary guidance, navigation, and control system), and scheduling and planning considerations. Recommendations are made regarding implementation of similar, large-scale simulations for future programs.

  4. Effects of a School-Based Sports Program on Physical Fitness, Physical Activity, and Cardiometabolic Health in Youth With Physical Disabilities: Data From the Sport-2-Stay-Fit Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwinkels, Maremka; Verschuren, Olaf; Balemans, Astrid; Lankhorst, Kristel; Te Velde, Saskia; van Gaalen, Leendert; de Groot, Janke; Visser-Meily, Anne; Takken, Tim

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a school-based once-a-week sports program on physical fitness, physical activity, and cardiometabolic health in children and adolescents with a physical disability. This controlled clinical trial included 71 children and adolescents from four schools for special education [mean age 13.7 (2.9) years, range 8-19, 55% boys]. Participants had various chronic health conditions including cerebral palsy (37%), other neuromuscular (44%), metabolic (8%), musculoskeletal (7%), and cardiovascular (4%) disorders. Before recruitment and based on the presence of school-based sports, schools were assigned as sport or control group. School-based sports were initiated and provided by motivated experienced physical educators. The sport group ( n  = 31) participated in a once-a-week school-based sports program for 6 months, which included team sports. The control group ( n  = 40) followed the regular curriculum. Anaerobic performance was assessed by the Muscle Power Sprint Test. Secondary outcome measures included aerobic performance, VO 2 peak, strength, physical activity, blood pressure, arterial stiffness, body composition, and the metabolic profile. A significant improvement of 16% in favor of the sport group was found for anaerobic performance ( p  = 0.003). In addition, the sport group lost 2.8% more fat mass compared to the control group ( p  = 0.007). No changes were found for aerobic performance, VO 2 peak, physical activity, blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and the metabolic profile. Anaerobic performance and fat mass improved following a school-based sports program. These effects are promising for long-term fitness and health promotion, because sports sessions at school eliminate certain barriers for sports participation and adding a once-a-week sports session showed already positive effects for 6 months. This trial was registered with the Dutch Trial Registry (NTR4698).

  5. Effects of a School-Based Sports Program on Physical Fitness, Physical Activity, and Cardiometabolic Health in Youth With Physical Disabilities: Data From the Sport-2-Stay-Fit Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maremka Zwinkels

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the effects of a school-based once-a-week sports program on physical fitness, physical activity, and cardiometabolic health in children and adolescents with a physical disability.MethodsThis controlled clinical trial included 71 children and adolescents from four schools for special education [mean age 13.7 (2.9 years, range 8–19, 55% boys]. Participants had various chronic health conditions including cerebral palsy (37%, other neuromuscular (44%, metabolic (8%, musculoskeletal (7%, and cardiovascular (4% disorders. Before recruitment and based on the presence of school-based sports, schools were assigned as sport or control group. School-based sports were initiated and provided by motivated experienced physical educators. The sport group (n = 31 participated in a once-a-week school-based sports program for 6 months, which included team sports. The control group (n = 40 followed the regular curriculum. Anaerobic performance was assessed by the Muscle Power Sprint Test. Secondary outcome measures included aerobic performance, VO2 peak, strength, physical activity, blood pressure, arterial stiffness, body composition, and the metabolic profile.ResultsA significant improvement of 16% in favor of the sport group was found for anaerobic performance (p = 0.003. In addition, the sport group lost 2.8% more fat mass compared to the control group (p = 0.007. No changes were found for aerobic performance, VO2 peak, physical activity, blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and the metabolic profile.ConclusionAnaerobic performance and fat mass improved following a school-based sports program. These effects are promising for long-term fitness and health promotion, because sports sessions at school eliminate certain barriers for sports participation and adding a once-a-week sports session showed already positive effects for 6 months.Clinical Trial RegistrationThis trial was registered with the Dutch Trial Registry (NTR

  6. APPLYING LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE UNITED STATES SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND’S HUMAN PERFORMANCE PROGRAM TO THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCES COMPREHENSIVE AIRMAN FITNESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    better state of readiness for manning joint sourcing assignments. There is a glass ceiling to the USAF’s physical fitness program’s construct based on... effectiveness of USAF critically manned career fields. A case study framework for comparative analysis of POTFF’s Human Performance Programs in...have huge second and third order effects based on operational requirements to backfill the qualified individual. The investments made into

  7. Recent operating experiences and programs at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II) is a pool-type, unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt and an electrical generation capability of 20 MW. It has been operated by Argonne National Laboratory for the US government for almost 20 years. During that time, it has operated safely and has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, high availability, and excellent performance of its sodium components. The 20 years of operating experience of EBR-II is a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future LMFBR's. Since past operating experience has been extensively reported, this report will focus on recent programs and events

  8. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serowik, Kristin L; Bellamy, Chyrell D; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients' day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients' day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients' control over their own affairs.

  9. Fitness Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Fitness Club is organising Zumba Classes on the first Wednesday of each month, starting 7 September (19.00 – 20.00). What is Zumba®? It’s an exhilarating, effective, easy-to-follow, Latin-inspired, calorie-burning dance fitness-party™ that’s moving millions of people toward joy and health. Above all it’s great fun and an excellent work out. Price: 22 CHF/person Sign-up via the following form: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Zumba%20Subscription/NewForm.aspx For more info: fitness.club@cern.ch

  10. The Importance of Exercise in the Well-Rounded Physician: Dialogue for the Inclusion of a Physical Fitness Program in Neurosurgery Resident Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargen, Kyle M; Spiotta, Alejandro M; Turner, Raymond D; Patel, Sunil

    2016-06-01

    Exercise, diet, and personal fitness programs are essentially lacking in modern graduate medical education. In the context of long hours and alternating shift and sleep cycles, the lack of exercise and poor dietary choices may have negative consequences on physician physical and mental health. This opinion piece aims to generate important dialogue regarding the scope of the problem, the literature supporting the health benefits of exercise, potential solutions to enhancing diet and exercise among resident trainees, and possible pitfalls to the adoption of exercise programs within graduate medical education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 10 CFR 26.406 - Fitness monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fitness monitoring. 26.406 Section 26.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS FFD Program for Construction § 26.406 Fitness monitoring. (a...) Licensees and other entities shall implement a fitness monitoring program to deter substance abuse and...

  12. Improvements in Functional Exercise Capacity after a Residential Behavioural Change, Diet and Fitness Program for Obese Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errickson, Sadye Paez; Kolotkin, Ronette L; Skidmore, Megan Simmons; Endress, Gerald; Østbye, Truls; Crosby, Ross; Eisenson, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Obese adults are at an increased risk for mobility-related problems. National guidelines recommend calorie restrictions and exercise for obese adults as a means to improve functional fitness capacity and to increase mobility. Yet, lifestyle weight loss interventions often fail to measure fitness changes. The aim of this study was to assess whether a 1-month, intensive behavioural change, diet and fitness intervention for overweight and obese adults would result in statistically significant and clinically meaningful changes in functional exercise. A pre-post test design was used in this study. Seventy-two participants (40 women, 32 men; mean baseline body mass index (BMI) = 42.6 + 9.0; mean age = 45.8 + 16.8) completed a modified 6-minute walk test (6MWT), performed on a treadmill, at baseline and at end of treatment. Significant improvements included decreased BMI (2.7 + 1.7 kg m(-2) , p diet and fitness programme. Physiotherapists are in a prime position to address the physical and motivational challenges participants face while living with severe obesity: targeting functional exercise capacity is one key strategy for addressing immobility associated with obesity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Effects of an afterschool community center physical activity program on fitness and body composition in obese youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouter, Scott E; Salas, Carlos; Wiecha, Jean

    2017-06-01

    Physical activity (PA) promotes health in obese youth and is an important adjunct to medical weight management. Access to structured fitness programmes for obese, low-income youth is limited and potential benefits of such programmes are poorly understood. We describe an urban afterschool fitness programme for obese youth and participants' changes in fitness and body composition. A case series of 30 youth (age: 11.5 ± 2.5 years) with BMI ≥95th percentile and physician referral received a 24-wk programme scholarship. The programme, offered 4 times a week for 90-min.session, included aerobic, strength, and self-organised PA. Primary outcomes, measured at baseline (BL) time 1 (4-8 wk) and time 2 (12-16 wk) were BMI, per cent body fat (%BF), fat-free mass (FFM), heart rate during a treadmill test, and muscular strength (one repetition maximum (1RM)) and endurance (reps at 70% of 1RM) on the leg press (LP) and chest press (CP). Average participation was 1.5 ± 0.6 visits per week for 18.7 ± 6.5 weeks. Between BL and time 2, LP and CP 1RM and endurance significantly improved (P  0.05) while girls lost 0% (>0.05). Obese youth attending an urban fitness programme for at least three months improved strength and body composition, but average attendance was below planned levels.

  14. Wii-Based Exercise Program to Improve Physical Fitness, Motor Proficiency and Functional Mobility in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, V.; Campos, C.; Sá, A.; Cavadas, M.; Pinto, J.; Simões, P.; Machado, S.; Murillo-Rodríguez, E.; Barbosa-Rocha, N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with Down syndrome (DS) usually display reduced physical fitness (aerobic capacity, muscle strength and abnormal body composition), motor proficiency impairments (balance and postural control) and physical functional limitations. Exergames can be an appealing alternative to enhance exercise engagement and compliance, whilst…

  15. Dancing or Fitness Sport? The Effects of Two Training Programs on Hippocampal Plasticity and Balance Abilities in Healthy Seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeld, Kathrin; Müller, Patrick; Aye, Norman; Schmicker, Marlen; Dordevic, Milos; Kaufmann, Jörn; Hökelmann, Anita; Müller, Notger G

    2017-01-01

    Age-related degenerations in brain structure are associated with balance disturbances and cognitive impairment. However, neuroplasticity is known to be preserved throughout lifespan and physical training studies with seniors could reveal volume increases in the hippocampus (HC), a region crucial for memory consolidation, learning and navigation in space, which were related to improvements in aerobic fitness. Moreover, a positive correlation between left HC volume and balance performance was observed. Dancing seems a promising intervention for both improving balance and brain structure in the elderly. It combines aerobic fitness, sensorimotor skills and cognitive demands while at the same time the risk of injuries is low. Hence, the present investigation compared the effects of an 18-month dancing intervention and traditional health fitness training on volumes of hippocampal subfields and balance abilities. Before and after intervention, balance was evaluated using the Sensory Organization Test and HC volumes were derived from magnetic resonance images (3T, MP-RAGE). Fourteen members of the dance (67.21 ± 3.78 years, seven females), and 12 members of the fitness group (68.67 ± 2.57 years, five females) completed the whole study. Both groups revealed hippocampal volume increases mainly in the left HC (CA1, CA2, subiculum). The dancers showed additional increases in the left dentate gyrus and the right subiculum. Moreover, only the dancers achieved a significant increase in the balance composite score. Hence, dancing constitutes a promising candidate in counteracting the age-related decline in physical and mental abilities.

  16. JMFA2—a graphically interactive Java program that fits microfibril angle X-ray diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve P. Verrill; David E. Kretschmann; Victoria L. Herian

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction techniques have the potential to decrease the time required to determine microfibril angles dramatically. In this paper, we discuss the latest version of a curve-fitting toll that permits us to reduce the time required to evaluate MFA X-ray diffraction patterns. Further, because this tool reflects the underlying physics more accurately than existing...

  17. Enhancing the Programming Experience for First-Year Engineering Students through Hands-On Integrated Computer Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Stephen L.; Ghafoor, Sheikh; Abdelrahman, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the redesign and implementation of the course, "Introduction to Programming for Engineers" using microcontroller (MCU) hardware as the programming target. The objective of this effort is to improve the programming competency for engineering students by more closely relating the initial programming experience to the student's…

  18. Getting CSR communication fit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmeltz, Line

    2017-01-01

    Companies experience increasing legal and societal pressure to communicate about their corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagements from a number of different publics. One very important group is that of young consumers who are predicted to be the most important and influential consumer group...... in the near future. From a value- theoretical base, this article empirically explores the role and applicability of ‘fit’ in strategic CSR communication targeted at young consumers. Point of departure is taken in the well-known strategic fit (a logical link between a company’s CSR commitment and its core...... values) and is further developed by introducing two additional fits, the CSR- Consumer fit and the CSR-Consumer-Company fit (Triple Fit). Through a sequential design, the three fits are empirically tested and their potential for meeting young consumers’ expectations for corporate CSR messaging...

  19. A kindergarten-based child health promotion program: the Adapted National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission X for improving physical fitness in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jungwon; Kim, Gilsook; Lim, Hyunjung; Carvajal, Nubia A; Lloyd, Charles W; Wang, Youfa

    2018-03-01

    Effective and sustainable intervention programs are needed to promote physical activity (PA) in children. To adapt the NASA Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut program for use with South Korean children, and to evaluate its feasibility and effectiveness for promoting children's physical fitness. Children 5 years old ( n = 212) and their parents were recruited from three kindergartens in three cities to participate in a 6-week intervention program in fall 2014. We assessed the children's PA and related changes, and parental changes in attitude and beliefs, after participation in the intervention. Girls reported less PA than boys (40.7 vs. 59.0, p X program was feasible and effective in promoting PA in kindergarteners, and also improved their parents' attitude and beliefs about children's PA in South Korea. This study provided a model for promoting childhood health through child care and educational settings.

  20. Experience of the Manitoba Perinatal Screening Program, 1965-85.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J G

    1987-01-01

    The Manitoba Perinatal Screening Program is guided by a committee of medical specialists with skills in the diagnosis and management of disorders of metabolism in the newborn. The program is voluntary and is centralized at Cadham Provincial Laboratory, in Winnipeg. A filter card blood specimen is collected from newborns on discharge from hospital, and a filter card urine sample is collected and mailed to the laboratory by the mother when the infant is about 2 weeks of age. The overall compliance rates for the blood and urine specimens are approximately 100% and 84% respectively. The blood specimen is screened for phenylalanine and other amino acids, thyroxine, galactose, galactose-1-phosphate and biotinidase. The urine specimen is screened for amino acids, including cystine, as well as methylmalonic acid and homocystine. Between 1965 and 1985, 83 cases of metabolic disorders were detected, including 23 cases of primary hypothyroidism, 14 of classic phenylketonuria, 5 of galactosemia variants, 3 of galactosemia, 2 of maple syrup urine disease and 1 of hereditary tyrosinemia. The direct cost per infant screened is $5.50, and the cost:benefit ratio is approximately 7.5:1. Maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein screening is being made available as the necessary supporting clinical facilities become available. On the basis of this experience, the author outlines the components that are important for an effective screening program. PMID:3676929

  1. Communication skills program in the first semester: An experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Liberali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2001, Brazilian Guidelines for undergraduate medical education highlighted the need to include communication skills (CS in the curriculum. At the Federal University of Santa Catarina (South Brazil, CS were taught in the third year in theoretical classes as an overview of physician-patient relationships, and in a nonsystematic way in practical classes. In 2013, theory and practice were aligned, mediated by reflection, by adding three classes: CS overview; responding to strong emotions; and giving bad news. Two Portuguese translation of modules from DocCom, a web-based audiovisual learning resource on CS in Healthcare (AACH, DUCOM, 2005- 2015, were used. In 2015, we started to teach CS to the 53 students registered in the first semester of our medical course. We report on the program in the first semester of the course and students’ perceptions of it. The CS program consisted of seven 1.5-hr face-to-face sessions with all students, co-taught by the authors, a PhD student and a medical school professor. The content included CS overview and importance in healthcare; relationship-centered care, building relationships and gathering information; students’ experiences in the medical course; and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI. To encourage continuous reflection and align theory with practice, before or after theoretical brief presentations, additional resources were used: exercises to raise awareness of verbal and nonverbal communication, drawings on medical students’ life experiences, reflections about the poem “After a While” by Veronica Shoffstall and after listening to Bach’s Brandenburg concerto #1; DocCom modules #6 “Build a relationship” and #8 “Gather information” (viewed online to prepare for class followed by face-toface small group discussions (6-7 students in each about CS learned and theirs practice in role-play; peers’ and patients’ interviews; students’ MBTI identification (at distance and group dynamics

  2. Vascular Trauma Operative Experience is Inadequate in General Surgery Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Koopmann, Matthew; Keeley, Jessica; Smith, Brian; Virgilio, Christian de; Kim, Dennis Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular injuries may be challenging, particularly for surgeons who have not received formal vascular surgery fellowship training. Lack of experience and improper technique can result in significant complications. The objective of this study was to examine changes in resident experience with operative vascular trauma over time. A retrospective review was performed using Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs of general surgery residents graduating between 2004 and 2014 at 2 academic, university-affiliated institutions associated with level 1 trauma centers. The primary outcome was number of reported vascular trauma operations, stratified by year of graduation and institution. A total of 112 residents graduated in the study period with a median 7 (interquartile range 4.5-13.5) vascular trauma cases per resident. Fasciotomy and exposure and/or repair of peripheral vessels constituted the bulk of the operative volume. Linear regression showed no significant trend in cases with respect to year of graduation (P = 0.266). Residents from program A (n = 53) reported a significantly higher number of vascular trauma cases when compared with program B (n = 59): 12.0 vs. 5.0 cases, respectively (P < 0.001). Level 1 trauma center verification does not guarantee sufficient exposure to vascular trauma. The operative exposure in program B is reflective of the national average of 4.0 cases per resident as reported by the ACGME, and this trend is unlikely to change in the near future. Fellowship training may be critical for surgeons who plan to work in a trauma setting, particularly in areas lacking vascular surgeons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fodbold Fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Søren

    Samfundet forandrer sig og ligeså gør danskernes idrætsmønstre. Fodbold Fitness, der er afhandlingens omdrejningspunkt, kan iagttages som en reaktion på disse forandringer. Afhandlingen ser nærmere på Fodbold Fitness og implementeringen af dette, der ingenlunde er nogen let opgave. Bennike bidrager...

  4. Fitness cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L.; Pedersen, Thomas M.; Udekwu, Klas I.

    2012-01-01

    phage types, predominantly only penicillin resistant. We investigated whether isolates of this epidemic were associated with a fitness cost, and we employed a mathematical model to ask whether these fitness costs could have led to the observed reduction in frequency. Bacteraemia isolates of S. aureus...... from Denmark have been stored since 1957. We chose 40 S. aureus isolates belonging to phage complex 83A, clonal complex 8 based on spa type, ranging in time of isolation from 1957 to 1980 and with varyous antibiograms, including both methicillin-resistant and -susceptible isolates. The relative fitness...... of each isolate was determined in a growth competition assay with a reference isolate. Significant fitness costs of 215 were determined for the MRSA isolates studied. There was a significant negative correlation between number of antibiotic resistances and relative fitness. Multiple regression analysis...

  5. Fitting It All In: Adapting a Green Chemistry Extraction Experiment for Inclusion in an Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Heather L.; Beck, Annelise R.; Mulvihill, Martin J.; Douskey, Michelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Several principles of green chemistry are introduced through this experiment designed for use in the undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory. An established experiment of liquid CO2 extraction of D-limonene has been adapted to include a quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. This facilitates drop-in incorporation of an exciting…

  6. Low-Income Urban Mothers' Experiences with the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Sarah; Ettinger, Anna K; Keefe, Carolyn; Riley, Anne; Surkan, Pamela J

    2017-10-01

    Food insecurity remains a public health concern in the United States, particularly among low-income urban ethnically diverse families, even with the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Limited phenomenologic data exist to capture how programmatic changes to SNAP address the needs of users and why a gap in SNAP use may exist. The primary aim of this study was to examine the experiences of low-income, Baltimore, MD, mothers in applying for and maintaining access to SNAP. Secondary aims included understanding participants' perspectives on the influence of changes in SNAP over a 3-year period and how SNAP fits into the overall system of social services for families. In this qualitative, phenomenologic study, in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 mothers and three focus groups with 20 mothers, for a total sample of 33 mothers receiving SNAP benefits. Ten mothers participated in the first round of data collection (January to May 2010), and 23 in the second round (February to May 2013). Participants were 33 mothers receiving SNAP benefits in Baltimore City, MD. Baltimore SNAP users' experiences with applying for and maintaining access to SNAP, as well as with program changes to the SNAP program. Data were analyzed using an iterative emergent design and phenomenologic approach. A constructivist perspective was implemented throughout the coding process. SNAP functioned as a valuable support system within the broader social safety net for mothers living in poverty, yet participants expressed frustration about the processes of applying for and maintaining benefits due to communication problems and poor integration of services. In applying for and accessing SNAP, positive interactions with caseworkers and previous knowledge of the SNAP program were important for maintaining benefits. Interviews and focus group discussions revealed the need for additional outreach and education about the implemented program changes to build trust and improve access to SNAP

  7. One size (never) fits all: segment differences observed following a school-based alcohol social marketing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Timo; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Leo, Cheryl; Connor, Jason

    2015-04-01

    According to commercial marketing theory, a market orientation leads to improved performance. Drawing on the social marketing principles of segmentation and audience research, the current study seeks to identify segments to examine responses to a school-based alcohol social marketing program. A sample of 371 year 10 students (aged: 14-16 years; 51.4% boys) participated in a prospective (pre-post) multisite alcohol social marketing program. Game On: Know Alcohol (GO:KA) program included 6, student-centered, and interactive lessons to teach adolescents about alcohol and strategies to abstain or moderate drinking. A repeated measures design was used. Baseline demographics, drinking attitudes, drinking intentions, and alcohol knowledge were cluster analyzed to identify segments. Change on key program outcome measures and satisfaction with program components were assessed by segment. Three segments were identified; (1) Skeptics, (2) Risky Males, (3) Good Females. Segments 2 and 3 showed greatest change in drinking attitudes and intentions. Good Females reported highest satisfaction with all program components and Skeptics lowest program satisfaction with all program components. Three segments, each differing on psychographic and demographic variables, exhibited different change patterns following participation in GO:KA. Post hoc analysis identified that satisfaction with program components differed by segment offering opportunities for further research. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  8. Cuban experience in dosimetry quality audit program in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso-Samper, J.L.; Dominguez, L.; Yip, F.G.; Laguardia, R.A.; Morales, J.L.; Larrinaga, E.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Five years ago we started a National Program of Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy. This program was possible thanks to the cooperation between the Cuban Ministry of Health and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the Projects ARCAL XXX and CUB/6/011. In the framework of these projects a total of ten complete dosimetry set were acquired and a large number of medical physicists were trained. At the same time, the Cuban side signed a contract for nine cobalt units, which have been gradually installed and all of them are running at the moment. During more than 20 years Cuba has taken part in the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose audit programs and our results have been inside the (+/-)5 % acceptance limit. Cuba also joined the IAEA Coordinated Research Program E2 40 07, to extend at a national level the experience of the TLD based audits, using the capability of our SSDL to measure TLD. At the same time the work of the already existing External Audit Group was consolidated. The National Program of Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy works on base of external on-site visits. The main objective is to avoid any accident and to improve the quality of the RT treatments. Every year each Radiotherapy service is visited by a qualified team of physicists with the objective to check the physical aspects of the quality of the RT treatment, it includes: Documents and Records, safety, mechanical and dosimetric aspects, treatment planning, also we use the fixed depth phantom to simulate and verify several techniques. Although the TLD postal audit results are acceptable, in our QA audits we have detected some problems that may deviate the dose delivery to patients in more than 5%, examples of which are: Not all the clinical plans are redundantly checked by an independent person; Not all the controls (daily, monthly and annual) are performed according to the protocols approved by the National QA Committee. In some cases the controls are not well recorded; Clinical

  9. Curve Fitting via the Criterion of Least Squares. Applications of Algebra and Elementary Calculus to Curve Fitting. [and] Linear Programming in Two Dimensions: I. Applications of High School Algebra to Operations Research. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Units 321, 453.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, John W., Jr.; Rosenberg, Nancy S.

    This document consists of two modules. The first of these views applications of algebra and elementary calculus to curve fitting. The user is provided with information on how to: 1) construct scatter diagrams; 2) choose an appropriate function to fit specific data; 3) understand the underlying theory of least squares; 4) use a computer program to…

  10. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  11. Experience with a routine fecal sampling program for plutonium workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bihl, D.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Sula, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    A quarterly fecal sampling program was conducted at the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford site for congruent to 100 workers at risk for an intake of plutonium oxide and other forms of plutonium. To our surprise, we discovered that essentially all of the workers were excreting detectable activities of plutonium. Further investigation showed that the source was frequent, intermittent intakes at levels below detectability by normal workplace monitoring, indicating the extraordinary sensitivity of fecal sampling. However, the experience of this study also indicated that the increased sensitivity of routine fecal sampling relative to more common bioassay methods is offset by many problems. These include poor worker cooperation; difficulty in distinguishing low-level chronic intakes from a more significant, acute intake; difficulty in eliminating interference from ingested plutonium; and difficulty in interpreting what a single void means in terms of 24-h excretion. Recommendations for a routine fecal program include providing good communication to workers and management about reasons and logistics of fecal sampling prior to starting, using annual (instead of quarterly) fecal sampling for class Y plutonium, collecting samples after workers have been away from plutonium exposure for a least 3 d, and giving serious consideration to improving urinalysis sensitivity rather than going to routine fecal sampling

  12. Developing a robotic pancreas program: the Dutch experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Carolijn L; Zwart, Maurice J; Fong, Yuman; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Hogg, Melissa E; Koerkamp, Bas Groot; Besselink, Marc G; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2017-01-01

    Robot-assisted surgery has been developed to overcome limitations of conventional laparoscopy aiming to further optimize minimally invasive surgery. Despite the fact that robotics already have been widely adopted in urology, gynecology, and several gastro-intestinal procedures, like colorectal surgery, pancreatic surgery lags behind. Due to the complex nature of the procedure, surgeons probably have been hesitant to apply minimally invasive techniques in pancreatic surgery. Nevertheless, the past few years pancreatic surgery has been catching up. An increasing number of procedures are being performed laparoscopically and robotically, despite it being a highly complex procedure with high morbidity and mortality rates. Since the complex nature and extensiveness of the procedure, the start of a robotic pancreatic program should be properly prepared and should comply with several conditions within high-volume centers. Robotic training plays a significant role in the preparation. In this review we discuss the different aspects of preparation when working towards the start of a robotic pancreas program against the background of our nationwide experience in the Netherlands.

  13. Importance of quality assurance in establishing nucleoelectric programs - Spanish experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Buergo, L. de; Santoma Juncadella, L.

    1977-01-01

    One condition which must be fulfilled in order for a nucleoelectric station to be successfully introduced, in countries being developed, is to define and structure the necessary organizations which will carry out the programs and insure that the stations be reliable, safe and economical. The two basic organizations which should be defined and structured are: a) The Government organization, whose objective is to insure the health and safety of the public, by means of evaluation, revision and control of the projects and their future operation; and b) The Project Management organization, whose objective is to select the site and the prototype of the station to be installed as well as carry out the project in such a way that the stations produce the expected amount of energy at a competitive kwh price and so that the operation does not create undue or unacceptable risks for the public. The importance of the quality assurance on the job is analyzed to achieve the indicated objectives, specific missions are defined and the quality assurance is presented as the link between the binomial National Participation-Quality Demands. The Spanish experience, referring to the application of quality in its present nuclear program with about 6500 Mwe in the construction stage and another 15.000 Mwe in various study and contracting stages, is also analyzed [es

  14. The Program Planned for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, Paul N.

    1967-01-01

    This document outlines the program planned for the MSRE in fiscal years 1968 and 1969. It includes a bar diagram of the program, a critical-path type diagram of the operations, and a brief description of each task. In addition to the work at the reactor site, the outline also covers activities elsewhere at ORNL and by the AEC that directly affect the reactor schedule. The amount of detail and the accuracy with which we can estimate times varies considerably among the different items on the schedule. Some items, such as annual checkouts and core sample replacement, have been done before and our time estimates do not include any contingency, In the case of such tasks as planning, reviewing, and preparing for experiments or operations, we have set target dates that appear reasonable and we fully expect to meet these. Processing the salt is a different matter. If there are no unforeseen difficulties we should finish easily in the time shown, but the operation is in part a shakedown, so delays would not be too surprising, The time for modifying the system and adding fluoroborate is, of course, uncertain because the requirements are not yet known. As the requirements develop in more detail the estimate will be updated, but we do not foresee any major dislocation in the schedule, The scheduled time for preparation of enriching salt is becoming tight because of delays in facility construction. Should there be further delays in this key item, the entire schedule would have to be reconsidered.

  15. Effect of programmed physical activity on the physical fitness of adolescent students DOI:10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n2p98

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Dos Santos Farias

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the influence of programmed physical activity on the physical fitness of adolescent students over one school year. The sample consisted of 383 students (age range: 10 to 14 years divided into two groups: 186 cases (96 boys and 90 girls and 197 controls (108 boys and 89 girls. An intervention study with pre- and post-tests was conducted, in which the intervention group was submitted to programmed physical activity, while the control group underwent conventional classes of school physical education. Physical fitness was assessed by sit-and-reach (flexibility, muscle endurance (elbow flexion and extension and aerobic endurance (run/walk, 9 min tests. Motor performance observed in the three tests (flexibility, strength and endurance did not improve from pre-test to post-test in either group, but comparison of the intervention and control groups showed significant improvement in the strength and endurance tests for both genders in the intervention group. Boys of the two groups also showed dominance in the strength and endurance tests. In general, higher muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness and lower flexibility were observed for boys when compared to girls, and all parameters increased in the post-test and were higher in the intervention group compared to control A significant difference in flexibility was only observed between genders. With respect to muscle strength, a significant difference was observed between genders and between the intervention and control group after adjustment for age and socioeconomic level. Cardiorespiratory fitness differed significantly between genders and between the intervention and control group.

  16. The new spin physics program of the COMPASS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment, at CERN SPS, has been compiling for more than a decade successful and precise results on nucleon structure and hadron spectroscopy, leading to statistical errors much smaller than previously measured. The new COMPASS spin physics program, starting this year, aims to a rather complete nucleon structure description; this new representation goes beyond the collinear approximation by including the quark intrinsic transverse momentum distributions. The theoretical framework, for this new picture of the nucleon, is given by the Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions (TMDs and by the Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs. The TMDs, in particular Sivers, Boer-Mulders, pretzelosity and transversity functions will be obtained through the polarised Drell-Yan process, for the first time. The results will be complementary to those already obtained via polarised Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS. Also unpolarised SIDIS will be studied, allowing the knowledge improvement of the strange quark PDF and the access to the kaon fragmentation functions (FFs. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS off an unpolarised hydrogen target will be used to study the GPDs, in a kinematic region not yet covered by any existing experiment.

  17. Semantics-Driven Migration of Java Programs: a Practical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom O. Aleksyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to demonstrate the feasibility of automated code migration to a new set of programming libraries. Code migration is a common task in modern software projects. For example, it may arise when a project should be ported to a more secure or feature-rich library, a new platform or a new version of an already used library. The developed method and tool are based on the previously created by the authors a formalism for describing libraries semantics. The formalism specifies a library behaviour by using a system of extended finite state machines (EFSM. This paper outlines the metamodel designed to specify library descriptions and proposes an easy to use domainspecific language (DSL, which can be used to define models for particular libraries. The mentioned metamodel directly forms the code migration procedure. A process of migration is split into five steps, and each step is also described in the paper. The procedure uses an algorithm based on the breadth- first search extended for the needs of the migration task. Models and algorithms were implemented in the prototype of an automated code migration tool. The prototype was tested by both artificial code examples and a real-world open source project. The article describes the experiments performed, the difficulties that have arisen in the process of migration of test samples, and how they are solved in the proposed procedure. The results of experiments indicate that code migration can be successfully automated. 

  18. Critical experiments facility and criticality safety programs at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Tachimori, Shoichi; Takeshita, Isao; Suzaki, Takenori; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Nomura, Yasushi

    1985-10-01

    The nuclear criticality safety is becoming a key point in Japan in the safety considerations for nuclear installations outside reactors such as spent fuel reprocessing facilities, plutonium fuel fabrication facilities, large scale hot alboratories, and so on. Especially a large scale spent fuel reprocessing facility is being designed and would be constructed in near future, therefore extensive experimental studies are needed for compilation of our own technical standards and also for verification of safety in a potential criticality accident to obtain public acceptance. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is proceeding a construction program of a new criticality safety experimental facility where criticality data can be obtained for such solution fuels as mainly handled in a reprocessing facility and also chemical process experiments can be performed to investigate abnormal phenomena, e.g. plutonium behavior in solvent extraction process by using pulsed colums. In FY 1985 detail design of the facility will be completed and licensing review by the government would start in FY 1986. Experiments would start in FY 1990. Research subjects and main specifications of the facility are described. (author)

  19. 76 FR 4137 - Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Comment Request: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and... Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title of Collection: Innovative Technology Experiences for Students... Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) is a National Science Foundation program that...

  20. Python and Roles of Variables in Introductory Programming: Experiences from Three Educational Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikula, Uolevi; Sajaniemi, Jorma; Tedre, Matti; Wray, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Students often find that learning to program is hard. Introductory programming courses have high drop-out rates and students do not learn to program well. This paper presents experiences from three educational institutions where introductory programming courses were improved by adopting Python as the first programming language and roles of…

  1. The Functional Measurement Experiment Builder suite: two Java-based programs to generate and run functional measurement experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Olivier; Hofmans, Joeri; Theuns, Peter

    2008-05-01

    We propose a free, easy-to-use computer program that does not requires prior knowledge of computer programming to generate and run experiments using textual or pictorial stimuli. Although the FM Experiment Builder suite was initially programmed for building and conducting FM experiments, it can also be applied for non-FM experiments that necessitate randomized, single, or multifactorial designs. The program is highly configurable, allowing multilingual use and a wide range of different response formats. The outputs of the experiments are Microsoft Excel compatible .xls files that allow easy copy-paste of the results into Weiss's FM CalSTAT program (2006) or any other statistical package. Its Java-based structure is compatible with both Windows and Macintosh operating systems, and its compactness (< 1 MB) makes it easily distributable over the Internet.

  2. Neutron study of fast neutron reactor systems by exponential experiments on Harmonie - Graphite program HUG-PHUG - Oxide program PHRIXOS - Uranium program UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desprets, Alain.

    1977-12-01

    Exponential experiments allow to obtain the fundamental characteristics of a lattice (material buckling, reaction rate ratios) more economically than critical experiments. This report describes the experimental techniques and the methods of analysis used for this type of experiments. The results obtained with three programs performed with the source reactor HARMONIE are given: graphite-lattices program (3 U-fueled and 3 Pu-fueled lattices); oxide-fuel program (4 PuO 2 -UO 2 lattices); pure uranium program (one lattice). Some of these lattices were also studied in critical experiments. The coherence of the results obtained by the two types of experiments is established [fr

  3. Effects of a 6-Week Aquatic Treadmill Exercise Program on Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Walking Endurance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A PILOT TRIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee

    2017-03-15

    To assess the feasibility and safety of a 6-week course of water walking performed using a motorized aquatic treadmill in individuals with subacute stroke for cardiorespiratory fitness, walking endurance, and activities of daily living. Twenty subacute stroke patents were randomly assigned to aquatic treadmill exercise (ATE) or land-based exercise (LBE). The ATE group (n = 10) performed water-based aerobic exercise on a motorized aquatic treadmill, and the LBE group (n = 10) performed land-based aerobic exercise on a cycle ergometer. Both groups performed aerobic exercise for 30 minutes, 5 times per week for 6 weeks. Primary outcome measures were 6-minute walk test for walking endurance and cardiopulmonary fitness parameters of a symptom-limited exercise tolerance test, and secondary measures were Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) for activities of daily living. All variables were assessed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. The ATE group showed significant improvements in 6-minute walk test (P = .005), peak oxygen uptake (V·o2peak; P = .005), peak heart rate (P = .007), exercise tolerance test duration (P = .005), and K-MBI (P = .008). The LBE group showed a significant improvement only in K-MBI (P = .012). In addition, improvement in V·o2peak was greater in the ATE than in the LBE group. This preliminary study showed that a 6-week ATE program improved peak aerobic capacity and walking endurance in patients with subacute stroke. The improvement in V·o2peak after an ATE exercise program was greater than that observed after an LBE program. Therefore, ATE effectively improves cardiopulmonary fitness in patients with subacute stroke.

  4. [Experiences of a nation-wide integrated program for healthy body weight among students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yiing Mei; Chen, Mei-Yen; Chiang, Li-Chi; Chien, Li-Yin; Chang, Po-Lun; Hung, Yung-Tai

    2007-10-01

    Taiwan has good support systems for obesity prevention and management. The percentage of elementary school students with normal body weight, however, has undergone a sustained decrease to 55%. Many factors are associated with this trend, such as lack of physical activity, dissatisfaction with body image, unbalanced dietary pattern, and unsupportive environment. Even though the rate of overweight and obesity is under control, the rate of underweight among girls has undergone a sustained increase, to 28%. Nurses therefore organized the "Aid students to fit" project, which emphasizes the bipolar issue of overweight and underweight. This national project is sponsored by the Ministry of Education and is expected to establish a beneficial environment, in which students can easily adopt healthy lifestyles and increase self-esteem. The program incorporates the AID triangle concept (Active, Image, Diet) and five strategies for achieving the goals. These strategies are: 1. Develop a persuasive statement to fit in with the philosophies of parents, students and teachers. 2. Set up measurable behavior indices and slogans. (Active life: 210 minutes per week. Image: confident and elegant. Diet: balanced and wise choice of low fat and high fiber foods.) 3. Establish a nation-wide interactive surveillance system for body weight control. 4. Develop an internet system that emphasizes tailored case management for overweight students. 5. Develop a supportive teaching plan, material, and aids to promote a healthy school environment. Five modeling schools, moreover, can be used to demonstrate the program. Educators can also download a free teaching plan, material, and aids at the website for healthy weight management (www.ym.edu.tw/active/aid). The authors brought together scholars from eight universities to accomplish the program. In support of the program, the Taiwan Ministry of Education addressed the new recommendation for physical activity which is to engage in moderate intensity

  5. A Pilot Study of Determinants of Ongoing Participation in EnhanceFitness: A Community-Based Group Exercise Program for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, David B; Petrescu-Prahova, Miruna; Herting, Jerald R; Belza, Basia

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity has many benefits for older adults, but adherence is often low. The purposes of this study were to (1) identify motivators and barriers for participation in EnhanceFitness (EF), a group-based exercise program; and (2) quantitatively examine the association between motivators, barriers and individual characteristics, and ongoing participation in the program. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study. We mailed a pilot, investigator-developed survey to assess motivators and barriers to exercising to 340 adults who started a new EF class, regardless of their attendance rate. We precoded surveys on the basis of class attendance, with former participants defined as having no attendance a month or more before a 4-month fitness check. Of the 241 respondents (71% response rate), 61 (25%) were precoded as former participants and 180 (75%) as current participants. The mean age of respondents was 71 years and they were predominately female (89%). More than half of respondents were whites (58%), and almost half were married (46%). Former participants reported lower total motivation scores than current participants (P exercise," "Personal illness," and "Exercise caused pain") and 2 motivators ("I want to exercise" and "I plan exercise as part of my day") were significantly different between current and former participants. Discrete event history models show that dropout was related positively to ethnicity (whites were more likely to drop out) and health-related barriers. In newly formed EF classes, participants who drop out report more program, psychosocial, and health barriers, and fewer program and psychosocial motivators. Total barrier score and health barriers significantly predict a participant's dropping out, and white ethnicity is associated with a higher likelihood of dropping out. Employing strategies that address health barriers to participation could improve attendance rates for group-based exercise programs.

  6. Experiment in Application of Methods of Programmed Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradkin, S. L.

    In a document translated from the Russian, an analysis is made of various forms and methods of programed learning. The primary developments in the introduction of programed learning methods are: creation of programed teaching aids; use of existing textbooks for programed lectures with feedback; and use of both teaching machines and machineless…

  7. Effects of Combined Vigorous Interval Training Program and Diet on Body Composition, Physical Fitness, and Physical Self-Perceptions Among Obese Adolescent Boys and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Olivier; Vallier, Jean-Marc; Nicol, Caroline; Mercier, Charles-Symphorien; Maïano, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the effects of a five-week intervention combining vigorous interval training (VIT) with diet among twenty-four obese adolescents. Fourteen girls and ten boys (aged 14-15) schooled in a pediatric rehabilitation center participated. The VIT intensity was targeted and remained above 80% of maximal heart rate (HR) and over six kilocalories per minute. Pre- and postintervention measures were body composition (BMI, weight, body fat percentage), physical self-perceptions (PSP), physical fitness (6-min walking distance and work) and its associated physiological responses (HR peak and blood lactate concentration). A series of two-way analyses of variance or covariance controlling for weight loss were used to examine the changes. Significant improvements were found in body composition, physical fitness and PSP (endurance, activity level, sport competence, global physical self-concept and appearance). In addition, boys presented higher levels of perceived strength and global physical self-concept than girls. Finally, there was a significant increase in perceived endurance, sport competence, and global physical self-concept in girls only. This five-week VIT program combined with diet represents an effective means for improving body composition, physical fitness, and PSP in obese adolescents, the effects on PSP being larger among girls.

  8. Analysis of the reaction γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} by the identification of the charged K* decay channel at the BGO-OD experiment using kinematic fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Bjoern-Eric [Physikalisches Institut Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA facility in Bonn is built to investigate nucleon excitations via meson photoproduction. A program of measurements of reactions of associated strangeness in the final state has begun, one of which is γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +}. One research objective is associated production of strange particles. An interesting reaction channel is γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +}. This talk shows the preliminary results of the analysis for the charged decay channel K{sup 0}Σ{sup +} → π{sup -}π{sup +}π{sup 0}p. Due to the small production cross section kinematic fitting has been used to discriminate the wanted channel against background.

  9. Experiments on a Toroidal Screw Pinch with Various Field Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicker, H.; Wilhelm, R.; Krause, H. [Max-Planck-Institut Fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Garching, Munich, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1971-10-15

    In the toroidal screw pinch ISAR-IV (large diameter 60 cm, aspect ratio 5, maximum storage, energy 140 kj) attempts were made to get an improved stability of the plasma by different kinds of field programming. The best results were obtained with positive trapped B{sub z}-fields and simultaneous switching of main B{sub z}-field and I{sub z}-current. In this case the dense plasma column (n{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 2-3 x 10{sup 16} , kT Almost-Equal-To 50-100 eV, {beta} Almost-Equal-To 15-20%) is surrounded by a force-free plasma ({beta} = 1%) with weak shear and it behaves stably for, at least, 25 {mu}s. The resulting containment time nr of near 10{sup 12} s cm{sup -3} remains a factor of 2-3 below the upper limit given by the classical diffusion. The following loss of the equilibrium position near the coil axis ({Delta} Almost-Equal-To 1-2 cm) is connected to a strong damping of the axial plasma current which starts near the end of the containment. It may be assumed that the increase of the effective plasma resistance mainly results from a contact of the force-free regions with the tube wall. Attempts were made to improve the containment by suitable programming of a plasma z-current. The results are presented. Experiments with one quartz limiter inside the torus improved the equilibrium but introduced instabilities at the new surface of the dilute plasma. To obtain more information about the outer region, the dilute plasma was produced without a dense core and separated from the tube walls by weak adiabatic compression. Under these Tokamak-like conditions the q-value was varied. In the region of q Almost-Equal-To 1 there appeared instabilities which seem to haver higher m-modes and rather short wavelengths. In a different kind of field programming the field distribution of the ''diffuse pinch'' was realized within an accuracy of 5-10% (kT Almost-Equal-To 100 eV, {beta} Almost-Equal-To 30%). In contrast to the predictions of MHD-theory, stability was observed only for

  10. Are They Fit For Purpose? Exploring Managers' Experiences of UK HR Graduates & Employability Implications: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mullen, Emma

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to expand on existing understandings of graduate employability through exploring the lived experiences and perceptions of key informants, in this case, those with direct line management responsibilities for graduates. The context of this research is focused on Human Resources (HR) graduates, a discipline that has seen little qualitative inquiry across the Higher Education (HE), employability and HR literature, and which is currently dominated by skills-led appr...

  11. Effect of the Adapted NASA Mission X International Child Fitness Program on Young Children and their Parents in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jungwon; Kim, Gilsook; Lim, Hyunjung; Carvajal, Nubia A.; Lloyd, Charles W.; Wang, Youfa; Reeves, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become a global epidemic. Childhood obesity is global public health concern including in South Korea where 16.2% of boys and 9.9% of girls are overweight or obese in 2011. Effective and sustainable intervention programs are needed for prevention of childhood obesity. Obesity prevention programs for young children may have a greater intervention effect than in older children. The NASA Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut (MX) program was developed to promote children's exercise and healthy eating by tapping into their excitement for training like an astronaut. This study aimed to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of the adapted NASA MX intervention in promoting PA in young children and in improving parents' related perspectives.

  12. The structural relationships between organizational commitment, global job satisfaction, developmental experiences, work values, organizational support, and person-organization fit among nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Antonio P; Candela, Lori L; Carver, Lara

    2012-07-01

    GUTIERAIM: The aim of this correlational study was to examine the relations between organizational commitment, perceived organizational support, work values, person-organization fit, developmental experiences, and global job satisfaction among nursing faculty. The global nursing shortage is well documented. At least 57 countries have reported critical shortages. The lack of faculty is finally being recognized as a major issue directly influencing the ability to admit and graduate adequate numbers of nurses. As efforts increase to both recruit and retain faculty, the concept of organizational commitment and what it means to them is important to consider. A cross-sectional correlational design was used. The present study investigated the underlying structure of various organizational factors using structural equation modelling. Data were collected from a stratified random sample of nurse faculty during the academic year 2006-2007. The final model demonstrated that perceived organizational support, developmental experiences, person-organization fit, and global job satisfaction positively predicted nurse faculty's organizational commitment to the academic organization. Cross-validation results indicated that the final full SEM is valid and reliable. Nursing faculty administrators able to use mentoring skills are well equipped to build positive relationships with nursing faculty, which in turn, can lead to increased organizational commitment, productivity, job satisfaction, and perceived organizational support, among others. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Enhancement of daily physical activity increases physical fitness of outclinic COPD patients : Results of an exercise counseling program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospes, Gieneke; Bossenbroek, Linda; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; van Hengel, Peter; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.

    Objective: To investigate whether a 12-week pedometer-based exercise counseling strategy is feasible and effectively enhances daily physical activity in outclinic Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients who do not participate in a rehabilitation program in a controlled way. Methods: 35

  14. One Size (Never) Fits All: Segment Differences Observed Following a School-Based Alcohol Social Marketing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Timo; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Leo, Cheryl; Connor, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Background: According to commercial marketing theory, a market orientation leads to improved performance. Drawing on the social marketing principles of segmentation and audience research, the current study seeks to identify segments to examine responses to a school-based alcohol social marketing program. Methods: A sample of 371 year 10 students…

  15. One size fits all? : optimization of rainbow trout breeding program under diverse preferences and genotype-by-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sae-Lim, P.

    2013-01-01

    Global fish breeders distribute improved animal material to several continents to be farmed under diverse environments, and for very different market conditions. When establishing a global breeding program, there is a need to assess whether or not a single breeding objective satisfies the

  16. Peer mentoring is associated with positive change in physical activity and aerobic fitness of grades 4, 5, and 6 students in the heart healthy kids program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Rebecca A; Bower, Jenna; Kirk, Sara F L; Hancock Friesen, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Only 7% of Canadian children achieve activity recommendations, contributing to obesity and preventable disease. The Heart Healthy Kids (H2K) program was designed to test the relationship between peer mentoring, physical activity, and cardiovascular fitness. Participants from 10 schools (5 control, 5 intervention) were enrolled in the program. In control schools, H2K included a physical activity challenge and education sessions. Intervention schools included the addition of a peer-mentoring component. Physical activity was measured through daily pedometer recording. Cardiovascular fitness was evaluated using the PACER (Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run) protocol to calculate maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max). Participants included 808 children (average age 9.9 ± 1.0 years). Although control and intervention schools did not differ at baseline, participants with peer mentoring logged significantly more steps per school day, on average, than those in control schools (6,785 ± 3,011 vs. 5,630 ± 2,586; p peer mentoring shows promise for application in health promotion interventions. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  17. Comment to: The effects of an 8-week multicomponent inpatient treatment program on body composition and anaerobic fitness in overweight and obese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radtke T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Radtke,1 Bruno H Knöpfli,2 Johannes H Wildhaber,3 Jürg Hammer4 1Division of Cardiovascular Prevention, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, Swiss Cardiovascular Center, Inselspital, University Hospital and University of Bern, Bern, 2Kinder und Jugendmedizin, Zurich, 3Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Fribourg, Fribourg, 4Division of Intensive Care and Pulmonology, University Children's Hospital Basel, Basel, SwitzerlandWe note with surprise a recent paper entitled "The effects of an 8-week multicomponent inpatient treatment program on body composition and anaerobic fitness in overweight and obese children and adolescents" by Karner-Rezek et al1 published in the International Journal of General Medicine concerning the effects of an 8-week multicomponent inpatient treatment program on body composition and anaerobic fitness in overweight and obese children and adolescents. We would like to take this opportunity to comment on the study findings and, in particular, address the methodological inconsistencies and ambiguities in this study.View original paper by Karner-Rezek and colleagues.

  18. Fitness club

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness club

    2013-01-01

      Nordic Walking Classes Come join the Nordic walking classes and outings offered by the CERN Fitness Club starting September 2013. Our licensed instructor Christine offers classes for people who’ve never tried Nordic Walking and who would like to learn the technique, and outings for people who have completed the classes and enjoy going out as a group. Course 1: Tuesdays 12:30 - 13:30 24 September, 1 October, 8 October, 15 October Course 2: Tuesdays 12:30 - 13:30 5 November, 12 November, 19 November, 26 November Outings will take place on Thursdays (12:30 to 13:30) from 12 September 2013. We meet at the CERN Club Barracks car park (close to Entrance A) 10 minutes before departure. Prices: 50 CHF for 4 classes, including the 10 CHF Club membership. Payments made directly to instructor. Renting Poles: Poles can be rented from Christine at 5 CHF / hour. Subscription: Please subscribe at: http://cern.ch/club-fitness Looking forward to seeing you among us! Fitness Club FitnessClub@c...

  19. Fitness Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2012-01-01

    Get in Shape for Summer with the CERN Fitness Club Saturday 23 June 2012 from 14:30 to 16.30 (doors open at 14.00) Germana’s Fitness Workshop. Build strength and stamina, sculpt and tone your body and get your heart pumping with Germana’s workout mixture of Cardio Attack, Power Pump, Power Step, Cardio Combat and Cross-Training. Where: 216 (Pump room – equipped with changing rooms and showers). What to wear: comfortable clothes and indoor sports shoes + bring a drink! How much: 15 chf Sign up here: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Test_Subscription/NewForm.aspx? Join the Party and dance yourself into shape at Marco + Marials Zumba Masterclass. Saturday 30 June 2012 from 15:00 to 16:30 Marco + Mariel’s Zumba Masterclass Where: 216 (Pump room – equipped with changing rooms and showers). What to wear: comfortable clothes and indoor sports shoes + bring a drink! How much: 25 chf Sign up here: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Lists/Zumba%20...

  20. Fitness Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2010-01-01

    Nordic Walking Please note that the subscriptions for the general fitness classes from July to December are open: Subscriptions general fitness classes Jul-Dec 2010 Sign-up to the Fitness Club mailing list here Nordic Walking: Sign-up to the Nordic Walking mailing list here Beginners Nordic walking lessons Monday Lunchtimes (rdv 12:20 for 12:30 departure) 13.09/20.09/27.09/04.10 11.10/18.10/08.11/15.11 22.11/29.11/06.12/20.12 Nordic walking lessons Tuesday evenings (rdv 17:50 for 18:00 departure) 07.09/14.09/21.09/28.09 05.10/12.10/19.10/26.10 Intermediate/Advanced Nordic walking outings (follow the nordic walking lessons before signing up for the outings) every Thursday from 16.09 - 16.12, excluding 28.10 and 09.12 Subscriptions and info: fitness.club@cern.ch  

  1. Fitness Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2012-01-01

      The CERN Fitness Club is pleased to announce its new early morning class which will be taking place on: Tuesdays from 24th April 07:30 to 08:15 216 (Pump Hall, close to entrance C) – Facilities include changing rooms and showers. The Classes: The early morning classes will focus on workouts which will help you build not only strength and stamina, but will also improve your balance, and coordination. Our qualified instructor Germana will accompany you throughout the workout  to ensure you stay motivated so you achieve the best results. Sign up and discover the best way to start your working day full of energy! How to subscribe? We invite you along to a FREE trial session, if you enjoy the activity, please sign up via our website: https://espace.cern.ch/club-fitness/Activities/SUBSCRIBE.aspx. * * * * * * * * Saturday 28th April Get in shape for the summer at our fitness workshop and zumba dance party: Fitness workshop with Germana 13:00 to 14:30 - 216 (Pump Hall) Price...

  2. Distributed and collaborative: Experiences of local leadership of a first-year experience program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo McKenzie

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Local level leadership of the first year experience (FYE is critical for engaging academic and professional staff in working collaboratively on a whole of institution focus on student transition and success. This paper describes ways in which local informal leadership is experienced at faculty level in an institutional FYE program, based on interviews with faculty coordinators and small grant recipients. Initial analysis using the distributed leadership tenets described by Jones, Hadgraft, Harvey, Lefoe, and Ryland (2014 revealed features that enabled success, such as collaborative communities, as well as faculty differences influenced by the strength of the external mandate for change in the FYE. More fine-grained analysis indicated further themes in engaging others, enabling and enacting the FYE program that fostered internal mandates for change: gaining buy-in; being opportunistic; making use of evidence of success and recognition; along with the need for collegial support for coordinators and self-perceptions of leadership being about making connections, collaboration, trust and expertise.

  3. The relationship between customer satisfaction and the demographic profile of participants in the exercise programs of health and fitness clubs for municipal youth and sport organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRA TRIPOLITSIOTI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyze the satisfaction of participants in the offered programs of exercise of health and fitness clubs for municipal Youth and Sport organizations. A random sample of 320 participants was selected from 18 closed halls and responded to a questionnaire that was pre-checked for reliability, validity and objectivity (Chen, 2001. The questionnaire included questions related to demographics, participant satisfaction from the exercise programs and from the level of organisation these have, the quality of equipment the athletic halls have and the variety of services offered. Data was analysed statistically to determine the relationships and differences between the mean value of the different variables. Results show that the profile of the major customer segment is women from 26 to 35 years old with University education. Also, statistical analysis shows that there are significant differences between the average values in all 5 dimensions of participant satisfaction: the prices of exercise programs, program content, the quality of hall equipment, public relations and employee performance. Also, there are statistically significant differences between the demographic variables (age, sex, income and the 5 participant satisfaction dimensions. However, the dimensions that present statistically significant differences vary according to the demographic variable analysed. This shows that municipal sports centres should differentiate their offers according to the dimensions of satisfaction that are more important for each customer segment as these are formed based on age, income or sex.

  4. Association of Anthropometric and Lifestyle Parameters with Fitness Levels in Greek Schoolchildren: Results from the EYZHN Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannis Arnaoutis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe aim of the study was to evaluate physical fitness (PF and identify its anthropometric and lifestyle determinants in a sample of Greek schoolchildren.MethodsThe study sample consisted of 335,810 schoolchildren (♂: 51.3%, 6–18 years old. Students’ anthropometric parameters and PF levels—assessed via the Eurofit test battery—were measured by trained physical education teachers and evaluated according to the available norms, while their lifestyle habits were assessed through a questionnaire.ResultsIn all applied PF tests, students’ performance was negatively associated with the presence of obesity and central obesity, defined through international criteria for body mass index and waist to height ratio, respectively. According to multiple logistic regression analysis, the presence of overweight/obesity [odds ratio (OR: 4.43, 95% confidence interval (CI: 3.98–4.93], low adherence to the MD (KIDMED ≤ 3 (OR: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.09–1.48, and increased time spent in sedentary activities (>2 h per day (OR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.03–1.29 were positively associated with poor PF, after adjusting for age and sex. In contrast, for every 1 day increase in the weekly frequency of engagement in athletic activity, the probability of poor PF decreased by 26% (OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.72–0.77. In a similar model, the presence of central obesity emerged as an even stronger possible predictor of poor PF (OR: 5.20, 95% CI: 4.66–5.78, compared to the presence of general obesity.ConclusionHigher general or abdominal adiposity, as well as the adoption of a low-quality diet and a sedentary lifestyle, is strongly associated with low PF levels during childhood.

  5. Study of the effects of multimodal exercise program on physical fitness and health perception in community-living Hungarian older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virág, Anikó; Harkányi, Izabella; Karóczi, Csilla K; Vass, Zsolt; Kovács, Éva

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects on fitness indicators and subjective health-perception of a multimodal exercise program provided by a district in Budapest among community-living seniors. Sixty community-living older adults aged over 60 years formed beginner group (who were at the beginning of the exercise program), advanced group (who had been in the programme for 3-6 months), active group (who had been participating in the exercise program for at least 6 months, in addition to Nordic walking program) and a physically inactive control group. Balance, functional mobility, lower and upper limb strength, lower and upper body flexibility, aerobic endurance and self-reported health perception were measured at baseline, and after a 12-week follow-up period. The beginner group and the advanced group improved in upper body flexibility (beginner Δ=1.2; d=0.83; advanced: Δ=1.7; d=1.39), lower body flexibility (beginner: Δ=1.7, d=0.484; advanced: Δ=1.9; d=1.55), lower limb strength (beginner: Δ=1.47; d=0.84; advanced: Δ=1.57; d=0.72), and functional mobility (beginner: Δ=-0.6; d=0.54; advanced: Δ=-0.4; d=0.90). There were also improvements in aerobic endurance (Δ=11.06; d=0.96) and balance (Δ=1.6; d=0.62) of beginner group. These indicators declined in the control group. Indicators of the active group did not change. The self-perceived health status declined (Δ=-13.9; d=0.73) in the control group but did not change in any exercising groups. This multimodal exercise program can be effective among community-living older adults, even in Hungary, a country where geriatric physical activity is not widespread. Therefore, it would be useful to extend this model program to other settlements as well.

  6. Self-management for obesity and cardio-metabolic fitness: Description and evaluation of the lifestyle modification program of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coates Alison M

    2008-10-01

    were found to be supportive. More frequent clinical assessment was suggested for future programs. Conclusion This group-based lifestyle program achieved improvements in body composition and cardio-metabolic and physical fitness similar to individualised interventions which are more resource intensive to deliver. It confirmed that active training in lifestyle modification is more effective than passive provision of guidelines. Such programs should include social support and self-management techniques. Continued clinical follow up may be required for long-term maintenance in individuals attempting lifestyle behaviour change. Program facilitation by peers may help and should be further investigated in a community-based model.

  7. Fitness Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2012-01-01

    Nordic Walking Classes Sessions of four classes of one hour each are held on Tuesdays. RDV barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Session 1 =  11.09 / 18.09 / 25.09 / 02.10, 18:15 - 19:15 Session 2 = 25.09 / 02.10 / 09.10 / 16.10, 12:30 - 13:30 Session 3 = 23.10 / 30.10 / 06.11 / 13.11, 12:30 - 13:30 Session 4 = 20.11 / 27.11 / 04.12 / 11.12, 12:30 - 13:30 Prices 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership 5 CHF/hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at http://cern.ch/club-fitness   Hope to see you among us!  fitness.club@cern.ch In spring 2012 there was a long-awaited progress in CERN Fitness club. We have officially opened a Powerlifting @ CERN, and the number of members of the new section has been increasing since then reaching 70+ people in less than 4 months. Powerlifting is a strength sport, which is simple as 1-2-3 and efficient. The "1-2-3" are the three basic lifts (bench press...

  8. Darlington refurbishment - performance improvement programs goals and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, N. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the refurbishment program at the Darlington site. The program focuses on safety, integrity, excellence and personnel. Worker safety and public safety are of the highest priority. Success resulted from collaborative engineering interface, collaborative front end planning, highly competent people and respectful relationship with partners and regulators.

  9. Friendship Experiences of Participants in a University Based Transition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Maya; Cranston-Gingras, Ann; Jang, Seung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the nature of friendships of 14 students with intellectual and developmental disabilities participating in a university-based transition program in the United States. The transition program is a bridge between high school and adulthood, designed to foster students' self-esteem and self-confidence by providing them with training…

  10. Program Evolves from Basic CAD to Total Manufacturing Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassola, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Close to a decade ago, John Hersey High School (JHHS) in Arlington Heights, Illinois, made a transition from a traditional classroom-based pre-engineering program. The new program is geared towards helping students understand the entire manufacturing process. Previously, a JHHS student would design a project in computer-aided design (CAD) software…

  11. The Effects of a Motorized Aquatic Treadmill Exercise Program on Muscle Strength, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and clinical function in Subacute Stroke Patients -- a Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So Young; Han, Eun Young; Kim, Bo Ryun; Im, Sang Hee

    2018-03-12

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a motorized aquatic treadmill exercise program improve the isometric strength of the knee muscles, cardiorespiratory fitness, arterial stiffness, motor function, balance, functional outcomes and quality of life in subacute stroke patients. Thirty-two patients were randomly assigned to 4-week training sessions of either aquatic therapy(n=19) or land-based aerobic exercise(n=18). Isometric strength was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Cardiopulmonary fitness was evaluated using a symptom-limited exercise tolerance test and by measuring brachial ankle pulse wave velocity. Moreover, motor function(Fugl-Meyer Assessment[FMA] and FMA-lower limb[FMA-LL]), balance(Berg Balance Scale[BBS]), Activities of daily living(Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index [K-MBI]), and Quality of life(EQ-5D index) were examined. There were no inter-group differences between demographic and clinical characteristics at baseline(p>0.05). The results shows significant improvements in peak oxygen consumption (p=0.02), maximal isometric strength of the bilateral knee extensors (paquatic therapy group. However, only significant improvements in maximal isometric strength in the knee extensors (p=0.03) and flexors (p=0.04) were found within the aquatic therapy group and control group. Water-based aerobic exercise performed on a motorized aquatic treadmill had beneficial effect on isometric muscle strength in the lower limb.

  12. "It is our exercise family": experiences of ethnic older adults in a group-based exercise program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kuan-Chun; Seman, Leslie; Belza, Basia; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun

    2008-01-01

    Enhance Fitness (EF) (formerly the Lifetime Fitness Program) is an evidence-based community exercise program for older adults. From 1998 to 2005, participation of ethnic older adults increased significantly. However, little research is available about what ethnic older adults want or need to continue participation in exercise programs. The purpose of this study was to examine how physical environment, social environment, and individual biology and behavior influence adherence to exercise for ethnic older adults participating in EF. Six focus groups were conducted with 52 older adults participating in EF. Facilitators asked questions about factors that helped participants continue exercising in EF. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Transcripts were systematically reviewed using content analysis. Focus group participants were Chinese (n = 21, 40%), African American (n = 18, 35%), white (n = 10, 19%), and Japanese (n = 3, 6%). Mean (SD) age was 76 years (7.4). Participants had, on average, participated in EF for 44 months (SD = 37.8). Results revealed four themes related to adherence. First, environmental factors that promoted adherence were location of the classes, transportation, weather, and the facility. Second, design of the exercise program that encouraged adherence included exercise content and type of delivery. Third, social support factors that encouraged adherence were the socializing and support between class participants and support from family, health care providers, and the class instructors. Finally, individual factors that encouraged adherence were personality traits and feelings, past physical activity experience, health benefits, and mental stimulation. Findings from this study suggest strategies for developing community-based physical activity programs for older adults from ethnically diverse communities.

  13. The Racialized Experiences of Students of Color in Higher Education and Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jessica C.; Linder, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Using a critical race theory lens, we examined the racialized experiences of 29 Students of Color in HESA programs across the United States. Students' experiences illuminate 4 themes: educating white peers, invalidation of experiences and identity, racial stereotypes, and isolation. Participants' experiences illustrate a disconnect between HESA…

  14. Fitness club

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness club

    2013-01-01

    Nordic Walking Classes New session of 4 classes of 1 hour each will be held on Tuesdays in May 2013. Meet at the CERN barracks parking at Entrance A, 10 minutes before class time. Dates and time: 07.05, 14.05, 21.05 and 28.05, fom  12 h 30 to 13 h 30 Prices: 40 CHF per session + 10 CHF club membership – 5 CHF / hour pole rental Check out our schedule and enroll at http://cern.ch/club-fitness Hope to see you among us! 

  15. The Soldier Fitness Tracker: global delivery of Comprehensive Soldier Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fravell, Mike; Nasser, Katherine; Cornum, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    Carefully implemented technology strategies are vital to the success of large-scale initiatives such as the U.S. Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. Achieving the U.S. Army's vision for CSF required a robust information technology platform that was scaled to millions of users and that leveraged the Internet to enable global reach. The platform needed to be agile, provide powerful real-time reporting, and have the capacity to quickly transform to meet emerging requirements. Existing organizational applications, such as "Single Sign-On," and authoritative data sources were exploited to the maximum extent possible. Development of the "Soldier Fitness Tracker" is the most recent, and possibly the best, demonstration of the potential benefits possible when existing organizational capabilities are married to new, innovative applications. Combining the capabilities of the extant applications with the newly developed applications expedited development, eliminated redundant data collection, resulted in the exceeding of program objectives, and produced a comfortable experience for the end user, all in less than six months. This is a model for future technology integration. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Remote programming of MED-EL cochlear implants: users' and professionals' evaluation of the remote programming experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovkov, Vladislav; Yanov, Yuri; Levin, Sergey; Bovo, Roberto; Rosignoli, Monica; Eskilsson, Gunnar; Willbas, Staffan

    2014-07-01

    Remote programming is safe and is well received by health-care professionals and cochlear implant (CI) users. It can be adopted into clinic routine as an alternative to face-to-face programming. Telemedicine allows a patient to be treated anywhere in the world. Although it is a growing field, little research has been published on its application to CI programming. We examined hearing professionals' and CI users' subjective reactions to the remote programming experience, including the quality of the programming and the use of the relevant technology. Remote CI programming was performed in Italy, Sweden, and Russia. Programming sessions had three participants: a CI user, a local host, and a remote expert. After the session, each CI user, local host, and remote expert each completed a questionnaire on their experience. In all, 33 remote programming sessions were carried out, resulting in 99 completed questionnaires. The overwhelming majority of study participants responded positively to all aspects of remote programming. CI users were satisfied with the results in 96.9% of the programming sessions; 100% of participants would use remote programming again. Although technical problems were encountered, they did not cause the sessions to be considerably longer than face-to-face sessions.

  17. A holistic school-based intervention for improving health-related knowledge, body composition, and fitness in elementary school students: an evaluation of the HealthMPowers program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Rachel M; Meyer, Adria; Kay, Christi; Allensworth, Diane; Gazmararian, Julie A

    2014-06-26

    Over the past 30 years, obesity in the United States has increased twofold in children and threefold in adolescents. In Georgia, nearly 17% of children aged 10 - 17 are obese. In response to the high prevalence of child obesity in Georgia and the potential deleterious consequences that this can have, HealthMPowers was founded in 1999 with the goal of preventing childhood obesity by improving health-enhancing behaviors in elementary schools, utilizing a holistic three-year program. This study measures the effectiveness of the HealthMPowers program in improving the school environment, student knowledge, behavior, cardiovascular fitness levels, and Body Mass Index (BMI). The present analysis utilizes data from 40 schools that worked with HealthMPowers over the course of the 2012 - 2013 school year (including schools at each of the three years of the intervention period) and provided information on demographics, student knowledge and behaviors, BMI, performance on the PACER test of aerobic capacity, and school practices and policies (measured via school self-assessment with the HealthMPowers-developed instrument "Continuous Improvement Tracking Tool" or CITT), measured at the beginning and end of each school year. Paired two-sample T tests were used to compare continuous variables (e.g., student knowledge scores, BMI-for-age Z scores), while chi-squared tests were used to assess categorical variables (e.g., trichotomized PACER performance). Students across all grades and cohorts demonstrated improvements in knowledge and self-reported behaviors, with particularly significant improvements for third-graders in schools in the second year of the HealthMPowers program (p grades and gender, with the most significant decreases for students overweight or obese at baseline (p Students also showed significant increases in performance on the PACER test across grades and cohorts (p improve their practices over time, as measured via the CITT instrument. The present report

  18. The effects of an 8-week multicomponent inpatient treatment program on body composition and anaerobic fitness in overweight and obese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karner-Rezek K

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Klaus Karner-Rezek,1 Beat Knechtle,2,3 Matthias Fenzl,4 Christian Schlegel,4 Manuela Konrad,5 Thomas Rosemann2 1Private University of the Principality of Liechtenstein, Triesen, Principality of Liechtenstein, 2Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 4Swiss Olympic Medical Center, Medizinisches Zentrum Bad Ragaz, Switzerland; 5University of Applied Sciences JOANNEUM, Bad Gleichenberg, Austria Background: High intensity exercise is considered as an effective means for reducing body fat. The aims of the present study were to investigate (1 whether body mass would be lost and body composition would change and (2 whether variables of anaerobic fitness prior to the intervention period would be related to loss of body mass and changes in body composition in overweight and obese children and adolescents. Methods: A total of 28 children and adolescents (19 boys, 9 girls attended an 8-week multicomponent inpatient program. Caloric intake was based on the subject's weight and a daily energy deficit of ~500 kcal was targeted. At the beginning and at the end of the program, variables of anaerobic fitness were assessed using Wingate tests. Body composition was measured before and after the program using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results: Body mass decreased by 11.4% ± 1.6% in boys and by 11.0% ± 2.8% in girls (P < 0.001. Fat mass decreased by 23.8% ± 6.1% in boys and by 21.5% ± 5.2% in girls (P < 0.001. The decrease in fat mass was associated with the decrease in body mass in boys (r = 0.54, P = 0.017 but not in girls (P > 0.05. The decrease in body mass and the decrease in fat mass were neither associated with overall energy expenditure nor with the energy deficit in both genders (P > 0.05. Mean power in W/kg increased in the Wingate tests by 95.4% ± 109.1% in boys and by 100.0% ± 119.9% in girls (P < 0.001. Conclusions

  19. FItness programy a individuální přístup ve fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Rambous, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Souhrn: Tato diplomová práce se zabývá problematikou fitness programů a individuálru'ho přístupu ve fitness centrech. Celé téma zahrnuje rozpracování postupu při vytváření fitness programů a roli osobního trenéra ve fitness. Dále jsou zde uvedeny specifika některých fitness programů a v empirické části pak příklad dvou individuálních fitness programů. Název práce: Fitness programy a individuálnípřístup ve fitness Title: FITNESS PROGRAMS AND INDIVIDUAL CARE IN FITNESS Cíle práce: 1. podrobný p...

  20. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies on the zero G cloud physics laboratory are reported. This program involves the definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineations of a set of candidate experiments that must utilize the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity.

  1. Transition Program: The Challenges Faced by Special Needs Students in Gaining Work Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Aliza

    2014-01-01

    Transition program for special needs students is known to open opportunities for students with learning disabilities to gain work experience in actual work environment. The program provides training activities and also an opportunity to go for internship to gain work experience. Therefore, this study is to identify the challenges faced by special…

  2. Does the MBA Experience Support Diversity? Demographic Effects on Program Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaugh, J. B.; Bento, Regina; Hwang, Alvin

    2010-01-01

    Using data provided by graduates from 128 MBA programs, we examined the extent to which age, gender, and ethnicity predicted student perceptions of the MBA experience. We found that women and minorities were more likely to see program costs and the availability of financial support as significant factors in their program enrollment decisions than…

  3. Camp NERF: methods of a theory-based nutrition education recreation and fitness program aimed at preventing unhealthy weight gain in underserved elementary children during summer months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Laura C; Fristad, Mary; Goodway, Jacqueline D; Eneli, Ihuoma; Holloman, Chris; Kennel, Julie A; Melnyk, Bernadette; Gunther, Carolyn

    2016-10-26

    The number of obese children in the US remains high, which is problematic due to the mental, physical, and academic effects of obesity on child health. Data indicate that school-age children, particularly underserved children, experience unhealthy gains in BMI at a rate nearly twice as fast during the summer months. Few efforts have been directed at implementing evidence-based programming to prevent excess weight gain during the summer recess. Camp NERF is an 8-week, multi-component (nutrition, physical activity, and mental health), theory-based program for underserved school-age children in grades Kindergarten - 5th coupled with the USDA Summer Food Service Program. Twelve eligible elementary school sites will be randomized to one of the three programming groups: 1) Active Control (non-nutrition, physical activity, or mental health); 2) Standard Care (nutrition and physical activity); or 3) Enhanced Care (nutrition, physical activity, and mental health) programming. Anthropometric, behavioral, and psychosocial data will be collected from child-caregiver dyads pre- and post-intervention. Site-specific characteristics and process evaluation measures will also be collected. This is the first, evidence-based intervention to address the issue of weight gain during the summer months among underserved, school-aged children. Results from this study will provide researchers, practitioners, and public health professionals with insight on evidence-based programming to aid in childhood obesity prevention during this particular window of risk. NCT02908230/09-19-2016.

  4. The rationale and experiences in implementing New Jersey's radon program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bynum, J.; Klotz, J.; Cahill, M.; Nicholls, G.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss how radon data from domestic modeling, mining studies, and animal studies provided a strong basis for New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) to support MJDEP's recommendation to establish a state radon program. The program, described in this report, focuses on promoting intensive testing by state residents followed by prompt remediation for residences with radon levels greater than or equal to four pico curies per liter. NJDOH believes a threshold for radiation carcinogens does not exist. Even at low levels, exposure to radiation is associated with some health risk. Hence, with consideration given to the length of exposure in the home prompt action is warranted until more definitive data suggest otherwise

  5. Effects of a Physical Activity Program on Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Pulmonary Function in Obese Women after Bariatric Surgery: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofre, Tatiana; Carlos, Renata; Oliver, Nicole; Felismino, Amanda; Fialho, Davi; Corte, Renata; da Silva, Eliane Pereira; Godoy, Eudes; Bruno, Selma

    2017-08-01

    In severely obese individuals, reducing body weight induced by bariatric surgery is able to promote a reduction in comorbidities and improve respiratory symptoms. However, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) reflected by peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak ) may not improve in individuals who remain sedentary post-surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a physical training program on CRF and pulmonary function in obese women after bariatric surgery, and to compare them to a control group. Twelve obese female candidates for bariatric surgery were evaluated in the preoperative, 3 months postoperative (3MPO), and 6 months postoperative (6MPO) periods through anthropometry, spirometry, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). In the 3MPO period, patients were divided into control group (CG, n = 6) and intervention group (IG, n = 6). CG received only general guidelines while IG underwent a structured and supervised physical training program involving aerobic and resistance exercises, lasting 12 weeks. All patients had a significant reduction in anthropometric measurements and an increase in lung function after surgery, with no difference between groups. However, only IG presented a significant increase (p bariatric surgery could promote a significant increase in CRF only in the trained group, yet also showing that bariatric surgery alone caused an improvement in the lung function of both groups.

  6. EFFECTS OF A SHORT-TERM PLYOMETRIC AND RESISTANCE TRAINING PROGRAM ON FITNESS PERFORMANCE IN BOYS AGE 12 TO 15 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery D. Faigenbaum

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a six week training period of combined plyometric and resistance training (PRT, n = 13 or resistance training alone (RT, n = 14 on fitness performance in boys (12-15 yr. The RT group performed static stretching exercises followed by resistance training whereas the PRT group performed plyometric exercises followed by the same resistance training program. The training duration per session for both groups was 90 min. At baseline and after training all participants were tested on the vertical jump, long jump, medicine ball toss, 9.1 m sprint, pro agility shuttle run and flexibility. The PRT group made significantly (p < 0.05 greater improvements than RT in long jump (10.8 cm vs. 2.2 cm, medicine ball toss (39.1 cm vs. 17.7 cm and pro agility shuttle run time (-0.23 sec vs. -0.02 sec following training. These findings suggest that the addition of plyometric training to a resistance training program may be more beneficial than resistance training and static stretching for enhancing selected measures of upper and lower body power in boys

  7. Having a Ball with Fitness Balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Fitness programs can be greatly enhanced with the addition of fitness balls. They are a fun, challenging, economical, and safe way to incorporate a cardiovascular, strength, and stretching program for all fitness levels in a physical education setting. The use of these balls has become more popular during the last decade, and their benefits and…

  8. Subsidy programs on diffusion of solar water heaters: Taiwan's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Keh-Chin; Lin, Wei-Min; Lee, Tsong-Sheng; Chung, Kung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Financial incentives are essentially one of the key factors influencing diffusion of solar water heaters in many countries. Two subsidy programs were initiated by the government of Taiwan in 1986 (1986-1991) and 2000 (2000-present), respectively. Those long-term national programs are considered to be the driving force on local market expansion. In 2008, the regional subsidy programs for solar water heaters were announced by Kaohsiung city and Kiemen county, which resulted in the growth in sales. A revised subsidy was also initiated by the government of Taiwan in 2009. The subsidy is 50% more. However, the tremendous enlargement of market size with a high-level ratio of subsidy over total installation cost might result in a negative impact on a sustainable SWH industry and long-term development of the local market, which is associated with system design and post-installation service. This paper aims to address the relative efficiency and pitfalls of those national and regional programs. - Research Highlights: → The direct subsidy has been the driving force on market expansion in Taiwan. → Higher subsidy would certainly increase the total number of systems installed. → A high-level subsidy results in a negative impact on users or a sustainable industry.

  9. PBF/LOFT Lead Rod Test Program experiment operating specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.

    1978-11-01

    The PBF/LOFT Lead Rod (LLR) Test Program is being conducted to provide experimental information on the behavior of nuclear fuel under normal and accident conditions in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Understanding the behavior of light-water reactors (LWR) under loss-of-coolant conditions is a major objective of the NRC Reactor Safety Research Program. The Loss of Fluid Test (LOFT) facility is the major testing facility to evaluate the systems response of an LWR over a wide range of Loss of Coolant Experment (LOCE) conditions. As such, the LOFT core is intended to be used for sequential LOCE tests provided no significant fuel rod failures occur. The PFB/LLR tests are designed to simulate the test conditions for the LOFT Power Ascension Tests L2-2 through L2-5. The test program has been designed to provide a parametric evaluation of the LOFT fuel over a wide range of power. Thus, a relatively accurate assessment of the state of the LOFT core after the completion of each subtest and the anticipated effect of the next test can be obtained by utilizing a combination of LLR test data and analytical predictions. Specifications for the test program are presented

  10. Designing fractional factorial split-plot experiments using integer programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capehart, Shay R.; Keha, Ahmet; Kulahci, Murat

    2011-01-01

    factorial (FF) design, with the restricted randomisation structure to account for the whole plots and subplots. We discuss the formulation of FFSP designs using integer programming (IP) to achieve various design criteria. We specifically look at the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions...

  11. African American Students' Experiences in Special Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Eleanor; Howley, Aimee

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: Disproportionate placement of African American students into special education programs is likely to be a form of institutional racism, especially when such placement stigmatizes students. If placement also fails to lead to educational benefits, the practice becomes even more suspect. Some studies have explored disproportionate…

  12. Aptitud física en mujeres adultas mayores vinculadas a un programa de envejecimiento activo Physical fitness in older woman related to an active aging program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Correa Bautista

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la aptitud física, entendida como la capacidad para desarrollar actividades normales de la vida diaria de forma segura, con independencia y sin excesiva fatiga, en un grupo de mujeres, vinculadas durante ocho meses al programa de recreación para el adulto mayor del Instituto Distrital de Recreación y Deporte (IDRD, de la localidad de Puente Aranda de la ciudad de Bogotá. Materiales y métodos: Estudio transversal de una cohorte de n= 344 mujeres en edades entre 60 y 87 años, a las cuales se les realizaron mediciones de peso (Kg, talla (cm, porcentaje de grasa, perímetro de cintura (cm, fuerza muscular de resistencia en miembros inferiores, y resistencia aeróbica, de acuerdo a la Bateria Senior Fitness Test (SFT.La agilidad no fue tenida encuenta. Para identificar el cambio de comportamiento de la población se utilizó el modelo transteórico de Prochaska y Velicer Resultados: El (56,4 % de las mujeres del estudio se encontró en etapa de acción en relación al comportamiento frente a la actividad física. Se identificaron 159 mujeres en sobrepeso, 121 mujeres con fuerza de resistencia adecuada, 183 con resistencia aeróbica dentro de los parámetros de normalidad y 183 mujeres con mala flexibilidad. Conclusión: A partir de los resultados descritos concluimos que la práctica regular de actividad física en la población de mujeres personas mayores trajo beneficios, pues su nivel de aptitud física sobre todo en lo relacionado con la fuerza en miembros inferiores y la capacidad aeróbica, mostró niveles suficientes y se clasificaron como activas físicamente. Salud UIS 2011; 43 (3: 263-269Objective: To determine physical fitness, understood as ability to develop normal activities of daily living safely, independently and without excessive fatigue through the measurement of physical components as the force of resistance, endurance, and agility in a group of women, linked for 8 months in a recreation program for the

  13. Experience with a pharmacy technician medication history program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Julie B; Lilliston, Michelle; Brooks, DeAnne; Swords, Bruce

    2014-09-15

    The implementation and outcomes of a pharmacy technician medication history program are described. An interprofessional medication reconciliation team, led by a clinical pharmacist and a clinical nurse specialist, was charged with implementing a new electronic medication reconciliation system to improve compliance with medication reconciliation at discharge and capture compliance-linked reimbursement. The team recommended that the pharmacy department be allocated new pharmacy technician full-time-equivalent positions to assume ownership of the medication history process. Concurrent with the implementation of this program, a medication history standard was developed to define rules for documentation of what a patient reports he or she is actually taking. The standard requires a structured interview with the patient or caregiver and validation with outside sources as indicated to determine which medications to document in the medication history. The standard is based on four medication administration category rules: scheduled, as-needed, short-term, and discontinued medications. The medication history standard forms the core of the medication history technician training and accountability program. Pharmacy technicians are supervised by pharmacists, using a defined accountability plan based on a set of medical staff approved rules for what medications comprise a best possible medication history. Medication history accuracy and completeness rates have been consistently over 90% and rates of provider compliance with medication reconciliation rose from under 20% to 100% since program implementation. A defined medication history based on a medication history standard served as an effective foundation for a pharmacy technician medication history program, which helped improve provider compliance with discharge medication reconciliation. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Experience in plant transients. The Swedish RKS program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento, J.P.

    1983-09-01

    A data-base for reactor operation experience is presented. The input comes from utilities in 14 countries. From experience with the Swedish reactors, trends have been extracted. Using the number of operational scrams as a measure of reactor management, there seem to be a maximum at early reactor life, followed by a decreasing trend after 2 years. This seems to be true for all reactors in the programme. There is even a decrease in the number of scrams with further reactor generations. Causes for events and for scrams are evaluated. (Aa)

  15. Impact of a visual programming experience on the attitude toward programming of introductory undergraduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Saurabh

    Traditionally, textual tools have been utilized to teach basic programming languages and paradigms. Research has shown that students tend to be visual learners. Using flowcharts, students can quickly understand the logic of their programs and visualize the flow of commands in the algorithm. Moreover, applying programming to physical systems through the use of a microcontroller to facilitate this type of learning can spark an interest in students to advance their programming knowledge to create novel applications. This study examined if freshmen college students' attitudes towards programming changed after completing a graphical programming lesson. Various attributes about students' attitudes were examined including confidence, interest, stereotypes, and their belief in the usefulness of acquiring programming skills. The study found that there were no statistically significant differences in attitudes either immediately following the session or after a period of four weeks.

  16. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was $1000 US, and the yearly maintenance cost was <$500 with funds typically allocated from existing school resources. The facilitator was a school official or volunteer for 81% of schools. Average estimated training time commitment per student was <2 hours. Automated external defibrillators are available in 98% of schools, and 61% include automated external defibrillator training in their curriculum. Despite perceived barriers, school CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 10 CFR 26.189 - Determination of fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of fitness. 26.189 Section 26.189 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Determining Fitness-for-Duty Policy Violations and Determining Fitness § 26.189 Determination of fitness. (a) A determination of fitness is the process entered...

  18. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency–based Program on Residents’ Learning and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Background The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency–based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency–based program on residents’ learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. Methods The data from the 2007–2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents’ learning was measured using preceptors’ evaluations of residents’ skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents’ rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate’s Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. Results For residents’ learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents’ scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents’ training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. Conclusion The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience. PMID:27403213

  19. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency-based Program on Residents' Learning and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency-based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency-based program on residents' learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. The data from the 2007-2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents' learning was measured using preceptors' evaluations of residents' skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents' rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate's Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. For residents' learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents' scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents' training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience.

  20. NMR pulse experiments data aquisition and Fast Fourier Transform assembler program for Mera-400 minicomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachurowa, M.; Jasinski, A.

    1981-01-01

    An assembler program of NMR pulse experiments data acquisition digital signal filtering and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) for the Mera-400 minicomputer interfaced to the pulsed NMR spectrometer is described. A phase correction subroutine of the program allows the phase correction to be made after the experiment. The program is run under the SOM-3 operating system. The program occupies 2.25 k 16 bit words of the computer memory, 3 k words are reserved for data. FFT computation time is 2.5 sec. for 1 k data points. (Author)

  1. Status of the LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, G.R.; Dickinson, D.R.; Hilliard, R.K.; McCormack, J.D.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Rahn, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The LACE program, sponsored by an international consortium, is investigating inherent aerosol behavior for three postulated high consequence accident sequences; the containment bypass or V-sequence, failure to isolate containment, and delayed containment failure. Six large-scale tests are described which focus on these accident situations and which will be completed in the Containment Systems Test Facility at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The aerosol generation systems used to generate soluble and insoluble aerosols for the large-scale tests are described. The report then focuses on those tests which deal with the containment bypass accident sequence. Test results are presented and discussed for three containment bypass scoping tests

  2. Validation experience with the core calculation program karate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegyi, Gy.; Hordosy, G.; Kereszturi, A.; Makai, M.; Maraczy, Cs.

    1995-01-01

    A relatively fast and easy-to-handle modular code system named KARATE-440 has been elaborated for steady-state operational calculations of VVER-440 type reactors. It is built up from cell, assembly and global calculations. In the frame of the program neutron physical and thermohydraulic process of the core at normal startup, steady and slow transient can be simulated. The verification and validation of the global code have been prepared recently. The test cases include mathematical benchmark and measurements on operating VVER-440 units. Summary of the results, such as startup parameters, boron letdown curves, radial and axial power distributions of some cycles of Paks NPP is presented. (author)

  3. EDF/EPRI collaborative program on operator reliability experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villemeur, A.; Meslin, T.; Mosneron, F.; Worledge, D.H.; Joksimovich, V.; Spurgin, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Electricite de France (EDF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have been involved in human reliability studies over the last few years, in the context of improvements in human reliability assessment (HRA) methodologies, and have been following a systematic process since 1982 which consists of addressing the following five ingredients: - First, classify human interactions into a limited number of classes. - Second, introduce an acceptable framework to organize the application of HRA to PRA studies. - Third, select approach(es) to quantification. - Fourth, test promising models. - Fifth, establish an appropriate data base for tested model(s) with regard to specific applications. EPRI has just recently completed Phase I of the fourth topic. This primarily focused on testing the fundamental hypotheses behing the human cognitive reliability (HCR) correlation, using power plant simulators. EDF has been carrying out simulator studies since 1980, both for man-machine interface validation and HRA data collection. This background of experience provided a stepping stone for the EPRI project. On the other hand, before 1986, EDF had mainly been concentrating on getting qualitative insights from the tests and lacked experience in quantitative analysis and modeling, while EPRI had made advances in this latter area. Before the EPRI Operator Reliability Experiments (ORE) project was initiated, it was abundantly clear to EPRI and EDF that cooperation between the two could be useful and that both parties could gain from the cooperation

  4. Role of Mecp2 in Experience-Dependent Epigenetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Zimmermann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2, the founding member of a family of proteins recognizing and binding to methylated DNA, are the genetic cause of a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder in humans, called Rett syndrome. Available evidence suggests that MECP2 protein has a critical role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity and transcription during brain development. Moreover, recent studies in mice show that various posttranslational modifications, notably phosphorylation, regulate Mecp2’s functions in learning and memory, drug addiction, depression-like behavior, and the response to antidepressant treatment. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis drives the stress response and its deregulation increases the risk for a variety of mental disorders. Early-life stress (ELS typically results in sustained HPA-axis deregulation and is a major risk factor for stress related diseases, in particular major depression. Interestingly, Mecp2 protein has been shown to contribute to ELS-dependent epigenetic programming of Crh, Avp, and Pomc, all of these genes enhance HPA-axis activity. Hereby ELS regulates Mecp2 phosphorylation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activities in a tissue-specific and temporospatial manner. Overall, these findings suggest MECP2 proteins are so far underestimated and have a more dynamic role in the mediation of the gene-environment dialog and epigenetic programming of the neuroendocrine stress system in health and disease.

  5. Understanding Dieting and Previous Weight Loss Attempts among Overweight and Obese Participants: Insights into My Body Is Fit and Fabulous at Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Tengku Alina Tengku; Jalil, Rohana Abdul; Wan Ishak, Wan Rosli; Hamid, Noor Fadzlina; Wan Nik, Wan Suriati; Jan Mohamed, Hamid Jan; Mohd, Nor Haslina; Arifin, Wan Nor; Mohamed, Wan Mohd Izani Wan; Ibrahim, Mohd Ismail; Ismail, Rohaida; Hassim, Tengku Fatimatul Tengku; Aris, Tahir; Wan Muda, Wan Manan

    2018-01-01

    A qualitative study providing an in-depth exploration of people's view and the increasing burden of overweight and obesity is required. This study aimed to explore the understanding of dieting and previous experiences on weight loss attempts among overweight and obese government employees in Kelantan, Malaysia, prior to recruitment into the intervention program. Thirteen focus group discussions involving 129 participants from a weight-loss intervention program were conducted within the first 1 month of recruitment. These discussions were moderated by two trained researchers in the Malay language and assisted by an interview guide. They were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A thematic analysis was performed, and codes and themes from each discussion were constructed. The participants understood dieting with various meanings, including skipping meals and removing rice from daily diets. They applied numerous methods to lose weight and achieved various outcomes. Health and appearance, social support, and compliance with current trends were the factors motivating these participants to lose weight. Their determination to lose weight was limited by lack of self-control and motivation, experiences of unpleasant effects, influence on weight, and environmental and health factors. Real-life weight loss experiences and perceptions provided relevant insights into current weight loss management strategies. Some of these issues and misunderstandings should be emphasized in weight loss strategies during health promotion.

  6. Some experiences from the commissioning program of the SLC arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.; Brown, K.L.; Bulos, F.; Fieguth, T.; Hutton, A.; Murray, J.J.; Toge, N.; Weng, W.T.; Wiedemann, H.

    1987-01-01

    The SLC Arc System is designed to transport beams of electrons and positrons from the end of the SLAC Linac to the beginning of the Final Focus System where they are made to collide head on. To minimize phase space dilution caused by quantum processes in the synchrotron radiation energy loss mechanism, the bending radii are large (279 m) and very high gradient (n = 32824) AG cells are arranged in trains of low dispersion, terrain following achromats. First experiences in operating a system of over 900 magnets, each with beam position monitors and corrector magnet movers, spanning 9000 feet, are described

  7. The Exercise-Induced Irisin Is Associated with Improved Levels of Glucose Homeostasis Markers in Pregnant Women Participating in 8-Week Prenatal Group Fitness Program: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Szumilewicz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Both exercise and pregnancy influence serum irisin concentration. Aim. To determine how the interaction of pregnancy and exercise affects irisin level and whether various patterns of exercise adherence had different effect on irisin concentration. Methods. It was a one-group pretest-posttest study among 9 Caucasian nulliparous healthy women in normal pregnancy (age 23±3 years, 21±2 weeks of gestation; mean ± SD who participated in 8-week group fitness program. Before and after exercise intervention, we determined serum concentrations of irisin and selected parameters of lipid profile and glucose homeostasis markers. Results. In active women, irisin slightly decreased with the development of pregnancy. After 8 weeks of exercising, irisin correlated negatively with fasting glucose (R = −0.922; p=0.001, glycated hemoglobin (R = −0.784; p=0.012, and insulin concentrations (R = −0.845; p=0.004. In women exercising below recommended level, we observed a significant drop in irisin concentration, whereas in women exercising at least three times a week this myokine slightly increased (31% difference; 90% confidence limits ±28; a large, clear effect. Conclusions. Irisin stimulated by prenatal exercise may improve glucose homeostasis markers in healthy women and compensate for metabolic changes induced by pregnancy. Moreover, the frequency of exercise may regulate the changes in exercise-induced irisin concentration.

  8. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  9. Teaching and learning curriculum programs: recommendations for postgraduate pharmacy experiences in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; Brown, Bonnie; Gettig, Jacob; Martello, Jay L; McClendon, Katie S; Smith, Kelly M; Teeters, Janet; Ulbrich, Timothy R; Wegrzyn, Nicole; Bradley-Baker, Lynette R

    2014-08-01

    Recommendations for the development and support of teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) experiences within postgraduate pharmacy training programs are discussed. Recent attention has turned toward meeting teaching- and learning-related educational outcomes through a programmatic process during the first or second year of postgraduate education. These programs are usually coordinated by schools and colleges of pharmacy and often referred to as "teaching certificate programs," though no national standards or regulation of these programs currently exists. In an effort to describe the landscape of these programs and to develop a framework for their basic design and content, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Pharmacy Practice Section's Task Force on Student Engagement and Involvement, with input from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, reviewed evidence from the literature and conference proceedings and considered author experience and expertise over a two-year period. The members of the task force created and reached consensus on a policy statement and 12 recommendations to guide the development of best practices of TLC programs. The recommendations address topics such as the value of TLC programs, program content, teaching and learning experiences, feedback for participants, the development of a teaching portfolio, the provision of adequate resources for TLC programs, programmatic assessment and improvement, program transparency, and accreditation. TLC programs provide postgraduate participants with valuable knowledge and skills in teaching applicable to the practitioner and academician. Postgraduate programs should be transparent to candidates and seek to ensure the best experiences for participants through systematic program implementation and assessments. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Experiences and emotions of faculty teaching in accelerated second baccalaureate degree nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Cheryl L; Boellaard, Melissa R; Zorn, Cecelia R

    2013-07-01

    The number of accelerated second baccalaureate degree nursing (ASBSN) programs has mushroomed over recent decades, with more than 225 currently in existence. Scholars have described students and programs, but research examining the faculty experience is limited. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences and emotions of faculty teaching students in ASBSN programs. Using a descriptive qualitative survey design, faculty (N = 138) from 25 randomly selected programs in 11 midwestern states were surveyed using an instrument developed for this study and distributed online. Ten themes emerged, including (a) Engaging With Motivated, Mature, and Diverse Students, (b) Students Choosing Nursing for the "Wrong Reasons," (c) Too Much Work, Too Little Time for Students and Faculty, (d) Amazement, (e) Pride, and (f) Frustration. These findings will help novice and seasoned ASBSN faculty interpret their experiences, strengthen precepting and mentoring activities, and support administrators in determining staffing plans and designing ASBSN programs. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Successes and Challenges in the SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, L. W.; Baldridge, W. S.; Pellerin, L.; Ferguson, J. F.; Bedrosian, P.; Biehler, S.; Jiracek, G. R.; Snelson, C. M.; Kelley, S.; McPhee, D.

    2014-12-01

    The SAGE program was initiated in 1983 to provide an applied geophysics research and education experience for students. Since 1983, 820 students have completed the SAGE summer program. Beginning in 1992, with funding from the NSF, SAGE has included an REU (Research Experience for Undergraduates) experience for selected undergraduate students from U.S. colleges and universities. Since 1992, 380 undergraduate REU students have completed the SAGE program. The four week, intensive, summer program is based in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and involves students in learning geophysical theory and applications; collection of geophysical field data in the northern Rio Grande Rift area; data processing, modeling and interpretation; and presentation (oral and written) of results of each student's research results. Students (undergraduates, graduates and professionals) and faculty are together on a school campus for the summer program. Successful strategies (developed over the years) of the program include teamwork experience, mentoring of REUs (by faculty and more senior students), cultural interchange due to students from many campuses across the U.S. and international graduate students, including industry visitors who work with the students and provide networking, a capstone experience of the summer program that includes all students making a "professional-meeting" style presentation of their research and submitting a written report, a follow-up workshop for the REU students to enhance and broaden their experience, and providing professional development for the REUs through oral or poster presentations and attendance at a professional meeting. Program challenges include obtaining funding from multiple sources; significant time investment in program management, reporting, and maintaining contact with our many funding sources and industry affiliates; and, despite significant efforts, limited success in recruiting racial and ethnic minority students to the program.

  12. Program of experiments for the operating phase of the Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, G.R.; Bilinsky, D.M.; Davison, C.C.; Gray, M.N.; Kjartanson, B.H.; Martin, C.D.; Peters, D.A.; Lang, P.A.

    1992-09-01

    The Underground Research Laboratory (URL) is one of the major research and development facilities that AECL Research has constructed in support of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The URL is a unique geotechnical research facility constructed in previously undisturbed plutonic rock, which was well characterized before construction. The site evaluation and construction phases of the URL project have been completed and the operating phase is beginning. A program of operating phase experiments that address AECL's objectives for in situ testing has been selected. These experiments were subjected to an external peer review and a subsequent review by the URL Experiment Committee in 1989. The comments from the external peer review were incorporated into the experiment plans, and the revised experiments were accepted by the URL Experiment Committee. Summaries of both reviews are presented. The schedule for implementing the experiments and the quality assurance to be applied during implementation are also summarized. (Author) (9 refs., 11 figs.)

  13. Software complex for developing dynamically packed program system for experiment automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baluka, G.; Salamatin, I.M.

    1985-01-01

    Software complex for developing dynamically packed program system for experiment automation is considered. The complex includes general-purpose programming systems represented as the RT-11 standard operating system and specially developed problem-oriented moduli providing execution of certain jobs. The described complex is realized in the PASKAL' and MAKRO-2 languages and it is rather flexible to variations of the technique of the experiment

  14. The Impact of Parental Involvement on a Structured Youth Program Experience: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mat D. Duerden

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Parental involvement is an often proposed, but rarely researched, key element of youth programs. Questions remain regarding the impact of parental involvement on program processes and outcomes. Qualitative data were collected over a one-year period with youth participants (n=46, parents (n=26, and teachers (n=5 associated with an international immersion/service learning program for adolescents. Three main research questions guided the data analysis: (1 what role does parental involvement play in the youths’ experience in the program; (2 how does parental involvement in the program influence the parent/child relationship; and (3 what role does parental involvement play in terms of the program’s long-term impact on the youth participants? Findings suggest a relationship between parental involvement in youth programs and improved parent/child communication, bonding, and perceptions of one another. Findings also suggest that having a common ground experience prolonged the experience’s positive post-participation effects.

  15. Programming and supervision of resistance training leads to positive effects on strength and body composition: results from two randomised trials of community fitness programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Steven; Jimenez, Alfonso; Steele, James; Domone, Sarah; Wade, Matthew; Beedie, Chris

    2018-03-27

    Many sedentary adults have high body fat along with low fitness, strength, and lean body mass (LBM) which are associated with poor health independently of body mass. Physical activity can aid in prevention, management, and treatment of numerous chronic conditions. The potential efficacy of resistance training (RT) in modifying risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic disease is clear. However, RT is under researched in public health. We report community-based studies of RT in sedentary (Study 1), and overweight and pre-diabetic (Study 2) populations. Study 1 - A semi randomised trial design (48-weeks): Participants choosing either a fitness centre approach, and randomised to structured-exercise (STRUC, n = 107), or free/unstructured gym use (FREE, n = 110), or not, and randomised to physical-activity-counselling (PAC, n = 71) or a measurement only comparator (CONT, n = 76). Study 2 - A randomised wait list controlled trial (12-weeks): Patients were randomly assigned to; traditional-supervised-exercise (STRUC, n = 30), physical-activity-counselling (PAC, n = 23), either combined (COMB, n = 39), or a wait-list comparator (CONT, n = 54). Outcomes for both were BF mass (kg), LBM (kg), BF percentage (%), and strength. Study 1: One-way ANCOVA revealed significant between group effects for BF% and LBM, but not for BF mass or strength. Post hoc paired comparisons revealed significantly greater change in LBM for the STRUC group compared with the CONT group. Within group changes using 95%CIs revealed significant changes only in the STRUC group for both BF% (- 4.1 to - 0.9%) and LBM (0.1 to 4.5 kg), and in FREE (8.2 to 28.5 kg) and STRUC (5.9 to 26.0 kg) for strength. Study 2: One-way ANCOVA did not reveal significant between group effects for strength, BF%, BF mass, or LBM. For strength, 95%CIs revealed significant within group changes for the STRUC (2.4 to 14.1 kg) and COMB (3.7 to 15.0 kg) groups. Strength increased in both

  16. Multi-dimensional reflooding experiments: the PEARL program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenne, N.; Pradier, M.; Olivieri, J.; Eymery, S.; Fichot, F.; March, P.; Fleurot, J.

    2011-01-01

    PEARL is an experimental program to study heat transfer and flow regime during the reflooding of a severely damaged PWR core where a large part of the core has collapsed and formed a debris bed. PEARL device will consist in a water-steam loop where the key component is an autoclave capable of housing a test section containing the particle bed and its instrumentation made of thermocouples, pressure sensors and flow rate meters. An electromagnetic induction heating system will generate a predefined specific power in the debris bed and maintains the power during the water reflooding phase. A preliminary experimental investigation has been launched with the setting of the PRELUDE facility, which is one-dimensional. The main aim was to test the particle bed heating system and instrumentation during the reflooding phase. PRELUDE results obtained so far show that the chosen technology is able to deposit a sufficient power density during the reflooding phase. Moreover a temperature of 1000 Celsius degrees for the debris bed is reached accurately with the induction system

  17. Marketing Program Standardization: The Experience of TNCs in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Sagan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the rate of standardization of marketing programs in transnational corporations in the consumer goods market in Poland, which currently is one of the fastest growing markets in the world. An important research objective was to observe how Polish consumers adopt the marketing patterns and related lifestyles from countries of Western Europe and the USA. The empirical tests and data, collected in a sample survey of 35 transnational corporations and their 140 products, and using varied methods of statistical inference, allowed to formulate the following conclusions. The analyzed TNC’s adopted a clear standardization strategy in the Polish market. Among the analyzed products, 2/3 of them have been entirely transferred from foreign markets into the Polish market. A detailed analysis has indicated that the standardization rate of product and its items in the FMCG market in Poland is high and very high, and significantly higher than the pricing and advertising strategy standardization rates. The product standardization rate in the Polish market has been slightly higher than the rate in the developed countries, yet the pricing standardization has been significantly lower. The standardization of advertising strategies showed similar features.

  18. PROGRAM OF PALLIATIVE CANCER CARE – OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Slánská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually more than 27,000 persons die of cancer in the Czech Republic and the overall incidence of malignancies is still increasing. These data shows the need for affordable and good follow-up care especially for patients without any cancer treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Currently the outpatient palliative cancer care gets more into the forefront. Prerequisite for a well working outpatient palliative care is cooperation with general practitioners and home health care agencies. The purpose of the so called program of palliative cancer care is to guide a patient in palliative cancer care and to improve the cooperation among health care providers. Methods: During the period from January 2008 to October 2010 we evaluated in patient without any oncology treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Results: In palliative outpatient clinic we treated 446 patients, 119 of them received home care services with average length of 27.8 days. 77 patients died at home, 51 in health facilities and 41 in inpatient hospice care. Conclusion: We present pilot study focusing on outpatient palliative cancer care which shows the real benefit from early indication of palliative cancer care. This type of care allows patients to stay as long as possible at home among their close relatives.

  19. Designing an Effective Prevention Program: Principles Underlying the Rand Smoking and Drug Prevention Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellickson, Phyllis L.

    This paper describes the Project ALERT program (Adolescent Learning Experiences in Resistance Training) which was established by the Rand Corporation to prevent smoking and drug use among seventh graders. The program is based on the social influence model of drug use initiation. Curriculum features are described including motivation to resist and…

  20. Does Teaching Experience Matter? Examining Biology Teachers' Prior Knowledge for Teaching in an Alternative Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichsen, Patricia J.; Abell, Sandra K.; Pareja, Enrique M.; Brown, Patrick L.; Lankford, Deanna M.; Volkmann, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative certification programs (ACPs) have been proposed as a viable way to address teacher shortages, yet we know little about how teacher knowledge develops within such programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate prior knowledge for teaching among students entering an ACP, comparing individuals with teaching experience to those…

  1. A Social Work Program's Experience in Teaching about Race in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Phu; Vugia, Holly; Wright, Paul; Woods, Dianne Rush; Chu, Mayling; Jones, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Teaching about race, racism, and oppression presents higher education programs with complex challenges. This article reports on the experiences of a new MSW program in designing a gateway "race, gender, and inequality" course. Embracing a theoretical base of culturally competent practice and solutions to the inherent difficulties of discussing…

  2. Teaching Global Change in Local Places: The HERO Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnal, Brent; Neff, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The Human-Environment Research Observatory (HERO) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program aimed to develop the next generation of researchers working on place-based human-environment problems. The program followed a cooperative learning model to foster an integrated approach to geographic research and to build collaborative research…

  3. Intellectually Gifted Females and Their Perspectives of Lived Experience in the AP and IB Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbrook, Carrie M.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) programs serve as popular choices for many intellectually gifted high school students. This article describes an aspect of a larger study that examined 5 intellectually gifted females' perceptions of their educational experience while enrolled in one of the programs. Using the…

  4. Experiences and Outcomes of a Women's Leadership Development Program: A Phenomenological Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brue, Krystal L.; Brue, Shawn A.

    2016-01-01

    Women's leadership training programs provide organizations opportunities to value women leaders as organizational resources. This qualitative research utilized phenomenological methodology to examine lived experiences of seven alumni of a women's-only leadership program. We conducted semi-structured interviews to clarify what learning elements…

  5. Fit of experimental points to the sum of two (or one) exponentials with background. Program for ODRA 1305 computer. Part 2: for time analysers with constant dead time after each registered pulse (AC-256 type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdowicz, K.; Krynicka-Drozdowicz, E.

    1979-01-01

    The LAMA program (in FORTRAN 1900 language), which fits the set of decaying experimental values to the sum of the two (or one) exponentials with background, is described. The method of calculation and its accuracy and the interpretation of the program results are given. The changes and the extensions of the calculation, referred to the dead time effect taken into account for time analysers having the constant dead time after each registered pulse, are described. (author)

  6. Training for my Life: Lived Experiences of Dislocated Workers in an Advanced Manufacturing Training Program

    OpenAIRE

    Marquita R. Walker

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative paper explores the lived experiences of one group of workers dislocated because of globalized trade policies who completed a hybrid Advanced Manufacturing Training Program (AMTP) by taking advantage of Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), a federally-funded program for retraining workers dislocated because of trade policies. The research questions focus on how satisfied these workers are with the services and programs provided by TAA. Focus groups and survey instrument results ...

  7. Nurse Leaders? Experiences of Implementing Career Advancement Programs for Nurses in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Career advancement programs are currently implemented in many countries. In Iran, the first career advancement program was Nurses? Career Advancement Pathway. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse leaders? experiences about implementing the Nurses? Career Advancement Pathway program in Iran. Methods: This exploratory qualitative study was conducted in 2013. Sixteen nurse managers were recruited from the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Behesthi, Qazvin,...

  8. Mothers’ experiences in the Nurse-Family Partnership program: a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landy Christine

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have explored the experiences of low income mothers participating in nurse home visiting programs. Our study explores and describes mothers' experiences participating in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP Program, an intensive home visiting program with demonstrated effectiveness, from the time of program entry before 29 weeks gestation until their infant's first birthday. Methods A qualitative case study approach was implemented. A purposeful sample of 18 low income, young first time mothers participating in a pilot study of the NFP program in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada partook in one to two face to face in-depth interviews exploring their experiences in the program. All interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Conventional content analysis procedures were used to analyze all interviews. Data collection and initial analysis were implemented concurrently. Results The mothers participating in the NFP program were very positive about their experiences in the program. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: 1. Getting into the NFP program; 2. The NFP nurse is an expert, but also like a friend providing support; and 3. Participating in the NFP program is making me a better parent. Conclusions Our findings provide vital information to home visiting nurses and to planners of home visiting programs about mothers' perspectives on what is important to them in their relationships with their nurses, how nurses and women are able to develop positive therapeutic relationships, and how nurses respond to mothers' unique life situations while home visiting within the NFP Program. In addition our findings offer insights into why and under what circumstances low income mothers will engage in nurse home visiting and how they expect to benefit from their participation.

  9. The CIRENE program: experience gained in development of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villani, A.

    1982-01-01

    The construction of the Cirene 40 MW prototype electrical power plant at Latina is the main objective of the Cirene development program. A plant contract was given to NIRA at the end of 1976, and the plant completion is foreseen by the end of 1984. The Cirene is a heavy water-moderated, natural uranium-fueled pressure-tube reactor using boiling light water as the primary coolant. The design of Cirene is outlined. The numbers of pressure tubes, calandria tubes, liquid rod tubes and regulating rod tubes are 60, 60, 10 and 4, respectively, all made of Zircaloy-2. The equivalent diameter, length and lattice pitch of the core are 236 cm, 400 cm and 27 cm, respectively. The heavy water tank has the central zone of I.D. 369 cm and the dump annulus of I.D. 520 cm, made of AISI 304 L. These key parameters are shown. The means of regulating radioactivity during the normal operation of the reactor are: the two-phase rods, the level of the moderator and the concentration of boron in moderator. The function of two-phase rod regulation system is to introduce a variable density two-phase mixture consisting of boric acid solution and nonabsorbent gas in the core. The R and D was conducted to assess the functional and dynamic features of this control system. The plant is equipped with two independent fast-acting scram systems, discharging of moderator and liquid-rod system. The pressure-tube rupture test was carried out. (Nakai, Y.)

  10. The YMCA Healthy, Fit, and Strong Program: a community-based, family-centered, low-cost obesity prevention/treatment pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert P; Vitolins, Mara Z; Case, L Douglas; Armstrong, Sarah C; Perrin, Eliana M; Cialone, Josephine; Bell, Ronny A

    2012-12-01

    Many resources are available for adults, but there are few community-based programs for overweight and obese children. Community engagement may be instrumental in overcoming barriers physicians experience in managing childhood obesity. Our objective was to design and test the feasibility of a community-based (YMCA), family-centered, low-cost intervention for overweight and obese children. Children 6-11 years over the 85th BMI percentile for age and sex were recruited to YMCA sites in four North Carolina communities. The children had physical activity sessions three times weekly for 3 months (one activity session weekly was family night). The parents received a once-weekly nutrition education class conducted by a registered dietitian using the NC Eat Smart Move More curriculum (10 sessions). Changes in BMI were measured at 3, 6, and 12 months and diet and activity behaviors at 3 and 12 months after baseline. Significant reductions were observed in BMI percentile for age and BMI z-scores at 3, 6, and 12 months. Improvements occurred in dietary and physical activity behaviors, including drinking fewer sugar-sweetened beverages, spending more time in physically active behaviors, and spending less time in sedentary behaviors. The program was low-cost, and qualitative comments suggest the parents and children benefited from the experience. This low-cost YMCA-based intervention was associated with BMI reductions and positive nutritional and activity behavior changes, providing an additional strategy for addressing childhood obesity in community settings.

  11. Cooking, healthy eating, fitness and fun (CHEFFs): qualitative evaluation of a nutrition education program for children living at urban family homeless shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jacqueline; Applebaum, Jo; Stephenson-Hunter, Cara; Tinio, Andrea; Shapiro, Alan

    2013-12-01

    We assessed the feasibility of a 15-week nutrition education, physical activity, and media literacy program for children living in urban family homeless shelters. We developed a qualitative monitoring tool to evaluate program process and impact at 2 shelter sites in the Bronx, New York, from 2009 to 2012. Facilitators recorded indications of participants' understanding of intended messages and demonstrations of changes in attitudes and behaviors. Comments, insights, and actions were recorded as they occurred. Facilitators also documented barriers to delivery of content and activities as intended. We used content analysis to examine data for patterns and identify themes. A total of 162 children participated at the 2 shelter sites. Analysis of qualitative data yielded 3 themes: (1) children's knowledge and understanding of content, (2) children's shift in attitudes or intentions, and (3) interpretations through children's life experience. Food insecurity as well as shelter food service and policies were important influences on children's choices, hunger, and sense of well-being. Children's experiences highlighted the need to advocate for shelter policies that adequately provide for children's nutritional and physical activity requirements and foster academic development.

  12. Nordic Experiences: Participants' Expectations and Experiences of Short-Term Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahikainen, Katariina; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Finnish high school students' and teachers' perceptions of the effects of short-term Nordic study abroad programs in which they had participated. The data presented were based on a "mixed-methods strategy." The data set consisted of responses from 158 students and 92 teachers to a specifically…

  13. Fitness for duty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.; Matney, C.

    1991-01-01

    A Fitness For Duty training program was developed to satisfy the requirements of the NRC, 10 CFR 26, 10 CFR 707 and to meet requirements at the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. Interactive videodisc technology was selected as the training medium using the TenCore authoring language. Computer-based training was chosen because of the large number of trainees, the advantages of the reduced overall cost, and the increased trainee retention of course material compared to traditional instruction. The resulting training program utilizes extensive role playing exercises in which employees and supervisors are exposed to real life situations. Extensive interactions by the trainees are required in that they must answer questions concerning the behav ior of individuals, random and for-cause drug testing, and the employee assistance program. Feedback is given in each case. Emphasis is placed on recognition of deteriorating job performance

  14. Online Student Evaluation Improves Course Experience Questionnaire Results in a Physiotherapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Beatrice; Jones, Sue; Straker, Leon

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the use of an online student evaluation system, Course Experience on the Web (CEW), in a physiotherapy program to improve their Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) results. CEW comprises a course survey instrument modeled on the CEQ and a tailored unit survey instrument. Closure of the feedback loop is integral in the CEW…

  15. High energy physics program: Task A, Experiment and theory; Task B, Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Contained in this paper are: highlights of activities during the past few years; five year summary; fixed target experiments; collider experiments; SSC preparation, detector development and detector construction; computing, networking and VAX upgrade to ALPHA; and particle theory programs

  16. Funktioneel programmeren: evaluatie van een onderwijsexperiment [Functional programming: evaluation of an educational experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Klaas; Pilot, A.

    In this report we describe an experiment with a course in Functional Programming for first years students in Computer Science. The background of the experiment is given as well as the aims of the questionaires, assignments and time requirement analysis. A discussion is given about some didactical

  17. Expedition Zenith: Experiences of eighth grade girls in a non-traditional math/science program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulm, Barbara Jean

    2004-11-01

    This qualitative study describes the experiences of a group of sixteen, eighth grade girls participating in a single-sex, math/science program based on gender equity research and constructivist theory. This phenomenological case study highlights the individual changes each girl perceives in herself as a result of her involvement in this program which was based at a suburban middle school just north of New York City. Described in narrative form is what took place during this single-sex program. At the start of the program the girls worked cooperatively in groups to build canoes. The canoes were then used to study a wetland during the final days of the program. To further immerse the participants into nature, the girls also camped during these final days. Data were collected from a number of sources to uncover, as fully as possible, the true essence of the program and the girls' experiences in it. The data collection methods included direct observation; in-depth, open-ended interviews; and written documentation. As a result of data collection, the girls' perceived outcomes and assessment of the program, as well as their recommendations for future math/science programs are revealed. The researcher in this study also acted as teacher, directing the program, and as participant to better understand the experiences of the girls involved in the program. Thus, unique insights could be made. The findings in this study provide insight into the learning of the participants, as well as into the relationships they formed both inside and outside of the program. Their perceived experiences and assessment of the program were then used to develop a greater understanding as to the effectiveness of this non-traditional program. Although this study echoed much of what research says about the needs of girls in learning situations, and therefore, reinforces previously accepted beliefs, it also reveals significant findings in areas previously unaddressed by gender studies. For example

  18. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness: a fitter fitness concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, James T

    2013-01-01

    In 1963-1964 W. D. Hamilton introduced the concept of inclusive fitness, the only significant elaboration of Darwinian fitness since the nineteenth century. I discuss the origin of the modern fitness concept, providing context for Hamilton's discovery of inclusive fitness in relation to the puzzle of altruism. While fitness conceptually originates with Darwin, the term itself stems from Spencer and crystallized quantitatively in the early twentieth century. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness, with Price's reformulation, provided the solution to Darwin's 'special difficulty'-the evolution of caste polymorphism and sterility in social insects. Hamilton further explored the roles of inclusive fitness and reciprocation to tackle Darwin's other difficulty, the evolution of human altruism. The heuristically powerful inclusive fitness concept ramified over the past 50 years: the number and diversity of 'offspring ideas' that it has engendered render it a fitter fitness concept, one that Darwin would have appreciated.

  19. U.S. utilities' experiences with the implementation of energy efficiency programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Courtney

    In the U.S., many electric utility companies are offering demand-side management (DSM) programs to their customers as ways to save money and energy. However, it is challenging to compare these programs between utility companies throughout the U.S. because of the variability of state energy policies. For example, some states in the U.S. have deregulated electricity markets and others do not. In addition, utility companies within a state differ depending on ownership and size. This study examines 12 utilities' experiences with DSM programs and compares the programs' annual energy savings results that the selected utilities reported to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 2009 EIA data suggests that DSM program effectiveness is not significantly affected by electricity market deregulation or utility ownership. However, DSM programs seem to generally be more effective when administered by utilities located in states with energy savings requirements and DSM program mandates.

  20. Experience from the ECORS program in regions of complex geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damotte, B.

    1993-04-01

    The French ECORS program was launched in 1983 by a cooperation agreement between universities and petroleum companies. Crustal surveys have tried to find explanations for the formation of geological features, such as rifts, mountains ranges or subsidence in sedimentary basins. Several seismic surveys were carried out, some across areas with complex geological structures. The seismic techniques and equipment used were those developed by petroleum geophysicists, adapted to the depth aimed at (30-50 km) and to various physical constraints encountered in the field. In France, ECORS has recorded 850 km of deep seismic lines onshore across plains and mountains, on various kinds of geological formations. Different variations of the seismic method (reflection, refraction, long-offset seismic) were used, often simultaneously. Multiple coverage profiling constitutes the essential part of this data acquisition. Vibrators and dynamite shots were employed with a spread generally 15 km long, but sometimes 100 km long. Some typical seismic examples show that obtaining crustal reflections essentialy depends on two factors: (1) the type and structure of shallow formations, and (2) the sources used. Thus, when seismic energy is strongly absorbed across the first kilometers in shallow formations, or when these formations are highly structured, standard multiple-coverage profiling is not able to provide results beyond a few seconds. In this case, it is recommended to simultaneously carry out long-offset seismic in low multiple coverage. Other more methodological examples show: how the impact on the crust of a surface fault may be evaluated according to the seismic method implemented ( VIBROSEIS 96-fold coverage or single dynamite shot); that vibrators make it possible to implement wide-angle seismic surveying with an offset 80 km long; how to implement the seismic reflection method on complex formations in high mountains. All data were processed using industrial seismic software

  1. Faculty Experiences of Merger and Organizational Change in a Social Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoyin, A Christson; Miller, Monte; Jackson, Mary S; Dodor, Bernice; Hall, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Social work programs are experiencing unprecedented organizational changes due to budget cuts, dwindling resources, global, and technological challenges. However, there is limited information in the literature about the merger experiences of faculty in social work programs. On one hand undergoing merger and reorganization provides the opportunity to reorganize, reprioritize, re-assess, develop strategies, and explore previously untapped opportunities for social work programs. Conversely, merger experiences have caused frustration, intention to quit, confusion, and loss of professional identity for social work faculty. In this article the authors utilize a journaling method and sense-making approach of the merger experiences of some of the faculty members of a social work program in the United States. The authors suggest a framework to understand how the faculty confronted the challenges, overcame the pitfalls, and maximized the opportunities offered during the merger and organizational change process.

  2. Trends in physical activity, health-related fitness, and gross motor skills in children during a two-year comprehensive school physical activity program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusseau, Timothy A; Hannon, James C; Fu, You; Fang, Yi; Nam, Kahyun; Goodrum, Sara; Burns, Ryan D

    2018-01-06

    The purpose of this study was to examine the trends in school-day step counts, health-related fitness, and gross motor skills during a two-year Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) in children. Longitudinal trend analysis. Participants were a sample of children (N=240; mean age=7.9±1.2 years; 125 girls, 115 boys) enrolled in five low-income schools. Outcome variables consisted of school day step counts, Body Mass Index (BMI), estimated VO 2 Peak , and gross motor skill scores assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development-3rd Edition (TGMD-3). Measures were collected over a two-year CSPAP including a baseline and several follow-up time-points. Multi-level mixed effects models were employed to examine time trends on each continuous outcome variable. Markov-chain transition models were employed to examine time trends for derived binary variables for school day steps, BMI, and estimated VO 2 Peak . There were statistically significant time coefficients for estimated VO 2 Peak (b=1.10mL/kg/min, 95% C.I. [0.35mL/kg/min-2.53mL/kg/min], p=0.009) and TGMD-3 scores (b=7.8, 95% C.I. [6.2-9.3], p<0.001). There were no significant changes over time for school-day step counts or BMI. Boys had greater change in odds of achieving a step count associating with 30min of school day MVPA (OR=1.25, 95% C.I. [1.02-1.48], p=0.044). A two-year CSPAP related to increases in cardio-respiratory endurance and TGMD-3 scores. School day steps and BMI were primarily stable across the two-year intervention. Copyright © 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reactor Physics Experiments by Korean Under-Graduate Students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly Program (KUGSiKUCA Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu; Ichihara, Chihiro; Shiroya, Seiji; Whang, Joo Ho; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2006-01-01

    The Reactor Laboratory Course for Korean Under-Graduate Students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUGSiKUCA) program has been launched from 2003, as one of international collaboration programs of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI). This program was suggested by Department of Nuclear Engineering, College of Advanced Technology, Kyunghee University (KHU), and was adopted by Ministry of Science and Technology of Korean Government as one of among Nuclear Human Resources Education and Training Programs. On the basis of her suggestion for KURRI, memorandum for academic corporation and exchange between KHU and KURRI was concluded on July 2003. The program has been based on the background that it is extremely difficult for any single university in Korea to have her own research or training reactor. Up to this 2006, total number of 61 Korean under-graduate school students, who have majored in nuclear engineering of Kyunghee University, Hanyang University, Seoul National University, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Chosun University and Cheju National University in all over the Korea, has taken part in this program. In all the period, two professors and one teaching assistant on the Korean side led the students and helped their successful experiments, reports and discussions. Due to their effort, the program has succeeded in giving an effective and unique course, taking advantage of their collaboration

  4. Online public health preparedness training programs: an evaluation of user experience with the technological environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambisan, Priya

    2010-01-01

    Several public health education programs and government agencies across the country have started offering virtual or online training programs in emergency preparedness for people who are likely to be involved in managing or responding to different types of emergency situations such as natural disasters, epidemics, bioterrorism, etc. While such online training programs are more convenient and cost-effective than traditional classroom-based programs, their success depends to a great extent on the underlying technological environment. Specifically, in an online technological environment, different types of user experiences come in to play-users' utilitarian or pragmatic experience, their fun or hedonic experience, their social experience, and most importantly, their usability experience-and these different user experiences critically shape the program outcomes, including course completion rates. This study adopts a multi-disciplinary approach and draws on theories in human computer interaction, distance learning theories, usability research, and online consumer behavior to evaluate users' experience with the technological environment of an online emergency preparedness training program and discusses its implications for the design of effective online training programs. . Data was collected using a questionnaire from 377 subjects who had registered for and participated in online public health preparedness training courses offered by a large public university in the Northeast. Analysis of the data indicates that as predicted, participants had higher levels of pragmatic and usability experiences compared to their hedonic and sociability experiences. Results also indicate that people who experienced higher levels of pragmatic, hedonic, sociability and usability experiences were more likely to complete the course(s) they registered for compared to those who reported lower levels. The study findings hold important implications for the design of effective online emergency

  5. Experiences of a Mental Health First Aid training program in Sweden: a descriptive qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Bengt; Hansson, Lars; Stjernswärd, Sigrid

    2015-05-01

    Restricted mental health literacy and stigma are barriers to treatment of mental disorders. A Mental Health First Aid training program was tested for implementation in Sweden among employees in the public sector. The aim of the present qualitative study was to explore participants' experiences of the program in more depth, in conjunction with a randomized controlled study. Twenty four persons participated in a total of six focus groups 6-8 months after program participation. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The analysis resulted in five categories illustrating the participants' experiences of the course: increased awareness, knowledge and understanding; influence on attitude and approach; tool box and confidence; feedback on content and layout; and tangible examples of applied knowledge. The most central finding is the fruitfulness of the program's practical focus and use, the increased confidence and inclination to act following program participation, and the importance of experienced instructors.

  6. Sample Size and Statistical Conclusions from Tests of Fit to the Rasch Model According to the Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Model (Rumm) Program in Health Outcome Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagell, Peter; Westergren, Albert

    Sample size is a major factor in statistical null hypothesis testing, which is the basis for many approaches to testing Rasch model fit. Few sample size recommendations for testing fit to the Rasch model concern the Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMM) software, which features chi-square and ANOVA/F-ratio based fit statistics, including Bonferroni and algebraic sample size adjustments. This paper explores the occurrence of Type I errors with RUMM fit statistics, and the effects of algebraic sample size adjustments. Data with simulated Rasch model fitting 25-item dichotomous scales and sample sizes ranging from N = 50 to N = 2500 were analysed with and without algebraically adjusted sample sizes. Results suggest the occurrence of Type I errors with N less then or equal to 500, and that Bonferroni correction as well as downward algebraic sample size adjustment are useful to avoid such errors, whereas upward adjustment of smaller samples falsely signal misfit. Our observations suggest that sample sizes around N = 250 to N = 500 may provide a good balance for the statistical interpretation of the RUMM fit statistics studied here with respect to Type I errors and under the assumption of Rasch model fit within the examined frame of reference (i.e., about 25 item parameters well targeted to the sample).

  7. Effectiveness of a physical activity program on weight, physical fitness, occupational stress, job satisfaction and quality of life of overweight employees in high-tech industries: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yun-Ya; Huang, Chien-Yuan; Hsu, Mei-Chi

    2018-03-27

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of a physical activity (PA) program on weight control, physical fitness, occupational stress, job satisfaction and quality of life of overweight and sedentary employees in high-tech industries. Participants in the intervention group (n = 37) were instructed to carry out a PA program at moderate intensity for 60 min/session, 3 sessions/week for 12 weeks. Those in the control group (n = 38) received no PA program and were asked to continue their routine lifestyle. Evaluations were performed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. Results of structured questionnaires and blood biochemistry tests and evaluations of physical fitness were analyzed. The PA program effectively reduced the number of risk factors for metabolic syndrome and body fat percentage, and improved physical fitness such as flexibility, muscular strength and endurance and cardiorespiratory endurance. The intervention also significantly decreased levels of serum triglyceride, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Significant positive effects on work control, interpersonal relationships at work, global job satisfaction and quality of life were also demonstrated. This study showed that a PA program can be helpful in improving physical, physiological and psychological outcomes for overweight and sedentary employees in high-tech industries.

  8. Programming experience promotes higher STEM motivation among first-grade girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Allison; Cheryan, Sapna; Moscatelli, Adriana; Meltzoff, Andrew N

    2017-08-01

    The gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) engagement is large and persistent. This gap is significantly larger in technological fields such as computer science and engineering than in math and science. Gender gaps begin early; young girls report less interest and self-efficacy in technology compared with boys in elementary school. In the current study (N=96), we assessed 6-year-old children's stereotypes about STEM fields and tested an intervention to develop girls' STEM motivation despite these stereotypes. First-grade children held stereotypes that boys were better than girls at robotics and programming but did not hold these stereotypes about math and science. Girls with stronger stereotypes about robotics and programming reported lower interest and self-efficacy in these domains. We experimentally tested whether positive experience with programming robots would lead to greater interest and self-efficacy among girls despite these stereotypes. Children were randomly assigned either to a treatment group that was given experience in programming a robot using a smartphone or to control groups (no activity or other activity). Girls given programming experience reported higher technology interest and self-efficacy compared with girls without this experience and did not exhibit a significant gender gap relative to boys' interest and self-efficacy. These findings show that children's views mirror current American cultural messages about who excels at computer science and engineering and show the benefit of providing young girls with chances to experience technological activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clients' experiences of a community based lifestyle modification program: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ruth S M; Lok, Kris Y W; Sea, Mandy M M; Woo, Jean

    2009-10-01

    There is little information about how clients attending lifestyle modification programs view the outcomes. This qualitative study examined the clients' experience of a community based lifestyle modification program in Hong Kong. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 clients attending the program. Clients perceived the program had positive impacts on their health and nutrition knowledge. They experienced frustration, negative emotion, lack of motivation, and pressure from others during the program. Working environment and lack of healthy food choices in restaurants were the major perceived environmental barriers for lifestyle modification. Clients valued nutritionists' capability of providing professional information and psychological support in the program. Our results suggest that nutritionist's capability of providing quality consultations and patient-centered care are important for empowering clients achieve lifestyle modification.

  10. Clients’ Experiences of a Community Based Lifestyle Modification Program: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Woo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available There is little information about how clients attending lifestyle modification programs view the outcomes. This qualitative study examined the clients’ experience of a community based lifestyle modification program in Hong Kong. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 clients attending the program. Clients perceived the program had positive impacts on their health and nutrition knowledge. They experienced frustration, negative emotion, lack of motivation, and pressure from others during the program. Working environment and lack of healthy food choices in restaurants were the major perceived environmental barriers for lifestyle modification. Clients valued nutritionists’ capability of providing professional information and psychological support in the program. Our results suggest that nutritionist’s capability of providing quality consultations and patient-centered care are important for empowering clients achieve lifestyle modification.

  11. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinilla, Severin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU. We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  12. Multilevel approach to mentoring in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonine, K. E.; Dontsova, K.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Paavo, B.; Hogan, D.; Oberg, E.; Gay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation focuses on different types of mentoring for students participating in Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs with examples, including some new approaches, from The Environmental and Earth Systems Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program at Biosphere 2. While traditional faculty mentors play essential role in students' development as researchers and professionals, other formal and informal mentoring can be important component of the REU program and student experiences. Students receive mentoring from program directors, coordinators, and on site undergraduate advisors. While working on their research projects, REU students receive essential support and mentoring from undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral scientists in the research groups of their primary mentors. Cohort living and group activities give multiple opportunities for peer mentoring where each student brings their own strengths and experiences to the group. Biosphere 2 REU program puts strong emphasis on teaching students to effectively communicate their research to public. In order to help REUs learn needed skills the outreach personnel at Biosphere 2 mentor and advise students both in groups and individually, in lecture format and by personal example, on best outreach approaches in general and on individual outreach projects students develop. To further enhance and strengthen outreach mentoring we used a novel approach of blending cohort of REU students with the Cal Poly STAR (STEM Teacher And Researcher) Program fellows, future K-12 STEM teachers who are gaining research experience at Biosphere 2. STAR fellows live together with the REU students and participate with them in professional development activities, as well as perform research side by side. Educational background and experiences gives these students a different view and better preparation and tools to effectively communicate and adapt science to lay audiences, a challenge commonly facing

  13. Training for my Life: Lived Experiences of Dislocated Workers in an Advanced Manufacturing Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquita R. Walker

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative paper explores the lived experiences of one group of workers dislocated because of globalized trade policies who completed a hybrid Advanced Manufacturing Training Program (AMTP by taking advantage of Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA, a federally-funded program for retraining workers dislocated because of trade policies. The research questions focus on how satisfied these workers are with the services and programs provided by TAA. Focus groups and survey instrument results indicate these workers found TAA services and processes cumbersome and time- consuming and actually had the effect of discouraging their education, training, and self- employment. The consequences of their dislocation as it relates to TAA experiences are increased frustration and dissatisfaction with the TAA program. Serious consideration for TAA policy changes should be deemed of utmost importance.

  14. Nurse Leaders' Experiences of Implementing Career Advancement Programs for Nurses in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2015-02-24

    Career advancement programs are currently implemented in many countries. In Iran, the first career advancement program was Nurses' Career Advancement Pathway. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse leaders' experiences about implementing the Nurses' Career Advancement Pathway program in Iran. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted in 2013. Sixteen nurse managers were recruited from the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Behesthi, Qazvin, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Participants were recruited using purposive sampling method. Study data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The conventional content analysis approach was used for data analysis. participants' experiences about implementing the Nurses' Career Advancement Pathway fell into three main categories including: a) the shortcomings of performance evaluation, b) greater emphasis on point accumulation, c) the advancement-latitude mismatch. The Nurses' Career Advancement pathway has several shortcomings regarding both its content and its implementation. Therefore, it is recommended to revise the program.

  15. Experiences in solving the challenges of on-site degree programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christenson, J.M.; Eckart, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    The University of Cincinnati (UC) Nuclear Engineering Program Faculty has now had six years of experience in delivering on-site educational programs to nuclear power plant technical personnel. Programs of this type present a variety of challenges to the faculty, the management of the client utility and to the students who become involved in a particular program. This paper describes how each of these groups can identify and successfully solve these challenges. The solutions the authors describe are drawn from their own experiences which have been described in some detail elsewhere. Other solutions to those challenges are certainly possible. They make no claim for the particular ones they offer, beyond the fact that they have worked over a sustained period of time and that results they have produced have left all three parties mutually satisfied

  16. Experience with a mobile whole body counting screening program at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.Y.

    1976-01-01

    A whole-body counting program using a trailer-mounted counter has been in service in Ontario Hydro since 1972 to monitor routinely internal uptakes of radionuclides by nuclear station employees. The philosophy and objectives of the program are discussed; equipment and calibration procedures are described, and experience over the past two and a half years is reviewed. The procedures to minimize the effects of external contamination, a problem commonly encountered in whole-body counting, are described. (auth)

  17. Experience from the development of Point Lepreau's training program for technical support staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, S.; Scott, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Training Department at the Point Lepreau GS has been developing and improving its training for technical support staff. A generic set of objectives are being used as the basis for a systematic approach to training. The program covers general and job specific knowledge and skills using a mix of classroom instruction, mentoring and continuing training seminars. This paper describes experience, success and the challenges in the development, delivery and evaluation of the training program. (author)

  18. Authentic Astronomy Research Experiences for Teachers: The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)

    OpenAIRE

    Rebull, L. M.; Gorjian, V.; Squires, G.

    2012-01-01

    How many times have you gotten a question from the general public, or read a news story, and concluded that “they just don’t understand how real science works?” One really good way to get the word out about how science works is to have more people experience the process of scientific research. Since 2004, the way we have chosen to do this is to provide authentic research experiences for teachers using real data (the program used to be called the Spitzer Teacher Program for Teachers and Stu...

  19. [High energy particle physics]: Task A, High energy physics program: Experiment and theory; Task B, High energy physics program: Numerical simulation of quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannutti, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following research: fixed target experiments; collider experiments; computing, networking and VAX upgrade; SSC preparation, detector development and detector construction; solid argon calorimetry; absorption of CAD system geometries into GEANT for SSC; and particle theory programs

  20. Development of Teachers as Scientists in Research Experiences for Teachers Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Courtney; Hardin, Emily; Klein-Gardner, Stacy; Benson, Lisa

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the teachers' development as scientists for participants in three National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Teachers. Participants included secondary science and math teachers with varying levels of education and experience who were immersed in research environments related to engineering and science topics. Teachers' functionality as scientists was assessed in terms of independence, focus, relationships with mentors, structure, and ability to create new concepts. Hierarchies developed within these constructs allowed tracking of changes in functionality throughout the 6-week programs. Themes were further identified in teachers' weekly journal entries and exit interviews through inductive coding. Increases in functionality as scientists were observed for all teachers who completed both the program and exit interview ( n = 27). Seven of the 27 teachers reached high science functionality; however, three of the teachers did not reach high functionality in any of the constructs during the program. No differences were observed in demographics or teaching experience between those who did and did not reach high functionality levels. Inductive coding revealed themes such as teachers' interactions with mentors and connections made between research and teaching, which allowed for descriptions of experiences for teachers at high and low levels of functionality. Teachers at high functionality levels adjusted to open-ended environments, transitioned from a guided experience to freedom, felt useful in the laboratory, and were self-motivated. In contrast, teachers at low functionality levels did not have a true research project, primarily focused on teaching aspects of the program, and did not display a transition of responsibilities.

  1. Design of the Quality of Life in Motion (QLIM) study: a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a combined physical exercise and psychosocial training program to improve physical fitness in children with cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braam, Katja I; Huisman, Jaap; Kaspers, Gertjan JL; Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline van; Dijk, Elisabeth M van; Veening, Margreet A; Bierings, Marc B; Merks, Johannes HM; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Chinapaw, Mai JM; Sinnema, Gerben; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Childhood cancer and its treatment have considerable impact on a child's physical and mental wellbeing. Especially long-term administration of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy impairs physical fitness both during and after therapy, when children often present with muscle weakness and/or low cardiorespiratory fitness. Physical exercise can improve these two elements of physical fitness, but the positive effects of physical exercise might be further increased when a child's wellbeing is simultaneously enhanced by psychosocial training. Feeling better may increase the willingness and motivation to engage in sports activities. Therefore, this multi-centre study evaluates the short and long-term changes in physical fitness of a child with a childhood malignancy, using a combined physical exercise and psychosocial intervention program, implemented during or shortly after treatment. Also examined is whether positive effects on physical fitness reduce inactivity-related adverse health problems, improve quality of life, and are cost-effective. This multi-centre randomized controlled trial compares a combined physical and psychosocial intervention program for children with cancer, with care as usual (controls). Children with cancer (aged 8-18 years) treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and who are no longer than 1 year post-treatment, are eligible for participation. A total of 100 children are being recruited from the paediatric oncology/haematology departments of three Dutch university medical centres. Patients are stratified according to pubertal stage (girls: age ≤10 or >10 years; boys: ≤11 or >11 years), type of malignancy (haematological or solid tumour), and moment of inclusion into the study (during or after treatment), and are randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Childhood cancer patients undergoing long-term cancer therapy may benefit from a combined physical exercise and psychosocial intervention program since it may

  2. Design of the Quality of Life in Motion (QLIM study: a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a combined physical exercise and psychosocial training program to improve physical fitness in children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takken Tim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood cancer and its treatment have considerable impact on a child's physical and mental wellbeing. Especially long-term administration of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy impairs physical fitness both during and after therapy, when children often present with muscle weakness and/or low cardiorespiratory fitness. Physical exercise can improve these two elements of physical fitness, but the positive effects of physical exercise might be further increased when a child's wellbeing is simultaneously enhanced by psychosocial training. Feeling better may increase the willingness and motivation to engage in sports activities. Therefore, this multi-centre study evaluates the short and long-term changes in physical fitness of a child with a childhood malignancy, using a combined physical exercise and psychosocial intervention program, implemented during or shortly after treatment. Also examined is whether positive effects on physical fitness reduce inactivity-related adverse health problems, improve quality of life, and are cost-effective. Methods This multi-centre randomized controlled trial compares a combined physical and psychosocial intervention program for children with cancer, with care as usual (controls. Children with cancer (aged 8-18 years treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, and who are no longer than 1 year post-treatment, are eligible for participation. A total of 100 children are being recruited from the paediatric oncology/haematology departments of three Dutch university medical centres. Patients are stratified according to pubertal stage (girls: age ≤10 or >10 years; boys: ≤11 or >11 years, type of malignancy (haematological or solid tumour, and moment of inclusion into the study (during or after treatment, and are randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Discussion Childhood cancer patients undergoing long-term cancer therapy may benefit from a combined physical exercise and

  3. Commissioning and initial experimental program of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alef, S.; Bauer, P.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Becker, M.; Bella, A.; Bielefeldt, P.; Böse, S.; Braghieri, A.; Brinkmann, K.; Cole, P.; Di Salvo, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Fantini, A.; Freyermuth, O.; Friedrich, S.; Frommberger, F.; Ganenko, V.; Geffers, D.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Görtz, S.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hammann, D.; Hannappel, J.; Hillert, W.; Ignatov, A.; Jahn, R.; Joosten, R.; Jude, T. C.; Klein, F.; Knaust, J.; Kohl, K.; Koop, K.; Krusche, B.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lopatin, I. V.; Mandaglio, G.; Messi, F.; Messi, R.; Metag, V.; Moricciani, D.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Nanova, M.; Nedorezov, V.; Novinskiy, D.; Pedroni, P.; Reitz, B.; Romaniuk, M.; Rostomyan, T.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Scheluchin, G.; Schmieden, H.; Stugelev, A.; Sumachev, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Vegna, V.; Walther, D.; Watts, D.; Zaunick, H.; Zimmermann, T.

    2016-11-01

    BGO-OD is a new meson photoproduction experiment at the ELSA facility of Bonn University. It aims at the investigation of non strange and strange baryon excitations, and is especially designed to be able to detect weekly bound meson-baryon type structures. The setup for the BGO-OD experiment is presented, the characteristics of the photon beam and the detector performances are shown and the initial experimental program is discussed.

  4. Programming Basics for Beginners. Experience of the Institute of Informatics at Tallinn University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mironova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper demonstrates the teaching approach in programming basics course for novices: schoolchildren of different ages and schoolteachers. This programming course was developed at the Institute of Informatics at Tallinn University of Technology in Tallinn, Estonia and it based on many years experience in teaching programming for non-IT first year students. The main aim of the chosen teaching approach in the course is to raise the motivation and keep the learners’ interest in programming field on the high level. The idea of developed teaching technique is the implementation of the visual programming before a serious textual coding. Furthermore, authors suggest readers some ways and methods to overcome learners’ difficulties in the first stage in a textual coding.

  5. Adapted recreational and sports programs for children with disabilities: A decade of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg-Wolff, Elizabeth; Kiesling, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    To identify and describe community based adapted sports and recreational programs (SARPs) for children with physically disabilities, documenting program types, benefits, challenges, growth and/or decline, and lessons they have learned over a 10-year period. In 1996, a total of 277 children's hospitals and freestanding rehabilitation hospitals stating that they provided pediatric rehabilitation services were contacted and asked to provide information regarding adapted recreational and sports programs in their region. Seventy-nine SARPs were identified, contacted, and survyed about programming, benefits and challenges they faced. They were then re-surveyed in 2006 for comparison data. Ten years ago, the average SARP served 25 or fewer clients and was led by a therapeutic recreation specialist with assistance from volunteers. Most programs had been in place for 5 years or more, met weekly for 2-3 hours, and were recreational in orientation. Activities varied, with basketball, aquatics, horseback riding and snow skiing being most common. Fund-raisers and grants supported most programs, and securing funding was their greatest challenge. Participant benefits noted by programs included improved socialization, enhanced physical fitness, increased self esteem, improved therapeutic skills (ADL's, transfers, etc.), enhanced cognition, expanded client independence, improved community relations, and enhanced leisure skills. Ten years later, the majority of SARPs noted similar benefits, and reported an increase in number of participants despite continued challenges with funding and staffing. Leadership and mentorship by those with disabilities was still very low, but community awareness of the abilities of those with disabilities had increased. Adapted sports and recreation programs surveyed in 1996 and again in 2006, report overall that their health is good, and many have retained the same programming, financial support mechanisms, leadership and participant mix over the years

  6. The Canadian CANDU fuel development program and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.K.; Inch, W.W.R.; Cox, D.S.; Steed, R.G.; Kohn, E.; Macici, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the CANDU fuel in the Canadian CANDU reactors in 1997 and 1998. The operating experience demonstrates that the CANDU fuel has performed very well. Over the two-year period, the fuel-bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in the Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, at between 0.006% to 0.016%. On a fuel element basis, this represents an element defect rate of less than about 0.0005%. One of the reasons for the good fuel performance is the support provided by the Canadian fuel research and development programs. These programs address operational issues and provide evolutionary improvements to the fuel products. The programs consist of the Fuel Technology Program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, and the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycles Technology Program, funded by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. These two programs, which have been in place for many years, complement each other by sharing expert resources and experimental facilities. This paper describes the programs in 1999/2000, to provide an overview of the scope of the programs and the issues that these programs address. (author)

  7. Cernavoda NPP Unit 1: Operating experience program and plant specific performance indicators (level 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodor, Vasile; Popa, Viorel

    1998-01-01

    The basis for the Operating Experience Program was set in place since early stages of the commissioning phase (1993), when a system based on the Canadian approach was implemented for reporting, reviewing, assessing and establishing of the necessary corrective action for unplanned events. This system provided excellent opportunity to train staff in unplanned event assessment methodology, and prepare the station for the formal reporting process following criticality in accordance with the licensing requirements. The formal process, set in place after criticality is described in Station Instruction Procedure SI-01365-P13 'Unplanned Event Report' and was developed under the supervision of Safety and Compliance Department. In parallel, a program for information exchange and trending of performance indicators was developed by Technical Services Department. The WANO recommendations following August 1997 Peer Review provided the opportunity for a better understanding and reconsideration of the Operating Experience Program. As a result, all the activities related to this topic were assigned to a new structure, within Safety and Compliance Department. As such an Operating Experience Group was created and a new program is now being developed in an integrated and centralized manner. The content of the paper is the following: - Overview; - Operating Experience Program; - Event Analysis (Unplanned Events Assessment System - UEIR Process- and Systematic Analysis of Operational Events - ACR Process); - Information Exchange Program; - Monitoring of Operating Experience - Plant Specific Performance Indicators; - Purpose; - Level 2 Performance Indicators. Four appendices are added containing: - A. Station performance indicators/targets (Level 2); - B. SPI (Station Performance Indicators - Level 2) - Graphics; - C. UEIR, LRS (Safety and Licensing Review Sheet), UEFR (Unplanned Event Follow-up Report), ACR and OPEX forms. (authors)

  8. Integrating scientific knowledge into large-scale restoration programs: the CALFED Bay-Delta Program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K.A.; Short, A.

    2009-01-01

    Integrating science into resource management activities is a goal of the CALFED Bay-Delta Program, a multi-agency effort to address water supply reliability, ecological condition, drinking water quality, and levees in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of northern California. Under CALFED, many different strategies were used to integrate science, including interaction between the research and management communities, public dialogues about scientific work, and peer review. This paper explores ways science was (and was not) integrated into CALFED's management actions and decision systems through three narratives describing different patterns of scientific integration and application in CALFED. Though a collaborative process and certain organizational conditions may be necessary for developing new understandings of the system of interest, we find that those factors are not sufficient for translating that knowledge into management actions and decision systems. We suggest that the application of knowledge may be facilitated or hindered by (1) differences in the objectives, approaches, and cultures of scientists operating in the research community and those operating in the management community and (2) other factors external to the collaborative process and organization.

  9. The Effect of Authentic Leadership, Person-Job Fit, and Civility Norms on New Graduate Nurses' Experiences of Coworker Incivility and Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Read, Emily A

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the influence of authentic leadership, person-job fit with 6 areas of worklife, and civility norms on coworker incivility and burnout among new graduate nurses. New graduate nurses report experiencing high levels of workplace incivility from coworkers, which has been found to negatively impact their job and career satisfaction and increase their intention to leave. The role of civility norms in preventing burnout and subsequent exposure to incivility from coworkers has yet to be examined among new graduate nurses. A cross-sectional mail survey of 993 new graduate nurses across Canada was conducted. The results supported the hypothesized relationships between study variables. Civility norms play a key role in preventing early career burnout and coworker incivility experienced by new graduate nurses. Leaders can influence civility norms by engaging in authentic leadership behaviors and optimizing person-job fit.

  10. Creating Authentic Geoscience Research Experiences for Underrepresented Students in Two-Year Undergraduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou-Mark, J.; Blake, R.

    2014-12-01

    With community college and two-year program students playing pivotal roles in advancing the nation's STEM agenda now and throughout the remainder of this young millennia, it is incumbent on educators to devise innovative and sustainable STEM initiatives to attract, retain, graduate, and elevate these students to four-year programs and beyond. Involving these students in comprehensive, holistic research experiences is one approach that has paid tremendous dividends. The New York City College of Technology (City Tech) was recently awarded a National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) supplemental grant to integrate a community college/two-year program component into its existing REU program. The program created an inviting and supportive community of scholars for these students, nurtured them through strong, dynamic mentoring, provided them with the support structures needed for successful scholarship, and challenged them to attain the same research prominence as their Bachelor degree program companions. Along with their colleagues, the community college/two-year program students were given an opportunity to conduct intensive satellite and ground-based remote sensing research at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST) at City College and its CREST Institute Center for Remote Sensing and Earth System Science (ReSESS) at City Tech. This presentation highlights the challenges, the rewards, and the lessons learned from this necessary and timely experiment. Preliminary results indicate that this paradigm for geoscience inclusion and high expectation has been remarkably successful. (The program is supported by NSF REU grant #1062934.)

  11. Program of critical experiment and measurements at the RA reactor; Program kriticnih eksperimenata i merenja na reaktoru RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-04-14

    Program described in this document describes in detail the following experiments: critical experiments with two reactor core lattices with 38 and 44 fuel channels, initial heavy water level being 1300 mm, criticality is achieved by adding heavy water; preliminary analysis of heavy water quality and verification of the fuel isotopic contents; experiment with the initial core which contains 56 fuel channels with maximum heavy water level according to the Russian proposal; measurement of neutron flux by Dy and In foils; measurement of reactivity excess dependent on the heavy water level and number of fuel rods; measurement of reactor period for determined reactivity change; measurement of moderator temperature coefficient; measurement of absolute flux. [Serbo-Croat] Program sadrzan u ovom dokumentu opisuje detaljno sledece eksperimente: kriticni eksperiment sa dve konfiguracije jezgra reaktora, sa 38 i 44 gorivna kanala, pocetni nivo teske vode je 1300 mm, kriticnost se dostize dodavanjem teske vode; prethodno izvrsenom analizom teske vode i proverom izotopskog sastava goriva; eksperiment sa pocetnom resetkom koja prema ruskom predlogu sadrzi 56 gorivnih kanala i maksimalnom visinom teske vode; merenje raspodele neutronskog fluksa folijama Dy i In; kalibracija regulacionih sipki; merenje viska reaktivnosti sa promenom visine nivoa teske vode i promenom broja sipki; merenje periode reaktora za odredjenu promenu reaktivnosti; merenje temperaturnog koeficijenta za vodu; merenje apsolutnog fluksa.

  12. Parallel reorganization of protein function in the spindle checkpoint pathway through evolutionary paths in the fitness landscape that appear neutral in laboratory experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex N Nguyen Ba

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory networks often increase in complexity during evolution through gene duplication and divergence of component proteins. Two models that explain this increase in complexity are: 1 adaptive changes after gene duplication, such as resolution of adaptive conflicts, and 2 non-adaptive processes such as duplication, degeneration and complementation. Both of these models predict complementary changes in the retained duplicates, but they can be distinguished by direct fitness measurements in organisms with short generation times. Previously, it has been observed that repeated duplication of an essential protein in the spindle checkpoint pathway has occurred multiple times over the eukaryotic tree of life, leading to convergent protein domain organization in its duplicates. Here, we replace the paralog pair in S. cerevisiae with a single-copy protein from a species that did not undergo gene duplication. Surprisingly, using quantitative fitness measurements in laboratory conditions stressful for the spindle-checkpoint pathway, we find no evidence that reorganization of protein function after gene duplication is beneficial. We then reconstruct several evolutionary intermediates from the inferred ancestral network to the extant one, and find that, at the resolution of our assay, there exist stepwise mutational paths from the single protein to the divergent pair of extant proteins with no apparent fitness defects. Parallel evolution has been taken as strong evidence for natural selection, but our results suggest that even in these cases, reorganization of protein function after gene duplication may be explained by neutral processes.

  13. Rotational energy transfer in Na2 (A Σ) colliding with Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne, He, H2, CH4, and N2: Experiment and fitting laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, T.A.; Smith, N.; Karp, A.W.; Pritchard, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Using the method of laser-induced fluorescence, we have measured level to level rate constants for rotational energy transfer (RET) in Na 2 colliding with Xe, Kr, Ar, Ne, He, H 2 , N 2 , and CH 4 . For each target gas we varied the initial rotational quantum number ji-italic over a wide range, typically 4--100, and measured approximately 60 rate constants with an average error of between 6% and 9%. The resulting base of 479 rate constants is used to test several recently proposed fitting laws. The energy corrected sudden scaling law of DePristo et al., when combined with the assumption of a power gap law for the basis rate constants k/sub l/→0, fit with only 3 parameters all of the data for a given target gas with 7%--12% average percentage deviation. Our statistical power gap law worked well and was generally the best law for those data sets with only one value of j/sub i/. The worst fits in all cases considered here were those using the exponential gap law of surprisal theory

  14. Computer program to fit a hyperellipse to a set of phase-space points in as many as six dimensions. [HELIPS, and COFAC to determine derivatives of determinants, in FORTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program that will fit a hyperellipse to a set of phase-space points in as many as 6 dimensions was written and tested. The weight assigned to the phase-space points can be varied as a function of their distance from the centroid of the distribution. Varying the weight enables determination of whether there is a difference in ellipse orientation between inner and outer particles. This program should be useful in studying the effects of longitudinal and transverse phase-space couplings.

  15. Does personal experience affect choice-based preferences for wildfire protection programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando González-Cabán; Thomas P. Holmes; John B. Loomis; José J. Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate homeowner preferences and willingness to pay for wildfire protection programs using a choice experiment with three attributes: risk, loss, and cost. A phone-mail-phone survey was used to collect data from homeowners predominantly living in medium and high wildfire risk communities in Florida. We tested three hypotheses: (1) homeowner...

  16. Program Experiences of Adults with Autism, Their Families, and Providers: Findings from a Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffer Miller, Kaitlin H.; Mathew, Mary; Nonnemacher, Stacy L.; Shea, Lindsay L.

    2018-01-01

    A growing number of individuals with autism spectrum disorder are aging into adulthood. In the United States, Medicaid is the primary payer for services for adults with autism spectrum disorder, yet there are few funded programs that provide dedicated supports to this population. This study examined the experiences of adults with autism spectrum…

  17. The Experiences of International Nursing Students in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanner, Susan; Wilson, Astrid H.; Samson, Linda F.

    2002-01-01

    Eight female Nigerians studying nursing in the United States experienced social isolation, became resolved to acceptance of antagonistic attitudes encountered in the program, and persisted in spite of obstacles. From their experiences, recommendations for the adjustment of international students were developed. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  18. The Impact of Programming Experience on Successfully Learning Systems Analysis and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wang-chan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports the results of an empirical study on the relationship between a student's programming experience and their success in a traditional Systems Analysis and Design (SA&D) class where technical skills such as dataflow analysis and entity relationship data modeling are covered. While it is possible to teach these…

  19. MyCrystals - a simple visual data management program for laboratory-scale crystallization experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Løvgreen, Mikkel; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2009-01-01

    MyCrystals is designed as a user-friendly program to display crystal images and list crystallization conditions. The crystallization conditions entry fields can be customized to suit the experiments. MyCrystals is also able to sort the images by the entered crystallization conditions, which...

  20. Understanding the Experience of Women in Undergraduate Engineering Programs at Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jessica Ohanian

    2017-01-01

    Women earn bachelor's degrees in engineering at a rate of less than 17% at public universities in California. The purpose of this study was to understand how women experience undergraduate engineering programs at public universities. To understand this lack of attainment, a qualitative methodology and Feminist Poststructuralist perspective were…

  1. Introducing Ethics to Chemistry Students in a "Research Experiences for Undergraduates" (REU) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    A three-day ethics seminar introduced ethics to undergraduate environmental chemistry students in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. The seminar helped students become sensitive to and understand the ethical and values dimensions of their work as researchers. It utilized a variety of resources to supplement lectures and…

  2. Affirmative Action. Module Number 16. Work Experience Program Modules. Coordination Techniques Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawhan, Carl; Morley, Ray

    This self-instructional module, the last in a series of 16 on techniques for coordinating work experience programs, deals with affirmative action. Addressed in the module are the following topics: the nature of affirmative action legislation and regulations, the role of the teacher-coordinator as a resource person for affirmative action…

  3. POBE: A Computer Program for Optimal Design of Multi-Subject Blocked fMRI Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärbel Maus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies, researchers can use multi-subject blocked designs to identify active brain regions for a certain stimulus type of interest. Before performing such an experiment, careful planning is necessary to obtain efficient stimulus effect estimators within the available financial resources. The optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for a multi-subject blocked design with fixed experimental costs can be determined using optimal design methods. In this paper, the user-friendly computer program POBE 1.2 (program for optimal design of blocked experiments, version 1.2 is presented. POBE provides a graphical user interface for fMRI researchers to easily and efficiently design their experiments. The computer program POBE calculates the optimal number of subjects and the optimal scanning time for user specified experimental factors and model parameters so that the statistical efficiency is maximised for a given study budget. POBE can also be used to determine the minimum budget for a given power. Furthermore, a maximin design can be determined as efficient design for a possible range of values for the unknown model parameters. In this paper, the computer program is described and illustrated with typical experimental factors for a blocked fMRI experiment.

  4. Perceptions of Skill Development in a Living-Learning First-Year Experience Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kerri Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of students and faculty involved in a living-learning first-year experience program at a small, liberal arts institution about developing skills for life-long learning including critical thinking, written communication, and reflection and engagement across disciplines. The researcher…

  5. Technology Experiences of Student Interns in a One to One Mobile Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Theresa A.; Karademir, Tugra

    2018-01-01

    This article describes how a group of student intern teachers (n = 51) in a one to one teacher education iPad program were asked to reflect using Experience Sampling Method (ESM) on their use of technology in the classroom during internship. Interns also completed summative reflections and class discussions. Data collected both in online and…

  6. Broadening the Learning Community Experience: An Outdoor Orientation Program's Impact on Engagement, Persistence, and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christy David

    2013-01-01

    The Keystone Learning Community was implemented by the Department of Campus Recreation to address retention at the institution. This learning community for incoming freshmen consists of two phases. Phase I is as an outdoor orientation program that includes a three day, two night canoeing and camping experience lead by upperclassmen leaders.…

  7. A general purpose program system for high energy physics experiment data acquisition and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuren; Xing Yuguo; Jin Bingnian

    1985-01-01

    This paper introduced the functions, structure and system generation of a general purpose program system (Fermilab MULTI) for high energy physics experiment data acquisition and analysis. Works concerning the reconstruction of MULTI system level 0.5 which can be run on the computer PDP-11/23 are also introduced briefly

  8. The Effectiveness of an Embedded Approach to Practicum Experiences in Educational Leadership: Program Candidates' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mary; Chan, Tak Cheung; Jiang, Binbin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how effective an embedded practicum experience in an educational leadership program in a Southeastern University is in serving the purpose of preparing educational leaders to meet future challenges. Findings of this study confirm practicum areas that met the educational demands and highlight areas that need improvement to…

  9. The effect of personal experience on choice-based preferences for wildfire protection programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Holmes; Armando Gonzalez-Caban; John Loomis; Jose Sanchez

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate homeowner preferences and willingness to pay for wildfire protection programs using a choice experiment with three attributes: risk, loss and cost. Preference heterogeneity among survey respondents was examined using three econometric models and risk preferences were evaluated by comparing willingness to pay for wildfire protection...

  10. Plant and Industry Experience. MAS-122. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to prepare trainees to use plant and industry experience to improve plant safety and reliability. The following topics are covered in the module's individual…

  11. Laser Light Scattering, from an Advanced Technology Development Program to Experiments in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Tscharnuter, Walther W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, Pierre; Boucher, Francois; Zuh, Jixiang; Tin, Padetha; Rogers, Richard B.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser light scattering hardware are described. These include intelligent single card correlators; active quench/active reset avalanche photodiodes; laser diodes; and fiber optics which were used by or developed for a NASA advanced technology development program. A space shuttle experiment which will employ aspects of these hardware developments is previewed.

  12. Professional Interaction, Relevant Practical Experience, and Intellectual Contributions at Nondoctoral AACSB-Accredited Accounting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, Barry P.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a survey of faculty members at nondoctoral AACSB-accredited accounting programs in the United States. The purpose of the survey was to determine the environment for professional interaction and relevant experience in light of institutional demands for intellectual contributions. The findings show that the…

  13. Evaluation of one-year results of the full-face respirator quantitative man-test fitting program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, B.J.; Cross, J.; Ellis, K.P.; Richards, C.P.; Rodriques, R.

    1976-01-01

    In August 1975, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory began to quantitatively fit all employees who are or may be required to wear any type of full-face respirator. After one year, 306 employees have been fitted. A total of 1362 tests were made, using seven makes of full-face respirators. Of the 306 employees fitted, 284 were tested using more than one make of full-face mask. All employees fitted could get a maximum use limit (MUL) of at least 100, 8 percent has a MUL of 100 to 499 on at least one of the makes of masks tested, 11 percent had an MUL of 500 to 999, 13 percent had an MUL of 1000 to 1999, 24 percent had an MUL of 2000 to 4999, and 44 percent had an MUL greater than 5000. These numbers were derived using the average of the peak leakages occurring during each of six exercises performed while wearing each mask. If the overall average leakage occurring during the six exercises rather than the peak average is used in the calculations, 90 percent of the employees could obtain an MUL over 1000 on at least one make of mask

  14. Lessons from international experience for China's microgrid demonstration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romankiewicz, John; Marnay, Chris; Zhou, Nan; Qu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Microgrids can provide an avenue for increasing the amount of distributed generation (DG) and delivery of electricity, where control is more dispersed and quality of service is locally tailored to end-use requirements, with applications from military bases to campuses to commercial office buildings. Many studies have been done to date on microgrid technology and operations, but fewer studies exist on demonstration programs and commercial microgrid development. As China prepares to launch the largest microgrid demonstration program in the world, we review progress made by demonstration programs across Europe, Asia, and the Americas as well as microgrid benefits and barriers. Through case studies, we highlight the difference in experience for microgrids developed under the auspices of a government-sponsored demonstration program versus those that were commercially developed. Lastly, we provide recommendations oriented towards creating a successful microgrid demonstration program. - Highlights: • We discuss major microgrid demonstration programs in the U.S., E.U., and Asia. • We identify barriers faced by microgrids to date and propose policy solutions. • Two detailed case studies of government sponsored microgrid demonstrations are provided. • We outline eight recommendations for microgrid demonstration programs, with a focus on China's upcoming program

  15. Schools' Responses to Voucher Policy: Participation Decisions and Early Implementation Experiences in the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Megan J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the supply side of voucher programs, despite schools' central role in program effectiveness. Using survey and interview data on the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program (ICSP), I analyze schools' participation decisions and early implementation experiences to understand better how schools respond to program regulations. I find…

  16. TFTR lithium blanket module program. Final design report. Volume VII. LBM instrumentation and Program of Experiments and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, Y.D.; Tsang, F.Y.; Jassby, D.L.

    1983-07-01

    The Program of Experiments and Analysis comprises 3 spheres of activity: (1) measurements of neutron fluence and flux spectra inside and around the LBM, and of tritium production in the LBM central zone; (2) neutronic-code modeling and analysis of the TFTR/LBM system to predict the quantities measured in (1); (3) comparisons of the predicted and measured quantities, and improvements of the code modeling and analysis and the experimental techniques, in order to resolve any discrepancy between prediction and measurement. The measurement techniques are discussed. Section 5 of this volume discusses the strategy for carrying out the measurement program, for making comparisons with the neutronics code predictions, and for resolving discrepancies

  17. Early Experience with a Brief, Multimodal, Multidisciplinary Treatment Program for Fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O.; Oh, Terry H.; Guderian, Janet A.; Barton, Debra L.; Luedtke, Connie A.

    2014-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a complex, heterogeneous disorder for which a multidisciplinary individualized approach is currently advocated. We executed a 1 week multidisciplinary fibromyalgia clinical program with 7 patients, based on our previous experience with our existing 1.5 day multidisciplinary fibromyalgia program that has demonstrated both short- and long-term benefits. The current expanded program was not designed as a clinical study, but rather as a clinical feasibility assessment and was multidisciplinary in nature, with cognitive behavioral therapy, activity pacing and graded exercise therapy as major components. We assessed changes in individual patients at 1 week and 3 months following the program utilizing validated self-report measures of pain, fatigue, and self-efficacy. All patients indicated at least small improvements in pain and physical symptoms both at 1 week and 3 months and all but one patient showed improvement in self-efficacy at 1 week and 3 months. Similar trends were observed for fatigue. Based on our early clinical experience, we conclude that the 1 week multidisciplinary fibromyalgia program is logistically feasible and has potential for clinical efficacy. Further research is needed and is planned to test the clinical efficacy of this program and compare it with other interventions. PMID:24315246

  18. MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Research Presentation Day: Experience Mathematics and Science in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the summaries of the MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Technological areas discussed include: Mathematical curriculum development for real world problems; Rain effects on air-water gas exchange; multi-ring impact basins on mars; developing an interactive multimedia educational cd-rom on remote sensing; a pilot of an activity for for the globe program; fossils in maryland; developing children's programming for the american horticultural society at river farm; children's learning, educational programs of the national park service; a study of climate and student satisfaction in two summer programs for disadvantaged students interested in careers in mathematics and science; the maryland governor's academy, integrating technology into the classroom; stream sampling with the maryland biological stream survey (MBSS); the imaging system inspection software technology, the preparation and detection of nominal and faulted steel ingots; event-based science, the development of real-world science units; correlation between anxiety and past experiences; environmental education through summer nature camp; enhancing learning opportunities at the Salisbury zoo; plant growth experiment, a module for the middle school classroom; the effects of proxisome proliferators in Japanese medaka embryos; development of a chapter on birth control and contraceptive methodologies as part of an interactive computer-based education module on hiv and aids; excretion of gentamicin in toadfish and goldfish; the renaissance summer program; and Are field trips important to the regional math science center?

  19. Women's experiences accessing a women-centered cardiac rehabilitation program: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Danielle E; Sutton, Erica J; Landry, Mireille; Sternberg, Len; Price, Jennifer A D

    2010-01-01

    The health benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for women living with heart disease are well documented, yet women remain underrepresented in traditionally structured CR programs. This health service delivery gap has been attributed to a number of sex-related factors experienced by women, including lower rates of physician referral, travel-related barriers, competing work and caregiving responsibilities, greater cardiovascular disease severity, and number of comorbid health conditions. Whether a program specifically designed for women is able to address these barriers and facilitate women's participation is a question that has seldom been explored in the CR literature. As part of a larger study exploring whether 6 predefined principles of women's health (empowerment of women, accessible programs, broad definition of health care, high-quality of care, collaborative planning, and innovative and creative approaches) are reflected in the practices of the Women's Cardiovascular Health Initiative (WCHI) (a comprehensive CR and primary prevention program designed for women), the objective of this analysis was to explore how the principle of "accessible programs" is experienced by women participating in the WCHI. Fourteen women previously enrolled in the WCHI program participated in a single, in-person qualitative interview. Transcripts were analyzed using a constant-comparative approach to identify relevant themes related to program accessibility. Key themes identified included participants' experiences with acquiring physician referral, negotiating transportation issues, and navigating program schedules. Women discussed how peer support and staff members' willingness to address their health-related concerns facilitated their participation. While a women-centered CR/primary prevention program may facilitate and encourage women's participation by providing flexible program schedules as well as peer and professional support, efforts are still required to address

  20. Three Women’s Educational Doctoral Program Experiences: A Case Study of Performances and Journeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Goodykoontz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Three academic women joined to write this piece to explore individual doctoral program experiences and to establish common understandings. They collectively analyzed their experiences using the conceptual approach of doctoral program performances and journeys. This case study shares their experiences within the conceptual approach through emerging themes. The common understandings developed herein about doctoral education based on these themes are also shared. The broader contributions of the three women’s work are two-fold. First, the entire case study provides a way to view, discuss, and consider women’s doctoral education pluralistically. Secondly, perhaps readers of this piece will recognize that individual and common understandings with others are a way to develop professional knowledge as academics. Further, readers of this piece might be able to relate more deeply to their own and others’ unique doctoral program experiences through the lens of performances or journeys. Some of these connections might be based on the overarching framework, while others might be specific to the shared women’s experiences.

  1. MCNP benchmark analyses of critical experiments for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ludewig, H.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Schmidt, E.; Todosow, M.; Parma, E.J.; Ball, R.M.; Hoovler, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Benchmark analyses have been performed of Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) critical experiments (CX) using the MCNP radiation transport code. The experiments have been conducted at the Sandia National Laboratory reactor facility in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. The test reactor is a nineteen element water moderated and reflected thermal system. A series of integral experiments have been carried out to test the capabilities of the radiation transport codes to predict the performance of PBR systems. MCNP was selected as the preferred radiation analysis tool for the benchmark experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculational results indicate close agreement. This paper describes the analyses of benchmark experiments designed to quantify the accuracy of the MCNP radiation transport code for predicting the performance characteristics of PBR reactors

  2. MCNP benchmark analyses of critical experiments for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcow, Elizabeth C.; Cerbone, Ralph J.; Ludewig, Hans; Mughabghab, Said F.; Schmidt, Eldon; Todosow, Michael; Parma, Edward J.; Ball, Russell M.; Hoovler, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    Benchmark analyses have been performed of Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) critical experiments (CX) using the MCNP radiation transport code. The experiments have been conducted at the Sandia National Laboratory reactor facility in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. The test reactor is a nineteen element water moderated and reflected thermal system. A series of integral experiments have been carried out to test the capabilities of the radiation transport codes to predict the performance of PBR systems. MCNP was selected as the preferred radiation analysis tool for the benchmark experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculational results indicate close agreement. This paper describes the analyses of benchmark experiments designed to quantify the accuracy of the MCNP radiation transport code for predicting the performance characteristics of PBR reactors.

  3. Non-Constant Learning Rates in Retrospective Experience Curve Analyses and their Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-16

    A key challenge for policy-makers and technology market forecasters is to estimate future technology costs and in particular the rate of cost reduction versus production volume. A related, critical question is what role should state and federal governments have in advancing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies? This work provides retrospective experience curves and learning rates for several energy-related technologies, each of which have a known history of federal and state deployment programs. We derive learning rates for eight technologies including energy efficient lighting technologies, stationary fuel cell systems, and residential solar photovoltaics, and provide an overview and timeline of historical deployment programs such as state and federal standards and state and national incentive programs for each technology. Piecewise linear regimes are observed in a range of technology experience curves, and public investments or deployment programs are found to be strongly correlated to an increase in learning rate across multiple technologies. A downward bend in the experience curve is found in 5 out of the 8 energy-related technologies presented here (electronic ballasts, magnetic ballasts, compact fluorescent lighting, general service fluorescent lighting, and the installed cost of solar PV). In each of the five downward-bending experience curves, we believe that an increase in the learning rate can be linked to deployment programs to some degree. This work sheds light on the endogenous versus exogenous contributions to technological innovation and highlights the impact of exogenous government sponsored deployment programs. This work can inform future policy investment direction and can shed light on market transformation and technology learning behavior.

  4. Physical Fitness Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Alice

    This document presents baseline data on physical fitness that provides an outline for assessing the physical fitness of students. It consists of 4 tasks and a 13-item questionnaire on fitness-related behaviors. The fitness test evaluates cardiorespiratory endurance by a steady state jog; muscular strength and endurance with a two-minute bent-knee…

  5. Unge, sundhed og fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ole

    2003-01-01

    Artiklen redegør for udbredelsen af fitness blandt unge og diskuterer, hvor det er blevet så populært at dyrke fitness.......Artiklen redegør for udbredelsen af fitness blandt unge og diskuterer, hvor det er blevet så populært at dyrke fitness....

  6. Space Shuttle Program (SSP) Shock Test and Specification Experience for Reusable Flight Hardware Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curtis E.

    2012-01-01

    As commercial companies are nearing a preliminary design review level of design maturity, several companies are identifying the process for qualifying their multi-use electrical and mechanical components for various shock environments, including pyrotechnic, mortar firing, and water impact. The experience in quantifying the environments consists primarily of recommendations from Military Standard-1540, Product Verification Requirement for Launch, Upper Stage, and Space Vehicles. Therefore, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) formed a team of NASA shock experts to share the NASA experience with qualifying hardware for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and other applicable programs and projects. Several team teleconferences were held to discuss past experience and to share ideas of possible methods for qualifying components for multiple missions. This document contains the information compiled from the discussions

  7. Experiences of women with stress-related ill health in a therapeutic gardening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Therese; Westerberg, Yvonne; Jonsson, Hans

    2011-12-01

    Stress-related ill health, e.g. burnout, is of great concern worldwide. Effective rehabilitation programs need to be developed and their therapeutic aspects understood. To explore and describe how women with stress-related ill health who are on sick leave experience the rehabilitation process in a therapeutic garden and how these experiences connect to their everyday lives. This longitudinal study used methods from grounded theory. Five women completed three semi-structured interviews at three weekly intervals during rehabilitation and one interview three months after. Data were analyzed using a constant comparative approach. A secure environment facilitated engagement in activities that provided feelings of enjoyment. These experiences inspired participants to add enjoyable activities in their everyday lives, contributing to occupational balance, despite worries of not be able to continue performing enjoyable activities. Implications. Effective rehabilitation programs need to focus on enjoyable activities in a protective environment to support achievement of occupational balance.

  8. Civilian Fitness: A Readiness Enabler

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-24

    bonus to make working out convenient and facilitate work / life balance . This was secondary to the hope that a fitness program would produce healthier...workforce; and 3) become an employer of choice and promote work life balance .88 34 Strategic plans and supporting objectives of the Army Installation

  9. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattione, Paul [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  10. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving physical fitness and health status perception in community-dwelling older adults through a structured program for physical activity promotion in the city of Naples, Italy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallè, Francesca; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Mastronuzzi, Roberto; Russo Krauss, Pio; Belfiore, Patrizia; Buono, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a physical activity promotion intervention in community-dwelling older adults based on a free program of exercise adapted for older adults aged ≥60 years managed by trainees from the Movement Sciences degree course. A total of 160 adults aged 60-82 years were randomly allocated into the intervention and control group. The exercise program consisted of 1-h sessions carried out twice a week for a year. Control participants received recommendations about an active lifestyle from their physicians. Senior Fitness Tests and the 12-item Short Form Health Survey were used to assess six functional fitness domains of participants and perception of their health status, respectively. Body mass index was also evaluated. A total of 62 participants completed the exercise path. At the end of the intervention, they showed a significant body mass index decrease (from 27.9 ± 1.6 to 25.1 ± 1.8 kg/m 2 , P fitness (+33.9%, P  0.05). A high acceptance of the intervention was registered among participants (>88.7%); staff competence and gratuitousness were the most appreciated features (>85.5%). The structured program represented a useful opportunity to promote physical activity among participants, and it was effective in improving their physical fitness and health status perception. Similar interventions are required to sensitize the whole older population, and experts in Movement Sciences might represent a key figure in this context. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1421-1428. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of the Financial Incentives of Two Distinct Experience-Rating Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompa, Emile; McLeod, Chris; Mustard, Cam

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the association between insurance premium incentives and claim outcomes in two different workers' compensation programs. Regression models were run for claim outcomes using data from two Canadian jurisdictions with different experience-rating programs-one with prospective (British Columbia) and another with retrospective (Ontario) adjustment of premiums. Key explanatory variables were past premium adjustments. For both programs, past premium adjustments were significantly associated with claim outcomes, suggesting adjustments provided incentives for claims reduction. The magnitudes of effects in the prospective program were smaller than the retrospective one, though relative persistence of effects over time was larger. Having large and immediate employer responses to incentives may appear desirable, but insurers should consider the time required for employers to improve and sustain good practices, and create incentives that parallel such time lines.

  13. Anglo-Saxon experience in the implementation of correctional treatment and the Polish individual rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Bernasiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors cite American and British research on the effectiveness of correctional treatment. On that basis, they describe several crucial factors that affect the success of rehabilitation (e.g., educators’ skills, working with families of juvenile offenders. The article broadly discusses the specific juvenile residential treatment program that has been implemented in Florida. The conclusions of this program are drawn from the research conducted through interviews with juvenile offenders (young adults who have effectively completed the process of rehabilitation in correctional facilities. Furthermore, the authors discuss an individual program of rehabilitation (IPR implemented in Polish correctional facilities. Using the experience and the impact of correctional treatment in the West, it is proposed to introduce certain modifications in the planning and implementation of Polish correctional treatment programs (IPR s.

  14. Use of the PASKAL' language for programming in experiment automation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrovnoj, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    A complex of standard solutions intended for realization of the main functions is suggested; execution of these solutions is provided by any system for experiment automation. They include: recording and accumulation of experimental data; visualization and preliminary processing of incoming data, interaction with the operator and system control; data filing. It is advisable to use standard software, to represent data processing algorithms as parallel processes, to apply the PASCAL' language for programming. Programming using CAMAC equipment is provided by complex of procedures similar to the set of subprograms in the FORTRAN language. Utilization of a simple data file in accumulation and processing programs ensures unified representation of experimental data and uniform access to them on behalf of a large number of programs operating both on-line and off-line regimes. The suggested approach is realized when developing systems on the base of the SM-3, SM-4 and MERA-60 computers with RAFOS operating system

  15. Towards program theory validation: Crowdsourcing the qualitative analysis of participant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Elena; Azzam, Tarek

    2018-02-01

    This exploratory study examines a novel tool for validating program theory through crowdsourced qualitative analysis. It combines a quantitative pattern matching framework traditionally used in theory-driven evaluation with crowdsourcing to analyze qualitative interview data. A sample of crowdsourced participants are asked to read an interview transcript and identify whether program theory components (Activities and Outcomes) are discussed and to highlight the most relevant passage about that component. The findings indicate that using crowdsourcing to analyze qualitative data can differentiate between program theory components that are supported by a participant's experience and those that are not. This approach expands the range of tools available to validate program theory using qualitative data, thus strengthening the theory-driven approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The main steps of the Romanian nuclear power program development - Accumulated experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Popescu, D.; Condu, M.; Vatamanu, M.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents a historical summary of the Romanian Nuclear Power Program development, providing details for the main criteria and principles the Program was based upon, the contracts signed with the foreign partners to implement it, and the national participation (site contractors, suppliers and design organizations). The effect of the equipment assimilation program on the NPP Cernavoda (5x700 MWe) and especially on Unit 1 schedule and performance is analyzed. Further on the impact of the transition from centralized to a market economy over the Romanian Nuclear Power Program development is analyzed, providing information's on its actual status and perspectives for the next 20 years. A description of the NPP Cernavoda Unit 1 actual progress and of the main steps performed by RENEL to get finance to complete NPP Cernavoda Unit 2 is included. Finally there is summarized the accumulated experience, and its feed back on RENEL strategy to complete NPP Cernavoda Unit 2. (author)

  17. Advancing women and closing the leadership gap: the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, R C; Morahan, P S; Cohen, D W; McDade, S A

    2001-04-01

    Women are persistently underrepresented in the higher levels of academic administration despite the fact that they have been entering the medical profession in increasing numbers for at least 20 years and now make up a large proportion of the medical student body and fill a similar proportion of entry level positions in medical schools. Although there are no easy remedies for gender inequities in medical schools, strategies have been proposed and implemented both within academic institutions and more broadly to achieve and sustain the advancement of women faculty to senior level positions. Substantial, sustained efforts to increase programs and activities addressing the major obstacles to advancement of women must be put in place so that the contributions of women can be fully realized and their skills fittingly applied in meeting the medical education and healthcare needs of all people in the 21st century.

  18. Criteria for prioritization of HIV programs in Viet Nam: a discrete choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Safarnejad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the decline in funding for Viet Nam’s response to the HIV epidemic, there is a need for evidence on the criteria to guide the prioritization of HIV programs. There is a gap in the research on the relative importance of multiple criteria for prioritizing a package of interventions. This study elicits preferences and the trade-offs made between different HIV programs by relevant stakeholders and decision-makers in Viet Nam. It also pays attention to how differences in social and professional characteristics of stakeholders and their agency affiliations shape preferences for HIV program criteria in Viet Nam. Methods This study uses self-explicated ranking and discrete choice experiments to determine the relative importance of five criteria - effectiveness, feasibility, cost-effectiveness, rate of investment and prevention/treatment investment ratio - to stakeholders when they evaluate and select hypothetical HIV programs. The study includes 69 participants from government, civil society, and international development partners. Results Results of the discrete choice experiment show that overall the feasibility criterion is ranked highest in importance to the participants when choosing a hypothetical HIV program, followed by sustainability, treatment to prevention spending ratio, and effectiveness. The participant’s work in management, programming, or decision-making has a significant effect on the importance of some criteria to the participant. In the self-explicated ranking effectiveness is the most important criterion and the cost-effectiveness criterion ranks low in importance across all groups. Conclusions This study has shown that the preferred HIV program in Viet Nam is feasible, front-loaded for sustainability, has a higher proportion of investment on prevention, saves more lives and prevents more infections. Similarities in government and civil society rankings of criteria can create common grounds for future

  19. Criteria for prioritization of HIV programs in Viet Nam: a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnejad, Ali; Pavlova, Milena; Son, Vo Hai; Phuong, Huynh Lan; Groot, Wim

    2017-11-13

    With the decline in funding for Viet Nam's response to the HIV epidemic, there is a need for evidence on the criteria to guide the prioritization of HIV programs. There is a gap in the research on the relative importance of multiple criteria for prioritizing a package of interventions. This study elicits preferences and the trade-offs made between different HIV programs by relevant stakeholders and decision-makers in Viet Nam. It also pays attention to how differences in social and professional characteristics of stakeholders and their agency affiliations shape preferences for HIV program criteria in Viet Nam. This study uses self-explicated ranking and discrete choice experiments to determine the relative importance of five criteria - effectiveness, feasibility, cost-effectiveness, rate of investment and prevention/treatment investment ratio - to stakeholders when they evaluate and select hypothetical HIV programs. The study includes 69 participants from government, civil society, and international development partners. Results of the discrete choice experiment show that overall the feasibility criterion is ranked highest in importance to the participants when choosing a hypothetical HIV program, followed by sustainability, treatment to prevention spending ratio, and effectiveness. The participant's work in management, programming, or decision-making has a significant effect on the importance of some criteria to the participant. In the self-explicated ranking effectiveness is the most important criterion and the cost-effectiveness criterion ranks low in importance across all groups. This study has shown that the preferred HIV program in Viet Nam is feasible, front-loaded for sustainability, has a higher proportion of investment on prevention, saves more lives and prevents more infections. Similarities in government and civil society rankings of criteria can create common grounds for future policy dialogues between stakeholders. Innovative models of planning should

  20. Interaction of D2 with H2O amorphous ice studied by temperature-programmed desorption experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiaud, L; Fillion, J H; Baouche, S; Dulieu, F; Momeni, A; Lemaire, J L

    2006-03-07

    The gas-surface interaction of molecular hydrogen D2 with a thin film of porous amorphous solid water (ASW) grown at 10 K by slow vapor deposition has been studied by temperature-programmed-desorption (TPD) experiments. Molecular hydrogen diffuses rapidly into the porous network of the ice. The D2 desorption occurring between 10 and 30 K is considered here as a good probe of the effective surface of ASW interacting with the gas. The desorption kinetics have been systematically measured at various coverages. A careful analysis based on the Arrhenius plot method has provided the D2 binding energies as a function of the coverage. Asymmetric and broad distributions of binding energies were found, with a maximum population peaking at low energy. We propose a model for the desorption kinetics that assumes a complete thermal equilibrium of the molecules with the ice film. The sample is characterized by a distribution of adsorption sites that are filled according to a Fermi-Dirac statistic law. The TPD curves can be simulated and fitted to provide the parameters describing the distribution of the molecules as a function of their binding energy. This approach contributes to a correct description of the interaction of molecular hydrogen with the surface of possibly porous grain mantles in the interstellar medium.

  1. Improving delivery of a health-promoting-environments program: experiences from Queensland Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, S

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the key components of a statewide multisite health-promoting-environments program. Contemporary health-promotion programs in settings such as schools, workplaces and hospitals use organisational development theory to address the health issues of the setting, including the physical environment, the organisational environment, and the specific health needs of the employees and consumers of the service. Program principles include management of each project by the participant organisation or site (for example, a school or workplace), using resources available within the organisation and the local community, voluntary participation, social justice and participant-based priority setting, and evaluation and monitoring. Adoption of these principles implies a shift in the role of the health worker from implementer to facilitator. Based on the experience of Queensland Health, it is proposed that the essential building blocks of the health-promoting-environments program are an intersectoral policy base, a model for action, training and resources, local facilitators, support from local organisations, a supportive network of sites, marketing of the program, and a state-based evaluation and monitoring system. The program in Queensland was able to develop a significant number of these components over the 1990-1996 period. In regard to evaluation, process measures can be built around the program components; however, further research is required for development of impact indicators and benchmarks on quality.

  2. Authentic Astronomy Research Experiences for Teachers: The NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebull, L. M.; Gorjian, V.; Squires, G.; Nitarp Team

    2012-08-01

    How many times have you gotten a question from the general public, or read a news story, and concluded that "they just don't understand how real science works?" One really good way to get the word out about how science works is to have more people experience the process of scientific research. Since 2004, the way we have chosen to do this is to provide authentic research experiences for teachers using real data (the program used to be called the Spitzer Teacher Program for Teachers and Students, which in 2009 was rechristened the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program, or NITARP). We partner small groups of teachers with a mentor astronomer, they do research as a team, write up a poster, and present it at an American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting. The teachers incorporate this experience into their classroom, and their experiences color their teaching for years to come, influencing hundreds of students per teacher. This program differs from other similar programs in several important ways. First, each team works on an original, unique project. There are no canned labs here! Second, each team presents their results in posters at the AAS, in science sessions (not outreach sessions). The posters are distributed throughout the meeting, in amongst other researchers' work; the participants are not "given a free pass" because they are teachers. Finally, the "product" of this project is the scientific result, not any sort of curriculum packet. The teachers adapt their project to their classroom environment, and we change the way they think about science and scientists.

  3. A qualitative study exploring adolescents' experiences with a school-based mental health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmy, Pernilla; Berg, Agneta; Clausson, Eva K

    2015-10-21

    Supporting positive mental health development in adolescents is a major public health concern worldwide. Although several school-based programs aimed at preventing depression have been launched, it is crucial to evaluate these programs and to obtain feedback from participating adolescents. This study aimed to explore adolescents' experiences with a -based cognitive-behavioral depression prevention program. Eighty-nine adolescents aged 13-15 years were divided into 12 focus groups. The focus group interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Three categories and eight subcategories were found to be related to the experience of the school-based program. The first category, intrapersonal strategies, consisted of the subcategories of directed thinking, improved self-confidence, stress management, and positive activities. The second category, interpersonal awareness, consisted of the subcategories of trusting the group and considering others. The third category, structural constraints, consisted of the subcategories of negative framing and emphasis on performance. The school-based mental health program was perceived as beneficial and meaningful on both individual and group levels, but students expressed a desire for a more health-promoting approach.

  4. 'Fit Moms/Mamás Activas' internet-based weight control program with group support to reduce postpartum weight retention in low-income women: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Suzanne; Brannen, Anna; Erickson, Karen; Diamond, Molly; Schaffner, Andrew; Muñoz-Christian, Karen; Stewart, Ana; Sanchez, Teresa; Rodriguez, Vanessa C; Ramos, Dalila I; McClure, Linda; Stinson, Caro; Tate, Deborah F

    2015-02-25

    High postpartum weight retention is a strong independent risk factor for lifetime obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes in women. Interventions to promote postpartum weight loss have met with some success but have been limited by high attrition. Internet-based treatment has the potential to overcome this barrier and reduce postpartum weight retention, but no study has evaluated the effects of an internet-based program to prevent high postpartum weight retention in women. Fit Moms/Mamás Activas targets recruitment of 12 Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Supplemental Nutrition Program clinics with a total of 408 adult (>18 years), postpartum (internet-based weight loss intervention. The intervention includes: monthly face-to-face group sessions; access to a website with weekly lessons, a web diary, instructional videos, and computer-tailored feedback; four weekly text messages; and brief reinforcement from WIC counselors. Participants are assessed at baseline, six months, and 12 months. The primary outcome is weight loss over six and 12 months; secondary outcomes include diet and physical activity behaviors, and psychosocial measures. Fit Moms/Mamás Activas is the first study to empirically examine the effects of an internet-based treatment program, coupled with monthly group contact at the WIC program, designed to prevent sustained postpartum weight retention in low-income women at high risk for weight gain, obesity, and related comorbidities. This trial was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT01408147 ) on 29 July 2011.

  5. Conceptual design report for the scientific program of the super-FRS experiment collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) presents the plans of the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration for a variety of experiments, which build on the versatile high-resolution separator and spectrometer performance of the Super-FRS. The characteristic feature of these experiments is the fact that they use the separator as an integral part of the measurement. These experiments build on the experience of the collaboration and their scientific program pursued at the FRS in the last 25 years, but also includes recently developed novel topics. Under these premises, the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration has identified ten major topics of current interest and with far-reaching scientific potential. In this CDR, the scientific case is briefly recapitulated and the conceptual design of the experiments, the setups and their implementation are described. Much of the needed equipment is already available or, if not, will be realized with new, additional resources and efforts outside the FAIR Cost Books. The related R and D works and some pilot experiments can be carried out at the existing FRS of GSI in FAIR Phase-0. On the midterm, the science program of this collaboration can start at the commissioning phase of the Super-FRS and will continue on the long term with the established full performance. Accordingly, the prototype equipment and other already existing devices can be tested and used at the FRS and can later, when completed or upgraded, be moved to the Super-FRS. The related developments and organization of the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration are described,and the collaboration partners and institutes are listed. The Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration is formally and firmly established and is a comprising part of the NUSTAR Collaboration. A large variety of modern nuclear physics experiments with new scientific possibilities and outstanding scientific potential were presented in the scientific program (GSI-Report 2014-4), which was very positively evaluated and

  6. Conceptual design report for the scientific program of the super-FRS experiment collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-11-01

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) presents the plans of the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration for a variety of experiments, which build on the versatile high-resolution separator and spectrometer performance of the Super-FRS. The characteristic feature of these experiments is the fact that they use the separator as an integral part of the measurement. These experiments build on the experience of the collaboration and their scientific program pursued at the FRS in the last 25 years, but also includes recently developed novel topics. Under these premises, the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration has identified ten major topics of current interest and with far-reaching scientific potential. In this CDR, the scientific case is briefly recapitulated and the conceptual design of the experiments, the setups and their implementation are described. Much of the needed equipment is already available or, if not, will be realized with new, additional resources and efforts outside the FAIR Cost Books. The related R and D works and some pilot experiments can be carried out at the existing FRS of GSI in FAIR Phase-0. On the midterm, the science program of this collaboration can start at the commissioning phase of the Super-FRS and will continue on the long term with the established full performance. Accordingly, the prototype equipment and other already existing devices can be tested and used at the FRS and can later, when completed or upgraded, be moved to the Super-FRS. The related developments and organization of the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration are described,and the collaboration partners and institutes are listed. The Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration is formally and firmly established and is a comprising part of the NUSTAR Collaboration. A large variety of modern nuclear physics experiments with new scientific possibilities and outstanding scientific potential were presented in the scientific program (GSI-Report 2014-4), which was very positively evaluated and

  7. Randomized field experiments for program planning, development, and evaluation: an illustrative bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruch, R F; Mcsweeny, A J; Soderstrom, E J

    1978-11-01

    This bibliography lists references to over 300 field experiments undertaken in schools, hospitals, prisons, and other social settings, mainly in the U.S. The list is divided into 10 major categories corresponding to the type of program under examination. They include: criminal and civil justice programs, mental health, training and education, mass media, information collection, utilization, commerce and industry, welfare, health, and family planning. The main purpose of the bibliography is to provide evidence on feasibility and scope of randomized field tests, since despite their advantages, it is not always clear from managerial, political, and other constraints on research that they can be mounted. Dates of publications range from 1944 to 1978.

  8. Implementation of the G8GP program on physical protection - experiences and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, A.

    2006-01-01

    At the Kananaskis Summit in June 2002, G8 Leaders launched the Global Partnership against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction committing to support projects to issues of non-proliferation, disarmament, counter terrorism and nuclear safety in Russia. Since then progress has been made in implementing projects. The German Federal Foreign Office contracted GRS to implement a program for improving the physical protection of nuclear or highly radioactive materials of relevance at facilities in the Russian Federation. This paper reports about this G8GP Program on physical protection, its implementation, gained experiences, current achievements and results. (author)

  9. Operating experience review for nuclear power plants in the Systematic Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. This paper describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review portion of the SEP evaluation. SEPB will combine the results from these operational reviews with other safety topic evaluations to perform an integrated assessment of the SEP plants

  10. Improving Undergraduate Research Experiences With An Intentional Mentoring Program: Lessons Learned Through Assessment of Keck Geology Consortium Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, K. R.; Garver, J. I.; Greer, L.; Pollock, M.; Varga, R. J.; Davidson, C. M.; Frey, H. M.; Hubbard, D. K.; Peck, W. H.; Wobus, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Keck Geology Consortium, with support from the National Science Foundation (REU Program) and ExxonMobil, is a collaborative effort by 18 colleges to improve geoscience education through high-quality research experiences. Since its inception in 1987 more than 1350 undergraduate students and 145 faculty have been involved in 189 yearlong research projects. This non-traditional REU model offers exceptional opportunities for students to address research questions at a deep level, to learn and utilize sophisticated analytical methods, and to engage in authentic collaborative research that culminates in an undergraduate research symposium and published abstracts volume. The large numbers of student and faculty participants in Keck projects also affords a unique opportunity to study the impacts of program design on undergraduate research experiences in the geosciences. Students who participate in Keck projects generally report significant gains in personal and professional dimensions, as well as in clarification of educational and career goals. Survey data from student participants, project directors, and campus advisors identify mentoring as one of the most critical and challenging elements of successful undergraduate research experiences. Additional challenges arise from the distributed nature of Keck projects (i.e., participants, project directors, advisors, and other collaborators are at different institutions) and across the span of yearlong projects. In an endeavor to improve student learning about the nature and process of science, and to make mentoring practices more intentional, the Consortium has developed workshops and materials to support both project directors and campus research advisors (e.g., best practices for mentoring, teaching ethical professional conduct, benchmarks for progress, activities to support students during research process). The Consortium continues to evolve its practices to better support students from underrepresented groups.

  11. Implementing Health-Promoting Leadership in Municipal Organizations: Managers’ Experiences with a Leadership Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Larsson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze how line and middle managers experience and describe barriers and enablers in the implementation of a health-promoting leadership program in municipal organizations. A qualitative case study design was applied to examine the leadership program in a case involving implementation of an organizational health intervention. Data were mainly collected using semi-structured interviews with line and middle managers participating in the leadership program. Interviews with senior managers, notes from meetings/workshops, and written action plans were used as complementary data. The interview data were analyzed using a thematic analysis, and the complementary data using a summative content analysis. The findings show that the interviewed line and middle managers experienced this leadership program as a new approach in leadership training because it is based primarily on employee participation. Involvement and commitment of the employees was considered a crucial enabler in the implementation of the leadership program. Other enablers identified include action plans with specific goals, earlier experiences of organizational change, and integration of the program content into regular routines and structures. The line and middle managers described several barriers in the implementation process, and they described various organizational conditions, such as high workload, lack of senior management support, politically initiated projects, and organizational change, as challenges that limited the opportunities to be drivers of change. Taken together, these barriers interfered with the leadership program and its implementation. The study contributes to the understanding of how organizational-level health interventions are implemented in public sector workplaces.

  12. Design of FitFor2 study: the effects of an exercise program on insulin sensitivity and plasma glucose levels in pregnant women at high risk for gestational diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eekhoff Elisabeth MW

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy is a period in the life of women that is often associated with decreased daily physical activity and/or exercise. However, maintaining adequate levels of daily physical activity during pregnancy is important for mother and child. Studies suggest that moderate daily physical activity and exercise during pregnancy are associated with reductions in the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. However, at present, physical activity is not routinely advised to pregnant women at risk for gestational diabetes in the Netherlands. In FitFor2-study we aim to assess whether an exercise program can improve insulin sensitivity and fasting plasma glucose levels of women at high risk for gestational diabetes, assuming that this will lower their risk of gestational diabetes. Methods The FitFor2-study is a randomised controlled trial. Women who visit one of the participating hospitals or midwifery practices and who are at risk for gestational diabetes are eligible to participate. After baseline measurement they are randomly allocated to in the intervention or control group. The intervention group receives an exercise program twice a week in addition to usual care. The exercise program consist of aerobic and strength exercises and takes place under close supervision of a physiotherapist. Data are collected at 15, 24 and 32 weeks of pregnancy and 12 weeks after delivery. Primary maternal outcome measures are fasting plasma glucose and relative increase in insulin resistance. Primary neonatal outcome is birth weight. Secondary outcome measures are: maternal serum triglycerides, HDL, cholesterol, HbA1c, maternal weight gain during pregnancy, maternal physical activity level, foetal growth. Discussion If the FitFor2 intervention program proves to be effective, obstetricians and midwives should refer women at risk for GDM to a special exercise program. Exercise programs for pregnant women under supervision of an experienced trainer are

  13. Retrospective North American CFL Experience Curve Analysis and Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Retrospective experience curves are a useful tool for understanding historic technology development, and can contribute to investment program analysis and future cost estimation efforts. This work documents our development of an analysis approach for deriving retrospective experience curves with a variable learning rate, and its application to develop an experience curve for compact fluorescent lamps for the global and North American markets over the years 1990-2007. Uncertainties and assumptions involved in interpreting data for our experience curve development are discussed, including the processing and transformation of empirical data, the selection of system boundaries, and the identification of historical changes in the learning rate over the course of 15 years. In the results that follow, we find that that the learning rate has changed at least once from 1990-2007. We also explore if, and to what degree, public deployment programs may have contributed to an increased technology learning rate in North America. We observe correlations between the changes in the learning rate and the initiation of new policies, abrupt technological advances, including improvements to ballast technology, and economic and political events such as trade tariffs and electricity prices. Finally, we discuss how the findings of this work (1) support the use of segmented experience curves for retrospective and prospective analysis and (2) may imply that investments in technological research and development have contributed to a change in market adoption and penetration.

  14. LEU-HTR critical experiment program for the PROTEUS facility in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogli, R.; Bucher, K.H.; Chawla, R.; Foskolos, K.; Luchsinger, H.; Mathews, D.; Sarlos, G.; Seiler, R.

    1990-01-01

    New critical experiments in the framework of an IAEA Coordinated Research Program on 'Validation of Safety Related Reactor Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTRs' are planned at the PSI PROTEUS facility. The experiments are designed to supplement the experimental data base and reduce the design and licensing uncertainties for small- and medium-sized helium-cooled reactors using low-enriched uranium (LEU) and graphite high temperature fuel. The main objectives of the new experiments are to provide first-of-a-kind high quality experimental data on: 1) The criticality of simple, easy to interpret, single core region LEU HTR systems for several moderator-to-fuel ratios and several lattice geometries; 2) the changes in reactivity, neutron balance components and control rod effectiveness caused by water ingress into this type of reactor, and 3) the effects of the boron and/or hafnium absorbers that are used to modify the reactivity and the power distributions in typical HTR systems. Work on the design and licensing of the modified PROTEUS critical facility is now in progress with the HTR experiments scheduled to begin early in 1991. Several international partners will be involved in the planning, execution and analysis of these experiments in order to insure that they are relevant and cost effective with respect to the various gas cooled reactor national programs. (author)

  15. LEU-HTR critical experiment program for the PROTEUS facility in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogli, R; Bucher, K H; Chawla, R; Foskolos, K; Luchsinger, H; Mathews, D; Sarlos, G; Seiler, R [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Technology Wuerenlingen and Villigen, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    1990-07-01

    New critical experiments in the framework of an IAEA Coordinated Research Program on 'Validation of Safety Related Reactor Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTRs' are planned at the PSI PROTEUS facility. The experiments are designed to supplement the experimental data base and reduce the design and licensing uncertainties for small- and medium-sized helium-cooled reactors using low-enriched uranium (LEU) and graphite high temperature fuel. The main objectives of the new experiments are to provide first-of-a-kind high quality experimental data on: 1) The criticality of simple, easy to interpret, single core region LEU HTR systems for several moderator-to-fuel ratios and several lattice geometries; 2) the changes in reactivity, neutron balance components and control rod effectiveness caused by water ingress into this type of reactor, and 3) the effects of the boron and/or hafnium absorbers that are used to modify the reactivity and the power distributions in typical HTR systems. Work on the design and licensing of the modified PROTEUS critical facility is now in progress with the HTR experiments scheduled to begin early in 1991. Several international partners will be involved in the planning, execution and analysis of these experiments in order to insure that they are relevant and cost effective with respect to the various gas cooled reactor national programs. (author)

  16. Program controlled system for mathematical processing the αp-experiment data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glagolev, V.V.; Govorun, N.N.; Dirner, A.; Ivanov, V.G.; Kretov, A.P.; Mirolyubov, V.P.; Pervushov, V.V.; Shelontsev, I.I.

    1982-01-01

    ZEUS system which allows one mathematical processing of bubble chamber pictures for αp-experiment with computer control is descibed. The comparison and basic defect of traditional processing of film information is considered. The structure, operation and further development of this system are described. It consists of the monitoring programs, directory file, input request language, data bank and documentation. ZEUS system is developed for processing αp-experiment from JINR one-meter-hydrogen liquid chamber. It makes possible to eliminate big manual work at organization of mass data processing by a computer. The system is realized on the CDC-6500 computer

  17. A Three-Year Reflective Writing Program as Part of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jessica; Kerr, Kevin; Zielenski, Christopher; Toppel, Brianna; Johnson, Lauren; McCauley, Patrina; Turner, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To implement and evaluate a 3-year reflective writing program incorporated into introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) in the first- through third-year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Design. Reflective writing was integrated into 6 IPPE courses to develop students’ lifelong learning skills. In their writing, students were required to self-assess their performance in patient care activities, identify and describe how they would incorporate learning opportunities, and then evaluate their progress. Practitioners, faculty members, and fourth-year PharmD students served as writing preceptors. Assessment. The success of the writing program was assessed by reviewing class performance and surveying writing preceptor’s opinions regarding the student’s achievement of program objectives. Class pass rates averaged greater than 99% over the 8 years of the program and the large majority of the writing preceptors reported that student learning objectives were met. A support pool of 99 writing preceptors was created. Conclusions. A 3-year reflective writing program improved pharmacy students’ reflection and reflective writing skills. PMID:23788811

  18. Distributed Solar Incentive Programs: Recent Experience and Best Practices for Design and Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, L.; Reger, A.; Heeter, J.

    2012-12-01

    Based on lessons from recent program experience, this report explores best practices for designing and implementing incentives for small and mid-sized residential and commercial distributed solar energy projects. The findings of this paper are relevant to both new incentive programs as well as those undergoing modifications. The report covers factors to consider in setting and modifying incentive levels over time, differentiating incentives to encourage various market segments, administrative issues such as providing equitable access to incentives and customer protection. It also explores how incentive programs can be designed to respond to changing market conditions while attempting to provide a longer-term and stable environment for the solar industry. The findings are based on interviews with program administrators, regulators, and industry representatives as well as data from numerous incentive programs nationally, particularly the largest and longest-running programs. These best practices consider the perspectives of various stakeholders and the broad objectives of reducing solar costs, encouraging long-term market viability, minimizing ratepayer costs, and protecting consumers.

  19. A yell of negritude: Experiences in the readers and writers formation in the More Education program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnaldo Mesquita de Lima Junior

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study has as objective expose the report of activities developed by the programExperiences of reading/writing: the readers/ writers formation”, focusing in the sub-project “(Di versifying: experiences at school”, specifically at the module I “A yell of negritude”. This job has been realized with the More Education program of the municipal secondary school Marechal Castelo Branco, with the objective of offering to the students a delightful relation with the reading and production of diverse texts, focusing in the formation of reading and writing of literary texts. Therefore, will be presented the theoretical and methodological references used to start the referred module, as how a brief description of the realized activities followed of reflections about the docent work.

  20. Fiscal Fitness for Non-Profits: Project Puts Chicago After-School Programs and Funders through a Financial Workout. Stories from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Strengthening after-school programming for city youngsters has long been an objective of The Wallace Foundation, a national philanthropy based in New York City. In its work over the years, Wallace has found that weak financial management of the nonprofits running many high-quality programs hampers their ability to improve and expand. In 2009,…