WorldWideScience

Sample records for experiencing programmatic re-direction

  1. Towards programmatic design research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Löwgren

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The notion of design research entails research where design practice forms part of the knowledge production. Based on our characterization of the nature of design, we propose to conceptualize this kind of research as programmatic design research. Two ongoing PhD projects in interaction design are presented as examples of programmatic research processes, highlighting issues to do with the virtues and qualities of the processes, the interplay of optics and engagements in a hermeneutical dynamic, and the production of takeaways for the academic community.

  2. 76 FR 61295 - Programmatic Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 1 Programmatic Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... extension of time to file comments in response to a draft programmatic environmental assessment (PEA) of the... environmental effects of the Commission's ASR program. Owners of structures that are taller than 200 feet above...

  3. Experiencing control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monaci, G.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Meerbeek, B.W.; Bingley, P.; Rajagopalan, R.; Triki, M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the activities carried out in the first part of the Experiencing Control project (2008-324). The guiding idea of the project is to make control part of the experience, exploring new interaction solutions for complex, engaging interactions with Philips devices in the living

  4. Experiencing variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Berge, Maria; Grout, Brian William Wilson

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes towards a better understanding of learning dynamics in doctoral supervision by analysing how learning opportunities are created in the interaction between supervisors and PhD students, using the notion of experiencing variation as a key to learning. Empirically, we have bas...... were discussed, created more complex patterns of variation. Both PhD students and supervisors can learn from this. Understanding of this mechanism that creates learning opportunities can help supervisors develop their competences in supervisory pedagogy....

  5. Heat Flux and Wall Temperature Estimates for the NASA Langley HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, Vincent, Jr.; Hass, Neal E.

    2010-01-01

    An objective of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program Flight 2 is to provide validation data for high enthalpy scramjet prediction tools through a single flight test and accompanying ground tests of the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR) tested in the NASA LaRC Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HDCR is a full-scale, copper heat sink structure designed to simulate the isolator entrance conditions and isolator, pilot, and combustor section of the HIFiRE flight test experiment flowpath and is fully instrumented to assess combustion performance over a range of operating conditions simulating flight from Mach 5.5 to 8.5 and for various fueling schemes. As part of the instrumentation package, temperature and heat flux sensors were provided along the flowpath surface and also imbedded in the structure. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the surface heat flux and wall temperature of the Zirconia coated copper wall can be obtained with a water-cooled heat flux gage and a sub-surface temperature measurement. An algorithm was developed which used these two measurements to reconstruct the surface conditions along the flowpath. Determinations of the surface conditions of the Zirconia coating were conducted for a variety of conditions.

  6. Effector memory and central memory NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells for treatment of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberth, P C; Jakka, G; Jensen, S M; Wadle, A; Gautschi, F; Haley, D; Haile, S; Mischo, A; Held, G; Thiel, M; Tinguely, M; Bifulco, C B; Fox, B A; Renner, C; Petrausch, U

    2013-04-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is a potential target antigen for immune therapy expressed in a subset of patients with multiple myeloma. We generated chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing the immunodominant NY-ESO-1 peptide 157-165 in the context of HLA-A*02:01 to re-direct autologous CD8(+) T cells towards NY-ESO-1(+) myeloma cells. These re-directed T cells specifically lysed NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A*02:01-positive cells and secreted IFNγ. A total of 40% of CCR7(-) re-directed T cells had an effector memory phenotype and 5% a central memory phenotype. Based on CCR7 cell sorting, effector and memory CAR-positive T cells were separated and CCR7(+) memory cells demonstrated after antigen-specific re-stimulation downregulation of CCR7 as sign of differentiation towards effector cells accompanied by an increased secretion of memory signature cytokines such as IL-2. To evaluate NY-ESO-1 as potential target antigen, we screened 78 bone marrow biopsies of multiple myeloma patients where NY-ESO-1 protein was found to be expressed by immunohistochemistry in 9.7% of samples. Adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells protected mice against challenge with endogenously NY-ESO-1-positive myeloma cells in a xenograft model. In conclusion, re-directed effector- and central memory T cells specifically recognized NY-ESO-1(157-165)/ HLA-A*02:01-positive cells resulting in antigen-specific functionality in vitro and in vivo.

  7. A practical approach to programmatic assessment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, A A; Dijkstra, J

    2017-12-01

    Assessment of complex tasks integrating several competencies calls for a programmatic design approach. As single instruments do not provide the information required to reach a robust judgment of integral performance, 73 guidelines for programmatic assessment design were developed. When simultaneously applying these interrelated guidelines, it is challenging to keep a clear overview of all assessment activities. The goal of this study was to provide practical support for applying a programmatic approach to assessment design, not bound to any specific educational paradigm. The guidelines were first applied in a postgraduate medical training setting, and a process analysis was conducted. This resulted in the identification of four steps for programmatic assessment design: evaluation, contextualisation, prioritisation and justification. Firstly, the (re)design process starts with sufficiently detailing the assessment environment and formulating the principal purpose. Key stakeholders with sufficient (assessment) expertise need to be involved in the analysis of strengths and weaknesses and identification of developmental needs. Central governance is essential to balance efforts and stakes with the principal purpose and decide on prioritisation of design decisions and selection of relevant guidelines. Finally, justification of assessment design decisions, quality assurance and external accountability close the loop, to ensure sound underpinning and continuous improvement of the assessment programme.

  8. A Systematic Approach to Programmatic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffit, Dani M.; Mansell, Jamie L.; Russ, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Accrediting bodies and universities increasingly require evidence of student learning within courses and programs. Within athletic training, programmatic assessment has been a source of angst for program directors. While there are many ways to assess educational programs, this article introduces 1 systematic approach. Objective: This…

  9. 76 FR 54422 - Programmatic Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 1 Programmatic Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... environmental assessment (PEA) of the Antenna Structure Registration (ASR) program. The purpose of the PEA is to evaluate the potential environmental effects of the Commission's ASR program. Owners of structures that are...

  10. Re-directed T cells for the treatment of fibroblast activation protein (FAP-positive malignant pleural mesothelioma (FAPME-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrausch Ulf

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asbestos is the main cause of MPM in industrialized countries. Even since asbestos is banned in most developed countries, the peak wave of MPM incidence is anticipated for the next years due to the long latency of asbestos induced MPM. MPM patients not eligible for surgical procedures like decortication or pleuro-pneumectomie have a median survival of 12 months with palliative chemotherapy. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches are of crucial need in this clinical situation. Methods/design This is a phase I trial for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma with pleural effusion testing the safety of a fixed single dose of 1x106 adoptively transferred FAP-specific re-directed T cells given directly in the pleural effusion. Lymphocytes will be taken 21 days before transfer from peripheral blood. CD8 positive T cells will be isolated and re-programmed by retroviral transfer of a chimeric antigen receptor recognizing FAP which serves as target structure in MPM. At day 0 of the protocol, re-directed T cells will be injected in the pleural effusion and patients will be monitored for 48h under intermediate care conditions. AE, SAE, SADR and SUSAR will be monitored for 35 days and evaluated by an independent safety board to define any dose limiting toxicity (DLT. No further patient can be treated before the previous patient passed day 14 after T cell transfer. The protocol will be judged as save when no DLT occurred in the first 3 patients, or 1 DLT in 6 patients. Secondary objectives are feasibility and immune monitoring. Discussion Adoptive T cell transfer is a new and rapidly expanding branch of immunotherapies focusing on cancer treatment. Recently, objective responses could be observed in patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia treated with adoptively transferred CD19-specific re-directed T cells. The choice of the target antigen determines the possible on-target off-tissue toxicity of such approaches. There are reports of

  11. Developmental Milestones Across the Programmatic Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover-Kudon, Rebecca; DeGroff, Amy; Rohan, Elizabeth A.; Preissle, Judith; Boehm, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2005 through 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded 5 sites to implement a colorectal cancer screening program for uninsured, low-income populations. These 5 sites composed a demonstration project intended to explore the feasibility of establishing a national colorectal cancer screening program through various service delivery models. METHODS A longitudinal, multiple case study was conducted to understand and document program implementation processes. Using metaphor as a qualitative analytic technique, evaluators identified stages of maturation across the programmatic life cycle. RESULTS Analysis rendered a working theory of program development during screening implementation. In early stages, program staff built relationships with CDC and local partners around screening readiness, faced real-world challenges putting program policies into practice, revised initial program designs, and developed new professional skills. Midterm implementation was defined by establishing program cohesiveness and expanding programmatic reach. In later stages of implementation, staff focused on sustainability and formal program closeout, which prompted reflection about personal and programmatic accomplishments. CONCLUSIONS Demonstration sites evolved through common developmental stages during screening implementation. Findings elucidate ways to target technical assistance to more efficiently move programs along their maturation trajectory. In practical terms, the time and cost associated with guiding a program to maturity may be potentially shortened to maximize return on investment for both organizations and clients receiving service benefits. PMID:23868487

  12. Diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis: programmatic management issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, A D; Kumar, A M V; Satyanarayana, S; Lin, Y; Zachariah, R; Lönnroth, K; Kapur, A

    2015-08-01

    In August 2011, the World Health Organization and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease launched the Collaborative Framework for Care and Control of Tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) to guide policy makers and implementers in combatting the epidemics of both diseases. Progress has been made, and includes identifying how best to undertake bidirectional screening for both diseases, how to provide optimal treatment and care for patients with dual disease and the most suitable framework for monitoring and evaluation. Key programmatic challenges include the following: whether screening should be directed at all patients or targeted at those with high-risk characteristics; the most suitable technologies for diagnosing TB and diabetes in routine settings; the best time to screen TB patients for DM; how to provide an integrated, coordinated approach to case management; and finally, how to persuade non-communicable disease programmes to adopt a cohort analysis approach, preferably using electronic medical records, for monitoring and evaluation. The link between DM and TB and the implementation of the collaborative framework for care and control have the potential to stimulate and strengthen the scale-up of non-communicable disease care and prevention programmes, which may help in reducing not only the global burden of DM but also the global burden of TB.

  13. Space construction system analysis. Part 2: Cost and programmatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonflue, F. W.; Cooper, W.

    1980-01-01

    Cost and programmatic elements of the space construction systems analysis study are discussed. The programmatic aspects of the ETVP program define a comprehensive plan for the development of a space platform, the construction system, and the space shuttle operations/logistics requirements. The cost analysis identified significant items of cost on ETVP development, ground, and flight segments, and detailed the items of space construction equipment and operations.

  14. Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  15. Click Fraud Detection In Mobile Ads Served In Programmatic Exchanges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Badhe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Programmatic inventory auction or Real Time Bidding is the latest buzz in the mobile advertisement industry. This concept refers to a real time auction held for mobile advertisement spots and bidders bidding for that spot to show their advertisement. For a programmatic exchange that conducts these auctions detecting advertisements that auto click becomes very important since click fraud can quickly degrade the quality of supply for the exchange. Click fraud robs advertisers of their connection to unique users potential customers they might acquire. Click fraud nowadays is achieved with scripts to make it more legitimate and convincing.

  16. 78 FR 56869 - Nuclear Infrastructure Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Supplement Analysis...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Infrastructure Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Supplement Analysis Determination for Plutonium-238... Analysis (SA) of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian...

  17. Programmatic aspects of postpartum family planning in developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    To achieve the improved maternal and child outcomes of birth spacing, family planning in the postpartum period is essential. The objective of this study is to determine the perceptions regarding programmatic aspects of postpartum family planning by key informants in 17 countries determined to have high unmet need for ...

  18. Teaching Psychological Research Methods through a Pragmatic and Programmatic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, Patrick; Fielden, Amy; Tzemou, Effy

    2014-01-01

    Research methods teaching in psychology is pivotal in preparing students for the transition from student as learner to independent practitioner. We took an action research approach to re-design, implement and evaluate a module guiding students through a programmatic and pragmatic research cycle. These revisions allow students to experience how…

  19. 75 FR 17940 - Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the Evaluation of the Grant Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the Evaluation...) has prepared a draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) to address the potential impacts to... exemption. DATES: Comments on the draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment and on the draft Memorandum of...

  20. The science pendulum: From programmatic to incremental-and back?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Margaret M

    2017-01-01

    The climate in which scientific research is conducted changes over time, and in recent years there has been a shift from a positive view of programmatic science to a more negative evaluation that its contribution to scientific progress is only incremental. In this special issue focusing on the tools of a programmatic approach-replication, reliability and reproducibility-I reflect on changes in scientific practice over my research career, considering some factors contributing to changes in emphasis and highlighting potential pitfalls, particularly in terms of the impact on scientific progress and future scientists. In concluding, I suggest that, as members of the scientific community, we can influence current scientific practices in our day-to-day roles as authors, reviewers, investigators, editors, employers, and educators. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  1. Operating an Advertising Programmatic Buying Platform: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Gonzalvez-Cabañas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses how new technological developments and the possibilities generated by the internet are shaping the online advertising market. More specifically it focuses on a programmatic advertising case study. The origin of the problem is how publishers resort to automated buying and selling when trying to shift unsold inventory. To carry out our case study, we will use a programmatic online advertising sales platform, which identifies the optimal way of promoting a given product. The platform executes, evaluates, manages and optimizes display advertising campaigns, all in real-time. The empirical analysis carried out in the case study reveals that the platform and its exclusion algorithms are suitable mechanisms for analysing the performance and efficiency of the various segments that might be used to promote products. Thanks to Big Data tools and artificial intelligence the platform performs automatically, providing information in a user-friendly and simple manner.

  2. Are you experienced?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael Slavensky; Reichstein, Toke

    . We also find that spin-offs from parent companies that exit are less likely to survive than either spin-offs from surviving parents or other start-ups. These findings support the theoretical arguments that organizational heritage is important for the survival of new organizations. We found no similar...... ranked members of start-ups prior to their founding, and follow the fate of these firms. More specifically, we compare the survival of spin-offs from surviving parents, spin-offs from exiting parents, and other start-ups. Moreover, we investigate whether firms managed and founded by more experienced...... teams with higher levels of industry-specific experience are more likely to survive. Distinguishing between survivors and firms that have been acquired, we find that spin-offs from a surviving parent company combined with and industry-specific experience, positively affects the likelihood of survival...

  3. 77 FR 36998 - Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment for Office of Coast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... Coast Survey (OCS) seeks comment on a draft programmatic environmental assessment (PEA) of the... determine water depth. Hydrographic survey projects support the OCS mission to provide reliable nautical...

  4. Training Impact on Novice and Experienced Research Coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Potter, JoNell Efantis; Prikhidko, Alena; Swords, Stephanie; Sonstein, Stephen; Kolb, H Robert

    2017-12-01

    Competency-based training and professional development is critical to the clinical research enterprise. Understanding research coordinators' perspectives is important for establishing a common core curriculum. The purpose of this study was to describe participants' perspectives regarding the impact of online and classroom training sessions. 27 participants among three institutions, completed a two-day classroom training session. 10 novice and seven experienced research coordinators participated in focus group interviews. Grounded theory revealed similarities in novice and experienced coordinator themes including Identifying Preferences for Instruction and Changing Self Perceptions. Differences, seen in experienced participants, focused on personal change, in the theme of Re-Assessing Skills. Infrastructure and cultural issues were evident in their theme, Promoting Leadership and Advocacy. Novice participants recommended ways to improve training via their theme of Making Programmatic Improvements. Participants reported a clear preference for classroom learning. Training played an influential role in changing participants' self-perceptions by validating their experiences. The findings provided guidance for developing a standardized curriculum. Training must be carefully tailored to the needs of participants while considering audience needs based on work experience, how technology can be used and offering content that is most urgently needed.

  5. 75 FR 21650 - Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Biscayne National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Draft Programmatic... Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Biscayne National Park. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental... availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan...

  6. 76 FR 24050 - Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Biscayne National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... National Park Service Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement... Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan, Biscayne National... Impact Statement for the Coral Reef Restoration Plan (Plan/FEIS) for Biscayne National Park, Florida. The...

  7. Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    In accordance with the Department of Energy`s National Environmental Policy Act implementing procedures in Volume 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1021,312, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation Plan has two primary purposes: to provide guidance for the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and to record the issues resulting from the scoping and the extended public participation process. The Implementation Plan identifies and discusses the following: background of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities, the purpose of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and the relationship of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement to other Departmental initiatives (Chapter 1); need and purposes for action (Chapter 2); scoping process and results of the public participation program in defining the scope of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, including a summary of the comments received and their disposition (Chapter 3); planned scope and content of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 4); consultations with other agencies and the role of cooperating agencies (Chapter 5); planned schedule of major Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement milestones (Chapter 6); and responsibilities for preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 7).

  8. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Scramjet Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Karen; Hass, Neal; Storch, Andrea; Gruber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A series of hydrocarbon-fueled direct-connect scramjet ground tests has been completed in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF) at simulated Mach 8 flight conditions. These experiments were part of an initial test phase to support Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program. In this flight experiment, a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet is intended to demonstrate transition from dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and a majority of the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests were to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the simulated Mach 6-8 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition. Both of these objectives were achieved prior to the HiFIRE Flight 2 payload Critical Design Review. Mach 8 ground test results are presented in this report, including flowpath surface pressure distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath in scramjet-mode over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 8 simulation, as well as over a range of fuel equivalence ratios. Flowpath analysis using ground test data is presented elsewhere; however, limited comparisons with analytical predictions suggest that both scramjet-mode operation and the combustion performance objective are achieved at Mach 8 conditions.

  9. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Ground Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Neal E.; Cabell, Karen F.; Storch, Andrea M.

    2010-01-01

    The initial phase of hydrocarbon-fueled ground tests supporting Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experiment (HIFiRE) Program has been conducted in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HIFiRE Program, an Air Force-lead international cooperative program includes eight different flight test experiments designed to target specific challenges of hypersonic flight. The second of the eight planned flight experiments is a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet flight test intended to demonstrate dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools. A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink, direct-connect ground test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests are to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the Mach 6.0-8.0 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition prior to the HiFIRE payload Critical Design Review. Although the phase I test plans include testing over the Mach 6 to 8 flight simulation range, only Mach 6 testing will be reported in this paper. Experimental results presented here include flowpath surface pressure, temperature, and heat flux distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 6 simulation, as well as a range of fuel equivalence ratios and fuel injection distributions. Both ethylene and a mixture of ethylene and methane (planned for flight) were tested. Maximum back pressure and flameholding limits, as well as a baseline fuel schedule, that covers the Mach 5.84-6.5 test space have been

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authors, Various

    1980-01-01

    The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

  12. Accelerator Production of Tritium Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Input Submittal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Greene, G.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boyack, B.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling considers several methods for the production of tritium. One of these methods is the Accelerator Production of Tritium. This report summarizes the design characteristics of APT including the accelerator, target/blanket, tritium extraction facility, and the balance of plant. Two spallation targets are considered: (1) a tungsten neutron-source target and (2) a lead neutron-source target. In the tungsten target concept, the neutrons are captured by the circulating He-3, thus producing tritium; in the lead target concept, the tritium is produced by neutron capture by Li-6 in a surrounding lithium-aluminum blanket. This report also provides information to support the PEIS including construction and operational resource needs, waste generation, and potential routine and accidental releases of radioactive material. The focus of the report is on the impacts of a facility that will produce 3/8th of the baseline goal of tritium. However, some information is provided on the impacts of APT facilities that would produce smaller quantities.

  13. 78 FR 64598 - Bank Enterprise Award (BEA) Program; Programmatic and Administrative Aspects; Public Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Bank Enterprise Award (BEA) Program; Programmatic and Administrative Aspects; Public Comment Request AGENCY: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Request for public comment. SUMMARY: This notice invites comments from...

  14. 78 FR 21919 - Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment for Army 2020...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... Programmatic Environmental Assessment for Army 2020 Force Structure Realignment (PEA), supporting studies, and... Impact Statement; therefore, one will not be prepared. An electronic version of the FNSI and PEA is...

  15. Programmatic and Teaching Initiatives for Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marivic B. Torregosa, PhD, RN, FNP-BC

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Although positive student outcomes were reported about programmatic and teaching initiatives for EDS, the evidence remained inconclusive. Recommendations for policy and future research in this area of nursing education research were provided.

  16. Systems Engineering Design Via Experimental Operation Research: Complex Organizational Metric for Programmatic Risk Environments (COMPRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mog, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Unique and innovative graph theory, neural network, organizational modeling, and genetic algorithms are applied to the design and evolution of programmatic and organizational architectures. Graph theory representations of programs and organizations increase modeling capabilities and flexibility, while illuminating preferable programmatic/organizational design features. Treating programs and organizations as neural networks results in better system synthesis, and more robust data modeling. Organizational modeling using covariance structures enhances the determination of organizational risk factors. Genetic algorithms improve programmatic evolution characteristics, while shedding light on rulebase requirements for achieving specified technological readiness levels, given budget and schedule resources. This program of research improves the robustness and verifiability of systems synthesis tools, including the Complex Organizational Metric for Programmatic Risk Environments (COMPRE).

  17. Experiencing Security in Interaction Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Niels Raabjerg; Bødker, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Security is experienced differently in different contexts. This paper argues that in everyday situations, users base their security decisions on a mix of prior experiences. When approaching security and interaction design from an experience approach, tools that help bring out such relevant...... experiences for design are needed. This paper reports on how Prompted exploration workshops and Acting out security were developed to target such experiences when iteratively designing a mobile digital signature solution in a participatory design process. We discuss how these tools helped the design process...... and illustrate how the tangibility of such tools matters. We further demonstrate how the approach grants access to non-trivial insights into people's security experience. We point out how the specific context is essential for exploring the space between experience and expectations, and we illustrate how people...

  18. Using EMBL-EBI Services via Web Interface and Programmatically via Web Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Rodrigo; Cowley, Andrew; Li, Weizhong; McWilliam, Hamish

    2014-12-12

    The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) provides access to a wide range of databases and analysis tools that are of key importance in bioinformatics. As well as providing Web interfaces to these resources, Web Services are available using SOAP and REST protocols that enable programmatic access to our resources and allow their integration into other applications and analytical workflows. This unit describes the various options available to a typical researcher or bioinformatician who wishes to use our resources via Web interface or programmatically via a range of programming languages. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. 78 FR 16275 - Extension of the Duration of Programmatic Agreements Based on the Department of Energy Prototype...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Energy Prototype Programmatic Agreement for Its Weatherization Assistance Program, State Energy Program... Comment for Extending the Duration of Programmatic Agreements based on the Department of Energy Prototype... compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act to continue under the prototype...

  20. 78 FR 73555 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan and Draft...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Environmental Impact Statement (Draft Phase III ERP/PEIS). The Draft Phase III ERP/PEIS considers programmatic... programmatic restoration alternatives. The Draft Phase III ERP/PEIS evaluates these restoration alternatives... the Framework Agreement. The Draft Phase III ERP/PEIS also evaluates the environmental consequences of...

  1. Experiencing sexuality after intestinal stoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angela Boccara de Paula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Identify the Social Representations (SR of ostomized people in terms of sexuality after the stoma. METHODS: An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study using the Social Representation Theory with 15 ostomized people (8 females, mean age of 57.9 years, between August and September 2005. Data obtained from transcribed interviews were submitted to content analysis, resulting in the thematic unit "Giving new meaning to sexuality" and subthemes. RESULTS: The study demonstrated that the intestinal stoma interferes in the sexuality experience, showing that the meanings attributed to this experience are based on individual life stories, quality of personal relationships established in practice and perception of sexuality, despite the stoma. CONCLUSIONS: The Social Representations, in terms of experiencing sexuality after the stoma, are based on meanings attributed to the body, associated with daily life and present in the social imaginary. It is influenced by other factors, such as physiological changes resulting from the surgery and the fact of having or not a partner. Care taken during sexual practices provide greater security and comfort in moments of intimacy, resembling the closest to what ostomized people experienced before the stoma. The self-irrigation technique associated or not with the use of artificial occluder, has been attested by its users as a positive element that makes a difference in sexual practice after the stoma. The support to ostomized people should be comprehensive, not limited to technical care and disease, which are important, but not sufficient. The interdisciplinary health team should consider all aspects of the person, seeking a real meeting between subjects.OBJETIVO: Identificar as Representações Sociais (RS da pessoa estomizada intestinal sobre vivência da sexualidade após confecção do estoma. MÉTODOS: Estudo exploratório, descritivo, qualitativo do ponto de vista do referencial da Representa

  2. 75 FR 68333 - Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    .... The primary environmental issues evaluated include impacts to air quality, soil, airspace, cultural... control mitigation techniques. Impacts to cultural resources, air quality, noise impacts, public land use... DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS...

  3. 78 FR 71561 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    .... CRP is a voluntary program that supports the implementation of long-term conservation measures... administered by FSA with the support of other Federal, State, and local agencies and organizations. More... impacts of managed haying and grazing variations on CRP contracts. The 2008 CRP Programmatic EA (PEA) and...

  4. Obvious and Subtle Contributions of Merlin C. Wittrock to Programmatic R&D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Eva L.; O'Neil, Harry

    2010-01-01

    We describe some of Merl's more subtle contributions that extended beyond his own prodigious scholarly record, his high-quality teaching, and his mentoring of students. The context of our remarks on Programmatic R&D focuses on his contribution to the University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Education. Merl was the first director of…

  5. The development and evaluation of programmatic performance indicators associated with maintenance at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wreathall, J.; Fragola, J.; Appignani, P.; Burlile, G.; Shen, Y. (Science Applications International Corp., Columbus, OH (USA))

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the development and evaluation of programmatic performance indicators of maintenance. These indicators were selected by: (1) creating a formal framework of plant processes; (2) identifying features of plant behavior considered important to safety; (3) evaluating existing indicators against these features; and (4) performing statistical analyses for the selected indicators. The report recommends additional testing. 32 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. 34 CFR 611.52 - What are a grantee's programmatic responsibilities for ensuring that scholarship recipients...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ensuring that scholarship recipients become successful teachers in high-need schools? 611.52 Section 611.52... EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TEACHER QUALITY ENHANCEMENT GRANTS PROGRAM Scholarships § 611.52 What are a grantee's programmatic responsibilities for ensuring that scholarship recipients become successful...

  7. 76 FR 63909 - Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Modernization of Training...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... unit leaders with a facility to train and evaluate the unit during a live-fire exercise. The MOUT... documents. Copies of the Draft Programmatic EIS are available at the following libraries: ] Hilo Public Library, 300 Waianuenue Avenue, Hilo; Kailua-Kona Public Library, 75-138 Hualalai Road, Kailua-Kona...

  8. 78 FR 33431 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Notice of Intent To Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Notice of Intent To Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for a... state natural resource trustees for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (Trustees) intend to prepare a PEIS... discharges from the rig and from the wellhead on the seabed. The Deepwater Horizon oil spill is the largest...

  9. 76 FR 38429 - Notice of Availability of Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... Notice of Availability of Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact... Proposed Action is to fund the investigation of the geology and geophysics of the seafloor by collecting... at least 30 days after the date of publication in the Federal Register of the U.S. Environmental...

  10. 75 FR 62433 - Notice of Public Hearings and the Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS... agencies. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to fund the investigation of the geology and geophysics of...: Currently, individual Environmental Assessments (EAs) are prepared for individual or small numbers of...

  11. 47 CFR Appendix B to Part 1 - Nationwide Programmatic Agreement for the Collocation of Wireless Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the standard number of new equipment cabinets for the technology involved, not to exceed four, or more... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nationwide Programmatic Agreement for the Collocation of Wireless Antennas B Appendix B to Part 1 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION...

  12. Programmatic Factors Associated with Undergraduate Athletic Training Student Retention and Attrition Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Wathington, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Athletic training programs (ATPs) are charged with meeting an increased demand for athletic trainers with adequate graduates. Currently, the retention rate of athletic training students in ATPs nationwide and the programmatic factors associated with these retention rates remain unknown. Objective: Determine the retention rate for athletic…

  13. Program Directors' Perceptions of Programmatic Attributes Contributing to Athletic Training Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Graduates of athletic training programs (ATPs) have identified factors contributing to their persistence through professional education. However, program directors have yet to elaborate on programmatic attributes that might contribute to athletic training student retention in their respective ATPs. Objective: To determine program…

  14. 77 FR 73996 - Notice of Availability for the Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the Recycling of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... of Availability for the Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the Recycling of Scrap Metals... Environmental Assessment (PEA) for the Recycling of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas. On... order previously governing release procedures). This Draft PEA for the Recycling of Scrap Metals...

  15. 76 FR 71070 - Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Integrated Water Resource Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Water Resource Management Plan, Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project. The draft Programmatic... Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Yakima River Basin Integrated Water Resource Management Alternative in June 2009 under SEPA. The Integrated Water Resource Management Alternative evaluated in the...

  16. 75 FR 78980 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... solar power technologies (i.e., parabolic trough, power tower, and dish engine systems), and... the Programmatic EIS to help define the potential magnitude of solar energy development that could..., the DOE will build on the BLM's analysis of potential impacts of utility-scale solar ] development on...

  17. BioServices: a common Python package to access biological Web Services programmatically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokelaer, Thomas; Pultz, Dennis; Harder, Lea M; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2013-12-15

    Web interfaces provide access to numerous biological databases. Many can be accessed to in a programmatic way thanks to Web Services. Building applications that combine several of them would benefit from a single framework. BioServices is a comprehensive Python framework that provides programmatic access to major bioinformatics Web Services (e.g. KEGG, UniProt, BioModels, ChEMBLdb). Wrapping additional Web Services based either on Representational State Transfer or Simple Object Access Protocol/Web Services Description Language technologies is eased by the usage of object-oriented programming. BioServices releases and documentation are available at http://pypi.python.org/pypi/bioservices under a GPL-v3 license.

  18. Comprehensiveness and programmatic vulnerability to stds/hiv/aids in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Ferreira do Val

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify programmatic vulnerability to STDs/HIV/AIDS in primary health centers (PHCs. This is a descrip - tive and quantitative study carried out in the city of São Paulo. An online survey was applied (FormSUS platform, involving administrators from 442 PHCs in the city, with responses received from 328 of them (74.2%, of which 53.6% were nurses. At - tention was raised in relation to program - matic vulnerability in the PHCs regarding certain items of infrastructure, prevention, treatment, prenatal care and integration among services on STDs/HIV/AIDS care. It was concluded that in order to reach comprehensiveness of actions for HIV/ AIDS in primary health care, it is necessary to consider programmatic vulnerability, in addition to more investment and reor - ganization of services in a dialogue with the stakeholders (users, multidisciplinary teams, and managers, among others.

  19. Programmatic conversion of crystal structures into 3D printable files using Jmol

    OpenAIRE

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Williams, Antony J.; Tkachenko, Valery; Karapetyan, Karen; Pshenichnov, Alexey; Hanson, Robert M.; Liddie, Jahred M.; Bara, Jason E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) printed crystal structures are useful for chemistry teaching and research. Current manual methods of converting crystal structures into 3D printable files are time-consuming and tedious. To overcome this limitation, we developed a programmatic method that allows for facile conversion of thousands of crystal structures directly into 3D printable files. Results A collection of over 30,000 crystal structures in crystallographic information file (CIF) format from...

  20. FY 2016 Grant Announcement: FY 2016 Technical Analysis and Programmatic Evaluation Support to the Chesapeake Bay Program Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Chesapeake Bay Program Office is announcing a Request for Proposals for applicants to provide the Chesapeake Bay Program partners with a proposal(s) for providing technical analysis and programmatic evaluation

  1. Developmental milestones across the programmatic life cycle: implementing the CDC's Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover-Kudon, Rebecca; DeGroff, Amy; Rohan, Elizabeth A; Preissle, Judith; Boehm, Jennifer E

    2013-08-01

    In 2005 through 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded 5 sites to implement a colorectal cancer screening program for uninsured, low-income populations. These 5 sites composed a demonstration project intended to explore the feasibility of establishing a national colorectal cancer screening program through various service delivery models. A longitudinal, multiple case study was conducted to understand and document program implementation processes. Using metaphor as a qualitative analytic technique, evaluators identified stages of maturation across the programmatic life cycle. Analysis rendered a working theory of program development during screening implementation. In early stages, program staff built relationships with CDC and local partners around screening readiness, faced real-world challenges putting program policies into practice, revised initial program designs, and developed new professional skills. Midterm implementation was defined by establishing program cohesiveness and expanding programmatic reach. In later stages of implementation, staff focused on sustainability and formal program closeout, which prompted reflection about personal and programmatic accomplishments. Demonstration sites evolved through common developmental stages during screening implementation. Findings elucidate ways to target technical assistance to more efficiently move programs along their maturation trajectory. In practical terms, the time and cost associated with guiding a program to maturity may be potentially shortened to maximize return on investment for both organizations and clients receiving service benefits. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  2. Policy and practice of programmatic management of latent tuberculosis infection in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard de Vries

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI screening and preventive treatment is one of the components of the World Health Organization (WHO End TB strategy, and particularly relevant for low tuberculosis (TB incidence countries, i.e. less than 100TB cases per million population. The Netherlands is such a low-incidence country with traditionally a strong emphasis on programmatic management of LTBI, e.g. examining contacts of infectious TB patients by the public health services. Increasingly, curative services are involved in LTBI management of clinical risk groups. The country recently adopted a five-year strategic national plan recommending LTBI screening of high-risk migrants populations. A monitoring and evaluation system is already in place to measure programme performance and guide policy. Research on LTBI screening of migrants is on-going and results should inform future decisions in scaling-up this intervention. Several challenges remain for programmatic LTBI management, such as securing financial resources and the right professional cadre for implementation; availability of screening tests and drugs; collecting additional data for monitoring and evaluation, in line with the WHO indicators for LTBI programmatic management; developing cultural-sensitive and client-centred education for migrants; reducing patient costs for LTBI screening and preventive treatment; and assessing cost-effectiveness and impact on TB epidemiology. Keywords: Elimination, Latent tuberculosis infection, Prevention, Screening, Tuberculosis, Municipal Public Health Service

  3. Development of a comprehensive clinical performance assessment system for nursing students: A programmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanipour, Masoomeh; Jalili, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of achievement of learning objectives needs an accurate assessment program. Hence, nursing educators should move away from the use of individual assessment methods to apply a programmatic approach. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive assessment system for nursing students in their critical care rotation based on a programmatic approach. The population of this study was nursing students in their critical care course. The learning objectives of the course were determined using an expert panel and classified into three categories. Suitable assessment methods were identified for each category according to the consensus of experts. Then, the assessment tools were designed and the content validity was established using content validity ratio (CVR) and index (CVI). The reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The satisfaction of the participants was investigated using a questionnaire. According to the findings, all items of the assessment system had a high CVR (P assessment system had a positive impact on learning. In addition, the majority of them were satisfied with the new assessment system. A programmatic approach should be used for effective evaluation of clinical performance of nursing students in critical care settings because of high validity and reliability, multidimensionality, positive educational impact, and acceptability. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  4. Policies and practices on the programmatic management of latent tuberculous infection: global survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Y; Sidibe, A; Matteelli, A; Dadu, A; Aziz, M A; Del Granado, M; Nishikiori, N; Floyd, K; Getahun, H

    2016-12-01

    Global survey among low tuberculosis (TB) burden countries, which are primary target countries for the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on the programmatic management of latent tuberculous infection (LTBI). To perform a baseline assessment of policies and practices for the programmatic management of LTBI. Online and paper-based pre-tested questionnaire filled out by national TB programme managers or their equivalents from 108 countries. Of 74 respondent countries, 75.7% (56/74) had a national policy on LTBI. The majority of the countries (67/74, 90.5%) provided LTBI testing and treatment for child contacts of TB cases, while almost two thirds (49/74, 66%) reported provision of LTBI testing and treatment to people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). Six countries (8.1%) did not report providing LTBI management to child contacts and PLHIV. Among countries that reported both the availability of policy and practice of testing and treatment of LTBI for at-risk populations, a system for recording and reporting data was available in 62% (33/53) for child contacts and in 53% (21/40) for PLHIV. Countries need to ensure that national LTBI policies and a standardised monitoring and evaluation system are in place to promote the programmatic management of LTBI.

  5. Experienced General Music Teachers' Instructional Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel C.; Matthews, Wendy K.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore experienced general music teachers' decision-making processes. Participants included seven experienced, American general music teachers who contributed their views during two phases of data collection: (1) responses to three classroom scenarios; and (2) in-depth, semi-structured, follow-up…

  6. Experienced discrimination amongst European old citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; van Santvoort, Marc M.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyses the experienced age discrimination of old European citizens and the factors related to this discrimination. Differences in experienced discrimination between old citizens of different European countries are explored. Data from the 2008 ESS survey are used. Old age is defined as

  7. Programmatic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn Johansson, Troels

    2016-01-01

    Few would probably characterize contemporary relational and social art by a distinctive richness in its use of pictorial means of expression. Relational art often turns to other media such as design, performance, and installation in order to invite the art audience to participate in activities...... within or outside the spaces of the art institution. Here pictorial media, typically photography, is employed to document activities in order to represent events in exhibitions, catalogues, etc. An interesting exception to this approach is Danish art collective Learning Site--co-founding members of N55......, Rikke Luther and Cecilia Wendt. Inspired by graphic traditions within the field of pedagogical and instructive charts, Learning Site’s posters demonstrates an obvious instructive function which supports a social and relational project context, but these posters also challenge the established pictorial...

  8. Through Rubrics and Scaffolded Instruction: A Programmatic Self-Study of Writing Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanfu Mi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Colleagues in a teacher education program describe their journey of programmatic self-study as they examine how they teach and assess teacher candidates’ writing in a series of three required and sequenced undergraduate literacy courses. They lead the reader through the questions they asked themselves about their instruction and their reflective process with a goal of improving teacher candidates’ technical, reflective, and creative writing. Readers are encouraged to reflect on their expectations for teacher candidates’ writing in light of instruction and assessment. Implications for teacher education are explored.

  9. Other programmatic agencies in the metropolis: a machinic approach to urban reterritorialization processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Guatelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available What if the strength of the architectural object were associated with program and spatial strategies engendered at the service of “habitability” and future sociabilities rather than with the building of monumental architectural gadgets and optical events in the landscape? Based on the Deleuzean (from the philosopher Gilles Deleuze machinic phylum as well as concepts associated with it such as “bonding” and “agency,” using the Lacanian approach (from the psychiatrist Jacques Lacan to the gadget concept and the Derridian concept (from the philosopher Jacques Derrida of “supplement,” this article discusses a shift of the most current senses and representations of contemporary urban architectural design historically associated with the notable (meaning the wish to be noticed formal and composite materialization of the artistic object at the service of programmed sociabilities towards nother conceptualization. The building of architectural supports from residual (according to Deleuze, the possibility of producing other wishes, far from the dominant capitalist logic, lies in residues in the residual flows produced by the capital itself programmatic and spatial agencies emerges as a critical path to the categorical imperative of the generalizing global logic. It is a logic based on non-territorial landscapes and centered on investments in the composite view and intentional spatial and programmatic imprisonments in familiar formulae originating from domesticated and standardized prêt-à-utiliser thinking. To think about other architectural spatial and programmatic agencies originating from residues and flows that simultaneously rise from and escape the global logic is to bet on the chance of non-programmed sociabilities taking place. Ceasing to think about architecture as a formal object in its artistic and paradigmatic dimension would mean to conceive it as an urban syntagmatic machine of [de]constructive power

  10. Programmatic conversion of crystal structures into 3D printable files using Jmol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfani, Vincent F; Williams, Antony J; Tkachenko, Valery; Karapetyan, Karen; Pshenichnov, Alexey; Hanson, Robert M; Liddie, Jahred M; Bara, Jason E

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printed crystal structures are useful for chemistry teaching and research. Current manual methods of converting crystal structures into 3D printable files are time-consuming and tedious. To overcome this limitation, we developed a programmatic method that allows for facile conversion of thousands of crystal structures directly into 3D printable files. A collection of over 30,000 crystal structures in crystallographic information file (CIF) format from the Crystallography Open Database (COD) were programmatically converted into 3D printable files (VRML format) using Jmol scripting. The resulting data file conversion of the 30,000 CIFs proceeded as expected, however some inconsistencies and unintended results were observed with co-crystallized structures, racemic mixtures, and structures with large counterions that led to 3D printable files not containing the desired chemical structure. Potential solutions to these challenges are considered and discussed. Further, a searchable Jmol 3D Print website was created that allows users to both discover the 3D file dataset created in this work and create custom 3D printable files for any structure in the COD. Over 30,000 crystal structures were programmatically converted into 3D printable files, allowing users to have quick access to a sizable collection of 3D printable crystal structures. Further, any crystal structure (>350,000) in the COD can now be conveniently converted into 3D printable file formats using the Jmol 3D Print website created in this work. The 3D Print website also allows users to convert their own CIFs into 3D printable files. 3D file data, scripts, and the Jmol 3D Print website are provided openly to the community in an effort to promote discovery and use of 3D printable crystal structures. The 3D file dataset and Jmol 3D Print website will find wide use with researchers and educators seeking to 3D print chemical structures, while the scripts will be useful for programmatically

  11. INL Site Portion of the April 1995 Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Mamagement Programmatic Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2005-06-30

    In April 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of the Navy, as a cooperating agency, issued the Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement (1995 EIS). The 1995 EIS analyzed alternatives for managing The Department's existing and reasonably foreseeable inventories of spent nuclear fuel through the year 2035. It also included a detailed analysis of environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The analysis supported facility-specific decisions regarding new, continued, or planned environmental restoration and waste management operations. The Record of Decision (ROD) was signed in June 1995 and amended in February 1996. It documented a number of projects or activities that would be implemented as a result of decisions regarding INL Site operations. In addition to the decisions that were made, decisions on a number of projects were deferred or projects have been canceled. DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing procedures (found in 10 CFR Part 1 021.330(d)) require that a Supplement Analysis of site-wide EISs be done every five years to determine whether the site-wide EIS remains adequate. While the 1995 EIS was not a true site-wide EIS in that several programs were not included, most notably reactor operations, this method was used to evaluate the adequacy of the 1995 EIS. The decision to perform a Supplement Analysis was supported by the multi-program aspect of the 1995 EIS in conjunction with the spirit of the requirement for periodic review. The purpose of the SA is to determine if there have been changes in the basis upon which an EIS was prepared. This provides input for an evaluation of the continued adequacy of the EIS in light of those changes (i.e., whether there are substantial changes in the proposed

  12. Health care for women over 50: programmatic vulnerability in the Family Health Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Karine Pasqual

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the health care process for women over 50 at a Family Health Unit based on the concept of programmatic vulnerability. METHOD: This study is inserted in the field of health care assessments. The framework proposed by Donabedian was used to analyze 90.5% of the 790 records of women registered at the unit. RESULTS: It was observed that none of the women that did not have a diagnosed pathology attended the recommended consultations or underwent the recommended tests. Of the total number of women with hypertension or diabetes, 20.7% were registered in the Hiperdia Programme and less than 1.0% had attended the consultations and undergone the necessary tests. Only 11.9% of the women had had a gynaecological examination, a clinical breast examination and a mammography the year before data collection. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that women over 50 are in a situation of programmatic vulnerability in terms of the indicators established in this study. Knowledge of this reality can help nurses provide care that is best suited for this group.

  13. Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

  14. Programmatic approaches to assessing and improving animal welfare in zoos and aquariums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Joseph C E

    2009-11-01

    There continues to be intense public, professional, and scientific focus on the welfare of animals in zoos and aquariums, but implementing welfare assessment tools consistently throughout this community remains challenging. Indirect measures can be used to assess "welfare potential"-the potential that animals will experience good welfare based on the care that they are provided with. Zoos and aquariums focus on welfare potential with their continued commitment to develop animal care guidelines (e.g. Animal Care Manuals) that can play a role within institutional accreditation or certification. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums Animal Welfare Committee has been pursuing approaches to maximize welfare potential by developing the concept of an integrated welfare approach or framework-an attempt to identify recommended animal care programs (e.g. enrichment, nutrition, veterinary care, research, and animal training programs) and their programmatic components. Objectively assessing the influence that animal care recommendations have on the welfare of individual animals is important to determine the efficacy of programmatic approaches. The future of welfare assessment within zoos and aquariums will include population-level evaluations-tracking emerging trends in health and behavior that come from both formal and informal institutional animal reports. Sharing this information, and performing meta-analyses of the data using epidemiological approaches, will become easier with advances in technology and database management software. Identifying welfare "red/green flags" throughout captive populations will provide direction for more focused assessments that will ultimately inform the design of more effective animal care programs.

  15. Soccer kick kinematic differences between experienced and non-experienced soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz López, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to examine kinematic differences of instep soccer kick between experienced and non-experienced soccer players. Subjects: 17 men between 17 and 21 years old. Methodology: a 3D film system with 4 cameras was used. Maximum power instep kicks were executed. It was analyzed feet velocity in the impact, maximum hip extension, maximum knee flexion and kick phases duration. Results: were found significant differences in feet velocity with non-dominant leg in the impact moment (m/s (Experienced: 14.5±.52, Non-experienced: 12.5±.5; p<.001 and maximum hip extension (degrees (Experienced: 39.2 ± 1.3, Non-experienced: 34.28±3.2; p<.001. Also were significant differences in the second phase duration in both legs (p<.05. Conclusions: Maximum instep soccer kick show significant differences between groups of different level only in non-dominant leg.

  16. Experiencing Variation: Learning Opportunities in Doctoral Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Berge, Maria; Grout, Brian W. W.; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes towards a better understanding of learning dynamics in doctoral supervision by analysing how learning opportunities are created in the interaction between supervisors and PhD students, using the notion of experiencing variation as a key to learning. Empirically, we have based the study on four video-recorded sessions, with…

  17. Types of Stresses Experienced by Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.; And Others

    This study was conducted to examine the types of stresses experienced by professionals. Subjects were 56 persons enrolled in graduate classes who completed the Tennessee Stress Scale-L, Work Related Stress Inventory for Professionals. Besides the Total stress score, the instrument produced three subscale scores: Stress Producers, Coping…

  18. Psychological demands experienced by recreational endurance athletes

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, Alister; Meijen, Carla; Marcora, Samuele

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify psychological demands that are commonly experienced by endurance athletes so that these demands could inform the design of performance-enhancement psychological interventions for endurance athletes. Focus group interviews were conducted with 30 recreational endurance athletes of various sports (running, cycling, and triathlon), distances, and competitive levels to explore the psychological demands of training, competition preparation, and competition participation...

  19. Activity limitations and participation restrictions experienced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cite as: Urimubenshi G. Activity limitations and participation restrictions experienced by people with stroke in Musanze district in Rwanda. Afri Health ..... analysis in nursing research: concepts, procedures and measures to achieve trustworthiness. Nurse Education To- day 2004, 24(2), 105–112. 20. Lincoln YS, Guba EA.

  20. Perceived and experienced restrictions in participation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perceived and experienced restrictions in participation and autonomy among adult survivors of stroke in Ghana. ... There were significant differences in two domains between survivors who received physiotherapy and those who received traditional rehabilitation. Over half of the survivors also perceived they would ...

  1. Children's Actions when Experiencing Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlien, Carolina; Hyden, Margareta

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is, by analysing children's discourses, to investigate their actions or absence of actions during a domestic violence episode. The empirical data are recorded group therapy sessions and individual interviews with children who have grown up experiencing their fathers' violence against their mothers. The analysis shows that…

  2. Experienced and physiological fatigue in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillings, M.L.; Kalkman, J.S.; Janssen, H.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Bleijenberg, G.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fatigue has been described as a typical symptom of neurological diseases. It might be caused both by changes at the peripheral and at the central level. This study measured the level of experienced fatigue and physiological correlates of fatigue in three genetically defined neuromuscular

  3. Novice and experienced teachers’ views on professionalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okas, Anne; van der Schaaf, Marieke; Krull, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses teachers’ practical knowledge and beliefs of their profession based on reflective writings of twenty Estonian teachers.Ten novice and ten experienced teachers participated in the study. They put together their professional portfolios, which among other documents included

  4. Experiencing the enchantment of place and mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærenholdt, Jørgen Ole

    2016-01-01

    Experiences of place and mobility play central roles not only in what was traditionally understood as tourism, but also in the broader practices of travelling and visiting sites and sights. On the one hand, such experiences are performed to an extent where it is difficult to isolate the sites...... and movements experienced per se, since visitors and travellers take part in ‘doing’ places and mobility. On the other, experience sites and routes stand out with specific traces and characteristics affording some – and not other – experiences. This paper discusses conceptual understandings that may help...... to better analyse what it takes to perform tourist sites. Following a discussion of Walter Benjamin’s way of understanding experiences as Erlebnisse, I suggest that ideas about multiplicity and absence-presence in Actor-Network Theory can develop new insights into how place and mobility are experienced...

  5. Deprivation as un-experienced harm?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keerus, Külli; Gjerris, Mickey; Röcklinsberg, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Tom Regan encapsulated his principle of harm as a prima facie direct duty not to harm experiencing subjects of a life. However, his consideration of harm as deprivation, one example of which is loss of freedom, can easily be interpreted as a harm, which may not be experienced by its subject....... This creates a gap between Regan’s criterion for moral status and his account of what our duties are. However, in comparison with three basic paradigms of welfare known in nonhuman animal welfare science, Regan’s understanding coheres with a modified version of a feelings-based paradigm: not only the immediate...... feelings of satisfaction, but also future opportunities to have such feelings, must be taken into account. Such an interpretation is compatible with Regan’s understanding of harm as deprivation. The potential source of confusion, however, lies in Regan’s own possible argumentative mistakes....

  6. The Occupational Wellbeing of People Experiencing Homelessness

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Yvonne; Gray, M.; McGinty, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a study that utilised an occupational perspective to explore how wellbeing was achieved and sustained by the occupations of people experiencing homelessness in Australia. Thirty three in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with homeless individuals in a regional city in Australia. Data from the interviews were thematically analysed to understand the relationship between wellbeing, as defined by the individual, and the occupations engaged in by people exp...

  7. Women experiencing the intergenerationality of conjugal violence

    OpenAIRE

    Paixão,Gilvânia Patrícia do Nascimento; Gomes,Nadirlene Pereira; Diniz,Normélia Maria Freire; Lira,Margaret Ollinda de Souza Carvalho e; Carvalho,Milca Ramaiane da Silva; Silva,Rudval Souza da

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the family relationship, in childhood and adolescence, of women who experience conjugal violence. Method: qualitative study. Interviews were held with 19 women, who were experiencing conjugal violence, and who were resident in a community in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The project was approved by the Research Ethics Committee (N. 42/2011). Results: the data was organized using the Discourse of the Collective Subject, identifying the summary central ideas: they witnessed vio...

  8. Security Selection Factors: Novice Versus Experienced Investors

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Freund; Dev Prasad; Frank Andrews

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine the differences in the factors perceived to be significant in the security selection process between novice and experienced investors. We apply the direct inquiry approach to two distinct groups: One group is composed of students enrolled in traditional face-to-face introductory investments classes, while the other group consists of students enrolled in the online sections of the same course. The online students tend to be generally older part-time students with grea...

  9. Burnout among Low and High Experienced Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedehhava Mousavy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is a serious psychological syndrome that can affect not only an individual’s well-being, but also the functioning of whole organisations, such as schools. It is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased personal accomplishment.The level of burnout among teachers in the field of education has a negative impact on student success. The present investigation examines the level of burn out among high and low experienced teachers. It focused on a group of English teachers from different nationalities: Iranian, and Malaysian at UPM to examine if there is any relation between burnout and experience level. The sample consisted of 30 English teachers. Two instruments namely, The Maslach Burnout Inventory and Demographic Questionnaire were used to collect data. Data analysis revealed that there is no significant difference in depersonalization and personal accomplishment scores between low and high experienced teachers. But the result of this study also revealed that there is a significant difference in Emotional Exhaustion scores between low and high experienced teachers. Further research is required to explore the roots and the causes of burnout.

  10. Stigma experienced by persons under psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struch, Naomi; Levav, Itzhak; Shereshevsky, Yechiel; Baidani-Auerbach, Alona; Lachman, Max; Daniel, Noga; Zehavi, Tali

    2008-01-01

    Mental health-related stigma causes suffering and interferes with care and social inclusion. This study explored stigma as experienced by mental health service users. Particular attention is given to their use of coping mechanisms. Interviews were held with 167 adults undergoing outpatient psychiatric treatment; two-thirds of them had previously been hospitalized. Examples of frequency of stigma-related situations included the following: Over half of service users expect people to refuse to have a person with a mental disorder as a co-worker or neighbor, or to engage in other types of social contact. A sizeable group acknowledged that they feared or had experienced rejection. A third of respondents reported they feared or had experienced inappropriate treatment by their doctor. Service users utilize several coping mechanisms to deal with stigma, among them: education, withdrawal, secrecy, and positive distinctiveness. Although we studied a convenience sample of service users, our findings provide sufficient basis to suggest different types of intervention, i.e., to address stigma in the course of treatment in the specialist settings, to promote the establishment of mutual support groups, and to raise family physicians' awareness with regard to the stigma that may be present when caring for persons with mental disorders.

  11. Challenges of vaccine presentation and delivery: How can we design vaccines to have optimal programmatic impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giersing, Birgitte K; Kahn, Anna-Lea; Jarrahian, Courtney; Mvundura, Mercy; Rodriguez, Carmen; Okayasu, Hiromasa; Zehrung, Darin

    2017-05-29

    Immunization program delivery strategies that enable high vaccine coverage, particularly in inaccessible and remote areas, are critical to achieving optimal vaccine impact. In addition to demonstration of safety and efficacy, there are many factors that influence whether a newly licensed vaccine will be introduced into a country's national immunization program, particularly in resource-constrained environments. This paper describes three case studies of novel approaches that represent the potential for improved programmatic impact by increasing vaccine accessibility in different ways. However, the pathway to regulatory approval, policy recommendation, and program introduction in low- and middle-income countries is complex, requiring engagement with multiple, diverse stakeholders. Consideration of aspects that affect uptake in low- and middle-income countries, during the product development stage, will help better position new or second-generation vaccine products for successful implementation to achieve public health impact. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  13. Extending the Common Framework for Earth Observation Data to other Disciplinary Data and Programmatic Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B. J. K.; Wyborn, L. A.; Druken, K. A.; Richards, C. J.; Trenham, C. E.; Wang, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages a large geospatial repository (10+ PBytes) of Earth systems, environmental, water management and geophysics research data, co-located with a petascale supercomputer and an integrated research cloud. NCI has applied the principles of the "Common Framework for Earth-Observation Data" (the Framework) to the organisation of these collections enabling a diverse range of researchers to explore different aspects of the data and, in particular, for seamless programmatic data analysis, both in-situ access and via data services. NCI provides access to the collections through the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP) - a comprehensive and integrated data platform with both common and emerging services designed to enable data accessibility and citability. Applying the Framework across the range of datasets ensures that programmatic access, both in-situ and network methods, work as uniformly as possible for any dataset, using both APIs and data services. NCI has also created a comprehensive quality assurance framework to regularise compliance checks across the data, library APIs and data services, and to establish a comprehensive set of benchmarks to quantify both functionality and performance perspectives for the Framework. The quality assurance includes organisation of datasets through a data management plan, which anchors the data directory structure, version controls and data information services so that they are kept aligned with operational changes over time. Specific attention has been placed on the way data are packed inside the files. Our experience has shown that complying with standards such as CF and ACDD is still not enough to ensure that all data services or software packages correctly read the data. Further, data may not be optimally organised for the different access patterns, which causes poor performance of the CPUs and bandwidth utilisation. We will also

  14. Einstein's Institute for Aging Research: collaborative and programmatic approaches in the search for successful aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilai, Nir; Rossetti, Luciano; Lipton, Richard B

    2004-02-01

    While aging research has been progressing rapidly recently, the involvement of multiple organs and systems in the aging process has hampered a comprehensive assessment of some of aging's basic features. In response to this problem, the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein did not emerge out of the traditional geriatric programs, but through enhanced collaborations between basic and clinical scientists who had successful careers in the research of a specific organ or system. The strength of the Center derives from three specific programs focused on a specific area of aging research. The programs focus on the Biology of Aging, Genetics of Aging and the Aging Brain. Each programmatic area is characterized by collaboration between basic and clinical scientists. In addition to addressing the traditional questions about the mechanisms of involution, the programs also examine the mechanisms for exceptional and healthy longevity. The mechanisms favoring longevity are being examined in models of caloric restriction (biological nutrient sensing pathways), in human centenarians (longevity genes), and in longitudinal studies identifying humans who maintain excellent cognitive function (protection from Alzheimer's). Each programmatic area is enhanced by common research core laboratory and by the creation of a scientific training program for new investigators. In addition to the investigators involved in the program project, the Institute for Aging Research includes other investigators with funded aging research who participate in journal clubs, seminars, and in specific collaborations. We suggest that this Institute serve as a model that gerontologists at other institutions should consider as they evaluate opportunities for collaborative, multi-disciplinary approaches to enhance aging research.

  15. Evaluation of Programmatic Interventions to Improve Postsecondary STEM Education for Students with Disabilities: Findings from SciTrain University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Nathan W.; Utschig, Tristan T.; Todd, Robert L.; Bozzorg, Ariyana

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the evaluation of programmatic interventions to enhance postsecondary STEM education for students with disabilities. SciTrain University, a federally funded project to provide instructor training on accessible teaching according to universal design principles, is presented here as a case study on evaluation for similar…

  16. 76 FR 21003 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Possible Land...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ...) and Possible Land Use Plan Amendments for Allocation of Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resources on Lands... available for potential leasing and development of oil shale resources, and two other land use plans to... development of oil shale. The 2008 Programmatic EIS and Record of Decision (ROD) amending the land use plans...

  17. 47 CFR Appendix C to Part 1 - Nationwide Programmatic Agreement Regarding the Section 106 National Historic Preservation Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... inclusion in the National Register and that might be affected by a federal undertaking (16 U.S.C. 470a(d)(6... any person to challenge any prior determination of what does or does not constitute an Undertaking... Nationwide Programmatic Agreement for Review of Effects on Historic Properties for Certain Undertakings...

  18. 78 FR 53754 - Loup River Public Power District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List for a Programmatic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Loup River Public Power District; Notice of Proposed Restricted Service List... license for the Loup River Hydroelectric Project No. 1256. The programmatic agreement, when executed by... any Order issuing a license. Loup River Public Power District, as applicant for the Loup River...

  19. Ethical Conflicts Experienced by Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Mendes Menezes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The current study aimed to identify and analyze the prevalence of ethical conflicts experienced by medical students. This study is a cross-sectional and analytical research that was conducted in a public school in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The instrument used for the data collection was a self-administered questionnaire. The data collected were presented in absolute and percentage values. For the analytical statistical treatment of the data, the level of significance was considered p <0.05. The outcome variables were: Experiences of ethical conflicts in interpersonal relations within the medical course and Ethical conduct in health care. The identification of the prevalence of ethical conflicts in the undergraduate program adopted the perspective of different interpersonal relations (academic-teaching, academic-academic, academic-employee, academic-patient, teacher-teacher, teacher-patient, teacher-employee and employee-patient. (Importance of identifying themselves to the health services user and requesting consent to perform the physical examination, assistance without the supervision of the teacher, issuance of health documents without the signature of the professional responsible and use of social networks to share data Of patient. It was verified the association of the outcome variables with sex, year of graduation and course evaluation. A total of 281 undergraduate students enrolled in all undergraduate courses in Medicine of both sexes, with a predominance of female (52.7%. The students reported having experienced conflicting situations in interpersonal relations with teachers (59.6%, provided assistance without proper supervision of a teacher (62.6%, reported having issued health documents without the accompaniment of teachers (18, 5%. The highest frequency was observed among those enrolled in the most advanced years of the undergraduate program (p <0.05. The use of social networks for the purpose of sharing patient

  20. Physics Climate as Experienced by LGBT+ Physicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Elena

    2012-02-01

    In 2009, Elena Long created the LGBT+ Physicists website (http://lgbtphysicists.x10hosting.com) as a warehouse for resources useful for sexual and gender minorities working in physics. This resource has grown to include networking resources, lists of LGBT-friendly universities and localities, recommendations for enacting positive change in physics communities, and out-reach to other STEM-oriented LGBT organizations. This has been possible in large part by the dynamic community of LGBT+ physicists and allies looking to make physics more welcoming towards our community. In 2011, Elena used hir position as Member at Large on the executive committee of the Forum of Graduate Student Affairs (FGSA) to conduct a climate survey that included, among other things, the first serious look at LGBT+ demographics in physics. The survey focused particularly on issues of language heard and harassment experienced by physicists and was broken down into categories based on race, physical and mental ability, gender, and sexuality. Furthermore, it examined the outcomes of experienced harassment and the reasons for when harassment was not reported. Due to the nature of the study, overlapping demographics, especially ``multiple minorities,'' were also explored. This talk will give a brief history of the LGBT+ Physicists resource as well as an overview of the FGSA study.

  1. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Kely Regina; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Schmidtt, Pablo Henrique; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; da Rosa, Luciana Martins

    2015-01-01

    To know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. For the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude.

  2. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kely Regina da Luz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Method: descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. Conclusion: for the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude.

  3. The experienced temperature sensitivity and regulation survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Dekker, Kim; Te Lindert, Bart H. W.; Benjamins, Jeroen S.; Moens, Sarah; Migliorati, Filippo; Aarts, Emmeke; van der Sluis, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Individuals differ in thermosensitivity, thermoregulation, and zones of thermoneutrality and thermal comfort. Whereas temperature sensing and -effectuating processes occur in part unconsciously and autonomic, awareness of temperature and thermal preferences can affect thermoregulatory behavior as well. Quantification of trait-like individual differences of thermal preferences and experienced temperature sensitivity and regulation is therefore relevant to obtain a complete understanding of human thermophysiology. Whereas several scales have been developed to assess instantaneous appreciation of heat and cold exposure, a comprehensive scale dedicated to assess subjectively experienced autonomic or behavioral thermoregulatory activity has been lacking so far. We constructed a survey that specifically approaches these domains from a trait-like perspective, sampled 240 volunteers across a wide age range, and analyzed the emergent component structure. Participants were asked to report their thermal experiences, captured in 102 questions, on a 7-point bi-directional Likert scale. In a second set of 32 questions, participants were asked to indicate the relative strength of experiences across different body locations. Principal component analyses extracted 21 meaningful dimensions, which were sensitive to sex-differences and age-related changes. The questions were also assessed in a matched sample of 240 people with probable insomnia to evaluate the sensitivity of these dimensions to detect group differences in a case-control design. The dimensions showed marked mean differences between cases and controls. The survey thus has discriminatory value. It can freely be used by anyone interested in studying individual or group differences in thermosensitivity and thermoregulation. PMID:27227080

  4. Programmatic access to data and information at the IRIS DMC via web services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weertman, B. R.; Trabant, C.; Karstens, R.; Suleiman, Y. Y.; Ahern, T. K.; Casey, R.; Benson, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    The IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) has developed a suite of web services that provide access to the DMC's time series holdings, their related metadata and earthquake catalogs. In addition, services are available to perform simple, on-demand time series processing at the DMC prior to being shipped to the user. The primary goal is to provide programmatic access to data and processing services in a manner usable by and useful to the research community. The web services are relatively simple to understand and use and will form the foundation on which future DMC access tools will be built. Based on standard Web technologies they can be accessed programmatically with a wide range of programming languages (e.g. Perl, Python, Java), command line utilities such as wget and curl or with any web browser. We anticipate these services being used for everything from simple command line access, used in shell scripts and higher programming languages to being integrated within complex data processing software. In addition to improving access to our data by the seismological community the web services will also make our data more accessible to other disciplines. The web services available from the DMC include ws-bulkdataselect for the retrieval of large volumes of miniSEED data, ws-timeseries for the retrieval of individual segments of time series data in a variety of formats (miniSEED, SAC, ASCII, audio WAVE, and PNG plots) with optional signal processing, ws-station for station metadata in StationXML format, ws-resp for the retrieval of instrument response in RESP format, ws-sacpz for the retrieval of sensor response in the SAC poles and zeros convention and ws-event for the retrieval of earthquake catalogs. To make the services even easier to use, the DMC is developing a library that allows Java programmers to seamlessly retrieve and integrate DMC information into their own programs. The library will handle all aspects of dealing with the services and will parse the returned

  5. Vitamin A supplementation in Tanzania: the impact of a change in programmatic delivery strategy on coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanja, Honorati; Schellenberg, Joanna Armstrong; Mshinda, Hassan M; Shekar, Meera; Mugyabuso, Joseph K L; Ndossi, Godwin D; de Savigny, Don

    2006-11-01

    Efficient delivery strategies for health interventions are essential for high and sustainable coverage. We report impact of a change in programmatic delivery strategy from routine delivery through the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI+) approach to twice-yearly mass distribution campaigns on coverage of vitamin A supplementation in Tanzania We investigated disparities in age, sex, socio-economic status, nutritional status and maternal education within vitamin A coverage in children between 1 and 2 years of age from two independent household level child health surveys conducted (1) during a continuous universal targeting scheme based on routine EPI contacts for children aged 9, 15 and 21 months (1999); and (2) three years later after the introduction of twice-yearly vitamin A supplementation campaigns for children aged 6 months to 5 years, a 6-monthly universal targeting scheme (2002). A representative cluster sample of approximately 2,400 rural households was obtained from Rufiji, Morogoro Rural, Kilombero and Ulanga districts. A modular questionnaire about the health of all children under the age of five was administered to consenting heads of households and caretakers of children. Information on the use of child health interventions including vitamin A was asked. Coverage of vitamin A supplementation among 1-2 year old children increased from 13% [95% CI 10-18%] in 1999 to 76% [95%CI 72-81%] in 2002. In 2002 knowledge of two or more child health danger signs was negatively associated with vitamin A supplementation coverage (80% versus 70%) (p = 0.04). Nevertheless, we did not find any disparities in coverage of vitamin A by district, gender, socio-economic status and DPT vaccinations. Change in programmatic delivery of vitamin A supplementation was associated with a major improvement in coverage in Tanzania that was been sustained by repeated campaigns for at least three years. There is a need to monitor the effect of such campaigns on the routine health

  6. Vitamin A supplementation in Tanzania: the impact of a change in programmatic delivery strategy on coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekar Meera

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient delivery strategies for health interventions are essential for high and sustainable coverage. We report impact of a change in programmatic delivery strategy from routine delivery through the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI+ approach to twice-yearly mass distribution campaigns on coverage of vitamin A supplementation in Tanzania Methods We investigated disparities in age, sex, socio-economic status, nutritional status and maternal education within vitamin A coverage in children between 1 and 2 years of age from two independent household level child health surveys conducted (1 during a continuous universal targeting scheme based on routine EPI contacts for children aged 9, 15 and 21 months (1999; and (2 three years later after the introduction of twice-yearly vitamin A supplementation campaigns for children aged 6 months to 5 years, a 6-monthly universal targeting scheme (2002. A representative cluster sample of approximately 2,400 rural households was obtained from Rufiji, Morogoro Rural, Kilombero and Ulanga districts. A modular questionnaire about the health of all children under the age of five was administered to consenting heads of households and caretakers of children. Information on the use of child health interventions including vitamin A was asked. Results Coverage of vitamin A supplementation among 1–2 year old children increased from 13% [95% CI 10–18%] in 1999 to 76% [95%CI 72–81%] in 2002. In 2002 knowledge of two or more child health danger signs was negatively associated with vitamin A supplementation coverage (80% versus 70% (p = 0.04. Nevertheless, we did not find any disparities in coverage of vitamin A by district, gender, socio-economic status and DPT vaccinations. Conclusion Change in programmatic delivery of vitamin A supplementation was associated with a major improvement in coverage in Tanzania that was been sustained by repeated campaigns for at least three years. There is a

  7. Experienced poker players are emotionally stable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakasuo, Michael; Palomäki, Jussi; Salmela, Mikko

    2014-10-01

    Online poker and poker subcultures have become exceedingly popular. Previous studies assessing experience and skill in poker have revealed that proficiency in emotion regulation is a consequential factor in explaining financial success in the game. We assessed (N=478) the associations between poker players' (recruited from online poker forums) level of poker experience and HEXACO-PI-R personality traits. The results indicate that a predisposition for emotional stability-that is, lower scores on emotionality-is linked to high levels of poker experience. Thus, in order to become a successful and experienced poker player, it helps to be able to "keep cool" under pressure. Further exploratory analyses suggest that players who prefer live play to online play are more likely to be extroverted and open to experiences. The results contribute to the extant literature on individual differences in personality in poker players, and in particular help to fill the interdisciplinary gap between personality and gambling research.

  8. Experienced discrimination in home mortgage lending

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secchi, Davide; Seri, Raffaello

    2017-01-01

    the applicant’s nationality is considered. In addition to its findings, the study (a) provides an original econometric model on a two-step procedure to test perceived discrimination and (b) suggests a method and approach that may constitute a point of reference for those willing to study perceived......This article proposes a framework for the analysis of experienced discrimination in home mortgages. It addresses the problem of home mortgage lending discrimination in one of the richest areas of northern Italy. Employees of a local hospital were interviewed to study their perception (or experience......) of discriminatory behavior related to home financing. The analysis follows two steps. The first evaluates self-selection (the probability that individuals apply) and the second focuses on the likelihood that applications are accepted by the bank. Findings show that discrimination is likely to appear when...

  9. Challenges experienced by debt counsellors in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kgomotso Masilo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gauteng, Province of South Africa is experiencing a decreasing number of registered and practising debt counsellors. This paper investigates and assesses the challenges that debt counsellors in Gauteng experiences. Fifteen debt counsellors from three municipalities of Gauteng were interviewed. Data was analysed using ATLAS ti. The paper concluded that though debt counsellors are complying with the regulations in rendering debt counselling service, they still had challenges regarding backlogs in debt review. The paper recommends that debt counsellors should be adequately trained and should restructure their rehabilitation methods on the one hand and the National Credit Regulator should monitor debt counsellors’ practices and assist them with their queries on the other hand.

  10. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa: thinking ahead on programmatic tasks and related operational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Rony; Van Damme, Wim; Arendt, Vic; Schmit, Jean Claude; Harries, Anthony D

    2011-07-06

    Until now, we have all been desperately trying to run behind the HIV/AIDS epidemic and catch up with it, but despite all our efforts, the epidemic remains well ahead of us. In 2010, the antiretroviral treatment (ART) gap was about 60%, AIDS-related deaths were almost two million a year, and on top of these figures, for every one person started on ART, there were two new HIV infections. What is needed to change this situation is to think ahead of the epidemic in terms of the programmatic tasks we will be faced with and try to act boldly in trying to implement those tasks. From a programmatic perspective, we: a) highlight what needs to fundamentally change in our thinking and overall approach to the epidemic; and b) outline a number of key task areas for implementation and related operational research.

  11. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa: thinking ahead on programmatic tasks and related operational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachariah Rony

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Until now, we have all been desperately trying to run behind the HIV/AIDS epidemic and catch up with it, but despite all our efforts, the epidemic remains well ahead of us. In 2010, the antiretroviral treatment (ART gap was about 60%, AIDS-related deaths were almost two million a year, and on top of these figures, for every one person started on ART, there were two new HIV infections. What is needed to change this situation is to think ahead of the epidemic in terms of the programmatic tasks we will be faced with and try to act boldly in trying to implement those tasks. From a programmatic perspective, we: a highlight what needs to fundamentally change in our thinking and overall approach to the epidemic; and b outline a number of key task areas for implementation and related operational research.

  12. Interim findings of programmatic options for a building design competition for energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-02-27

    The purpose of this report is to present various programmatic options for the Buildings and Community Systems (BCS) to use in utilizing a building design competition as a mechanism to promote the widescale adoption of energy conservation in new buildings design. The general program requirements were that: (1) the design competition focus on the multi-family low-rise residential market; (2) the design competition would result in the construction of a building or buildings under a Federally-assisted housing program; (3) the competition would be among competitors who are professional architects, designers, and/or developers; (4) the design competition would generate a high degree of public and professional awareness of conservation options in building design; and (5) the competition would be based on the use of a common standard of judgement (e.g., Btu's per square foot). The purpose of the initial phase of this study has been: (1) to assess the feasibility of developing a design competition that can meet the general requirements; (2) to identify potential program options for the competition; and (3) to develop a preliminary structural framework for it. This paper reports the study approach and the preliminary findings. (MCW)

  13. Gendered Empowerment and HIV Prevention: Policy and Programmatic Pathways to Success in the MENA Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Shari L.; Kambou, Sarah Degnan; Sutherland, Carla; Moalla, Khadija; Kapoor, Archana

    2011-01-01

    Although HIV in the Middle East and North Africa is currently characterized as a low seroprevalence epidemic, there are numerous factors that are present in the region that could prevent—or exacerbate—the epidemic. The time to invest substantially in prevention—and gender-specific prevention in particular—is now. Given that most policy makers do not make gender-specific plans as epidemics progress, our research team—which draws upon expertise from both within and outside the region—worked together to make programmatic and policy suggestions in the Middle East and North Africa region in 5 key areas: (1) gender-specific and gender transformative HIV prevention interventions; (2) access to quality education and improvements in life skills and sex education; (3) economic empowerment; (4) property rights; and (5) antiviolence. In short, this work builds upon many ongoing efforts in the region and elucidates some of the links between gendered empowerment and health outcomes around the world, particularly HIV and AIDS. PMID:19553778

  14. Learning Team Review 2016-0001: Installing Outlets for Programmatic Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunwoody, John Tyler [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Obrey, Kimberly Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bridgewater, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Griego, Frank X. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brenner, Andrew Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lopez, Ted T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henderson, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gordon, Lloyd Baumgardner [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Blumberg, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilburn, Dianne Williams [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of a Learning Team is to transfer and communicate the information into operational feedback and improvement. We want to pay attention to the small things that go wrong because they are often early warning signals and may provide insight into the health of the whole system. An ESR was placed in the October of 2015 to move/install a number of 120V and 208V outlets in 455-104B to support programmatic furnace needs. Electrical design review was completed for ESR 22217 on February 22, 2016 and a Design Change Form completed describing the modification needed as: demolish 1 existing receptacle and circuit leaving conduit and jbox for use to install new receptacle and 5 new receptacles/circuits are required and one existing receptacle is to be relocated, listed under FSR 149229. The FSR scope of work was written:: Please have the Electricians come out to perform demolition (1ea.), installation (6ea.)& relocation (1ea.) of receptacles / circuits. ESR 22217 & DCF-16-35-0455-1281 is in place for this work. Coordinate final receptacle locations with Laboratory Resident. Contact John Dunwoody or O-MC for this information. WO# 545580-01 was signed on April 20, 2016.: Electricians to perform demolition, installation, & relocation of receptacles / circuits PER attached DCF-16-0455-1281-SK-1.

  15. Multi-Programmatic and Institutional Computing Capacity Resource Attachment 2 Statement of Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seager, M

    2002-04-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has identified high-performance computing as a critical competency necessary to meet the goals of LLNL's scientific and engineering programs. Leadership in scientific computing demands the availability of a stable, powerful, well-balanced computational infrastructure, and it requires research directed at advanced architectures, enabling numerical methods and computer science. To encourage all programs to benefit from the huge investment being made by the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASCI) at LLNL, and to provide a mechanism to facilitate multi-programmatic leveraging of resources and access to high-performance equipment by researchers, M&IC was created. The Livermore Computing (LC) Center, a part of the Computations Directorate Integrated Computing and Communications (ICC) Department can be viewed as composed of two facilities, one open and one secure. This acquisition is focused on the M&IC resources in the Open Computing Facility (OCF). For the M&IC program, recent efforts and expenditures have focused on enhancing capacity and stabilizing the TeraCluster 2000 (TC2K) resource. Capacity is a measure of the ability to process a varied workload from many scientists simultaneously. Capability represents the ability to deliver a very large system to run scientific calculations at large scale. In this procurement action, we intend to significantly increase the capability of the M&IC resource to address multiple teraFLOP/s problems, and well as increasing the capacity to do many 100 gigaFLOP/s calculations.

  16. Low-level waste management alternatives and analysis in DOE`s programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstein, J.S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy is preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The PEIS has been divided into an Environmental Restoration section and a Waste Management section. Each section has a unique set of alternatives. This paper will focus on the waste management alternatives and analysis. The set of alternatives for waste management has been divided into waste categories. These categories are: high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, greater-than-class C and low-level waste from commercial sources, hazardous waste, and spent nuclear fuel. This paper will discuss the alternatives and analytical approach that will be used to evaluate these alternatives for the low-level waste section. Although the same alternatives will be considered for all waste types, the analysis will be performed separately for each waste type. In the sections that follow, information will be provided on waste management configurations, the analysis of waste management alternatives, waste types and locations, facility and transportation activities, the facility and transportation impacts assessment, and the compilation of impacts.

  17. A Pharmacotherapy Capstone Course to Target Student Learning and Programmatic Curricular Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnebur, Sunny A.; Borgelt, Laura M.; Trujillo, Jennifer; Fish, Douglas N.; Mueller, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To describe how a pharmacotherapy capstone course was used for student learning and programmatic curricular assessment. Design. A pharmacotherapy capstone course was included in the University of Colorado curriculum for 13 years from 2002 through 2014. This 9-credit hour course was the last course prior to Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs). Students were held accountable for prior learning using complex patient cases and other activities that are seen in APPEs. Application of knowledge, skills, and critical thinking were integrated in this course using exclusively active learning methodologies. Students were expected to actively participate and learn independently, from peers and through self-assessment. Assessment. Evidence of student learning was demonstrated based on student performance on written and verbal evaluations analyzed from 2012 to 2014. Survey and self-evaluation data indicated that students learned within the course. An increase in student confidence in critical thinking, problem-solving, decision making, and lifelong learning was also seen during APPEs. Student performance in this course prompted changes to prerequisite courses and guided development of a renewed curriculum. Conclusion. The University of Colorado pharmacotherapy capstone course prepared students for the rigor of APPEs, provided insight that facilitated improvements in prerequisite courses, and was a nexus for the development of a renewed curriculum, which includes a new clinical capstone course. PMID:28496265

  18. Sexually Experienced Adolescents' Thoughts About Sexual Pleasure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliares, Ellen; Wilkerson, J Michael; Sieving, Renee E; Brady, Sonya S

    Little research on adolescents has examined developmentally normative facets of sexuality that are not obviously linked to physical health. The purpose of this secondary data analysis was to qualitatively analyze adolescents' thoughts about and experiences with sexual pleasure. The study sample consisted of 56 sexually experienced, ethnically diverse, predominantly female adolescents who were participating in a Web-based intervention to promote healthy sexual decision making. Comments on one message board, "Sexual Pleasure: Does It Matter to You?," provided an opportunity to examine adolescents' thoughts about and experiences with sexual pleasure, as well as their communication with partners about that topic. Adolescents' comments demonstrated that they experience difficulties with pleasure in their sexual relationships. Adolescents generally believed that men are more likely than women to feel pleasure due to differences that include biology, understanding of one's body, and control over partnered sexual behavior. Adolescents defined inequality of received pleasure differently and discussed contexts in which inequality may be acceptable. Adolescents expressed motivation to communicate with partners about sexual pleasure. However, their statements suggested they often lack the skills to do so. Future prevention and intervention programs should equip adolescents with skills to communicate with partners about sexual pleasure.

  19. Women experiencing the intergenerationality of conjugal violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvânia Patrícia do Nascimento Paixão

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the family relationship, in childhood and adolescence, of women who experience conjugal violence.Method: qualitative study. Interviews were held with 19 women, who were experiencing conjugal violence, and who were resident in a community in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The project was approved by the Research Ethics Committee (N. 42/2011.Results: the data was organized using the Discourse of the Collective Subject, identifying the summary central ideas: they witnessed violence between their parents; they suffered repercussions from the violence between their parents: they were angry about the mother's submission to her partner; and they reproduced the conjugal violence. The discourse showed that the women witnessed, in childhood and adolescence, violence between their parents, and were injured both physically and psychologically. As a result of the mother's submission, feelings of anger arose in the children. However, in the adult phase of their own lives, they noticed that their conjugal life resembled that of their parents, reproducing the violence.Conclusion: investment is necessary in strategies designed to break inter-generational violence, and the health professionals are important in this process, as it is a phenomenon with repercussions in health. Because they work in the Family Health Strategy, which focuses on the prevention of harm and illness, health promotion and interdepartmentality, the nurses are essential in the process of preventing and confronting this phenomenon.

  20. Women experiencing the intergenerationality of conjugal violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Gilvânia Patrícia do Nascimento; Gomes, Nadirlene Pereira; Diniz, Normélia Maria Freire; Carvalho e Lira, Margaret Ollinda de Souza; Carvalho, Milca Ramaiane da Silva; da Silva, Rudval Souza

    2015-01-01

    to analyze the family relationship, in childhood and adolescence, of women who experience conjugal violence. qualitative study. Interviews were held with 19 women, who were experiencing conjugal violence, and who were resident in a community in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The project was approved by the Research Ethics Committee (N. 42/2011). the data was organized using the Discourse of the Collective Subject, identifying the summary central ideas: they witnessed violence between their parents; they suffered repercussions from the violence between their parents: they were angry about the mother's submission to her partner; and they reproduced the conjugal violence. The discourse showed that the women witnessed, in childhood and adolescence, violence between their parents, and were injured both physically and psychologically. As a result of the mother's submission, feelings of anger arose in the children. However, in the adult phase of their own lives, they noticed that their conjugal life resembled that of their parents, reproducing the violence. investment is necessary in strategies designed to break inter-generational violence, and the health professionals are important in this process, as it is a phenomenon with repercussions in health. Because they work in the Family Health Strategy, which focuses on the prevention of harm and illness, health promotion and interdepartmentality, the nurses are essential in the process of preventing and confronting this phenomenon.

  1. Unpleasant subjective emotional experiencing of pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Vallath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of pain medicine that once began as a supportive and compassionate care, adding value to the management of acute and chronic ailments, has now transformed into a vital and essential specialty with structured training programs and service units with professionals dedicating their careers to it. The expansion of understanding of the direct relationship of pain relief to the quality of life, uncovering of neuronal pathways, and technological advances in imaging as well as in interventional techniques have all contributed to this phenomenal growth. However, there is a growing concern whether the training programs and the specialized practitioners are gradually limiting their skilled inputs primarily within the sensory realm of the pain experience with sophisticated interventional techniques and relegating its subjective and emotional dimensions to perfunctory realms within the schema of service provision. While the specialty is still young, if we can understand the inherent aspect of these dimensions within the pain experience and acknowledge the gaps in service provision, it may be possible to champion development of truly comprehensive pain relief programs that responds effectively and ethically to a patient′s felt needs. This article attempts to position the subjectivity of pain experience in context and surface the need to design complete systems of pain relief services inclusive of this dimension. It presents authors′ review of literature on perspectives of ′unpleasant subjective emotional experiencing of the pain" to elucidate possible clinical implications based on the evidences presented on neuro-biology and neuro-psychology of the pain experience; the aim being to inspire systems of care where this dimension is sufficiently evaluated and managed.

  2. Stress Management Training for Employees Experiencing Corporate Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Timothy R.; Maples, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Describes a stress management seminar for employees experiencing corporate acquisition which was attended by 40 men and 16 women. Presents information regarding specific types of stressors experienced by these employees. Notes that participant reactions support the design and utility of this type of program for employees experiencing corporate…

  3. [Sense of agency: experiencing is not judging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulot, V; Thomas, P; Delevoye-Turrell, Y

    2007-09-01

    Experiencing oneself as the author of an action defines the sense of agency, which is a component of the self. A deficit affecting this process is thought to cause the principle symptoms characterizing schizophrenia - e.g. delusions of control and auditive hallucinations would exist because patients do not experience themselves as the author of their own actions. To explore this specific problem of the sense of agency in schizophrenia, Frith et al. collected a serie of experimental data that lead them to propose that the sense of agency relied on the automatic motor system, processes that enable the predictive adjustment of action. An impairment in these processes (called in the literature) would lead to the problem of dissociation between our own actions and those performed by others. More specifically, the problem would lay in the comparison between the predicted state and the desired state (figure 1). Jeannerod et al. from Lyon used attribution judgements that suggested that the sense of agency would not depend uniquely on the motor mechanisms but would also involve conscious processes. Recently, Frith et al. have published new data that integrates both preceding models. According to this theory, the sense of agency would depend on the processes involved in the predictive control of action but at a conscious level: the attenuation of the sensory feedback, specific of our own actions. This attenuation would depend on the accuracy of comparison between the predicted state and the actual state. Moreover, the sense of agency would also imply the management of social frame, which normally gives the means to cope with human interaction. The conception of the sense of agency has greatly evolved over the years, mainly because of the various experimental methods employed. The consequences of this are the various theoretical interpretations given to the characteristics of the sense of agency. They can be explained in two main points: a non-unified definition of the sense

  4. Programmatic Need for a Zero Emission Steam Technology (ZEST) Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meltzer, M; Followill, F; Johnson, J

    2001-06-30

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is proposing to construct an on-site research facility for a novel electric power generation system that exploits clean-burning fossil fuels. This system, termed Zero Emission Steam Technology (ZEST), offers unique economic and environmental benefits, including: (1) Highly efficient power generation using the most advanced combustion and turbine technologies. (2) Ability to burn a range of fossil fuels, including natural gas, synthetic gas from coal (''coal syngas''), and coal-bed methane. (3) No oxides of nitrogen generated that would contribute to air pollution. (4) No greenhouse gases emitted. (5) Secure geologic sequestration of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) combustion product. (6) Use of the CO{sub 2} combustion product to enhance oil recovery in mature fields. The proposed research facility will provide a necessary step toward commercialization of ZEST. Despite the technology's promise, it will not be implemented by the U.S. electric power industry unless an agency such as DOE takes on the task of demonstrating its scientific and economic viability. The U.S. electric power industry typically requires 50,000 hours of operational data--nearly six years of continuous duty--before investing in a major new technology. Hence, there is a strong programmatic need for DOE to provide such data for ZEST, to accelerate commercial investment in this technology. The ZEST combustion process is based on rocket engine technology. It burns pure oxygen with a hydrocarbon fuel under stoichiometric conditions to produce power with virtually no oxides of nitrogen generated. The flexibility of ZEST's gas generator, which has independent temperature and pressure control, will allow modular upgrading of turbine systems as new, more efficient technology becomes available. It is envisioned that the ZEST research facility will serve as a testing laboratory for new turbine technology being designed by the U

  5. Results from early programmatic implementation of Xpert MTB/RIF testing in nine countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Jacob; Codlin, Andrew J; Andre, Emmanuel; Micek, Mark A; Bedru, Ahmed; Carter, E Jane; Yadav, Rajendra-Prasad; Mosneaga, Andrei; Rai, Bishwa; Banu, Sayera; Brouwer, Miranda; Blok, Lucie; Sahu, Suvanand; Ditiu, Lucica

    2014-01-02

    versatility and impact of the technology, but also outlines various surmountable barriers to implementation. The study is not representative of all early implementer experiences with MTB/RIF testing but rather provides an overview of the shared issues as well as the many different approaches to programmatic MTB/RIF implementation.

  6. Topic-Specific Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TSPCK) in Redox and Electrochemistry of Experienced Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephanie

    Topic specific pedagogical content knowledge (TSPCK) is the basis by which knowledge of subject matter of a particular topic is conveyed to students. This includes students' prior knowledge, curricular saliency, what makes a topic easy or difficult to teach, representations, and teaching strategies. The goal of this study is to assess the pedagogical content knowledge of chemistry teachers in a professional learning community in the areas of redox and electrochemistry, as this has been regarded in previous literature as conceptually challenging for students to learn. By acquiring information regarding the PCK development of experienced chemistry teachers, the education and practice of all science teachers can be advanced. This study builds upon previous research that developed validated instruments to evaluate TSPCK. The research questions sought to determine which components of TSPCK were evidenced by the instructional design decisions teachers made, what shared patterns and trends were evident, and how TSPCK related to student learning outcomes. To answer the research questions subjects completed a background questionnaire, a TSPCK assessment, and interview tasks to elicit information about pedagogical decision making and processes that influenced student learning in their classrooms. The TSPCK exam and interview responses were coded to align with thematic constructs. To determine the effect of TSPCK on student learning gains, pre/post-assessment data on redox and electrochemistry were compared to teachers' TSPCK. The chemistry teachers displayed varying levels of TSPCK in redox and electrochemistry, as evidenced by their knowledge of student learning obstacles, curricular saliency, and teaching methodologies. There was evidence of experienced teachers lacking in certain areas of TSPCK, such as the ability to identify student misconceptions, suggesting the need for programmatic improvements in pre-service and in-service training to address the needs of current

  7. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-04-01

    The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. One of these alternatives is the proposed action. These alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies because the PEIS is a planning document only. It assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. This PEIS differs substantially from a site-specific environmental impact statement because multiple ground water compliance strategies, each with its own set of potential impacts, could be used to implement all the alternatives except the no action alternative. In a traditional environmental impact statement, an impacts analysis leads directly to the defined alternatives. The impacts analysis for implementing alternatives in this PEIS first involves evaluating a ground water compliance strategy or strategies, the use of which will result in site-specific impacts. This PEIS impacts analysis assesses only the potential impacts of the various ground water compliance strategies, then relates them to the alternatives to provide a comparison of impacts.

  8. Implementation of HPV-testing for cervical cancer screening in programmatic contexts: The Jujuy demonstration project in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrossi, Silvina; Thouyaret, Laura; Laudi, Rosa; Marín, Oscar; Ramírez, Josefina; Paolino, Melisa; Herrero, Rolando; Campanera, Alicia

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this article is to present results of programmatic introduction of HPV testing with cytologic triage among women 30 years and older in the province of Jujuy, Argentina, including description of the planning phase and results of program performance during the first year. We describe the project implementation process, and calculate key performance indicators using SITAM, the national screening information system. We also compare disease detection rates of HPV testing in 2012 with cytology as performed during the previous year. HPV testing with cytology triage was introduced through a consensus-building process. Key activities included establishment of algorithms and guidelines, creating the HPV laboratory, training of health professionals, information campaigns for women and designing the referral network. By the end of 2012, 100% (n = 270) of public health care centers were offering HPV testing and 22,834 women had been HPV tested, 98.5% (n = 22,515) were 30+. HPV positivity among women over 30 was 12.7%, 807 women were HPV+ and had abnormal cytology, and 281 CIN2+ were identified. CIN2+ detection rates was 1.25 in 2012 and 0.62 in 2011 when the program was cytology based (p = 0.0002). This project showed that effective introduction of HPV testing in programmatic contexts of low-middle income settings is feasible and detects more disease than cytology. © 2015 UICC.

  9. Answering the Call: Facilitating Responsive Services for Students Experiencing Homelessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothaus, Tim; Lorelle, Sonya; Anderson, Kie; Knight, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    After a review of the literature elucidating the status quo for students experiencing homelessness, this article shares the results of a mixed methods study. With a phenomenological qualitative emphasis, the mixed methods study explored the perceptions of parents and children experiencing homelessness regarding their academic needs and the…

  10. Young Children Experiencing Homelessness: The Overlooked Medium of Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlembach, Sue

    2017-01-01

    The number of mothers with young children experiencing homelessness and seeking shelter has increased in the USA over the past decade. Shelters are often characterized as environments offering few opportunities for appropriate play experiences. This article delineates the important role of play for young children experiencing homelessness and…

  11. Emotions Experienced by Students Taking Online and Classroom Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Jeffrey R.; Allan, Wesley D.; Teoro, Samantha M.

    2012-01-01

    Emotions experienced during online academic examinations may differ from emotions experienced in the traditional classroom testing situation. Students in a "Psychology of Learning" course (n = 61) completed assessments of emotions before and after a quiz in each of the following settings: online at their own choice of time and location; online in…

  12. Self-motion perception compresses time experienced in return travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, Takeharu; Ito, Hiroyuki; Shoji, Sunaga

    2011-01-01

    It is often anecdotally reported that time experienced in return travel (back to the start point) seems shorter than time spent in outward travel (travel to a new destination). Here, we report the first experimental results showing that return travel time is experienced as shorter than the actual time. This discrepancy is induced by the existence of self-motion perception.

  13. Problems experienced by women re-entering the education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The problems experienced by women re-entering the education profession in South Africa were focused on. A review of the literature revealed that problems are experienced at five different levels: within the women themselves, in their work situation, at management level, within their career, and within society.

  14. Five Years on: Leadership Challenges of an Experienced CEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarros, James C.; Sarros, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Experienced leaders face challenges that demand different leadership approaches to those of inexperienced leaders. The purposes of this article are to: (1) explore the leadership initiatives prominent for experienced leaders compared with inexperienced leaders; (2) examine the relationship between transformational leadership and these initiatives;…

  15. Peran Experienced Stigma terhadap Self Esteem pada Suku Nias

    OpenAIRE

    Hutauruk, Lucy Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to determine the role of experienced stigma against self esteem in Nias ethnic. The study involved 151 people of Nias ethnic who lived in Medan. Sampling was done by incidental sampling and processed by simple linear regression test with an SPSS 17.0 Software Program. The instrument in this research are the scale of experienced stigma and self-esteem scale developed by the researchers.These results indicate there is the role of experienced stigma against self esteem in Nias et...

  16. The programmatic hemosorption in the comprehensive treatment of atherosclerosis of various localization. Hemosorption in the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, S S; Nalivaiko, E S; Khalilov, E M; Moreino, M S; Kaminka TYa; Fedin, A I; Teterina, E B; Belousov YuB

    1987-01-01

    The inclusion of hemosorption through activated coals into the comprehensive treatment of 580 patients sick with atherosclerosis has made it possible to achieve a positive clinical effect among 81 per cent of the patients sick with the ischemic heart disease, 79 per cent of atherosclerotic discirculatory encephalopathy and 76 per cent of obliterating atherosclerosis of lower limbs. The positive dynamics is especially visible among patients who are administered the programmatic hemosorption, making it possible over a long period of time (3-5 years) to sustain remission in the clinical state and the normal level of the lipids in the blood. The direct effect is expressed in the improved microcirculation, disappearance of the sludge-syndrome and the reduction of ischemic disorders. The remote effect of hemosorption is connected with the repeated removals of cholesterin of the atherogenic lipoproteids, which leads, we believe, to the interruption or even regression of the atherosclerotic process.

  17. Impact of experienced professionalism on professional culture in probation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butter, R.; Hermanns, J.

    2011-01-01

    The level of work engagement is an important aspect of organizational culture. In this empirical study the relation between engagement and experienced professionalism of probation officers is investigated. Starting from ideal-typical theories on professionalism, a psychometric instrument for

  18. Active Experiencing Training Improves Episodic Memory Recall in Older Adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarah E. Banducci; Ana M. Daugherty; John R. Biggan; Gillian E. Cooke; Michelle Voss; Tony Noice; Helga Noice; Arthur F. Kramer

    2017-01-01

    Active experiencing (AE) is an intervention aimed at attenuating cognitive declines with mindfulness training via an immersive acting program, and has produced promising results in older adults with limited formal education...

  19. Advance Selling in the Presence of Experienced Consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Oksana Loginova; X. Hnery Wang; Chenhang Zeng

    2011-01-01

    The advance selling strategy is implemented when a firm offers consumers the opportunity to order its product in advance of the regular selling season. Advance selling reduces uncertainty for both the firm and the buyer and enables the firm to update its forecast of future demand. The distinctive feature of the present theoretical study of advance selling is that we divide consumers into two groups, experienced and inexperienced. Experienced consumers know their valuations of the product in a...

  20. Experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdok, Hilde; Cronie, Doug; van der Speld, Cecile; van Dillen, Jeroen; de Jonge, Ank; Rijnders, Marlies; de Graaf, Irene; Schellevis, François G; Verhoeven, Corine J

    2017-11-01

    High levels of experienced job autonomy are found to be beneficial for healthcare professionals and for the relationship with their patients. The aim of this study was to assess how maternity care professionals in the Netherlands perceive their job autonomy in the Dutch maternity care system and whether they expect a new system of integrated maternity care to affect their experienced job autonomy. A cross-sectional survey. The Leiden Quality of Work Life Questionnaire was used to assess experienced job autonomy among maternity care professionals. Data were collected in the Netherlands in 2015. 799 professionals participated of whom 362 were primary care midwives, 240 obstetricians, 93 clinical midwives and 104 obstetric nurses. The mean score for experienced job autonomy was highest for primary care midwives, followed by obstetricians, clinical midwives and obstetric nurses. Primary care midwives scored highest in expecting to lose their job autonomy in an integrated care system. There are significant differences in experienced job autonomy between maternity care professionals. When changing the maternity care system it will be a challenge to maintain a high level of experienced job autonomy for professionals. A decrease in job autonomy could lead to a reduction in job related wellbeing and in satisfaction with care among pregnant women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Experienced and potential medical tourists' service quality expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiry, Michael; Scott, Jeannie J; Vequist, David G

    2013-01-01

    The paper's aim is to compare experienced and potential US medical tourists' foreign health service-quality expectations. Data were collected via an online survey involving 1,588 US consumers engaging or expressing an interest in medical tourism. The sample included 219 experienced and 1,369 potential medical tourists. Respondents completed a SERVQUAL questionnaire. Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to determine significant differences between experienced and potential US medical tourists' service-quality expectations. For all five service-quality dimensions (tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance and empathy) experienced medical tourists had significantly lower expectations than potential medical tourists. Experienced medical tourists also had significantly lower service-quality expectations than potential medical tourists for 11 individual SERVQUAL items. Results suggest using experience level to segment medical tourists. The study also has implications for managing medical tourist service-quality expectations at service delivery point and via external marketing communications. Managing medical tourists' service quality expectations is important since expectations can significantly influence choice processes, their experience and post-consumption behavior. This study is the first to compare experienced and potential US medical tourist service-quality expectations. The study establishes a foundation for future service-quality expectations research in the rapidly growing medical tourism industry.

  2. Breaking up Romantic Relationships: Costs Experienced and Coping Strategies Deployed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carin Perilloux

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined differences between men and women, and between individuals experiencing rejection (Rejectees and individuals doing the rejecting (Rejectors in romantic relationship break-ups. We tested fourteen evolution-based predictions about romantic breakups using data from 193 participants; ten received support. Women more than men, for example, experienced costly sequelae such as the loss of a mate's physical protection and harmful post-breakup stalking by the ex-partner. Both men and women who were rejected, compared with those who did the rejecting, experienced more depression, loss of self-esteem, and rumination. Rejectors, on the other hand, experienced the reputational cost of being perceived by others as cruel. Exploratory data analyses revealed that women more than men reported experiencing negative emotions after a breakup, particularly feeling sad, confused, and scared. Both sexes used an array of strategies to cope with the breakup, ranging from high base-rate strategies such as discussing the breakup with friends to low base-rate strategies such as threatening suicide. The largest sex difference in coping strategies centered on the act of shopping, used by women Rejectors as well as women Rejectees, likely a strategy of appearance enhancement prior to reentering the mating market. Discussion focuses on the adaptive significance of sex differences and individual differences based on rejection status.

  3. Use of analogies by novice and experienced design engineers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Saeema; Christensen, Bo T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a study to understand the use of analogies by design engineers with different levels of experience. Protocol analyses of twelve design engineers have been analysed to understand the functions and reasoning of the analogies. The protocols are real world data from the aerospace...... industry. The findings indicate a significant difference in both the functions and reasoning by novices and experienced designers. Novices were found to predominantly transfer information without explicit reference to design issues, whereas experienced designers tended to either solve or identify problems....... Experienced designers were found to reason about the function of a component and to some degree the predicted behaviour of the component, whereas the novices seem to lack such reasoning processes....

  4. Marketing actions can modulate neural representations of experienced pleasantness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassmann, Hilke; O'Doherty, John; Shiv, Baba; Rangel, Antonio

    2008-01-22

    Despite the importance and pervasiveness of marketing, almost nothing is known about the neural mechanisms through which it affects decisions made by individuals. We propose that marketing actions, such as changes in the price of a product, can affect neural representations of experienced pleasantness. We tested this hypothesis by scanning human subjects using functional MRI while they tasted wines that, contrary to reality, they believed to be different and sold at different prices. Our results show that increasing the price of a wine increases subjective reports of flavor pleasantness as well as blood-oxygen-level-dependent activity in medial orbitofrontal cortex, an area that is widely thought to encode for experienced pleasantness during experiential tasks. The paper provides evidence for the ability of marketing actions to modulate neural correlates of experienced pleasantness and for the mechanisms through which the effect operates.

  5. Experienced biology teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) on photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Ari

    2017-05-01

    Teacher certification program raises a question of whether certified teachers really more competence than non-certified teachers. However, since the notion of teachers' competence is measure in terms of content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge instead of Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK). Teacher' PCK as the essence of teachers' competence is somehow ignored. The study presented here analyses experienced biology teachers' PCK. Subjects are experienced biology teachers who teach at the formerly called Pioneered Standardized Schools (RSBI). They are purposively chosen since they are certified teachers who have received very intensive training organized by the education authorities (national, province and district) as well as by the schools. Therefore, this group of teachers can be considered as experienced and well-prepared for teaching science.

  6. Mapping Discrimination Experienced by Indonesian Trans* FtM Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Danny; Pratama, Mario Prajna

    2017-01-01

    This work sought to document how Indonesian trans* FtM persons experienced discrimination across the interlinked domains of social networks, religious and educational institutions, employment and the workplace, and health care institutions. Objectives were (1) to map the discrimination experienced by trans* FtM individuals in Indonesia, and (2) to establish the specific priorities of the Indonesian trans* FtM community. In-depth interviews, focus groups, and participant observation was used involving 14 respondents. Findings revealed that respondents experienced othering through rejection, misidentification, harassment, "correction," and bureaucratic discrimination across the five preestablished domains. Health care and a lack of information emerged as areas of particular concern for respondents. This work calls for health care that is sensitive to the needs of trans* FtM people coupled with high-quality information to alleviate the cycles through which discrimination is sustained.

  7. The reliability and validity of a portfolio designed as a programmatic assessment of performance in an integrated clinical placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Chris; Shadbolt, Narelle; Clark, Tyler; Simpson, Phillip

    2014-09-20

    Little is known about the technical adequacy of portfolios in reporting multiple complex academic and performance-based assessments. We explored, first, the influencing factors on the precision of scoring within a programmatic assessment of student learning outcomes within an integrated clinical placement. Second, the degree to which validity evidence supported interpretation of student scores. Within generalisability theory, we estimated the contribution that each wanted factor (i.e. student capability) and unwanted factors (e.g. the impact of assessors) made to the variation in portfolio task scores. Relative and absolute standard errors of measurement provided a confidence interval around a pre-determined pass/fail standard for all six tasks. Validity evidence was sought through demonstrating the internal consistency of the portfolio and exploring the relationship of student scores with clinical experience. The mean portfolio mark for 257 students, across 372 raters, based on six tasks, was 75.56 (SD, 6.68). For a single student on one assessment task, 11% of the variance in scores was due to true differences in student capability. The most significant interaction was context specificity (49%), the tendency for one student to engage with one task and not engage with another task. Rater subjectivity was 29%. An absolute standard error of measurement of 4.74%, gave a 95% CI of +/- 9.30%, and a 68% CI of +/- 4.74% around a pass/fail score of 57%. Construct validity was supported by demonstration of an assessment framework, the internal consistency of the portfolio tasks, and higher scores for students who did the clinical placement later in the academic year. A portfolio designed as a programmatic assessment of an integrated clinical placement has sufficient evidence of validity to support a specific interpretation of student scores around passing a clinical placement. It has modest precision in assessing students' achievement of a competency standard. There were

  8. Correlates of condom use among sexually experienced secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analyses are based on 214 sexually experienced males aged 14 - 20 years who completed web-based questionnaires about their sexual attitudes and behaviour. Results indicate that students did not see themselves as susceptible to HIV/AIDS and believed condom effectiveness in preventing HIV to be low. Consequently ...

  9. Do in-car devices affect experienced users' driving performance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapper, A.S.; Hagenzieker, M.P.; Brookhuis, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Distracted driving is considered to be an important factor in road safety. To investigate how experienced user's driving behaviour is affected by in-vehicle technology, a fixed-base driving simulator was used. 20 participants drove twice in a rich simulated traffic environment while performing

  10. Experiencing Beach in Australia: Study Abroad Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshifumi; Payne, Phillip G.

    2011-01-01

    The current "Australian-"ness"" of outdoor environmental education is an evolving "set" of socio-cultural constructions. These constructions can be interpreted within the circumstances of an empirical study of tertiary study abroad students' participation in an undergraduate semester long unit "Experiencing the…

  11. Environmental barriers experienced by stroke patients in Musanze ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients with stroke experience a number of environmental barriers, limiting their re-integration. Information regarding the barriers experienced by patients with stroke in a specific setting such as the Musanze district in Rwanda would assist with the development of rehabilitation programmes that would take into ...

  12. Hearing Voices: Qualitative Research with Postsecondary Students Experiencing Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venville, Annie; Street, Annette F.

    2014-01-01

    Vocational Education and Training (VET) students experiencing mental illness have been described as one of the most vulnerable student groups in the Australian post-secondary sector. This vulnerability can be attributed to the impacts of illness, the oft-reported experiences of stigma and discrimination, and low educational outcomes. There is…

  13. Children with sickle cell disease who are experiencing psychosocial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of the study was to identify children with Sickle cell disease (SCD) who are experiencing psychosocial problems concurrently with their mothers; and comparing the dyads to determine correlation, pattern of correlation and to identify correlating or modifying factors. Method: The psychosocial impact ...

  14. On Mathematical Understanding: Perspectives of Experienced Chinese Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jinfa; Ding, Meixia

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have long debated the meaning of mathematical understanding and ways to achieve mathematical understanding. This study investigated experienced Chinese mathematics teachers' views about mathematical understanding. It was found that these mathematics teachers embrace the view that understanding is a web of connections, which is a result…

  15. Common difficulties experienced by grade 12 students in learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to examine the nature and causes of common difficulties experienced by grade twelve students in learning chemistry in Ebinat preparatory school. A qualitative method was employed to investigate the questions, which used interviews and questionnaires with students and teachers. The key ...

  16. Expected usability is not a valid indicator of experienced usability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meinald T. Thielsch

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Usability is a core construct of website evaluation and inherently defined as interactive. Yet, when analysing first impressions of websites, expected usability, i.e., before use, is of interest. Here we investigate to what extend ratings of expected usability are related to (a experienced usability, i.e., ratings after use, and (b objective usability measures, i.e., task performance. Furthermore, we try to elucidate how ratings of expected usability are correlated to aesthetic judgments. In an experiment, 57 participants submitted expected usability ratings after the presentation of website screenshots in three viewing-time conditions (50, 500, and 10,000 ms and after an interactive task (experienced usability. Additionally, objective usability measures (task completion and duration and subjective aesthetics evaluations were recorded for each website. The results at both the group and individual level show that expected usability ratings are not significantly related either to experienced usability or objective usability measures. Instead, they are highly correlated with aesthetics ratings. Taken together, our results highlight the need for interaction in empirical website usability testing, even when exploring very early usability impressions. In our study, user ratings of expected usability were no valid proxy neither for objective usability nor for experienced website usability.

  17. The nature of workplace bullying experienced by teachers and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports on the nature of workplace bullying experienced by teachers in South African schools and the biopsychosocial health effects that may arise from such victimisation. Voluntary victimised teachers who wanted to share their experiences were sampled using a lifestyle magazine and online articles.

  18. Counseling Adult Women Who Experienced Incest in Childhood or Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Christine A.; Watts, Deborah L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the definition and incidence of incest, counseling needs of incest victims, and strategies for working with women who experienced incest in childhood or adolescence. Identifies techniques and resources for individual and group counseling. Suggests counselors expand their knowledge about incest in order to offer appropriate services.…

  19. Persistent Classroom Management Training Needs of Experienced Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stough, Laura M.; Montague, Marcia L.; Landmark, Leena Jo; Williams-Diehm, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    Experienced special education teachers (n = 62) were surveyed on their professional preparation to become effective classroom managers. Despite having received extensive preservice training, over 83% of the sample reported being underprepared in classroom management and behavioral interventions. No statistically significant difference was found…

  20. The Changes in Experienced Teachers' Understanding towards Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersozlu, Alpay; Cayci, Dilara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the views of experienced teachers related to the changes in their understanding of classroom management in general terms until today. In this study according to the information given by teachers, it is expected to contribute to the discussions about the development of classroom management, which is a key to…

  1. Students' Ways of Experiencing Human-Centered Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltowski, Carla B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the qualitatively different ways which students experienced human-centered design. The findings of this research are important in developing effective design learning experiences and have potential impact across design education. This study provides the basis for being able to assess learning of human-centered design which…

  2. Adolescent reports of experiencing gender based violence: findings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although a quarter of perpetrators were strangers, more were known to the victim. Findings suggest that adolescents are experiencing high levels of GBV from those known to them. Hence, there is a need for more accessible options for reporting and supporting adolescents to deal with these experiences, such as social ...

  3. Sources of marital stress experienced by married people as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated sources of marital stress experienced by married people as perceived by lecturers of College of Education. Respondents were stratified into different strata of gender, age group, educational qualification and number of children, after which simple random sampling technique was used for selecting 20 ...

  4. Simulated Citizen: How Students Experienced a Semester Length Legislative Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzler, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    This collective case study contains the results of year-long inquiry into how students experienced a semester length legislative simulation that was rife with political conflict. Specifically the study sought to determine: what teaching strategies were employed, what role conflict played in affecting students' political engagement, and what the…

  5. A look at language problems experienced by children with hearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results revealed that children with hearing impairments experienced communication and language problems at home and at school. They had to learn either Chishona or isiNdebele at home, as well as Zimbabwe Sign Language at school. There is need for the parents and siblings to be taught Zimbabwe Sign ...

  6. TESOL Degree Programs for Experienced English Teachers from Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoof, Maurice

    1970-01-01

    Stated positively, the experienced foreign teacher of English comes to the United States to improve his English teaching abilities. Stated negatively, he comes, more often than not, to retrain rather than expand, to correct faulty language skills and improper or non-productive teaching practices. Identified here are some of the major problem areas…

  7. Experiencing and Verifying what is Felt as Real in Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Torben Kragh

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the criteria by which films and scenes in films are experienced as real and argues that the feeling of realism is not congruent with what is actually real. It discusses how visual salience is one parameter, categorical match another. It argues that formal criteria are unable...

  8. Problems experienced by professional nurses providing care for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to describe the problems experienced by professional nurses providing health care to patients living with HIV and AIDS in the public hospitals of Polokwane municipality, Limpopo province. A qualitative descriptive, contextual and phenomenology design was used to described the problems ...

  9. Perpetrators of sexual harassment experienced by athletes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence in literature and reports showed that both male and female athletes are sexually harassed in their course of participating in sports. The purpose of the study was to find out the perpetrators of sexual harassment experienced by athletes in southern Nigerian universities. A cross-sectional survey design was ...

  10. Children with sickle cell disease who are experiencing psychosocial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Psychiatry • November 2011. 392. Introduction. Sickle cell ... disease and their social environment including the family, is dynamic and fraught with ... Objective: The objective of the study was to identify children with Sickle cell disease (SCD) who are experiencing psychosocial problems concurrently with ...

  11. The nature of workplace bullying experienced by teachers and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2015-08-21

    Aug 21, 2015 ... This article reports on the nature of workplace bullying experienced by teachers in South African schools and the bio- psychosocial health effects .... disciplinary thinking and collaboration when study- ing the interaction between the ..... those participants who felt that their family did not support them (De Vos, ...

  12. Experienced Teachers' Voices: What Motivates Them to Mentor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Ruben; Ramirez, Alfredo, Jr.; Ovando, Martha

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examined 88 experienced teachers' responses related to mentoring. Our findings suggest mentors possess the willingness and expertise to enhance the professional development and growth of a beginning teacher. Mentors were motivated by the opportunity to express an altruistic value, to provide affective support, to grow…

  13. Experiencing the Meaning of Breathing | Edwards | Indo-Pacific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The meaning of breathing is discussed in relation to consciousness, bodiliness, spirituality, illness prevention and health promotion. Experiencing the meaning of breathing is to experience more meaning in life itself. Experiential vignettes confirm that breathing skills may be regarded as an original method of survival, ...

  14. Factors influencing the occupational well-being of experienced nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangping Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: By identifying the factors that contribute to a nurse's occupational well-being, the nursing management is better able to address the nurse's needs to maintain a positive well-being. This in turn will decrease the burnout and increase retention of experienced nurses, which will raise the quality of patient care.

  15. The phenomenon of xenophobia as experienced by immigrant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to describe how xenophobia is experienced by a small selection of immigrant participants in five inner city schools in Johannesburg. The May 2008 xenophobic violence prompted the investigation. Theoretically, the article is also concerned with ways to combat xenophobia in schools with a view to bringing ...

  16. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  17. Uzņēmuma informācijas sistēmas izveide izmantojot atvērtā pirmkoda programmatūru.

    OpenAIRE

    Staškevičs, Braijens

    2015-01-01

    Kvalifikācijas darba “Uzņēmuma informācijas sistēmas izveide izmantojot atvērtā pirmkoda programmatūru” mērķis bija izveidot uzņēmuma SIA “Aerobs” informācijas sistēmu, kurā uzņēmuma darbinieki varētu droši glabāt datus, koplietot tos, bet galvenais - sistēmas izveidē jāizmanto atvērtā pirmkoda programmatūra. Darba gaitā informācijas sistēma tika izveidota izmantojot virtualizāciju, tajā tika iekļauti sekojoši atvērtā pirmkoda risinājumi – Endian, Samba, BackupPC, Zabbix. Mērķi...

  18. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

  19. RegPrecise web services interface: programmatic access to the transcriptional regulatory interactions in bacteria reconstructed by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichkov, Pavel S; Brettin, Thomas S; Novichkova, Elena S; Dehal, Paramvir S; Arkin, Adam P; Dubchak, Inna; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2012-07-01

    Web services application programming interface (API) was developed to provide a programmatic access to the regulatory interactions accumulated in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov), a core resource on transcriptional regulation for the microbial domain of the Department of Energy (DOE) Systems Biology Knowledgebase. RegPrecise captures and visualize regulogs, sets of genes controlled by orthologous regulators in several closely related bacterial genomes, that were reconstructed by comparative genomics. The current release of RegPrecise 2.0 includes >1400 regulogs controlled either by protein transcription factors or by conserved ribonucleic acid regulatory motifs in >250 genomes from 24 taxonomic groups of bacteria. The reference regulons accumulated in RegPrecise can serve as a basis for automatic annotation of regulatory interactions in newly sequenced genomes. The developed API provides an efficient access to the RegPrecise data by a comprehensive set of 14 web service resources. The RegPrecise web services API is freely accessible at http://regprecise.lbl.gov/RegPrecise/services.jsp with no login requirements.

  20. Current Knowledge and Future Research on Infant Feeding in the Context of HIV: Basic, Clinical, Behavioral, and Programmatic Perspectives12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sera L.; Mbuya, Mduduzi N. N.; Chantry, Caroline J.; Geubbels, Eveline P.; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Cohan, Deborah; Vosti, Stephen A.; Latham, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, between 129,000 and 194,000 of the 430,000 pediatric HIV infections worldwide were attributable to breastfeeding. Yet in many settings, the health, economic, and social consequences of not breastfeeding would have dire consequences for many more children. In the first part of this review we provide an overview of current knowledge about infant feeding in the context of HIV. Namely, we describe the benefits and risks of breastmilk, the evolution of recommended infant feeding modalities in high-income and low-income countries in the last two decades, and contextualize the recently revised guidelines for infant feeding in the context of HIV current knowledge. In the second section, we suggest areas for future research on the postnatal prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) in developing and industrialized countries. We suggest two shifts in perspective. The first is to evaluate PMTCT interventions more holistically, to include the psychosocial and economic consequences as well as the biomedical ones. The second shift in perspective should be one that contextualizes postnatal PMTCT efforts in the cascade of maternal health services. We conclude by discussing basic, clinical, behavioral, and programmatic research questions pertaining to a number of PMTCT efforts, including extended postnatal ARV prophylaxis, exclusive breastfeeding promotion, counseling, breast milk pasteurization, breast milk banking, novel techniques for making breast milk safer, and optimal breastfeeding practices. We believe the research efforts outlined here will maximize the number of healthy, thriving, HIV-free children around the world. PMID:22332055

  1. Programmatically Optimized SEM Image Acquisition for Measurement of Contamination on Molybdenum Coated Foils from the NASA Genesis Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, A.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Genesis Mission flew high-purity collector materials on a satellite from 2001-2004 to collect a sample of the solar wind. Upon return to Earth, a spacecraft malfunction caused the onboard sample materials to be severely contaminated during the crash landing in the Utah desert. As part of an ongoing effort to decontaminate the collector materials, they are being scanned with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the amount of dirt and spacecraft debris contaminating the collectors. This effort is underway currently, but we have identified an opportunity to improve the quality of the SEM data collected. At present, many small images are acquired and stitched together to form larger images of Genesis collector pieces, which are then analyzed. The collectors are physically distorted, however, and the imaging method presently used doesn't allow imaging parameters to be adjusted between images to correct for this distortion. In order to improve the quality of the collected imaging, we are developing a program to acquire a focus map of each sample prior to image collection. The program then uses this data to adjust the position of the sample in the SEM to image all sections in focus and at a constant focal length. This is accomplished using the Python programming language, and the programmatic interface built into our Tescan VEGA Scanning Electron Microscope. Our approach, progress to date, and challenges are discussed.

  2. A comprehensive review of the policy and programmatic response to chronic non-communicable disease in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosu, W K

    2012-06-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Ghana have caused significant illness and death in Ghana for many years. Yet, until recently, they have been neglected and not considered a health priority. This paper reviews the national policy and programme response to chronic NCDs over the period 1992 to 2009. Unpublished reports, documents, relevant files of the Ghana Health Service (GHS) were examined to assess programmatic response to chronic NCDs. Literature was searched to locate published articles on the epidemiology of chronic NCDs in Ghana. The websites of various local and international health institutions were also searched for relevant articles. Several policy and programme initiatives have been pursued with limited success. A national control programme has been established, NCDs are currently a national policy priority, draft tobacco control legislation prepared, public education campaigns on healthy lifestyles, instituted cervical cancer screening and a national health insurance system to reducing medical costs of chronic NCD care. Major challenges include inefficient programme management, low funding, little political interest, low community awareness, high cost of drugs and absence of structured screening programmes. Emerging opportunities include improving political will, government's funding of a national cancer screening programme; basic and operational research; and using funds from well-resourced health programmes for overall health system strengthening. Although Ghana has recently determined to emphasise healthy lifestyles and environment as a major health policy for the prevention and control of chronic NCDs, low funding and weak governance have hindered the effective and speedy implementation of proposed interventions.

  3. Current knowledge and future research on infant feeding in the context of HIV: basic, clinical, behavioral, and programmatic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sera L; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Chantry, Caroline J; Geubbels, Eveline P; Israel-Ballard, Kiersten; Cohan, Deborah; Vosti, Stephen A; Latham, Michael C

    2011-05-01

    In 2008, between 129,000 and 194,000 of the 430,000 pediatric HIV infections worldwide were attributable to breastfeeding. Yet in many settings, the health, economic, and social consequences of not breastfeeding would have dire consequences for many more children. In the first part of this review we provide an overview of current knowledge about infant feeding in the context of HIV. Namely, we describe the benefits and risks of breastmilk, the evolution of recommended infant feeding modalities in high-income and low-income countries in the last two decades, and contextualize the recently revised guidelines for infant feeding in the context of HIV current knowledge. In the second section, we suggest areas for future research on the postnatal prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) in developing and industrialized countries. We suggest two shifts in perspective. The first is to evaluate PMTCT interventions more holistically, to include the psychosocial and economic consequences as well as the biomedical ones. The second shift in perspective should be one that contextualizes postnatal PMTCT efforts in the cascade of maternal health services. We conclude by discussing basic, clinical, behavioral, and programmatic research questions pertaining to a number of PMTCT efforts, including extended postnatal ARV prophylaxis, exclusive breastfeeding promotion, counseling, breast milk pasteurization, breast milk banking, novel techniques for making breast milk safer, and optimal breastfeeding practices. We believe the research efforts outlined here will maximize the number of healthy, thriving, HIV-free children around the world.

  4. Experiencing the changing climate on the shores of Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerlof, K.; Maibach, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Great Lakes of the United States - the largest freshwater system in the world - have been termed "the canary in the coal mine" of environmental change. To assess if and how residents of Alger County, Michigan are experiencing changes in climate on the shores of Lake Superior, during the summer of 2010 we conducted a representative household mail survey in collaboration with a national lakeshore and watershed partnership. A total of 765 adult residents (18 years or older) responded to the survey; a 57% survey completion rate. We content analyzed respondents' open-ended characterizations of how they have personally experienced global warming, and compared the results with land surface and storm data for the same geographic region to see whether public perceptions of local changes match trends in National Climatic Data Center data. Just over a quarter of residents (27%) indicated that they had personally experienced global warming. Those who had were most likely to say that they had experienced global warming locally (as opposed to in other locations of the country or globally), and most frequently cited changes in seasons, weather, lake levels, and animals or plant species. However, some local public perceptions appeared to conflict with weather records. For example, residents were more likely to say that they had been experiencing less snow in the winters, while NCDC data suggests the reverse is true. As climate changes differentially in regions across the United States, the public will in turn experience its physical impacts in distinct ways that are unique to each landscape. This may be counter-intuitive to a public that increasingly experiences the world, and issues such as climate change, through sources of information such as national news media that operate at much larger geographic scales. Understanding where these forms of cognitive dissonance may arise may assist researchers, educators, and communicators in furthering discourses with the public about

  5. [Professional Development Processes of Trainee and Experienced Psychotherapists in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilican, F Işıl; Soygüt, Gonca

    2015-01-01

    This study explored professional characteristics of psychotherapists in Turkey, examined the changes in their professional developmental processes, and compared the professional characteristics of the trainees and experienced therapists. The participants were 88 psychotherapists, including trainee (N=37) and experienced (N=51) psychotherapists in Turkey. They completed the Development of Psychotherapists International Study-Common Core Questionnaire (DPCCQ), developed by the Collaborative Research Network. The participants identified with the cognitive theoretical orientation most often. 30% of the participants had more than two salient orientations. The most prevalent therapy modality was individual, followed by couples, family, and group psychotherapy. Ongoing supervision rate was 44%. Trainees scored lower on effectiveness in engaging patients in a working alliance, feeling natural while working with patients, effectiveness in communicating their understanding and concern to their patients, and feeling confident in their role as a therapist. Experienced therapists made changes in the therapeutic contract and invited collaboration from families more compared to the trainees. 63% of the variance in Healing Involvement was explained by Overall Career Development, Currently Experienced Growth, being influenced by the humanistic approach, and the impact of the main therapeutic environment; 26% of the variance in Stressful Involvement was explained by the length of official supervision received and having control over the length of therapy sessions. Therapists were more cognitively oriented, less eclectic, and had less supervision compared to their international counterparts. Experienced therapists were more flexible, natural, and confident than the trainees. Supervision, a supportive work environment, the humanistic approach, and investing in career development were essential to providing a healing experience.

  6. Occupational Violence and Aggression Experienced by Nursing and Caring Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Tracey; Sheehan, Cathy; Donohue, Ross; Cooper, Brian; De Cieri, Helen

    2017-03-01

    To examine the extent and source of occupational violence and aggression (OVA) experienced by nursing and caring professionals. This study also examines the relative contributions of demographic characteristics and workplace and individual safety factors in predicting OVA. A cross-sectional study design with data collected using an online survey of employees in the nursing and caring professions in Victoria, Australia. Survey data collected from 4,891 members of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victorian branch) were analyzed using logistic regression. Sixty-seven percent of respondents reported experiencing OVA in the preceding 12 months, with nearly 20% experiencing OVA on a weekly or daily basis. The dominant sources of OVA were patients (79%) or relatives of patients (48%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that respondents working in public hospitals and aged care facilities were more likely to experience OVA, compared to those working in other workplaces. While higher levels of safety compliance reduced the likelihood of experiencing OVA, role overload and workplace safety factors such as prioritization of employee safety and leading indicators of occupational health and safety were stronger predictors. The likelihood of healthcare workers experiencing OVA varies across demographic and workplace characteristics. While some demographic characteristics and individual safety factors were significant predictors, our results suggest that a greater reduction in OVA could be achieved by improving workplace safety. The study's outcomes identify workforce segments that are most vulnerable to OVA. The study also highlights workplace safety factors such as the prioritization of employee safety that might assist in the reduction of OVA. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. Experiencing aggression in clubs: social group and individual level predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brenda A; Bourdeau, Beth; Johnson, Mark; Voas, Robert

    2015-05-01

    To examine the social drinking group's influence on the individual's experiences of physical or sexual aggression at clubs, data were collected from 368 groups (N = 986 individuals). Both group and individual level indicators were examined for impact on self-reports of physical and sexual aggression experiences while at the club. Recent aggressive experiences and perpetration, concerns for group safety, one's own plans and assessment of other group members' plans to drink to the point of intoxication, and personal characteristics were examined, using both individual and group indicators. At exit, participants reported experiencing physical aggression (12.3 %) and sexual aggression (12.6 %) at the club. Using generalized linear mixed modeling to account for nested data (club, event, and group), group level indicators predicted both the individual's physical and sexual aggression experiences. Especially for experiences of physical aggression, group effects are notable. Being in a group whose members recently experienced physical aggression increased the risk for the individual. Interestingly, groups that had higher levels of planned intoxication decreased risks of experiencing aggression, while a discrepancy in these intentions among group members increased the risks. Group effects were also noted for experiencing sexual aggression. High levels of prior experiences for sexual aggression in the group increased the risks for the individual during the event. Also, being in a group that is identified as having at least one member who is frequently drunk increases the risk for experiencing sexual aggression. These findings inform prevention strategies for young adults engaged in high-risk behaviors by targeting social drinking groups who frequent clubs.

  8. Predictors of experiencing aggression in clubs: Beyond alcohol consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brenda A.; Bourdeau, Beth; Johnson, Mark; Voas, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To examine the social drinking group's influence on the individual's experiences of physical or sexual aggression at clubs, data were collected from 368 groups (N=986 individuals). Both group and individual level indicators were examined for impact on self-reports of physical and sexual aggression experiences while at the club. Recent aggressive experiences and perpetration, concerns for group safety, one's own plans and assessment of other group members' plans to drink to the point of intoxication, and personal characteristics were examined, using both individual and group indicators. At exit, participants reported experiencing physical aggression (12.3%) and sexual aggression (12.6%) at the club. Using generalized linear mixed modeling to account for nested data (club, event, and group), group level indicators predicted both the individual's physical and sexual aggression experiences. Especially for experiences of physical aggression, group effects are notable. Being in a group whose members recently experienced physical aggression, increased the risk for the individual. Interestingly, groups that had higher levels of planned intoxication decreased risks of experiencing aggression, while a discrepancy in these intentions among group members increased the risks. Group effects were also noted for experiencing sexual aggression. High levels of prior experiences for sexual aggression in the group increased the risks for the individual during the event. Also, being in a group that is identified as having at least one member who is frequently drunk, increases the risk for experiencing sexual aggression. These findings inform prevention strategies for young adults engaged in high risk behaviors by targeting social drinking groups who frequent clubs. PMID:24838821

  9. The role of empathy in experiencing vicarious anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jocelyn; Hassell, Samuel; Weber, Jochen; Ochsner, Kevin N; Mobbs, Dean

    2017-08-01

    With depictions of others facing threats common in the media, the experience of vicarious anxiety may be prevalent in the general population. However, the phenomenon of vicarious anxiety-the experience of anxiety in response to observing others expressing anxiety-and the interpersonal mechanisms underlying it have not been fully investigated in prior research. In 4 studies, we investigate the role of empathy in experiencing vicarious anxiety, using film clips depicting target victims facing threats. In Studies 1 and 2, trait emotional empathy was associated with greater self-reported anxiety when observing target victims, and with perceiving greater anxiety to be experienced by the targets. Study 3 extended these findings by demonstrating that trait empathic concern-the tendency to feel concern and compassion for others-was associated with experiencing vicarious anxiety, whereas trait personal distress-the tendency to experience distress in stressful situations-was not. Study 4 manipulated state empathy to establish a causal relationship between empathy and experience of vicarious anxiety. Participants who took an empathic perspective when observing target victims, as compared to those who took an objective perspective using reappraisal-based strategies, reported experiencing greater anxiety, risk-aversion, and sleep disruption the following night. These results highlight the impact of one's social environment on experiencing anxiety, particularly for those who are highly empathic. In addition, these findings have implications for extending basic models of anxiety to incorporate interpersonal processes, understanding the role of empathy in social learning, and potential applications for therapeutic contexts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement, Summary

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Energy

    1995-01-01

    This document analyzes (at a programmatic level) the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. F...

  11. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 3, Part B

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Energy

    1995-01-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For...

  12. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 1, Appendix E

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Energy

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is performing a DOE-wide programmatic evaluation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management alternatives in order to determine the appropriate means of managing existing and projected quantities of SNF from now until the year 2035. At the same time, the DOE is performing a site-specific assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in order to determine how to manage environmental restoration, waste management, and SNF at the INEL. Sites curr...

  13. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 1, Appendix C

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Energy

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decisionmaking processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this tw...

  14. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2, Part B

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Energy

    1995-01-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For...

  15. Do in-car devices affect experienced users' driving performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allert S. Knapper

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Distracted driving is considered to be an important factor in road safety. To investigate how experienced user's driving behaviour is affected by in-vehicle technology, a fixed-base driving simulator was used. 20 participants drove twice in a rich simulated traffic environment while performing secondary, i.e. mobile phone and navigation system tasks. The results show that mean speed was lower in all experimental conditions, compared to baseline driving, while subjective effort increased. Lateral performance deteriorated only during visual–manual tasks, i.e. texting and destination entry, in which the participants glanced off the forward road for a substantial amount of time. Being experienced in manipulating in-car devices does not solve the problem of dual tasking when the primary task is a complex task like driving a moving vehicle. The results and discussion may shed some light on the current debate regarding phone use hazards.

  16. Remembered, read and experienced time in virtual text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raine Koskimaa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-9288.2015v11n1p250 In this article I will scrutinize Screen (2002, by WARDRIP-FRUIN & al., a literary work set and experienced in a CAVE Virtual Reality environment, especially from the perspective of its temporal aspects. There are obvious themes of remembering, forgetting and textually constructing the past in this work, but most notably, Screen emphasizes the temporality of the reading act itself. I will analyze this highly special work in relation to the remembered, read, and bodily experienced time, and thus, attempt to better understand both the notion of fictive time and the temporality of fiction.

  17. Experiencing Physical Pain Leads to More Sympathetic Moral Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qianguo; Zhu, Yi; Luo, Wen-bo

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that observing another’s pain can evoke other-oriented emotions, which instigate empathic concern for another’s needs. It is not clear whether experiencing first-hand physical pain may also evoke other-oriented emotion and thus influence people’s moral judgment. Based on the embodied simulation literature and neuroimaging evidence, the present research tested the idea that participants who experienced physical pain would be more sympathetic in their moral judgments. Study 1 showed that ice-induced physical pain facilitated higher self-assessments of empathy, which motivated participants to be more sympathetic in their moral judgments. Study 2 confirmed findings in study 1 and also showed that State Perspective Taking subscale of the State Empathy Scale mediated the effects of physical pain on moral judgment. These results provide support for embodied view of morality and for the view that pain can serve a positive psychosocial function. PMID:26465603

  18. Expected usability is not a valid indicator of experienced usability

    OpenAIRE

    Meinald T. Thielsch; Ronja Engel; Gerrit Hirschfeld

    2015-01-01

    Usability is a core construct of website evaluation and inherently defined as interactive. Yet, when analysing first impressions of websites, expected usability, i.e., before use, is of interest. Here we investigate to what extend ratings of expected usability are related to (a) experienced usability, i.e., ratings after use, and (b) objective usability measures, i.e., task performance. Furthermore, we try to elucidate how ratings of expected usability are correlated to aesthetic judgments. I...

  19. Experiencing authenticity - the core of student learning in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Katri

    2016-10-01

    Learning in clinical practice is challenging regarding organizational and pedagogical issues. Clinical education wards are one way to meet these challenges by focusing on both patient care and student learning. However, more knowledge is needed about how students' learning can be enhanced and about patients' and supervisors' roles in these settings. The aim was to explore nursing students' learning on a clinical education ward with an explicit pedagogical framework. Semi-structured interviews of students were analyzed using qualitative content analysis and an ethnographic study including observations and follow-up interviews of students, patients and supervisors was conducted. The core of student meaningful learning experiences both external and internal authenticity. Students in early stages immediately created mutual relationships, experienced both external and internal authenticity, and patients became active participants in student learning. Without a mutual relationship, patients passively let students practice on their bodies. Students nearing graduation experienced only external authenticity, creating uncertainty as a threshold for learning. Caring for patients with complex needs helped students overcome the threshold and experience internal authenticity. Supervisors' challenges were to balance patient care and student learning by working as a team. They supported students coping with the complex challenges on the ward. Students need to experience external and internal authenticity to make learning meaningful. Experiencing authenticity, involving meaning-making processes and knowledge construction, is linked to transformative learning and overcoming thresholds. Therefore, an explicit pedagogical framework, based on patient-centredness, peer learning and the supervisory team, creates the prerequisites for experiencing external and internal authenticity.

  20. Which Poor Neighborhoods Experienced Income Growth in Recent Decades?

    OpenAIRE

    Aliprantis, Dionissi; Fee, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Why has average income grown in some poor neighborhoods over the past 30 years and not in others? We explore that question and find that low-income neighborhoods that experienced large improvements in income over the past three decades tended to be located in large, densely populated metro areas that grew in income and population. Residential sorting—changes in population and demographics within neighborhoods—could help to explain this relationship

  1. A STUDY OF EXPERIENCED REALITY OF AUDITORY HALLUCINATIONS IN SCHIZOPHERENICS

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, A.

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY 30 Schizophrenics having verbal auditory hallucinations and satisfying the criteria of Feighner et al. (1972) were examined for the experienced reality of auditory hallucinations and the influence of certain variables on such reality. Number of hallucinating days per month, fast movement of time during hallucination, presence of running commentary voices, interference in self-care and social activities due to the Voices and degree of success in manipulation and avoidance (coping theme...

  2. A successful programmatic structure and strategies to attract and educate students in earth and environmental sciences: an example from the University of Delaware, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levia, Delphis

    2013-04-01

    The achievement of sustainable use of our natural world is one of the major issues confronting humankind today. Environmental issues are inherently complex and difficult to resolve. Successful resolution of our most pressing environmental problems, such as climate change and ocean acidification, will require well-trained earth and environmental scientists that think critically in a multi-dimensional framework at variable spatial and temporal scales. This begs the question as to how we can both attract and successfully educate students in such a way that will permit them to tackle the multitude of environmental problems currently facing society. This poster details one way to successfully attract and train students in an interdisciplinary environmental education framework by sharing: (1) some of the successful strategies and programmatic structure of the University of Delaware's undergraduate environmental programs that have grown over 60% in two years after a major programmatic revision; and (2) the current round of programmatic revisions that will complete the strategic planning process.* The interdisciplinary environmental education program at the University of Delaware has a strong programmatic core that provides students with the requisite quantitative training and field experience to solve complicated environmental issues. At the same time, the environmental program includes the social, political, and economic contexts of environmental issues. Together, these two parts of the core best equip students to mitigate environmental problems. Following a strategic planning effort, the University of Delaware is building upon past successes in training environmental scientists and managers by further reformulating its environmental programs to leverage the power of theme-based learning which complements the programmatic core in such a way to teach problem-solving skills. This poster details the multidimensional nature of the University of Delaware's environmental

  3. Iranian EFL Experienced vs. Novice Teachers’ Beliefs Regarding Learner Autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Bashiri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Learner autonomy has been described as the ultimate objective in many language teaching programs since the third quarter of the twentieth century and educators have highlighted the significant role of promoting learner autonomy in the process of language learning and teaching. However, only limited number of studies has been awarded to what leaner autonomy mean to teachers. This study addressed the gap and investigated novice and experienced teachers’ beliefs regarding learner autonomy. Forty teachers participated in two groups who were grouped based on their teaching experiences as novice and experienced teachers. A questionnaire which was adapted from British Council was administered to elicit the teachers’ beliefs regarding learner autonomy. The independent samples t-test analysis of the data revealed a significant difference between novice and experienced teachers beliefs. The findings of the present study may have some implications for teachers in promoting learner autonomy in their classes, in general, and involving learners in the process of teaching and learning, in particular.

  4. Experienced Barriers to Lean in Swedish Manufacturing and Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt Halling

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to compare similarities and divergences in how the concepts of Lean and barriers to Lean are described by key informants at a production unit in a large manufacturing company and two emergency health care units in Sweden. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews and analyzed with the constant comparative method (CCM and Porras and Robertson’s (1992 change model. : In both organizations, the view of Lean changed from a toolbox to a human behavior view. Eight barriers were experienced in both organizations. Three barriers were unique to manufacturing or to health care, respectively. Nine barriers were elements of social factors; five were elements of organizing arrangements. Only people practically involved and responsible for the implementation at the two organizations participated in the study. Persons responsible for implementing Lean should consider organizational arrangements and social factors in order to limit barriers to successful implementation. Most research on Lean has been about successful Lean implementations. This study focuses on how Lean is viewed and what barriers personnel in manufacturing and health care have experienced. In comparing the barriers to Lean experienced in the two groups, common, archetypical, and unique barriers for manufacturing and health care can be identified, thus contributing to knowledge about barriers to Lean implementation.

  5. Meaning in life in psychotherapy: The perspective of experienced psychotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E; Kanazawa, Yoshi; Knox, Sarah; Schauerman, Iris; Loureiro, Darren; James, Danielle; Carter, Imani; King, Shakeena; Razzak, Suad; Scarff, Melanie; Moore, Jasmine

    2017-07-01

    Our goal was to explore the meaning experienced psychotherapists derive from providing psychotherapy, their beliefs about the role of meaning in life (MIL) in psychotherapy, how they worked with MIL with a client who explicitly presented concerns about MIL, and how they worked with a different client for whom MIL was a secondary and more implicit concern. Thirteen experienced psychotherapists were interviewed and data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research. Therapists derived self-oriented meaning (e.g., feeling gratified, fulfilled, connected) and other-oriented meaning (helping others, making the world a better place) from providing psychotherapy. They believed that MIL is fundamental and underlies all human concerns, including those brought to therapy. In contrast to the clients who had implicit MIL concerns, clients who explicitly presented MIL concerns were reported to have more interpersonal problems and physical problems, but about the same amount of psychological distress and loss/grief. Therapists used insight-oriented interventions, support, action-oriented interventions, and exploratory interventions to work with MIL with both types of clients, but used more exploratory interventions with implicit than explicit MIL clients. MIL is a salient topic for experienced, existentially oriented psychotherapists; they work with MIL extensively with some clients in psychotherapy. We recommend that therapists receive training to work with MIL in therapy, and that they pay attention to MIL concerns when they conduct psychotherapy. We also recommend additional research on MIL in psychotherapy.

  6. Using the World Health Organization Measles Programmatic Risk Assessment Tool for Monitoring of Supplemental Immunization Activities in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducusin, Maria Joyce U; de Quiroz-Castro, Maricel; Roesel, Sigrun; Garcia, Luzviminda C; Cecilio-Elfa, Dulce; Schluter, W William; Goodson, James L; Lam, Eugene

    2017-06-01

    In 2012, the World Health Organization Regional Committee for the Western Pacific Region (WPR) reaffirmed its commitment to eliminate measles and urged WPR member states to interrupt endemic measles virus transmission as rapidly as possible. In 2013, a large measles outbreak occurred in the Philippines despite implementation of measles elimination strategies including a nationwide supplemental immunization activity (SIA) in 2011 using measles- and rubella-containing vaccine and targeting children aged nine months to seven years. To prevent future measles outbreaks a new tool was developed to assess district-level risk for measles outbreaks, based on the WPR polio risk assessment tool previously applied in the Philippines. Risk was assessed as a function of combined indicator scores from four data input categories: population immunity, surveillance quality, program performance, and threat assessment. On the basis of the overall score, the tool assigned each district a risk category of low, medium, high, or very high. Of the 122 districts and highly urbanized cities in the Philippines, 58 (48%) were classified as high risk or very high risk, including the district of the Metro Manila area and Region 4A where the outbreak began in 2013. Risk assessment results were used to guide the monitoring and supervision during the nationwide SIA conducted in 2014. The initial tool drafted in the Philippines served as a template for development of the global risk assessment tool. Regular annual measles programmatic risk assessments can be used to help plan risk mitigation activities and measure progress toward measles elimination. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  7. Modelling the elimination of river blindness using long-term epidemiological and programmatic data from Mali and Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Walker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The onchocerciasis transmission models EPIONCHO and ONCHOSIM have been independently developed and used to explore the feasibility of eliminating onchocerciasis from Africa with mass (annual or biannual distribution of ivermectin within the timeframes proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO and endorsed by the 2012 London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases (i.e. by 2020/2025. Based on the findings of our previous model comparison, we implemented technical refinements and tested the projections of EPIONCHO and ONCHOSIM against long-term epidemiological data from two West African transmission foci in Mali and Senegal where the observed prevalence of infection was brought to zero circa 2007–2009 after 15–17 years of mass ivermectin treatment. We simulated these interventions using programmatic information on the frequency and coverage of mass treatments and trained the model projections using longitudinal parasitological data from 27 communities, evaluating the projected outcome of elimination (local parasite extinction or resurgence. We found that EPIONCHO and ONCHOSIM captured adequately the epidemiological trends during mass treatment but that resurgence, while never predicted by ONCHOSIM, was predicted by EPIONCHO in some communities with the highest (inferred vector biting rates and associated pre-intervention endemicities. Resurgence can be extremely protracted such that low (microfilarial prevalence between 1% and 5% can be maintained for 3–5 years before manifesting more prominently. We highlight that post-treatment and post-elimination surveillance protocols must be implemented for long enough and with high enough sensitivity to detect possible residual latent infections potentially indicative of resurgence. We also discuss uncertainty and differences between EPIONCHO and ONCHOSIM projections, the potential importance of vector control in high-transmission settings as a complementary intervention strategy, and the

  8. Physicians Experiencing Intense Emotions While Seeing Their Patients: What Happens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Joana Vilela Da; Carvalho, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Physicians often deal with emotions arising from both patients and themselves; however, management of intense emotions when they arise in the presence of patients is overlooked in research. The aim of this study is to inspect physicians' intense emotions in this context, how these emotions are displayed, coping strategies used, adjustment behaviors, and the impact of the emotional reactions on the physician-patient relationship. A total of 127 physicians completed a self-report survey, built from a literature review. Participants were recruited in 3 different ways: through a snowball sampling procedure, via institutional e-mails, and in person during service meetings. Fifty-two physicians (43.0%) reported experiencing intense emotions frequently. Although most physicians (88.6%) tried to control their reactions, several reported not controlling themselves. Coping strategies to deal with the emotion at the moment included behavioral and cognitive approaches. Only the type of reaction (but not the emotion's valence, duration, relative control, or coping strategies used) seemed to affect the physician-patient relationship. Choking-up/crying, touching, smiling, and providing support were significantly associated with an immediate positive impact. Withdrawing from the situation, imposing, and defending oneself were associated with a negative impact. Some reactions also had an extended impact into future interactions. Experiencing intense emotions in the presence of patients was frequent among physicians, and the type of reaction affected the clinical relationship. Because many physicians reported experiencing long-lasting emotions, these may have important clinical implications for patients visiting physicians while these emotions last. Further studies are needed to clarify these results.

  9. Caffeine Improves Basketball Performance in Experienced Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Puente

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine intake on overall basketball performance in experienced players. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized experimental design was used for this investigation. In two different sessions separated by one week, 20 experienced basketball players ingested 3 mg of caffeine/kg of body mass or a placebo. After 60 min, participants performed 10 repetitions of the following sequence: Abalakov jump, Change-of-Direction and Acceleration Test (CODAT and two free throws. Later, heart rate, body impacts and game statistics were recorded during a 20-min simulated basketball game. In comparison to the placebo, the ingestion of caffeine increased mean jump height (37.3 ± 6.8 vs. 38.2 ± 7.4 cm; p = 0.012, but did not change mean time in the CODAT test or accuracy in free throws. During the simulated game, caffeine increased the number of body impacts (396 ± 43 vs. 410 ± 41 impacts/min; p < 0.001 without modifying mean or peak heart rate. Caffeine also increased the performance index rating (7.2 ± 8.6 vs. 10.6 ± 7.1; p = 0.037 during the game. Nevertheless, players showed a higher prevalence of insomnia (19.0 vs. 54.4%; p = 0.041 after the game. Three mg of caffeine per kg of body mass could be an effective ergogenic substance to increase physical performance and overall success in experienced basketball players.

  10. Caffeine Improves Basketball Performance in Experienced Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Carlos; Abián-Vicén, Javier; Salinero, Juan José; Lara, Beatriz; Areces, Francisco; Del Coso, Juan

    2017-09-19

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine intake on overall basketball performance in experienced players. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized experimental design was used for this investigation. In two different sessions separated by one week, 20 experienced basketball players ingested 3 mg of caffeine/kg of body mass or a placebo. After 60 min, participants performed 10 repetitions of the following sequence: Abalakov jump, Change-of-Direction and Acceleration Test (CODAT) and two free throws. Later, heart rate, body impacts and game statistics were recorded during a 20-min simulated basketball game. In comparison to the placebo, the ingestion of caffeine increased mean jump height (37.3 ± 6.8 vs. 38.2 ± 7.4 cm; p = 0.012), but did not change mean time in the CODAT test or accuracy in free throws. During the simulated game, caffeine increased the number of body impacts (396 ± 43 vs. 410 ± 41 impacts/min; p < 0.001) without modifying mean or peak heart rate. Caffeine also increased the performance index rating (7.2 ± 8.6 vs. 10.6 ± 7.1; p = 0.037) during the game. Nevertheless, players showed a higher prevalence of insomnia (19.0 vs. 54.4%; p = 0.041) after the game. Three mg of caffeine per kg of body mass could be an effective ergogenic substance to increase physical performance and overall success in experienced basketball players.

  11. Financial Hardships Experienced by Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altice, Cheryl K; Banegas, Matthew P; Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D; Yabroff, K Robin

    2017-02-01

    With rising cancer care costs, including high-priced cancer drugs, financial hardship is increasingly documented among cancer survivors in the United States; research findings have not been synthesized. We conducted a systematic review of articles published between 1990 and 2015 describing the financial hardship experienced by cancer survivors using PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and CINAHL databases. We categorized measures of financial hardship into: material conditions (eg, out-of-pocket costs, productivity loss, medical debt, or bankruptcy), psychological responses (eg, distress or worry), and coping behaviors (eg, skipped medications). We abstracted findings and conducted a qualitative synthesis. Among 676 studies identified, 45 met the inclusion criteria and were incorporated in the review. The majority of the studies (82%, n = 37) reported financial hardship as a material condition measure; others reported psychological (7%, n = 3) and behavioral measures (16%, n = 7). Financial hardship measures were heterogeneous within each broad category, and the prevalence of financial hardship varied by the measure used and population studied. Mean annual productivity loss ranged from $380 to $8236, 12% to 62% of survivors reported being in debt because of their treatment, 47% to 49% of survivors reported experiencing some form of financial distress, and 4% to 45% of survivors did not adhere to recommended prescription medication because of cost. Financial hardship is common among cancer survivors, although we found substantial heterogeneity in its prevalence. Our findings highlight the need for consistent use of definitions, terms, and measures to determine the best intervention targets and inform intervention development in order to prevent and minimize the impact of financial hardship experienced by cancer survivors. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Workplace aggression experienced by frontline staff in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Anne-Marie; Squires, Janet E; Mitchell, Agnes; Sales, Anne E; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2012-05-01

    To describe the frequency of aggressive acts experienced by frontline staff working in two models of dementia care: Residential Alzheimer's Care Centers and Secured Dementia Units and to explore the associations between aggressive acts experienced by frontline staff and factors related to the work context and care providers. Aggression towards healthcare providers in residential long-term care settings is well documented. However, few studies have examined associations between aggressive behaviours towards care providers and organisational factors. A cross-sectional survey. The survey included demographic items and questions about aggressive acts experienced by staff and contextual factors. Analyses included: (1) descriptive statistics, (2) tests of difference (i.e. Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test, chi-squared test and anova), (3) bivariate associations (i.e. Pearson and Spearman rank order correlations) and (4) multivariate linear regression. Ninety-one health care aides and licensed practical nurses working in four nursing units using two models of dementia care participated (response rate 81%). The most frequently reported types of aggression were physical assault (50% of staff, n = 45) and emotional abuse (48% of staff, n = 44). Aggressive acts were significantly associated with working in Secured Dementia Units rather than Residential Alzheimer's Care Centers. Frontline staff working in Secured Dementia Units were exposed to higher frequencies of various types of aggressive acts mainly initiated by residents. Future research needs to explore modifiable workplace factors associated with aggressive acts in a larger sample across a variety of long-term care settings. To prevent staff perceived aggressive acts, leaders and managers in dementia care need to acknowledge the complex topic of workplace aggression and encourage an open discussion among frontline staff without assigning blame. Care provider strategies for dealing with aggressive behaviour have to

  13. Subjective expansion of extended time-spans in experienced meditators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eWittmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experienced meditators typically report that they experience time slowing down in meditation practise as well as in everyday life. Conceptually this phenomenon may be understood through functional states of mindfulness, i.e. by attention regulation, body awareness, emotion regulation, and enhanced memory. However, hardly any systematic empirical work exists regarding the experience of time in meditators. In the current cross-sectional study, we investigated whether 42 experienced mindfulness meditation practitioners (with on average 10 years of experience showed differences in the experience of time as compared to 42 controls without any meditation experience matched for age, sex and education. The perception of time was assessed with a battery of psychophysical tasks assessing the accuracy of prospective time judgments in duration discrimination, duration reproduction and time estimation in the milliseconds to minutes range as well with several psychometric instruments related to subjective time such as the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, the Barrett Impulsivity Scale and the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory. In addition, subjective time judgments on the current passage of time and retrospective time ranges were assessed. While subjective judgements of time were found to be significantly different between the two groups on several scales, no differences in duration estimates in the psychophysical tasks were detected. Regarding subjective time, mindfulness meditators experienced less time pressure, more time dilation, and a general slower passage of time. Moreover, they felt that the last week and the last month passed more slowly. Overall, although no intergroup differences in psychophysical tasks were detected, the reported findings demonstrate a close association between mindfulness meditation and the subjective feeling of the passage of time captured by psychometric instruments.

  14. Non-technical skills of surgical trainees and experienced surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, H; Marlow, N; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P J; Kiermeier, A; Babidge, W; Altree, M; Pena, G; Maddern, G

    2017-05-01

    In addition to technical expertise, surgical competence requires effective non-technical skills to ensure patient safety and maintenance of standards. Recently the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons implemented a new Surgical Education and Training (SET) curriculum that incorporated non-technical skills considered essential for a competent surgeon. This study sought to compare the non-technical skills of experienced surgeons who completed their training before the introduction of SET with the non-technical skills of more recent trainees. Surgical trainees and experienced surgeons undertook a simulated scenario designed to challenge their non-technical skills. Scenarios were video recorded and participants were assessed using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) scoring system. Participants were divided into subgroups according to years of experience and their NOTSS scores were compared. For most NOTSS elements, mean scores increased initially, peaking around the time of Fellowship, before decreasing roughly linearly over time. There was a significant downward trend in score with increasing years since being awarded Fellowship for six of the 12 NOTSS elements: considering options (score -0·015 units per year), implementing and reviewing decisions (-0·020 per year), establishing a shared understanding (-0·014 per year), setting and maintaining standards (-0·024 per year), supporting others (-0·031 per year) and coping with pressure (-0·015 per year). The drop in NOTSS score was unexpected and highlights that even experienced surgeons are not immune to deficiencies in non-technical skills. Consideration should be given to continuing professional development programmes focusing on non-technical skills, regardless of the level of professional experience. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Stigma Perceived and Experienced by Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulla Møller; Willaing, Ingrid; Ventura, Adriana D

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to (a) culturally and linguistically adapt the Type 1 Diabetes Stigma Assessment Scale (DSAS-1) from English (for Australia) into Danish and (b) examine psychometric properties of the measure among Danish adults with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: We performed a forward......-backward translation, face validity interviews with experts and cognitive debriefing of the Danish version (DSAS-1 DK) with ten adults from the target group. The DSAS-1 DK was then completed by 1594 adults with type 1 diabetes. Electronic clinical records provided age, diabetes duration, diabetes-related complications...... to advance research into the stigma perceived and experienced by adults with type 1 diabetes in a Danish context....

  16. Students' ways of experiencing human-centered design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoltowski, Carla B.

    This study investigated the qualitatively different ways which students experienced human-centered design. The findings of this research are important in developing effective design learning experiences and have potential impact across design education. This study provides the basis for being able to assess learning of human-centered design which will allow educational programs to determine their impact, and what aspects are most effective. Because the object of study was the variation of students' experiences human-centered design, a phenomenographic framework was used to guide the methodology of the study. The literature and research on service-learning and human-centered design informed the construction of the phenomenographic study and also provided ways to interpret the data and situate the results. Thirty-three student designers from a variety of academic contexts were interviewed using a semi-structured, open-ended approach in which they discussed concrete experiences "designing for others", and reflections and meanings associated with those experiences. Analysis of the data yielded seven qualitatively different ways in which the students experienced human-centered design, or categories of description. Logically related, the seven categories of description formed an outcome space that was two-dimensional with distinct, but not independent, axes. The critical differences among the categories provided the basis for developing their hierarchical relationship. Five of the categories were nested hierarchically. From less comprehensive to more comprehensive, those categories included: Human-centered design as "User as Information Source Input to Linear Process", "Keep Users' Needs in Mind", "Design in Context", "Commitment" and "Empathic Design". Two categories represented ways of experiencing human-centered design that were distinct: design was not human-centered, but "Technology-Centered" and human-centered design was not design, but "Service". In addition, this

  17. Experiencing mathematics what do we do, when we do mathematics?

    CERN Document Server

    Hersh, Reuben

    2014-01-01

    The question "What am I doing?" haunts many creative people, researchers, and teachers. Mathematics, poetry, and philosophy can look from the outside sometimes as ballet en pointe, and at other times as the flight of the bumblebee. Reuben Hersh looks at mathematics from the inside; he collects his papers written over several decades, their edited versions, and new chapters in his book Experiencing Mathematics, which is practical, philosophical, and in some places as intensely personal as Swann's madeleine. -Yuri Manin, Max Planck Institute, Bonn, Germany What happens when mid-career a mathemat

  18. Suicide risk and protective factors among youth experiencing school difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Elaine; Eggert, Leona L

    2007-10-01

    Youth who experience difficulty in school are at risk for suicide, yet there is little published information specific to risk and protective factors among this group. The purpose of this study was to conduct an in-depth examination of risk and protective factors associated with suicidal behaviour among youth who were experiencing problems in school and to compare these factors between suicide risk and non-suicide risk subgroups. Participants were 730 high school students in the Northwest and Southwest regions of the United States, aged 14-21 years. All participants were known to be experiencing difficulty with grades and/or attendance. Students completed a paper-and-pencil questionnaire and a one-on-one interview, which assessed suicidal behaviours as well as risk factors (e.g. drug involvement, emotional distress, stress), and protective factors (e.g. self-esteem, coping, support). Analysis of covariance tests, controlling for age and sex, were conducted to examine differences between the suicide risk and non-suicide risk groups on each risk and protective factor. The suicide risk subgroup reported higher levels of all risk factors, except alcohol and marijuana use, and lower levels of protective factors. While the groups did not differ on frequency of alcohol or marijuana use, they did differ on other illicit drug use and consequences of alcohol and other illicit drug use. Recommendations for nurses practising in school settings are discussed.

  19. Stress and health in novice and experienced nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Cristobal; Navia-Osorio, Pilar Martínez; Diaz, Carmen Vacas

    2010-02-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to identify the differences in novice and experienced nursing students' reports of stress and health. Stress from clinical practice and its impact are international yet culturally mediated phenomena. Nursing students are under considerable stress during clinical practice periods, putting their education and health at risk. However, there is little or no empirical evidence about the stress suffered by nursing students and its impact on their health throughout clinical practice. We performed cross-sectional research using standard information gathering tools. This study was carried out with 357 students from all 3 years of a nursing diploma programme at a Spanish nursing college (71% response rate). The data were collected over an 8-month period in 2004-2005. We identified three types of stressors (clinical, academic and external) and two categories of symptoms (physiological and psychological) linked to clinical practice. Factor analysis identified six major sources of stress and six important symptoms. Students perceived clinical stressors more intensely than academic and external stressors, and showed psychological symptoms more frequently than physiological symptoms. Nursing students from all 3 years perceived moderate stress at similar levels. Experienced students perceived more academic stressors than novices. Although the students were healthy, second year students were the most vulnerable to somatic and psychic anxiety, and common symptoms. We suggest informing students about possible stressors associated with their profession, and introducing interventions to support development of professionalism, social skills and coping capacity for clinical practice.

  20. Ambiguous Loss Experienced by Transnational Mexican Immigrant Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, Catherine; Zaid, Samantha; Ballard, Jaime

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an ambiguous loss framework as described by Boss (1999, Ambiguous loss: Learning to live with unresolved grief, First Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA) was used to examine and understand the family experiences of Mexican immigrant agricultural workers in Minnesota. Transcripts from interviews with 17 workers in Minnesota and 17 family members in Mexico were analyzed using qualitative methodology to identify experiences of ambiguous loss in the participants' narratives. Key dimensions of ambiguous loss identified in the transcripts include: psychological family, feelings of chronic/recurring loss, finding support, and meaning making. In the category of psychological family, participants in both Mexico and the United States mourned the physical absence of their family members and experienced ambiguity regarding family responsibilities, but worked to maintain their psychological roles within the family. In the category of chronic/recurring loss, participants in both countries experienced chronic worry from not knowing if family members were safe, ambiguity regarding when the immigrant would return, and chronic stressors that compounded these feelings of loss. Participants in both countries coped with both real and ambiguous losses by accessing family support and by using ambiguous communication to minimize worry. Participants in Mexico also accessed work and community-based support. Participants in both countries made meaning of the ambiguous loss by identifying ways their lives were improved and goals were met as a result of the immigration for agricultural work in Minnesota. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  1. Caffeine Improves Basketball Performance in Experienced Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Carlos; Areces, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine intake on overall basketball performance in experienced players. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized experimental design was used for this investigation. In two different sessions separated by one week, 20 experienced basketball players ingested 3 mg of caffeine/kg of body mass or a placebo. After 60 min, participants performed 10 repetitions of the following sequence: Abalakov jump, Change-of-Direction and Acceleration Test (CODAT) and two free throws. Later, heart rate, body impacts and game statistics were recorded during a 20-min simulated basketball game. In comparison to the placebo, the ingestion of caffeine increased mean jump height (37.3 ± 6.8 vs. 38.2 ± 7.4 cm; p = 0.012), but did not change mean time in the CODAT test or accuracy in free throws. During the simulated game, caffeine increased the number of body impacts (396 ± 43 vs. 410 ± 41 impacts/min; p basketball players. PMID:28925969

  2. Mammalian ranges are experiencing erosion of natural darkness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, James P.; Bennie, Jonathan; Durán, América P.; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2015-07-01

    The continuous increase in the intensity and extent of anthropogenic artificial light has significantly shaped Earth’s nighttime environment. This environmental change has effects across the natural world, with consequences for organismal physiology and behaviour and the abundances and distributions of species. Here, we evaluate for the first time the relations between the spatio-temporal patterns of anthropogenic nighttime light and the distribution of terrestrial mammals, one of the most endangered species groups and one that expresses varying time partitioning strategies. Using descriptive statistics, trend tests and spatial prioritization analysis we show that in most places on earth there is a terrestrial mammal species whose range is experiencing detectable artificial light. For most species this tends only to be for small parts of their range, and those affected across large parts are typically rare. Over time (1992-2012), an increase in mean light intensity was found for the ranges of the majority of species, with very few experiencing a decrease. Moreover, nocturnal species are more likely to experience an increase in light within their ranges. This is of conservation concern as many terrestrial mammals are nocturnal and therefore often particularly vulnerable to a pressure such as artificial light at night.

  3. Experiencing a natural disaster alters children's altruistic giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiyuan; Li, Hong; Decety, Jean; Lee, Kang

    2013-09-01

    Altruism is thought to be a major contributor to the development of large-scale human societies. However, much of the evidence supporting this belief comes from individuals living in pacific and often affluent environments. It is entirely unknown whether humans act altruistically when facing adversity. Adversity is arguably a common human experience (as manifested in, e.g., personal tragedies, political upheavals, and natural disasters). In the research reported here, we found that experiencing a natural disaster affected children's altruistic giving. Immediately after witnessing devastations caused by a major earthquake, 9-year-olds became more altruistic. In addition, the more empathic they were, the more they gave. In contrast, experiencing a major earthquake caused 6-year-olds to be more selfish. Three years after the earthquake, children's altruistic tendencies returned to pre-earthquake levels, which suggests that changes in children's altruistic giving are an acute response to the immediate aftermath of a major natural disaster. These findings suggest that environmental insults and empathy play crucial roles in human altruism.

  4. Quantification of experienced hearing problems with item response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenault, Michelene; Berger, Martijn; Kremer, Bernd; Anteunis, Lucien

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the effectiveness of adult hearing screens and demonstrate that interventions assessment methods are needed that address the individual's experienced hearing. Item response theory, which provides a methodology for assessing patient-reported outcomes, is examined here to demonstrate its usefulness in hearing screens and interventions. The graded response model is applied to a scale of 11 items assessing perceived hearing functioning and 10 items assessing experienced social limitations completed by a sample of 212 persons age 55+ years. Fixed and variable slope models are compared. Discrimination and threshold parameters are estimated and information functions evaluated. Variable slope models for both scales provided the best fit. The estimated discrimination parameters for all items except for one in each scale were good if not excellent (1.5-3.4). Threshold values varied, demonstrating the complementary and supplementary value of items within a scale. The information provided by each item varies relative to trait values so that each scale of items provides information over a wider range of trait values. Item response theory methodology facilitates the comparison of items relative to their discriminative ability and information provided and thus provides a basis for the selection of items for application in a screening setting.

  5. Transmission of vocational skills between experienced and new hospital workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, Jeanne; Gaudart, Corinne; Cloutier, Esther; Volkoff, Serge

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study currently underway looking at the transmission of vocational skills between health care workers in a French hospital. The aim was to show that health care workers, in addition to their work with patients, also have to incorporate the transmission of vocational skills into their daily activities. Thirteen transmission situations were observed and analyzed by means of an activity-focused ergonomic work analysis, with the aim of reporting on this "invisible work". The population studied was composed of nurses and the nursing assistants from three different units in one hospital. The results show that the work required to integrate and supervise new staff members is left to the discretion of health care workers. This means they are constantly required to arbitrate on both an individual and collective basis between providing health care for patients and supporting new members of staff. The content of the transmission goes beyond the prescribed tasks and technical knowledge, as staff members also pass on their professional strategies (individual and collective), rules of practice and ethical considerations. Supervising students also offers experienced workers the opportunity to share their professional practices. This study highlights the issues arising from this transmission activity for the experienced workers, new workers, patients and the hospital.

  6. Programmatic Constraints on Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkkonen, Eric H.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses obstacles to interdisciplinary training of sociology and history students. Argues that a single graduate social science history seminar, as has been proposed, will have little impact because of the culture of the professions involved and the fiscal politics of scholarship. Contends that the intellectual division of labor produces…

  7. Superfund Programmatic Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes an inventory of program policy and guidance documents that are used by the EPA regions, states, tribes and private parties to implement the...

  8. Toward Integral Higher Education Study Programs in the European Higher Education Area: A Programmatic and Strategic View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Molz

    2009-12-01

    of higher education.This essay is programmatic and thus deliberately combines facts and values, past andfuture, summaries of first person observations and third person factual information,without the burden of systematic referencing required by scholarly writing. It does notclaim to replace empirical surveys which, however, are still lacking to date regarding theactual state of affairs of higher education inspired by integral and likeminded approachesin Europe. Accordingly, at this stage, the essay is an exercise of awareness-raising tostimulate more and better collaboration across streams, disciplines and countries betweenthose scholars, students and activists who are already inspired by integral and likeminded approaches and interested or already engaged in developing and sustaining highereducation programs according to a more integral spirit.

  9. Experiencing the Implementation of New Inquiry Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ower, Peter S.

    Using a phenomenological methodology, a cohort of four experienced science teachers was interviewed about their experience transitioning from traditional, teacher and fact-centered science curricula to inquiry-based curricula. Each teacher participated in two interviews that focused on their teaching backgrounds, their experience teaching the prior traditional curriculum, and their experience teaching the new inquiry-based curriculum. The findings are presented as a narrative of each teachers' experience with the new curriculum implementation. Analyzing the data revealed four key themes. 1) The teachers felt trapped by the old curriculum as it did not align with their positive views of teaching science through inquiry. 2) The teachers found a way to fit their beliefs and values into the old and new curriculum. This required changes to the curriculum. 3) The teachers attempted to make the science curriculum as meaningful as possible for their students. 4) The teachers experienced a balancing act between their beliefs and values and the various aspects of the curriculum. The revealed essence of the curriculum transition is one of freedom and reconciliation of their beliefs. The teachers experienced the implementation of the new curriculum as a way to ensure their values and beliefs of science education were embedded therein. They treated the new curriculum as a malleable structure to impart their grander ideas of science education (e.g. providing important skills for future careers, creating a sense of wonder, future problem solving) to the students. Their changes were aligned with the philosophy of the curriculum kits they were implementing. Thus, the fidelity of the curriculum's philosophy was not at risk even though the curriculum kits were not taught as written. This study showed that phenomenological methods are able to reveal the relationship between a teacher's prior experiences, values and beliefs and their current instructional philosophy in science

  10. Postpartum depression among women who have experienced intimate partner violence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogathi, Jane J.; Manongi, Rachael; Mushi, Declare

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Post-partum depression (PPD) in many low-income countries, including Tanzania, is not well recognized, and the underlying predictors and causes of PPD remain unclear. Results from previous studies suggest that PPD is associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) experienced during...... gestation attending antenatal clinics in two primary level health facilities. Women were interviewed at four time points: 1) Socio-demographic and reproductive health characteristics were assessed at recruitment; 2) At 34 weeks gestational age we screened for depression using the Edinburgh Postpartum...... Depression Scale (EPDS) and self-reported IPV experiences were assessed using structured questions adopted from the WHO's Multi-country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence; 3) Assessment for postpartum depression using EPDS was repeated at 40 days post-partum. Data were analyzed using bivariate...

  11. Suddenly included: cultural differences in experiencing re-inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfundmair, Michaela; Graupmann, Verena; Du, Hongfei; Frey, Dieter; Aydin, Nilüfer

    2015-03-01

    In the current research, we examined whether re-inclusion (i.e. the change from a previous state of exclusion to a new state of inclusion) was perceived differently by people with individualistic and collectivistic cultural backgrounds. Individualists (German and Austrian participants) but not collectivists (Chinese participants) experienced re-inclusion differently than continued inclusion: While collectivistic participants did not differentiate between both kinds of inclusion, individualistic participants showed reduced fulfilment of their psychological needs under re-inclusion compared to continued inclusion. The results moreover revealed that only participants from individualistic cultures expressed more feelings of exclusion when re-included than when continually included. These exclusionary feelings partially mediated the relationship between the different states of inclusion and basic need fulfilment. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  12. Public service: Experienced nurses' views on social and civic responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Joan M; Beal, Judy A

    2010-01-01

    Socially engaged nurses participate in public service because of their strong sense of civic and social responsibility. Public service within the profession of nursing has a historical mandate but is not well described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to describe how experienced nurses contribute nursing knowledge in public service, rationale for their service, and types of service activities. This article reports on a subset of data from a larger qualitative study exploring the meaning of scholarly nursing practice within the practice setting. Thirty-six nurses were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The major finding of this study is that all participants fully embraced the concept of public service as an integral component of their professional identity. Data were organized around the themes of what participants did in their public service and why they did it. Participants viewed public service as their responsibility as a professional nurse. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Violence Experienced By Nursing Students in Clinical Practice Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem KÜRTÜNCÜ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was made to determine violence experienced by nurse students in clinical settings. It was applied to the School of Health Nursing Student of a university during a week in June, 2010. There were 360 students, 53 of whom were senior, 60 of whom were thirdyear, 114 of whom were sophomore, 79 of whom were first-year and 102 of whom were prep-school students, at the school. Students in preparatory classes were not included in the scope of the study since they didn't take applied courses. 70,58% of the students were reached. It was determined that the students were often exposed to verbal abuse and sexism in clinical setting and the abuse was performed by their colleagues.

  14. Andragogy of everyday – Learning by experiencing death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nives Ličen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The death is rite de passage which crosses life of everyone when the close ones die. Yet, we still do not know what effect it has on the individual person. The article presents a reflection on the learning in the time of bereavement and tries to add a component to the comprehension of learning as a lifelong process. We looked into how one changes when experiencing death by means of life story analysis. Evidence shows that learning takes place on physical, mental and spiritual level. One changes his/her attitudes and values. Therefore the narration of a life story is not merely a research method. Namely, it also unveils one self, which enables self-change and self-education.

  15. Counting is easier while experiencing a congruent motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Lugli

    Full Text Available Several studies suggest that numerical and spatial representations are intrinsically linked. Recent findings demonstrate that also motor actions interact with number magnitude processing, showing a motor-to-semantic effect. The current study assesses whether calculation processes can be modulated by motions performed with the whole body. Participants were required to make additions or subtractions while performing (on-line condition or after having experienced (off-line condition an ascending or descending motion through a passive (i.e., taking the elevator or an active (i.e., taking the stairs mode. Results show a congruency effect between the type of calculation and the direction of the motion depending on: a the off-line or on-line condition, b the passive or active mode and c the real or imagined task. Implications of the results for an embodied and grounded perspective view will be discussed.

  16. The nature of stress experienced by lesbians and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Ristock, Janice L

    2007-09-01

    This study examined both the meanings and sources/causes of stress from the perspectives of lesbians and gay men (n=30), using a series of focus groups. The findings suggest that stress is considered a part of life itself, and is perceived to contain both negative (e.g. detrimental effects on health and overall functioning, unfairness, out-of-control), and positive (e.g. a motivator, growth-facilitator) elements. The sources/causes of stress (i.e. stressors) identified include stress experienced from the "coming out" process, stress in family relations and intimate relationships, conflict over one's sexuality given society's homophobic and heterosexist attitudes toward lesbians and gay men, as well as stress from financial and work-related issues. More importantly, this study suggests that culture/ethnicity, gender, and aging, which are interconnected with one's sexual identity, play an important role in shaping the experiences of stress among lesbians and gay men.

  17. The gingival biotype assessed by experienced and inexperienced clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbali, Aryan; De Rouck, Tim; De Bruyn, Hugo; Cosyn, Jan

    2009-11-01

    A recent cluster analysis has identified three gingival biotypes among 100 periodontally healthy subjects based on different combinations of morphometric data related to maxillary front teeth and surrounding soft tissues. Patients with a thin-scalloped biotype are considered at risk because they have been associated with a compromised soft tissue response following surgical and/or restorative therapy. Hence, an accurate identification of these high-risk patients is warranted. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the precision of simple visual inspection as a method to identify the gingival biotype by experienced and inexperienced clinicians. Fifteen clinicians (five Restorative Dentists, five Periodontists and five Students) were invited to assess the gingival biotype (thin-scalloped, thick-flat, thick-scalloped) of 100 periodontally healthy subjects based on clinical slides. Cluster analysis on these subjects was used as the gold standard and the accuracy in identifying the gingival biotype was determined using percentile agreement and kappa statistics. Intra- and inter-examiner reliability were also calculated. The gingival biotype was accurately identified only in about half of the cases irrespective of the clinician's experience. The thick-flat biotype was mostly recognized especially by experienced clinicians (> or =70% of the cases). Nearly half of the thin-scalloped cases were misclassified. The intra-examiner repeatability was fair to substantial (kappa: 0.328-0.670) and the inter-examiner reproducibility was slight to moderate (kappa: 0.127-0.547). Simple visual inspection may not be considered a valuable method to identify the gingival biotype as nearly half of the high-risk patients are overlooked.

  18. Sex differences in depressive effects of experiencing spousal bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Lee, Sang Gyu; Chun, Sung-Youn; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-02-01

    Spousal death is a significant event that becomes a turning point in an individual's life. Widowed persons experience new circumstances, which might induce depression. However, the effects of spousal death on depression can differ by sex and culture. Thus, the present study examined the association between depressive levels and experience of spousal death in Korean adults aged older than 45 years. The data were from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging from 2010 to 2012. The analysis used frequency analysis to compare the distribution of demographic variables between men and women, and anova to compare 10-item short-form Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores as the dependent variable among comparison groups. We also carried out linear mixed model analysis on the association between the 10-item short-form Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and experience of spousal death. Among 5481 respondents, 2735 were men and 2741 were women. The number of men and women who experienced spousal death were 43 (1.6%) and 181 (6.6%), respectively. Men had lower depressive levels than women when they had been married (men 2.99, women 3.64). Both men and women experiencing spousal death had significantly higher 10-item short-form Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores than married men and women (men β = 0.911, P = 0.003; women β = 0.512, P = 0.001; ref: no experience of spousal death). There was a significant association between experience of spousal death and depressive level for both men and women. We suggest that policy practitioners promote community programs that provide bereaved adults with easy access to meaningful social participation and support the minimum cost of living of the widowed. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 322-329. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Experiencing and the realization of motherhood by teenage mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Rzechowska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Early motherhood constitutes a difficult challenge for girls, and the level of their performance in that role is varied. In this article, teenage motherhood as a process is considered. The objective of the research was to determine the paths by which teenage girls enter the mother role. Particular attention was paid to the nature of individual differences in the ways of experiencing and the realization of the successive steps of teenage motherhood: how the girls reacted to the fact of being a mother, what they experienced and how they behaved during pregnancy and performed child care. Participants and procedure In the research, 166 mothers who had given birth to their children between the 15th and 19th year of life were included (at the moment of giving birth to the child, the age of the mother was M = 17.22. A follower interview was used. It was directed towards recreating the course of their lives from the period preceding becoming pregnant to the period of pregnancy and looking after the child, taking into consideration the complex situations connected with life and development of the female teenagers. Results In the research, we applied the Reconstruction Strategy of the Process Transformation, setting the direction of qualitative analyses: (1 the level of single cases (case study, and (2 the level of the collection of cases (extracting groups of girls with common characteristics using the artificial intelligence algorithm C4.5. The analysis revealed the diversity and the internal structure of paths of the experience and realization of early motherhood: from negating oneself as a responsible mother to accepting the role of mother. Conclusions The final result is constituted by the model revealing the transformation of teenage motherhood and mechanisms underlying it.

  20. Effectiveness of a live oral human rotavirus vaccine after programmatic introduction in Bangladesh: A cluster-randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Zaman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus vaccines are now globally recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO, but in early 2009 WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization reviewed available data and concluded that there was no evidence for the efficacy or effectiveness of a two-dose schedule of the human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix given early at 6 and 10 wk of age. Additionally, the effectiveness of programmatic rotavirus vaccination, including possible indirect effects, has not been assessed in low-resource populations in Asia.In Bangladesh, we cluster-randomized (1:1 142 villages of the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance System to include two doses of HRV with the standard infant vaccines at 6 and 10 wk of age or to provide standard infant vaccines without HRV. The study was initiated November 1, 2008, and surveillance was conducted concurrently at Matlab Diarrhoea Hospital and two community treatment centers to identify children less than 2 y of age presenting with acute rotavirus diarrhea (ARD through March 31, 2011. Laboratory confirmation was made by enzyme immunoassay detection of rotavirus antigen in stool specimens. Overall effectiveness of the HRV vaccination program (primary objective was measured by comparing the incidence rate of ARD among all children age-eligible for vaccination in villages where HRV was introduced to that among such children in villages where HRV was not introduced. Total effectiveness among vaccinees and indirect effectiveness were also evaluated. In all, 6,527 infants were age-eligible for vaccination in 71 HRV villages, and 5,791 in 71 non-HRV villages. In HRV villages, 4,808 (73.7% infants received at least one dose of HRV. The incidence rate of ARD was 4.10 cases per 100 person-years in non-HRV villages compared to 2.8 per 100 person-years in HRV villages, indicating an overall effectiveness of 29.0% (95% CI, 11.3% to 43.1%. The total effectiveness of HRV against ARD among vaccinees was 41.4% (95% CI

  1. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are

  2. Hospitalized patients experienced suffering in life with incurable cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2005-09-01

    The concept 'suffering' has been central within nursing since Florence Nightingale. But few researchers have made empirical studies about the lived phenomenon. Several researchers within nursing agree that more research concerning individual groups of patients has to be initiated. Within research about patients with incurable cancer focus has been on death, the terminal period and patients experience of being dying. This qualitative study was initiated to describe the characteristics of a group of Danish hospitalized patients' experienced suffering in life with incurable cancer. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews were arranged with 12 patients ones a week within a period of 4 weeks. In week 2 and 4, the interviews were supplemented by questions developed on the basis of the potential signs of suffering which appeared during the participant observations that took place the day before each interview. C. S. Peirce's semiotic and phenomenological grounded theory of signs was used in order to identify the potential signs. A phenomenological methodology developed by A. Giorgi was used to develop and describe the general structure of the phenomenon. The phenomenon is described as: 'The experience of living in an increasingly unpredictable existents at the mercy of the body, the consciousness, the illness, the death, the treatment, the professionals, one's articulateness, the past, the present and the future, influenced by increasing powerlessness, loneliness and isolation, and the experience of existing in an persistent, and with time, unconquerable struggle to maintain and regain control'.

  3. The Likelihood of Experiencing Relative Poverty over the Life Course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Rank

    Full Text Available Research on poverty in the United States has largely consisted of examining cross-sectional levels of absolute poverty. In this analysis, we focus on understanding relative poverty within a life course context. Specifically, we analyze the likelihood of individuals falling below the 20th percentile and the 10th percentile of the income distribution between the ages of 25 and 60. A series of life tables are constructed using the nationally representative Panel Study of Income Dynamics data set. This includes panel data from 1968 through 2011. Results indicate that the prevalence of relative poverty is quite high. Consequently, between the ages of 25 to 60, 61.8 percent of the population will experience a year below the 20th percentile, and 42.1 percent will experience a year below the 10th percentile. Characteristics associated with experiencing these levels of poverty include those who are younger, nonwhite, female, not married, with 12 years or less of education, or who have a work disability.

  4. Experienced Gray Wolf Optimization Through Reinforcement Learning and Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emary, E; Zawbaa, Hossam M; Grosan, Crina

    2017-01-10

    In this paper, a variant of gray wolf optimization (GWO) that uses reinforcement learning principles combined with neural networks to enhance the performance is proposed. The aim is to overcome, by reinforced learning, the common challenge of setting the right parameters for the algorithm. In GWO, a single parameter is used to control the exploration/exploitation rate, which influences the performance of the algorithm. Rather than using a global way to change this parameter for all the agents, we use reinforcement learning to set it on an individual basis. The adaptation of the exploration rate for each agent depends on the agent's own experience and the current terrain of the search space. In order to achieve this, experience repository is built based on the neural network to map a set of agents' states to a set of corresponding actions that specifically influence the exploration rate. The experience repository is updated by all the search agents to reflect experience and to enhance the future actions continuously. The resulted algorithm is called experienced GWO (EGWO) and its performance is assessed on solving feature selection problems and on finding optimal weights for neural networks algorithm. We use a set of performance indicators to evaluate the efficiency of the method. Results over various data sets demonstrate an advance of the EGWO over the original GWO and over other metaheuristics, such as genetic algorithms and particle swarm optimization.

  5. Can environmental conditions experienced in early life influence future generations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Tim; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of early developmental conditions for performance in later life are now subjected to convergent interest from many different biological sub-disciplines. However, striking data, largely from the biomedical literature, show that environmental effects experienced even before conception can be transmissible to subsequent generations. Here, we review the growing evidence from natural systems for these cross-generational effects of early life conditions, showing that they can be generated by diverse environmental stressors, affect offspring in many ways and can be transmitted directly or indirectly by both parental lines for several generations. In doing so, we emphasize why early life might be so sensitive to the transmission of environmentally induced effects across generations. We also summarize recent theoretical advancements within the field of developmental plasticity, and discuss how parents might assemble different ‘internal’ and ‘external’ cues, even from the earliest stages of life, to instruct their investment decisions in offspring. In doing so, we provide a preliminary framework within the context of adaptive plasticity for understanding inter-generational phenomena that arise from early life conditions. PMID:24807254

  6. Body composition and somatotype of experienced mountain climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Davide; Zaccagni, Luciana; Cogo, Annalisa; Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela

    2012-03-01

    In order to evaluate body composition and somatotype, 10 Italian experienced mountain climbers were assessed from an anthropometric point of view, before a high altitude ascent. Body mass, height, girths, skinfolds, and bone breadths were gathered and used to calculate body composition and somatotype of each subject. Means and standard deviations of the subjects' anthropometric characteristics were calculated. Mesomorphism (5.28±1.10) is the dominant somatotype component in all but one the participants, endomorphism (1.55±0.49) is low, and body fat percentage (11.76%±2.93) is low. Comparisons with athletes involved in other climbing subdisciplines highlight the specificity of elite mountain climbers anthropometry. The elite mountain climbers in our sample were predominantly mesomorphic with somatotype attitudinal mean values lower than reported for male athletes participating in free-climbing, volleyball, gymnastics, and soccer. Anthropometric characteristics may therefore play a role in mountain climbing, even though the trainable components may be more relevant than the nontrainable ones.

  7. Assessing the professional development needs of experienced nurse executive leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Linda Searle; McFarland, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the professional development topics that senior nurse leaders believe are important to their advancement and success. Senior/experienced nurse leaders at the executive level are able to influence the work environment of nurses and institutional and health policy. Their development needs are likely to reflect this and other contemporary healthcare issues and may be different from middle and frontline managers. A systematic way of assessing professional development needs for these nurse leaders is needed. A descriptive study using an online survey was distributed to a convenience sample of nurse leaders who were members of the Association of California Nurse Leaders (ACNL) or have participated in an ACNL program. Visionary leadership, leading complexity, and effective teams were the highest ranked leadership topics. Leading change, advancing health: The future of nursing, healthy work environments, and healthcare reform were also highly ranked topics. Executive-level nurse leaders are important to nurse retention, effective work environments, and leading change. Regular assessment and attention to the distinct professional development needs of executive-level nurse leaders are a valuable human capital investment.

  8. Women experiencing the intergenerationality of conjugal violence1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Gilvânia Patrícia do Nascimento; Gomes, Nadirlene Pereira; Diniz, Normélia Maria Freire; Lira, Margaret Ollinda de Souza Carvalho e; Carvalho, Milca Ramaiane da Silva; da Silva, Rudval Souza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the family relationship, in childhood and adolescence, of women who experience conjugal violence. Method: qualitative study. Interviews were held with 19 women, who were experiencing conjugal violence, and who were resident in a community in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The project was approved by the Research Ethics Committee (N. 42/2011). Results: the data was organized using the Discourse of the Collective Subject, identifying the summary central ideas: they witnessed violence between their parents; they suffered repercussions from the violence between their parents: they were angry about the mother's submission to her partner; and they reproduced the conjugal violence. The discourse showed that the women witnessed, in childhood and adolescence, violence between their parents, and were injured both physically and psychologically. As a result of the mother's submission, feelings of anger arose in the children. However, in the adult phase of their own lives, they noticed that their conjugal life resembled that of their parents, reproducing the violence. Conclusion: investment is necessary in strategies designed to break inter-generational violence, and the health professionals are important in this process, as it is a phenomenon with repercussions in health. Because they work in the Family Health Strategy, which focuses on the prevention of harm and illness, health promotion and interdepartmentality, the nurses are essential in the process of preventing and confronting this phenomenon. PMID:26487137

  9. The Likelihood of Experiencing Relative Poverty over the Life Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Mark R.; Hirschl, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Research on poverty in the United States has largely consisted of examining cross-sectional levels of absolute poverty. In this analysis, we focus on understanding relative poverty within a life course context. Specifically, we analyze the likelihood of individuals falling below the 20th percentile and the 10th percentile of the income distribution between the ages of 25 and 60. A series of life tables are constructed using the nationally representative Panel Study of Income Dynamics data set. This includes panel data from 1968 through 2011. Results indicate that the prevalence of relative poverty is quite high. Consequently, between the ages of 25 to 60, 61.8 percent of the population will experience a year below the 20th percentile, and 42.1 percent will experience a year below the 10th percentile. Characteristics associated with experiencing these levels of poverty include those who are younger, nonwhite, female, not married, with 12 years or less of education, or who have a work disability. PMID:26200781

  10. How experienced tutors facilitate tutorial dynamics in PBL groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gin-Hong; Lin, Chaou-Shune; Lin, Yu-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial are conducted in small groups, and successful learning in such groups requires good group facilitating skills. There is a lack of research on actual skills employed by tutors in facilitating the group dynamics. To explore the process of PBL tutorial small groups, focusing on the tutors' actual behavior in facilitating group dynamics. Eight experienced tutors from various departments in medical colleges participated in this research. Forty tutorial group sessions were videotaped. Among the 636 tutorial intervention episodes, 142 of them were associated with facilitating group dynamics. Tutors interventions as well as their recalls were transcribed verbatim. Qualitative research methods were utilized to analyze the data. There were 10 tutorial group dynamic situations and 48 tutorial skills. Analysis of the tutors' intentions employing these skills in the 10 situations showed that tutors were trying to achieve the following aims: (1) iteration of PBL principles, (2) delegation of responsibility to the students, (3) creation of a good discussion forum, and (4) the generation of a good learning atmosphere. Results from this study provide PBL tutors with a practical frame of reference on group dynamic facilitating skills and stimulate further research on this topic.

  11. Experiencing organ donation: feelings of relatives after consent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marli Elisa Nascimento Fernandes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify experiences and feelings on the organ donation process, from the perspective of a relative of an organ donor in a transplant unit.Method: this was exploratory research using a qualitative approach, performed with seven family members of different organ donors, selected by a lottery. Sociodemographic data and the experiences regarding the donation process were collected through semi-structured interviews. The language material was transcribed and submitted to content analysis.Results: poor sensitivity of the medical staff communicating the relative's brain death - the potential donor - and the lack of socio-emotional support prior to the situation experienced by the family was highlighted by participants.Conclusions: the study identified the need to provide social-emotional support for families facing the experience of the organ donation process. From these findings, other care and management practices in health must be discussed to impact the strengthening of the family ties, post-donation, as well as the organ procurement indexes.

  12. Energy cost of the Trondheim firefighter test for experienced firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Heimburg, Erna; Medbø, Jon Ingulf

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure aerobic demands of fire fighting activities including exercise in the heat. Twenty-two experienced firefighters performed the Trondheim test simulating fire fighting tasks including work in the heat. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max), heart rate (HR) and ventilation were recorded continuously. Data were compared with results obtained during a treadmill test during which the participants were dressed as smoke divers. The participants completed physical parts of the Trondheim test in ˜12 min (range: 7.5-17.4). Time to complete the test was closely related to the participant's VO2 max. HR of ˜170 beats/min and pulmonary ventilation of ˜100 L/min were higher than at lactate threshold (LT) during laboratory tests. VO2 averaged over the test's physical part was 35 ± 7 ml/min/kg, which was at the same or below the level corresponding to the participants' LT. Physically fit participants completed the test faster than less fit participants. Slower and physically less fit participants consumed more air and used more oxygen than faster and physically more fit participants. The Trondheim test is physically demanding; it distinguishes physically fit and less fit participants.

  13. Darunavir-based dual therapy in HIV experienced patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrantino, Gaetana; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Di Biagio, Antonio; Rosi, Andrea; Bruzzone, Bianca; Cicconi, Paola; Carli, Tiziana; Biondi, Maria Luisa; Antinori, Andrea; Bartolozzi, Dario; Penco, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the virological response of DRV/r-based dual therapy in drug-experienced patients included in the Italian antiretroviral resistance database (ARCA). Patients included in the study were treated with DRV/r in association with raltegravir (RAL), etravirine (ETV) or maraviroc (MAR) following treatment failure(s) and with a resistance test and at least one follow-up visit available. Observation was censored at last visit under dual therapy and survival analysis and proportional hazard models were used, taking virological failure (confirmed >50 c/mL HIV-RNA) as the end-point. Of the total 221 patients included, 149 (67.4%) started DRV/r with RAL, 45 (20.4%) with ETV, 27 (12.2%) with MAR. Patients characteristics at the start of dual regimen were as follows: mean number of previous regimens, nine (IQR: 5-13); non-B subtype, 17 (7.7%); median CD4 count, 347 (IQR: 246-544); undetectable viral load, 74 (33.5%). Full DRV/r resistance was detected in one (0.5%, HIV-DB interpretation system), 13 (5.9%, ANRS) and 17 patients (7.7%, Rega). 69 virological failures (31.2%) were observed during follow-up. At survival analysis, the overall proportion of failure was 29.2% at one year and 33.8% at two years. The proportion of failure was lower in patients starting with undetectable versus detectable viral load (13.3% and 25.2% versus 37.4% and 38.8% at one and two years, respectively, p=0.001 for both analyses) and in patients treated with DRV 600 BID versus 800 QD (HR: 0, 56; 95% CI 0.31-0.99; pfailure (27.7% at one year, 32.0% at two years) if compared with DRV/r-MAR (35.9%, 47.1%) and DRV/r-ETV (34.1%, 34.1% at one and two years). In the adjusted proportional model, no significant difference among the three regimens was detected. A significant lower risk of failure was associated with higher overall GSS (HIV-DB HR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.32-0.88, p=0.014; Rega 0.60, 0.40-0.88, pfailure was associated with detectable HIV-RNA (3.02, 1.70-5.72, p<0.001). Among experienced patients

  14. Darunavir-based dual therapy in HIV experienced patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Sterrantino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We assessed the virological response of DRV/r-based dual therapy in drug-experienced patients included in the Italian antiretroviral resistance database (ARCA. Materials and Methods: Patients included in the study were treated with DRV/r in association with raltegravir (RAL, etravirine (ETV or maraviroc (MAR following treatment failure(s and with a resistance test and at least one follow-up visit available. Observation was censored at last visit under dual therapy and survival analysis and proportional hazard models were used, taking virological failure (confirmed >50 c/mL HIV-RNA as the end-point. Results: Of the total 221 patients included, 149 (67.4% started DRV/r with RAL, 45 (20.4% with ETV, 27 (12.2% with MAR. Patients characteristics at the start of dual regimen were as follows: mean number of previous regimens, nine (IQR: 5–13; non-B subtype, 17 (7.7%; median CD4 count, 347 (IQR: 246–544; undetectable viral load, 74 (33.5%. Full DRV/r resistance was detected in one (0.5%, HIV-DB interpretation system, 13 (5.9%, ANRS and 17 patients (7.7%, Rega. 69 virological failures (31.2% were observed during follow-up. At survival analysis, the overall proportion of failure was 29.2% at one year and 33.8% at two years. The proportion of failure was lower in patients starting with undetectable versus detectable viral load (13.3% and 25.2% versus 37.4% and 38.8% at one and two years, respectively, p=0.001 for both analyses and in patients treated with DRV 600 BID versus 800 QD (HR: 0, 56; 95% CI 0.31–0.99; p<0.05. By regimen, patients treated with DRV/r-RAL showed a non-significant lower proportion of failure (27.7% at one year, 32.0% at two years if compared with DRV/r-MAR (35.9%, 47.1% and DRV/r-ETV (34.1%, 34.1% at one and two years. In the adjusted proportional model, no significant difference among the three regimens was detected. A significant lower risk of failure was associated with higher overall GSS (HIV-DB HR: 0.53, 95% CI

  15. Impact strength of small icy bodies that experienced multiple collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Minami; Hayama, Ryo; Arakawa, Masahiko

    2014-05-01

    Frequent collisions are common for small bodies in the Solar System, and the cumulative damage to these bodies is thought to significantly affect their evolution. It is important to study the effects of multiple impacts such as the number of impacts on the impact strength and the ejection velocity of impact fragments. Here we conducted multiple-impact experiments using a polycrystalline water ice target, varying the number of impacts from 1 to 10 times. An ice cylindrical projectile was impacted at 84-502 m s-1 by using a single-stage gas gun in a cold room between -10 and -15 °C. The impact strength of the ice target that experienced a single impact and multiple impacts is expressed by the total energy density applied to the same target, ΣQ, and this value was observed to be 77.6 J kg-1. The number of fine impact fragments at a fragment mass normalized by an initial target mass, m/Mt0 ∼ 10-6, nm, had a good correlation with the single energy density at each shot, Qj, and the relationship was shown to be nm=10·Qj1.31±0.12. We also estimated the cumulative damage of icy bodies as a total energy density accumulated by past impacts, according to the crater scaling laws proposed by Housen et al. (Housen, K.R., Schmidt, R.M., Holsapple, K.A. [1983]. J. Geophys. Res. 88, 2485-2499) of ice and the crater size distributions observed on Phoebe, a saturnian icy satellite. We found that the cumulative damage of Phoebe depended significantly on the impact speed of the impactor that formed the craters on Phoebe; and the cumulative damage was about one-third of the impact strength ΣQ* at 500 m s-1 whereas it was almost zero at 3.2 km s-1.

  16. Experiencing stigma as a nurse with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, A L

    2017-06-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Stigma involves connecting individuals with a particular label to negative characteristics; this is based not on the stigmatized condition itself, but cultural reactions to it. Stigma exists towards nurses with mental illness. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This paper offers a first-person account of experiencing stigma as a nurse with a mental illness. This paper incorporates the existing literature to offer a broader cultural perspective on the experiences of a nurse with a mental illness. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Nurses are likely to encounter a nurse with a mental illness at some point in their practice. Nurses' reactions towards colleagues with mental illness can have significant implications for those colleague(s)' wellbeing. Nurses with mental illness will have to navigate their person and professional journey while giving consideration to the attitudes of their nursing peers and leaders. Limited research has been done on the stigma faced by nurses with mental illness from their nursing peers. Mental illness is not generally considered acceptable within the context of nursing culture, so when nurses do experience mental illness, their experiences in a professional context may be influenced by stereotypes, particularly those relating to dangerousness. Using autoethnography as a research method, the author examines her own subjective experiences of stigma as a nurse with a mental illness, and draws upon existing literature on stigma, deviance and the phenomenon of mental illness in nurses to analyse broader cultural implications for nursing. Assessment of suitability to return to work arises throughout the narratives, and consideration is given to the way that risk assessment by nursing leaders is impacted by negative stereotypes that surround mental illness. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cultural modes of expressing emotions influence how emotions are experienced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immordino-Yang, Mary Helen; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Damasio, Hanna

    2016-10-01

    The brain's mapping of bodily responses during emotion contributes to emotional experiences, or feelings. Culture influences emotional expressiveness, that is, the magnitude of individuals' bodily responses during emotion. So, are cultural influences on behavioral expressiveness associated with differences in how individuals experience emotion? Chinese and American young adults reported how strongly admiration- and compassion-inducing stories made them feel, first in a private interview and then during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As expected, Americans were more expressive in the interview. Although expressiveness did not predict stronger reported feelings or neural responses during fMRI, in both cultural groups more-expressive people showed tighter trial-by-trial correlations between their experienced strength of emotion and activations in visceral-somatosensory cortex, even after controlling for individuals' overall strength of reactions (neural and felt). Moreover, expressiveness mediated a previously described cultural effect in which activations in visceral-somatosensory cortex correlated with feeling strength among Americans but not among Chinese. Post hoc supplementary analyses revealed that more-expressive individuals reached peak activation of visceral-somatosensory cortex later in the emotion process and took longer to decide how strongly they felt. The results together suggest that differences in expressiveness correspond to differences in how somatosensory mechanisms contribute to constructing conscious feelings. By influencing expressiveness, culture may therefore influence how individuals know how strongly they feel, what conscious feelings are based on, or possibly what strong versus weak emotions "feel like." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Imported malaria in pregnant women experienced in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mikio; Koga, Michiko; Hasegawa, Chihiro; Mutoh, Yoshikazu; Kato, Yasuyuki; Maruyama, Haruhiko

    2017-08-01

    With ever-growing global exchanges, the number of travelers, including pregnant women, to the tropics is increasing, which poses a risk of contracting malaria. Although there are several reports on imported malaria in pregnancy from Western countries, those focusing on cases experienced in Japan are very limited. We searched for cases of malaria in pregnancy in the treatment records submitted to the Research Group on Chemotherapy of Tropical Diseases, Japan, during the period 1993-2016. Literature searches were also conducted using an American and a Japanese search system. Ten cases of malaria in pregnant women were identified, including four cases with Plasmodium falciparum. Of eight evaluable cases, only one practiced malaria chemoprophylaxis. Among the nine evaluable cases, eight resulted in uneventful delivery and one P. falciparum case developed severe hepatic disturbance, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and intrauterine fetal death. After the initial attack, none of the Plasmodium vivax/Plasmodium ovale cases practiced chloroquine prophylaxis until delivery. One P. ovale case received a lower dose regimen of chloroquine as acute-stage therapy. This study demonstrated additional cases of imported malaria in pregnant women to the literature and highlighted various epidemiological, demographic, and clinical characteristics. Some of the clinical issues raised need to be investigated. Due to the paucity of the cases worldwide, sharing information among various countries is indispensable, and international guidelines which are now increasingly recommending the use of artemisinins in pregnant women should be referred. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Using a programmatic mapping approach to plan for HIV prevention and harm reduction interventions for people who inject drugs in three South African cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Andrew; Shelly, Shaun; Lambert, Andrew; Schneider, Andrea; Basson, Rudolf; Medeiros, Nelson; Padayachee, Kalvanya; Savva, Helen; Hausler, Harry

    2017-06-07

    Stigma, criminalisation and a lack of data on drug use contribute to the "invisibility" of people who inject drugs (PWID) and make HIV prevention and treatment service delivery challenging. We aimed to confirm locations where PWID congregate in Cape Town, eThekwini and Tshwane (South Africa) and to estimate PWID population sizes within selected electoral wards in these areas to inform South Africa's first multi-site HIV prevention project for PWID. Field workers (including PWID peers) interviewed community informants to identify suspected injecting locations in selected electoral wards in each city and then visited these locations and interviewed PWID. Interviews were used to gather information about the accessibility of sterile injecting equipment, location coordinates and movement patterns. We used the Delphi method to obtain final population size estimates for the mapped wards based on estimates from wisdom of the crowd methods, the literature and programmatic data. Between January and April 2015, we mapped 45 wards. Tshwane teams interviewed 39 PWID in 12 wards, resulting in an estimated number of accessible PWID ranging from 568 to 1431. In eThekwini, teams interviewed 40 PWID in 15 wards with an estimated number of accessible PWID ranging from 184 to 350. The Cape Town team interviewed 61 PWID in 18 wards with an estimated number of accessible PWID ranging between 398 and 503. Sterile needles were only available at one location. Almost all needles were bought from pharmacies. Between 80 and 86% of PWID frequented more than one location per day. PWID who reported movement visited a median of three locations a day. Programmatic mapping led by PWID peers can be used effectively to identify and reach PWID and build relationships where access to HIV prevention commodities for PWID is limited. PWID reported limited access to sterile injecting equipment, highlighting an important HIV prevention need. Programmatic mapping data show that outreach programmes should be

  20. Workplace violence experienced by nursing students: A UK survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Stephen; Üzar Özçetin, Yeter Sinem; Russell-Westhead, Michele

    2016-06-01

    To appreciate the nature and scope of workplace violence amongst a sample of the UK nursing student population during clinical placement and to recommend strategies universities can implement to successfully manage the impact. Workplace violence is defined as a violent act(s) directed toward workers and can include physical, psychological or verbal behaviour. It is prevalent in nursing and causes victims work-based stress that can affect not only the individual but also the quality of care. Similar negative experiences amongst students can have a direct impact on the development of future professional skills. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Questions were uploaded in the format of a commercial internet survey provider (SurveyMonkey.com) and distributed across a sample of nursing schools in the UK. The survey was voluntary and employed a validated tool to assess workplace violence and was based on a similar study in Australia. The number of respondents was 657. This paper reports on the quantitative results. Nearly half of the students (42.18%) indicated they had experienced bullying/harassment in the past year while on clinical placement. One-third (30.4%) had witnessed bullying/harassment of other students and 19.6% of incidents involved a qualified nurse. The unwanted behaviours made some students consider leaving nursing (19.8%). Some respondents said the standard of patient care (12.3%) and their work with others (25.9%) were negatively affected. Workplace violence can influence nursing students' attitude toward the profession and their level of satisfaction with the work. Whilst it was reassuring to note that the majority of the participants knew where/how to report, only one fifth had actively reported an episode of bullying/harassment. Current students are the nurses and leaders of the future and have a key role in shaping the culture of generations to come. Universities and clinical providers need to work together to reduce the

  1. Disability and schizophrenia: a systematic review of experienced psychosocial difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świtaj, Piotr; Anczewska, Marta; Chrostek, Anna; Sabariego, Carla; Cieza, Alarcos; Bickenbach, Jerome; Chatterji, Somnath

    2012-11-09

    Schizophrenia is a significantly disabling disease that affects all major areas of life. There is a lack of comprehensive synthesis of research findings on the full extent of psychosocial difficulties (PSDs) experienced by people living with schizophrenia. This paper provides a systematic review of the literature concerning PSDs and their associated factors in schizophrenia. PSDs were conceptualized in accordance with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as disabilities, in particular impairments of mental functions, activity limitations and participation restrictions. An electronic search using MEDLINE and PsychINFO plus a manual search of the literature was performed for qualitative and longitudinal studies published in English between 2005 and 2010 that examined PSDs in persons with schizophrenia. The ICF was used as a conceptual framework. A total of 104 papers were included. The most frequent PSDs addressed in the literature were not specific ones, directly linkable to the ICF categories of mental functions, activity limitations or participation restrictions, but broad areas of psychosocial functioning, such as psychopathological symptoms (53% of papers) or global disability and functioning (37%). Among mental functions, the most extensively studied were cognitive functions (27%) and emotional functions (27%). Within the domain of activities and participation, the most widely investigated were difficulties in relationships with others (31%) and employment (20%). Of the factors associated with the intensity or course of PSDs, the most commonly identified were treatment modalities (56%), psychopathological symptoms (26%), and socio-demographic variables (24%). Medication tended to improve the most relevant PSD, but at the same time was the only consistently reported determinant of onset of PSDs (emerging as unwanted side-effects). The present review illustrates the remarkably broad scope and diversity of psychosocial areas

  2. Disability and schizophrenia: a systematic review of experienced psychosocial difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świtaj Piotr

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a significantly disabling disease that affects all major areas of life. There is a lack of comprehensive synthesis of research findings on the full extent of psychosocial difficulties (PSDs experienced by people living with schizophrenia. This paper provides a systematic review of the literature concerning PSDs and their associated factors in schizophrenia. PSDs were conceptualized in accordance with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF as disabilities, in particular impairments of mental functions, activity limitations and participation restrictions. Methods An electronic search using MEDLINE and PsychINFO plus a manual search of the literature was performed for qualitative and longitudinal studies published in English between 2005 and 2010 that examined PSDs in persons with schizophrenia. The ICF was used as a conceptual framework. Results A total of 104 papers were included. The most frequent PSDs addressed in the literature were not specific ones, directly linkable to the ICF categories of mental functions, activity limitations or participation restrictions, but broad areas of psychosocial functioning, such as psychopathological symptoms (53% of papers or global disability and functioning (37%. Among mental functions, the most extensively studied were cognitive functions (27% and emotional functions (27%. Within the domain of activities and participation, the most widely investigated were difficulties in relationships with others (31% and employment (20%. Of the factors associated with the intensity or course of PSDs, the most commonly identified were treatment modalities (56%, psychopathological symptoms (26%, and socio-demographic variables (24%. Medication tended to improve the most relevant PSD, but at the same time was the only consistently reported determinant of onset of PSDs (emerging as unwanted side-effects. Conclusions The present review illustrates the

  3. Meeting the Needs of Students with Disabilities Experiencing Homelessness: Federal, Community, and Educator Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan-Walker, Melissa E.; Rock, Marcia L.; Popp, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Homelessness is a complex and multifaceted condition that affects 2.5 million, or one in every 30, children annually. Based on these numbers, it is likely that at least one student has experienced or is experiencing homelessness in most public school classrooms. Sixteen percent of students experiencing homelessness also received services under…

  4. Supplemental results of the human health risk analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy draft waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This report is intended as an information supplement to the human health risk analysis performed for the US Department of Energy`s Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, hereinafter called the PEIS. This report provides the installation-by-installation human health risk analysis results from which the risk estimate summaries for the PEIS were drawn. Readers should bear in mind that the risk estimates presented here are the result of a program-wide (as opposed to site-specific) study. They are based on best available data; systematically applied assumptions; and professional judgment about DOE waste inventories, waste volumes generated annually, currently available treatment and disposal technologies, technical limitations of treatment, and facility capacities across the numerous installations in the DOE complex.

  5. Programmatic evaluation of a combined antigen and antibody test for rapid HIV diagnosis in a community and sexual health clinic screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taegtmeyer, Miriam; MacPherson, Peter; Jones, Kathy; Hopkins, Mark; Moorcroft, Jay; Lalloo, David G; Chawla, Anu

    2011-01-01

    A substantial proportion of HIV-infected individuals in the UK are unaware of their status and late presentations continue, especially in low prevalence areas. Fourth generation antigen/antibody rapid test kits could facilitate earlier diagnosis of HIV in non-clinical settings but lack data on performance under programmatic conditions. We evaluated the performance of Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo Test (Determine Combo), a rapid test with indicators for both HIV antibodies and p24 antigen, in participants recruited from community outreach and hospital-based sexual health clinics. HIV infection was confirmed using laboratory enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA), Line Immuno Assay (LIA) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 953 people underwent HIV testing. HIV antibody (Ab) prevalence was 1.8% (17/953). Four false positive rapid tests were identified: two antibody and two p24 antigen (Ag) reactions. Of participants diagnosed as HIV Ab positive, 2/17 (12%) were recent seroconverters based on clinical history and HIV antibody avidity test results. However, none of these were detected by the p24 antigen component of the rapid test kit. There were no other true positive p24 Ag tests. These data lend support to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that 4th generation rapid HIV tests have little additional benefit over 3rd generation HIV kits for routine screening in low prevalence settings and have high rates of false positives. In order to optimally combine community-based case-finding among hard-to-reach groups with reliable and early diagnosis 3rd generation kits should be primarily used with laboratory testing of individuals thought to be at risk of acute HIV infection. A more reliable point of care diagnostic is required for the accurate detection of acute HIV infection under programmatic conditions.

  6. Programmatic evaluation of a combined antigen and antibody test for rapid HIV diagnosis in a community and sexual health clinic screening programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Taegtmeyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of HIV-infected individuals in the UK are unaware of their status and late presentations continue, especially in low prevalence areas. Fourth generation antigen/antibody rapid test kits could facilitate earlier diagnosis of HIV in non-clinical settings but lack data on performance under programmatic conditions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We evaluated the performance of Determine HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo Test (Determine Combo, a rapid test with indicators for both HIV antibodies and p24 antigen, in participants recruited from community outreach and hospital-based sexual health clinics. HIV infection was confirmed using laboratory enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA, Line Immuno Assay (LIA and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR. In total, 953 people underwent HIV testing. HIV antibody (Ab prevalence was 1.8% (17/953. Four false positive rapid tests were identified: two antibody and two p24 antigen (Ag reactions. Of participants diagnosed as HIV Ab positive, 2/17 (12% were recent seroconverters based on clinical history and HIV antibody avidity test results. However, none of these were detected by the p24 antigen component of the rapid test kit. There were no other true positive p24 Ag tests. CONCLUSION: These data lend support to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that 4th generation rapid HIV tests have little additional benefit over 3rd generation HIV kits for routine screening in low prevalence settings and have high rates of false positives. In order to optimally combine community-based case-finding among hard-to-reach groups with reliable and early diagnosis 3rd generation kits should be primarily used with laboratory testing of individuals thought to be at risk of acute HIV infection. A more reliable point of care diagnostic is required for the accurate detection of acute HIV infection under programmatic conditions.

  7. Prevention, control, and elimination of neglected diseases in the Americas: Pathways to integrated, inter-programmatic, inter-sectoral action for health and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holveck, John C; Ehrenberg, John P; Ault, Steven K; Rojas, Rocio; Vasquez, Javier; Cerqueira, Maria Teresa; Ippolito-Shepherd, Josefa; Genovese, Miguel A; Periago, Mirta Roses

    2007-01-01

    Background In the Latin America and Caribbean region over 210 million people live below the poverty line. These impoverished and marginalized populations are heavily burdened with neglected communicable diseases. These diseases continue to enact a toll, not only on families and communities, but on the economically constrained countries themselves. Discussion As national public health priorities, neglected communicable diseases typically maintain a low profile and are often left out when public health agendas are formulated. While many of the neglected diseases do not directly cause high rates of mortality, they contribute to an enormous rate of morbidity and a drastic reduction in income for the most poverty-stricken families and communities. The persistence of this "vicious cycle" between poverty and poor health demonstrates the importance of linking the activities of the health sector with those of other sectors such as education, housing, water and sanitation, labor, public works, transportation, agriculture, industry, and economic development. Summary The purpose of this paper is three fold. First, it focuses on a need for integrated "pro-poor" approaches and policies to be developed in order to more adequately address the multi-faceted nature of neglected diseases. This represents a move away from traditional disease-centered approaches to a holistic approach that looks at the overarching causes and mechanisms that influence the health and well being of communities. The second objective of the paper outlines the need for a specific strategy for addressing these diseases and offers several programmatic entry points in the context of broad public health measures involving multiple sectors. Finally, the paper presents several current Pan American Health Organization and other institutional initiatives that already document the importance of integrated, inter-programmatic, and inter-sectoral approaches. They provide the framework for a renewed effort toward the

  8. Follow-up and programmatic outcomes of HIV-exposed infants registered in a large HIV centre in Lilongwe, Malawi: 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng'ambi, Wingston F; Ade, Serge; Harries, Anthony D; Midiani, Dalitso; Owiti, Philip; Takarinda, Kudakwashe C; Gugsa, Salem; Phiri, Sam

    2016-08-01

    To assess follow-up and programmatic outcomes of HIV-exposed infants at Martin Preuss Centre, Lilongwe, from 2012 to 2014. Retrospective cohort study using routinely collected HIV-exposed infant data. Data were analysed using frequencies and percentages in Stata v.13. Of 1035 HIV-exposed infants registered 2012-2014, 79% were available to be tested for HIV and 76% were HIV-tested either with DNA-PCR or rapid HIV test serology by 24 months of age. Sixty-five infants were found to be HIV-positive and 43% were started on antiretroviral therapy (ART) at different ages from 6 weeks to 24 months. Overall, 48% of HIV-exposed infants were declared lost-to-follow-up in the database. Of these, 69% were listed for tracing; of these, 78% were confirmed as lost-to-follow-up through patient charts; of these, 51% were traced; and of these, 62% were truly not in care, the remainder being wrongly classified. Commonest reasons for being truly not in care were mother/guardian unavailability to bring infants to Martin Preuss Centre, forgetting clinic appointments and transport expenses. Of these 86 patients, 36% were successfully brought back to care and 64% remained lost-to-follow-up. Loss to follow-up remains a huge challenge in the care of HIV-exposed infants. Active tracing facilitates the return of some of these infants to care. However, programmatic data documentation must be urgently improved to better follow-up and link HIV-positive children to ART. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  10. Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Revision of the Coronado National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan: Cochise, Graham, Pima, Pinal, and Santa Cruz Counties, Arizona; Hidalgo County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert Peralta; Andrea Wargo Campbell; Ann Lynch; Cheri Bowen; Christopher Stetson; Craig Wilcox; Daniela Zormeier; Debby Kriegel; Delilah Jaworski; Dustin Walters; Eli Curiel; Erin Boyle; George McKay; Janet Moser; Jennifer Morrissey; Jennifer M. Ruyle; Jeremy Sautter; Judy York; Kenna Schoenle; Larry Jones; Laura White; Linda Peery; Mary Farrell; Mindi Lehew; Mindy Sue Vogel; Nicholas Laluk; Rachael Biggs; Robert Lefevre; Richard Gerhart; Salek Shafiqullah; Sara Dechter; Sarah Davis; Sharon Biedenbender; Tami Emmett; Terry Austin; William Gillespie; Yolynda Begay

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Coronado National Forest prepared this programmatic environmental impact statement to disclose the potential effects of a proposed action to revise the "Coronado National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan" (1986, as amended). The Coronado comprises 1,783,639 acres, most of which are located in...

  11. Experienced nurses learning with medical students: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, L; Jones, H M

    1999-05-01

    Although there are successful examples of interdisciplinary education this generally relates to pre-registration health-care professionals. Post-registration projects are usually confined to skills workshops or social science subjects, which rarely include medical staff. This project was unusual in its attempt to combine the needs of experienced practitioners with those of medical students. There are practical issues for this form of learning such as, the organization of modules into 'systems' when health-care professionals (as part of a parallel project) indicated their interests lay in courses that related to clinical practice organized around disease processes/conditions. This case study demonstrates that concerns related to the potential mismatch of clinical expertise, maturity and scientific background are not insurmountable problems, and that clear benefits can be gained. It could be argued that until pre- and post-graduate medical staff are integrated with other disciplines, the real benefits of shared understanding, enhanced team work and mutual respect will remain illusive. It is not anticipated that this form of learning would be suitable for the majority of practitioners, whose core needs are generally met by existing opportunities. However, there is a need for a greater depth of academic understanding particularly for those in senior positions or in specific specialized areas (also identified in the parallel study) and for those whose roles are expanding. These practitioners are more likely to have the ability to apply their new knowledge to clinical practice, using reflective techniques with minimal facilitation to enhance their established clinical expertise. For them this model of learning offers the opportunity to tailor education to the individual needs of the practitioner without the costly establishment of complete new programmes of learning. This case study proved particularly successful for the participants as they enhanced understanding and

  12. Stress echocardiography in patients who experienced mechanical ventilation weaning failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Cobo-Molinos, Jesús; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Pola-Gallego-de-Guzmán, María Dolores; Cárdenas-Cruz, Antonio; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Sevilla-Martínez, María; Hernández-Caballero, Clara

    2017-06-01

    Critically ill patients may suffer varying degrees of temporary myocardial dysfunction during respiratory weaning that could play an important role in weaning failure. In this study, we tried to assess the existence of temporary diastolic dysfunction during respiratory weaning. Inclusion period is from 2006 to 2015. In this study, we included 181 ventilated patients with cardiogenic shock that were being weaned from mechanical ventilation. Twenty of those patients were successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation, and the rest (161) experienced complications in their weaning process. All patients had a left ventricular ejection fraction >0.45 and E/E' ratio≤8, did not require vasoactive drugs at that time, and did not have remaining significant ischemic disease. We divided our patients into 3 groups, as follows: A, patients who could not tolerate a T-tube and required pressure-support ventilation (82); B, patients who successfully tolerated a T-tube period (20); and C, patients who could not tolerate spontaneous breathing modes of mechanical ventilation and remained on assisted mechanical ventilation. We performed stress echocardiography for the last two groups; using dobutamine to assess diastolic function and using ephedrine to evaluate functional mitral regurgitation (MR). We estimated pulmonary capillary wedge pressure through the E/E' ratio and the flow in the pulmonary veins. In group A (ie, those patients who could not tolerate a T-tube trial), we observed an increase in the E/E' ratio (6.32±0.77 vs 15.2±6.65; P=.0001) and a worsening of strain (S) and strain rate (SR) (-13.6±1.80 vs -11.88±5.6, P=.0001; and -1.3±1.28 vs -0.95±0.38, P=.0001; respectively). We did not observe a change in the E/E' ratio during stress echocardiogram on those patients with successful weaning from mechanical ventilation (7.41±0.43 vs 8.38±4.57, P=.001). However, we did see in this group an increased peak velocity of the S wave and of SR (-16.11±08.72 vs -19.89±5

  13. Facilitating Participant Success: Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, S. S.; Bruccoli, A.; Porter, M.; Meese, D.

    2003-12-01

    Through the NSF-funded Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA) Program K-12 science teachers participate as members of polar field projects. Objectives of the program include: immersing the science teacher in the experience of research; 2) leveraging the research experience of the teacher to better inform teaching practices; and 3) sharing the experience with the broader educational and general community. The polar field experience is an exciting opportunity accompanied by a daunting number of responsibilities. In addition to preparing for field research, TEA teachers bring their experience to colleagues, classrooms, and communities. Before going into the field, they give presentations, help plan how students can connect to the polar regions, and share the expedition with the public. In the field, the TEA teacher is a team member and educational liaison, responding to questions by e-mail, and posting e-journals describing the research experience. Upon return, the TEA again shares the experience broadly with the community. In addition, they work closely with 3 colleagues for 140 hours to bring the experience of research into classrooms. Formative evaluation of the TEA Program underscores the need to support teachers in accomplishing their responsibilities; this support is necessary to achieve program objectives. TEA teachers are responsible for sharing the science content of their research. While many broadcast the excitement of the experience, they may not have the scientific background to convey the content. This is due, in part, to many teachers having to be generalists in their classrooms. Shifting into the role of specialist can be challenging. In the year of preparation before the field experience, TEA teachers attend orientation, meet with their research teams for several days, and are encouraged to learn more about their science topic. Understanding builds through the field experience. It may take two or more years after the field work for the

  14. Comparative study of emotional experiencing in psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiser, S; Goldfried, M R

    1993-10-01

    Despite increased interest in the role of emotion in the process of psychotherapy, we currently lack a valid gauge of its importance in the change process. Significant sessions obtained from 13 experienced psychodynamic-interpersonal and 17 experienced cognitive-behavior therapists were examined to determine the extent of affective exploration and therapists' views of these client states. Results indicate that affective experiencing is present in equivalent amounts in the change sessions of these two orientations. However, therapists' clinical views were dissimilar. Psychodynamic-interpersonal therapists viewed portions containing higher affective experiencing as more critical to the change process, whereas cognitive-behavior therapists viewed lower levels of experiencing as being therapeutically more significant. These findings suggest that, with regard to emotional experiencing, psychodynamic-interpersonal therapists may share common ground with experiential therapists, whereas cognitive-behavior therapists appear to have a unique perspective.

  15. Outcomes, infectiousness, and transmission dynamics of patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and home-discharged patients with programmatically incurable tuberculosis: a prospective cohort study

    KAUST Repository

    Dheda, Keertan

    2017-01-19

    Background: The emergence of programmatically incurable tuberculosis threatens to destabilise control efforts. The aim of this study was to collect prospective patient-level data to inform treatment and containment strategies. Methods: In a prospective cohort study, 273 South African patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, or resistance beyond extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, were followed up over a period of 6 years. Transmission dynamics, infectiousness, and drug susceptibility were analysed in a subset of patients from the Western Cape using whole-genome sequencing (WGS; n=149), a cough aerosol sampling system (CASS; n=26), and phenotypic testing for 18 drugs (n=179). Findings: Between Oct 1, 2008, and Oct 31, 2012, we enrolled and followed up 273 patients for a median of 20·3 months (IQR 9·6-27·8). 203 (74%) had programmatically incurable tuberculosis and unfavourable outcomes (treatment failure, relapse, default, or death despite treatment with a regimen based on capreomycin, aminosalicylic acid, or both). 172 (63%) patients were discharged home, of whom 104 (60%) had an unfavourable outcome. 54 (31%) home-discharged patients had failed treatment, with a median time to death after discharge of 9·9 months (IQR 4·2-17·4). 35 (20%) home-discharged cases were smear-positive at discharge. Using CASS, six (23%) of 26 home-discharged cases with data available expectorated infectious culture-positive cough aerosols in the respirable range (<5 μm), and most reported inter-person contact with suboptimal protective mask usage. WGS identified 17 (19%) of the 90 patients (with available sequence data) that were discharged home before the diagnosis of 20 downstream cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis with almost identical sequencing profiles suggestive of community-based transmission (five or fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms different and with identical resistance-encoding mutations for 14 drugs). 11 (55%) of these downstream

  16. The role of rumination in the occurrence of positive effects of experienced traumatic events

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Ogińska-Bulik

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive processes play a significant role in both the negative and positive consequences of traumatic experiences. The aim of this research was to investigate the role of rumination in the occurrence of positive effects, in the form of posttraumatic growth, of experienced traumatic events. Participants and procedure Data were collected from 227 subjects who had experienced traumatic events, including cancer patients (31.30%), women who had experienced domestic...

  17. Burnout and experienced limitations as a therapist : a qualitative study of Norwegian psychotherapists

    OpenAIRE

    Kristiansen, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Little research has been done on how burned out psychotherapists are experiencing limitations as therapists. The aim of the present study was to do an explorative qualitative analysis of the main limitations experienced as therapist in a strategic sample of burned out Norwegian psychotherapists. A second focus in this study was to investigate how these experienced limitations could shed new light on burnout as a phenomenon. The data used in the present study was collected as pa...

  18. Infrequency of Sexually Transmitted Disease Screening among Sexually Experienced U.S. Female Adolescents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lynne C. Fiscus; Carol A. Ford; William C. Miller

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Since 1993, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and professional medical organizations have recommended that all sexually experienced female adolescents receive annual screening for Chlamydia trachomatis...

  19. The comparison of socioeconomic status, perceived social support and mental status in women of reproductive age experiencing and not experiencing domestic violence in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vameghi, Roshanak; Amir Ali Akbari, Sedigheh; Alavi Majd, Hamid; Sajedi, Firoozeh; Sajjadi, Homeira

    2018-01-01

    Given the significant health effects of domestic violence against women, the present study was conducted in 2016, in Tehran, Iran in order to compare the socioeconomic status, perceived social support and mental status in women of reproductive age experiencing and not experiencing domestic violence. This descriptive-analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on 500 women. The data collection tools used included questionnaires: demographic information, Socioeconomic, Beck's Depression, Spielberger's Anxiety, Cohen's Perceived Stress, Sarason's Perceived Social Support and WHO's Domestic Violence Inventory. The results showed that 43.2% of women said they had experienced at least one case of domestic violence, among which 16.4%, 15% and 36.6% of women had experienced physical, sexual and emotional-verbal types of violence, respectively. The mean age (p less than 0.001) and educational level (p=0/018) of violated women and their spouses (p less than 0.001) were lower than those of non-violated women. Furthermore, violated women experienced lower socioeconomic status (p less than 0.05), higher perceived stress (p less than 0.008), higher depression (p less than 0.001), and higher overt anxiety (0.002. They also perceived lower levels of social support (p less than 0.001). The issue of domestic violence was rather prevalent in the participants of the present study, particularly the younger, less educated and more socioeconomically deprived communities and families.

  20. The second iteration of the Systems Prioritization Method: A systems prioritization and decision-aiding tool for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Volume 3, Analysis for final programmatic recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prindle, N.H.; Boak, D.M.; Weiner, R.F. [and others

    1996-05-01

    Systems Prioritization Method (SPM) is a decision-aiding tool developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US DOE Carlsbad Area Office (DOE/CAO). This tool provides an analytical basis for programmatic decision making for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). SPM integrates decision-analysis techniques, performance,a nd risk-assessment tools, and advanced information technology. Potential outcomes of proposed activities and combination of activities are used to calculate a probability of demonstrating compliance (PDC) with selected regulations. The results are presented in a decision matrix showing cost, duration, and maximum PDC for all activities in a given cost and duration category. This is the third and final volume in the series which presents the analysis for final programmatic recommendations.

  1. Transporting Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness. McKinney-Vento Law into Practice Brief Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Changing schools may greatly impede the academic achievement and social development of students experiencing homelessness. Students who transfer to a new school often experience educational discontinuity and, as a result, lose academic credits. Moreover, the mobility experienced by these students separates them from their social network and from…

  2. Learning from Families Experiencing Homelessness--How School Leaders Can Make a Difference through Transformative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warke, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Homelessness is a growing phenomenon, especially among women and children (Hulchanski, 2009). This study was conducted because of the increase in families experiencing homelessness registering in my school. In none of the current studies about homelessness have the researchers spoken to the families and children experiencing homelessness. This…

  3. Differences of Ballet Turns ("Pirouette") Performance between Experienced and Novice Ballet Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shing-Jye; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Hong-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the different postural control strategies exhibited by experienced and novice dancers in ballet turns ("pirouettes"). Method: Thirteen novice and 13 experienced dancers performed ballet turns with dominant-leg support. The peak push force was measured in the double-leg support phase. The inclination…

  4. Prevalence and prediction of re-experiencing and avoidance after elective surgical abortion: A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Emmerik, A.A.P.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated short-term re-experiencing and avoidance after elective surgical abortion. In addition, it was prospectively investigated whether peritraumatic dissociation and pre-abortion dissociative tendencies and alexithymia predict re-experiencing and avoidance. Method: In a

  5. Experienced Speech-Language Pathologists' Responses to Ethical Dilemmas: An Integrated Approach to Ethical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Belinda; Lincoln, Michelle; Balandin, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the approaches of experienced speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to ethical reasoning and the processes they use to resolve ethical dilemmas. Method: Ten experienced SLPs participated in in-depth interviews. A narrative approach was used to guide participants' descriptions of how they resolved ethical dilemmas. Individual…

  6. Shaping Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Experienced Agriculture Teachers in the Plant Sciences: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Amber H.; Kitchel, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    This grounded theory study explored the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of experienced agriculture teachers in the plant sciences. The most emergent phenomenon to surface from the data was the influence of beliefs on participants' PCK. This central phenomenon became the cornerstone for the model of what was shaping experienced agriculture…

  7. Identifying Pregnant Women Experiencing Domestic Violence in an Urban Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datner, Elizabeth M.; Wiebe, Douglas J.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Nelson, Deborah B.

    2007-01-01

    The article describes characteristics of pregnant women presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) who are experiencing current violence and presented a screening tool to identify pregnant women experiencing violence. Women completed an in-person interview regarding violence, sociodemo-graphic factors, health status, and drug use. Fifteen percent…

  8. The Online Life of Individuals Experiencing Socioeconomic Disadvantage: How Do They Experience Information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeaton, Kathleen; Bruce, Christine S.; Hughes, Hilary; Davis, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This paper explores the online information experiences of individuals experiencing socioeconomic disadvantage in Australia. As access to online information becomes increasingly critical those without access are in danger of being left behind. This exploratory pilot study examines the way that digital exclusion may be experienced.…

  9. Iteratīvi izstrādājamās programmatūras testēšanas ekonomika

    OpenAIRE

    Vaisfelds, Leonīds

    2009-01-01

    Maģistra darbs „Iteratīvi izstrādājamās programmatūras testēšanas ekonomika” ir veltīts testēšanas procesam iteratīvās izstrādes metodes ietvaros. Galvenā problēma, kam tiek veltīts darbs, ir iteratīvās testēšanas stratēģijas izvēle un izmaksu optimizācija, kuras ietvaros primāri tiek analizēta manuālās un automatizētās testēšanas specifika. Darba teorētiskajā daļā ir analizēta iteratīvās izstrādes un iteratīvās testēšanas būtība un to aspekti. Rezultāti demonstrē iteratīvās izstrādes u...

  10. Being closely connected to health care providers experiencing burnout: putting one's life on hold to help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Strandberg, Gunilla

    2010-02-01

    Being closely connected to a person experiencing illness may be a trying experience.This study aimed to illuminate meanings of being closely connected to health care providers experiencing burnout. Ten interviews were conducted with five people closely connected (i.e., family members or supportive friends) to health care providers recovering from burnout. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and the resulting text was interpreted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method. One consequence of being closely connected to health care providers experiencing burnout is putting one's life on hold to help. In facing an almost unmanageable burden, those closely connected revealed their own suffering, emphasizing their need for support. Health care professionals need to be aware that those who are closely connected to a person experiencing burnout may lack knowledge about burnout and its related challenges. It is to be hoped such knowledge would allow significant others to better support the person experiencing burnout and promote their own health.

  11. Experiencing Radians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleton, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an activity that uses an inexpensive paper plate and a short length of adding machine tape to help students experience the concept of radian measure. Focuses on radian measurement and connects many geometric concepts regarding the circle. (ASK)

  12. Experiencing Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Younis, Tarek; Hassani, Amani

    2015-01-01

    , who narrates her experience of losing herhusband to lung cancer. By drawing on a religious framework, Aisha creates meaning fromher loss, which enables her to incorporate this loss into her life history and sustain agency.Her narrative invites wider audiences to witness her tale of overcoming loss...

  13. Patient affect experiencing following therapist interventions in short-term dynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Joel M; Hardy, Gillian E; McCullough, Leigh; Stride, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between therapist interventions and patient affect responses in Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (STDP). The Affect Experiencing subscale from the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale (ATOS) was adapted to measure individual immediate affect experiencing (I-AES) responses in relation to therapist interventions coded within the preceding speaking turn, using the Psychotherapy Interaction Coding (PIC) system. A hierarchical linear modelling procedure was used to assess the change in affect experiencing and the relationship between affect experiencing and therapist interventions within and across segments of therapy. Process data was taken from six STDP cases; in total 24 hours of video-taped sessions were examined. Therapist interventions were found to account for a statistically significant amount of variance in immediate affect experiencing. Higher levels of immediate affect experiencing followed the therapist's use of Confrontation, Clarification and Support compared to Questions, Self-disclosure and Information interventions. Therapist Confrontation interventions that attempted to direct pressure towards either the visceral experience of affect or a patient's defences against feelings led to the highest levels of immediate affect experiencing. The type of therapist intervention accounts for a small but significant amount of the variation observed in a patient's immediate emotional arousal. Empirical findings support clinical theory in STDP that suggests strategic verbal responses promote the achievement of this specific therapeutic objective.

  14. The comparison of socioeconomic status, perceived social support and mental status in women of reproductive age experiencing and not experiencing domestic violence in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vameghi, Roshanak; Amir Ali Akbari, Sedigheh; Alavi Majd, Hamid; Sajedi, Firoozeh; Sajjadi, Homeira

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Given the significant health effects of domestic violence against women, the present study was conducted in 2016, in Tehran, Iran in order to compare the socioeconomic status, perceived social support and mental status in women of reproductive age experiencing and not experiencing domestic violence. Methods: This descriptive-analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on 500 women. The data collection tools used included questionnaires: demographic information, Socioeconomic, Beck’s Depression, Spielberger’s Anxiety, Cohen’s Perceived Stress, Sarason’s Perceived Social Support and WHO’s Domestic Violence Inventory. Results: The results showed that 43.2% of women said they had experienced at least one case of domestic violence, among which 16.4%, 15% and 36.6% of women had experienced physical, sexual and emotional-verbal types of violence, respectively. The mean age (p less than 0.001) and educational level (p=0/018) of violated women and their spouses (p less than 0.001) were lower than those of non-violated women. Furthermore, violated women experienced lower socioeconomic status (p less than 0.05), higher perceived stress (p less than 0.008), higher depression (p less than 0.001), and higher overt anxiety (0.002. They also perceived lower levels of social support (p less than 0.001). Conclusions: The issue of domestic violence was rather prevalent in the participants of the present study, particularly the younger, less educated and more socioeconomically deprived communities and families. PMID:29376514

  15. Environmental settings for selected US Department of Energy installations - support information for the programmatic environmental impact statement and the baseline environmental management report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdren, G.R.; Glantz, C.S.; Berg, L.K.; Delinger, K.; Fosmire, C.J.; Goodwin, S.M.; Rustad, J.R.; Schalla, R.; Schramke, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report contains the environmental setting information developed for 25 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) installations in support of the DOE`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Study (PEIS) and the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). The common objective of the PEIS and the BEMR is to provide the public with information about the environmental contamination problems associated with major DOE facilities across the country, and to assess the relative risks that radiological and hazardous contaminants pose to the public, onsite workers, and the environment. Environmental setting information consists of the site-specific data required to model (using the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System) the atmospheric, groundwater, and surface water transport of contaminants within and near the boundaries of the installations. The environmental settings data describes the climate, atmospheric dispersion, hydrogeology, and surface water characteristics of the installations. The number of discrete environmental settings established for each installation was governed by two competing requirements: (1) the risks posed by contaminants released from numerous waste sites were to be modeled as accurately as possible, and (2) the modeling required for numerous release sites and a large number of contaminants had to be completed within the limits imposed by the PEIS and BEMR schedule. The final product is the result of attempts to balance these competing concerns in a way that minimizes the number of settings per installation in order to meet the project schedule while at the same, time providing adequate, if sometimes highly simplified, representations of the different areas within an installation. Environmental settings were developed in conjunction with installation experts in the fields of meteorology, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry.

  16. Challenges to the programmatic implementation of ready to use infant formula in the post-earthquake response, Haiti, 2010: a program review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Leisel E; Boyd, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, infant and young child feeding was identified as a priority nutrition intervention. A new approach to support breastfeeding mothers and distribute ready-to-use infant formula (RUIF) to infants unable to breastfeed was established. The objective of the evaluation was to assess the implementation of infant feeding programs using RUIF in displaced persons camps in Port-au-Prince, Haiti during the humanitarian response. A retrospective record review was conducted from April-July, 2010 to obtain data on infants receiving RUIF in 30 baby tents. A standardized data collection form was created based on data collected across baby tents and included: basic demographics, admission criteria, primary caretaker, feeding practices, and admission and follow-up anthropometrics. Orphans and abandoned infants were the most frequent enrollees (41%) in the program. While the program targeted these groups, it is unlikely that this is a true reflection of population demographics. Despite programmatic guidance, admission criteria were not consistently applied across programs. Thirty-four percent of infants were undernourished (weight for age Z score <-2) at the time of admission. Defaulting accounted for 50% of all program exits and there was no follow-up of these children. Low data quality was a significant barrier. The design, implementation and magnitude of the 'baby tents' using RUIF was novel in response to infant and young child feeding (IYCF) in emergencies and presented multiple challenges that should not be overlooked, including adherence to protocols and the adaption of emergency programs to existing programs. The implementation of IYCF programs should be closely monitored to ensure that they achieve the objectives set by the humanitarian community and national government. IYCF is an often overlooked component of emergency preparedness; however to improve response, generic protocols and pre-emergency training and preparedness should be

  17. Challenges to the programmatic implementation of ready to use infant formula in the post-earthquake response, Haiti, 2010: a program review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leisel E Talley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, infant and young child feeding was identified as a priority nutrition intervention. A new approach to support breastfeeding mothers and distribute ready-to-use infant formula (RUIF to infants unable to breastfeed was established. The objective of the evaluation was to assess the implementation of infant feeding programs using RUIF in displaced persons camps in Port-au-Prince, Haiti during the humanitarian response. METHODS: A retrospective record review was conducted from April-July, 2010 to obtain data on infants receiving RUIF in 30 baby tents. A standardized data collection form was created based on data collected across baby tents and included: basic demographics, admission criteria, primary caretaker, feeding practices, and admission and follow-up anthropometrics. MAIN FINDINGS: Orphans and abandoned infants were the most frequent enrollees (41% in the program. While the program targeted these groups, it is unlikely that this is a true reflection of population demographics. Despite programmatic guidance, admission criteria were not consistently applied across programs. Thirty-four percent of infants were undernourished (weight for age Z score <-2 at the time of admission. Defaulting accounted for 50% of all program exits and there was no follow-up of these children. Low data quality was a significant barrier. CONCLUSIONS: The design, implementation and magnitude of the 'baby tents' using RUIF was novel in response to infant and young child feeding (IYCF in emergencies and presented multiple challenges that should not be overlooked, including adherence to protocols and the adaption of emergency programs to existing programs. The implementation of IYCF programs should be closely monitored to ensure that they achieve the objectives set by the humanitarian community and national government. IYCF is an often overlooked component of emergency preparedness; however to improve

  18. UNICEF-CDC global assessment of home fortification interventions 2011: current status, new directions, and implications for policy and programmatic guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferds, Maria Elena; Irizarry, Laura; Timmer, Arnold; Tripp, Katie

    2013-12-01

    Micronutrient powders (MNP) reduce anemia and improve iron status in children aged 6 to 23 months. Little is known about home fortification interventions in low-income and middle-income countries. To describe highlights of the Global Assessment of Home Fortification Interventions 2011, new directions, and needed policy and programmatic guidance. A cross-sectional survey ofhomefortification interventions was conducted. Staff at UNICEF and regional focal points at Home Fortification Technical Advisory Group partner agencies sent questionnaires to representatives in 152 low-income and middle-income countries. Included interventions met the following criteria: they were for prevention and used MNP lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS), or complementary food supplements (CFS); one recommended mode of use was mixing into food; they were implemented or planning to start within 12 months; and research interventions were directly linked to programs. This study identified 63 implemented interventions (36 countries) and 28 planned interventions (21 countries), including 34 implemented interventions (22 countries) and 25 planned interventions (20 countries) that used MNP These interventions were expected to reach 17.2 million people in 2011, including 14.1 million participants in MNP interventions. Among implemented interventions, 16% distributed nationally. Most interventions used integrated approaches targeting young children. Recently, there was increasing expansion of interventions in Africa. The main challenges identified were monitoring and evaluation, adherence, product funding, and procurement. Home fortification interventions, especially those that use MNP, are increasing and scaling up rapidly in regions with widespread problems of micronutrient deficiencies and stunting. Home fortification interventions contribute to global initiatives to reduce undernutrition.

  19. The importance of programmatic health actions in tuberculosis control: experience of a Primary Health Care Service in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Furtado de Souza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis deserves special attention from health professionals and society. However, health services are not organized to attend these patients, and the prevalence of the disease remains high in the country. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the role of primary care in improving tuberculosis indicators with structured programmatic actions. Methods: Data from patients diagnosed with tuberculosis linked to the Primary Health Care Service of the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, attended in the health care services of the city, were analyzed and compared before (2002-2008 and after (2009-2012 the implementation of a Tuberculosis Control Program. The indicators were analyzed based on the goals established by WHO. Results: One hundred and forty patients had tuberculosis between 2002 and 2012, 94 before the implementation of the Program and 46 after. With the Program, the annual number of tracked respiratory symptomatic patients and patients diagnosed with tuberculosis increased. Also, the diagnosis of tuberculosis in primary care services increased from 4.3% (n = 4 to 39.1% (n = 18 (p <0.001; and there was an improvement in cure (78.2% to 85.7% and therapy dropout (9.3% to 9.1% rates. Conclusion: Our study showed that, after implementation of the Tuberculosis Control Program in the Primary Health Care Service of the Hospital de Clínicas dePorto Alegre, there was improvement in diagnosis of the disease, cure and treatment dropout rates, which have reached the cure rate goal established by the Ministry of Health.

  20. The precision of experienced action video-game players: line bisection reveals reduced leftward response bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Andrew J; Patston, Lucy L M; Tippett, Lynette J

    2014-11-01

    Twenty-two experienced action video-game players (AVGPs) and 18 non-VGPs were tested on a pen-and-paper line bisection task that was untimed. Typically, right-handers bisect lines 2 % to the left of true centre, a bias thought to reflect the dominance of the right-hemisphere for visuospatial attention. Expertise may affect this bias, with expert musicians showing no bias in line bisection performance. Our results show that experienced-AVGPs also bisect lines with no bias with their right hand and a significantly reduced bias with their left hand compared to non-AVGPs. Bisections by experienced-AVGPs were also more precise than those of non-AVGPs. These findings show the cognitive proficiencies of experienced-AVGPs can generalize beyond computer based tasks, which resemble their training environment.

  1. Factors associated with food workers working while experiencing vomiting or diarrhea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sumner, Steven; Brown, Laura Green; Frick, Roberta; Stone, Carmily; Carpenter, L Rand; Bushnell, Lisa; Nicholas, Dave; Mack, James; Blade, Henry; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Everstine, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine the frequency with which food workers said they had worked while experiencing vomiting or diarrhea, and to identify restaurant and worker characteristics associated with this behavior...

  2. The effect of experienced individuals on navigation by king penguin chick pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesterova, A.P.; Flack, A.; van Loon, E.E.; Bonadonna, F.; Biro, D.

    2015-01-01

    Group members' individual experience can have important influences when navigating collectively. However, how exactly they structure group travel performance is still not fully understood. This study investigated how navigation and leadership dynamics are affected by the presence of an experienced

  3. Improved emotional stability in experienced meditators with concentrative meditation based on electroencephalography and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Hao; Shiah, Yung-Jong; Chen, Sharon Chia-Ju; Wang, Shih-Feng; Young, Ming-Shing; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether emotional stability distinguishes how experienced and novice meditators react to visual stimuli. PARTICIPANTS practiced concentrative meditation and then responded to visual stimuli while continuing to meditate. Ten experienced and 10 novice meditators responded to sequences of visual stimuli after concentrative meditation. As predicted, both groups had increased parasympathetic activities during concentrative meditation. Experienced meditators had increased low-frequency electroencephalography (EEG) rhythms in response to visual stimulation, whereas novices had increased high-frequency EEG rhythms. Correlational analyses revealed that novice meditators changed from a meditative state to a nonrelaxed state when the visual stimuli were presented, whereas experienced meditators maintained the meditative state. The study provides evidence that regular concentrative meditation can improve emotional stability and that recording physiologic responses to visual stimuli can be a good method for identifying the effects of long-term concentrative meditation practice.

  4. Women's perceptions of their community's social norms towards assisting women who have experienced intimate partner violence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDonnell, Karen Ann; Burke, Jessica G; Gielen, Andrea C; O'Campo, Patricia; Weidl, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    .... This study will present our initial findings into the development of measures to assess women's perception of their community's social norms toward assisting women who have experienced intimate partner violence (IPV...

  5. Some like it bad: testing a model on perceiving and experiencing fictional characters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijn, E.A.; Hoorn, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    We developed an encompassing theory that explains how readers of fiction and spectators of motion pictures establish affective relationships with fictional characters (FCs). The perceiving and experiencing fictional characters (PEFiC) theory is anchored in art perception, psychological aesthetics,

  6. Risks in Adventure Sport Activity: Which risks are perceived by experienced canyoneers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    António Brandão; Joel Pereira; Francisco Gonçalves; Susana Vale; Luís Quaresma

    2017-01-01

    The search for experiences in nature and adventure sports (NAS) is a growing reality, and canyoning is one of these sports to be experienced, thus contemporary society demands for new knowledge and sensations...

  7. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mental Illness Stigma and Discrimination Among Californians Experiencing Mental Health Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eunice C; Collins, Rebecca L; Cerully, Jennifer; Seelam, Rachana; Roth, Beth

    2017-01-01

    Reports racial and ethnic differences on the California Well-Being Survey, a surveillance tool that tracks mental illness stigma and discrimination among a sample of California adults experiencing psychological distress.

  8. Experienced and anticipated discrimination reported by individuals in treatment for substance use disorders within the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boekel, L.C.; Brouwers, E.P.M.; van Weeghel, J.; Garretsen, H.F.L.

    2016-01-01

    Experiences and expectations of discrimination (anticipated discrimination) may delay treatment seeking among people with substance use disorders. In addition, experienced and anticipated discrimination can be a barrier to successful recovery and rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to study

  9. How Home Health Caregivers’ Perceive the Influence of Professionalism on Their Experienced Work Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Mette Strange

    2017-01-01

    This article explores how the perception of increasing professionalism of home health-care influences caregivers’ experienced work engagement. A qualitative study including 24 interviews, 85 hr of observations and the think-aloud technique was applied in three Danish caregiving organizations. Using...... a consensual qualitative research approach, analysis of the data suggests that increasing professionalism is experienced among caregivers and influences caregivers’ engagement in three distinct ways: through their identification with their work, psychological safety, and feelings of insecurity. This article...

  10. Physical characteristics of experienced and junior open-wheel car drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschner, Christian; Platzer, Hans-Peter; Patterson, Carson

    2013-01-01

    Despite the popularity of open-wheel car racing, scientific literature about the physical characteristics of competitive race car drivers is scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare selected fitness parameters of experienced and junior open-wheel race car drivers. The experienced drivers consisted of five Formula One, two GP2 and two Formula 3 drivers, and the nine junior drivers drove in the Formula Master, Koenig, BMW and Renault series. The following fitness parameters were tested: multiple reactions, multiple anticipation, postural stability, isometric upper body strength, isometric leg extension strength, isometric grip strength, cyclic foot speed and jump height. The group differences were calculated using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Because of the multiple testing strategy used, the statistical significance was Bonferroni corrected and set at P < 0.004. Significant differences between the experienced and junior drivers were found only for the jump height parameter (P = 0.002). The experienced drivers tended to perform better in leg strength (P = 0.009), cyclic foot speed (P = 0.024) and grip strength (P = 0.058). None of the other variables differed between the groups. The results suggested that the experienced drivers were significantly more powerful than the junior drivers: they tended to be quicker and stronger (18% to 25%) but without statistical significance. The experienced drivers demonstrated excellent strength and power compared with other high-performance athletes.

  11. Emotions experienced in association with agricultural work performed in childhood--in opinions of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowski, Stanisław; Lachowska, Bogusława

    2014-01-01

    Performance of work is related with experiencing various emotions, from positive - indicating full satisfaction with work, to negative - describing failures, and even harm caused by work. Such emotions are also experienced by children engaged in work on family farms. The objective of the study is the determination of emotions experienced in association with performing agricultural work in childhood, and indication of the factors conditioning the occurrence of positive and negative emotions. The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey using a questionnaire technique, and covered a group of 482 adults from agricultural families. In childhood, positive emotions related with the performance of work are more often experienced than negative emotions. The occurrence of positive emotions is positively related with willingness to perform work activities, working time, respondent's age, age at which a child started to perform work, and age at which a child discontinued helping on a farm. The occurrence of negative emotions is positively related with unwillingness to perform work, performing work activities beyond the physical capabilities of a child, neglecting school duties, missing classes at school due to work, and with working time. With work performed in childhood are associated positive and negative emotions experienced in childhood and adulthood. The performance of work in childhood shapes emotions experienced by an adult which may affect his/her quality of life and functioning in adulthood.

  12. Dairy heifers benefit from the presence of an experienced companion when learning how to graze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J H C; Costa, W G; Weary, D M; Machado Filho, L C P; von Keyserlingk, M A G

    2016-01-01

    Pasture remains important on many dairy farms, but the age of first contact with pasture varies depending on the month of birth, weaning age, and farm management. Regardless of age, naïve dairy heifers must learn to graze when first introduced to pasture. This study investigated whether being grouped with experienced dairy cows would affect the development of grazing behaviors. Sixty-three Holstein heifers (mean ± SD 14.2 ± 1.3 mo; 546 ± 60.7 kg) and 21 dry Holstein cows (2.6 ± 0.8 lactations; 751 ± 53.9 kg) were assigned into 7 groups of 12 animals (3 dry cows and 9 naïve heifers), and each was divided and assigned to an experienced (3 cows and 3 heifers) and nonexperienced (6 heifers) sub-group. Sub-groups were introduced to pasture in different paddocks without visual contact with any other cattle. No difference was found in the time after introduction to the paddock for heifers to first attempt to nibble grass [experienced: 0:23 (0:17-0:43) vs. nonexperienced 0:40 (0:35-0:46); median (quartile 1 - quartile 3), h:mm]. However, heifers grouped with experienced cows showed a shorter latency to begin grazing [experienced: 0:47 (0:28-00:52) vs. nonexperienced 2:13 (1:25-2:30)]. During the first hour after introduction to pasture, heifers in the experienced treatment showed fewer stomping events [experienced: 2.5 (1.25-4) vs. nonexperienced: 6.5 (4-8)] and vocalized less often [experienced: 3.5 (1.25-5.75) vs. nonexperienced: 7 (5-8.75)]. After this initial period, animals in both subgroups began to graze normally; treatments did not differ in grazing behaviors over the 3-d observation period. These results indicate that grouping heifers with pasture-experienced cows improves grazing behavior of dairy heifers in the first hours following introduction to pasture. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. OTV propulsion tecnology programmatic overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, L. P.

    1984-04-01

    An advanced orbit transfer vehicles (OTV) which will be an integral part of the national space transportation system to carry men and cargo between low Earth orbit and geosynchronous orbit will perform planetary transfers and deliver large acceleration limited space structures to high Earth orbits is reviewed. The establishment of an advanced propulsion technology base for an OTV for the mid 1990's is outlined. The program supports technology for three unique engine concepts. Work is conducted to generic technologies which benefit all three concepts and specific technology which benefits only one of the concepts. Concept and technology definitions to identify propulsion innovations, and subcomponent research to explore and validate their potential benefits are included.

  14. Respiratory Protection Program. Programmatic description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J.M.; Porter, W.E.

    1986-03-01

    The ORNL Respirator Program is designed to provide employees with devices which afford maximum protection with minimum inconvenience and discomfort. Teamwork is essential since a comprehensive program involves the Medical Department, the Industrial Hygiene Department, Radiation and Safety Surveys, the Operations Division, Quality Assurance and Inspection, and the Fire Department. The purpose of this manual is to describe in detail the ORNL Respirator Program. Included are discussions of the following elements: quality assurance, selection, fit-testing, maintenance and issue, certified breathing air for self-contained breathing apparatus, inspection, program surveillance, available devices, and standard operating procedures. As program modifications develop and improvements are made, periodic revisions may be necessary. The Industrial Hygiene Department will perform this task on an ''as required'' basis.

  15. Obese and Overweight Youth: Risk for Experiencing Bullying Victimization and Internalizing Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waasdorp, Tracy Evian; Mehari, Krista; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2018-01-22

    Obese and overweight youth are at an increased risk for poor peer relations and psychosocial adjustment. Of particular concern is the high rate of bullying victimization experienced by obese and overweight youth. While it is known that victimized youth are at an increased risk for internalizing symptoms, few studies have examined if weight status exacerbates the association between victimization and internalizing symptoms. The current study drew upon data from over 43,000 youth attending 107 middle and high schools. Multilevel results suggested that compared with normal weight youth, both overweight and obese youth were at an increased risk for experiencing relational, verbal, and cyber victimization, with only obese youth being at an increased risk for experiencing physical victimization. Notably, the odds for experiencing cyber victimization were higher than the odds for experiencing other forms of victimization. Frequently victimized obese youth, but not frequently victimized overweight youth, had significantly higher levels of internalizing symptoms compared to their frequently victimized, normal-weight peers. Together, these findings highlight the increased risk for psychosocial adjustment problems among frequently victimized overweight and obese youth, suggesting these youth may require preventive interventions tailored to meet their unique needs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Ethnicity and cultural values as predictors of the occurrence and impact of experienced workplace incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welbourne, Jennifer L; Gangadharan, Ashwini; Sariol, Ana M

    2015-04-01

    Workplace incivility is a subtle type of deviant work behavior that is low in intensity and violates workplace norms of respect. Past research demonstrates the harmful impact of incivility on work attitudes and employee wellbeing; however, little is known about how incivility is experienced by individuals of different ethnicities and cultural orientations. In the current study, we compared the amount and impact of workplace incivility that was experienced by Hispanic and white, non-Hispanic employees. Further, we examined whether cultural dimensions of vertical and horizontal individualism and collectivism moderated the relationships between workplace incivility and work and health outcomes. A sample of 262 university employees (50% Hispanic; 63% female) provided self-reports of experienced incivility, burnout, job satisfaction, and cultural values. Although male Hispanic employees experienced more incivility, female Hispanic employees experienced less incivility than non-Hispanic employees of the same gender. Hispanic employees displayed greater resilience against the impact of incivility on job satisfaction and burnout, compared with non-Hispanic employees. Additionally, employees with strong horizontal collectivism values (emphasizing sociability) were more resilient against the impact of incivility on burnout, whereas employees with strong horizontal individualism values (emphasizing self-reliance) were more susceptible to burnout and dissatisfaction when faced with incivility. These findings suggest that employees' ethnicity and cultural values may increase or decrease their vulnerability to the impact of incivility at work. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Patient aggression experienced by staff in a New Zealand public hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Nicola; Gale, Chris; Greenwood, Rachel

    2014-05-23

    Working in a healthcare environment is a known risk factor for violence. Patient aggression towards staff is often present in a hospital setting but the extent, type and variation among various occupations and roles are not known. This research examines the type and frequency of aggression experienced by healthcare staff, using a previously used measure the POPAS-NZ, which is a short pen and paper survey. Responses were gathered from 227 people working in a single district health board. Responses showed verbal anger was experienced by 93% of healthcare workers in the previous year and physical aggression was experienced by 65% of respondents. Also, 38% of staff reported experiencing a physical assault in the previous year. When analysed by role it was found that nurses and support staff experienced the greatest number of aggressive incidents compared to doctors and allied health staff. No effects of gender of the healthcare worker were found. Psychiatric units showed greater levels of destructive behaviour and attempted assaults but were similar to other areas of the hospital on all other measures. These results demonstrate many hospital staff, of all roles and workplaces experience aggression on a frequent basis. Implications for staff training are discussed.

  18. Public policy and regulatory strategies in the global climate change context: opportunities and limitations of programmatic CDM; Politicas publicas e estrategias regulatorias no contexto das mudancas climaticas globais: oportunidades e limitacoes do MDL programatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeiro, Viviane; Simoes, Andre Felipe; Januzzi, Gilberto M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Planejamento de Sistemas Energeticos

    2008-07-01

    Carbon Market and its implications to reduce green house effect has been broadly discussed in the context of global climate change. This paper intends to analyze the new regulation of global climate change since Programmatic CDM was created, describing the proceeds to its implementation and discussing limitations and opportunities analyzes of this mechanism as a tool to obtain alternative energy source. It is discussed the challenges and opportunities about CDM programs in the international legal system in which Kyoto Protocol is based, as well as its contribution to attain benefits to global climate system and quality of social life. (author)

  19. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

  20. Effectiveness of Pharmacy Student-Led Health Education in Adults Experiencing Homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Ashton E; Karst, Allison C

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of pharmacy student-led education in adults experiencing homelessness. Five groups of pharmacy students each developed three Bingo games focused on a primary care health topic (asthma, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, smoking cessation). Each group delivered the content via a one-hour class offered to adults experiencing homelessness at a local outreach organization. Class participants completed a seven-question survey following each class. Thirty-seven surveys were completed. Results indicated the pharmacy student-led classes were effective in increasing knowledge for the health topic presented. All participants indicated they would attend a future class led by pharmacy students. Adults experiencing homelessness find learning from pharmacy students about health-related topics effective.

  1. Experiencing flow in different types of physical activity intervention programs: three randomized studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Strahler, K.; Krustrup, Peter

    2010-01-01

    exercise intervention groups experience rather high levels of flow regardless of whether the intervention is a team or individual sport. Differences in experiencing flow, worry and exertion as well as physiological improvements could be found for the different types of sports and the two genders......This study explores whether inactive individuals can experience flow, a rewarding, psychological state, during an exercise intervention and if there are differences according to the type of intervention they perform. Furthermore, the study investigates if experiencing flow is connected......, with the male football group having the highest score for physiological improvement and the lowest score for worry. A connection between experiencing flow and physiological improvement could not be found. Future research should investigate the influence that the participant's gender and also the type of sport...

  2. Virtual Distance and Soundstage, and their Impacts on Experienced Emotional Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Research from animal ethology and affective neuroscience suggest that a listener’s perceived distance from a signal source can alter their experienced emotional valence of the music. Furthermore, appraisal theories of emotion suggest that emotionally valenced responses will diverge according...... to the type of emotion presented. For these exploratory investigations, subjects listen to selected musical excerpts on speakers in combination with a tactile transducer attached to their chair. The listening sessions are recorded on EEG supported by subject feedback responses. My hypothesis is that musical...... stimuli should cause stronger valenced responses in the nearfield than at a distance. Thus, music experienced as being negatively valenced at a distance should be more negatively valenced in nearfield, and music that is experienced as having a positive valence at a distance should be more positively...

  3. Making Sense of Experienced Teachers’ Interactive Decisions: Implications for Expertise in Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Gün

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers’ decision making has always been an area of curiosity in many studies related to teachers and teaching. One approach to understanding teachers’ decisions is through the analysis of their reflection-in-action behaviours. This study, based on the premise that one can gain understanding from examining experienced teachers’ classroom performances, focuses on the interactive decisions made by ten experienced language teachers. The study presents the findings of an analysis of similarities in the motivations behind teachers’ interactive decisions, as demonstrated in their verbal reports following the video recorded lesson observations. These findings show that there are both shared pedagogical and affective attributes among participant teachers. These results, and the insight they give into experienced teachers’ decision making are potentially beneficial for all pre-service and practising teachers.

  4. Expected and experienced quality as predictors of intention to purchase four new processsed beef products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Faiza; Grunert, Klaus G

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores consumers‟ perception of quality of new processed beef products and the role of expected and experienced quality in the formation of consumer‟s purchase intentions. Based on the Total Food Quality Model, a conceptual framework is developed that relates cue evaluation, expected...... quality, experienced quality, purchase motive fulfillment and purchase intention. Structural equation modeling is used to test the framework with data from a sample of 201 respondents. Results show that cue evaluations, expected/experienced quality and purchase motive fulfillment all are predictors...... of purchase intention, but that their weight (as measured by path coefficients in a structural equation model) and their causal interrelationship differ between purchase intentions before and after taste trial. Implications for the introduction of new beef products are discussed....

  5. Differences in Eye and Hand Movements of Novice and Experienced Press Operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Soo; Kim, Yu Chang

    1997-01-01

    Presses are very widely used in industrial and commercial companies and are often the source of serious accidents occurring during operation. Most of the accidents are due to inadequate training of novice operators. Continuous recordings of eye and hand movements of five novice operators and five experienced operators in press operation were made. Significant difference between novice and experienced operators was observed in eye fixation time, eye movement patterns, hand dwell time, and eye-hand coordination. Also, differences were observed in spatial distribution of eye fixations during the die-closing portion of a stroke. There were no significant differences between novice and experienced operators in the eye and the hand movement time. The results could be used as basic data to establish a guide determining the method and training period to train novice operators.

  6. Practicing what we know: Multicultural counseling competence among clinical psychology trainees and experienced multicultural psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Radhika; Saules, Karen; Young, Amy; Grey, Melissa J; Gillem, Angela R; Nabors, Nina A; Byrd, Michelle R; Jefferson, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Multicultural (MC) competence is considered a necessary skill for clinical and counseling psychologists; however, there is little to no research on the assessment of demonstrated multicultural counseling competence (DMCCC) of clinical psychology graduate students. In this study, we developed a MC assessment instrument to assess DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students compared with MC-experienced psychologists. In addition, we assessed for differences between the endorsement of MC-appropriate strategies and actual use of these strategies in clinical practice, both by MC-experienced psychologists and clinical psychology students. Results revealed significant differences between the DMCCC of clinical psychology graduate students and MC-experienced psychologists. Significant differences also emerged between endorsement of strategies as multiculturally appropriate and likelihood of actual use of these strategies. Findings suggest that future training and competence models should incorporate participants' ability to not only identify multiculturally appropriate strategies but also use these strategies in therapy.

  7. Safety as experienced by patients themselves: a Finnish survey of the most recent period of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlström, Merja; Partanen, Pirjo; Turunen, Hannele

    2014-06-01

    We examined patients' experiences of patient safety and participation in promoting safe care during their most recent care period. A survey of patients (N = 175) revealed that treatment, medication, and device safety were mostly experienced as very good or excellent, but responses varied by age and experience. Patients ages 66-75 were most critical of treatment and medication safety. Device safety was rated the worst aspect of safety. Twenty percent of respondents had experienced errors at some time during their care. Patients who had experienced errors and those who were treated at inpatient wards versus a day surgery unit were most critical towards patient participation. Open and transparent error management involving patients is needed to promote treatment, medication, and especially device safety. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Experiencing information seeking and learning: a study of the interaction between two phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Limberg

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Reports the design and findings of a research project for a doctoral thesis on information seeking and use in a learning context. Theoretical frames were found in LIS use and user studies and in phenomenographic learning theory. The empirical study was conducted in a naturalistic setting with a group of 25 high school seniors. Phenomenographic method, designed to investigate variation in people's ways of experiencing phenomena in the world, was used. Three major ways of experiencing information seeking and use were identified; (a fact-finding, (b balancing information in order to make correct choices, (c scrutinizing and analysing. The variation in information seeking and use interacted closely with variation in learning outcomes. These findings form a basis for further research on variation in users' ways of experiencing the content of information. They also provide a basis for didactic development of information literacy instruction.

  9. Who Receives Confrontation in Recovery Houses and when is it Experienced as Supportive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L

    2009-01-01

    The Alcohol and Drug Confrontation Scale (ADCS) is a 72-item instrument that measures a construct of confrontation defined as warnings about potential harm associated with alcohol and drug use. This analysis describes the characteristics of individuals entering residential recovery homes (N=323) who received confrontation and when it was experienced as supportive. A large proportion reported receiving at least one confrontational statement (80%), most commonly from family/friends (71%). Individuals who did and did not receive confrontation did not differ by demographics, but those receiving confrontation had more recent substance use, higher perceived costs of sobriety and more severe family and psychiatric problems. Differences were noted in confrontation from the criminal justice system versus family/friends. Overall, residents experienced confrontation as supportive regardless of who confronted them. Residents who experienced confrontation the most helpful were those with higher levels of substance use and those who believed maintaining sobriety would be difficult.

  10. Exercise dependence, social physique anxiety, and social support in experienced and inexperienced bodybuilders and weightlifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, R.; Hale, B.; Smith, D.; Collins, D.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To investigate psychological correlates of exercise dependence in experienced and inexperienced bodybuilders and weightlifters. Secondary objectives included measuring social physique anxiety, bodybuilding identity, and social support among bodybuilders and weightlifters. Methods—Thirty five experienced bodybuilders, 31 inexperienced bodybuilders, and 23 weightlifters completed the bodybuilding dependence scale, a bodybuilding version of the athletic identity measurement scale, the social physique anxiety scale, and an adapted version of the social support survey-clinical form. Results—A between subjects multivariate analysis of variance was calculated on the scores of the three groups of lifters for the four questionnaires. Univariate F tests and follow up tests indicated that experienced bodybuilders scored significantly higher than inexperienced bodybuilders and weightlifters on bodybuilding dependence (pbodybuilding identity (pbodybuilders exhibit more exercise dependence, show greater social support behaviour, and experience less social physique anxiety than inexperienced bodybuilders and weightlifters. Key Words: bodybuilding; exercise dependence; social physical anxiety; social support; athletic identity PMID:11131230

  11. Global pattern of experienced and anticipated discrimination reported by people with major depressive disorder : A cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lasalvia, A.; Zoppei, S.; van Boxtel, T.; Bonetto, C.; Crisofalo, D.; Wahlbeck, K.; Vasseur Bacle, S.; van Audenhove, C.; van Weeghel, J.; Reneses, B.; Germanavicius, A.; Economou, M.; Lanfredi, M.; Ando, S.; Sartorius, N.; Lopez-Ibor, J.J.; Thornicroft, G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is the third leading contributor to the worldwide burden of disease. We assessed the nature and severity of experienced and anticipated discrimination reported by adults with major depressive disorder worldwide. Moreover, we investigated whether experienced discrimination is

  12. Pilot Study on Clinical Effectiveness of Autofluorescence Imaging for Early Gastric Cancer Diagnosis by Less Experienced Endoscopists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Tada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess and compare effectiveness of Autofluorescence imaging (AFI in diagnosis of early gastric cancer (EGC between experienced and less experienced endoscopists. Fifty selected images (20 neoplastic lesions and 30 benign lesions/areas of both white light endoscopy (WLE and AFI were blindly reviewed by two groups; first consisted of five experienced endoscopists and second included five less experienced endoscopists. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 70%, 78%, and 75%, respectively, for AFI and 81%, 76%, and 78%, respectively, for WLE in the experienced group. In the less experienced group, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 81% and 80%, respectively, for AFI and 65%, 77%, and 72%, respectively, for WLE. Interobserver variability for the less experienced group was better with AFI than WLE. AFI improved sensitivity of endoscopic diagnosis of neoplastic lesions by less experienced endoscopists, and its use could beneficially enhance the clinical effectiveness of EGC screening.

  13. Risk, resilience, and the rorschach: a longitudinal study of children who experienced sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Douglas; Heinze, Hillary J; Arble, Eamonn

    2013-01-01

    Experiencing sexual abuse increases the risk that children will report or otherwise demonstrate problems with emotion, behavior, and health. This longitudinal study of 44 children who experienced sexual abuse examined whether information processing as assessed via the Rorschach Inkblot Test was associated with child-reported depression symptoms assessed via the Children's Depression Inventory (Kovacs, 1992) concurrently and an average of 15 months later. Children whose Rorschach protocols were relatively free of scores suggesting intense distress, complex processing, and sexual content were more likely to experience remission of depression symptoms at follow-up. Findings provide incremental validity for certain Rorschach indexes to inform prognosis regarding depression symptoms and perhaps their treatment.

  14. Apparatuses and methods of determining if a person operating equipment is experiencing an elevated cognitive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Michael L.; Keller, Paul Edwin; Amaya, Ivan A.

    2015-06-16

    A method of, and apparatus for, determining if a person operating equipment is experiencing an elevated cognitive load, wherein the person's use of a device at a first time is monitored so as to set a baseline signature. Then, at a later time, the person's use of the device is monitored to determine the person's performance at the second time, as represented by a performance signature. This performance signature can then be compared against the baseline signature to predict whether the person is experiencing an elevated cognitive load.

  15. Does Teaching Experience Matter? The Beliefs and Practices of Beginning and Experienced Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleon, Imelda S.; Tan, Yuen Sze Michelle; Cho, Young Hoan

    2018-01-01

    This study utilized multiple data sources to examine the beliefs about learning and teaching physics and the instructional practices of five beginning teachers and seven experienced teachers from Singapore. Our study was implemented in the unique context of teachers teaching the topic of electricity to students grouped according to academic…

  16. Early Care and Education for Young Children Experiencing Homelessness. Best Practices in Homeless Education Brief Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Given the number of young children experiencing homelessness and its devastating impacts on development, preschool programs play a critical role in meeting these children's need for quality early care and education; yet, most young homeless children do not receive early childhood services. Many barriers limit access to early childhood programs for…

  17. Exploring the Needs of Students Experiencing Homelessness from School Counselors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlik, Stacey A.; Brady, Jennifer; Gavin, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    An increased understanding of the needs of students experiencing homelessness will better inform educational and clinical practices to ensure student success. Through an analysis of survey data using the Knowledge and Skills with Homeless Students Survey (Gaenzle & Bryan, 2013), this exploratory study applied a mixed methods approach to assess…

  18. Older people experiencing homelessness show marked impairment on tests of frontal lobe function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogoz, Astrid; Burke, David

    2016-03-01

    Reported rates of mild and moderate cognitive impairment in older people experiencing homelessness range from 5-80%. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of cognitive impairment in older people experiencing homelessness in the inner city of Sydney, Australia. Men and women experiencing homelessness aged 45 years and over in the inner city were screened for cognitive impairment. Participants who scored 26 or below on the mini-mental state examination and/or were impaired on any one of the clock-drawing test, the verbal fluency test and the trail-making test, part B were then assessed with a semi-structured interview, including the 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. Screening of 144 men and 27 women aged between 45 years and 93 years identified cognitive impairment in 78%. Subsequently, high rates of mental and physical illness were identified, and 75% of subjects who were cognitively impaired performed poorly on frontal lobe tests. The trail-making test, part B was the most sensitive measure of frontal function. This study demonstrated that a large majority of older people experiencing homelessness, in the inner city of a high-income country, showed impairment on tests of frontal lobe function, a finding that could have significant implications for any medical or psychosocial intervention. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. [Ruminations as predictors of negative and positive effects of experienced traumatic events in medical rescue workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogińska-Bulik, Nina; Juczyński, Zygfryd

    Emergency service workers are exposed to experienced traumatic events related to the nature of their work. The study aimed at identifying the role of cognitive processes, namely different forms of ruminations, as predictors of consequences of experienced trauma. The data on 120 medical rescuers (80 men, 40 women) who had experienced in their worksite at least 1 traumatic event in the last 5 years, were analyzed. The age of the participants ranged from 25 to 61 years (mean (M) = 38.07; standard deviation (SD) = 8.92). The following Polish versions of standardized tools were used: the Impact of Event Scale - Revised (IES-R), the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) and the Event Related Rumination Inventory (ERRI). The results of regression analyses indicated 2 significant predictors, intrusive rumination for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and deliberate rumination for posttraumatic growth (PTG). Ruminations play an essential role in the occurrence of negative and positive outcomes of experienced trauma. The associations between PTSD and PTG, with different forms of ruminations, may be used in therapy, treating the appearance of intrusive rumination as an opportunity to turn towards active engagement in deliberate rumination, that facilitates the occurrence of posttraumatic growth. Med Pr 2016;67(2):201-211. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  20. Ruminations as predictors of negative and positive effects of experienced traumatic events in medical rescue workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ogińska-Bulik

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergency service workers are exposed to experienced traumatic events related to the nature of their work. The study aimed at identifying the role of cognitive processes, namely different forms of ruminations, as predictors of consequences of experienced trauma. Material and Methods: The data on 120 medical rescuers (80 men, 40 women who had experienced in their worksite at least 1 traumatic event in the last 5 years, were analyzed. The age of the participants ranged from 25 to 61 years (mean (M = 38.07; standard deviation (SD = 8.92. The following Polish versions of standardized tools were used: the Impact of Event Scale – Revised (IES-R, the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI and the Event Related Rumination Inventory (ERRI. Results: The results of regression analyses indicated 2 significant predictors, intrusive rumination for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and deliberate rumination for posttraumatic growth (PTG. Conclusions: Ruminations play an essential role in the occurrence of negative and positive outcomes of experienced trauma. The associations between PTSD and PTG, with different forms of ruminations, may be used in therapy, treating the appearance of intrusive rumination as an opportunity to turn towards active engagement in deliberate rumination, that facilitates the occurrence of posttraumatic growth. Med Pr 2016;67(2:201–211

  1. The Importance of Taste for Food Demand and the Experienced Taste Effect of Healthy Labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunström, Linda; Nordström, Leif Jonas

    This paper quantitatively analyzes the importance of taste versus health in food demand, as well as the effect on consumers’ experienced taste of the non-intrinsic value of healthy labels. Our analysis is based on taste experiments and Vickrey second price auctions on potato chips and bread. Our...

  2. Physical Activity and Quality of Life Experienced by Highly Active Individuals with Physical Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Stancil, Michael; Hardin, Brent; Bryant, Lance

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined links between physical activity and quality of life experienced by individuals with physical disabilities recruited from a wheelchair user's basketball tournament. The participants included 12 male and 14 female adults between the ages of 18-54 (M = 31.12, SD = 10.75) who all reported one or more condition(s) that…

  3. The influence of experiencing success in math on math anxiety, perceived math competence, and math performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, B.R.J.; Louwerse, J.; Straatemeier, M.; van der Ven, S.H.G.; Klinkenberg, S.; van der Maas, H.L.J.

    2013-01-01

    It was investigated whether children would experience less math anxiety and feel more competent when they, independent of ability level, experienced high success rates in math. Comparable success rates were achieved by adapting problem difficulty to individuals' ability levels with a

  4. Self-Concept and Depression among Children Who Experienced the Death of a Family Member

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong T.; Scott, Amy N.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the moderating effects of physical and academic self-concept on depression among children who experienced the death of a family member. Data from Phase III of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care was used in the present study. Having a higher physical self-concept…

  5. Film Selection in a Cinematherapy Intervention with Preadolescents Experiencing Parental Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsick, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Film selection and children's reactions to films are discussed in this article based on a qualitative multiple-case study with three preadolescent-aged children experiencing parental divorce. Six films were selected based on recommended films in cinematherapy. Although many films have been recommended for cinematherapy, multiple participants'…

  6. Situated Teacher Quality: A Case Study of an Experienced Elementary School Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolman, Joni S.

    2017-01-01

    This case study examines how an experienced teacher's practice and pedagogy differs across two high-accountability urban charter schools in the United States of America (USA). Drawing on semi-structured interviews and participant observations, the findings describe variances in Rebecca's planning, use of classroom time, and curriculum flexibility,…

  7. Relevance of Student and Contextual School Variables in Explaining a Student's Severity of Violence Experienced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Ton

    2015-01-01

    Teachers conceptualise and interpret violent behaviour of secondary students in different ways. They also differ in their estimates of the relevance of student and contextual school variables when explaining the severity of violence experienced by students. Research can assist here by explicating the role of different types of contextual school…

  8. Postsecondary Strengths, Challenges, and Supports Experienced by Foster Care Alumni College Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Amy M.; Jones, Kevin R.; Emerson, John C.; Mucha, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Young people transitioning from foster care to college experience unique identities and circumstances that make being successful in college especially challenging. We used qualitative survey data from 248 college graduates who were formerly in foster care to explore the strengths, challenges, and supports they experienced while in college that…

  9. Multigenerational Learning for Expanding the Educational Involvement of Bilinguals Experiencing Academic Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Álvarez, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Focusing on two bilingual children experiencing learning difficulties, I explore the scientific representations these students generate in an afterschool programme where they have opportunities to exercise agency. In the programme, children use a digital camera to document science in their lives and engage in conversations about the products they…

  10. Stigma experienced by people using mental health services in San Diego County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkin, Andrew; Lale, Rachel; Sklar, Marisa; Center, Kimberly C; Gilmer, Todd; Fowler, Chris; Heller, Richard; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how individuals struggling with severe mental illness experience stigma along multiple dimensions including their experiences of discrimination by others, their unwillingness to disclose information about their mental health, and their internalization or rejection of the negative and positive aspects of having mental health problems. This cross-sectional study employs descriptive analyses and linear regression to assess the relationship between demographics, mental health diagnoses and self-reported stigma among people receiving mental health services in a large and ethnically diverse county public mental health system (n = 1,237) in 2009. We used the King Stigma Scale to measure three factors related to stigma: discrimination, disclosure, and positive aspects of mental illness. Most people (89.7 %) reported experiencing some discrimination from having mental health problems. Regression analyses revealed that younger people in treatment experienced more stigma related to mental health problems. Women reported experiencing more stigma than men, but men were less likely to endorse the potentially positive aspects of facing mental health challenges than women. Although people with mood disorders reported more discomfort with disclosing mental illness than people with schizophrenia, they did not report experiencing more discrimination than people with schizophrenia. Study findings suggest that the multidimensional experiences of stigma differ as a function of age, gender, and diagnosis. Importantly, these findings should inform anti-stigma efforts by describing different potential treatment barriers due to experiences of stigma among people using mental health services, especially among younger people and women who may be more susceptible to stigma.

  11. Hegemonic Masculinity in Sport Education: Case Studies of Experienced In-Service Teachers with Teaching Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, YuChun; Curtner-Smith, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Research has revealed that while pre-service teachers (PTs) with coaching orientations reinforce sexism and masculine bias, those with teaching orientations combat and reject it. The purpose of this study was to examine four sport education (SE) seasons taught by two experienced in-service teachers for the presence or absence of sexism and…

  12. Learning from the Pros: How Experienced Designers Translate Instructional Design Models into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, Peggy A.; York, Cindy S.; Gedik, Nuray

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how experienced designers approach complex design problems provides new perspectives on how they translate instructional design (ID) models and processes into practice. In this article, the authors describe the results of a study in which 16 "seasoned" designers shared compelling stories from practice that offered insights into their…

  13. Association Between Experiencing Relational Bullying and Adolescent Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Kayleigh L; Spencer, Neil H; Whiting, Lisa; Brooks, Fiona M

    2017-11-01

    Bullying is a public health concern for the school-aged population, however, the health outcomes associated with the subtype of relational bullying are less understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between relational bullying and health-related quality of life (HRQL) among young people. This study utilized data from 5335 students aged 11-15 years, collected as part of the 2014 Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) study conducted in England. Data were collected through self-completed surveys. Multilevel analysis modeled the relationship between relational bullying and HRQL. Demographic variables (sex, age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status) and other forms of bullying were controlled for. Experiencing relational bullying had a significant negative association with HRQL whilst controlling for other forms of bullying. Weekly relational bullying resulted in an estimated 5.352 (95% confidence interval (CI), -4.178, -6.526) decrease in KIDSCREEN-10 score compared with those not experiencing relational bullying. Experiencing relational bullying is associated with poorer HRQL. The findings question the perception of relational bullying as being a predominantly female problem. Girls were more likely to report experiencing relational bullying, but the negative association with HRQL was equal for boys and girls. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  14. [The quality of sibling relation who have experienced family transitions and those who have not].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Marie; Beaudry, Madeleine; Drapeau, Sylvie; Nadeau, France; Charbonneau, Cécile

    2002-01-01

    In this study, similarities and differences in sibling relationships between children who have experienced family transitions and those who have not are examined. Comparisons are made between children who live in intact families, those whose parents have separated, and those who live in substitute care regarding the quality of their relationships with one of their siblings. More specifically, 4 dimensions describing the quality of sibling relationships are compared: Warmth/Closeness, Conflict, Relative Status/Power, and Rivalry (Furman & Buhrmester, 1985). The sample is made up of 3 groups of children (N = 158) aged between 8 and 12 years old: children living in intact families (n = 101), children who have experienced parental separation (n = 35), and children living in substitute care (n = 22). Results indicate differences on dimensions of Warmth/Closeness, Conflict, and Relative Status/Power. Different patterns of responses between the children who have experienced family transitions and those who have not are observed for the dimensions of Conflict and Power. The significant difference observed between the groups for the dimension of Warmth appears difficult to explain. Discussion of these results emphasizes the importance of the relationship between brothers and sisters experiencing family transition.

  15. Stressors Experienced by Nursing Students Enrolled in Baccalaureate Second Degree Accelerated Registered Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Charlene

    2017-01-01

    A mounting concern throughout the country is a current and growing nursing shortage. In order to meet the growing demand of nurses, many colleges have created baccalaureate second degree accelerated registered nursing programs. Stressors, experienced by nursing students in these accelerated programs, may affect their retention. A deeper…

  16. "Sad, Just Sad": A Woman with a Learning Disability Experiencing Bereavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alison; Bell, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    This case study considers the psychological assessment, formulation and treatment of Hannah, a woman with a learning disability who recently experienced the death of her mother. Death still remains a challenging and often taboo subject. Moreover, when the grief is of a person with a learning disability, this combines with underlying difficulties…

  17. Writing profiles: the effect of the writing mode on pausing and revision patterns of experienced writers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waes, Luuk; van Waes, L.; Schellens, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated how writing processes are affected by physical aspects of the task environment, specifically the use of a word processor, with respect to patterns of pausing and revision. Consistent with the tradition of cognitive writing research, the writing processes of experienced writers were

  18. Communication Strategies in Experienced vs. Inexperienced Teachers' Talk: A Sign of Transformation in Teacher Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani Doqaruni, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Due to the fact that research in areas related to "teacher experience" is in short supply, the purpose of the present study is to fill the gap in L2 teacher education through comparing two groups of teachers, namely inexperienced vs. experienced, to see whether differences between them in the course of communication strategies (CSs)…

  19. Young Children's References to Temporal Attributes of Allegedly Experienced Events in the Course of Forensic Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Yael; Lamb, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Developmental differences in references to temporal attributes of allegedly experienced events were examined in 250 forensic interviews of 4- to 10-year-old alleged victims of sexual abuse. Children's ages, the specific temporal attributes referenced, and the types of memory tapped by the interviewers' questions significantly affected the quantity…

  20. Exploring the Attractiveness of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) among Experienced Drug Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, J.G.C.; Nabben, T.; Keiman, D.; Haanschoten, G.; Korf, D.

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) appear yearly on the European market (81 for the first time in 2013, adding to a total of over 350 NPS). Using semi-structured interviews with 25 Dutch experienced recreational drug users, the role of the Internet and friends in gathering and

  1. Contraceptive Attitudes and Intention to Use Condoms in Sexually Experienced and Inexperienced Adolescent Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleck, Joseph H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Assessed contraceptive attitudes and intention to use a condom at next intercourse among 1,880 adolescent males. Findings showed that about three-fifths of sexually experienced and inexperienced adolescent males intending to have sex in the next year reported an "almost certain chance" of condom use with a hypothetical future partner. (Author/PVV)

  2. Role of the police in linking individuals experiencing mental health crises with mental health services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Rob H. S.; Broer, Jan; Tholen, Alfons J.; Winthorst, Wim H.; Visser, Ellen; Wiersma, Durk

    2012-01-01

    Background: The police are considered frontline professionals in managing individuals experiencing mental health crises. This study examines the extent to which these individuals are disconnected from mental health services, and whether the police response has an influence on re-establishing

  3. Family-School Strategies for Responding to the Needs of Children Experiencing Chronic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Kevin J.; Knopf, Herman; Williams, Reginald; Fields, M. Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Children experience chronic stress in ways that can impair their brain functioning and overall development. This article articulates the unique needs of children experiencing chronic stress and discusses strategies that families and schools can use to support and strengthen children's development across the social, emotional, and cognitive domains.

  4. The Influence of Experiencing Success in Math on Math Anxiety, Perceived Math Competence, and Math Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Brenda R. J.; Louwerse, Jolien; Straatemeier, Marthe; Van der Ven, Sanne H. G.; Klinkenberg, Sharon; Van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2013-01-01

    It was investigated whether children would experience less math anxiety and feel more competent when they, independent of ability level, experienced high success rates in math. Comparable success rates were achieved by adapting problem difficulty to individuals' ability levels with a computer-adaptive program. A total of 207 children (grades 3-6)…

  5. Exploring Negative Emotion in Women Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence: Shame, Guilt, and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, J. Gayle; McNiff, Judiann; Clapp, Joshua D.; Olsen, Shira A.; Avery, Megan L.; Hagewood, J. Houston

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the association of shame and guilt with PTSD among women who had experienced intimate partner violence (IPV). Sixty-three women were assessed by a research clinic serving the mental health needs of women IPV survivors. Results indicated that shame, guilt-related distress, and guilt-related cognitions showed significant…

  6. Experienced Teachers' Perspectives on Cultural and Social Class Diversity: Which Differences Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Andrea C.; Santoro, Ninetta

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot study that investigated the beliefs, values, and pedagogies of experienced high school teachers who worked with student populations of non-English speaking and economically disadvantaged immigrants or refugees in Australia. Qualitative research methods, including focus groups and in-depth individual interviews with…

  7. It's All about Location, Location, Location: Children's Memory for the "Where'' of Personally Experienced Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Doydum, Ayzit O.; Pathman, Thanujeni; Larkina, Marina; Guler, O. Evren; Burch, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Episodic memory is defined as the ability to recall specific past events located in a particular time and place. Over the preschool and into the school years, there are clear developmental changes in memory for when events took place. In contrast, little is known about developmental changes in memory for where events were experienced. In the…

  8. Primary care management of non-English-speaking refugees who have experienced trauma: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Sondra S

    2013-08-07

    Refugees are a vulnerable class of immigrants who have fled their countries, typically following war, violence, or natural disaster, and who have frequently experienced trauma. In primary care, engaging refugees to develop a positive therapeutic relationship is challenging. Relative to care of other primary care patients, there are important differences in symptom evaluation and developing treatment plans. To discuss the importance of and methods for obtaining refugee trauma histories, to recognize the psychological and physical manifestations of trauma characteristic of refugees, and to explore how cultural differences and limited English proficiency affect the refugee patient-clinician relationship and how to best use interpreters. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched from 1984 to 2012. Additional citations were obtained from lists of references from select research and review articles on this topic. Engagement with a refugee patient who has experienced trauma requires an understanding of the trauma history and the trauma-related symptoms. Mental health symptoms and chronic pain are commonly experienced by refugee patients. Successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach that is culturally acceptable to the refugee. Refugee patients frequently have experienced trauma requiring a directed history and physical examination, facilitated by an interpreter if necessary. Intervention should be sensitive to the refugee's cultural mores.

  9. Barriers of delivering oral health care to older people experienced by dentists: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bots-Vantspijker, P.C.; Vanobbergen, J.N.; Schols, J.M.; Schaub, R.M.; Bots, C.P.; Baat, C. de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify barriers of delivering oral health care to older people experienced by dentists. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was carried out for studies published in the period January 1990-December 2011, using free text and MESH term search strategies for PubMed (Medline),

  10. Barriers of delivering oral health care to older people experienced by dentists : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bots-VantSpijker, Pieternella C.; Vanobbergen, Jacques N. O.; Schols, Jos M. G. A.; Schaub, Rob M. H.; Bots, Casper P.; de Baat, Cees

    Objective To identify barriers of delivering oral health care to older people experienced by dentists. Methods A comprehensive literature search was carried out for studies published in the period January 1990-December 2011, using free text and MESH term search strategies for PubMed (Medline),

  11. Acute effects of ayahuasca on neuropsychological performance: differences in executive function between experienced and occasional users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouso, José Carlos; Fábregas, Josep Maria; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Riba, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    Ayahuasca, a South American psychotropic plant tea containing the psychedelic 5-HT2A receptor agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine, has been shown to increase regional cerebral blood flow in prefrontal brain regions after acute administration to humans. Despite interactions at this level, neuropsychological studies have not found cognitive deficits in abstinent long-term users. Here, we wished to investigate the effects of acute ayahuasca intake on neuropsychological performance, specifically on working memory and executive function. Twenty-four ayahuasca users (11 long-term experienced users and 13 occasional users) were assessed in their habitual setting using the Stroop, Sternberg, and Tower of London tasks prior to and following ayahuasca intake. Errors in the Sternberg task increased, whereas reaction times in the Stroop task decreased and accuracy was maintained for the whole sample following ayahuasca intake. Interestingly, results in the Tower of London showed significantly increased execution and resolution times and number of movements for the occasional but not the experienced users. Additionally, a correlation analysis including all subjects showed that impaired performance in the Tower of London was inversely correlated with lifetime ayahuasca use. Acute ayahuasca administration impaired working memory but decreased stimulus-response interference. Interestingly, detrimental effects on higher cognition were only observed in the less experienced group. Rather than leading to increased impairment, greater prior exposure to ayahuasca was associated with reduced incapacitation. Compensatory or neuromodulatory effects associated with long-term ayahuasca intake could underlie preserved executive function in experienced users.

  12. Exploring Novice and Experienced Teachers' Perceptions of Motivational Constructs with Adolescent Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesman, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare novice and experienced teachers' perceptions of student motivation at the high school level and to determine if the teachers were likely to incorporate research-based techniques. Survey data were collected on the following motivational constructs: intrinsic and extrinsic motivation; performance, mastery,…

  13. Differences between experienced and student teachers’perceptions and interpretations of classroom management events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, Charlotte; Van den Bogert, Niek; Jarodzka, Halszka; Boshuizen, Els

    2013-01-01

    Wolff, C., Van den Bogert, N., Jarodzka, H., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2012, November). Differences between experienced and student teachers’perceptions and interpretations of classroom management events. Presented at the Inter-university Center for Educational Sciences Fall School, Girona, Spain.

  14. Multiple Identity Considerations among African American Christian Men Experiencing Same-Sex Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarhouse, Mark A.; Nowacki-Butzen, Stephanie; Brooks, D. Fredrica

    2009-01-01

    The authors explored the experiences of African American men who identified as Christian and experienced same-sex attraction. Participants completed an online questionnaire addressing experiences of same-sex attraction; meaning attributed to their attractions; the sharing of their experiences with others; and perceptions regarding the intersection…

  15. Effects of Grouping Forms, Student Gender and Ability Level on the Pleasure Experienced in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentillon-Kaestner, Vanessa; Patelli, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the main and interaction effects of grouping forms, student gender and ability level on the pleasure experienced in physical education (PE). The participants included 178 secondary school students (M = 13.17, SD = 0.81), with 72 students enrolled in a basketball unit and 106 students enrolled in an…

  16. Making Sense of Experienced Teachers' Interactive Decisions: Implications for Expertise in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gün, Bahar

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' decision making has always been an area of curiosity in many studies related to teachers and teaching. One approach to understanding teachers' decisions is through the analysis of their reflection-in-action behaviours. This study, based on the premise that one can gain understanding from examining experienced teachers' classroom…

  17. Supporting children when providing services to families experiencing multiple problems : Perspectives and evidence on programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knorth, Erik J.; Knot-Dickscheit, Jana; Thoburn, June

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest amongst researchers, practitioners and policy-makers in approaches to understanding and ways of helping parents, children and the communities in which they live to respond to ‘families experiencing multiple problems’ (FEMPs). There is a strong need for

  18. Social Support as a Contributor to Student Teachers' Experienced Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, Sanna; Pietarinen, Janne; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Toom, Auli; Soini, Tiina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to gain better understanding of the dynamics of the social support system adopted in teacher education and its significance for the student teachers' experienced well-being. The focus was on exploring the extent to which empowering "emotional," "informational" or "instrumental" support is…

  19. The Relationship among Parenting Styles Experienced during Childhood, Anxiety, Motivation, and Academic Success in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marc; Dorso, Erin; Azhar, Aisha; Renk, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the relationships among parenting styles experienced in childhood, anxiety, motivation, and academic success in college students. Results suggested that fathers' authoritative parenting was related to decreases, whereas mothers' authoritarian parenting was related to increases, in college students' anxiety. Further,…

  20. Recovery-Promoting Care as Experienced by Persons with Severe Mental Illness and Substance Misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruce, Gunilla; Ojehagen, Agneta; Nordstrom, Monica

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores recovery-promoting care as experienced by persons with concomitant severe mental illness and substance misuse. Sixteen in-depth interviews, based on an interview guide concerning their experiences of health, life situation and care, were held with eight participants in an outpatient treatment programme. The analysis aimed to…

  1. Efficacy of Heartfulness Meditation in Moderating Vital Parameters - A Comparison Study of Experienced and New meditators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Amarnath G

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyse and compare the effect of a 30-minute Heartfulness meditation session on vital parameters of experienced and new meditators. Methodology: The study conducted on a mixed group of participants include both experienced and new meditators of various age groups, Body Mass Index (BMI; patients with known illness as well as healthy volunteers. Variations in heart rate, respiratory rate and systolic blood pressure is recorded before and after a 30-minute heartfulness meditation session and analysed statistically. Results: At baseline, average heart rate (HR and systolic blood pressure (SBP is significantly lower in experienced meditators compared to new meditators. Heartfulness meditation is highly significant in moderating HR, RR and SBP. Conclusion: A 30-minute session of Heartfulness meditation produces significant relaxation of the autonomic nervous system and favourably moderates basic vital parameters across all groups. This influence is higher in New meditators particularly the younger group probably because stress is more amplified due to greater responsibilities in life and meditation is an effective tool in reducing stress. The enthusiasm and open mindedness of youth to try new things is also contributing factor for getting better benefits from the heartfulness meditation session. In the case of experienced meditators, the elderly group showed greater changes, probably because they put in the time and effort to pursue the practice of meditation seriously, and thus able to derive a greater benefit.

  2. Determinants of food demand and the experienced taste effect of healthy labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunström, Linda; Nordström, Leif Jonas

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the importance of taste and health in food demand, as well as the effect on consumers’ experienced taste of the non-intrinsic value of healthy labels. Our analysis is based on taste experiments and Vickrey second price auctions on potato chips and bread. Our findings imply a l...

  3. Socio-Emotional Problems Experienced by Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonnen, Mulat; Hannu, Savolainen; Elina, Lehtomäki; Matti, Kuorelahti

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the socio-emotional problems experienced by deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students with those of hearing students in Ethiopia. The research involved a sample of 103 grade 4 students attending a special school for the deaf, a special class for the deaf and a regular school. Socio-emotional problems were measured using Goodman's…

  4. Factors associated with traumatic symptoms and internalizing problems among adolescents who experienced a traumatic event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deković, M.; Koning, I.M.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Buist, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify factors that are related to the traumatic symptoms and problem behavior among adolescents who experienced the New Years fire in 2001 in Volendam, The Netherlands. Three groups of factors were considered: pre-trauma (personality and coping), traumarelated

  5. An Assessment of Stress Experienced by Students in a Prepharmacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales-Gonzales, Patricia L.; Kranz, Peter L.; Granberry, Mark; Tanguma, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated stress levels experienced by students in a prepharmacy curriculum. A survey was used to evaluate perceived levels of stress, factors that contribute to stress, and mechanisms used to cope with stress. Participants were first year students enrolled in a Cooperative Pharmacy Program. Data were collected using an individual…

  6. Development and Implementation of a Psychoeducational Group for Ghanaian Adolescents Experiencing Parental Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkyi, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents development and informal assessment of a 10-week psychoeducational program designed for 8 adolescent group members experiencing parental divorce in a rural community in Ghana. Group design, cultural considerations, program implementation, and impacts are described. The literature review pertaining to group work as an…

  7. Interpersonal Interaction in Online Learning: Experienced Online Instructors' Perceptions of Influencing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Cindy S.; Richardson, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    A multitude of factors influence interpersonal interaction between students and instructors in an online course. This study examines perceptions of six experienced online instructors to determine factors they believe increase interaction among their students and between the students and instructor of online courses. The end result is an inventory…

  8. Example of "Character Education" Course Design in the Light of "Experienced Centred" Design for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Nida

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design the course "Character Education" in the light of the "experienced centred" design and to assert an example of "Character Education" course design for higher education students. The research was conducted during the 2015-2016 spring semester as an action research. The participants…

  9. Antipsychotic Medication Prescription Patterns in Adults with Developmental Disabilities Who Have Experienced Psychiatric Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Yona; Elserafi, Jonny

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic medication rates are high in adults with developmental disability. This study considered rates of antipsychotic use in 743 adults with developmental disability who had experienced a psychiatric crisis. Nearly half (49%) of these adults were prescribed antipsychotics. Polypharmacy was common with 22% of those prescribed antipsychotics…

  10. Psychological Symptoms and Concerns Experienced by International Students: Outreach Implications for Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyrazli, Senel

    2015-01-01

    This study examines psychological symptoms and concerns experienced by international students. Participants identified with a variety of psychological symptoms and concerns. The top three were related to academics (71%), career (60%), and stress (43%). In addition, 34% of the participants indicated being concerned about depression and/or anxiety.…

  11. Peer Counseling for Middle School Students Experiencing Family Divorce: A Deliberate Psychological Education Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinthall, Norman A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Designed peer counseling program in which 10 high school students co-led 5 groups of 8 middle school students each who were experiencing family divorce, and 14 high school students co-led groups of elementary and middle school students with problems in self-esteem, achievement, and social isolation. Findings demonstrated positive interactive…

  12. ICT supporting the assessment, explanation, and reduction possibilities of severity of violence experienced by secondary pupils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton

    2012-01-01

    Mooij, T. (2012, 19 September). ICT supporting the assessment, explanation, and reduction possibilities of severity of violence experienced by secondary pupils. Presentation at the ‘European Conference on Educational Research’ (ECER) of the ‘European Educational Research Association’ (EERA), Cádiz,

  13. Moved through Music: The Effect of Experienced Emotions on Performers' Movement Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zijl, Anemone G. W.; Luck, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    Do performers who feel sad move differently compared to those who express sadness? Although performers' expressive movements have been widely studied, little is known about how performers' experienced emotions affect such movements. To investigate this, we made 72 motion-capture recordings of eight violinists playing a melodic phrase in response…

  14. Counseling College Women Experiencing Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) is, by far, the most common eating disorder that college counseling professionals encounter among their female clients. Empirical evidence and best practice guidelines support use of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with women experiencing EDNOS. This article…

  15. Associations between Sexually Experienced Adolescents' Sources of Information about Sex and Sexual Risk Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor-Turner, Molly; Sieving, Renee E.; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Skay, Carol

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe prevalent informal sources of information about sex and examine associations between informal sources of information about sex and sexual risk outcomes among sexually experienced adolescents. Work involved the secondary analysis of data from the Minnesota Student Survey, a statewide survey to monitor…

  16. 76 FR 28997 - Extension of Employment Authorization for Haitian F-1 Nonimmigrant Students Experiencing Severe...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Experiencing Severe Economic Hardship as a Direct Result of the January 12, 2010 Earthquake in Haiti AGENCY: U... direct result of the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti. This notice extends the effective date of that..., 2010 earthquake in Haiti. See 75 FR 56120. The previous notice was effective from September 15, 2010...

  17. 77 FR 59942 - Extension of Employment Authorization for Haitian F-1 Nonimmigrant Students Experiencing Severe...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Experiencing Severe Economic Hardship as a Direct Result of the January 12, 2010 Earthquake in Haiti AGENCY: U... direct result of the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti. This notice extends the effective date of that... direct result of the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti. See 75 FR 56120, September 15, 2010. The...

  18. Mammographic positioning quality of newly trained versus experienced radiographers in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Timmers, Janine; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare mammographic positioning quality of new (NR) versus experienced screening radiographers (ER) in the Netherlands. Before starting to work in breast screening, NR must complete an education programme including a theoretical course (four days), practical training (six weeks),

  19. Hardiness Mediates Stress and Impact Level in ED Nurses Who Experienced a Violent Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Eun Nam; Kong, Kyung Ran; Jang, Moon Jung

    2017-11-01

    This secondary analysis examined the mediating effect of hardiness between stress and impact level in ED nurses who experienced a violent event. This correlational study was conducted from June to August 2014. We used the visual analog scale to measure stress level, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised to measure impact level after the violent event, and the Dispositional Resilience Scale to measure hardiness. We then analyzed mediating effects with the Sobel test. Data were collected in 31 emergency medical centers located in B city in Korea. Data from 321 ED nurses who experienced a violent event were analyzed. Most nurses (91.9%) were women, with a mean age of 28.73 years. The main outcome measure was the mediating effect of hardiness between stress and impact level after ED nurses experienced violence. We found that both violence-related stress (B = 0.22, P level from a violent event. Based on results of a Sobel test, hardiness partially mediated the relationship between violence-related stress and impact level from a violent event (Z = 2.03, P = .044). Hardiness had an effect on reducing the impact level of ED nurses who had experienced a violent event and had a mediating role in mitigating their stress. Therefore, we recommend the development of an intervention program that emphasizes the improvement of hardiness in ED nurses. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bridging the gap from university research to high-tech venture via experienced entrepreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeng, Jes; Kramer Overgaard, Majken; Murdock, Karen

    2015-01-01

    We report a new model for development of sustainable growth companies based on research from universities via systematic collaboration with experienced, external entrepreneurs having spin-out experience and market insight. The research has identified university structures that support the spinnin...

  1. Bridging the gap from research-to-high-technology ventures with experienced entrepreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer Overgaard, Majken; Murdock, Karen; Jensen, Monika Luniewska

    2015-01-01

    t: The paper outlines an initiative undertaken to increase the number of spin-outs from a research university. The Bridging the Gap (BtG) model takes a systematic approach to identify and match experienced external entrepreneurs at a very early stage in the technological development process...

  2. The role of rumination in the occurrence of positive effects of experienced traumatic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ogińska-Bulik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Cognitive processes play a significant role in both the negative and positive consequences of traumatic experiences. The aim of this research was to investigate the role of rumination in the occurrence of positive effects, in the form of posttraumatic growth, of experienced traumatic events. Participants and procedure Data were collected from 227 subjects who had experienced traumatic events, including cancer patients (31.30%, women who had experienced domestic violence (39.20%, and medical rescue workers exposed to traumatic events at work (29.50%. The age of participants ranged from 19 to 67 years (M = 40.12, SD = 13.28. The Posttraumatic Growth Inventory was used to measure positive changes, and the Event Related Rumination Inventory was used to assess the two types of ruminations (intrusive and deliberate. Results Both types of ruminations (intrusive and deliberate were positively correlated with the level of posttraumatic growth in the group of cancer patients, and deliberate ruminations were associated with posttraumatic growth in the group of women who had experienced domestic violence and in the medical rescue workers. The results of regression analysis confirmed a significant role of deliberate rumination. Conclusions The study of ruminations allows us to better explain the mechanisms underlying the consequences of traumatic experiences.

  3. Effect of flapless surgery on pain experienced in implant placement using an image-guided system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Thomas; Bosson, Jean Luc; Isidori, Michel; Blanchet, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain experienced after implant placement with 2 different surgical procedures: a flapless surgical procedure using an image-guided system based on a template and an open-flap procedure. The study population consisted of 60 patients who were referred for implant placement. One group consisted of 30 patients who were referred for the placement of 80 implants and treated with a flapless procedure. The other group consisted of 30 patients who were referred for the placement of 72 implants with a conventional procedure. Patients were selected randomly. They were requested to fill out a questionnaire using a visual analog scale (VAS) to assess the pain experienced and to indicate the number of analgesic tablets taken every postoperative day from the day of the surgery (DO) to 6 days after surgery (D6). The results showed a significant difference in pain measurements, with higher scores on the VAS with open-flap surgery (P flapless procedure (P = .05). The number of patients who felt no pain (VAS = 0) was higher with the flapless procedure (43% at DO versus 20%). With the flapless procedure, patients took fewer pain tablets (P = .03) and the number of tablets taken decreased faster (P = .04). Minimally invasive procedures may be requested by patients to reduce their anxiety and the pain experienced and thus increase the treatment acceptance rate. With the flapless procedure, patients experienced pain less intensely and for shorter periods of time.

  4. Kinetic comparison of a side-foot soccer kick between experienced and inexperienced players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Ryuji; Miyagi, Osamu; Ohashi, Jiro; Fukashiro, Senshi

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify critical kinetic variables that lead to increased ball velocity during a side-foot passing kick in soccer. Seven experienced male soccer players and eight inexperienced players participated in the experiment. They were instructed to perform side-foot kicks along the ground with maximum effort with an eye on the target line. The joint angles, angular velocities, and torques of the kicking leg were determined based on the three-dimensional kinematic data. The mean ball speed of the experienced group (21.4 +/- 1.5 m/s) was significantly faster than that of the inexperienced group (16.0 +/- 1.0m/s; P < 0.001). The motions of the inexperienced players tended to be less dynamic than those of the experienced players. The most noticeable difference in the kinetics of the kick was found in the hip flexion torque throughout the back-swing phase until the leg-cocking phase. The mean peak value of the experienced group (168 +/- 20 N x or m) was significantly greater than that of the inexperienced group (94 +/- 17 N x or m; P < 0.001). To increase ball speed during a side-foot passing kick, the generation of hip-flexion torque during the earlier stage of kicking is critical.

  5. Sexuality Education Beliefs among Sexually Experienced Youth: Differences by Gender and Birth Control Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolma, Eleni L.; Vesely, Sara K.; Oman, Roy F.; Aspy, Cheryl B.; Rodine, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether gender and birth control use are associated with premarital sexual attitudes, beliefs about peers, family communication about sexual relationships, and sexuality education among sexually experienced youth. Methods: Data were collected from a randomly selected ethnically diverse youth sample (N = 1,253). Only the…

  6. Criminal offending and distinguishing features of offenders among persons experiencing a first episode of psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2011-02-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are at increased risk of criminal offending, particularly violent offending, as compared with the general population. Most offenders with SMI acquire convictions prior to contact with mental health services. This study examined offending among 301 individuals experiencing their first episode of psychosis.

  7. Learning Phenomenology with Heidegger: Experiencing the Phenomenological "Starting Point" as the Beginning of Phenomenological Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quay, John

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenology has been with us for many years, and yet grasping phenomenology remains a difficult task. Heidegger, too, experienced this difficulty and devoted much of his teaching to the challenge of working phenomenologically. This article draws on aspects of Heidegger's commentary in progressing the teaching and learning of phenomenology,…

  8. Stress and Traumatic Stress: How Do Past Events Influence Current Traumatic Stress among Mothers Experiencing Homelessness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie K.; Hall, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the relationship between past traumatic events and the level of current traumatic stress among mothers experiencing homelessness. The data for this study were gathered from 75 homeless mothers between May 2006 and October 2006 using a cross-sectional survey design with purposive sampling. All mothers…

  9. Studying novice and experienced teachers’ visual perception and interpretations of classroom situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, Charlotte; Van den Bogert, Niek; Van Bruggen, Jan; Jarodzka, Halszka; Jochems, Wim; Boshuizen, Els

    2013-01-01

    Wolff, C., Van den Bogert, N., Van Bruggen, J., Jochems, W. M. G., Jarodzka, H., & Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2012, October). Studying novice and experienced teachers’ visual perception and interpretations of classroom situations. Poster presented at Open Universiteit Research Day, Heerlen, The

  10. AN INTERNATIONAL EXPLORATION ON PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF EXPERIENCED TEACHER EDUCATORS: HOW DO THEY KEEP UP?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof Simone White; dr Tetsuhito Sakata; dr Gilada Avissar; dr.ir. Quinta Kools; dr Marcel van der Klink

    2015-01-01

    The attention for teacher educators as professionals and their professional development is indeed increasing. While much of the attention has been directed to novice teacher educators little has been paid to experienced teacher educators and their particular developmental activities. This paper

  11. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  12. Exploring the Challenges Experienced by International Students during Work-Integrated Learning in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the challenges experienced by international students during Work Integrated Learning (WIL) in Australia. Student participation in WIL not only enhances individual student employability but also the attractiveness of Australia as a study destination. WIL, in particular work placements, is in high demand by international students…

  13. Writing in New Tongues: Re-Directions in the Works of Dambudzo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth of African literature in the postcolonial era has at times paralleled and imitated the social, political, cultural and economic processes on the continent. Indeed, most of the literatures written and published in the years after the 1960s reflect both the dynamism of modern free Africa and the continent's problems too.

  14. Comparing resident cataract surgery outcomes under novice versus experienced attending supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sidharth; Kiely, Amanda E; Wang, Jiangxia; Woodfield, Alonzo S; Ramanathan, Saras; Sikder, Shameema

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether supervision by an attending who is new to surgical teaching, or an experienced attending measurably influences intraoperative complications rates or outcomes in phacoemulsification performed by ophthalmology residents. Single tertiary hospital. Retrospective cohort study. Resident-performed phacoemulsification cases supervised by one novice attending (N=189) and experienced attending (N=172) over 1 year were included. Data included: resident year, patient age, sex, preoperative risk factors (4+ on the four point scale for dense/white/brunescent cataracts, Flomax, zonular dialysis, pseudoexfoliation, glaucoma risk, post-vitrectomy), intraoperative risk factors (Trypan blue, iris hooks), and intraoperative complications (capsule tears, vitreous loss, zonular dialysis, zonular dehiscence, burns, nuclear fragment loss, Descemet's tear). Experienced attending data were compared against those of the novice attending. Regarding preoperative risks, experienced attending cases more likely involved 4+ cataract (P=0.005), Flomax (P<0.001), or glaucoma risk (P=0.001). For intraoperative risks, novice attending cases more likely involved Trypan blue (P<0.001). Regarding complications, novice attending cases were associated with vitreous loss (P=0.002) and anterior capsule tears (P<0.001). When comparing total complications, the novice attending was more likely to have both increased number of cases with complications and total complications than the experienced attending. The novice attending's overall complication rate trended downward (rate from 28% in first 25 cases to 6.67% in last 15). Early cases for the novice attending were accompanied by greater complications (vitreous loss and anterior capsule tear), likely due to a learning curve. Surgical judgment in the operating room likely develops with experience. Training programs may focus on these specific areas to aid new instructors.

  15. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

  16. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

  17. Survey of programmatic experiences and challenges in delivery of hepatitis B and C testing in low- and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azumi Ishizaki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been few reports on programmatic experience of viral hepatitis testing and treatment in resource-limited settings. To inform the development of the 2017 World Health Organization (WHO viral hepatitis testing guidance and in particular the feasibility of proposed recommendations, we undertook a survey across a range of organisations engaged with hepatitis testing in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. Our objective was to describe current hepatitis B and C testing practices across a range of settings in different countries, as well as key barriers or challenges encountered and proposed solutions to promote testing scale-up. Methods Hepatitis testing programmes in predominantly LMICs were identified from the WHO Global Hepatitis Programme contacts database and through WHO regional offices, and invited to participate. The survey comprised a six-part structured questionnaire: general programme information, description of hepatitis testing, treatment and care services, budget and funding, data on programme outcomes, and perceptions on key barriers encountered and strategies to address these. Results We interviewed 22 viral hepatitis testing programmes from 19 different countries. Nine were from the African region; 6 from the Western Pacific; 4 from South-East Asia; and 3 from Eastern Europe. All but four of the programmes were based in LMICs, and 10 (45.5% were supported by non-governmental or international organizations. All but two programmes undertook targeted testing of specific affected populations such as people living with HIV, people who inject drugs, sex workers, health care workers, and pregnant women. Only two programmes focussed on routine testing in the general population. The majority of programmes were testing in hospital-based or other health facilities, particularly HIV clinics, and community-based testing was limited. Nucleic acid testing (NAT for confirmation of HCV and HBV viraemia was available

  18. Barriers experienced in the supermarket by parents and children during family food buying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Maria Kümpel; Brunsø, Karen

    Children today are gaining an increasing level of influence in family decision-making during food buying, and they assist their parents in carrying out various tasks during food buying. However, involving several active participants in decision-making is not always a walk in the park. The purpose...... other to make healthy food choices; and that food marketing should further develop points-of-purchase and food packaging initiatives in order to lower the barriers experienced among families with children....... of this paper is to broaden up the understanding of barriers experienced in the interaction between parents and children during family food buying. Assumptions are explored in a qualitative empirical study of 12 Danish tweens and their parents combining participant observation with semi-structured interviews...

  19. Comparative study of the pedagogical content knowledge of experienced and novice chemical demonstrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clermont, Christian P.; Borko, Hilda; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    This study examined the pedagogical content knowledge of experienced and novice chemical demonstrators. It specifically delineates the nature of the declarative knowledge associated with science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge. Science teachers who (1) teach abstract concepts in chemistry, (2) have a strong interest in using demonstrations as a science teaching strategy, and (3) have high and low levels of experience conducting chemical demonstrations participated in the study. Clinical interviews were used to probe teachers' pedagogical content knowledge. The findings suggest that the experienced chemical demonstrators possess a greater representational and adaptational repertoire for teaching fundamental concepts in chemistry than novices. They also appeared to be more cognizant of the complexity of chemical demonstrations, how these complexities may interfere with learning, and how simplified variations of chemical demonstrations can promote concept learning. The implications for teacher education programs are discussed.

  20. A Thematic Analysis of Self-described Authentic Leadership Behaviors Among Experienced Nurse Executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Catherine; Lopez, Ruth Palan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the behaviors experienced nurse executives use to create healthy work environments (HWEs). The constructs of authentic leadership formed the conceptual framework for the study. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses recommends authentic leadership as the preferred style of leadership for creating and sustaining HWEs. Behaviors associated with authentic leadership in nursing are not well understood. A purposive sample of 17 experienced nurse executives were recruited from across the United States for this qualitative study. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the in-depth, semistructured interviews. Four constructs of authentic leaders were supported and suggest unique applications of each including self-awareness (a private and professional self), balanced processing (open hearted), transparency (limiting exposure), and moral leadership (nursing compass). Authentic leadership may provide a sound foundation to support nursing leadership practices; however, its application to the discipline requires additional investigation.

  1. Meanings of being received and met by others as experienced by women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuso, Päivi; Skär, Lisa; Olsson, Malin; Söderberg, Siv

    2014-10-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common chronic pain syndrome that mostly affects middle-aged women. Our aim with this study was to elucidate meanings of being received and met by others as experienced by women with FM. Interviews with a narrative approach were conducted with 9 women. We analyzed the transcribed interviews with a phenomenological hermeneutical interpretation. The findings revealed two themes: being seen as a malingerer and being acknowledged. Meanings of being received and met by others, as experienced by women with FM, can be understood as a movement between the two perspectives. When they were acknowledged, their feelings of security and trust increased, but the women could not rely on this because others received and met them in such an unpredictable manner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Subjective sleep quality in women experiencing intimate partner violence: contributions of situational, psychological, and physiological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephanie J; Kozachik, Sharon L; Hall, Rosalie J

    2010-02-01

    This study, guided by an adaptation of the theory of unpleasant symptoms, examined the complex relationships of childhood maltreatment, intimate partner violence (IPV), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and physical health symptoms with global sleep quality and disruptive nighttime behaviors. Data were analyzed using covariance structure analysis. A convenience sample of 157 women currently experiencing IPV was recruited from crisis shelters and community agencies. Findings provide empirical support that women concurrently experiencing PTSD, depression, and stress-related physical health symptoms demonstrated poor global sleep quality and frequent disruptive nighttime behaviors. Posttraumatic stress disorder and stress health symptoms functioned as mediators of childhood maltreatment and IPV effects on both global sleep quality and disruptive nighttime behaviors, but depression did not.

  3. The Care of Older Adults Experiencing Cognitive Challenges: How Interprofessional Teams Collaborate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Sherry; Meherali, Salima; Chambers, Thane; Freund-Heritage, Rosalie; Steil, Kim; Wagg, Adrian

    2017-12-01

    We conducted a scoping study to examine how interprofessional health care teams improve the outcomes of older adults experiencing cognitive challenges. We searched Ovid, Medline 1946, and MEDLINE In-Process and other non-indexed citations, using the concepts multi or interdisciplinary care teams, confusion or cognitive impairment, and elderly adults. Of 4,554 articles the review yielded, 34 relevant to our inquiry, using Arksey and O'Malley's methodological framework. Twenty-nine per cent of authors reported on the processes interprofessional teams use to achieve positive outcomes for older adults. They highlighted the importance of communication, staff strategies, and education interventions in achieving outcomes with older adults and in supporting interprofessional collaboration. The review revealed knowledge gaps about the processes teams use to collaborate in caring for older adults experiencing cognitive challenges, and how to best incorporate older adults and their families' perspectives in team decisions. More research to understand processes interprofessional teams use is needed.

  4. [Natural childbirth and cesarean section: social representations of women who experienced them].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velho, Manuela Beatriz; dos Santos, Evanguelia Kotzias Atherino; Collaço, Vânia Sorgatto

    2014-01-01

    Aiming to understand the social representations of natural childbirth and caesarean section for women who experienced them, it was developed a descriptive, qualitative research. Interviews were conducted from July to October 2010, with twenty women who experienced both types of birth. The number of participants was determined by theoretical saturation during data collection and content analysis. The results showed, during the experience of motherhood: the search for information, the experience of childbirth alone versus support at birth; and that the woman has no option of choice on type of birth. Natural childbirth includes important issues such as: the ambivalence of feelings, positive perception and hospitalization. Cesarean section is associated with ambivalence of feelings, understood as a solution of a problem and the preference for cesarean section. The natural childbirth is a challenge for women, but the positive feelings outweigh the difficulties, while the cesarean section is associated to the physical benefits of its execution.

  5. Social Psychological Conditions of Psychological Well-Being in Individuals Who Have Experienced Critical Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pergamenshchik L.A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the issue of maintaining psychological well-being in individuals who have experienced critical events. The research presented in this paper was carried out within the paradigm of salutogenesis, according to which the most crucial factors in preserving one’s mental and physical health are the realization of the inner potential, cognitive and physical activity, orientation towards healthy life goals, and self-actualization, and not only the absence of illness and disabilities. The authors describe a procedure of methodological triangulation of quantitative and qualitative data that enabled them to outline the social psychological conditions necessary for the positive functioning of individuals who have experienced critical events.

  6. Experienced drug users assess the relative harms and benefits of drugs: a web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin Lester; Nutt, David John

    2013-01-01

    A web-based survey was used to consult the opinions of experienced drug users on matters related to drug harms. We identified a rare sample of 93 drug users with personal experience with 11 different illicit drugs that are widely used in the UK. Asked to assess the relative harms of these drugs, they ranked alcohol and tobacco as the most harmful, and three "Class A" drugs (MDMA, LSD, and psilocybin) and one class B (cannabis) were ranked as the four least harmful drugs. When asked to assess the relative potential for benefit of the 11 drugs, MDMA, LSD, psilocybin, and cannabis were ranked in the top four; and when asked why these drugs are beneficial, rather than simply report hedonic properties, they referred to potential therapeutic applications (e.g., as tools to assist psychotherapy). These results provide a useful insight into the opinions of experienced drug users on a subject about which they have a rare and intimate knowledge.

  7. Diagnostic delay experienced among gynecological cancer patients: a nationwide survey in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Kirstine M; Ottesen, Bent; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine diagnostic delay among gynecological cancer patients. DESIGN: Nationwide study. SETTING: The cohort comprised all women receiving their first treatment for cervical, endometrial, or ovarian cancer between 1 October 2006 and 1 December 2007 in four of the five centers...... for gynecological cancer surgery in Denmark. SAMPLE: Of the 911 women alive, 648 participated, resulting in a response rate of 71.1%; of these, 30.1% were diagnosed with cervical cancer, 31.0% with endometrial cancer, and 38.9% with ovarian cancer. METHODS: Questionnaire survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Diagnostic...... experiencing very long delays. Ovarian cancer patients experienced significantly shorter delays compared with other gynecological cancer patients in all parts of the health care system. CONCLUSIONS: Delays occur in all parts of the diagnostic process, suggesting that a multifaceted approach should be adopted...

  8. Agentivity and experiencer verbs in Catalan and Mayangna and the roles of ‘little v’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricard Viñas-de-Puig

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Using Catalan and Mayangna data as evidence, I claim that experiencer predicates are drawn from a universal structure, headed by the functional projection vEXPP. According to this structure, an experience-denoting N is merged with a V-head to obtain an experience predication, which may take a source of experience phrase as its specifier. The experiencer, introduced by the vEXP head, c-commands the source of experience allowing for a ‘parasitic’ possession relationship. Additionally, the data presented here show that a limited subset of experience phrases allow an agentive reading. I argue that such agentive interpretation is the result of the merging in the structure of an agentive functional head, vAG, generated above vEXPP. In turn, this agentive functional head is responsible for the introduction of the agentive, external argument.

  9. Therapist interventions and client emotional experiencing in expert psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiser, S; Goldfried, M R

    1998-08-01

    Eighteen sessions of cognitive-behavioral (CB) and 13 sessions of psychodynamic-interpersonal therapy obtained from experienced clinicians in a naturalistic setting were investigated to determine the various therapeutic interventions associated with high and low emotional experiencing (EXP). Clients receiving reflections and acknowledgments, affiliative and noncontrolling interventions, or interventions highlighting nonspecific client content were associated with maintained high EXP. Lengthier interventions and interventions rated as affiliative but moderately controlling were associated with shifts to low EXP. For clients of CB therapists, questions, interventions rated affiliative but controlling, and highlighting minimal emotional content were also associated with shifts to low EXP. Male therapists were associated with clients who maintained high EXP and female therapists were associated with clients who shifted to low EXP.

  10. Challenges to discussing palliative care with people experiencing homelessness: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Caroline; Low, Joseph; Hewett, Nigel; Daley, Julian; Davis, Sarah; Brophy, Nimah; Howard, Diana; Vivat, Bella; Kennedy, Peter; Stone, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To explore the views and experiences of people who are homeless and those supporting them regarding conversations and approaches to palliative care Setting Data were collected between October 2015 and October 2016 in homeless hostels and day centres and with staff from primary and secondary healthcare providers and social care services from three London boroughs. Participants People experiencing homelessness (n=28), formerly homeless people (n=10), health and social care providers (n=48), hostel staff (n=30) and outreach staff (n=10). Methods In this qualitative descriptive study, participants were recruited to interviews and focus groups across three London boroughs. Views and experiences of end-of-life care were explored with people with personal experience of homelessness, health and social care professionals and hostel and outreach staff. Saturation was reached when no new themes emerged from discussions. Results 28 focus groups and 10 individual interviews were conducted. Participants highlighted that conversations exploring future care preferences and palliative care with people experiencing homelessness are rare. Themes identified as challenges to such conversations included attitudes to death; the recovery focused nature of services for people experiencing homelessness; uncertainty regarding prognosis and place of care; and fear of negative impact. Conclusions This research highlights the need for a different approach to supporting people who are homeless and are experiencing advanced ill health, one that incorporates uncertainty and promotes well-being, dignity and choice. We propose parallel planning and mapping as a way of working with uncertainty. We acknowledge that these approaches will not always be straightforward, nor will they be suitable for everyone, yet moving the focus of conversations about the future away from death and dying, towards the present and the future may facilitate conversations and enable the wishes of people who are

  11. Enhanced Methodologies to Enumerate Persons Experiencing Homelessness in a Large Urban Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, Catherine L; D'Andrea, Ritalinda; Grier, Gary; Williams, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Homelessness is a public health problem, and persons experiencing homelessness are a vulnerable population. Estimates of the number of persons experiencing homelessness inform funding allocations and services planning and directly determine the ability of a community to intervene effectively in homelessness. The point-in-time (PIT) count presents a logistical problem in large urban areas, particularly those covering a vast geographical area. Working together, academia, local government, and community organizations improved the methodology for the count. Specific enhancements include use of incident command system (ICS), increased number of staging areas/teams, specialized outreach and Special Weapons and Tactics teams, and day-after surveying to collect demographic information. This collaboration and enhanced methodology resulted in a more accurate estimate of the number of persons experiencing homelessness and allowed comparison of findings for 4 years. While initial results showed an increase due to improved counting, the number of persons experiencing homelessness counted for the subsequent years showed significant decrease during the same time period as a "housing first" campaign was implemented. The collaboration also built capacity in each sector: The health department used ICS as a training opportunity; the academics enhanced their community health efforts; the service sector was taught and implemented more rigorous quantitative methods; and the community was exposed to public health as a pragmatic and effective discipline. Improvements made to increase the reliability of the PIT count can be adapted for use in other jurisdictions, leading to improved counts and better evaluation of progress in ending homelessness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Unboosted Atazanavir in Treatment-experienced HIV-infected Children, Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressey, Tim R; Hazra, Rohan; Wiznia, Andrew; Foca, Marc; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Graham, Bobbie; King, Jennifer R; Britto, Paula; Carey, Vincent J; Acosta, Edward P; Yogev, Ram

    2016-12-01

    HIV protease inhibitor use in pediatrics is challenging due to the poor palatability and/or toxicity of concomitant low-dose ritonavir. Atazanavir without ritonavir (unboosted) is not recommended for patients with prior virologic failure, a common problem for perinatally-infected adolescents. Atazanavir 400 mg once-daily provided suboptimal exposure. Higher unboosted doses or splitting the daily dose to twice-daily warrants investigation in this treatment-experienced population.

  13. Exploring problems encountered among experienced nurses using critical reflective inquiry: implications for nursing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Marilyn E; Schwartz-Barcott, Donna

    2015-01-01

    This study explored problems encountered by nurses using critical reflective inquiry to examine clinical situations and the impact of group discussion on the reflective process. Secondary qualitative analysis of 19 reflective situations, rom a reflection continuing education program, revealed that nurses had problematic pauses in reflection and were stuck in cyclical self-questioning. Peer group discussion prompted deeper reflection. Experienced nurses may need assistance to enhance the comprehensiveness, depth, and scope of reflection on practice situations.

  14. Supporting new graduate nurses making the transition to rural nursing practice: views from experienced rural nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Jackie; Cruickshank, Mary

    2015-10-01

    To present the findings from the experienced rural nurse participants of a larger study that explored the transitional experiences of newly graduated nurses making the role transition in rural health care facilities in Australia. There are specific and unique aspects of rural nursing practice that influence the nature and timing of support for new graduate nurses that have not been explored or acknowledged as influencing the new graduate nurses' experience of transition. Specifically, the difficulties and challenges that experienced rural nurses face in providing effective and timely support for new graduate nurses who are making the transition to rural nursing practice is yet to be explored. Using a qualitative case study framework, this study specifically aimed to investigate and describe the nature and timing of support required during the transition to nursing practice that is specific for the rural context and capacity. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 16 experienced rural nurses who, at the time of the study, worked with new graduate nurses in the rural practice environment. The findings from this study showed that the provision of timely on-ward support for new graduates making the transition to rural nursing practice is affected and influenced by the skill mix and staffing allocation within the rural environment. As well, there is a lack of awareness by rural nurses of how to meet the on-ward support needs of new graduate nurses. This study has identified the specific and unique aspects of the rural nurse's role and responsibilities for which the new graduate nurse requires incremental learning and intensive clinical support. The findings can be used by rural health services and experienced rural registered nurses to assist in implementing adequate and timely support for new graduate nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Monitoring the Prescribed and Experienced Heart Rate Derived Training Loads in Elite Field Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Andrew S; Taunton, Jack E; Koehle, Michael S; White, Matthew D; Warburton, Darren E R

    2018-02-06

    This study examined the congruence between the prescribed and experienced heart rate derived training loads over a five week periodized mesocycle. Twenty-four elite female field hockey players training as part of a national team were monitored prior to an (FIH) Hockey World League tournament. Three on-field training sessions per week were prospectively designed focusing on technical, tactical, and physiologically-oriented hockey drills. A training load value, modelling the periodized weekly loading scheme, was prescribed for each training session and was calculated using normative training load responses from performing on-field hockey drills. Magnitude based inferences focusing on the effect size (ES) and a Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r) were utilized to examine the degree of difference and the strength of correlation between the prescribed and experienced training loads. A significant correlation was observed between the experienced and prescribed training loads over the five-week mesocycle [r = 0.92, 90% CL (0.84:0.96)]. The percentage difference and the effect size between the achieved and prescribed training loads were as follows, Week1 demonstrated a 2.0% difference [ES = 0.10, 90% CL (-0.22:0.41)], Week 2 a -5.4% difference [ES = -0.41, 90% CL (-0.75:-0.07)], Week3 a -1.5% difference [ES = -0.09, 90% CL (-0.37:0.20)], Week4 a 7.1% difference [ES = 0.46, 90% CL (0.14:0.78)] and Week5 a 3.5% difference [ES = 0.18, 90% CL (-0.17:0.53)]. This investigation demonstrates the efficacy for coaches to prospectively design on-field training sessions utilizing normative training load data to enhance the congruence between the prescribed and experienced training loads over a periodized mesocycle.

  16. Correlations between Academic Achievement and Anxiety and Depression in Medical Students Experiencing Integrated Curriculum Reform

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Huang, Chun-Hsiung; Liu, Keh-Min; Huang, In-Ting

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the correlations between academic achievement and levels of anxiety and depression in medical students who were experiencing curriculum reform. The differences in academic achievement and the directions of correlations between academic achievement and anxiety and depression among the medical students with different levels of anxiety and depression were also examined. Grade 1 students from graduate-entry program and grade 3 students from undergraduate-entry program ...

  17. Psychological effects of a one-month meditation retreat on experienced meditators: the role of nonattachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Montero-Marin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are few studies devoted to assessing the impact of meditation-intensive retreats on the well-being, positive psychology and personality of experienced meditators. We aimed to assess whether a 1-month Vipassana retreat: a would increase mindfulness and well-being; b would increase prosocial personality traits; and c whether psychological changes would be mediated and/or moderated by non-attachment.Method. A controlled, non-randomized, pre-post-intervention trial was used. The intervention group was a convenience sample (n=19 of experienced meditators who participated in a 1-month Vipassana meditation retreat. The control group (n=19 comprised matched experienced meditators who did not take part in the retreat. During the retreat, the mean duration of daily practice was 8-9 hours, the diet was vegetarian and silence was compulsory. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ, Non-Attachment Scale (NAS, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS, Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS, Temperament Character Inventory Revised (TCI-R-67, Five Facets Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ, Self-Other Four Immeasurables (SOFI and the MINDSENS Composite Index were administered. ANCOVAs and linear regression models were used to assess pre-post changes and mediation/moderation effects.Results. Compared to controls, retreatants showed increases in non-attachment, observing, MINDSENS, positive-affect, balance-affect and cooperativeness; and decreases in describing, negative-others, reward-dependence and self-directedness. Non-attachment had a mediating role in decentring, acting aware, non-reactivity, negative-affect, balance-affect and self-directedness; and a moderating role in describing and positive others, with both mediating and moderating effects on satisfaction with life.Conclusions. A 1-month Vipassana meditation retreat seems to yield improvements in mindfulness, well-being and personality, even in experienced meditators. Non-attachment might

  18. Sharing experienced sadness : Negotiating meanings of self-defined sad music within a group interview session

    OpenAIRE

    Peltola, Henna-Riikka

    2017-01-01

    Sadness induced by music listening has been a popular research focus in music and emotion research. Despite the wide consensus in affective sciences that emotional experiences are social processes, previous studies have only concentrated on individuals. Thus, the intersubjective dimension of musical experience – how music and music-related emotions are experienced between individuals – has not been investigated. In order to tap into shared emotional experiences, group discussions about experi...

  19. Fifteen years after parental divorce: mental health and experienced life-events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angarne-Lindberg, Teresia; Wadsby, Marie

    2009-01-01

    The children who experienced their parents' divorce when the divorce rate in Sweden had begun to grow to higher levels than in preceding decades are today adults. The aim of this study was to investigate if adults who had experienced parental divorce 15 years before the time of our study, differed in mental health from those with continuously married parents, taking into account life events other than the divorce. Instruments used were the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90) measuring mental health and the Life Event questionnaire capturing the number and experience of occurred events. Forty-eight persons, who were 7-18 years old when their parents divorced, constituted the divorce group, and 48 persons matched on age, sex and growth environment formed the study groups. The SCL-90 showed a limited difference between the groups, but not concerning total mental health. A main finding was a difference with regard to sex and age; women aged 22-27 in the divorce group displayed poorer mental health than other participants in both groups. The results from the Life Event questionnaire showed that the divorce group had experienced a significantly larger number of events, and more life events were described as negative with difficult adjustment. A regression analysis showed a significant relation between the SCL-90, Global Severity Index and life events experienced as negative with difficult adjustment, divorce events excluded, but not with the divorce itself. It seems highly desirable to pay more attention than has thus far been paid to girls with experience of childhood divorce at age 7-12.

  20. Physically Experienced Reactions and Music : A Questionnaire Study of Musicians and Non-Musicians

    OpenAIRE

    Mlejnek, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Studying physically experienced reactions such as chills, tears, and racing heart (sometimes generally referred to as thrills) represents an important approach to music and emotion. A questionnaire study methodologically based on Sloboda's influential article (1991) partly confirms the results but disagrees with them in some findings. More frequent physical reactions during music listening in women reported by previous studies were confirmed only for respondents older that 30 in thisstudy. In...

  1. Nursing students experienced personal inadequacy, vulnerability and transformation during their patient care encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaldal, Maiken Holm; Kristiansen, Jette; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence exploring nursing students' experiences of professional patient care encounters in a hospital unit. DESIGN: The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) guidelines were followed and a meta-synthesis was conducted. DATA SOURCES......; and clinical learning environment. CONCLUSIONS: We meta-synthesized that: Nursing students experienced personal inadequacy, vulnerability and a transformation during their patient care encounter....

  2. Female residents experiencing medical errors in general internal medicine: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Mankaka, Cindy Ottiger; Waeber, Gérard; Gachoud, David

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Doctors, especially doctors-in-training such as residents, make errors. They have to face the consequences even though today's approach to errors emphasizes systemic factors. Doctors' individual characteristics play a role in how medical errors are experienced and dealt with. The role of gender has previously been examined in a few quantitative studies that have yielded conflicting results. In the present study, we sought to qualitatively explore the experience of female residents...

  3. Practical knowledge of experienced nurses in critical care: a qualitative study of their narratives

    OpenAIRE

    Acebedo-Urdiales, María Sagrario; Medina-Noya, José Luis; Ferré-Grau, Carme

    2014-01-01

    Background Scholars of nursing practices have claimed practical knowledge is source of knowledge in its own right, nevertheless we know little about this knowledge associated with day-to-day practice. The purpose of this study is to describe knowledge that the more experienced nurses the in ICU make use of and discover the components of care it includes. Understanding this knowledge can contribute to improving the working practices of nurses with less experience. Methods We used a phenomenolo...

  4. Families Experiencing Housing Instability: The Effects of Housing Programs on Family Routines and Rituals

    OpenAIRE

    Mayberry, Lindsay S.; Shinn, Marybeth; Benton, Jessica Gibbons; Wise, Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of family processes can protect parents, children, and families from the detrimental effects of extreme stressors, such as homelessness. When families cannot maintain routines and rituals, the stressors of poverty and homelessness can be compounded for both caregivers and children. However, characteristics of living situations common among families experiencing homelessness present barriers to the maintenance of family routines and rituals. We analyzed 80 in-depth interviews with ...

  5. Alcohol service provision for older people in an area experiencing high alcohol use and health inequalities

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe, Karen E.; Ling, Jonathan; Wilson, Graeme B.; Crosland, Ann; Kaner, Eileen F.S.; Haighton, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Background: UK society is ageing. Older people who drink alcohol, drink more than those from previous generations, drink more frequently than other age groups and are more likely to drink at home and alone. Alcohol problems in later life however are often under-detected and under-reported meaning older people experiencing alcohol problems have high levels of unmet need. Methods: This study sought to identify existing services within South of Tyne, North East England to capture the extent of s...

  6. First Isolation of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron from a Patient with a Cholesteatoma and Experiencing Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Feuillet, Lionel; Carvajal, Joseph; Sudre, Isabelle; Pelletier, Jean; Thomassin, Jean Marc; Drancourt, Michel; Cherif, André Ali

    2005-01-01

    A 45-year-old man with a cholesteatoma experienced purulent meningitis. Microbial analysis of cerebrospinal fluid yielded in pure culture a gram-negative bacillus. Phenotypic methods were suggestive of a Bacteroides distasonis or either a Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron or Bacteroides ovatus infection. The isolate was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as B. thetaiotaomicron. This is the first case of B. thetaiotaomicron meningitis in pure culture.

  7. First isolation of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron from a patient with a cholesteatoma and experiencing meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuillet, Lionel; Carvajal, Joseph; Sudre, Isabelle; Pelletier, Jean; Thomassin, Jean Marc; Drancourt, Michel; Cherif, André Ali

    2005-03-01

    A 45-year-old man with a cholesteatoma experienced purulent meningitis. Microbial analysis of cerebrospinal fluid yielded in pure culture a gram-negative bacillus. Phenotypic methods were suggestive of a Bacteroides distasonis or either a Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron or Bacteroides ovatus infection. The isolate was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as B. thetaiotaomicron. This is the first case of B. thetaiotaomicron meningitis in pure culture.

  8. Objective psychomotor skills assessment of experienced, junior, and novice laparoscopists with virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, A G; Richie, K; McClure, N; McGuigan, J

    2001-11-01

    Objective assessment of psychomotor skills in surgery is now a priority; however, this assessment is difficult to achieve because of measurement difficulties associated with the reliability and validity of assessing surgical skills in vivo and in the laboratory. In this study virtual reality (VR) was used to overcome these problems in the objective psychomotor assessment of senior, junior, and novice laparoscopists. Twelve experienced laparoscopic surgeons (performed >50 Minimal Access Surgery (MAS) procedures), 12 inexperienced laparoscopic surgeons (psychomotor skills for laparoscopic surgery.

  9. Against all odds: a retrospective case-controlled study of women who experienced extraordinary breastfeeding problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley; Fallon, Tony; O'Brien, Maxine L

    2008-05-01

    The study investigated factors empowering women to continue breastfeeding despite experiencing extraordinary difficulties. The study documented the experiences and characteristics of women who continued to breastfeed (continuing cohort) and those who weaned (non-continuing cohort) despite extraordinary difficulties. Retrospective case control. The study was undertaken in south-east Queensland, Australia in 2004. Forty women (20 in each cohort) were recruited over six months. Both quantitative (breastfeeding knowledge questionnaire) and qualitative (semi-structured interviews) data were collected. This paper describes the qualitative data. Women from both cohorts expressed idealistic expectations about breastfeeding and experienced psychological distress due to their breastfeeding problems. Those who continued breastfeeding used coping strategies and exhibited personal qualities that assisted them to overcome the difficulties experienced. Women who continued to breastfeed were more likely to report relying on a health professional they could trust for support. This latter cohort were also more likely to report having peers with which they shared their experiences. Non-continuing women expressed feelings of guilt and inadequacy following weaning and were more likely to feel isolated. This study has highlighted the methods women use to deal with breastfeeding problems. It has also revealed modificable factors that can improve breastfeeding duration. The findings indicate that clinicians should: *Provide information which accurately reflects the breastfeeding experience; *Ensure systems are in place so that effective postnatal support for breastfeeding difficulties is available; *Consider screening to ascertain levels of psychological distress, sadness and disillusionment among breastfeeding women; *Design educational interventions with elements of cognitive skills, problem-solving and self-efficacy training to equip women with the skills to overcome any experienced

  10. Child and Caregiver Concordance of Potentially Traumatic Events Experienced by Orphaned and Abandoned Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru Rajan, Divya; Shirey, Kristen; Ostermann, Jan; Whetten, Rachel; O'Donnell, Karen; Whetten, Kathryn

    Exposure to trauma is associated with significant emotional and behavioral difficulties among children (Perepletchikova & Kaufman, 2010). Overall, reports of trauma and violence experienced by children are discrepant from those of their caregivers (Lewis et al., 2012). Even less is known about the extent of concordance between orphans and their caregivers. This study examines the correlates of concordance in reported traumatic experiences between 1,269 orphaned and abandoned children (OAC) and their caregivers. The OAC lived in family-settings in 5 low and middle income countries and were part of a longitudinal study, "Positive Outcomes for Orphans" (POFO) that enrolled children aged 6 to 12 at baseline. By examining concordance with respect to specific types of trauma reported, this study expands the understanding of who reports which types of traumas experienced by orphaned and abandoned children, thereby improving the potential to provide targeted interventions for children who have experienced such events. In this study, children and caregivers were asked separately if the child had experienced different types of potentially traumatic events. Children were significantly more likely to report physical abuse, sexual abuse and family violence than were caregivers. Caregivers were significantly more likely than children to report natural disasters and accidents. High levels of concordance were found in the reporting of wars, riots, killings, and deaths in the family. The impacts of trauma on behavior and mental health are profound, and highly effective interventions targeting sequelae of childhood trauma are currently being developed for use in low resource areas. Findings from this study demonstrate that it is feasible to conduct screening for potentially traumatic events utilizing child self-report in resource limited settings and that child self-report is crucial in evaluating trauma, particularly family violence and physical or sexual assault.

  11. School Counselor Advocacy: Postsecondary Planning for Adolescents Experiencing Emotional Disturbances in Urban Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Rowley, Patrick James

    2017-01-01

    While research studies have investigated postsecondary planning for high-need student populations, few studies have explored the intersectionality of students experiencing emotional disturbances and students living in urban environments and the postsecondary planning perspectives of school counselors with this demographic. The purpose of this study was to explore the current perspectives, practices, and experiences of 10 high schools counselors working within a large school district of the no...

  12. Gender Differences in Some Stress Symptoms and Intensity of Experiencing Stress Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Mesko Stok; Mateja Videmsek; Joze Stihec; Zlatka Mesko Stok; Damir Karpljuk

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the symptoms of stress and to establish gender differences in stress symptoms. We tried to find out if there are gender differences in the stress level at work, if there are gender differences in terms of stress symptoms frequency, and if there are gender differences in terms of the intensity of experiencing stress symptoms. In this study 85 randomly selected managers from Slovene companies participated. The results of the study have shown that there are ...

  13. Ethics and human rights issues experienced by nurses in leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Barbara A; Fry, Sara T

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify (1) the ethics and human rights issues experienced by nurses in leadership roles (NLs); (2) how frequently these issue occurred in the NLs'practices; and (3) how disturbed the NLs were by the issues. Dillman's Total Design Method (1978) for mailed surveys guided the study design. Data analysis was performed on 470 questionnaires from New England RNs in nursing leadership roles. The most frequently experienced ethics and human rights issues during the previous 12 months were (1) protecting patient right and human dignity; (2) respecting or not respecting informed consent to treatment; (3) use or nonuse of physical or chemical restraints; (4) providing care with possible risks to the RN's health; (5) following or not following advance directives; and (6) staffing patterns that limit patient access to nursing care. The most disturbing ethics and human rights issues experienced by the NLs were staffing patterns that limited patient access to nursing care, prolonging the dying process with inappropriate measures, working with unethical, incompetent, or impaired colleagues, implementing managed care policies that threaten quality of care, not considering quality of the patient's life, and caring for patients and families who are uninformed or misinformed about treatment, prognosis, or medical alternatives. Nearly 39% of the NLs reported experiencing ethics and human rights issues one to four times a week or more, and more than 90% handled their most recent ethics issue by discussing it with nursing peers. Study findings have implications for ethics education and resource support for nurses in leadership roles, and for further research on how NLs handle ethics and human rights issues in the workplace.

  14. Deformations experienced in the human skin, adipose tissue, and fascia in osteopathic manipulative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Hans; Bukiet, Bruce; Ji, Zhiming; Stecco, Antonio; Findley, Thomas W

    2014-10-01

    Osteopathic manipulative medicine techniques involve compressive and tangential forces to target the fascia. These forces are transmitted to the skin and adipose tissue before the fascia is encountered. Knowing the extent of deformation of these 2 tissue layers relative to the fascia will assist osteopathic physicians in evaluating techniques for manual therapies and adjusting these therapies to reduce patient discomfort and improve results. To determine the magnitude of the forces transmitted to the skin, adipose tissue, and fascia, and to determine the magnitude of deformation produced in the skin and adipose tissue relative to the fascia using a mathematical model. The large deformation theory of elasticity, valid for 3-dimensional deformations, was used to evaluate the forces that need to be applied such that a specified deformation is produced in any region of the skin, adipose tissue, or fascia layers. Similarly, if the forces are specified, then the deformation produced can be determined. The normal and tangential forces required to produce a deformation of 9% compression and 4% shear for the skin were 50 N and 11 N, respectively. Normal and tangential forces of about 100 N and 22 N were found for a similar deformation of fascia. For adipose tissue, these forces were 36 N and 8 N, respectively. In addition, the skin experienced more compression and shear-about 1.5 times as much as the fascia, and the adipose tissue experienced about 2.5 to 3.5 times the deformation of the fascia and 50% more than the skin when a given force was applied to the skin. The forces applied to the surface of the skin were transmitted through this layer and the adipose layer entirely to the fascia. Therefore, the skin and adipose tissue experienced the same magnitude of force as the fascia. However, the skin and adipose tissue experienced more compression and shear than the fascia. © 2014 The American Osteopathic Association.

  15. The Intersection of Gender Identity and Violence: Victimization Experienced by Transgender College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griner, Stacey B; Vamos, Cheryl A; Thompson, Erika L; Logan, Rachel; Vázquez-Otero, Coralia; Daley, Ellen M

    2017-08-01

    College students disproportionately experience victimization, stalking, and relationship violence when compared with other groups. Few studies explore victimization by the gender identity of college students, including those who identify as transgender. The purpose of this study is to explore the rates of violence experienced by transgender students compared with male and female college students. This study utilized the National College Health Assessment-II (NCHA-II) and included data from students ( n = 82,538) across fall 2011, 2012, and 2013. Bivariate statistics and binary logistic regression were conducted to test the relationships between gender identity and victimization. Transgender students ( n = 204) were compared with male ( n = 27,322) and female ( n = 55,012) students. After adjusting for individual factors, transgender students had higher odds of experiencing all nine types of violence when compared with males and higher odds of experiencing eight types of violence than females. Transgender students experienced the highest odds in crimes involving sexual victimization, including attempted sexual penetration (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 9.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [6.17, 14.59], d = 1.00), sexual penetration without consent (aOR: 9.06, 95% CI = [5.64, 14.53], d = 0.94), and being in a sexually abusive relationship (aOR: 6.48, 95% CI = [4.01, 10.49], d = 0.48), than did male students. Findings reveal increased odds of victimization among transgender students when compared with male and female students. Results demonstrate the need for more comprehensive violence prevention efforts in college settings.

  16. Phenotypes of intimate partner violence among women experiencing infertility in Kano, Northwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliyasu, Zubairu; Galadanci, Hadiza S; Abubakar, Sanusi; Auwal, Maryam S; Odoh, Chisom; Salihu, Hamisu M; Aliyu, Muktar H

    2016-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for intimate partner violence (IPV) among women attending a large urban fertility clinic in Kano, Nigeria. Interviewers administered questionnaires to a cross-section of women attending an infertility clinic in Northwest Nigeria, regarding their experience of IPV and associated factors. In total, 373 individuals were interviewed. Of the individuals interviewed, 134 (35.9%; 95% confidence Interval [CI] 31.1%-41.0%) had experienced at least one form of IPV in the preceding year. Of the 134 patients who had encountered violence, 126 (94.0%), 111 (82.8%), 47 (35.1%), and 25 (18.7%) had experienced psychological, sexual, verbal, and physical forms of violence, respectively. Of the affected individuals, 34 (25.4%) experienced multiple forms of violence, with spouses being the main perpetrators. A lack of formal education (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.21; 95%CI 1.21-7.43), employment in the informal sector (OR 2.01; 95%C: 1.02-4.52), and having an unemployed spouse (OR 1.56; 95%CI 1.02-3.15) or one with low level of education (OR 2.32; 95%CI 1.87-4.21) were independently associated with IPV. In this setting, women who were infertile experienced a high incidence of IPV. Women presenting at fertility clinics should be screened for IPV and provided with links to appropriate support services. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Material opportunities for children’s participation, articulation and re-experiencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Maj; Kolmos, Marie

    to know whether the researcher and the child share understandings of verbal articulations. A similar challenge counts for phenomena and experiences that may be difficult to describe and articulate in verbal language such as sensory and body experiences and diverse experiences of awareness, attention....... In both studies the mutual material references offer new opportunities for the children’s participation, articulation and re-experiencing in the interview situations....

  18. An investigation into the causes of speaking problems experienced by learners of English at tertiary level

    OpenAIRE

    Güney, İpek

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate reasons of students for not speaking in English speaking classes as well as solutions suggested by students to overcome problems in speaking classes. This study also tried to find out the influence of individual differences such as gender, marks, self- perceived success, and field of study on speaking problems experienced by participants. The study was conducted at Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University with 235 participants in the spring...

  19. The acceptance of hearing disability among adults experiencing hearing difficulties: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Manchaiah, Vinaya K. C.; Molander, Peter; Rönnberg, Jerker; Andersson, Gerhard; Lunner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study developed the Hearing Disability Acceptance Questionnaire (HDAQ) and tested its construct and concurrent validities. Design Cross-sectional. Participants A total of 90 participants who were experiencing hearing difficulties were recruited in the UK. Outcome measures The HDAQ was developed based on the Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire (TAQ). Participants completed self-report measures regarding hearing disability acceptance, hearing disability, symptoms of anxiety and dep...

  20. Understanding student stress: a qualitative study of the stress experienced by third level students

    OpenAIRE

    Aherne, Declan

    1998-01-01

    Stress can be understood in terms of the meaning of stressful experiences for individuals. The meaning of stressful experiences involves threats to self-adequacy, where self-adequacy is considered a basic human need. Appropriate research methods are required to explore this aspect of stress. The present study is a qualitative exploration of the stress experienced by a group of 27 students at the National Institute of Higher Education, Limerick (since renamed the University of Limerick). The s...

  1. Mammographic positioning quality of newly trained versus experienced radiographers in the Dutch breast cancer screening programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; den Heeten, Gerard J; Timmers, Janine; Broeders, Mireille J M

    2015-11-01

    Our purpose was to compare mammographic positioning quality of new (NR) versus experienced screening radiographers (ER) in the Netherlands. Before starting to work in breast screening, NR must complete an education programme including a theoretical course (four days), practical training (six weeks), and a portfolio-review of 50 mammographic screening examinations performed by the radiographer. Furthermore, Dutch screening has an extensive system of quality assurance, including an audit-review of positioning quality of mammograms by ER. We analysed 13,520 portfolio views (NR) and 14,896 audit views (ER) based on pre-specified criteria, e.g., depiction of inframammary angle. Overall positioning was more adequate for NR than ER (CC views: 97% versus 86%, p = 0.00; MLO views: 92% versus 84%, p = 0.00). NR scored better for most of the CC-criteria and showed, for instance, less folds (inadequate: 10% versus 16%, p = 0.00). In contrast, NR encountered more difficulties for MLO views in, for example, depiction of infra-mammary angle (inadequate: 38% versus 34%, p = 0.00). Overall, mammograms from NR were more often considered adequate, because of less severe errors. NR perform better than ER in overall positioning technique. These results stress the need for continuous monitoring and training in breast screening programmes to keep positioning skills up to date. • We evaluated positioning quality of new and experienced Dutch screening radiographers. • New radiographers outperform their experienced colleagues in mammographic positioning quality. • New radiographers make less severe errors compared to experienced colleagues. • There is a need for a continuous individual monitoring and feedback system.

  2. The Stigma Experienced by Terminally Ill Patients: Evidence From a Portuguese Ethnographic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hilário, Ana Patrícia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to offer an understanding of the ways in which terminally ill patients may face discrimination due to their visibly altered body. An ethnographic approach was adopted and fieldwork was conducted over 10 months in 2 inpatient hospice units in Portugal. Participant observation was complemented by 50 in-depth interviews with terminally ill patients, family members, and hospice staff. The stigma experienced by terminally ill patients derived mostly from the behavior of p...

  3. Witnessing versus Experiencing Direct Violence in Childhood as Correlates of Adulthood PTSD

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Madhur; Graham-Bermann, Sandra; Rauch, Sheila A.M.; Seng, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Research has established that childhood violence exposure plays a considerable role in the development of deleterious outcomes in childhood and adulthood. However, important gaps remain in understanding the complex relationships among early violence exposure, adulthood trauma exposure, and PTSD. This study investigates whether two specific types of childhood violence exposure (witnessing domestic violence and experiencing child abuse) are uniquely associated with PTSD while controlling for ad...

  4. A Draft Ethics Curriculum Based on Ethical Issues Experienced by Family Doctors in Düzce

    OpenAIRE

    Akpınar A et al.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine ethical issues experienced by family doctors in Düzce, the pilot province for implementation of the primary health care reform 'Transformation in Health' in Turkey in 2005.Method: We conducted this study between May and June 2007 in Düzce. A self-administered-questionnaire prepared by the researchers included 13 ethical issues inquiring about physicians' frequency of encounter, difficulty in managing the problem, and learning needs in ethical topics. Results: Fifty-seven per...

  5. War Stories; How Experienced Teachers Said They Responded To Disruptive Students In The Lifelong Learning Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebor, Merv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This small-scale qualitative research inquiry investigates how a small sample of experienced teachers dealt with disruptive students in their classes in the Lifelong Learning Sector (LLS in West Yorkshire. I wanted to continue my earlier writing on these issues by listening to what teachers said about their challenging experiences on the front line of the classroom interfacing with negative student behaviour. I firstly discuss a research instrument for collecting this data from these teachers’ experiences, and also explore their strategies for dealing with disruptive student behaviours. It seemed very important to hear from practitioners rather than relying on what textbooks advised. Previously I was interested in the experiences of trainee tutors facing these difficulties; in this piece I am more concerned with how experienced tutors deal with these unpleasant circumstances. I outline the findings that this questionnaire elicited in terms of key negative incidents that these teachers had experienced in class and the strategies they had deployed to overcome the social and emotional challenges of disruptive student behaviour. I briefly summarise these tutors’ perspectives on the support they felt they did or did not receive on these issues. I conclude with an analysis of the findings and question the problematics of this research, its meaning, validity and possible application in other teaching contexts.

  6. Characteristics of Herbal Medicine Users and Adverse Events Experienced in South Korea: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Soobin; Kim, Kyeong Han; Sun, Seung-Ho; Go, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Background. This survey aimed to investigate the characteristics of users and nonusers of herbal medicine and the adverse events experienced due to herbal medicines in South Korea. Methods. The questionnaire consisted of safety, using experience, using type, usage and nonusage reason, purchase location, and adverse events of herbal medicine. The survey was administered by online. Results. Of the total 1,134 respondents, 726 (64.0%) considered herbal medicine safe, and 693 (61.1%) answered that they have taken herbal medicines within the past year. Most common place to purchase them was "TKM hospital or clinic" (63.6%), and most participants (72.2%) took a decoction from a TKM institution. The biggest reason for taking them was for "health improvement" (57.3%), and the reasons for not using them was "medication not necessary" (63.7%). Among those who took herbal medicines, 46 experienced adverse events, and the most frequently reported symptoms were digestive disorders (52.2%). Of the 46 participants who experienced adverse events, 20 (43.5%) were treated by TKM doctors. Conclusions. This study suggests that regulation of herbal medicines is needed in order to resolve problems related to the safety of herbal medicines.

  7. Experienced Harm from Other People's Drinking: A Comparison of Northern European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Synnøve Moan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study addresses how experienced harm from other people's drinking varies between six Northern European countries by comparing 1 the prevalence of experienced harm and 2 the correlates of harm. Method The data comprise 18ȓ69-year olds who participated in general population surveys in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and Scotland during the period 2008–2013. Comparative data were available on five types of harm: physical abuse, damage of clothes/belongings, verbal abuse, being afraid, and being kept awake at night. Results This study shows that harms from other's drinking are commonly experienced in all six countries. Being kept awake at night is the most common harm, while being physically harmed is the least common. The proportions that reported at least one of the five problems were highest in Finland and Iceland and lowest in Norway, but also relatively low in Sweden. Across countries, the level of harm was highest among young, single, urban residents, and for some countries among women and those who frequently drank to intoxication themselves. Conclusions The study revealed large differences in the prevalence of harm in countries with fairly similar drinking cultures. However, the correlates of such experiences were similar across countries. Possible explanations of the findings are discussed, including differences in study design.

  8. Which Environmental Factors Have the Highest Impact on the Performance of People Experiencing Difficulties in Capacity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Loidl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Disability is understood by the World Health Organization (WHO as the outcome of the interaction between a health condition and personal and environmental factors. Comprehensive data about environmental factors is therefore essential to understand and influence disability. We aimed to identify which environmental factors have the highest impact on the performance of people with mild, moderate and severe difficulties in capacity, who are at risk of experiencing disability to different extents, using data from a pilot study of the WHO Model Disability Survey in Cambodia and random forest regression. Hindering or facilitating aspects of places to socialize in community activities, transportation and natural environment as well as use and need of personal assistance and use of medication on a regular basis were the most important environmental factors across groups. Hindering or facilitating aspects of the general environment were the most relevant in persons experiencing mild levels of difficulties in capacity, while social support, attitudes of others and use of medication on a regular basis were highly relevant for the performance of persons experiencing moderate to higher levels of difficulties in capacity. Additionally, we corroborate the high importance of the use and need of assistive devices for people with severe difficulties in capacity.

  9. Determining the Reasons of Technostress Experienced by Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Naci Çoklar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, especially means of information and communication technologies are intensively tried to be integrated into education period in educational fields. In this period, leadership and teachers who shape the ways to use this technology play an important role. Therefore, teachers are expected to use an intensive amount of technology following the technological investments in education fields required by the ministry in recent years. However, this expectation also brings some negative issues into the agenda. One of them is the stress caused by technology, namely; technostress. Technostress is defined as the price of technology use. The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons leading to technostress experienced by teachers, who are the addressee of an intensive use of technology as a result of an integration process to which they are subjected in this study. For this purpose, qualitative data were collected from 64 teachers, who benefit from technology intensively and themes were prepared using 117 different opinions after the content analysis. According to this, there are five main reasons indicating technostress experienced by teachers: individual problems, technical problems, education oriented problems, health problems and time problem. It was also seen in the study that the distribution of reasons leading to technostress experienced by teachers also differs in terms of gender.

  10. [Experienced bullying and hostile behavior in the workplace and symptoms of burnout in teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mościcka-Teske, Agnieszka; Drabek, Marcin; Pyżalski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between the exposure to workplace bullying and hostile behavior and occupational burnout in a sample of Polish teachers. In our research we studied a nationwide random sample of 1214 teachers. The frequency and type of hostile behaviors against employees was measured with the use of MDM Questionnaire, ("Mobbing, dręczenie, molestowanie" - "Bullying, harrasement, maltreatment") by Mościcka, Drabek, Merecz, developed in the Department of Occupational Psychology of the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Łódź (Poland), and the level of burnout was assessed with Maslach Burnout Inventory - General Survey (MBI-GS). As many as 63% of teachers experienced hostile behavior in their workplace and 7% of them experienced workplace bullying. Employees affected by bullying and hostile behavior reported more symptoms of professional burnout, such as emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and lower level of professional efficacy. The majority of teachers in this study experienced some form of hostile behavior in the workplace. One in ten respondents was the subject of workplace bullying. The experience of hostile behavior and bullying at work was significantly connected with symptoms of professional burnout. Therefore, it is desirable to take care of good interpersonal relationships in educational institutions, strengthen teachers' abilities to cope with difficult interpersonal situations, and implement procedures to prevent bullying and hostile behavior in the workplace.

  11. Sexual Violence Experienced in the Sport Context by a Representative Sample of Quebec Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Sylvie; Lavoie, Francine; Thibodeau, Marie-Ève; Hébert, Martine; Blais, Martin

    2016-10-01

    This is the first study to report the prevalence of sexual violence perpetrated by a sport coach within a representative sample of the general population of adolescents aged between 14 and 17 years (N = 6,450). The questionnaire administered in high schools includes self-reported measures on a variety of dimensions relevant to the study of victimization, including sexual abuse, sexual contacts perceived as consensual, sexual harassment, and involvement in an organized sport context. Descriptive and chi-square analyses were performed. The results show that 0.5% of adolescents experienced sexual abuse involving a coach. When considering all adolescents who experienced sexual abuse in their lifetime (10.2%), it appears that 5.3% of them were victims of sexual abuse by a coach. Participants also reported experiencing sexual harassment from a coach (0.4%) and consensual sexual contacts (1.2%) with a coach in the 12 months preceding the study. Questions are raised on the overrepresentation of boys in situations of sexual victimization experiences in an organized sport context. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Challenges experienced by mothers caring for children with cerebral palsy in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Singogo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mothers caring for children with disability experience a number of challenges.Aim: The aim of the study was to explore the challenges that mothers who cared for children with cerebral palsy (CP living in Zambia experienced.Methods: During a qualitative study the experiences of 16 conveniently sampled mothers of children with CP, from the Ndola district in Zambia, were explored by means of interviews. The responses were thematically analysed. All the necessary ethical considerations were upheld.Results: Mothers experienced social isolation and marital problems, as well as negative attitudes from family, friends, community members and health care professionals. The physical environment created access challenges because of a lack of sidewalks, ramps, functioning lifts and small indoor spaces.Conclusion: Mothers of children with CP feel socially isolated owing to a lack of support from family, community members, and health care providers. This social isolation was exacerbated by attitudes of others towards the mothers; it was felt that mothers were responsible for their children’s condition. Mothers also experienced marital problems as a result of having a child with CP.

  13. Coping and resilience among ethnoracial individuals experiencing homelessness and mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sayani; Corneau, Simon; Boozary, Tanya; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2017-12-01

    The multiple challenges that ethnoracial homeless individuals experiencing mental illness face are well documented. However, little is known about how this homeless subpopulation copes with the compounding stressors of racial discrimination, homelessness and mental illness. This study is an in-depth investigation of the personal perceived strengths, attitudes and coping behaviors of homeless adults of diverse ethnoracial backgrounds experiencing homelessness and mental illness in Toronto, Canada. Using qualitative methods, 36 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted to capture the perspectives of ethnoracial homeless participants with mental illness on coping and resilience. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Similar to prior findings in the general homeless population, study participants recognized personal strengths and attitudes as great sources of coping and resilience, describing hope and optimism, self-esteem and confidence, insight into their challenges and spirituality as instrumental to overcoming current challenges. In addition, participants described several coping strategies, including seeking support from family, friends and professionals; socializing with peers; engaging in meaningful activities; distancing from overwhelming challenges; and finding an anchor. Findings suggest that homeless adults with mental illness from ethnoracial groups use similar coping strategies and sources of resilience with the general homeless population and highlight the need for existing services to foster hope, recognize and support individual coping strategies and sources of resilience of homeless individuals experiencing complex challenges.

  14. Differences of ballet turns (pirouette) performance between experienced and novice ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shing-Jye; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Hong-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the different postural control strategies exhibited by experienced and novice dancers in ballet turns (pirouettes). Thirteen novice and 13 experienced dancers performed ballet turns with dominant-leg support. The peak push force was measured in the double-leg support phase. The inclination angles of rotation axis with respect to vertical axis were calculated in the early single-leg support phase as well as the initiation sequence of ankle, knee, and hip joints on the supporting leg. Moreover, the anchoring index of the head was computed in the transverse plane during turning. The novice dancers applied a greater push force, an increased inclination angle of rotation axis, and an insufficient proximal-to-distal extension sequence pattern. The novice dancers also had a smaller head-anchoring index compared with experienced dancers, which meant novice dancers were not using a space target as a stability reference. A poorer performance in novice dancers could result from higher push force in propulsion, lack of a "proximal-to-distal extension sequence" pattern, and lack of visual spotting for postural stability. Training on sequential initiation of lower-extremity joints and rehearsal of visual spotting are essential for novice dancers to obtain better performance on ballet turns.

  15. Does Teaching Experience Matter? The Beliefs and Practices of Beginning and Experienced Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleon, Imelda S.; Tan, Yuen Sze Michelle; Cho, Young Hoan

    2017-02-01

    This study utilized multiple data sources to examine the beliefs about learning and teaching physics and the instructional practices of five beginning teachers and seven experienced teachers from Singapore. Our study was implemented in the unique context of teachers teaching the topic of electricity to students grouped according to academic abilities. The topic of electricity is one of the most difficult physics topics for students to understand and for teachers to teach. It was found that the experienced teachers, compared to the beginning teachers, tended to have beliefs about teaching and learning physics that are closer to constructivist views. The majority of the teachers, particularly the beginning teachers, espoused beliefs about learning physics that were incongruent with their beliefs about teaching physics. Although transmission-oriented and teacher-directed practices dominated the classroom lessons of both groups of teachers, more elements of constructivist instruction were found in the classroom lessons of the experienced teachers. It was also found that the classroom practices of the teachers, especially those in their inductive years of teaching, were more aligned with their beliefs about learning physics than their beliefs about teaching physics.

  16. Workplace physical violence, verbal violence, and mobbing experienced by nurses at a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksakal, Fatma Nur Baran; Karaşahin, Emine Füsun; Dikmen, Asiye Uğraş; Avci, Emine; Ozkan, Seçil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of and risk factors for physical violence, verbal violence, and mobbing experienced by nurses in a university hospital. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Gazi University Medical Faculty Hospital. A questionnaire form recommended by the WHO and the International Labor Organization was administered through face-to-face interviews to determine the violence experienced in the past 12 months by nurses. The prevalence of physical violence, verbal violence, and mobbing was 13.9%, 41.8%, and 17.1%, respectively. Working more than 40 h per week increased the risk of physical violence by 1.86 times. The majority of nurses who experienced verbal violence and mobbing were significantly more willing to change their work, their institution, and their profession if given the opportunity. Fewer than one-fourth of the victims indicated they reported any incident. We knew that the prevalence of physical violence, verbal violence, and mobbing were high among nurses and that incidents were underreported, and the study corroborated this information. What this study adds to the topic is that long working hours increased the prevalence of physical violence and was defined as an important contributory factor.

  17. Risk factors of anxiety and depressive symptoms in female patients experiencing intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakuła Juchnowicz, Hanna; Łukasik, Paulina; Morylowska-Topolska, Justyna; Krukow, Paweł

    2017-02-26

    The aim of the study was to find factors associated with higher severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms in female patients experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). The study was conducted in six randomly selected primary healthcare centers in Lublin province. The HADS (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and a structured questionnaire designed by the authors were administered to a total of 350 consecutive female patients visiting a GP. Fully completed questionnaire forms were obtained from 200 women. 102 (51%) participants who confirmed experiencing IPV ultimately made up the study cohort. Sequential models were created using backward stepwise multiple regression to investigate the potential risk and the protective factors associated with higher severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms in the study group. 68% and 56% of the participants respectively had positive scores on the HADS anxiety and depression subscales. Living in a small town or in the countryside was associated with higher scores on the anxiety subscale (b = -1.18, p = 0.003), but not on the depression subscale. Chronic physical illness (b = 2.42, p = 0.013; b = 2.86, p = 0.015), being unemployed (b = 0.58, p = 0.024; b = 0.69, p = 0.008), and exposure to economic violence (b = 3.97, p anxiety subscale. The type of violence and socioeconomic characteristics were more strongly associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms in women experiencing IPV than demographic variables.

  18. The prevalence and incidence of perinatal anxiety disorders among women experiencing a medically complicated pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Nichole; Young, Allan H; Zhang, Areiyu; Janssen, Patricia; Antony, Martin M

    2017-04-01

    Over 20% of pregnancies involve medical difficulties that pose some threat to the health and well-being of the mother, her developing infant, or both. We report on the first comparison of the prevalence and incidence of maternal anxiety disorders (AD) in pregnancy and the postpartum, across levels of medical risk in pregnancy. Pregnant women (N = 310) completed postnatal screening measures for anxiety. Women who scored at or above cutoff on one or more of the screening measures were administered a diagnostic interview (n = 115) for AD. Pregnancies were classified into low, moderate, or high risk based on self-report and contact with high-risk maternity clinics. The incidence of AD in pregnancy was higher among women classified as experiencing a medically moderate or high-risk pregnancy, compared with women classified as experiencing a medically low-risk pregnancy. Across risk groups, there were no differences in AD prevalence or in the incidence of AD in the postpartum. Demographic characteristics and parity did not contribute meaningfully to outcomes. Pregnancies characterized by medical risks are associated with an increased likelihood of new onset AD. Women experiencing medically complex pregnancies should be screened for anxiety and offered appropriate treatment.

  19. Difficulties experienced by families following unsuccessful treatment of Pediculosis capitis: the mothers' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Ozlem; Sikar-Aktürk, Aysun; Mert, Kader; Bilen, Nilgün; Mumcuoğlu, Kosta Y

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the psychological and social difficulties faced by primary school children and their families, particularly from the mothers' perspective, when treatment for Pediculosis capitis fails. This descriptive study comprised 14 mothers of 19 children in the primary school in Kocaeli. The children and families were infested with lice and nits and were unsuccessfully treated with pediculicides. Data were collected by a semi-structured questionnaire with in-depth individual interviews with a qualitative approach from mothers. Seven social difficulties were experienced by children and families during treatment from the mothers' perspective, lack of support from other family members; children's exposure to verbal and physical violence; exclusion from the school and society due to stigma; children's refusal to be treated; difficulties in the physical removal of the nits; inability to pay for the pediculicide; and inappropriate physical conditions of the house. Eight psychological difficulties were experienced by children and their families: worry, upheaval, embarrassment/shame, guilt, being overwhelmed, disgust, scorn and despair. Parents and children, whose treatment for Pediculosis capitis failed, experienced many psychological and social difficulties. Further studies should be conducted to determine the relation to pediculosis management and their difficulties of chidren and families from different socio-economic levels.

  20. Perceived and experienced restrictions in participation and autonomy among adult survivors of stroke in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amosun, S L; Nyante, G G; Wiredu, E K

    2013-03-01

    Many stroke survivors do not participate in everyday life activities. To assess the perceived and experienced restrictions in participation and autonomy among adult stroke survivors in Ghana. The "Impact on Participation and Autonomy Questionnaire" (IPAQ) instrument was administered in a survey of 200 adult stroke survivors to assess perceived restrictions in participation and autonomy, followed by in-depth interviews with a sub-sample on the restrictions they experienced in participation. Perceived restrictions in participation were most prevalent in the domains of education and training (3.46±0.79), paid or voluntary work (2.68±0.89), helping and supporting other people (2.20±0.82), and mobility (2.12±0.79). There were significant differences in two domains between survivors who received physiotherapy and those who received traditional rehabilitation. Over half of the survivors also perceived they would encounter severe problems in participation in the domains of paid or voluntary work, mobility, and education and training. The sub-sample of stroke survivors (n=7) mostly experienced restrictions in participation and autonomy in going outside the house, working, and in fulfilling family roles. If these perceptions and experiences are not addressed during rehabilitation, they could further inhibit the full participation and social integration of stroke survivors.

  1. Families experiencing housing instability: the effects of housing programs on family routines and rituals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Shinn, Marybeth; Benton, Jessica Gibbons; Wise, Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of family processes can protect parents, children, and families from the detrimental effects of extreme stressors, such as homelessness. When families cannot maintain routines and rituals, the stressors of poverty and homelessness can be compounded for both caregivers and children. However, characteristics of living situations common among families experiencing homelessness present barriers to the maintenance of family routines and rituals. We analyzed 80 in-depth interviews with parents who were experiencing or had recently experienced an instance of homelessness. We compared their assessments of challenges to family schedules, routines, and rituals across various living situations, including shelter, transitional housing programs, doubled-up (i.e., living temporarily with family or friends), and independent housing. Rules common across shelters and transitional housing programs impeded family processes, and parents felt surveilled and threatened with child protective service involvement in these settings. In doubled-up living situations, parents reported adapting their routines to those of the household and having parenting interrupted by opinions of friends and family members. Families used several strategies to maintain family routines and rituals in these living situations and ensure consistency and stability for their children during an otherwise unstable time. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate with computer-aided detection: experienced observer performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannini, Valentina; Mazzetti, Simone; Armando, Enrico; Carabalona, Silvia; Russo, Filippo [FPO, IRCCS, Department of Radiology at the Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Giacobbe, Alessandro [San Giovanni Bosco Hospital, Department of Urology, Turin (Italy); Muto, Giovanni [University Campus Biomedico, Department of Urology, Rome (Italy); Regge, Daniele [FPO, IRCCS, Department of Radiology at the Candiolo Cancer Institute, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); University of Torino, A.O.U. Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Department of Surgical Sciences, Turin (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    To compare the performance of experienced readers in detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using likelihood maps generated by a CAD system with that of unassisted interpretation of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Three experienced radiologists reviewed mp-MRI prostate cases twice. First, readers observed CAD marks on a likelihood map and classified as positive those suspicious for cancer. After 6 weeks, radiologists interpreted mp-MRI examinations unassisted, using their favourite protocol. Sensitivity, specificity, reading time and interobserver variability were compared for the two reading paradigms. The dataset comprised 89 subjects of whom 35 with at least one significant PCa. Sensitivity was 80.9% (95% CI 72.1-88.0%) and 87.6% (95% CI 79.8-93.2; p = 0.105) for unassisted and CAD paradigm respectively. Sensitivity was higher with CAD for lesions with GS > 6 (91.3% vs 81.2%; p = 0.046) or diameter ≥10 mm (95.0% vs 80.0%; p = 0.006). Specificity was not affected by CAD. The average reading time with CAD was significantly lower (220 s vs 60 s; p < 0.001). Experienced readers using likelihood maps generated by a CAD scheme can detect more patients with ≥10 mm PCa lesions than unassisted MRI interpretation; overall reporting time is shorter. To gain more insight into CAD-human interaction, different reading paradigms should be investigated. (orig.)

  3. Experienced bullying and hostile behavior in the workplace and symptoms of burnout in teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Mościcka-Teske

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between the exposure to workplace bullying and hostile behavior and occupational burnout in a sample of Polish teachers. Material and Methods: In our research we studied a nationwide random sample of 1214 teachers. The frequency and type of hostile behaviors against employees was measured with the use of MDM Questionnaire, (“Mobbing, dręczenie, molestowanie” – “Bullying, harrasement, maltreatment” by Mościcka, Drabek, Merecz, developed in the Department of Occupational Psychology of the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Łódź (Poland, and the level of burnout was assessed with Maslach Burnout Inventory – General Survey (MBI-GS. Results: As many as 63% of teachers experienced hostile behavior in their workplace and 7% of them experienced workplace bullying. Employees affected by bullying and hostile behavior reported more symptoms of professional burnout, such as emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and lower level of professional efficacy. Conclusions: The majority of teachers in this study experienced some form of hostile behavior in the workplace. One in ten respondents was the subject of workplace bullying. The experience of hostile behavior and bullying at work was significantly connected with symptoms of professional burnout. Therefore, it is desirable to take care of good interpersonal relationships in educational institutions, strengthen teachers’ abilities to cope with difficult interpersonal situations, and implement procedures to prevent bullying and hostile behavior in the workplace. Med Pr 2014;65(4:535–542

  4. Confident but not theoretically grounded - experienced simulation educators' perceptions of their own professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allvin, Renée; Berndtzon, Magnus; Carlzon, Liisa; Edelbring, Samuel; Hult, Håkan; Hultin, Magnus; Karlgren, Klas; Masiello, Italo; Södersved Källestedt, Marie-Louise; Tamás, Éva

    2017-01-01

    Medical simulation enables the design of learning activities for competency areas (eg, communication and leadership) identified as crucial for future health care professionals. Simulation educators and medical teachers follow different career paths, and their education backgrounds and teaching contexts may be very different in a simulation setting. Although they have a key role in facilitating learning, information on the continuing professional development (pedagogical development) of simulation educators is not available in the literature. To explore changes in experienced simulation educators' perceptions of their own teaching skills, practices, and understanding of teaching over time. A qualitative exploratory study. Fourteen experienced simulation educators participated in individual open-ended interviews focusing on their development as simulation educators. Data were analyzed using an inductive thematic analysis. Marked educator development was discerned over time, expressed mainly in an altered way of thinking and acting. Five themes were identified: shifting focus, from following to utilizing a structure, setting goals, application of technology, and alignment with profession. Being confident in the role as an instructor seemed to constitute a foundation for the instructor's pedagogical development. Experienced simulation educators' pedagogical development was based on self-confidence in the educator role, and not on a deeper theoretical understanding of teaching and learning. This is the first clue to gain increased understanding regarding educational level and possible education needs among simulation educators, and it might generate several lines of research for further studies.

  5. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for treating psychological disturbances in Taiwanese adolescents who experienced Typhoon Morakot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tze-Chun; Yang, Pinchen; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Tai-Ling

    2015-07-01

    In this case-control study, we aimed to assess the intervention effects of four-session eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) on reducing the severity of disaster-related anxiety, general anxiety, and depressive symptoms in Taiwanese adolescents who experienced Typhoon Morakot. A total of 83 adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder related to Typhoon Morakot, major depressive disorder, or current moderate or high suicide risk after experiencing Typhoon Morakot were allocated to a four-session course of EMDR (N = 41) or to treatment as usual (TAU; N = 42). A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to examine the effects of EMDR in reducing the severity of disaster-related anxiety, general anxiety, and depressive symptoms in adolescents by using preintervention severity values as covariates. The multivariate analysis of covariance results indicated that the EMDR group exhibited significantly lower preintervention severity values of general anxiety and depression than did the TAU group. In addition, the preintervention severity value of disaster-related anxiety in the EMDR group was lower than that in the TAU group (p = 0.05). The results of this study support that EMDR could alleviate general anxiety and depressive symptoms and reduce disaster-related anxiety in adolescents experiencing major traumatic disasters. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  6. Physical activity and body mass index among women who have experienced infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Seddigheh; Basirat, Zahra; Shafi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The experience of infertility is a common medical condition in the developing countries. The aim of this retrospective epidemiologic study was to determine fertility status and parity in Babol, Iran and then identify physical activity and body mass index (BMI) among women who have experienced infertility. Material and methods A total of 1,081 women aged 20-45 years were selected using cluster sampling. The current physical activity was measured using the original International Physical Activity Questionnaire short form. Lifestyle factors were compared between those who had experienced infertility (n = 168) and the rest of the women. A face-to-face household interview was conducted using a specially designed interview questionnaire. Results After adjusting for suspected confounding factors, women with infertility experience had a 4.8-fold increased risk of obesity (OR = 2.02, CI = 0.70, 5.84) and almost a 3.8-fold increased risk of being overweight (OR = 2.11, CI = 0.72, 6.17) compared to women without infertility. No significant differences were found in Met-minutes of sedentary activity, intensity of walking, moderate, vigorous, and total physical activity, self-reported dietary intake, exercise, and level of physical activity between women with and without experience of infertility. Conclusions Since both obesity and infertility are increasing public health issues in Iranian women, more attention should be paid to lifestyle behaviors, especially gaining weight in women who have experienced infertility. PMID:23847673

  7. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for treating psychological disturbances in Taiwanese adolescents who experienced Typhoon Morakot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze-Chun Tang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this case–control study, we aimed to assess the intervention effects of four-session eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR on reducing the severity of disaster-related anxiety, general anxiety, and depressive symptoms in Taiwanese adolescents who experienced Typhoon Morakot. A total of 83 adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder related to Typhoon Morakot, major depressive disorder, or current moderate or high suicide risk after experiencing Typhoon Morakot were allocated to a four-session course of EMDR (N = 41 or to treatment as usual (TAU; N = 42. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to examine the effects of EMDR in reducing the severity of disaster-related anxiety, general anxiety, and depressive symptoms in adolescents by using preintervention severity values as covariates. The multivariate analysis of covariance results indicated that the EMDR group exhibited significantly lower preintervention severity values of general anxiety and depression than did the TAU group. In addition, the preintervention severity value of disaster-related anxiety in the EMDR group was lower than that in the TAU group (p = 0.05. The results of this study support that EMDR could alleviate general anxiety and depressive symptoms and reduce disaster-related anxiety in adolescents experiencing major traumatic disasters.

  8. Tipranavir in highly antiretroviral treatment-experienced patients: Results from a French prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allavena, Clotilde; Flandre, Philippe; Pugliese, Pascal; Valantin, Marc-Antoine; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Cabié, André; Melliez, Hugues; Cuzin, Lise; Duvivier, Claudine; Dellamonica, Pierre; Raffi, François

    2012-01-01

    In highly antiretroviral-experienced patients with a multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, recommended regimens should preferentially contain 3 active components, including a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r). Tipranavir/r (TPV/r), a non-peptidic PI, has been specifically developed for patients resistant to the usual antiretroviral classes including PIs. This paper discusses the role of TPV/r in patients experiencing multiple PI resistance. Virological, immunological, and safety outcomes were collected between 2003 and 2007 at 7 clinical units. Virus resistance assessment was based on 3 different genotypic tests. The 207 patients evaluated had previously received nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and PIs. The main drugs co-administered with TPV/r were 1 or 2 NRTIs associated, in half of the patients, with enfuvirtide. After 12 weeks, viral load was <50 copies/ml in 38% of the patients (44% with enfuvirtide), while median CD4 counts had increased from 150 to 250 cells/mm³. Genotypic testing suggested that most of the patients had viruses susceptible to TPV. Lipid and transaminase levels were slightly modified, and less than 10% of treatment discontinuations were due to gastrointestinal events. A regimen including TPV/r associated with at least 1 active component is a valuable option in highly ARV-experienced patients with multi-resistance to the usual ARV classes including PIs.

  9. Role of the body self and self-esteem in experiencing the intensity of menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Małgorzata; Dolińska-Zygmunt, Grażyna

    2017-10-29

    The aim of the study was to test differences in self-esteem and strength of the body self, body image, comfort with closeness with others and body protection among women reporting high and low intensity of psychological, vasomotor and somatic symptoms of menopause. The sample included 201 women aged 45-55 years. The Menopause Symptom List was used to test the intensity of menopausal symptoms, the Body Self Questionnaire was used to diagnose the body self, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was used to examine participants'levels of self-esteem. Differences between women experiencing high and low intensity of symptoms were analyzed using Student's t-test for independent samples. Women experiencing high-intensity psychological, vasomotor and somatic symptoms of menopause showed significantly lower self-esteem and poorer body-self functioning in all its dimensions except for body protection. Women experiencing high-intensity psychological, vasomotor and somatic symptoms of menopause demonstrated poorer functioning of the body self and lower self-esteem.

  10. Student-centred GP ambassadors: Perceptions of experienced clinical tutors in general practice undergraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Below, Bernhard; Haffling, Ann-Christin; Brorsson, Annika; Mattsson, Bengt; Wahlqvist, Mats

    2015-06-01

    To explore experienced general practitioner (GP) tutor perceptions of a skilled GP tutor of medical students. Interview study based on focus groups. Twenty GPs experienced in tutoring medical students at primary health care centres in two Swedish regions were interviewed. Four focus-group interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Twenty GP tutors, median age 50, specifically selected according to age, gender, and location participated in two focus groups in Gothenburg and Malmö, respectively. Meaning units in the texts were extracted, coded and condensed into categories and themes. Three main themes emerged: "Professional as GP and ambassador to general practice", "Committed and student-centred educator", and "Coordinator of the learning environment". Experienced GP tutors describe their skills as a clinical tutor as complex and diversified. A strong professional identity within general practice is vital and GP tutors describe themselves as ambassadors to general practice, essential to the process of recruiting a new generation of general practitioners. Leaders of clinical education and health care planners must understand the complexity in a clinical tutor's assignment and provide adequate support, time, and resources in order to facilitate a sustainable tutorship and a good learning environment, which could also improve the necessary recruitment of future GPs.

  11. Influence of surface on impact shock experienced during a fencing lunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Andrew; Bottoms, Lindsay; Sinclair, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sports surface on the magnitude of impact shock experienced during a lunge movement. Thirteen experienced, competitive fencers (age 32.4 ± 4.6 years; height 178.4 ± 7.2 cm; mass 74.4 ± 9.1 kg) performed 10 lunges on four different surfaces: concrete with an overlaid vinyl layer (COVL), wooden sprung court surface (WSCS), metallic carpet fencing piste overlaid on the WSCS, and aluminum fencing piste overlaid on the WSCS. An accelerometer measured accelerations along the longitudinal axis of the tibia at 1000 Hz. The results identified a significantly (P shock magnitude was experienced during a lunge on the COVL (14.88 ± 8.45 g) compared with the WSCS (11.61 ± 7.30 g), WSCS with metallic carpet piste (11.14 ± 6.38 g) and WSCS with aluminum piste (11.95 ± 7.21 g). Furthermore, the two types of piste used had no significant effect the impact shock magnitude measured when overlaid on the WSCS compared with the WSCS on its own. The results of this investigation suggest that occurrences of injuries related to increased levels of impact shock may be reduced through the utilization of a WSCS as opposed to a COVL surface during fencing participation.

  12. Six ways of experiencing information literacy in nursing: the findings of a phenomenographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy plays a vital role in evidence-based practice in nursing. However there is currently little evidence to show how being information literate is actually experienced by nurses and therefore information literacy educational interventions are not genuinely evidence-based. Are they promoting the appropriate knowledge and skills to help nurses find and use the research evidence they need? To investigate how being information literate is experienced by nurses. To use the insights obtained to develop a description of the parameters of information literacy in nursing, including those of its role and value in evidence-based practice. Phenomenography. 41 UK nurses of varying experience, specialism and background. Open-ended interviews. 7 contexts in which information literacy is experienced, were mapped out and 6 representative ways of being an information literate nurse, in increasing levels of depth and sophistication, were described. These findings may form the basis of future evidence-based information literacy education programmes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Experiencing Positive Religious Coping in the Process of Divorce: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonič, Barbara; Klobučar, Nataša Rijavec

    2017-10-01

    Divorce is one of the more stressful and psychologically challenging experiences for spouses and whole families. After divorce, a new era begins, when it is necessary to re-adapt to life and during which hard feelings also emerge. During the process of divorce, successful emotional adaptation to the new situation is of great significance. Religion or spirituality can be a powerful source of help for an individual coping with stressful situations brought up by divorce. This study aimed to explore if and how divorcees experience the burden of divorce and along with it the relationship with God (within Catholic tradition) as a source of positive support in coping with divorce. We conducted open semi-structured interviews with 11 participants. With empirical phenomenological analysis, we built a general description of the investigated experience which entails three areas of experience: experiencing the burden of divorce, which is related to experiencing the relationship with God and the ways of spiritual coping with divorce, and experiencing the effects of religious coping with divorce. The result of this research can be used in evidence-based psychosocial (e.g. psychotherapy, counselling) and spiritual help for individuals in comprehensive care after divorce.

  14. The social and learning environments experienced by underrepresented minority medical students: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orom, Heather; Semalulu, Teresa; Underwood, Willie

    2013-11-01

    To review the literature on the social and learning environments experienced by underrepresented minority (URM) medical students to determine what type of interventions are needed to eliminate potential barriers to enrolling and retaining URM students. The authors searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Ovid HealthStar, and Web of Science, and the reference lists of included studies, published between January 1, 1980, and September 15, 2012. Studies of the learning and social environments and of students' satisfaction, experiences with discrimination or unfair practices, and academic performance or progress, as well as assessments of programs or interventions to improve URM students' academic performance, were eligible for inclusion. The authors identified 28 studies (27 unique data sets) meeting the inclusion criteria. The results of the included studies indicated that URM students experienced less supportive social and less positive learning environments, were subjected to discrimination and racial harassment, and were more likely to see their race as having a negative impact on their medical school experiences than non-URM students. Academic performance on standardized exams was worse, progress less timely, and attrition higher for URM students as well. For URM students, an adverse climate may be decreasing the attractiveness of careers in medicine, impairing their academic performance, and increasing attrition. Improvements to the social and learning environments experienced by URM students are needed to make medicine a more inclusive profession. The current environment of health care reform creates an opportunity for institutions to implement strategies to achieve this goal.

  15. No experience required: Violent crime and anticipated, vicarious, and experienced racial discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herda, Daniel; McCarthy, Bill

    2018-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence linking racial discrimination and juvenile crime, and a number of theories explain this relationship. In this study, we draw on one popular approach, Agnew's general strain theory, and extend prior research by moving from a focus on experienced discrimination to consider two other forms, anticipated and vicarious discrimination. Using data on black, white, and Hispanic youth, from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN), we find that experienced, anticipated, and to a lesser extent, vicarious discrimination, significantly predict violent crime independent of a set of neighborhood, parental, and individual level controls, including prior violent offending. Additional analyses on the specific contexts of discrimination reveal that violence is associated with the anticipation of police discrimination. The effects tend to be larger for African American than Hispanic youth, but the differences are not statistically significant. These findings support the thesis that, like other strains, discrimination may not have to be experienced directly to influence offending. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Ethical dilemmas experienced by speech-language pathologists working in private practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatley, Danielle R; Kenny, Belinda J; Lincoln, Michelle A

    2014-06-01

    Speech-language pathologists experience ethical dilemmas as they fulfil their professional roles and responsibilities. Previous research findings indicated that speech-language pathologists working in publicly funded settings identified ethical dilemmas when they managed complex clients, negotiated professional relationships, and addressed service delivery issues. However, little is known about ethical dilemmas experienced by speech-language pathologists working in private practice settings. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe the nature of ethical dilemmas experienced by speech-language pathologists working in private practice. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 10 speech-language pathologists employed in diverse private practice settings. Participants explained the nature of ethical dilemmas they experienced at work and identified their most challenging and frequently occurring ethical conflicts. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse transcribed data and generate themes. Four themes reflected the nature of speech-language pathologists' ethical dilemmas; balancing benefit and harm, fidelity of business practices, distributing funds, and personal and professional integrity. Findings support the need for professional development activities that are specifically targeted towards facilitating ethical practice for speech-language pathologists in the private sector.

  17. Comparing resident cataract surgery outcomes under novice versus experienced attending supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sidharth Puri,1 Amanda E Kiely,2 Jiangxia Wang,3 Alonzo S Woodfield,4 Saras Ramanathan,5 Shameema Sikder21Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 3Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 4Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center, Sacramento, 5San Francisco School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USAPurpose: To determine whether supervision by an attending new to surgical teaching or an experienced attending measurably influences intraoperative complications rates or outcomes in phacoemulsification performed by ophthalmology residents.Setting: Single tertiary hospital.Design: Retrospective cohort study. Methods: Resident-performed phacoemulsification cases supervised by one novice attending (N=189 and experienced attending (N=172 over 1 year were included. Data included: resident year, patient age, sex, preoperative risk factors (4+ dense/white/brunescent cataracts, Flomax, zonular dialysis, pseudoexfoliation, glaucoma risk, post-vitrectomy, intraoperative risk factors (Trypan blue, iris hooks, and intraoperative complications (capsule tears, vitreous loss, zonular dialysis, zonular dehiscence, burns, nuclear fragment loss, Descemet’s tear. Experienced attending data were compared against those of the novice attending.Results: Regarding preoperative risks, experienced attending cases more likely involved 4+ cataract (P=0.005, Flomax (P<0.001, or glaucoma risk (P=0.001. For intraoperative risks, novice attending cases more likely involved Trypan blue (P<0.001. Regarding complications, novice attending cases were associated with vitreous loss (P=0.002 and anterior capsule tears (P<0.001. When comparing total complications, the novice attending was more likely to have both increased number of cases with complications and total complications than the experienced attending. The novice

  18. Evaluation of the antigen-experienced B-cell receptor repertoire in healthy children and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna IJspeert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Upon antigen recognition via their B cell receptor (BR B cells migrate to the germinal center where they undergo somatic hypermutation (SHM to increase their affinity for the antigen, and class switch recombination (CSR to change the effector function of the secreted antibodies. These steps are essential to create an antigen-experienced BR repertoire that efficiently protects the body against pathogens. At the same time, the BR repertoire should be selected to protect against responses to self-antigen or harmless antigens. Insights into the processes of SHM, selection and CSR can be obtained by studying the antigen experienced BR repertoire. Currently, a large reference data set of healthy children and adults, which ranges from neonates to the elderly, is not available. In this study, we analyzed the antigen-experienced repertoire of 38 healthy donors (HD, ranging from cord blood to 74 years old, by sequencing IGA and IGG transcripts using next generation sequencing. This resulted in a large, freely available reference data set containing 412,890 IGA and IGG transcripts. We used this data set to study mutation levels, SHM patterns, antigenic selection and CSR from birth to elderly HD. Only small differences were observed in SHM patterns, while the mutation levels increase in early childhood, and stabilize at six years of age at around 7%. Furthermore, comparison of the antigen-experienced repertoire with sequences from the naïve immune repertoire showed that features associated with auto-immunity such as long CDR3 length and IGHV4-34 usage are reduced in the antigen experienced repertoire. Moreover, IGA2 and IGG2 usage was increased in HD in higher age categories, while IGG1 usage was decreased. In addition, we studied clonal relationship in the different samples. Clonally related sequences were found with different subclasses. Interestingly, we found transcripts with the same CDR1-CDR3 sequence, but different subclasses. Together these data

  19. A comprehensive assessment of factors related to smoking and other cardiovascular disease risk factors among people experiencing severe mental illness

    OpenAIRE

    Filia, Sacha Louise

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking and the resultant impact on the health and well-being of people experiencing severe mental illness, is significantly disproportionate to smokers in the general population. Smokers experiencing severe mental illness are more likely to die, and at an earlier age, from smoking-related conditions, predominantly cardiovascular disease (CVD). Further, smoking among people experiencing severe mental illness is associated with a poorer clinical picture, and increases the f...

  20. Anticipated and experienced discrimination amongst people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a cross sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrelly, Simone; Clement, Sarah; Gabbidon, Jheanell; Jeffery, Debra; Dockery, Lisa; Lassman, Francesca; Brohan, Elaine; Henderson, R Claire; Williams, Paul; Howard, Louise M; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-01-01

    .... This study aimed to establish the levels and clinical and socio-demographic associations of anticipated and experienced discrimination amongst those diagnosed with a schizophrenia and comparator...