WorldWideScience

Sample records for experienciaa field hospital

  1. Field guide to hospital cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R P

    1986-09-01

    We have all faced the problem of whether or not to venture into that gastronomic wasteland known as the hospital cafeteria. Hospital cafeterias have developed a reputation, deserved or otherwise, as less than ideal places to eat. Many people overlook the fact that this is a direct result of trying to provide patient meals that are salt-free, sugar-free, fiber-free, and taste-free. (Some faint traces of color may, occasionally, be found.) How then does one go about choosing whether to venture in, and how does one survive the encounter once there? The following guide has been assembled to help the reader through this difficult process.

  2. Syrian revolution: a field hospital under attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanin, Ahmed; Mukhtar, Ahmed; Mokhtar, Ali; Radwan, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Syrian revolution that began on March 15, 2011 represents not only a political crisis but also a humanitarian one where many relief attempts for saving civil injured were tried. A secret field hospital organized by the medical Arab union was set in Al-Bab town in the district of Aleppo. Egyptian volunteer physicians were the operating team who reached Syria through the Turkish border. Medical supplies were delivered from Turkey and medical equipment were taken from the government hospital which was not running at that time. Many Syrian volunteers helped in running this field hospital most of them were non-medical personnel who were trained to help in some medical purposes. Total number of cases referred to the hospital was 75. Surgical intervention was needed for 28 patients. Most common procedures needed were vascular procedures (32 percent), orthopedic procedures (32 percent), and abdominal exploration (25 percent). Median injury severity score (ISS) for admitted patients were 21 with interquartile range (14-21). Two patients died intraoperatively due to massive bleeding. Setting up a field hospital in such an area with unsafe conditions needs good communication with medical and relief organizations in the site of crisis, selection of a location as near as possible to the Turkish border, developing a convenient triaging plan, and training nonmedical volunteers to do simple tasks.

  3. Hospitality Language In Tourism Field: Facework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohanes Kristianto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to uncover, analyze, and interpret the reality of hospitality language in tourism from the perspective of the duality. The underlying assumption that language is an action  in social practices. This is shown by the practice of the English language in the service interaction. The structure of the English language is like  schemata of principles for service interaction and at the same time empowering service  provider to perform service interaction To uncover and interpret  hospitality language practice, the theory of structuration is applied. Theory of pragmatics is  used to analyze the linguistic phenomena. Based on the frame of structuration, this  research is identified in four issues, namely (1 the structure of hospitality language, (2 the system of  hospitality language, and (3 hospitality language as a representation facework. Problem (1 and (2 are analyzed by ethnography of communication. Problem (3 is analyzed using speech act theory and politeness theory. This study is a qualitative research, due to explore, pattern, interpreting the language practices, so it does not use statistical analysis to generalize the results. Population is not  in large quantities, but using purposive sample to determine the number of informants based on the criteria and representativeness in service encounter. In addition, language behavior in general is homogeneous. Data collected by the ethnography of communication methods, observation, and recording. The data selected are English due to English as the main foreign language in the service interaction. The findings of this study are: (1 the structure of the hospitality language, namely (a the structure of significance in the form of setting or scene of service encounter, (b the structure of domination, namely participants (tourism practitioners and tourists, (2 the system of  hospitality language in the form of (a the schemata interpretation of act sequences and keys, (b the schemata

  4. A "Medical Physics" Course Based Upon Hospital Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onn, David G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a noncalculus, medical physics'' course with a basic element of direct hospital field experience. The course is intended primarily for premedical students but may be taken by nonscience majors. (Author/PR)

  5. Rocket grenade injuries: patient management in a field hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedeman, J E

    1994-01-01

    An incident involving RPG-7 (rocket grenade) injuries was managed in a field hospital in the Middle East. Used by guerrilla forces worldwide, the RPG-7 is exemplary of military weapons that produce extensive fragment-related wounds and associated blast effects. The active duty or reserve military physician must be prepared to diagnose and treat such injuries in a remote setting.

  6. Telemedicine for a Children's Field Hospital in Chechnya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, A I; Kobrinsky, B A; Petlakh, V I; Rozinov, V M; Shabanov, V E

    2007-01-01

    In 2001, the Children's Field Hospital in the Gudermes area of the Chechen Republic was connected to a telemedical centre at the Scientific Institute of Pediatrics and Children's Surgery in Moscow, via the Russian SCA HeliosNet satellite system. An asymmetric satellite link, in which there was a high-speed downlink from the satellite to Gudermes and a low-speed uplink from Gudermes to the satellite was used. In total, 179 teleconsultations were carried out from October 2001 until February 2002, when the field hospital was closed. Of the 179 teleconsultations, 26 were real-time, by videoconference and the rest were asynchronous, by email. Almost half of consultations were carried out for emergency or urgent reasons, thus demonstrating the value of providing access to the necessary experts. The use of satellite communication allowed telemedical support for medical decisions in a wide range of disease and trauma in children and teenage in a conflict situation.

  7. Telecommunications in Israeli field hospitals deployed to three crisis zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finestone, Aharon S; Levy, Gadi; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

    2014-10-01

    A field hospital overseas requires various types of communication equipment. This study presents the communications equipment used by three Israeli field hospital delegations to earthquake sites at Adapazari, Turkey, in 1999, Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in 2010 and Minamisanriku, Japan, in 2011. The delegations to Turkey and Haiti were relatively large (105-230 personnel) and were on the site early (three to four days after each event). The 55-person delegation to Japan arrived later and was established as an outpatient community hospital. Standard military VHF radios were the only effective tool up to 5 km, until cellular coverage was regained (1-2 weeks after each event). International communication was good. While short-wave communication (telephone and Internet) was used in Turkey, a direct satellite channel was set up in Haiti. In Japan, BGAN Inmarsat provided efficient Wi-Fi for all needs. Motorola walkie talkies were not efficient beyond the immediate vicinity. This paper recommends continued use of military-specification equipment alongside newer modalities, particularly in situations where infrastructure is damaged. © 2014 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2014.

  8. Using a verbal prompt to increase protein consumption in a hospital setting: a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, van der L.D.T.; Essen, van H.; Kleef, van E.; Wijk, de R.A.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sufficient protein intake among hospitalized patients may contribute to faster recovery and a decrease in healthcare costs. Nevertheless, hospitalized patients are often found to consume too little protein. This field study explored the success of a small, inexpensive intervention

  9. 'Hospitality' Is an Inviting Field at Many Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Michele N-K

    1988-01-01

    Hospitality programs, which include courses in hotel, restaurant, and institutional management, are more popular than ever, due to a boom in the hotel and restaurant industries. Interest has also been spurred by increased demands from hospitals and retirement homes. (MLW)

  10. Situational leadership style adopted by nurses in the hospital field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Cristina Kades Andrigue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze Situational Leadership styles adopted by hospital nurses and their association with their personal and professional profile. This is a quantitative and descriptive study and the Hersey and Blanchard leadership model was used with nurses who work in hospitals. Data were collected through sociodemographic questionnaire and the Leadership Effectiveness and Adaptability Description. The more directive leadership style focused on persuasion was the most present. The activity sector showed a significant relation to the leadership style (p=00.1, demonstrating approximation between assistance and leadership profile. Although the population is composed of young group with a short time of performance, the predominance of the Coaching leadership style may limit the creativity and potential of team members for the focus to be focused on the task. Strategies to achieve high levels of maturity, can assist nurses in adopting more flexible leadership practices.

  11. Siege of town and establishment of field hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buturovic, Sead

    2014-06-01

    The degree of material and social development determines the basic characteristics of warfare. There are various causes, means and goals of warfare. From the standpoint of international war law, significant is the division between international and non-international (civil) war. International law of war is a part of public international law and constitutes a set of contractual and legal rules governing the relations between the international recognized subjects in times of armed conflict. The town of Konjic and Konjic municipalities are geographically located in the northern part of Herzegovina-Neretva Canton. It is the largest urban municipality in the state of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Distance to some settlements in the northeast to the northwest or the villages are 186 km. Municipality area is 1,101 km(2). According to the character of the mountainous districts, inhabited by a sparse population, which amounts to 29.65 people per 1 km(2). A third of the population lives in the city and suburbs, and the other two-thirds is the rural population. Our aim was to show that in an environment, space, under the conditions imposed suddenly by all sorts of war blockade, the successful in transformation from peacetime to war organization, with full support to local personnel and material-technical resources can be achieved successful results. This research was conducted as a clinical, descriptive and retrospective, by valid documentation of War Hospital and already published thesis on a series of conferences, symposia and seminars at home and abroad. In this paper we show our results achieved in the care and treatment of injured and sick hospitalized in the War Hospital Konjic for the period from April 1992 till December 1995. Of the total number of hospitalized at the surgical ward, 62% had an injury, a disease had 30.7%. Dominated by war injuries (78.9%). The total mortality in the surgical ward was 4.5%. By localization were most often represented injuries of the

  12. Field test of microbend fiber sensor for hospital use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we report a field test of a microbend fiber sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate, breathing pattern, Ballistocardiogram and heart rate during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Comparative experiments conducted between our sensor and commercial physiologic device on a healthy male subject showed an accuracy of +/-2bpm for simultaneous measurement of both breathing rate and heart rate. Our preliminary field test on simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects in the 3.0 Tesla MRI environment showed very good agreement compared with measurements obtained from conventional MRcompatible devices.

  13. Coping with the challenges of early disaster response: 24 years of field hospital experience after earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Elhanan; Abargel, Avi; Peleg, Kobi; Kreiss, Yitshak

    2013-10-01

    To propose strategies and recommendations for future planning and deployment of field hospitals after earthquakes by comparing the experience of 4 field hospitals deployed by The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) Medical Corps in Armenia, Turkey, India and Haiti. Quantitative data regarding the earthquakes were collected from published sources; data regarding hospital activity were collected from IDF records; and qualitative information was obtained from structured interviews with key figures involved in the missions. The hospitals started operating between 89 and 262 hours after the earthquakes. Their sizes ranged from 25 to 72 beds, and their personnel numbered between 34 and 100. The number of patients treated varied from 1111 to 2400. The proportion of earthquake-related diagnoses ranged from 28% to 67% (P earthquakes, patient caseload and treatment requirements varied widely. The variables affecting the patient profile most significantly were time until deployment, total number of injured, availability of adjacent medical facilities, and possibility of evacuation from the disaster area. When deploying a field hospital in the early phase after an earthquake, a wide variability in patient caseload should be anticipated. Customization is difficult due to the paucity of information. Therefore, early deployment necessitates full logistic self-sufficiency and operational versatility. Also, collaboration with local and international medical teams can greatly enhance treatment capabilities.

  14. A practical guide to manuscript writing with particular relevance to the field of pediatric hospital medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Ronald J; Andrews, Anne L; Williams, Derek J

    2014-11-01

    Publishing manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals, such as Hospital Pediatrics, is critical for both the academic development of practitioners in pediatric hospital medicine and the scientific advancement of our field. Understanding the purpose of scientific writing and developing a structured approach to the writing process is essential. Doing so will improve the clarity of your work and likely the ease at which your research is published and disseminated throughout the scientific community. The purposes of this article are to detail the structure of a scientific manuscript, to highlight specific writing strategies, and to provide writing tips that may help or hinder publication. Our ultimate goal is to advance the field of pediatric hospital medicine and its growing membership by promoting the dissemination of high-quality research. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of Hospitals for 50 states and Washington D.C. , Puerto Rico and US territories. The dataset only includes hospital facilities and...

  16. 1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Max; Meunier, Bethann; Trottier, Vincent; Christian, Michael; Hillier, Tracey; Berger, Chris; McAlister, Vivian; Taylor, Scott

    2012-08-01

    The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.

  17. The field hospital at Zagreb: tri-service medical care in a peacekeeping operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R J; Martino, J; Eyestone, S M; Pugh, W M

    1998-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to provide military medical planners with insights into the specific materiel, skills, and information requirements demanded by humanitarian missions through review of approximately 16,000 records from a tri-service medical patient database used at the field hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, during Operation Provide Promise. This review describes (1) the origin, rationale, structure, and implementation of the database; (2) the patients who used medical services provided by the hospital; (3) the diagnoses encountered in outpatient visits, admissions, and surgical operations; and (4) the distribution of medical services used by various subgroups of interest.

  18. Considerations on occupational therapy in a custody and psychiatric treatment hospital: The psychosocial field versus the forensic psychiatry field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Santos de Souza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Custody and Psychiatric Treatment Hospital (CPTH is ambivalent and ambiguous in its essence, because it gathers not only the characteristics of a mental institution, but also those of a prison – epitomized by the security system. By analyzing this context, one can perceive the importance of implementing some knowhow able to attend the real needs of the individuals hospitalized in this type of institution. This interpretation of their needs must be done in association with a work in mental health based on the principles of the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform and Psychosocial Field Practice. The objective of this study is to reflect on the real possibilities of implementing mental health work based on the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform, inserted in the Psychosocial Field, in institutions such as CPTHs. This reflection occurs from the conflicts arisen in the beginning of Occupational Therapy service in a CPTH located in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, as well as through the analysis of the reality in which this Custody Hospital is inserted. When studying the Psychiatric Reform Law, ordinance 28.195/1988, which deliberates on the functions of Occupational Therapy in the CPTHs of the state of Sao Paulo, and the Penal Execution Law, the reality was analyzed from its dimensions, to conclude that the institutional forces ruled the work process of occupational therapists. Therefore, the structural, particular, singular dimensions that rule the CPTH were understood and, after that, the “nodes” that hinder the implementation of mental health work in the Psychosocial Field in this type of institution were revealed.

  19. A stochastic mathematical model to locate field hospitals under disruption uncertainty for large-scale disaster preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezir Aydin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we consider field hospital location decisions for emergency treatment points in response to large scale disasters. Specifically, we developed a two-stage stochastic model that determines the number and locations of field hospitals and the allocation of injured victims to these field hospitals. Our model considers the locations as well as the failings of the existing public hospitals while deciding on the location of field hospitals that are anticipated to be opened. The model that we developed is a variant of the P-median location model and it integrates capacity restrictions both on field hospitals that are planned to be opened and the disruptions that occur in existing public hospitals. We conducted experiments to demonstrate how the proposed model can be utilized in practice in a real life problem case scenario. Results show the effects of the failings of existing hospitals, the level of failure probability and the capacity of projected field hospitals to deal with the assessment of any given emergency treatment system’s performance. Crucially, it also specifically provides an assessment on the average distance within which a victim needs to be transferred in order to be treated properly and then from this assessment, the proportion of total satisfied demand is then calculated.

  20. A field study of the role of nurses in advocating for safe practice in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sandy Pin-pin; Cheung, Kin; Pang, Samantha Mei-che

    2014-07-01

    To explicate nurses' role and the underlying processes involved in advocating for safe practice in hospitals. Nurses' role as patient advocates in safeguarding patients' interests and well-being is constantly upheld. As previous studies have fallen short in delineating the processes of how and in what conditions the patient advocate role is operationalized, this study was conducted to fill the evidence gap through examining nurses' advocacy role and practices in real clinical contexts. A field study approach that involved multiple methods of data collection was adopted. This study was conducted from February 2010-March 2011 in four medical units in two public hospitals in Hong Kong. Empirical data were generated from weekly field observations, review of relevant documents and individual semi-structured interviews with 28 nurses and were then analysed through a comparative analysis process. Nurses play an integral role in ensuring safe practice in hospitals through mitigating risk arising from sudden changes in patients' health conditions and the hospitalization process and correcting near-misses for co-workers to prevent harm. The modelling of expert nurses and team-based learning emerged as essential factors facilitating the development of nurses' advocacy role and practices. The state of 'limited advocacy', as characterized by the adoption of disempowering and coercive measures to ensure patient safety, clearly indicates a need to re-examine the concept of advocacy in contemporary health care. The findings contribute to a more complete understanding of nurses' advocacy role and practices, which have a significant bearing on patient safety. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment modality. Design: It is a retrospective study of all confirmed. Burkitt's lymphoma of the head and neck region seen at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Ile. Ife (OAUTHC) between 1986 and 2002. Patients and methods: The medical records of all the patients with the histopathologically confirmed ...

  2. Lessons learned from an obstetrics and gynecology field hospital response to natural disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkert, Moshe; Dar, Shir; Goldberg, Doron; Abargel, Avi; Cohen-Marom, Ophir; Kreiss, Yitshak; Merin, Ofer

    2013-09-01

    Field hospitals were deployed by the Israel Defense Forces as part of the international relief efforts after major seismic events, one in Haiti (2010) and one in Japan (2011). The teams treated a total of 44 pregnant and 24 nonpregnant women and performed 16 deliveries and three cesarean deliveries under extreme conditions. Half of all deliveries were complicated by preeclampsia and 31% were preterm (at 30-32 weeks of gestation). It is imperative that obstetrician-gynecologists be included among humanitarian aid delegations sent to sites of natural disasters. The complicated cases we encountered required highly skilled obstetricians and led to a shortage of specific medications for these women. Cases that would have been considered routine under normal conditions created unanticipated ethical and practical issues in the face of very limited resources. The aim of this commentary is to share the experiences and lessons learned by our field hospital obstetrics and gynecology teams after the major earthquakes in Haiti and Japan. We present what we consider to be the 10 most important lessons learned and propose that they serve as guidelines in preparing for essential needs in other natural disaster settings.

  3. Pediatric Orthopedic Injuries Following an Earthquake: Experience in an Acute-Phase Field Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Elhanan; Lebel, Ehud; Blumberg, Nehemia; Sagi, Rami; Kreiss, Yitshak

    2015-01-01

    Following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps deployed a field hospital in Port au Prince. The purpose of this study was to characterize the injuries sustained by the pediatric population treated in the hospital and examine the implications for planning deployment in future similar disasters. Medical records of children treated in the hospital were reviewed and compared with medical records of the adult population. A total of 1,111 patients were treated in the hospital. Thirty-seven percent were aged 0 to 18 years. Earthquake-related injuries were the cause of admission in 47% of children and 66% of adults. Forty-seven percent of children with traumatic injuries sustained fractures. Seventy-two percent were in the lower limbs, 19% were in the upper limbs, and 9% were in the axial skeleton, with the femur being the most common long bone fractured compared with the tibia in adults. There were four functional operating theaters, and treatment guidelines were adjusted to the rapidly changing situation. Soft tissue injuries were treated by aggressive debridement. Fractures were stabilized by external fixation or casting. Amputation was performed only for nonviable limbs or life-threatening sepsis. Children were more likely than adults to undergo surgery (44% vs. 29% of trauma patients). To maximize hospital surge capacity, minor procedures were performed in the wards under sedation, and patients were discharged after an average of 1.4 days, with subsequent follow-up in the clinic. Children constitute a high percentage of patients in a developing country. The epidemiology of pediatric injuries following an earthquake differs significantly from that encountered in everyday practice and compared with that in adults. Children sustain a significantly higher percentage of femoral fractures and are more likely to require surgery. The shift to nontraumatic reasons for admission occurred earlier in the pediatric population than in adults

  4. Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    . Documentation exists in; well-being of patients and staff, sleep disorders, pain distraction, confidentiality and privacy, levels of errors in hospitals. Art and the use of color: Art can be context related so one should be aware whether it is in a private ward or the foyer and related to the experience...... in treating disease can be supported by architecture which is sensitive to the contextual conditions of healing in health facilities. It is not the intention to supplant technology, but a question of supplementing the incredible advances that have been made in medicine in recent decades. The central premise......- sick-leave and work-related injuries....

  5. The unit costs of inpatient hospital days, outpatient visits, and daycare treatments in the fields of oncology and hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Siok Swan; Van Gils, Chantal W M; Franken, Margreet G; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A

    2010-01-01

    Many economic evaluations are conducted in the fields of oncology and hematology, partially owing to the introduction of new expensive drugs in this field. Even though inpatient days, outpatient visits, and daycare treatments are frequently the main drivers of total treatment costs, their unit costs often lack generalizability. Therefore, we aimed to determine the unit costs of inpatient hospital days, outpatient visits, and daycare treatments specifically for oncological and hematological diseases in The Netherlands from the hospital's perspective. Unit costs were collected from 30 oncological and hematological departments of 6 university and 24 general hospitals. Costs included direct labor and indirect labor, hotel and nutrition, overheads and capital. Ordinary least squares regression models were constructed to examine the degree of association between unit costs and hospital and hospital department characteristics. All costs were based on Euro 2007 cost data. At university hospitals, the unit costs per inpatient day were determined at €633 in oncological and €680 in hematological departments. At general hospitals, the mean costs per inpatient day were €400. Unit costs for inpatient hospital days, outpatient visits. and daycare treatments equalled the relative ratio 100:21:44. Direct labor costs were the major cost driver and the type of hospital (university, yes/no) was a strong predictor of unit costs. The present study provided unit costs for inpatient hospital days, outpatient visits, and daycare treatments in the fields of oncology and hematology. The results may be used as Dutch reference unit prices in economic evaluations assessing oncological and hematological diseases. © 2010, International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR).

  6. Factors associated with inpatient mortality in a field hospital following the Haiti earthquake, January-May 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulski, Theresa M; Basavaraju, Sridhar V; Hotz, Gillian A; Xu, Likang; Selent, Monica U; DeGennaro, Vincent A; Andrews, David; Ford, Henri; Coronado, Victor G; Ginzburg, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    To describe factors associated with inpatient mortality in a field hospital established following the 2010 Haiti earthquake. Data were abstracted from medical records of patients admitted to the University of Miami Global Institute/Project Medishare hospital. Decedents were compared to survivors in terms of age, sex, length of stay, admission ward, diagnosis, and where relevant, injury mechanism and surgical procedure. Three multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to determine predictors of death among all patients, injured patients, and noninjured patients. During the study period, 1,339 patients were admitted to the hospital with 100 inpatient deaths (7.5 percent). The highest proportion of deaths occurred among patients aged earthquakes in resource-limited settings, survivors may require care in field hospitals for injuries or exacerbation of chronic medical conditions. Planning for sustained post-earthquake response should address these needs and include pediatric-specific preparation and long-term critical care requirements.

  7. Foreign field hospitals after the 2010 Haiti earthquake: how good were we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdin, Martin; Wladis, Andreas; von Schreeb, Johan

    2013-01-01

    To assess the timing and activities of foreign field hospitals (FFH) deployed during the first month after the Haiti earthquake and to evaluate adherence to WHO/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) guidelines. Results were compared with data from past sudden-onset disasters. A systematic attempt was made to contact all relief actors within the health care sector involved in the 12 January through 12 February 2010 FFH deployment. This was done using an email-based questionnaire and a web survey. In addition, the authors undertook a literature review using PubMed and the Google search engine between March 2010 and May 2011. The authors contacted key informants and agencies identified by direct observations in the field by email or phone. A total of 44 FFH were identified. The first FFH was operational on day two post-earthquake. The number of FFH beds peaked at about 3300 on day 17 post-earthquake. During the first month, the authors estimate that FFH conducted no more than 12 000 major surgical operations. While 25% of the FFH adhered to either WHO/PAHO first essential deployment requirements, none followed both requirements of WHO/PAHO. Compared with the 2005 earthquake in Pakistan, twice as many FFH provided medical care, resulting in three times more FFH beds. The present study suggests that more FFH were sent to Haiti than to any previous sudden-onset disasters, but due to lack of data and transparency it remains impossible to determine to what extent did the first wave of FFH do any good in Haiti.

  8. Analysis of medical treatment at a field hospital following Hurricane Andrew, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alson, R; Alexander, D; Leonard, R B; Stringer, L W

    1993-11-01

    To determine what medical care was required of a special operations response team by a community devastated by a major hurricane. Retrospective analysis of 1,544 patient encounter forms generated at a field hospital set up in Homestead, Florida, after Hurricane Andrew in August 1992 and staffed by the special operations response team from Forsyth County, North Carolina. All persons presenting for treatment. One thousand two hundred three adult patients and 336 pediatric patients were seen by the special operations response team. Only five of the injuries treated were due directly to the hurricane, whereas 285 of the treated injuries were sustained during clean-up activities. Most of the care provided was routine medical care denied the citizens due to the loss of their physicians' offices and clinics. Supplies of tetanus toxoid, antibiotics, and insulin were depleted in 24 hours. Resupplying these items and acquiring other medication to refill prescriptions constituted a pressing problem. The primary function of medical personnel responding to an area hit by a major hurricane will be to provide general medical care. Any trauma encountered will be primarily due to clean-up activities and not due to the hurricane itself. Responding medical personnel should plan on providing their own food and water for the first 72 hours and be well stocked with antibiotics, tetanus toxoid, and insulin.

  9. Post-earthquake injuries treated at a field hospital --- Haiti, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    On January 12, 2010, a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck Haiti, resulting in an estimated 222,570 deaths and 300,000 persons with injuries. The University of Miami Global Institute/Project Medishare (UMGI/PM) established the first field hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, after the earthquake. To characterize injuries and surgical procedures performed by UMGI/PM and assess specialized medical, surgical, and rehabilitation needs, UMGI/PM and CDC conducted a retrospective medical record review of all available inpatient records for the period January 13-May 28, 2010. This report describes the results of that review, which indicated that, during the study period (when a total of 1,369 admissions occurred), injury-related diagnoses were recorded for 581 (42%) admitted patients, of whom 346 (60%) required a surgical procedure. The most common injury diagnoses were fractures/dislocations, wound infections, and head, face, and brain injuries. The most common injury-related surgical procedures were wound debridement/skin grafting, treatment for orthopedic trauma, and surgical amputation. Among patient records with documented injury-related mechanisms, 162 (28%) indicated earthquake-related injuries. Earthquake preparedness planning for densely populated areas in resource-limited settings such as Haiti should account for injury-related medical, surgical, and rehabilitation needs that must be met immediately after the event and during the recovery phase, when altered physical and social environments can contribute to a continued elevated need for inpatient management of injuries.

  10. [The medical assistance of Swedish Red Cross Field Hospital in Busan during and after the Korean war].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiwook

    2010-06-30

    After the outbreak of the Korean war, the Kingdom of Sweden, a permanent neutral nation, dispatched the Swedish Red Cross Field Hospital(SRCFH) instead of armed forces for humanitarian support to the allied forces in South Korea. The Hospital consisted of about 170 Swedes, all volunteers. From the early part of the Korean War, SRCFH took part in the medical assistance in Busan. When the frontline advanced to northern Korea, the number of inflowing casualties to this field hospital decreased. At that time, earnest medical aid for civilians commenced, and many Koreans were treated in available beds in SRCFH. After the armistice in July 1953, SRCFH became the Swedish Hospital in Busan, serving not only the military but also civilians, and continued its humanitarian mission until April 1957 for the Korean who were suffering from a collapsed medical system in the midst of war. When the Hospital returned to Sweden, it had treated over two million patients from twenty countries, including wounded UN allied force, Korean (south and north), Chinese prisoner of war and Korean civilian. Moreover, it left a transformative legacy, the National Medical Center in Seoul which was established in collaboration with other Scandinavian countries who dispatched medical assistance during the Korean War.

  11. Self-Sufficient Healthcare Logistics Systems and Responsiveness: Ten Cases of Foreign Field Hospitals Deployed to Disaster Relief Supply Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Naor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent disasters around the globe illustrate the unpredictability of their timing and the severity of their impact, making aid operations highly uncertain and complex. The aftermath of sudden-impact disasters, such as civil conflicts, wars, and natural disasters, are typically characterized by chaos and the urgent need for medical care for a massive number of casualties; however, damage to local healthcare infrastructures usually render them unable to deliver needed services. Foreign field hospitals, innovative self-sufficient emergency healthcare logistics systems deployed outside the hospitals’ country, constitute a temporary solution until the local facilities are repaired or rebuilt. These types of healthcare logistics system have been deployed with great success. However, not much is known about factors that may account for their success in the supply chain literature. In this study, we investigate military foreign field hospitals and explore general factors that may account for their effectiveness. Specifically, we look into military healthcare logistics systems, specifically foreign field hospitals (FFHs, to explore factors that may account for their responsiveness. We examine ten successful deployments of an experienced and effective military FFH through an exploratory case analysis to shed light into factors that may account for its success. Various propositions and avenues for future research are developed.

  12. Prevalence and management status of urologic diseases in geriatric hospitals in South Korea: A field research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Heon Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to investigate the current management status of urologic diseases in geriatric hospitals in South Korea. Materials and Methods: Questionnaire surveys and in-depth person-to-person interviews were conducted at 13 hospitals within the Seoul and Incheon areas. Results: The study was carried out from July to December 2014; 75.6% of patients (1,858/2,458 and 77.5% (779/1,031 of medical personnel responded to our survey. All surveys and interviews were performed by urology specialists, fellows, residents, or nurses. The hospitals included in the study had an average of 215.2 beds (range, 110–367, 189.1 patients (range, 90–345, and 40.2 nurses (range, 10–83. The average number of physicians was 6.2 (range, 3–11, but none of these were certified urologists. Only 4 hospitals provided consultation services for urological disorders. In total, 64% of patients had urological disorders, although only 20.7% of patients were receiving medication. Most patients were being treated using urological interventions; diapers (49.7%, indwelling catheters (19.5%, clean intermittent catheters (12.2%, and external collection urinary drainage (7.9%. However, most interventions were inadequately implemented, and only 17% of the patients had been examined by a certified urologist. Urological complications were found in 20.2% of patients, and secondary complications occurred in 18.8%. Excluding redundant cases, the total prevalence of urological complications was 39.0%. Conclusions: Urologic diseases are poorly managed, and no certified urologists work in geriatric hospitals. Therefore, more designated urologists are needed in geriatric hospitals.

  13. Systematic Approach to the Goalsetting of Higher Education in the Field of Tourism and Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, Galina; Maznichenko, Marina; Neskoromnyh, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with key problems and contradictions of training of university graduates for the tourism and hospitality industry in Russia, primarily associated with the setting of educational goals. The article formulates the discussion points related to the updating of the existing educational standards for the enlarged "Service and…

  14. Can advanced paramedics in the field diagnose patients and predict hospital admission?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cummins, Niamh Maria

    2013-02-13

    BACKGROUND: Accurate patient diagnosis in the prehospital environment is essential to initiate suitable care pathways. The advanced paramedic (AP) is a relatively recent role in Ireland, and refers to a prehospital practitioner with advanced life-support skills and training. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare the diagnostic decisions of APs with emergency medicine (EM) physicians, and to investigate if APs, as currently trained, can predict the requirement for hospital admission. METHODS: A prospective study was initiated, whereby each emergency ambulance call received via the statutory 999 system was recorded by the attending AP. The AP was asked to provide a clinical diagnosis for each patient, and to predict if hospital admission was required. The data was then cross-referenced with the working diagnosis of the receiving emergency physician and the hospital admission records. RESULTS: A total of 17 APs participated in the study, and 1369 emergency calls were recorded over a 6-month period. Cases where a general practitioner attended the scene were excluded from the concordance analysis. Concordance with the receiving emergency physician represents 70% (525\\/748) for all cases of AP diagnosis, and is mirrored with 70% (604\\/859) correct hospital admission predictions. CONCLUSIONS: AP diagnosis and admission prediction for emergency calls is similar to other emergency medical services systems despite the relative recency of the AP programme in Ireland. Recognition of non-concordance case types may identify priorities for AP education, and drive future AP practice in areas such as \\'treat and refer\\'.

  15. Molecular, Spatial, and Field Epidemiology Suggesting TB Transmission in Community, Not Hospital, Gaborone, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surie, Diya; Fane, Othusitse; Finlay, Alyssa; Ogopotse, Matsiri; Tobias, James L; Click, Eleanor S; Modongo, Chawangwa; Zetola, Nicola M; Moonan, Patrick K; Oeltmann, John E

    2017-03-01

    During 2012-2015, 10 of 24 patients infected with matching genotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis received care at the same hospital in Gaborone, Botswana. Nosocomial transmission was initially suspected, but we discovered plausible sites of community transmission for 20 (95%) of 21 interviewed patients. Active case-finding at these sites could halt ongoing transmission.

  16. [Men of the sugarcane fields and their hospitals: the architecture of health under the Estado Novo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Marcia Rocha

    2011-12-01

    The article explores the emergence of an architectural heritage in the realm of healthcare assistance for workers in the sugarcane agroindustry in Brazil following enactment of the law known as the Estatuto da Lavoura Canavieira (1941), under the auspices of the Instituto do Açúcar e do Álcool and as part of Estado Novo policies (1937-1945). The institute proposed solutions based on surveys conducted at sugarcane mills in cane-producing states and on the medical and hospital system adopted by the institute's enlightened bureaucracy in the 1940s, which took the U.S. system as its model. Special focus is given to the central hospitals in Pernambuco and especially in Alagoas, which opposed institute guidelines.

  17. Ethical and Surgical Dilemmas in Patients with Neglected Surgical Diseases Visiting a Field Hospital in a Zone of Recent Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guy; Marom, Tal; Dagan, David; Merin, Ofer

    2017-02-01

    The massive typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) ripped across the central Philippines on November 8, 2013, and damaged infrastructure including hospitals. The Israeli Defense Forces field hospital was directed by the Philippine authorities to Bogo City in the northern part of the island of Cebu, to assist the damaged local hospital. Hundreds of patients with neglected diseases sought for medical treatment which was merely out of reach for them. Our ethical dilemmas were whether to intervene, when the treatment we could offer was not the best possible. Each patient had an electronic medical record that included diagnosis, management and aftercare instructions. We retrospectively reviewed all charts of patients. Over 200 patients presented with neglected chronic diseases (tuberculosis, goiter, hypertension and diabetes). We limited our intervention to extreme values of glucose and blood pressure. We had started anti-tuberculosis medications, hoping that the patients will have an option to continue treatment. We examined 85 patients with a presumed diagnosis of malignancy. Without histopathology and advanced imaging modality, we performed palliative operations on three patients. Eighteen patients presented with inguinal hernia. We performed pure tissue repair on seven patients with large symptomatic hernias. We examined 12 children with cleft lip/palate and transferred two of them to Israel. We operated on one child with bilateral club feet. Out of 37 patients with pterygium, our ophthalmologist repaired the nine patients with the most severe vision disturbance. Medical delegations to disaster areas should prepare a plan and appropriate measures to deal with non-urgent diseases.

  18. Mobile Display of Information about Aggregated Antibiotic Resistance in the Hospital Setting Supported by Near Field Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Philipp; Fehre, Karsten; Rappelsberger, Andrea; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a heterogeneous phenomenon. It does not only differ between countries or states, but also between wards of hospitals, where different resistance patterns have been found. To support clinicians in administering empiric antibiotic therapy, we developed software to present information about antibiotic resistance using a mobile concept. A pre-existing infrastructure was deployed as the server component. The systems analyze and aggregate data from laboratory information systems, generating statistical data on antibiotic resistance. The information is presented to the Android client using a Representational State Transfer (REST) interface. Geographical localization is performed using near field communication (NFC) tags. The prototype provides tabulated data concerning antibiotic resistance patterns in the wards of a hospital. Using Android, NFC, and data caching, the usability of the system is estimated to be high. We hypothesize that antibiotic stewardship in hospitals can be supported by this software, thus improving medical monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Future studies in a productive environment are needed to measure the impact of the system on the outcome of patient care.

  19. In situ free-floating craniectomy for traumatic cerebral decompression in an infant: A field hospital solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Victoria T; Duckworth, Edward A M

    2011-01-01

    Despite refinements in neurotrauma care, the morbidity and mortality of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in pediatric patients remains high. We report a novel approach to the surgical management of increased intracranial pressure in severe TBI utilizing an in situ free-floating craniectomy technique, which was originally devised as a creative solution to the unique challenges in a Haitian field hospital following the 2010 earthquake. A 13-month-old Haitian boy presented to Project Medishare field hospital in Port-au-Prince with left hemiplegia, a bulging fontanelle, and increasing lethargy following a traumatic head injury 4 days prior. An urgent craniectomy was performed based on clinical grounds (no brain imaging was available). A standard trauma flap incision was made, followed by a hemicraniectomy and expansion duraplasty. A small hematoma was evacuated. Frontal, temporal, and parietal bone flaps were placed on the dura in approximation to their normal anatomical configuration, but not affixed, leaving space for further brain edema, and the scalp was closed. The child experienced favorable peri-operative and early postoperative results. In situ free-floating craniectomy, while devised as a creative solution to limited resources in a natural disaster zone, may offer advantages over more traditional techniques.

  20. Five months of surgery in the multinational field hospital in Afghanistan with an emphasis on oral and maxillofacial injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, J; Monaghan, A M; Williams, M D; Clark, R N W; Gibbons, A J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the workload of theatres in the role 3 Multinational Field Hospital in Kandahar, Afghanistan and to identify what period of day most emergency admissions arrived. During the period 05 August 2006 to 21 December 2006, 288 operations were performed on 259 patients and comprised 393 individually quantifiable procedures. 98% of these operations were to treat acute injuries. Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons were involved in 24% of operations. 63% of procedures done at these operations involved upper or lower limbs, 19% the head and neck and 18% involved the torso. An analysis of emergency admissions in November 2006 showed that most occurred between 18.00 and midnight. Although theatre timetabling made provision for this, whenever possible, elective surgery was scheduled for the following morning when emergency injury admissions were at their lowest.

  1. In-hospital safety in field conditions of nifurtimox eflornithine combination therapy (NECT) for T. b. gambiense sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Caecilia; Kuemmerle, Andrea; Blum, Johannes; Ghabri, Salah; Kande, Victor; Mutombo, Wilfried; Ilunga, Medard; Lumpungu, Ismael; Mutanda, Sylvain; Nganzobo, Pathou; Tete, Digas; Mubwa, Nono; Kisala, Mays; Blesson, Severine; Mordt, Olaf Valverde

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.) gambiense Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness) is a fatal disease. Until 2009, available treatments for 2(nd) stage HAT were complicated to use, expensive (eflornithine monotherapy), or toxic, and insufficiently effective in certain areas (melarsoprol). Recently, nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT) demonstrated good safety and efficacy in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) and was added to the World Health Organisation (WHO) essential medicines list (EML). Documentation of its safety profile in field conditions will support its wider use. In a multicentre, open label, single arm, phase IIIb study of the use of NECT for 2(nd) stage T.b. gambiense HAT, all patients admitted to the trial centres who fulfilled inclusion criteria were treated with NECT. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients discharged alive from hospital. Safety was further assessed based on treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) occurring during hospitalisation. 629 patients were treated in six HAT treatment facilities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), including 100 children under 12, 14 pregnant and 33 breastfeeding women. The proportion of patients discharged alive after treatment completion was 98.4% (619/629; 95%CI [97.1%; 99.1%]). Of the 10 patients who died during hospitalisation, 8 presented in a bad or very bad health condition at baseline; one death was assessed as unlikely related to treatment. No major or unexpected safety concerns arose in any patient group. Most common AEs were gastro-intestinal (61%), general (46%), nervous system (mostly central; 34%) and metabolic disorders (26%). The overall safety profile was similar to previously published findings. In field conditions and in a wider population, including children, NECT displayed a similar tolerability profile to that described in more stringent clinical trial conditions. The in-hospital safety was comparable to published results, and long term

  2. Contraceptive usage and awareness among postpartum mothers in urban field practice area of a tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Kaur Sidhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study contraceptive usage and awareness among postpartum mothers. Objective: To assess prevalence of postpartum contraception and factors affecting the usage of contraceptives in Urban area. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in the Urban Field practice area of Adesh Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Bathinda. All females who delivered within last one year were included in the study. A pre-structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and other details. A total of 92 females were included. The appropriate statistical analysis was done to present the results. Results: 30.4% females had adopted one or the other postpartum contraceptive measure. Condom was the most common method used. Usage of postpartum contraception was significantly associated with women’s and husband’s education, type of delivery and availing of antenatal and postnatal visits. The main reason for not using postpartum contraception was lack of knowledge and access. 16.3% females had unmet need of postpartum contraception. Conclusions: Overall usage of postpartum contraception was low and mainly related to lack of awareness and knowledge.

  3. In-hospital safety in field conditions of nifurtimox eflornithine combination therapy (NECT for T. b. gambiense sleeping sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caecilia Schmid

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei (T.b. gambiense Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness is a fatal disease. Until 2009, available treatments for 2(nd stage HAT were complicated to use, expensive (eflornithine monotherapy, or toxic, and insufficiently effective in certain areas (melarsoprol. Recently, nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT demonstrated good safety and efficacy in a randomised controlled trial (RCT and was added to the World Health Organisation (WHO essential medicines list (EML. Documentation of its safety profile in field conditions will support its wider use.In a multicentre, open label, single arm, phase IIIb study of the use of NECT for 2(nd stage T.b. gambiense HAT, all patients admitted to the trial centres who fulfilled inclusion criteria were treated with NECT. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients discharged alive from hospital. Safety was further assessed based on treatment emergent adverse events (AEs occurring during hospitalisation.629 patients were treated in six HAT treatment facilities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC, including 100 children under 12, 14 pregnant and 33 breastfeeding women. The proportion of patients discharged alive after treatment completion was 98.4% (619/629; 95%CI [97.1%; 99.1%]. Of the 10 patients who died during hospitalisation, 8 presented in a bad or very bad health condition at baseline; one death was assessed as unlikely related to treatment. No major or unexpected safety concerns arose in any patient group. Most common AEs were gastro-intestinal (61%, general (46%, nervous system (mostly central; 34% and metabolic disorders (26%. The overall safety profile was similar to previously published findings.In field conditions and in a wider population, including children, NECT displayed a similar tolerability profile to that described in more stringent clinical trial conditions. The in-hospital safety was comparable to published results, and long term

  4. Management of the hospitalized patient with Parkinson's disease: current state of the field and need for guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aminoff, M.J.; Christine, C.W.; Friedman, J.H.; Chou, K.L.; Lyons, K.E.; Pahwa, R.; Bloem, B.R.; Parashos, S.A.; Price, C.C.; Malaty, I.A.; Iansek, R.; Bodis-Wollner, I.; Suchowersky, O.; Oertel, W.H.; Zamudio, J.; Oberdorf, J.; Schmidt, P.; Okun, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the literature and to identify practice gaps in the management of the hospitalized Parkinson's disease (PD) patient. BACKGROUND: Patients with PD are admitted to hospitals at higher rates, and frequently have longer hospital stays than the general population. Little is known

  5. Orthopaedic management in a mega mass casualty situation. The Israel Defence Forces Field Hospital in Haiti following the January 2010 earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Elhanan; Lebel, Ehud; Kreiss, Yitshak; Merin, Ofer; Benedict, Shaike; Gill, Amit; Lee, Evgeny; Pirotsky, Anatoly; Shirov, Taras; Blumberg, Nehemia

    2011-10-01

    Following the January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the Israel Defence Forces (IDF) established a field hospital in Port au Prince. The hospital started operating 89 h after the earthquake. We describe the experience of the orthopaedic department in a field hospital operating in an extreme mass casualty situation. The hospital contained 4 operating table and 72 hospitalization beds. The orthopaedic department included 8 orthopaedic surgeons and 3 residents. 1111 patients were treated in the hospital, 1041 of them had adequate records for inclusion. 684 patients were admitted due to trauma with a total of 841 injuries. 320 patients sustained 360 fractures, 18 had joint dislocations and 22 patients were admitted after amputations. 207 patients suffered 315 soft tissue injuries. 221 patients were operated on under general or regional anaesthesia. External fixation was used for stabilization of 48 adult femoral shaft fractures, 24 open tibial fractures and 1 open humeral fracture. All none femoral closed fractures were treated non-operatively. 18 joint reductions and 23 amputations were performed. Appropriate planning, training, operational versatility, and adjustment of therapeutic guidelines according to a constantly changing situation, enabled us to deliver optimal care to the maximal number of patients, in an overwhelming mass trauma situation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and phage-typing in the analysis of a hospital outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, U.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Dessau, R.

    1998-01-01

    Isolates of Salmonella Enteritidis from 81 patients from Herlev Hospital or from Copenhagen County were analysed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and phage-typing. Fourteen polymorphic markers from five decamer primers unambiguously placed...... that RAPD is useful as a tool in investigations of microbial outbreaks in its own right, or to supplement phage-typing and PFGE of Salmonella Enteritidis....

  7. CURRENT STATUS OF INTERNAL OSTEOSYNTHESIS IN TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH LONG-BONE FRACTURES IN MUNICIPAL MULTI-FIELD EMERGENCY HOSPITAL OF THE RUSSIAN MEGALOPOLIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Determine the changes in the structure of methods of internal osteosynthesis in treatment of patients with long-bone fractures in municipal multi-field emergency hospital of the modern Russian megalopolis. Carry out comparative analysis of effectiveness of use of minimally invasive osteosynthesis and conventional plating of long-bone fractures. Material and methods. We have studied the results of 1249 surgical operations of internal fixation of long-bone fractures performed in one of a municipal multi-field emergency hospitals of Saint Petersburg (Russia. We have studied the statistics of 1999-2000 and 2010. Results and conclusions. Minimally invasive osteosynthesis has occupied a leading position in the structure of internal fixation of long-bone fractures within the current 10 years period. Although such operations demand precise following surgical techniques, ability to use expensive implants and equipment as well as comparatively higher and longer training of orthopedic surgeons. These circumstances seriously limit effective use of minimally invasive osteosynthesis for the current moment. But at the same time conventional plating techniques haven’t lost their importance for treatment of patients with long-bone fractures. These techniques still occupy an important part among the methods of osteosynthesis used in the Russian multi-field hospitals. It reveals the need for continuous improvement of tactics used by orthopedic surgeons as well as the technique of performing such operations.

  8. Field Note-Developing Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Hospital Social Workers: An Academic-Community Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharff, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Abigail M.; Lambert, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes 1 large urban pediatric hospital's partnership with a university to provide suicide assessment and management training within its social work department. Social work administrators conducted a department-wide needs assessment and implemented a 2-session suicide assessment training program and evaluation. Respondents…

  9. Influence of gender, working field and psychosocial factors on the vulnerability for burnout in mental hospital staff: results of an Austrian cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadenhofer, Petra; Kundi, Michael; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Stummer, Harald; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2017-08-14

    According to the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA), hospitals represent a work environment with high job strain. Prolonged perceived occupational stress may result in symptoms of burnout, such as emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP) and reduced personal accomplishment (PA). Understanding which factors may reduce vulnerability for burnout is an important requirement for well-targeted occupational stress prevention in mental hospital staff. To identify the influence of gender, age, working field, family structure, education, voluntarily occupational training during holidays and length of stay on job on occupational stress perception. In a cross-sectional design, 491 employees (311 female, 180 male) of an Austrian mental health centre participated in the study. The extent of perceived occupational stress was assessed by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) with the scales for emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment. Participants were divided according to their working field in those working with/without patients. Prevalence of emotional exhaustion was higher in women working with patients compared to men working with patients (25% vs. 18%, p = 0.003). Age above 45 years was significantly associated with decreased vulnerability for burnout in men (EE p = 0.040, DP p = 0.010, PA p = 0.007), but not in women. A lower level of education had a significant impact on depersonalisation in both sexes (p = 0.001 for men, p = 0.048 for women). Length of stay on job showed a significant influence on emotional exhaustion. No significant relationship was found between family structure and vulnerability for burnout. Gender had a differential effect on perceived occupational stress indicating a need for gender-tailored preventive strategies. Age, working field, education, voluntarily occupational training during holidays and length of stay on job affect vulnerability for burnout in mental hospital staff.

  10. Hospitality Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  11. Application of ultrasound examination in tactical conditions illustrated with an example of the Field Hospital of the Polish Military Contingent in Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Machała

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that tactical medicine encompasses all therapeutic activities performed by a military medical service during military and humanitarian missions. Its scope is only apparently limited by the standards which, when referred to the NATO member countries, have been collected in the Joint Theater Trauma System – Clinical Practice Guidelines. The stage-structured character of medical assistance and treatment of the wounded, injured and sick patients assumes that the scope of therapeutic activities performed at each stage is limited only to essential actions. Consequently, more injured patients may be saved – those for whom life-saving activities are performed prior to their transfer to a higher level. The second level is represented by a field hospital. Its first structure is the trauma room in which a rescue team saves and qualifies the injured for further medical activities. Each injured patient undergoes an eFAST ultrasound examination which allows for a quick decision about a surgical treatment to be provided. Moreover, this technique is helpful in vascular cannulation. The authors present their own experiences with using an ultrasound examination during the work in the Field Hospital of the Polish Military Contingent in Afghanistan.

  12. Study of Attitude staff in the Field of Total Quality Management by using Fuzzy Logic, Case Study in Teaching Hospitals in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M ArabBanadaki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Total Quality Management, Quality is not only an admirable phenomenon but also is a customer inalienable right and will be created through the involvement and participation of all employees, managers and customers of an organization. This study was designed to evaluate staff attitudes in teaching hospitals of Yazd in the field of Total Quality Management by using fuzzy logic. Methods: This was a descriptive, analytical, cross – sectional study. Research population, were all staff in teaching hospitals of Yazd that among them 235 people were randomly Stratified, selected and studied. Data for this study were collected through a questionnaire. Since the theory of fuzzy is more suitable approach for measuring linguistic variables, so this paper determines the attitude of staff in the field of Quality Management by the use of fuzzy logic. Results: Results showed that the dimensions of the “Identification and training of staff," "empowerment and teamwork of Employees" and "support and leadership of the top management organization" respectively ranked first, second and third importance In terms of staff. Conclusion: Criteria of identification and training of staff and teamwork and support and leadership of the top management organization are Important in motivating Total Quality Management. So in total quality management improve programs, these aspects should be prioritized according to the degree of importance and effort to improve the quality of service.

  13. The effects of public education through Short Message Service on the time from symptom onset to hospital arrival in patients with myocardial infarction: A field trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Farzaneh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Zohrehie, Javad

    2017-05-01

    Patients' early hospital arrival is among the most important factors in minimizing the complications of myocardial infarction (MI). One of the measures which can reduce prehospital delay in these patients is public education. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of public education through Short Message Service (SMS) on the time from symptom onset to hospital arrival (or onset-to-door time) in patients with MI in Kashan, Iran. This field trial was done on 131 patients with definite diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Intervention included sending an educational short message about the symptoms of MI and the necessity of referring to hospital immediately. Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the predictors of the onset-to-door time. The results showed no significant difference in demographic characteristics, clinical variables and past medical history between the participants in the two groups. The onset-to-door time was significantly shorter in the intervention group than the control group (240.53 ± 156.60 vs. 291.70 ± 251.23, P= 0.003). Moreover, the onset-to-call time was significantly shorter in the intervention group than the control group (127.06 ± 202.62 vs. 44.32 ± 81.26, P = 0.002). The odds of arrival at hospital in the first 120 minutes after the onset of MI manifestations was 5.8 (2.04-16.8) times higher in the group that received the educational SMS. As both the onset-to-door and onset-to-call times were shorter in the intervention group, it is suggested to use this method to raise the public awareness of MI symptoms and the need for early referral.

  14. Unplanned Hospital Visits - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  15. Orthopedic Activity in Field Hospitals Following Earthquakes in Nepal and Haiti : Variability in Injuries Encountered and Collaboration with Local Available Resources Drive Optimal Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Elhanan; Blumberg, Nehemia; Joshi, Amit; Gam, Arnon; Peyser, Amos; Lee, Evgeny; Kashichawa, Shree Krishna; Morose, Alexander; Schein, Ophir; Lehavi, Amit; Kreiss, Yitshak; Bader, Tarif

    2016-09-01

    Field hospitals have been deployed by the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) Medical Corps in numerous disaster events. Two recent deployments were following earthquakes in Haiti in 2010 and in Nepal in 2015. Despite arrival in similar timetables, the mode of operation was different-independently in Haiti and in collaboration with a local hospital in Nepal. The pathology encountered in the two hospitals and the resultant treatment requirements were significantly different between the two events. The purpose of this study was to analyze these differences and their implications for preparation and planning of future deployments. Data were obtained from IDF records and analyzed using SPSS™ software. 1686 patients were treated in Nepal versus 1111 in Haiti. The caseload in Nepal included significantly less earthquake-related injuries (26 vs. 66 %) with 28 % of them sustaining fractures versus 47 % in Haiti. Femoral fractures accounted for 7.9 % of fractures in Nepal versus 26.4 % in Haiti with foot fractures accounting for 23.8 and 6.4 %, respectively. The rate of open fracture was similar at 29.4 % in Nepal and 27.5 % in Haiti. 18.1 % of injured patients in Nepal underwent surgery, and 32.9 % of which was skeletal compared to 32 % surgical cases (58.8 % skeletal) in Haiti. 74.2 % of patients in Nepal and 34.3 % in Haiti were treated for pathology unrelated to the earthquake. The reasons for the variability in activities between the two hospitals include the magnitude of the disaster, the functionality of the local medical system which was relatively preserved in Nepal and destroyed in Haiti and the mode of operation which was independent in Haiti and collaborative with a functioning local hospital in Nepal. Emergency medical teams (EMTs) may encounter variable caseloads despite similar disaster scenarios. Advance knowledge of the magnitude of the disaster, the functionality of the local medical system, and the collaborative possibilities will help in planning

  16. Framework for near-field-communication-based geo-localization and personalization for Android-based smartphones--application in hospital environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Philipp; Fehre, Karsten; Rappelsberger, Andrea; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Various applications using near field communication (NFC) have been developed for the medical sector. As a method of short-range wireless contact-driven data transfer, NFC is a useful tool in medicine. It can be used to transfer data such as blood pressure, control adherence to medication, or transmit in vivo data. The first proposed general framework uses NFC as a mechanism for indoor geo-localization in hospitals. NFC geo-localization is economical compared to classical concepts using indoor GPS or WLAN triangulation, and the granularity of location retrieval can be defined at a tag level. Using this framework, we facilitate the development of medical applications that require exact indoor geo-localization. Multi-user Android systems are addressed in the second framework. Using private NFC tags, users are able to carry on their personal settings for enabled applications. This eliminates the need for multiple user accounts on common Android devices, improves usability, and eases technical administration. Based on the prototypes presented here, we show a novel concept of using NFC-enabled Android devices in hospital environments.

  17. [Spectrum of surgical procedures performed in German rescue centers and the field hospital in Afghanistan in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güsgen, C; Achatz, G; Palm, H-G; Kollig, E; Engelhardt, M; Willy, C; Lieber, A

    2010-02-01

    From the military perspective detailed knowledge about the spectrum of operations undertaken abroad is of particular interest to provide indications of the skills that will be required by the surgeons. Therefore, all surgical reports produced in 2008 in the operation theatres of Mazar-e-Sharif, Feyzabad and Kunduz were reviewed. The overview shows that a total of 799 operations were performed equivalent to 0.4-1.6 operations/day. Most of the patients who underwent surgery were local civilians and most of these operations involved osteosynthesis, débridement and soft tissue procedures. Of the surgical procedures 11% involved patients who were German service personnel of which 85% were urgent or emergency procedures and 25% of these involved treatment of combat injuries. When civilian patients with life-threatening injuries or diseases are referred to the medical facilities there is little opportunity to make decisions with regard to acceptance. Often it may be necessary for surgeons to perform procedures which are outside their field of specialization. In order to ensure a favorable outcome in acute situations surgeons mainly required skills in emergency surgery of the body cavities (visceral and thoracic surgery).

  18. Enhancing field GP engagement in hospital-based studies. Rationale, design, main results and participation in the diagest 3-GP motivation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Christophe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagest 3 was a study aimed at lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 3 years after childbirth. Women with gestational diabetes were enrolled in the study. After childbirth, the subjects showed little interest in the structured education programme and did not attend workshops. Their general practitioners (GPs were approached to help motivate the subjects to participate in Diagest 3, but the GPs were reluctant. The present study aimed to understand field GPs’ attitudes towards hospital-based studies, and to develop strategies to enhance their involvement and reduce subject drop-out rates. Methods We used a three-step process: step one used a phenomenological approach exploring the beliefs, attitudes, motivations and environmental factors contributing to the GPs’ level of interest in the study. Data were collected in face-to-face interviews and coded by hand and with hermeneutic software to develop distinct GP profiles. Step two was a cross-sectional survey by questionnaire to determine the distribution of the profiles in the GP study population and whether completion of an attached case report form (CRF was associated with a particular GP profile. In step three, we assessed the impact of the motivation study on participation rates in the main study. Results Fifteen interviews were conducted to achieve data saturation. Theorisation led to the definition of 4 distinct GP profiles. The response rate to the questionnaire was 73%, but dropped to 52% when a CRF was attached. The link between GP profiles and the rate of CRF completion remains to be verified. The GPs provided data on the CRF that was of comparable quality to those collected in the main trial. Our analysis showed that the motivation study increased overall participation in the main study by 23%, accounting for 16% (24/152 of all final visits for 536 patients who were initially enrolled in the Diagest 3 study. Conclusions When a hospital-led study

  19. Enhancing field GP engagement in hospital-based studies. Rationale, design, main results and participation in the Diagest 3-GP motivation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhout, Christophe; Vandaele-Bétancourt, Marie; Robert, Stéphane; Lespinasse, Solène; Mitha, Gamil; Bradier, Quentin; Vambergue, Anne; Fontaine, Pierre

    2012-06-21

    Diagest 3 was a study aimed at lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes within 3 years after childbirth. Women with gestational diabetes were enrolled in the study. After childbirth, the subjects showed little interest in the structured education programme and did not attend workshops. Their general practitioners (GPs) were approached to help motivate the subjects to participate in Diagest 3, but the GPs were reluctant. The present study aimed to understand field GPs' attitudes towards hospital-based studies, and to develop strategies to enhance their involvement and reduce subject drop-out rates. We used a three-step process: step one used a phenomenological approach exploring the beliefs, attitudes, motivations and environmental factors contributing to the GPs' level of interest in the study. Data were collected in face-to-face interviews and coded by hand and with hermeneutic software to develop distinct GP profiles. Step two was a cross-sectional survey by questionnaire to determine the distribution of the profiles in the GP study population and whether completion of an attached case report form (CRF) was associated with a particular GP profile. In step three, we assessed the impact of the motivation study on participation rates in the main study. Fifteen interviews were conducted to achieve data saturation. Theorisation led to the definition of 4 distinct GP profiles. The response rate to the questionnaire was 73%, but dropped to 52% when a CRF was attached. The link between GP profiles and the rate of CRF completion remains to be verified. The GPs provided data on the CRF that was of comparable quality to those collected in the main trial. Our analysis showed that the motivation study increased overall participation in the main study by 23%, accounting for 16% (24/152) of all final visits for 536 patients who were initially enrolled in the Diagest 3 study. When a hospital-led study explores issues in primary care, its design must anticipate GP

  20. Hospitals; hospitals13

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — Hospital Facilities information was compiled from several various sources. Main source was the RI Department of Health Facilities Regulation database, License 2000....

  1. ELEMENTAL FORMS OF HOSPITALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Emanuel Korstanje

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern studies emphasized on the needs of researching the hospitality as relevant aspects of tourism and hospitality fields. Anyway, these approaches are inextricably intertwined to the industry of tourism and do not take seriously the anthropological and sociological roots of hospitality. In fact, the hotel seems to be a partial sphere of hospitality at all. Under this context, the present paper explores the issue of hospitality enrooted in the political and economic indo-European principle of free-transit which is associated to a much broader origin.  Starting from the premise etymologically hostel and hospital share similar origins, we follow the contributions of J Derrida to determine the elements that formed the hospitality up to date.

  2. Study of knowledge, attitude and practices regarding dengue in the urban and rural field practice area of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Pune, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Singru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dengue is the most common disease among all the arthropod-borne viral diseases. There is no specific treatment or vaccine available for dengue. The sole method of prevention and control is the knowledge attitude and practices (KAP for the same. Although, dengue is considered an urban- and semi-urban disease, in recent years, due to water storage practices and large-scale development activities in rural areas, dengue has become endemic in rural areas of India as well. Aims: To assess the KAP regarding dengue. Settings and Design: Urban and rural field practice area of a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: A pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was used to study the knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding dengue. Stratified random sampling technique was used. A modified B. G. Prasad criterion was used for socio-economic classification. Statistical Analysis Used: KAP represented as proportion (%. Chi-square test was used as a test of significance. P value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: 68.4% in urban areas and 40.4% in rural area knew that dengue is transmitted by mosquito. 62.6% in urban areas and 48% in rural areas respectively stated fever as a symptom of dengue. The use of anti-adult mosquito measures was 48.05% and 51.42% in urban and rural area respectively Conclusions: There is a definite need to increase the information education communication activities for dengue in the study area.

  3. HCAHPS - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  4. Hospital Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Compare has information about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. You can use Hospital Compare to find...

  5. Hospitality and hospitableness | Lashley | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Not long after the word hospitality emerged as a collective noun to describe the commercial provision of services associated with accommodation, drinking and eating, some academics began to investigate the meanings of hospitality and hospitableness. Whilst most academic programme provision related to developing ...

  6. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  7. [Ophthalmological screening via a hospital boat: field study for planning future health care services in remote villages at the Volta Lake in Ghana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong-Boateng, A; Rüfer, F; Fiadoyor, S; Nkrumah-Mills, J; Mensah-Tetteh, F; Kudoadzi, N; Roider, J

    2009-09-01

    A maiden voyage on a hospital boat was carried out to determine the spectrum of ophthalmological diseases in a rural and secluded area on the Volta Lake in Ghana in order to improve future health care services. Portable water, electricity, and an operating theatre were available on the hospital boat. Visual acuity was determined using Snellen E charts, and Lea boards were used in children up to the age of 4 years. The anterior segments were examined using hand held slit lamps. After pupil dilation indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy was performed and tonometry was carried out using a Perkins tonometer A total of 1,246 citizens were examined. The mean age was 23.7 years and the mean visual acuity was 6/6 (log MAR 0.0+/-0.3. The main cause of blindness was a cataract with 45.8%, followed by pathological conditions of the optic disc with 29.2%. The hospital boat is suitable for screening and for carrying out minor extraocular operations. Looking just at the technical aspect, it is possible to perform major intraocular operations on the hospital boat. However, due to the lack of immediate follow-up visits, it is advisable to carry out major operations in the next eye clinic on shore.

  8. Field Evaluation of Malaria Microscopy, Rapid Malaria Tests and Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification in a Rural Hospital in South Western Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Cuadros

    Full Text Available In up to one third of the hospitals in some rural areas of Africa, laboratory services in malaria diagnosis are limited to microscopy by thin film, as no capability to perform thick film exists (gold standard in terms of sensitivity for malaria diagnosis. A new rapid molecular malaria diagnostic test called Loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP has been recently validated in clinical trials showing exceptional sensitivity and specificity features. It could be a reliable diagnostic tool to be implemented without special equipment or training.The objective of this proof of concept study was to confirm the feasibility of using LAMP technique for diagnosis of malaria in a rural Ethiopian hospital with limited resources.This study was carried out in Gambo General Hospital, West Arsi Province (Ethiopia, from November 1st to December 31st 2013. A total of 162 patients with a non-focal febrile syndrome were investigated. The diagnostic capability (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of rapid malaria tests and microscopy by thin film was evaluated in comparison with LAMP. Eleven (6.79% out of the 162 patients with fever and suspected malaria, tested positive for LAMP, 3 (1.85% for rapid malaria tests and none of the eleven cases was detected by thin film microscopy.LAMP can be performed in basic rural laboratories without the need for specialized infrastructure and it may set a reliable tool for malaria control to detect a low level parasitemia.

  9. Hospitality and hospitableness | Lashley | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. Insecticide resistance and synergism of three field-collected strains of the German cockroach Blattella germanica (L.) (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae) from hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoee, M; Enayati, A A; Khassi, K; Salimi, M; Ladonni, H

    2011-04-01

    The development of insecticide resistance in the German cockroach, Blattella germanica (L.) is a serious problem in controlling this medically important household pest. The insecticide resistance status in three hospital-collected strains of the German cockroach using four commonly used insecticides from different classes (permethrin, cypermethrin, bendiocarb and chlorpyrifos) was detected by topical bioassay method and preliminary information on possible involvement of monooxygenases in permethrin resistant strains employing synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) was obtained. For each insecticide, four to six concentrations resulting in >0% and <100% mortality were used. Three to six replicates of 10 cockroaches per concentration were conducted. For synergism studies, 100 μg PBO per gram body weight of cockroach as the maximum sublethal dose was administered to the first abdominal segment 1 h before insecticide treatment. The differences between LD50 (μg/g) values were considered statistically significant only when the 95% confidence intervals did not overlap. The resistance ratio and synergism ratio were calculated for each insecticide. All three hospital-collected strains of the German cockroach showed different levels of resistance to permethrin and cypermethrin based on resistance ratios compared with SUS strain. Permethrin and cypermethrin resistance ratios ranged from 11.61 to 17.64 and 11.45 to 26.45 at LD50 levels, respectively. Low to moderate levels of bendiocarb resistance and low level of chlorpyrifos resistance were also observed in the hospital-collected strains under study. The synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) significantly enhanced the toxicity of permethrin to all strains with different degrees of synergist ratio, 2.45-, 1.87-, 2.51- and 2.38-fold, suggesting monooxygenase involvement in permethrin resistance.

  11. Clinicoradiological Profile of Lower Lung Field Tuberculosis Cases among Young Adult and Elderly People in a Teaching Hospital of Madhya Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Tiwari, Kamlesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To study the clinical and radiological features of lower lung field tuberculosis (LLFTB) in relation to the patients of nonlower lung field tuberculosis (non-LLFTB). Material and Methods. All the patients of lower lung field tuberculosis defined by the lesions below an arbitrary line across the hila in their chest X-rays were included in the study. Their sputum for acid fast bacilli, HIV, blood sugar, and other relevant investigations were performed. Results. The total of 2136 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis was studied. Among them 215 (10%) cases of patients were diagnosed as the case of lower lung field tuberculosis. Females (62%) were more commonly affected. Most common clinical feature in non-LLFTB was cough (69%) followed by fever (65%), chest pain (54.7%), and weight loss (54.4%). Chest X-ray showed predominance of right side (60.9%) in cases of LLFTB. The relative risk of having the LLFTB in diabetes patients, HIV seropositive patients, end stage renal disease patients, and patients on corticosteroid therapy was high. Conclusion. Lower lung field tuberculosis is not an uncommon entity. It is more common in diabetes, HIV positive, end stage renal disease, and corticosteroid treated patients. Clinical and radiological features are different from upper lobe tuberculosis patients. PMID:26379713

  12. Clinicoradiological Profile of Lower Lung Field Tuberculosis Cases among Young Adult and Elderly People in a Teaching Hospital of Madhya Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kumar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the clinical and radiological features of lower lung field tuberculosis (LLFTB in relation to the patients of nonlower lung field tuberculosis (non-LLFTB. Material and Methods. All the patients of lower lung field tuberculosis defined by the lesions below an arbitrary line across the hila in their chest X-rays were included in the study. Their sputum for acid fast bacilli, HIV, blood sugar, and other relevant investigations were performed. Results. The total of 2136 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis was studied. Among them 215 (10% cases of patients were diagnosed as the case of lower lung field tuberculosis. Females (62% were more commonly affected. Most common clinical feature in non-LLFTB was cough (69% followed by fever (65%, chest pain (54.7%, and weight loss (54.4%. Chest X-ray showed predominance of right side (60.9% in cases of LLFTB. The relative risk of having the LLFTB in diabetes patients, HIV seropositive patients, end stage renal disease patients, and patients on corticosteroid therapy was high. Conclusion. Lower lung field tuberculosis is not an uncommon entity. It is more common in diabetes, HIV positive, end stage renal disease, and corticosteroid treated patients. Clinical and radiological features are different from upper lobe tuberculosis patients.

  13. [Ryazan hospital--80 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, A S; Gromov, M F

    2012-02-01

    In December 2011 marked 80 years of the founding of the Ryazan garrison hospital, originally housed in two buildings: "Redut housed"--a monument of architecture of the XVIII century and the former almshouses room "for the maimed in the war", was built in 1884 now Ryazan garrison hospital (from 2010--Branch No 6 FSI "in 1586 the district military hospital in the Western Military District", the Defense Ministry of Russia)--a multi-field medical preventive institution on the basis of which soldiers, military retirees, family members and military retirees from Ryazan, Moscow, Tambov regions are treated. Every year more than 7 thousand patients get treatment here. During the counterterrorism operations in Chechnya over 800 wounded were brought to the hospital from the battle area.

  14. 'Hospital ' i _

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    years and below, who presented at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching' Hospital during a. 12-year period. ... However, the role of malignancies as a cause of death- .University of Port-Harcourt Teaching Hospital,. 'Port-Harcourt . " Department of Anatomical Pathology _ ' '. '''Lecturer ' ' - .... decreasing numerical order.

  15. Field Evaluation of Performance of Alere and Cepheid Qualitative HIV Assays for Pediatric Point-of-Care Testing in an Academic Hospital in Soweto, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Tanya Y; Sherman, Gayle G; Nakwa, Firdose; MacLeod, William B; Sipambo, Nosisa; Velaphi, Sithembiso; Carmona, Sergio

    2017-11-01

    Point-of-care (POC) technologies for HIV diagnosis in infants have the potential to overcome logistical challenges that delay treatment initiation and prevent improvements in morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of two POC technologies against the current standard-of-care (SOC) laboratory-based assay in South Africa, when operated by nurses in a hospital environment. Children <18 months of age who were treatment naive (excluding prophylaxis) and in whom an HIV PCR test was indicated were eligible for the study. To increase the rate of enrollment of HIV PCR-positive children, HIV-exposed neonates at high risk of mother-to-child transmission and children requiring confirmatory HIV testing were preferentially enrolled. The two POC technologies demonstrated excellent concordance, with 315 (97.8%) results consistent with the SOC result. The POC technologies yielded 102 positive and 220 negative tests each. The SOC assay had 101 positive, 214 negative, 4 indeterminate, 1 invalid, and 2 specimen-rejected results. To include the indeterminate results in sensitivity/specificity calculations, a sensitivity analysis was performed, which yielded a simulated sensitivity of 0.9904 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.9808 to 0.9904) and a specificity of 0.9954 (IQR, 0.9954 to 1.0). This study confirmed that both POC technologies can be successfully used outside the laboratory environment to yield precise sensitivity/specificity values for pediatric, including neonatal, HIV testing. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Hospital Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Welcome to hospitalinspections.org, a website run by the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) that aims to make federal hospital inspection reports easier...

  17. Characterisation of drug resistance of nosocomial ESBL-producing E. coli isolates obtained from a Turkish university hospital between 2009 and 2012 by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiotic resistance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöz, Alper; Sunnetcioglu, Mahmut; Ceylan, Mehmet Resat; Bayram, Yasemin; Yalcin, Gozde; Kocak, Nadir; Suvak, Burak; Andac, Cenk A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, drug resistance of 28 ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates obtained from 144 patients hospitalized at the Yüzüncüyil University Hospital at Van (YUH), Turkey, between 2009 and 2012 were characterized by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiotic susceptibility tests. Antibiotic resistance profile was determined by Phoenix automated system (BD, USA). The ratio of ESBL-producing E. coli strains was determined to be 19.4% (28 out of 144 E. coli isolates). It was determined that the anaesthesiology, paediatrics and thoracic medicine intensive care units in YUH were cross-contaminated between 2009 and 2012 by ESBL-producing E. coli strains, which is a sign of nosocomial infection in YUH. Analysis of PFGE results gave rise to two main PFGE profiles, profile-A with four subprofiles and profile-B with three subprofiles, where profile-A predominates over profile-B (14%). Comparison of the antibiotic resistance profile with the PFGE profile yielded similarities while some differences also exist due to either identical restriction enzyme cutting sites with slightly different genetic sequences in between the cutting sites or newly formed restriction enzyme cutting sites that do not affect antibiotic resistance genes. Enterobacteriaceae, particularly E. coli, have developed resistance in YUH by producing ESBLs against oxyimino and non-oxyimino cephalosporins, and penicillin-type antibiotics. Therefore, more effective antibiotics such as cefoxitin or cefoperazone-sulbactam should be used for the treatment of future nosocomial infections in YUH while hospital staff should take care with hygiene, such as hand washing.

  18. Short communication: patterns of chronic and acute diseases after natural disasters - a study from the International Committee of the Red Cross field hospital in Banda Aceh after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha-Sapir, Debarati; van Panhuis, Willem Gijsbert; Lagoutte, Joel

    2007-11-01

    To assess the pattern of diseases in a natural disaster, which are not necessarily a direct consequence of the event but can impact on the way health assistance is to be provided. Cross-sectional, record-based study in the International Committee of the Red Cross field hospital in Aceh, Indonesia, established immediately after the tsunami in 2004. Patients who presented to hospital from January 15 to 31, and whose diagnoses were available, were included in the study. One thousand one hundred and eighty-eight residents of Aceh participated. 43.5% of the diagnoses was chronic diseases. The odds of chronic vs. acute diseases increased by 16.4% per day up to January 23 [95% confidence interval (CI): 7.8-25.6%] and decreased thereafter by 13.1% (95% CI: 6.6-19.1%) per day. The odds of acute diseases were 34% lower among females than males (95% CI: 16-49%) and 4.3 times higher among children than the rest of the population (95% CI: 2.4-7.6). There were relatively few trauma cases among females and children. Medical teams providing relief after acute disasters should be prepared to provide healthcare for chronic diseases too. A delay in the presentation of many acute conditions has implications for long-term health consequences of disasters, such as disability.

  19. High Genetic Diversity of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis Clinical Isolates by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing from a Hospital in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poh Leng Weng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known on the genetic relatedness and potential dissemination of particular enterococcal clones in Malaysia. We studied the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and subjected them to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. E. faecium and E. faecalis displayed 27 and 30 pulsotypes, respectively, and 10 representative E. faecium and E. faecalis isolates (five each yielded few different sequence types (STs: ST17 (2 isolates, ST78, ST203, and ST601 for E. faecium, and ST6, ST16, ST28, ST179, and ST399 for E. faecalis. Resistance to tazobactam-piperacillin and ampicillin amongst E. faecium isolates was highly observed as compared to E. faecalis isolates. All of the isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and teicoplanin. The presence of epidemic and nosocomial strains of selected E. faecium STs: 17, 78, and 203 and E. faecalis ST6 as well as high rates of resistance to multiple antibiotics amongst E. faecium isolates is of a particular concern.

  20. High genetic diversity of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis clinical isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing from a hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Poh Leng; Ramli, Ramliza; Shamsudin, Mariana Nor; Cheah, Yoke-Kqueen; Hamat, Rukman Awang

    2013-01-01

    Little is known on the genetic relatedness and potential dissemination of particular enterococcal clones in Malaysia. We studied the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and subjected them to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). E. faecium and E. faecalis displayed 27 and 30 pulsotypes, respectively, and 10 representative E. faecium and E. faecalis isolates (five each) yielded few different sequence types (STs): ST17 (2 isolates), ST78, ST203, and ST601 for E. faecium, and ST6, ST16, ST28, ST179, and ST399 for E. faecalis. Resistance to tazobactam-piperacillin and ampicillin amongst E. faecium isolates was highly observed as compared to E. faecalis isolates. All of the isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and teicoplanin. The presence of epidemic and nosocomial strains of selected E. faecium STs: 17, 78, and 203 and E. faecalis ST6 as well as high rates of resistance to multiple antibiotics amongst E. faecium isolates is of a particular concern.

  1. Transmission of endemic ST22-MRSA-IV on four acute hospital wards investigated using a combination of spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Creamer, E

    2012-11-01

    The transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between individual patients is difficult to track in institutions where MRSA is endemic. We investigated the transmission of MRSA where ST22-MRSA-IV is endemic on four wards using demographic data, patient and environmental screening, and molecular typing of isolates. A total of 939 patients were screened, 636 within 72 h of admission (on admission) and 303 >72 h after admission, and 1,252 environmental samples were obtained. Isolates were typed by spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. A composite dendrogram generated from the three sets of typing data was used to divide isolates into \\'dendrogram groups\\' (DGs). Ten percent of patients (92\\/939) were MRSA-positive; 7 % (44\\/636) on admission and 16 % (48\\/303) >72 h after admission (p = 0.0007). MRSA was recovered from 5 % of environmental specimens (65\\/1,252). Most isolates from patients (97 %, 85\\/88) and the environment (97 %, 63\\/65) exhibited the ST22-MRSA-IV genotype. Four DGs (DG1, DG4, DG16 and DG17) accounted for 58 % of ST22-MRSA-IV isolates from patients. Epidemiological evidence suggested cross-transmission among 44\\/92 patients (48 %) but molecular typing confirmed probable cross-transmission in only 11 instances (13 %, 11\\/88), with the majority of cross-transmission (64 %; 7\\/11) occurring on one ward. In the setting of highly clonal endemic MRSA, the combination of local epidemiology, PFGE, spa and dru typing provided valuable insights into MRSA transmission.

  2. General public and workers exposure to high-frequency electric fields in Spanish hospitals Exposición de trabajadores y usuarios a campos eléctricos de alta frecuencia en hospitales españoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Caldés Casas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Electromagnetic fields (EMF are commonly used in hospitals to detect and treat certain diseases or ailments, exposing healthcare workers daily to such fields and casting doubts about workers and patients safety. Objectives: To quantify the actual exposure to high-frequency electric fields of workers and public hospitals users in the Balearic Islands (Spain and the compliance with the references levels established by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP. Material and Methods: High-frequency radiation exposure levels were measured in different areas and compared with ICNIRP levels and Spanish regulation, using a broadband field strength meter and a spectrum analyzer. Results: 1,290 measurements were performed obtaining a median electric field of 0.31 V/m (1st quartile: 0.16 V/m; 3rd quartile: 0.67 V/m. Users and workers are exposed to electric fields from 0.19 V/m to 0.25 V/m in all areas, but Rehabilitation and Radiology. In the former, the patients (not under microwave therapy are exposed to EMF between 1.87 V/m and 25.71 V/m. Discussion and conclusions: Although effective electric field values are lower than the reference levels, measures should be taken to reduce exposure of especially sensitive people (infants, children, pregnant women,... and ensure regular monitoring of the exposure.Introducción: Los campos electromagnéticos (CEM se utilizan con frecuencia en los hospitales para detectar y tratar ciertas enfermedades o dolencias, exponiendo diariamente a los trabajadores sanitarios a esos campos y sembrando dudas sobre la seguridad de trabajadores y pacientes. Objetivos: Cuantificar la exposición real de trabajadores y usuarios de los hospitales públicos de las Islas Baleares (España a campos eléctricos de alta frecuencia y el cumplimiento de los niveles de referencia establecidos por la Comisión Internacional de Protección contra la Radiación No Ionizante (ICNIRP. Material y m

  3. Multistage Deployment of the Army Theater Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    2. Analysis ...............................................................................................43 E. COMMANDER’S RISK ASSESMENT EFFECTS...continental United States CSH combat support hospital CT computed tomography FASH forward Army surgical hospital FH field hospital FSH forward... computed tomography (CT) scanner versus a FST having a simple and portable X-ray machine. Figure 4. A forward surgical team has appropriate mobility

  4. Academic Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  5. Sepsis management in the deployed field hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Andrew McD; Easby, D; Ewington, I

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, a syndrome caused by severe infection, affects a small proportion of military casualties but has a significant effect in increasing morbidity and mortality, including causing some preventable deaths. Casualties with abdominal trauma and those with significant tissue loss appear to be at a greater risk of sepsis. In this article, the diagnosis and management of sepsis in military casualties with reference to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines are examined. We discuss the management considerations specific to military casualties in the deployed setting and also discuss factors affecting evacuation by the UK Royal Air Force Critical Care Air Support Team.

  6. Functional textiles in hospital interiors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe

    is overall related to the construction of new Danish hospitals, where the design concept healing architecture is introduced in a national context, representing the vision of a promoted healing process of hospitalised patients, supported by design related influence. Past research studies provides evidence...... that the physical environments affect the patients’ level of stress and influence their process of recovery and healing. However, although research in this field of hospital design has increased substantially in recent years, knowledge on the use of new materials and textiles in hospital interiors is still rather...

  7. Hospitality and hostility in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Aanestad, Margunn

    2007-01-01

    propose to use the concepts of hospitality and hostility to turn our attention to the interaction between the host (the surgeons) and the guest (the information system) and consider how the boundaries between them evolved in the everyday work practices. As an alternative to previous studies on technology......The purpose of this paper is to discuss the adoption of healthcare information systems (HIS) from a user perspective. Our case study concerns how a group of orthopaedic surgeons experienced and reacted to the adoption and mandatory use of an Electronic Patient Record system in a Danish hospital. We...... adoption, these concepts help us appreciate and put special emphasis on particular aspects of the adoption process: the mutual and co-constitutive relationship between the users and the technology and the continued coexistence of both positive and negative attitudes among the users. The findings suggest...

  8. Hospitality and prosumption | Ritzer | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospitality and the hospitality industry need to be reevaluated in the era of the new prosumer and smart prosuming machines. Traditional notions of hospitality hearken back to an earlier era and ongoing changes are forcing us to reconsider them. Among those changes are the decline of settings that offer hospitality; the ...

  9. Hospital Outpatient PPS Partial Hospitalization Program LDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Partial Hospitalization Program LDS This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 claims...

  10. Structural Measures - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospitals and the availability of structural measures at that hospital. A structural measure reflects the environment in which hospitals care for patients....

  11. Patient survey (HCAHPS) - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  12. Art in Hospitals Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baceviciute, Sarune; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Burelli, Paolo

    The idea of this pilot experiment within the context of the “Art in Hospitals” project was to explore the fruitfulness and future perspectives for integrating psychophysiological methods to the ethnographic approach so far implemented in the project. As a pilot study it serves to open the doors...... to experimental avenues that can support the ethnographic investigation. Therefore in order to form a basis for applications of these methodologies in future studies in the field, this pilot was concentrated in one of the initial premises of the project, which intended to challenge current recommendations for art...... in hospitals. Most of these guidelines favor figurative over abstract art, based on ideas leaning to the emotional congruence theory, which would claim that abstract art leads to ambiguity and therefore it could augment the current emotional base-line of an already stressed patient. The early ethnographic...

  13. Hospital marketing revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature.

  14. The Young Hospitalized Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Anne

    This literature review examines the effects of hospitalization on the young child and suggests ways in which parents and hospital personnel can protect children from the potentially harmful emotional and intellectual effects of hospitalization. The history of attitudes toward the hospitalization of children is discussed. Children's emotional…

  15. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 16 for a list of other organizations that work to improve hospital quality. 12 Section 2: A Closer Look At Hospital Quality How can I find information about hospital quality? Medicare publishes information about hospital quality on the Hospital Compare ...

  16. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  17. SOME ASPECTS OF DEVELOPMENT OF HOSPITAL PHARMACY ABROAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Miroshnichenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We considered a number of aspects of the development of hospital pharmacy abroad. It is revealed that the focus of professional pharmaceutical associations in the information and educational fields creates the basis for creation of strategy of development of hospital pharmacy. The analysis of population dynamics of pharmaceutical staff in hospital pharmaciesis held, and the detailed characteristics of activities of certain categories of specialists of hospital pharmacies is presented.

  18. Hospital Compare - Archived Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Compare is a consumer-oriented website that provides information on how well hospitals provide recommended care to their patients. This information can help...

  19. Staph infections - hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000449.htm Staph infections - hospital To use the sharing features on ... can also spread from one person to another. Staph Infections in the Hospital Staph germs are mostly ...

  20. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updates Practice Hospital Bed Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Hospital Bed Entrapment Zones An ... the side edge of the head or foot board 7. between the head or foot board and ...

  1. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Distance Requirements and Critical Access Hospital (CAH) Recertification Checklist for Evaluation of Compliance with the Location and ... purchase new equipment such as hospital beds and office machines. Visit the funding section of this guide ...

  2. The Hospitable Meal Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Overgaard, Svend Skafte

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an analytical model that aims to conceptualize how meal experiences are framed when taking into account a dynamic understanding of hospitality: the meal model is named The Hospitable Meal Model. The idea behind The Hospitable Meal Model is to present a conceptual model...... that can serve as a frame for developing hospitable meal competencies among professionals working within the area of institutional foodservices as well as a conceptual model for analysing meal experiences. The Hospitable Meal Model transcends and transforms existing meal models by presenting a more open......-ended approach towards meal experiences. The underlying purpose of The Hospitable Meal Model is to provide the basis for creating value for the individuals involved in institutional meal services. The Hospitable Meal Model was developed on the basis of an empirical study on hospital meal experiences explored...

  3. HCAHPS Hospital Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Hospital Survey The intent of the HCAHPS initiative is to provide a standardized survey...

  4. This is Definitely Not a Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roelsgaard Obling, Anne

    2014-01-01

    different fields: a cancer department (located at a major teaching hospital); a rehabilitation castle (located on the countryside) and a cancer and health centre (located across the road of the teaching hospital). In the paper’s analyses a repeated truism coined in the case study is followed. The truism...... tells: ‘This is definitely not a hospital’ and points to the fact that cancer staff and clientele use the presence/non-presence of the hospital institution to either align or differentiate from it. It is suggested in the paper that the more the hospital is manifest, i.e., discursively, physically......, imaginatively and so on and so forth, the more delimited and well-defined are the professional roles, organizational coordination mechanisms, and the active contribution of practices on the managed areas of the patients. This also means that in those cases where the hospital is profoundly absent, it has some...

  5. HOSPITAL ABUJA NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environment. A. Objectives: The objective of this paper is to determine the mode of transmission, clinical presentations and outcome of hospital admissions in children with Paediatric HIV/AIDS at the National Hospital Abuja Nigeria. Methods: Aretrospective study of children with Paediatric HIV/AIDS admitted into the hospital ...

  6. Visual field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam. This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  7. Medicare Hospital Spending Per Patient - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The "Medicare hospital spending per patient (Medicare Spending per Beneficiary)" measure shows whether Medicare spends more, less or about the same per Medicare...

  8. Hospitality and prosumption | Ritzer | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Interruptions: Derrida and Hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Westmoreland

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Come in. Welcome. Be my guest and I will be yours. Shall we ask, in accordance with the Derridean question, "Is not hospitality an interruption of the self?" What is the relationship between the interruption and the moment one enters the host's home? Derrida calls us toward a new understanding of hospitality - as an interruption. This paper will illuminate the history of hospitality in the West as well as trace Derrida's discussions of hospitality throughout many of works. The overall goal of this project is to provide readers of Derrida with a sort of reference guide for his discussions on and deconstructive approach to hospitality.

  10. Japanese hospitals--culture and competition: a study of ten hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbäcken, O

    1994-01-01

    Japanese health care is characterized by a pluralistic system with a high degree of private producers. Central government regulates the prices and the financing system. All citizens are covered by a mandatory employment-based health insurance operating on a non-profit basis. The consumer has a free choice of physician and hospital. A comparison between Japan, Sweden and some other countries shows significant dissimilarities in the length of stay, number of treatments per hospital bed and year and the staffing of hospitals. About 80 per cent of the hospitals and 94 per cent of the clinics are privately owned. The typical private hospital owned by a physician has less than 100 beds. In this paper, data collected (1992/93) in an empirical study of Japanese hospitals and their leadership is presented. Also discussed are the hospitals' style of management, tools and strategies for competition and competences--personal and formal skills required of the leadership in the hospital. There follows a study of ten hospitals, among which hospital directors and chief physicians were interviewed. Interviews are also made with key persons in the Ministry of Health and Welfare and other organizations in the health care field. The result is also analysed from a cultural perspective--'what kind of impact does the Japanese culture have on the health care organization?' and/or 'what kind of sub-culture is developed in the Japanese hospitals'. Some comparisons are made with Sweden, USA, Canada and Germany. The different roles of the professions in the hospital are included in the study as well as the incentives for different kinds of strategies--specialization, growing in size, investments in new equipment, different kind of ownership and hospitals. Another issue discussed is the attempt to uncover whether there is an implicit distribution of specialties--silent agreements between hospitals, etc.

  11. Hospitality and Institutional Meals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Strøjer, Anna-Lise

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: There is a growing interest in articulating institutional meal serving practices as a hospitality activity involving host and guest interactions. This study aims to qualify institutional hospitality and meal activities by exploring private hospitality events. The study is based......-structured interview, students reflected on their hospitality experiences. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a thematic analysis method. The emerging themes on hospitality activities were identified. It was found that hospitality activities could be characterized as a process where the individual...... was transformed into a guest. Information on purpose of the event and other information given in the invitation were part of this process. Furthermore, hospitality activities could be characterized by blurred host-guest relations and by being able to embrace unexpected events as well. The activities were...

  12. Interprofessional cooperation by midwives in the field of out-of-hospital obstetrical care: an integrative review / Interprofessionelle Kooperation von Hebammen im Handlungsfeld der ambulanten geburtshilflichen Versorgung: ein integratives Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlüter-Cruse Martina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The central objective of early prevention in Germany is an improved cooperation between professional groups of the health services and child and youth welfare in interprofessional networks. This objective derives from the realisation that proper care for families with infants can only be achieved if the various groups act in close integration. The ‘Federal Initiative early prevention’ explicitly calls for freelance midwives to be integrated in this context. However, only a few scientific findings on midwives’ cooperation in networks of early prevention have been published to date. This integrative review aims to identify the central themes of interprofessional cooperation of midwives in out-of-hospital obstetrical care from national and international research literature.

  13. Hospitals Capability in Response to Disasters Considering Surge Capacity Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khademipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The man-made and natural disasters have adverse effects with sound, apparent, and unknown consequences. Among various components of disaster management in health sector, the most important role is performed by health-treatment systems, especially hospitals. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the surge capacity of hospitals of Kerman Province in disaster in 2015. Materials and Methods: This is a quantitative study, conducted on private, military, and medical sciences hospitals of Kerman Province. The sampling method was total count and data collection for the research was done by questionnaire. The first section of the questionnaire included demographic information of the studied hospitals and second part examined the hospital capacity in response to disasters in 4 fields of equipment, physical space, human resources, and applied programs. The extracted data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: The mean capability of implementing the surge capacity programs by hospitals of Kerman Province in disasters and in 4 fields of equipment, physical space, human resources, and applied programs was evaluated as 7.33% (weak. The surge capacity capability of state hospitals in disasters was computed as 8% and compared to private hospitals (6.07% had a more suitable condition. Conclusion: Based on the results of study and significance of preparedness of hospitals in response to disasters, it is proposed that managers of studied hospitals take measures to promote the hospital response capacity to disasters based on 4 components of increasing hospital capacity.

  14. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  15. [Hospital management conflict: the leadership role].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendemiatti, Mariana; Siqueira, Elisabete Straditto; Filardi, Fernando; Binotto, Erlaine; Simioni, Flávio José

    2010-06-01

    This study analyzes the context of the hospital management professionalization process showing as the main challenges the leadership role to solve the conflict between the doctor, the nurse and the administrative sub-culture. This is a descriptive research and a field investigation based on the survey tools with interview and observation of thirty professionals from the hospital. The results show that the conflict between the various kinds of activities is derivate from the control rules within the hospital, the difference of social assistance and individual values. The conclusion points the need to change the leadership focus from total control to a more flexible kind of management, with emphasis in the dialog and negotiation between these activities in a hospital.

  16. [Computerization of hospital blood banks in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurat, G; Py, J-Y

    2012-11-01

    In France, most blood products are delivered by the établissement francais du sang, directly to the recipients, and hospital blood banks deliver a minor part, but are independent from it. However that may be, hospital blood banks are hazardous activities regarding to recipients, blood products, blood supply of the hospital and regional blood supply. Because of the high risk level, a computerized information system is compulsory for all hospital blood banks, except for those only devoted to vital emergency transfusion. On the field, the integration of computerization in the different processes is very heterogeneous. So, it has been decided to publish guidelines for computerizing hospital blood banks information systems and production management. They have been built according to risk assessment and are intended to minimize those risks. The principle is that all acquisition and processing of data about recipients or blood products and tracking, must be fully computerized and that the result of all manual processes must be checked by computer before proceeding to the next step. The guidelines list the different processes and, for each of them, the functions the software must play. All together, they form the basic level all hospital blood banks should reach. Optional functions are listed. Moreover, the guidelines are also aimed to be a common tool for regional health authorities who supervise hospital blood banks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Toshiyuki

    The term phase field has recently become known across many fields of materials science. The meaning of phase field is the spatial and temporal order parameter field defined in a continuum-diffused interface model. By using the phase field order parameters, many types of complex microstructure changes observed in materials science are described effectively. This methodology has been referred to as the phase field method, phase field simulation, phase field modeling, phase field approach, etc. In this chapter, the basic concept and theoretical background for the phase field approach is explained in Sects. 21.1 and 21.2. The overview of recent applications of the phase field method is demonstrated in Sects. 21.3 to 21.6.

  18. Official Centre Hospitality

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sylvain Dufour

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... following aspects must be present: • the function exposes individuals visiting from overseas to examples of Canadian or regional art and culture; and. • the function is less expensive than meal-type hospitality. Hospitality activities usually have no formal agenda and program. The emphasis is on networking.

  19. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  20. Towards the collaborative hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Hasle, Peter; Edwards, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals are increasingly faced with conflicting demands as they have to respond to increasing patient demands as well as financial, clinical and quality challenges. To handle these demands the hospital need to reconfigure its organization, and we propose to build on a concept for the collaborat......Hospitals are increasingly faced with conflicting demands as they have to respond to increasing patient demands as well as financial, clinical and quality challenges. To handle these demands the hospital need to reconfigure its organization, and we propose to build on a concept...... for the collaborative hospital as new organizational form which is better equipped to respond to the challenges facing modern hospitals. The collaborative hospital is an ambidextrous organization that opens for pursuing both exploration and exploitation within the same organizational structure. The basic principles...... of the collaborative hospital concern the creation of an appropriate balance between standardization and local autonomy, shared purpose centred around providing the best possible care, and use of enabling structures that sustain the new ways of collaborative work. The chapter builds on the theoretical framework...

  1. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  2. Moving a hospital library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Many hospital libraries suffer from being poorly housed. This article describes a successful effort to find better space for a hospital library. Issues of planning, staff participation, and implementation are discussed, including constraints, what worked well, and what could have worked better.

  3. [Music in the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy.

  4. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  5. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  6. Hospital Returns - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital returns – national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures and the 30-day...

  7. Hospital Returns - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital returns – state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures and the 30-day...

  8. The interstices of hospitality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jane.b

    drew an interpretative picture of the dynamic of hospitality,. I prepared a descriptive scheme, with times .... the development of which may result in a pacifying effect, sentiments that range from friendship, love and ..... momentarily, the guest reassumes his position of superiority. All this takes place as if the hospitality scene ...

  9. Hospital radiopharmacy training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, T; Wolf, W; Mochizuki, D

    1975-06-01

    Training of radiopharmacists, including self-study and a hospital short-term course, is discussed. A systematic approach for self-study is suggested. The 30-day hospital training program described includes both didactic material and on-the-job experience.

  10. Heritage, Tourism and Hospitality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarse, van der R.; Egberts, L.

    Heritage, Tourism and HospitalityInternational Conference 2015 (HTHIC2015)Preservation, Presentation, Promotion and ProfitResearch Agendas, Best Practices and Hospitable Partnerships in TourismFollowing the success of the first conference in the series in Istanbul, Rotterdam School of

  11. The Ethic of Hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Muller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The idea of hospitality is evident in several types of human behavior including obligatory duties, commercial activity, and prosocial action. These are intertwined and revolve around the commitment to caring for others whether they are relatives, guests, or strangers. This article explores the ethic of hospitality in its various forms.

  12. Hjertestop uden for hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L

    1989-01-01

    During the period 1.10.1986-30.9.1987, all patients with cardiac arrest outside hospital brought to the casualty department in Odense Hospital were registered. Out of 160 patients, 133 (83%) could be primarily resuscitated, 19 (12%) were resuscitated but died later in hospital and eight patients (5......%) were resuscitated and could be discharged alive from hospital. Out of the eight patients who were discharged alive, only two (1%) had retained reasonable cerebral function as assessed by dementia testing. Treatment of the cardiac arrest prior to the arrival of the ambulance, duration of the cardiac...... arrest for less than six minutes and staffing of the ambulance with three first-aid men were factors of decisive importance for survival of the patients. The results of this investigation demonstrate that treatment of cardiac arrest outside hospital is unsatisfactory. Proposals for improvement...

  13. On spaces of hospitality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anni

    Although specialists in hospitality have worked extensively on hospitality with respect to relations between different nations or between nations and individuals of a different nationality, for instance when they seek asylum, Jacques Derrida preferred to focus instead upon the relationship between...... the guest and the host. This has provided a much-needed rethinking of how to understand hospitality as a way of relating, as an ethics and as a politics. Within this work, there have often appeared discussions of ‘spaces of hospitality’, but these spaces have remained largely abstract. This is where...... this paper comes in: It will re open discussions of spaces of hospitality with an introduction into an on-going research project that studies the performative, structural and social dynamics of cultural encounters focusing on forms of hospitality that are related to particular sites in the city, namely...

  14. Scientific research in hospitality studies in Brazil: challenges to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jane.b

    and entertainment with culinary arts, restaurant management, religion, hospitality services in hospitals, .... Arts and Restaurant Management are replaced by Food and. Beverages and Third Sector and Health are ... influence in issues of social responsibility and sustainability. An analysis of the dissertations by fields of ...

  15. in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted at the University of llorin. Teaching Hospital (U1TH) llorin between May and June 2002. The Hospital is a second generation Teaching Hospital es- tablished on 2nd May, 1980. Currently, the hospital has a total bed space of 515 distributed as follows: i. General Hospital Wing, llorin with 304 beds;.

  16. Patient Survey (PCH - HCAHPS) PPS-exempt Cancer Hospital - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  17. Analysis of hospital interior air quality audits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lee-Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, people spent more than 80∼90% of living time in the indoor every day, human health and indoor environmental quality are closely related. The hospital has a complex and unique environmental characteristics, medical personnel and patients are prolonged exposed to risk factors in a variety of environments. Therefore, the merits of indoor air quality in the hospital, not only has a threat to the health of medical personnel and patients, but also will directly affect the quality and efficiency of health care work. A regular monitoring can, improve and maintain a well of indoor air quality, thus ensuring the safety maintenance of medical personnel and patients in hospital, it has become an important issue for hospital. This study has literatures review to collate and analyse that are related issues with indoor air quality. Then measures the indoor air quality test with direct-reading instruments. In selected hospital of this study were field-tested, then use the measured data in the field, discussion and analysis of the causes of air pollutants and the establishment of the sensing area of pollutants Concentration empirical mode.

  18. Cardiovascular Surgery at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spray, Thomas L; Fuller, Stephanie; Mascio, Christopher E; Gaynor, J William

    2016-01-01

    Surgery for congenital heart disease at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia began in the earliest days of cardiac surgery. In a rapidly advancing field, surgeons at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are recognized as innovators in the field. The Division of Cardiac Surgery is dedicated to providing outstanding clinical care, educating the next generation of congenital cardiac surgeons, and advancing the specialty through clinical and translational research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hospital Readmission Reduction

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In October 2012, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for Inpatient Prospective Payment System hospitals with excess readmissions. Excess readmissions are measured...

  20. Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In October 2012, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for Inpatient Prospective Payment System hospitals with excess readmissions. Excess readmissions are measured...

  1. Hospital Compare Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These are the official datasets used on the Medicare.gov Hospital Compare Website provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. These data allow you to...

  2. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - provider data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical...

  3. THE HOSPITALITY SUITE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lauren McKay

    2010-01-01

    ...), the hotel eventually felt the need to hire a director of social hospitality. Hotels -- big and small, luxury and economy, independent and chain -- are coming to grips with a new breed of consumer...

  4. Allegheny County Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The data on health care facilities includes the name and location of all the hospitals and primary care facilities in Allegheny County. The current listing of...

  5. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get pneumonia while in the hospital if they: Abuse alcohol Have had chest surgery or other major ... Treatments may include: Antibiotics through your veins (IV) to treat the lung infection. The antibiotic you are given will fight the germs that ...

  6. isolated rural hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report the results of a qualitative study that evaluated the effect of an educational intervention aimed at rural ... performance spiral in academically isolated rural hospitals. .... Heavy after-hrs workload, alcohol ... Continued academic stimula-.

  7. Allegheny County Diabetes Hospitalization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data includes the number of people hospitalized with diabetes between 2013-2015, by age group, for Allegheny County Zip Codes.

  8. Premier Hospital Historical Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — To provide a historical overview of the participating hospitals, before the first project report, Premier Healthcare Informatics has used data already available for...

  9. Hospital Outpatient PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4523 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) provides authority for CMS to implement a prospective payment system (PPS) under Medicare for hospital...

  10. Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... human resources management, financial management, marketing, strategic management, economics, business forecasting, information technology and development, national and international legislation will be considered for publication. Articles covering social theory and the history and politics of the hospitality industry ...

  11. Service Robots for Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan

    believe that these transportation tasks, to a great extent, can be and will be automated using mobile robots. This thesis consequently addresses the key technical issues of implementing service robots in hospitals. In simple terms, a robotic system for automating hospital logistics has to be reliable......, adaptable and scalable. Robots have to be semi-autonomous, and should reliably navigate in large and dynamic environments in the hospital. The complexity of the problem has to be manageable, and the solutions have to be flexible, so that the system can be applicable in real world settings. This thesis...... summarizes the efforts to address these issues. Upon the analysis of the transportation tasks and how they are currently handled in hospitals, a navigation system is envisaged. Visual tags are a part of this system, and a survey was conducted to find out the most prominent ones to be used in mobile robot...

  12. Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. Physician-Owned Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 6001 of the Affordable Care Act of 2010 amended section 1877 of the Social Security Act to impose additional requirements for physician-owned hospitals to...

  14. Optimal Hospital Layout Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Malene Kirstine

    This PhD project presents a design model that generates and evaluates hospital designs with respect to long-term performances and functionalities. By visualizing and quantifying costs and performances in the early design phases, it is possible to make design choices based on a qualified, profound...... foundation. The basis of the present study lies in solving the architectural design problem in order to respond to functionalities and performances. The emphasis is the practical applicability for architects, engineers and hospital planners for assuring usability and a holistic approach of functionalities...... and performances. By formal descriptions, a design model can weigh and compare the impact of different perspectives and, even in the early design phase, it can visualize and quantify consequences for design choices. By qualitative study of hospital design and hospital functionality, formal descriptions develop...

  15. American Hospital Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Equity of Care Hiring Veterans Hospitals Against Violence Organ Donation The Patient Care Partnership Put It In Writing ... Gout drug may increase risk of heart-related death AHA guide offers strategies for improving transportation for ...

  16. Going to the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for kids, you'll probably also see medical students (who are learning to be doctors) and residents ( ... be glad to make you more comfortable. After spending time at the hospital, you should be on ...

  17. VT Hospital Site Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This data layer contains point locations of all major community, regional, comprehensive health, and healthcare provider hospitals in the state of...

  18. Nutrition support in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Nutrition support in hospitals is becoming an area of focus because of the evidence showing improved clinical outcome with nutrition support, its status as a human rights issue and its integration into quality assurance.......Nutrition support in hospitals is becoming an area of focus because of the evidence showing improved clinical outcome with nutrition support, its status as a human rights issue and its integration into quality assurance....

  19. Critical hospitality management research

    OpenAIRE

    Lugosi, Peter; Lynch, Paul; Morrison, Alison

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of critical hospitality management research (CHMR) and explores key issues that such approaches raise. The paper is split into two parts. The first reviews contemporary writings that reflect the changing nature of hospitality management research and accounts for the emergence of a critical tradition. The second part identifies eight areas which are central concerns for the future development of CHMR: criticality, ethics and advocacy, scale, claims of legit...

  20. The Amherst study of hospital marketing practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S A; Kane, C M; Sullivan, D J

    1988-03-01

    The study findings identify two major area of concern related to marketing and the direction the field is taking. First, health care marketing--though much discussed and expensive--is still in a stage of immaturity. As practiced in hospitals today, marketing is frequently synonymous with advertising. Second, marketing in health care will not ultimately be a "clone" of marketing practices in industry and retailing. Though hospitals are looking to those areas for knowledge and expertise, the unique character of the product will cause health care marketing to evolve into a practice uniquely different from that in other industries.

  1. [Quality management and quality assurance in the hospital with special reference to hospital public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, H G; Möller, J

    1996-12-01

    Due to the law of health reform and health structure the hospitals in the Federal Republic of Germany are asked to not only think about cost reduction but at the same time to also face the requirements of quality management (QM) and quality assurance (QA). For the field of medical and care taking treatment of patients in the hospital the term "quality" can be described as the total of characteristics of the medical services necessary for the realization of all requirements which lead to an optimal patient treatment. Hospital hygiene as part of hygiene in the broader sense deals with the bases of disease prevention of all persons actively or passively connected with the institution hospital as well as with the natural and social hospital environment and, thus, in every respect proves to be a guide discipline for the realization of QM and QA in the hospital. For the realization of an overall concept for QM and QA in the hospital three categories of quality have proved to be worthwhile, namely the structure quality which deals with the quality related arrangement of the frame conditions of hospital productivity the process quality which comprises the improvement of diagnostic, therapeutic, care taking and medical activities in the hospital as well as interactions between the hospital staff and the patient or his relatives, and the outcome quality, which judges the changes in the patient's condition by means of predefined target values. Furthermore, QM in the hospital needs detailed informative activities (initial stage of information) as well as motivating measures (initial stage of conduct) whereas latter has to be considered as an essential basis for a staff-related realization of quality assurance measures in the hospital. Possibilities for a practical realization of QM and QA are shown by means of the modular concept established in the Clinics of the University of Heidelberg. Thereby, one could experience that a successful QM in the hospital requires the declared

  2. User requirements for interruption management in mobile communications in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsma, Bernd G; Solvoll, Terje; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    In hospitals, mobile communication devices increase the occurrence of inappropriate interruptions during clinical task performance. These interruptions have been related to decreased quality of clinical care. User requirements were elicited using a scenario based approach. The results present insights into user requirements for an interruption management system for hospitals. Hospital workflow protocols were identified as a major source of interruptions. Many suggestions for managing these interruptions related to improving workflow using IT. We have shown that even though the hospital is an exceptionally demanding environment, the user requirements for interruption management concur with earlier findings in the broader fields of context aware interruption management and computer supported cooperative work.

  3. Hospitals look to hospitality service firms to meet TQM goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard, R

    1992-05-20

    Hospitals that hire contract service firms to manage one or all aspects of their hospitality service departments increasingly expect those firms to help meet total quality management goals as well as offer the more traditional cost reduction, quality improvement and specialized expertise, finds the 1992 Hospital Contract Services Survey conducted by Hospitals.

  4. Analisa Penerapan Sistem pada Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steeve Haryanto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis on the application of the system hospitality industry aims to determine whether the system from outside has a considerable influence on the number of luxury hotels in Jakarta as well as the factors that influence in picking the hospitality industry service system. The results of this survey are expected to be a consideration in implementing an information system in the field of hospitality industry. The method used in this paper is a literature review and analysis. The initial step in the analysis is to conduct a survey on the current system in hotels in Jakarta, and analysis of the survey results and the identification of the need for local companies to compete with foreign companies. Implementation of the system is no longer measured by how many facilities are available but the system is measured by how stable revenue generated calculations per dayrunning at a hotel with no lost posts.

  5. Trick questions: cosmopolitan hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Byrne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Byrne’s paper consists of two parallel texts. The first explores the limits of cosmopolitanism in practice, taking as its subject the Life in the UK Citizenship Test, inaugurated under the Labour Government in 2005. It argues that the test exemplifies the predicament of all attempts at cosmopolitan hospitality as unconditional welcoming, through a discussion of the relation between questioning and welcoming the stranger. Establishing the relationship between cosmopolitanism and hospitality as envisaged in Derrida’s reading of Kant it asks what kind of cosmopolitan hospitality is either possible or desirable by exploring what Derrida calls the ‘perversions’ inherent in the structures of hospitality. It focuses on the concept of the ‘trick questions’ that the state asks the foreigner observed by Derrida in his reading of The Apology of Socrates; questions that seem to invite answers but foreclose the possibilities of a free response. The second text asks how this logic that Derrida identifies can be pushed or coaxed into new ways of addressing the perceived threats of ‘unconditional’ hospitality through a reading of ‘unconditional hospitality’ as queer in the work of Tove Jansson.

  6. Improving Hospital Discharge Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Eid, Ghada R.; Kaddoum, Roland; Tamim, Hani; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Delays in discharging patients can impact hospital and emergency department (ED) throughput. The discharge process is complex and involves setting specific challenges that limit generalizability of solutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using Six Sigma methods to improve the patient discharge process. This is a quantitative pre and post-intervention study. Three hundred and eighty-six bed tertiary care hospital. A series of Six Sigma driven interventions over a 10-month period. The primary outcome was discharge time (time from discharge order to patient leaving the room). Secondary outcome measures included percent of patients whose discharge order was written before noon, percent of patients leaving the room by noon, hospital length of stay (LOS), and LOS of admitted ED patients. Discharge time decreased by 22.7% from 2.2 hours during the preintervention period to 1.7 hours post-intervention (P discharge. Hospital LOS dropped from 3.4 to 3.1 days postintervention (P hospital was significantly lower in the postintervention period (6.9 ± 7.8 vs 5.9 ± 7.7 hours; P discharge time. The focus of institutions aspiring to tackle delays in the discharge process should be on adopting the core principles of Six Sigma rather than specific interventions that may be institution-specific. PMID:25816029

  7. Maturity of hospital information systems: Most important influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal Carvalho, João; Rocha, Álvaro; Abreu, António

    2017-07-01

    Maturity models facilitate organizational management, including information systems management, with hospital organizations no exception. This article puts forth a study carried out with a group of experts in the field of hospital information systems management with a view to identifying the main influencing factors to be included in an encompassing maturity model for hospital information systems management. This study is based on the results of a literature review, which identified maturity models in the health field and relevant influencing factors. The development of this model is justified to the extent that the available maturity models for the hospital information systems management field reveal multiple limitations, including lack of detail, absence of tools to determine their maturity and lack of characterization for stages of maturity structured by different influencing factors.

  8. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced......he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  9. Hacking the hospital environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Kirsten A; Boisen, Anne Bank; Thomsen, Stine Legarth

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for youth-friendly hospital environments as the ward environment may affect both patient satisfaction and health outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To involve young people in designing youth-friendly ward environment. METHODS: We arranged a design competition lasting 42 h (Hackathon...... in two-bed wardrooms and social contact with other hospitalized AYA. The winning project included an integrated concept for both wardrooms and the AYA day room, including logos and names for the rooms and an 'energy wall' in the day room. CONCLUSION: A hackathon event was an effective mode of youth...... participation. The design concepts and ideas were in line with current evidence regarding pleasing hospital environment and youth-friendly inpatient facilities and may be applicable to other young patients....

  10. Patient life in hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid

    Patient life in hospital.A qualitative study of informal relationships between hospitalised patients Introduction Within a patientology framework, this PhD dissertation is about an empirical study on patient life that provides insight into the nature of informal relationships between patients...... in the various hospital wards gives a varied potential for mutuality and the development of relationships. When patients build these informal and often short-lived relationships, they may make possible the intensifying of their wellbeing and possibly improve healing processes within themselves when they engage...

  11. Hospitality and aesthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Bergflødt, Sigurd

    2013-01-01

    Tobias Nygren is Professor and Head of Department at the School of Hospitality, Culinary Arts, and Meal Science in Grythyttan, Sweden. He has been working for several years on meals, restaurants and hospitality. We meet at Grythyttan, and we need a few more lines to describe the place, which is quite unique in the Nordic food landscape. The School of Culinary Arts is a branch of the Örebro University and since 1993 it has offered multidisciplinary studies, combining science with practical sk...

  12. [Standardization of hospital feeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracuel García, Ángel Manuel

    2015-05-07

    Normalization can be understood as the establishing measures against repetitive situations through the development, dissemination, and application of technical design documents called standards. In Andalusia there are 45 public hospitals with 14,606 beds, and in which 11,700 full pensions / day are served. The Working Group on Hospital Food Standardization of the Andalusian Society for Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, started in 2010, working on the certification of suppliers, product specifications, and meals technical card. - Develop a specific tool to help improving food safety through the certification of their suppliers. - Develop a standardized technical specifications of foodstuffs necessary for the development of menus established codes diets Andalusian hospitals document. - Develop a catalog of data sheets plates of hospital meals, to homogenize menus, respecting local and unifying criteria for qualitative and quantitative ingredients. - Providing documentation and studying of several public hospitals in Andalusia: • Product specifications and certification of suppliers. • International standards certification and distribution companies. • Legislation. • Data sheets for the menu items. • Specifications of different product procurement procedures. - Development of the draft standard HOSPIFOOD®, and approval of the version “0.0”. - Training course for auditors to this standard. - Development of a raw materials catalog as technical cards. - Meals Technical cards review and election of the ones which will be part of the document. After nearly three years of work, we have achieved the following products: - Standardized database of technical specifications for the production of food dietary codes for: fish, seafood, meat and meat products, meats and pates, ready meals, bread and pastries, preserves, milk and dairy products, oils, cereals, legumes , vegetables, fruits, fresh and frozen vegetables, condiments and spices. - Standardized database of

  13. Rural hospital wages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Ann M.

    1989-01-01

    Average fiscal year 1982 wages from 2,302 rural American hospitals were used to test for a gradient descending from hospitals in counties adjacent to metropolitan areas to those not adjacent. Considerable variation in the ratios of adjacent to nonadjacent averages existed. No statistically significant difference was found, however. Of greater importance in explaining relative wages within States were occupational mix, mix of part-time and full-time workers, case mix, presence of medical residencies, and location in a high-rent county within the State. Medicare already adjusts payments for only two of these variables. PMID:10313454

  14. Toward healthier hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, H

    1997-01-01

    This article builds around a framework of cure, care, control, and community, with collaboration at the center, to consider 12 issues common to many hospitals. These include, among others, the fragmentation of efforts, confusion in mission (and in mission statements), the problems of bundling research with clinical work, selectivity in informing board members, the dangers of professional management, and the difficulties of combining external advocacy with internal reconciliation in the senior manager's job. The article concludes that hospitals could better learn how to solve systemic problems systemically, and that to do so will require not the wish lists of strategic planning and structural reorganizing, but tangible changes in their collective behavior.

  15. Hospitality, Tourism, and Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Litvin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Government policy has a significant impact on the hospitality and tourism industry, but it is unclear if political leaders fully understand this economic sector when crafting policies. This article offers new research about the direct involvement of industry practitioners in the political process, by analyzing the backgrounds of legislators in the six New England states. The data indicate that only 3% of these legislators have current or former careers related to hospitality and tourism. The author suggests that practitioners should seek election to political office, to better influence government policy.

  16. Hospital mergers: a panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Hospital mergers in Europe and North America have been launched to scale down expenditure, enhance the delivery of health care and elevate quality. However, the outcome of mergers suggest that they neither generated cost savings nor improved the quality of care. Almost all consolidations fall short, since those in leadership positions lack the necessary understanding and appreciation of the differences in culture, values and goals of the existing facilities. In spite of these shortcomings, hospital mergers will continue to be pursued in order to improve market share, eliminate excess capacity, gain access to capital and enhance the personal egos of the organizations' leaders.

  17. Managing hospitals in dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godiwalla, Y H; Batra, H C; Johnson, J A; Godiwalla, S Y

    1997-01-01

    Hospital environments have changed dramatically over the past two decades. Hospitals now have to contend with the dynamics of regulation, market forces, and quality and cost-conscious environments. The strategies proposed here emulate the changes pursued by much of US industry. Provides a framework for analysing hospital environments. Applies Deming's total quality management concepts to hospitals. Also suggests strategies to deal effectively with different types of hospital environments.

  18. COMPETITIVENESS IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY: ROMANIAN STYLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia-Elena TUCLEA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented one of the important sectors of the nationaleconomy, at least from its potential for development perspective: thehospitality industry. The research interest is related to finding out the mainfactors of competitiveness in this field. This research attempts to identify theessential aspects of competitiveness in the hospitality industry. Theobjectives pursued refer to: discovering the degree to which the concept ofcompetitiveness is understood and capitalized on by the managers in theRomanian hospitality industry; identifying a set of factors considered decisivein raising the competitiveness of Romanian firms in the hospitality industry;identifying the strategic concerns of firms operating in the Romanianhospitality industry, in order to establish the connection between strategy andthe competitiveness of the firms belonging to this sector.As a result, the hypotheses are: in the hospitality industry there areparticularities which influence the firms’ competitiveness and strategicorientation; preoccupation towards raising competitiveness and strategicorientation is influenced by the type of exploitation and the number of stars(level of comfort; in the hospitality industry, managers focus on cost controland service quality as decisive factors of competitiveness.

  19. The impact of medical tourism on Thai private hospital management: informing hospital policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Paul T J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help consolidate and understand management perceptions and experiences of a targeted group (n=7) of Vice-Presidents of international Private Thai hospitals in Bangkok regarding medical tourism impacts. The method adopted uses a small-scale qualitative inquiry. Examines the on-going development and service management factors which contribute to the establishment and strengthening of relationships between international patients and hospital medical services provision. Develops a qualitative model that attempts to conceptualize the findings from a diverse range of management views into a framework of main (8) - Hospital Management; Hospital Processes; Hospital Technology; Quality Related; Communications; Personnel; Financial; and Patients; and consequent sub-themes (22). Outcomes from small-scale qualitative inquiries cannot by design be taken outside of its topical arena. This inevitably indicates that more research of this kind needs to be carried out to understand this field more effectively. The evidence suggests that Private Thai hospital management have established views about what constitutes the impact of medical tourism on hospital policies and practices when hospital staff interact with international patients. As the private health service sector in Thailand continues to grow, future research is needed to help hospitals provide appropriate service patterns and appropriate medical products/services that meet international patient needs and aspirations. Highlights the increasing importance of the international consumer in Thailand's health industry. This study provides insights of private health service providers in Bangkok by helping to understand more effectively health service quality environments, subsequent service provision, and the integrated development and impacts of new medical technology.

  20. Assessing knowledge, performance, and efficiency for hospital waste management-a comparison of government and private hospitals in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mustafa; Wang, Wenping; Chaudhry, Nawaz; Geng, Yong; Ashraf, Uzma

    2017-04-01

    Proper management of healthcare waste is a critical concern in many countries of the world. Rapid urbanization and population growth rates pose serious challenges to healthcare waste management infrastructure in such countries. This study was aimed at assessing the situation of hospital waste management in a major city of Pakistan. Simple random sampling was used to select 12 government and private hospitals in the city. Field visits, physical measurements, and questionnaire survey method were used for data collection. Information was obtained regarding hospital waste generation, segregation, collection, storage, transportation, and disposal. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) was used to classify the hospitals on the basis of their relative waste management efficiencies. The weighted average total waste generation at the surveyed hospitals was discovered to be 1.53 kg/patient/day of which 75.15% consisted of general waste and the remaining consisted of biomedical waste. Of the total waste, 24.54% came from the public hospital and the remaining came from the private hospitals. DEA showed that seven of the surveyed hospitals had scale or pure technical inefficiencies in their waste management activities. The public hospital was relatively less efficient than most of the private hospitals in these activities. Results of the questionnaire survey showed that none of the surveyed hospitals was carrying out waste management in strict compliance with government regulations. Moreover, hospital staff at all the surveyed hospitals had low level of knowledge regarding safe hospital waste management practices. The current situation should be rectified in order to avoid environmental and epidemiological risks.

  1. Factors affecting hospitality industry's economic performance

    OpenAIRE

    Zalewska, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Tourism yield is currently one of the most contemporary fields of tourism research. This paper is a contribution to the ongoing Tourism Yield Norway project conducted at the Norwegian School of Hotel Management. Data has been obtained of financial performances of businesses within the hospitality and tourism industry in one of Norway’s most tourism-wise developed region – Rogaland. This paper set out to test part of one of three dimensions (economic, environmental and socio-cul...

  2. Factors affecting hospitality industry's economic performance

    OpenAIRE

    Zalewska, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Master's thesis in International hotel and tourism management Tourism yield is currently one of the most contemporary fields of tourism research. This paper is a contribution to the ongoing Tourism Yield Norway project conducted at the Norwegian School of Hotel Management. Data has been obtained of financial performances of businesses within the hospitality and tourism industry in one of Norway’s most tourism-wise developed region – Rogaland. This paper set out to test part ...

  3. Leadership in innovation: life beyond the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Kathryn J

    2009-01-01

    This article describes leadership in innovation opportunities for executive nurse leaders seeking a change from the traditional hospital setting. Concepts of disruptive innovation underlie the challenges in today's healthcare field. Recommendations for nurse leaders include developing a versatile portfolio of experience, establishing collegial partnerships, creating cultures of innovation, and being passionate about innovation to inspire others to a more creative approach to work. Many opportunities are available in healthcare for leaders committed to innovation.

  4. Gauge fields

    CERN Document Server

    Itzykson, C

    1978-01-01

    Some background on the theory of gauge fields, a subject of increasing popularity among particle physicists, is provided. The aim will be to stress those aspects which suggest that gauge fields may play some role in a future theory of strong interactions. (8 refs).

  5. Field Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Louise Lyngfeldt

    2012-01-01

    This field report expresses perfectly the kind of confusion almost all of us experience when entering the field. How do we know whether what we’re doing is “right” or not? What in particular should we record when we don’t have time to write down everything among all the myriad impressions thrusting...

  6. Hospital Prices Increase in California, Especially Among Hospitals in the Largest Multi-hospital Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn A. Melnick PhD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A surge in hospital consolidation is fueling formation of ever larger multi-hospital systems throughout the United States. This article examines hospital prices in California over time with a focus on hospitals in the largest multi-hospital systems. Our data show that hospital prices in California grew substantially (+76% per hospital admission across all hospitals and all services between 2004 and 2013 and that prices at hospitals that are members of the largest, multi-hospital systems grew substantially more (113% than prices paid to all other California hospitals (70%. Prices were similar in both groups at the start of the period (approximately $9200 per admission. By the end of the period, prices at hospitals in the largest systems exceeded prices at other California hospitals by almost $4000 per patient admission. Our study findings are potentially useful to policy makers across the country for several reasons. Our data measure actual prices for a large sample of hospitals over a long period of time in California. California experienced its wave of consolidation much earlier than the rest of the country and as such our findings may provide some insights into what may happen across the United States from hospital consolidation including growth of large, multi-hospital systems now forming in the rest of the rest of the country.

  7. The interstices of hospitality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jane.b

    that mixes ideals of goodness and beauty. What is the ritual of hospitality? It is a scene, in the theatrical sense of the word, with two central actors, whether individual or collective, one considered to be the host and the other the guest, with precise marking points in both time and space. Whether in the home, in the street, ...

  8. Innovations in Hospitality Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhandzhugazova, Elena A.; Blinova, Ekaterina A.; Orlova, Liubov N.; Romanova, Marianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the study of the role and importance of innovation, its classification, the problems of its application in the hotel industry with emphasis on the application of sensory marketing tools in the development of the innovative marketing mix within the hospitality industry. The article provides an analysis of the "seven…

  9. MAIDUGURI TEACHING HOSPITAL.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Surgery, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria. ABSTRACT . Background: Incisional hernias (IH) represent a breakdown or loss of continuity of a fascial closure. They are thus unique as the only external wall hernias that are iatrogenic in aetiology. Incisional hernias are ...

  10. Research in Hospitality Management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has a strong focus on issues which have an immediate practical application – giving the journal relevance to academics as well as industry practitioners. The journal includes articles from ... hospitality industry are welcome. As of 2016, this journal is open access under a Creative Commons Attribution Licence (CC BY 4.0).

  11. QECH general hospital strike

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for by volunteer workers who included; the Red Cross, med- ical and nursing students and their lecturers. The two-week strike at QECH has left an almost indelible mark in as far as tertiary level health care delivery in Malawi is concerned. We report on the conduct of the hospital workers strike and discuss ethical issues in ...

  12. Hospitality and prosumption

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jane.b

    playing slot machines (and other automated gambling games), where the gamblers (consumers) produce their own games, as well as the payouts from those games. In all of these examples, the prosumer produces outcomes, does work, which was formerly done for them. That work was often performed in a hospitable ...

  13. Official Centre Hospitality

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sylvain Dufour

    2016-05-01

    May 1, 2016 ... Application. The Hospitality may be extended under one or more of the following general circumstances to non- employees who are not in receipt of travel allowances from IDRC: • when discussions on official matters or business development take place;. • on the occasion of visits by persons who are ...

  14. Management accounting for hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management accounting for hospitals. Hennan leyenaar. The worldwide trend today is for the health sector to be under siege with increasing patient loads, more complex procedures and ever-rising medical costs. The cost of hospitalisation is the most dominant cost factor. absorbing most of the resources. Managing the ...

  15. Nigerian Hospital Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review of the Aetiology and Complications of Primary Postpartum Haemorrhage following vaginal delivery at University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH), Calabar, Nigeria: A 5-year Review. EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. CI Emechebe, CO Njoku, AN Njoku, ...

  16. Hospitals as food arenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Signe; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2010-01-01

    also identified. Research limitations: The assessment of the dietary changes based on the canteen take-away food was only based on indirect assessments based on interviews with users and non-users and furthermore based on a questionnaire at one of the hospitals. Value/originality: Canteen take...

  17. predictors for hospital admission

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cations were more pronounced in infants yo¡jnger than six months of age, in infants affected by RSV and in infants who had never been breast fed. Acknowledgment. We thank the medical students, the hou: e officers, the residents and the nurses at the pediatric emergency room and the pediatric ward at Assir Central Hospit ...

  18. Siege of Town and Establishment of Field Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Buturovic, Sead

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The degree of material and social development determines the basic characteristics of warfare. There are various causes, means and goals of warfare. From the standpoint of international war law, significant is the division between international and non-international (civil) war. International law of war is a part of public international law and constitutes a set of contractual and legal rules governing the relations between the international recognized subjects in times of armed...

  19. [Leadership in the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Current concepts in leadership and governance on the level of supervisory board, management and departments are often considered as insufficient to cope with the profound structural change which actually takes place in the German health care system. While vertical and horizontal disconnecting is typical of the professional bureaucracy of hospitals, transition from functional to divisional structure further increases this risk. Accordingly, medical experts are oriented towards their professional peers and patient care on the one side; on the other side the management gets isolated and looses operative and strategic control. Several studies provide evidence for the relevance of role models to serve as agents of change, which are now developed into the concept of "Clinical Governance": evidence-based medicine, guidelines, continuous quality improvement, safety culture, resource accountability and organisational learning. The present situation makes it necessary to extend this conception, which focuses on the departmental level in an organisation with divisional features, to one of "Clinical Corporate Governance". This term, which also includes supervisory structures and the management board and is relevant for the total hospital and company, respectively, is based on the corporate governance concept. Inside the hospital, the management and the heads of the departments have to agree that (1) experts really need to be integrated into the decision process, and that (2) the outcomes of the entire hospital have to be regarded as equal or superior to the aims of a single department. The public image of the hospital should be one of a strong and reliable partner in health care and health care business on a local, regional and national level. Members of the supervisory board should clearly put corporate aspects above political and other implications and pay attention to personal independence from the leaders of the medical departments.

  20. [The founding of Zemun Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanović, Jasmina; Milenković, Sanja; Pavlović, Momcilo; Stojanović, Dragos

    2014-01-01

    This year Zemun Hospital--Clinical Hospital Center Zemun celebrates 230th anniversary of continuous work, thus becoming the oldest medical facility in Serbia.The exact date of the hospital founding has been often questioned in history. Various dates appeared in the literature, but the most frequent one was 25th of February 1784. Until now, the document which confirms this has never been published. This article represents the first official publication of the document which confirms that Zemun Hospital was indeed founded on this date. The first hospitals started emerging in Zemun when the town became a part of the Habsburg Monarchy. The first sanitary facility ever formed was the"Kontumac"--a quarantine established in 1730. Soon after, two more confessional hospitals were opened.The Serbian (Orthodox) Hospital was founded before 1769, whereas the German (Catholic) Hospital started working in 1758. Both hospitals were financed, amongst others, by the Town Hall--the Magistrate. In order to improve efficiency of these hospitals, a decision was made to merge them into a single City Hospital. It was founded on 25th February 1784, when the General Command ordered the Magistrate of Zemun to merge the financess of all existing hospitals and initiate the construction of a new building. Although financially united, the hospitals continued working in separate buildings over a certain period of time.The final, physical merging of these hospitals was completed in 1795.

  1. An Evaluation of the Management Information System and Technology in Hospitals (GESITI/Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José Balloni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The research project "Management of System and Information Technology in Hospitals" (GESITI/Hospitals has the purpose of mapping out the management of Information Systems (IS and Information Technology (IT in hospitals. By applying a multifocal prospective questionnaire in hospitals, the research aims to identify the hospitals need and demand, prospecting for unfolding, and generate a public integrated research report for supporting public and/or private decisions-makings. The ultimate result from this GESITI/Health research project should be a significant improvement on the hospital management and on the decisions-makings, which must reflect on peoples more satisfied regarding a better health care. Therefore, this paper aims to publish the main ideas of the GESITI/Health project i.e., its "Methodology & original Prospective Questionnaire (PQ". The methodology used is the Interpretative (or Introspective. About the PQ, we do not known, up to this date, who have developed a multifocal broad field tool -the PQ-, aiming wide hospitals management-. From 2010-16 the "methodology and PQ" have been implemented by about forty -40- universities -and increasing-, from Brazil and Abroad and, forty local research reports were generated. A book, published by the Brazilian Minister of Health [1], presents the results of a pilot project carried out by nineteen -19- out of these forty -40- universities, to know: sixteen Brazilian, one Mexican, one Argentina, one from Slovakia and one from Portugal. The chapter 25 of this book [1.A] presents an integrated research from all nineteen chapters -an integrated research report-. Finally, in the oral presentation, we will briefly present the "Methodology and the PQ" presented in this paper and, also, we will present an integrated comparative analyzes -main results got with the field application of the PQ- regarding the case studies accomplished by the universities from Brazil and Abroad.

  2. Hospitality within hospital meals—Socio-material assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Mikkelsen, Bent E.

    2016-01-01

    Hospital meals and their role in nutritional care have been studied primarily from a life and natural science perspective. This article takes a different approach and explores the idea of hospitality inspired by Jacques Derrida’s work on the ontology of hospitality. By drawing on ethnographic...... and management involved in hospital food service and in nutritional care to work more systematically with the environment for improved hospital meal experiences in the future...... fieldwork in a Danish hospital, hospitality practices were studied using a socio-material assemblage approach. The study showed that rethinking the meal event could change the wards into temporary “pop-up-restaurants,” transcending the hospital context and providing a scene for shifting host...

  3. Field Notes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — This is a mobile application for capturing images , data, and geolocation for USAID projects in the field. The data is then stored on a server in AllNet. The...

  4. Moments of hospitality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise; Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2014-01-01

    reveal how the daily atmosphere could be changed by social activities such as a dancing nurse, or through artefacts such as meatballs or napkins in disruptive micro-events, creating a possibility for different hospitalityscapes manifested in cultural, humorous or social performances. The article suggests...... that a focus on disruptive micro-events might create opportunities for hospitalityscapes and add value to future hospital meal experiences....

  5. Hospital nurses' work motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge surrounding nurses' work motivation is currently insufficient, and previous studies have rarely taken into account the role of many influential background factors. This study investigates the motivation of Estonian nurses in hospitals, and how individual and organisational background factors influence their motivation to work. The study is quantitative and cross-sectional. An electronically self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection. The sample comprised of 201 Registered Nurses working in various hospital settings in Estonia. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test, Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test and Spearman's correlation. Both extrinsic and intrinsic motivations were noted among hospital nurses. Nurses were moderately externally motivated (M = 3.63, SD = 0.89) and intrinsically strongly motivated (M = 4.98, SD = 1.03). A nurses' age and the duration of service were positively correlated with one particular area of extrinsic work motivation, namely introjected regulation (p extrinsic motivation (p = 0.016) and intrinsic work motivation (p = 0.004). The findings expand current knowledge of nurses' work motivation by describing the amount and orientation of work motivation among hospital nurses and highlighting background factors which should be taken into account in order to sustain and increase their intrinsic work motivation. The instrument used in the study can be an effective tool for nurse managers to determine a nurse's reasons to work and to choose a proper motivational strategy. Further research and testing of the instrument in different countries and in different contexts of nursing is however required. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Hospital Presbiteriano Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luckman, Charles

    1964-12-01

    Full Text Available This hospital is built on the circular system. This arrangement has economic and functional advantages. The nurses walk 40 % less distance than in a hospital of similar size, of conventional layout. The rooms are situated along the external perimeter and the beds are orientated towards the corridor, rather than towards the window. However, the patients can see out of doors by turning on their side. The hospital is most carefully fitted out, and is very comfortable. There is air conditioning, and patients can control their own TV sets. There are also curtains separating each bed form the rest, thus providing maximum independence. Warm colours have been adopted in the decoration of rooms facing north, whilst those facing south are painted in cooler tones. The circular design arrangement makes the distribution far more flexible, and it will be easier to include further units later on; by adding small adjustments to the central building. To reduce external noise, and to improve the surrounding landscape, small sand hills have been provided in the garden, and the parking site also serves to partially absorb the noise.Presenta esta solución de unidades circulares numerosas ventajas de tipo económico, ahorra espacio y da eficiencia a la circulación— las enfermeras recorren un 40 por 100 menos de camino que en otro hospital de dimensiones similares—. Las habitaciones están distribuidas a lo largo del perímetro exterior y tienen las camas orientadas hacia los corredores, en lugar de hacia las ventanas, pero de tal modo que los pacientes puedan contemplar el exterior al volverse sobre uno de sus costados. Están cuidadosamente diseñadas y dotadas de las máximas comodidades: aire acondicionado y aparatos de televisión controlados por el paciente; así como cortinas divisorias que le proporcionan el grado de aislamiento deseado.

  7. E-procurement in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Julio Villalobos; Orrit, Joan; Villalobos, Juan Pablo

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the history, current status, advantages of and opposition to the implementation of e-procurement in hospitals and examines the results of its implementation in a psychiatric hospital.

  8. HSIP Hospitals in New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Hospitals in New Mexico The term "hospital" ... means an institution which- (1) is primarily engaged in providing, by or under the supervision of physicians, to...

  9. The general NFP hospital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the past 30 years, there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the proliferation of new forms of health care delivery organizations that challenge and compete with general NFP community hospitals. Traditionally, the health care system in the United States has been dominated by general NFP (NFP) voluntary hospitals. With the number of for-profit general hospitals, physician-owned specialty hospitals, and ambulatory surgical centers increasing, a question arises: “Why is the general NFP community hospital the dominant model?” In order to address this question, this paper reexamines the history of the hospital industry. By understanding how the “general NFP hospital” model emerged and dominated, we attempt to explain the current dominance of general NFP hospitals in the ever changing hospital industry in the United States.

  10. [Volgograd military hospital--70 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V Ia; Alborov, Z Ts

    2012-01-01

    History of the Volgograd military hospital dates back to July 24, 1941, when on the basis of the regional children's bone tuberculosis sanatorium in Krasnodar was transformed into 2150th military hospital consisted of 240 beds. Since May 1944 relocated in the city of Stalingrad became a garrison hospital. Today the hospital is a multidisciplinary health centre of the Russian Defense Ministry. Annually, the hospital performed at least 3000 surgical procedures, including more than 37%--are complex. In surgery, improved endovideosurgical direction, over 31% of emergency operations performed using this method. Since December 2009 the hospital became a structural division of the District Hospital in 1602 in Rostov on Don. The close connection between the branch and district hospital allows for complex diagnostic situations to consult leading experts, including consultation, thus ensuring the most effective treatment results.

  11. Parametric Optimization of Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Malene Kirstine; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Christoffersen, L.D.

    2013-01-01

    Present paper presents a parametric performancebased design model for optimizing hospital design. The design model operates with geometric input parameters defining the functional requirements of the hospital and input parameters in terms of performance objectives defining the design requirements...

  12. Has competition lowered hospital prices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanziger, Jack; Mooney, Cathleen

    2005-01-01

    On Jan. 1, 1997, New York ended its regulation of hospital prices with the intent of using competitive markets to control prices and increase efficiency. This paper uses data that come from annual reports filed by all health maintenance organizations (HMOs) operating in New York and include payments to and usage in the major hospitals in an HMO's network. We estimate the relationship between implied prices and hospital, plan, and market characteristics. The models show that after 1997, hospitals in more competitive markets paid less. Partially offsetting these price reductions were price increases associated with hospital mergers that reduced the competitiveness of the local market. Hospital deregulation was successful, at least in the short run, in using price competition to reduce hospital payments; it is unclear whether this success will be undermined by the structural changes taking place in the hospital industry.

  13. Prognosis after Hospitalization for Erythroderma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Thyssen, Jacob P; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2016-01-01

    Erythrodermic psoriasis (EP) and erythroderma exfoliativa (EE) are acute and potentially life-threatening inflammatory reactions. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) of 3-year mortality following hospitalization for EP or EE compared with general population controls, patients hospitalized for psoria...

  14. How hospitals approach price transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houk, Scott; Cleverley, James O

    2014-09-01

    A survey of finance leaders found that hospitals with lower charges were more likely than other hospitals to emphasize making prices defensible rather than simply transparent. Finance leaders of hospitals with higher charges were more likely to express concern that price transparency would cause a reduction in hospital revenue by forcing them to lower charges. Those respondents said commercial payers likely will have to agree to renegotiate contracts for price transparency to be a financially viable proposition.

  15. [The Vishnevsky Central Military Clinical Hospital N 3 celebrates the 45th anniversary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliakin, S A; Frolkin, M N

    2013-05-01

    The article is dedicated to the history of the Vishnevsky Central Military Clinical Hospital N 3. N.M.Nevskiy, the head of the 2nd Central military clinical hospital n.a. P. V. Mandryka, suggested to groud a military diagnostic and treatment complex in the countryside. It was caused by the exceeding demand for hospitalization for military personnel. The new hospital was built in 4 years and launched on 20 June 1968. The Central military clinical hospital of n.a. P. V.M andryka was transformed to the staff N 27/705 with 925 beds. This staff consisted of main treatment department with 655 beds (Krasnogorsk), branch of the 1st hospital with 120 beds (Moscow), branch of 2nd hospital with 100 beds and sanitary department with 50 beds (Bolshevo, the Moscow Region). In 1970 branch of the 1st 2nd hospitals were excluded from the staff. The name of hospital was changed for "Central clinical military hospital". In 1976 hospital was named after the prominent military surgeon A.A. Vishnevsky. Nowadays hospital is a multi-field medical and preventive treatment facility, one of the highest technological medical centers of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. This hospital provides a qualified medical treatment for servicemen, their families and other categories of employee of the Armed Forces. Hospital consists of 18 specialized centers, 110 diagnostic and treatment departments, 1 outpatient hospital and 6 branches.

  16. The Difficult Empowerment in Danish Hospital: Power to the nurses!?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Flemming; Nielsen, Jørn Flohr

    in Danish public hospitals work in a unique situation that makes the uncritical transfer of empowerment interventions intended to redesign their work difficult or even unfeasible. Analysis from an institutional perspective of the ongoing power struggle between agens of change at several levels in the Danish...... characteristics of public organizations, and the specific attitudes of physicians and politicians and their desire to control the hospital sector. At the same time, this paper also emphasizes that the empowerment concept is likely to appeal to hospital managers and nurses in the Danish public hospital sector......, since it builds on the nursing professions's self-conceptualization and is associated with better organizational performance. Our analysis starts by clarifying the concept of "nursing empowerment", and then applies a field perspective on Danish hospitals in order to identify the forces that may limit...

  17. Tachyonic field interacting with scalar (phantom) field

    OpenAIRE

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Debnath, Ujjal

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  18. Exploring hospitality within hospital meals by means of visual methodologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper reflects the application of visual methodologies adapted in an explorative study on hospitality and hospital meals. It takes point of departure in a multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork placed at a general hospital in 2012. Visual methodologies were applied in multiple ways....... This includes visual methodologies as part of observation and interview strategies. The paper presents and discusses how the application of different visual methodologies can contribute to the construction of ethnographical knowledge on hospitality and hospital meals. Finally ethical considerations as well...

  19. On Hospital Design – Identifying Building Attributes of Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Malene Kirstine; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Christoffersen, Lars D.

    The present paper surveys the input parameters in hospital design and describes them formally as building attributes in preparation for facilitating planning and designing of hospitals with the aim of a more optimal design process. The overview of the hospital functionalities, bonds, logistics...... and needs is based on an approach of understanding the complexity of the hospital functionalities based on capacities, qualities and times beforehand specific department or units are described. This approach attempts to create an overview of the hospital functionalities respecting capacities, qualities...

  20. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  1. Income smoothing by Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boterenbrood, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that hospitals manage their earnings. However, these findings might be influenced by methodological issues. In this study, I exploit specific features of Dutch hospitals to study income smoothing while limiting these methodological issues. The managers of Dutch hospitals have the

  2. Talk Time for Hospitalized Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Mary S.

    1975-01-01

    The Talk Time program, which focuses on discussion and encourages children to share their fears and fantasies of the hospital experience, was started at the University of Illinois hospital. It has proved effective as well in teaching hospital personnel about pediatric patients. (Author)

  3. Hospitality in College Composition Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haswell, Janis; Haswell, Richard; Blalock, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    There has been little discussion of hospitality as a practice in college writing courses. Possible misuses of hospitality as an educational and ethical practice are explored, and three traditional and still tenable modes of hospitality are described and historicized: Homeric, Judeo-Christian, and nomadic. Application of these modes to…

  4. Library Hospitality: Some Preliminary Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric D. M.; Kazmer, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Library scholars and practitioners have frequently reflected on the various factors that in combination make up a hospitable library, but there has been little theoretical synthesis of the notion of the library as a place of hospitality. The hospitality industry provides a rich vein of theoretical material from which to draw definitions of…

  5. Hospitality Studies: Escaping the Tyranny?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashley, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore current strands in hospitality management education and research, and suggest that future programs should reflect a more social science informed content. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews current research in hospitality management education and in the study of hospitality and…

  6. Hospital ventilation standards and energy conservation: chemical contamination of hospital air. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainer, D.; Michaelsen, G.S.

    1980-03-01

    In an era of increasing energy conservation consciousness, a critical reassessment of the validity of hospital ventilation and thermal standards is made. If current standards are found to be excessively conservative, major energy conservation measures could be undertaken by rebalancing and/or modification of current HVAC systems. To establish whether or not reducing ventilation rates would increase airborne chemical contamination to unacceptable levels, a field survey was conducted to develop an inventory and dosage estimates of hospital generated airborne chemical contaminants to which patients, staff, and visitors are exposed. The results of the study are presented. Emphasis is on patient exposure, but an examination of occupational exposure was also made. An in-depth assessment of the laboratory air environment is documented. Housekeeping products used in survey hospitals, hazardous properties of housekeeping chemicals and probable product composition are discussed in the appendices.

  7. Nursing magnet hospitals have better CMS hospital compare ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been conflicting data on whether Nursing Magnet Hospitals (NMH provide better care. Methods: NMH in the Southwest USA (Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Nevada, and New Mexico were compared to hospitals not designated as NMH using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS hospital compare star designation. Results: NMH had higher star ratings than non-NMH hospitals (3.34 + 0.78 vs. 2.86 + 0.83, p<0.001. The hospitals were mostly large, urban non-critical access hospitals. Academic medical centers made up a disproportionately large portion of the NMH. Conclusions: Although NMH had higher hospital ratings, the data may favor non-critical access academic medical centers which are known to have better outcomes.

  8. Topological fields

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, S

    1989-01-01

    Aimed at those acquainted with basic point-set topology and algebra, this text goes up to the frontiers of current research in topological fields (more precisely, topological rings that algebraically are fields).The reader is given enough background to tackle the current literature without undue additional preparation. Many results not in the text (and many illustrations by example of theorems in the text) are included among the exercises. Sufficient hints for the solution of the exercises are offered so that solving them does not become a major research effort for the reader. A comprehensive bibliography completes the volume.

  9. Field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Roman, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Intended for graduate courses or for independent study, this book presents the basic theory of fields. The first part begins with a discussion of polynomials over a ring, the division algorithm, irreducibility, field extensions, and embeddings. The second part is devoted to Galois theory. The third part of the book treats the theory of binomials. The book concludes with a chapter on families of binomials - the Kummer theory. This new edition has been completely rewritten in order to improve the pedagogy and to make the text more accessible to graduate students.  The exercises have also been im

  10. The First Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt International Scientific Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S

    2009-10-01

    A wide gathering of scientists, clinicians, pharmacists and nurses specialized in pediatric oncology practice met to celebrate the second anniversary of Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt (CCHE). The celebration was in the form of high-brow teaching lectures and reports presented by international experts in the fields of pediatric CNS tumors, solid tumors (neuroblastoma, nephroblastoma, soft tissue and bone tumors, lymphoma, leukemia and pediatric oncology nursing. The conference extends its activities to hospital management, clinical pharmacy and telemedicine. Furthermore, CCHE experts presented the efforts performed to establish a state-of-the-art pediatric oncology hospital equipped with all needed facilities to raise the standard of care to the highest levels.

  11. Field Note

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field Note. First Observation of the Slow Dragonet Callionymus aagilis Fricke,. 1999 in Its Natural Environment. M. Pinault1,2, A. Daydé3, R. Fricke4. 1USR 3278 CNRS-EPHE, CRIOBE & CBETM, University of Perpignan. 66860 Perpignan, France; 2Laboratory of Marine Ecology (ECOMAR), University of Reunion Island, ...

  12. Field Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrone, Edward G.; Montalto, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of athletic fields has increased in today's society because of the popularity of sporting events. As a result, education administrators face challenges when dealing with their athletic facilities. Decisionmakers constantly are being second-guessed in regard to outdated, overused facilities and lack of budget. In this article, the…

  13. Hospital readmission for bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Alex R; Kennedy, Emily J; Dechert, Ronald E; Saint, Sanjay

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the rate and risk factors for hospital readmission after inpatient treatment for bronchiolitis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study from 2000 to 2002. The readmission rate within 30 days was 3.7% (95% Confidence Interval: 2.1%-6.0%). Readmission was not associated with age, prematurity, respiratory syncytial virus status, receipt of intensive care, or the observation period off supplemental oxygen. Those who required supplemental oxygen had a lower risk of readmission. Identifying children at risk for readmission is challenging. Children who did not require supplemental oxygen may be at greater risk because they are progressing in their illness.

  14. VARIATION IN DURATION OF HOSPITAL STAY BETWEEN HOSPITALS AND BETWEEN DOCTORS WITHIN HOSPITALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WESTERT, GP; NIEBOER, AP; GROENEWEGEN, PP

    Whether one examines the average length of hospital stay at the level of geographic areas, at the level of hospitals, or at the level of doctors, length-of-stay figures are known to vary widely. Even for hospital admissions for comparable surgical procedures among comparable groups of patients,

  15. Variation in duration of hospital stay between hospitals and between doctors within hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westert, Gert P.; Nieboer, Anna P.; Westert, G.P.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    1993-01-01

    Whether one examines the average length of hospital stay at the level of geographic areas, at the level of hospitals, or at the level of doctors, length-of-stay figures are known to vary widely. Even for hospital admissions for comparable surgical procedures among comparable groups of patients,

  16. Variation in duration in hospital stay between hospitals and between doctors within hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westert, G.P.; Nieboer, A.P.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    1993-01-01

    Whether one examines the average length of hospital stay at the level of geographic areas, at the level of hospitals, or at the level of doctors, length-of-stay figures are known to vary widely. Even for hospital admissions for comparable surgical procedures among comparable groups of patients,

  17. [Success factors in hospital management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberer, M

    1998-12-01

    The hospital environment of most Western countries is currently undergoing dramatic changes. Competition among hospitals is increasing, and economic issues have become decisive factors for the allocation of medical care. Hospitals therefore require management tools to respond to these changes adequately. The balanced scorecard is a method of enabling development and implementation of a business strategy that equally respects the financial requirements, the needs of the customers, process development, and organizational learning. This method was used to derive generally valid success factors for hospital management based on an analysis of an academic hospital in Switzerland. Strategic management, the focus of medical services, customer orientation, and integration of professional groups across the hospital value chain were identified as success factors for hospital management.

  18. Hospitalizations among Danish SLE patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, R W; Kay, S D; Voss, A

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence, duration and cause of hospitalization in a cohort of Danish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In addition, we investigated risk factors for admission and prolonged hospital stay. Methods A total of 155 SLE patients from a population-based cohort...... of 101 of the 155 SLE patients (65%) had one or more hospitalization during the study period. The incidence rate of all hospitalizations was 0.50 per year. Leading causes of admission were complications to SLE or its treatment, but infections were also common. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.4 ± 10.......5 days, and SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) on admission emerged as a risk factor for prolonged hospital stay. Conclusion Danish SLE patients experience frequent admissions to hospital. Complications to SLE or its treatment, as well as infections, are leading causes of admission. High SLEDAI...

  19. Hospitals - HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN: Hospitals and Clinics in Indiana, Derived from HAZUS (Federal Emergency Management Agency, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN is a point shapefile that shows locations of hospitals and clinics in Indiana. HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN was derived from the shapefile named "HOSPITAL."...

  20. Hospital gets IAQ checkup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, K.E. (HDR, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Wozniak, A.L. (Pure Air Control Services, Inc., Clearwater, FL (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Findings and remediation efforts performed over the past year in a large hospital are presented. Recommended practice in new design and retrofit to reduce the potential for microbial growth in HVAC systems in discussed. The request for a building health check at a large, central Florida hospital was prompted by concern for the welfare of employees and patients. This facility consists of approximately 830,000 sq ft of building with 985 patient beds and was constructed over the past 40 years with a diversity of mechanical systems ranging from fan-coils to multizone air handlers to dual-duct built up air handlers serving over 100,000 sq ft. All air distribution systems are served by a chilled-water and hot-water four-pipe system from a central chiller/boiler plant. Air filtration systems range from 20 percent throwaway panel filters to 40 percent prefilters and 95 percent final air handler filters. Outside air quantities range from 25 cfm per person to 100 percent outside air once-through systems.

  1. [A survey on diet manuals in Italian hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, L M; Riti, M; Castellaneta, E; Ceccarelli, P; Civale, C; Passaretti, S; del Balzo, V; Cannella, C

    2009-01-01

    Hospital catering is very important to counteract the onset of malnutrition due to either undernutrition or overnutrition and for dietetic treatment. The aim of the study was to evaluate nutritional quality of the hospital dietetic manual used in some Italian hospitals and to analyze the role of the institutional Catering Service and of the Department of Clinical Nutrition. A survey has been carried out, in some Italian hospitals, using a questionnaire to point out the characteristics of hospitals, the typology of catering service, of the diets and of the staff of the Department of Clinical Nutrition. Only 22% of the hospitals has answered; three Italian regions (Umbria, Molise, Basilicata) are completely missing; -each hospital has a specific dietetic manual in most cases completely different from structure and nutritional quality point of view; the staff acting in this field is absolutely insufficient in term of numerousness and of professional typologies. Hospital in-patients are not homogeneous as for age, dietary needs and diseases, so it's necessary to treat them with an ad hoc nutritional intervention not established in advance in a dietetic manual; if from an organisation point of view it is necessary to have such a dietetic manual, it has to be based on nutritional guidelines and recommended dietary allowances.

  2. Field theory

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-11-08

    In these lectures I will build up the concept of field theory using the language of Feynman diagrams. As a starting point, field theory in zero spacetime dimensions is used as a vehicle to develop all the necessary techniques: path integral, Feynman diagrams, Schwinger-Dyson equations, asymptotic series, effective action, renormalization etc. The theory is then extended to more dimensions, with emphasis on the combinatorial aspects of the diagrams rather than their particular mathematical structure. The concept of unitarity is used to, finally, arrive at the various Feynman rules in an actual, four-dimensional theory. The concept of gauge-invariance is developed, and the structure of a non-abelian gauge theory is discussed, again on the level of Feynman diagrams and Feynman rules.

  3. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department.

  4. Field Centipedes

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Palacios-Huerta; Oscar Volij

    2009-01-01

    In the centipede game, all standard equilibrium concepts dictate that the player who decides first must stop the game immediately. There is vast experimental evidence, however, that this rarely occurs. We first conduct a field experiment in which highly ranked chess players play this game. Contrary to previous evidence, our results show that69 percent of chess players stop immediately. When we restrict attention to Grandmasters, this percentage escalates to 100 percent. We then conduct a labo...

  5. Implementing medical teaching policy in university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Bolhuis, Sanneke; de Visser, Marieke; Laan, Roland F J M

    2017-10-01

    Within the unique and complex settings of university hospitals, it is difficult to implement policy initiatives aimed at developing careers in and improving the quality of academic medical teaching because of the competing domains of medical research and patient care. Factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives have remained underexplored. Knowledge of these factors is needed to develop theory on the successful implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals. To explore factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives and to develop a conceptual model for implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals. We used the grounded theory methodology. We applied constant comparative analysis to qualitative data obtained from 12 semi-structured interviews conducted at the Radboud University Medical Center. We used a constructivist approach, in which data and theories are co-created through interaction between the researcher and the field and its participants. We constructed a model for the implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals, including five factors that were perceived to promote or inhibit faculty in a university hospital to make use of teaching policy incentives: Executive Board Strategy, Departmental Strategy, Departmental Structure, Departmental Culture, and Individual Strategy. Most factors we found to affect individual teachers' strategies and their use of medical teaching policy lie at the departmental level. If an individual teacher's strategy is focused on medical teaching and a medical teaching career, and the departmental context offers support and opportunity for his/her development, this promotes faculty's use of teaching policy incentives.

  6. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-12-29

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  7. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Meernik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121 to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62% completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  8. Kenyatta National Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Cancer of the Cervix cases and insertion of intracavitary after loading system applicators. The current equipment and facilities are adequate for the patient load at KNH. The machines treat. 100-150 fields daily from 7.00 am. — 7.00 pm. in two shifts. Machine maintenance is currently adequate. A large number of patients ...

  9. Breath of hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škof, Lenart

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we outline the possibilities of an ethic of care based on our self-affection and subjectivity in the ethical spaces between-two. In this we first refer to three Irigarayan concepts - breath, silence and listening from the third phase of her philosophy, and discuss them within the methodological framework of an ethics of intersubjectivity and interiority. Together with attentiveness, we analyse them as four categories of our ethical becoming. Furthermore, we argue that self-affection is based on our inchoate receptivity for the needs of the other(s) and is thus dialectical in its character. In this we critically confront some epistemological views of our ethical becoming. We wind up this paper with a proposal for an ethics towards two autonomous subjects, based on care and our shared ethical becoming - both as signs of our deepest hospitality towards the other.

  10. Organizing for the Collaborative Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Hasle, Peter; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    2016-01-01

    To meet demands for high quality and efficient care, hospitals increasingly organize horizontally around standardized processes (like lean and care pathways) and/or set-up formal structural arrangements such as using performance boards, having daily huddles or assigning specific roles. This trend...... highlights a management paradox that calls for balancing a both/and approach to bureaucratization and collaboration in hospitals. Through a qualitative multiple, embedded case study of four hospitals, the paper investigates how standardized processes and structural arrangements—instances of organizational...... design—facilitate collaboration in hospitals. This is important as the literature on formal organization is disconnected from the informal aspects of the organization, thereby limiting the understanding of how hospitals function. Findings suggest that hospitals use many different types of organizational...

  11. The economics of specialty hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, John E; Miller, Thomas R; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Morrisey, Michael A; Zelner, Bennet A; Pengxiang Li

    2008-10-01

    Specialty hospitals, particularly those specializing in surgery and owned by physicians, have generated a relatively high degree of policy attention over the past several years. The main focus of policy debates has been in two areas: the extent to which specialty hospitals might compete unfairly with incumbent general hospitals and the extent to which physician ownership might be associated with higher usage. Largely absent from the debates, however, has been a discussion of the basic economic model of specialty hospitals. This article reviews existing literature, reports, and findings from site visits to explore the economic rationale for specialty hospitals. The discussion focuses on six factors associated with specialization: consumer demand, procedural operating margins, clinical efficiencies, procedural economies of scale, economies (and diseconomies) of scope, and competencies and learning. A better understanding of the economics of specialization will help policy makers evaluate the full spectrum of advantages and disadvantages of specialty hospitals.

  12. Does outsourcing affect hospital profitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danvers, Kreag; Nikolov, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Organizations outsource non-core service functions to achieve cost reductions and strategic benefits, both of which can impact profitability performance. This article examines relations between managerial outsourcing decisions and profitability for a multi-state sample of non-profit hospitals, across 16 states and four regions of the United States. Overall regression results indicate that outsourcing does not necessarily improve hospital profitability. In addition, we identify no profitability impact from outsourcing for urban hospitals, but somewhat positive effects for teaching hospitals. Our regional analysis suggests that hospitals located in the Midwest maintain positive profitability effects with outsourcing, but those located in the South realize negative effects. These findings have implications for cost reduction efforts and the financial viability of non-profit hospitals.

  13. Union Density and Hospital Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koys, Daniel J; Martin, Wm Marty; LaVan, Helen; Katz, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The authors address the hospital outcomes of patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income per bed. They define union density as the percentage of a hospital's employees who are in unions, healthcare quality as its 30-day acute myocardial infraction (AMI; heart attack) mortality rate, and patient satisfaction as its overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems score. Using a random sample of 84 union and 84 nonunion hospitals from across the United States, multiple regression analyses show that union density is negatively related to patient satisfaction. Union density is not related to healthcare quality as measured by the AMI mortality rate or to net income per bed. This implies that unions per se are not good or bad for hospitals. The authors suggest that it is better for hospital administrators to take a Balanced Scorecard approach and be concerned about employee satisfaction, patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income.

  14. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    OpenAIRE

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associa...

  15. Standards for hospital libraries 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Gluck, Jeannine Cyr; Hassig, Robin Ackley; Balogh, Leeni; Bandy, Margaret; Doyle, Jacqueline Donaldson; Kronenfeld, Michael R.; Lindner, Katherine Lois; Murray, Kathleen; Petersen, Joan; Rand, Debra C.

    2002-01-01

    The Medical Library Association's “Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002” have been developed as a guide for hospital administrators, librarians, and accrediting bodies to ensure that hospitals have the resources and services to effectively meet their needs for knowledge-based information. Specific requirements for knowledge-based information include that the library be a separate department with its own budget. Knowledge-based information in the library should be directed by a qualified libr...

  16. Has competition increased hospital technical efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keon-Hyung; Park, Jungwon; Lim, Seunghoo; Park, Sang-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Hospital competition and managed care have affected the hospital industry in various ways including technical efficiency. Hospital efficiency has become an important topic, and it is important to properly measure hospital efficiency in order to evaluate the impact of policies on the hospital industry. The primary independent variable is hospital competition. By using the 2001-2004 inpatient discharge data from Florida, we calculate the degree of hospital competition in Florida for 4 years. Hospital efficiency scores are developed using the Data Envelopment Analysis and by using the selected input and output variables from the American Hospital Association's Annual Survey of Hospitals for those acute care general hospitals in Florida. By using the hospital efficiency score as a dependent variable, we analyze the effects of hospital competition on hospital efficiency from 2001 to 2004 and find that when a hospital was located in a less competitive market in 2003, its technical efficiency score was lower than those in a more competitive market.

  17. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    OpenAIRE

    Clare Meernik; Baker, Hannah M.; Karina Paci; Isaiah Fischer-Brown; Daniel Dunlap; Goldstein, Adam O.

    2015-01-01

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess w...

  18. The main indicators for Iranian hospital ethical accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENJOO, SEYED ALI; AMINI, MITRA; TABEI, SEYED ZIAADIN; MAHBUDI, ALI; KAVOSI, ZAHRA; SABER, MAHBOOBEH

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The application of organizational ethics in hospitals is one of the novel ways to improve medical ethics. Nowadays achieving efficient and sufficient ethical hospital indicators seems to be inevitable. In this connection, the present study aims to determine the best indicators in hospital accreditation. Methods 69 indicators in 11 fields to evaluate hospital ethics were achieved through a five-step qualitative and quantitative study including literature review, expert focus group, Likert scale survey, 3 rounded Delphi, and content validity measurement. Expert focus group meeting was conducted, employing Nominal Group Technique (NGT). After running NGT, a three rounded Delphi and parallel to Delphi and a Likert scale survey were performed to obtain objective indicators for each domain. The experts were all healthcare professionals who were also medical ethics researchers, teachers, or PhD students. Content validity measurements were computed, using the viewpoints of two different expert groups, some ethicists, and some health care professionals (n=46). Results After conducting NGT, Delphi, Likert survey, 11 main domains were listed including:  Informed consent, Medical confidentiality, Physician-patient economic relations, Ethics consultation policy in the hospital, Ethical charter of hospital, Breaking bad medical news protocol, Respect for the patients’ rights, Clinical ethics committee, Spiritual and palliative care unit programs in the hospitals, Healthcare professionals’ communication skills, and Equitable access to the healthcare. Also 71 objective indicators for these 11 domains were listed in 11 tables with 5 to 8 indicators per table. Content Validity Ratio (CVR) measurements were done and 69 indicators were highlighted. Conclusion The domains listed in this study seem to be the most important ones for evaluating hospital ethics programs and services. Healthcare organizations’ accreditation and ranking are crucial for the improvement of

  19. An examination of competition and efficiency for hospital industry in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgen Narcı, Hacer; Ozcan, Yasar A; Şahin, İsmet; Tarcan, Menderes; Narcı, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    The two particular reforms that have been undertaken under the Health Transformation Program in Turkey are enhancing efficiency and increasing competition. However, there is a lack of information about the relationship between competition and hospital efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of competition on technical efficiency for the hospital industry in Turkey. The target population included all public and private general hospitals that were open in 2010 in Turkey (n = 1,224). From these, 1,103 hospitals met the selection criteria and were included in the study. Data were obtained from the Turkish Statistical Institute, the Ministry of Health, and through a field survey. Technical efficiency of hospitals was estimated using Data Envelopment Analysis with five outputs and five inputs. The intensity of competition among hospitals was measured by objective and subjective measures. Objective competition was measured using the Hirschman-Herfindahl Index, and subjective competition was measured based on the perceptions of top level hospital managers. Multivariate Tobit regression was used to investigate the relationship between competition and efficiency while controlling the effects of demand and supply characteristics of the market and the hospital traits. Efficiency results showed that 17% of hospitals were technically efficient. Regression analyses portrayed that the degree of competition among general hospitals did not have a statistically significant relationship with hospitals' technical efficiency. To conclude, hospital efficiency in Turkey does not seem to be affected by the intensity of competition among hospitals.

  20. Pediatric out-of-hospital deaths following hospital discharge: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative interviews and univariate logistic regression were conducted to determine predictors of out-of-hospital deaths. Results: Of 1,242 children discharged, 61 died during the six month post-discharge period, with most (n=40, 66%) dying outside of a hospital. Incremental increases in maternal education were ...

  1. Hospital benchmarking: are U.S. eye hospitals ready?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korne, Dirk F.; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D. H.; Sol, Kees J. C. A.; Betz, Robert; Thomas, Richard C.; Schein, Oliver D.; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2012-01-01

    Benchmarking is increasingly considered a useful management instrument to improve quality in health care, but little is known about its applicability in hospital settings. The aims of this study were to assess the applicability of a benchmarking project in U.S. eye hospitals and compare the results

  2. International travel as medical research: architecture and the modern hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cameron; Willis, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The design and development of the modern hospital in Australia had a profound impact on medical practice and research at a variety of levels. Between the late 1920s and the 1950s hospital architects, administrators, and politicians travelled widely in order to review the latest international developments in the hospital field They were motivated by Australia's geographic isolation and a growing concern with how to govern the population at the level of physical health. While not 'medical research' in the conventional sense of the term, this travel was a powerful generator of medical thinking in Australia and has left a rich archival legacy. This paper draws on that archive to demonstrate the ways in which architectural research and international networks of hospital specialists profoundly shaped the provision of medical infrastructure in Australia.

  3. Steering patients to safer hospitals? The effect of a tiered hospital network on hospital admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Lindrooth, Richard C; Christianson, Jon B

    2008-10-01

    To determine if a tiered hospital benefit and safety incentive shifted the distribution of admissions toward safer hospitals. A large manufacturing company instituted the hospital safety incentive (HSI) for union employees. The HSI gave union patients a financial incentive to choose hospitals that met the Leapfrog Group's three patient safety "leaps." The analysis merges data from four sources: claims and enrollment data from the company, the American Hospital Association, the AHRQ HCUP-SID, and a state Office of the Insurance Commissioner. Changes in hospital admissions' patterns for union and nonunion employees using a difference-in-difference design. We estimate the probability of choosing a specific hospital from a set of available alternatives using conditional logistic regression. Patients affiliated with the engineers' union and admitted for a medical diagnosis were 2.92 times more likely to select a hospital designated as safer in the postperiod than in the preperiod, while salaried nonunion (SNU) patients (not subject to the financial incentive) were 0.64 times as likely to choose a compliant hospital in the post- versus preperiod. The difference-in-difference estimate, which is based on the predictions of the conditional logit model, is 0.20. However, the machinists' union was also exposed to the incentive and they were no more likely to choose a safer hospital than the SNU patients. The incentive did not have an effect on patients admitted for a surgical diagnosis, regardless of union status. All patients were averse to travel time, but those union patients selecting an incentive hospital were less averse to travel time. Patient price incentives and quality/safety information may influence hospital selection decisions, particularly for medical admissions, though the optimal incentive level for financial return to the plan sponsor is not clear.

  4. Looking at hospitalized persons throughout the prism of the handicap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giral, M; Boussat, B; Lombard, F; Stempfle, S; François, P; Pérennou, D

    2018-01-01

    To describe the disability status of non-selected hospitalized persons. We conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess activity limitations of every person older than 18 years hospitalized in a regional university hospital covering all medical fields. Evaluators rated, on a scale from 0 to 4, 22 selected items of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), covering the 6 following domains: learning and applying knowledge, general tasks and demands, communication, mobility, self-care, and interpersonal interactions and relationships. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to analyze the prevalence, severity and profile of the handicap in terms of sociodemographic characteristics and care pathways. Among 1572 eligible persons, 1267 (81%) were surveyed (mean age 62.7±20.4years; 655 males [51.7%]). Overall, 82% showed at least one activity limitation. For 52%, disability was severe or total for at least one ICF item. Prevalence of disabilities was higher for mobility (75%) and self-care domains (63%). Disability was strongly related to age: age older than 80years versus 18 to 44years (OR=12.8 95% CI 6.4-27.9]; PHandicap was common in hospitalized persons, involving all 6 tested ICF activity domains, particularly mobility and self-care. This study alerts care givers, hospital administrators, and in general, people influencing health policies about the need to plan actions to reduce activity limitations of hospitalized persons, whatever the cause of the hospitalization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The American General Hospital as a Complex Social System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Basil S.; Matejko, Aleksander

    1967-01-01

    Based on data from and about the medical, nursing, and administrative staffs in a probability sample of general hospitals, involving 41 institutions and some 2,400 respondents, certain aspects of the hospital social system are examined in each of the following basic problem-areas: organizational and member goal attainment; availability and allocation of organizational resources; organizational coordination; social integration; intraorganizational strain; and organizational adaptation. These areas are examined separately and in relation to one another, as a basis for understanding and assessing the overall effectiveness of the hospital as a complex social organization. Hospital effectiveness is viewed in the context of open system theory, as a joint function of the relative success with which the organization handles its problems in these key areas. Findings concerning a number of social-psychological variables in each area are presented and discussed, with emphasis on the interdependence of the areas and on organizational issues and implications. The results show some of the basic strengths and weaknesses of the system. Important differences associated with hospital size and affiliation are also discussed to illustrate the typical profile of the American general hospital and significant variations from it. Similarly, differences among the principal groups in the system are presented, where appropriate. Finally, promising directions for future organizational research in the hospital field are briefly presented.

  6. An Occupational Interest Survey for Hospitality Management Positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS.

    As part of a study sponsored by the National Food Brokers Association, a survey of Johnson County Community College (JCCC) students was conducted to determine their perceptions of hospitality management and the factors that might deter them from choosing careers in that field. The survey instrument, distributed in the college commons by members of…

  7. "Folk" Understandings of Quality in UK Higher Hospitality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the evolution of "folk" understandings of quality in higher hospitality education and the consequent implications of these understandings for current quality concerns in the field. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines a historical survey of the stated topic…

  8. [Types of and reasons for violence in hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grand-Sébille, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Patients' adherence to care has been built up over time. Violence is however an underlying reality in the field of care. Acts of violence are not only physical and relational. They can also be linked to the constant focus on costs and assessment which conveys a mutation of the references of the hospital sector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Hospitality, peace and conflict : 'Doing fieldwork' in Palestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the interconnections among in/hospitality, peace, conflict and tourism. Using excerpts from interview notes and a field diary, the paper presents and debates the complex and embodied connections between a Palestinian local host, some tourists and a tourism researcher.

  10. DRUG EXPECTATIONS AND DRUG CHOICES OF HOSPITAL PHYSICIANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENIG, P; HAAIJER-RUSKAMP, FM; WESSELING, H

    Objectives. To assess whether differences in drug choices of hospital physicians are related to differences in the underlying decision-making process. Design. A survey study was conducted addressing drug choices in six therapeutic fields with existing interprescriber variations; prescribers and

  11. [Infection control in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeyuki

    2010-01-01

    Infection control committee as the central decision-making and infection control team (ICT) for carrying out all aspects of infection control are important for hospital infection control. Standard precautions are used for all patients and apply to all body fluids except for sweat, whether or not they contain visible blood. Transmission-based precautions involve airborne, droplet, contact vector-borne and common vehicle precautions. Airborne precautions are for tuberculosis, varicella and measles. Small particles (precautions are for influenza, rubella, pertussis, and so on. Transmission via large droplet (transmissions are for blood-borne pathogens, such as hepatitis B and C virus and HIV, bacterial infections via percutaneous and mucocutaneous exposure, and so on. Vaccinations for measles, rubella, varicella, mumps, influenza and hepatitis B virus to health-care workers are important. Influenza virus is mainly transmitted via droplet and contact, but also via airborne transmission in the aerosol-generating procedures such as intubation and suctioning. WHO declared a public health emergency in April 2009. A novel influenza has spread rapidly across the globe, and it will be necessary to prepare for the outbreak in this autumn and winter.

  12. Two Belgian University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huylebrouck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bevacizumab (BEV, a humanized immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody that inhibits VEGF has demonstrated activity against recurrent high-grade gliomas (HGG in phase II clinical trials. Patients and Methods. Data were collected from patients with recurrent HGG who initiated treatment with BEV outside a clinical trial protocol at two Belgian university hospitals. Results. 19 patients (11 M/8 F were administered a total of 138 cycles of BEV (median 4, range 1–31. Tumor response assessment by MRI was available for 15 patients; 2 complete responses and 3 partial responses for an objective response rate of 26% for the intent to treat population were observed on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images; significant regressions on T2/FLAIR were documented in 10 out of 15 patients (67%. A reduced uptake on PET was documented in 3 out of 4 evaluable patients. The six-month progression-free survival was 21% (95% CI 2.7–39.5. Two patients had an ongoing tumor response and remained free from progression after 12 months of BEV treatment. Conclusions. The activity and tolerability of BEV were comparable to results from previous prospective phase II trials. Reduced uptake on PET suggests a metabolic response in addition to an antiangiogenic effect in some cases with favorable clinical outcome.

  13. Neuropsychological Counseling in Hospital Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul C.

    1992-01-01

    Explores integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology in hospital setting. Sees example of such interchange occurring in rehabilitation unit or hospital where psychologist has responsibilities for helping patients, families, and staff to understand implications of central nervous system dysfunction and to adapt to changes. Discusses…

  14. Hospital life: avoiding negative attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, A

    1979-11-30

    The population of Milton Keynes continues to grow and with it the need for more facilities in its recently opened community hospital. But how can the hospital cope now that Buckinghamshire AHA has put staff replacements under an embargo? Alison Hyde finds out how the staff are facing up to disappointed hopes, delayed plans and an establishment level which is one third under target.

  15. The Cradle of American Hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford Hudson, Ph.D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An astonishing array of firsts and near firsts in the history of the modern hospitality sector have occurred in and around Boston, and some of the oldest surviving hospitality businesses in the United States may be found in the area today. This article explores the evolution of hotels and restaurants in Boston from 1633 to the present.

  16. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  17. Do hospital mergers reduce costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Matt

    2017-03-01

    Proponents of hospital consolidation claim that mergers lead to significant cost savings, but there is little systematic evidence backing these claims. For a large sample of hospital mergers between 2000 and 2010, I estimate difference-in-differences models that compare cost trends at acquired hospitals to cost trends at hospitals whose ownership did not change. I find evidence of economically and statistically significant cost reductions at acquired hospitals. On average, acquired hospitals realize cost savings between 4 and 7 percent in the years following the acquisition. These results are robust to a variety of different control strategies, and do not appear to be easily explained by post-merger changes in service and/or patient mix. I then explore several extensions of the results to examine (a) whether the acquiring hospital/system realizes cost savings post-merger and (b) if cost savings depend on the size of the acquirer and/or the geographic overlap of the merging hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Practicing Hospitality in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Rebecca; Huyser, Mackenzi

    2013-01-01

    This article explores pedagogical approaches to teaching students how to practice hospitality toward the other. Using case examples from the college classroom, the authors discuss the roots of Christian hospitality and educational theory on transformative learning to explore how students experience engaging with others after they have…

  19. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  20. Research in Hospitality Management: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Original research papers, substantive topic reviews, viewpoints and short communications that make an original contribution to the understanding of hospitality and hospitality management in a global context will be considered for publication in the Journal. Submissions should be e-mailed to the ...

  1. The Cradle of American Hospitality

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford Hudson, Ph.D.

    2012-01-01

    An astonishing array of firsts and near firsts in the history of the modern hospitality sector have occurred in and around Boston, and some of the oldest surviving hospitality businesses in the United States may be found in the area today. This article explores the evolution of hotels and restaurants in Boston from 1633 to the present.

  2. Designing a modern hospital pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, B G; Boyar, R L; Raspante, P S

    1986-02-01

    Cooperation between the pharmacy director and the hospital's architects in planning a modern hospital pharmacy is described. The pharmacy director at an 870-bed voluntary nonprofit institution and the hospital's architects planned the design for a new 3250-square foot pharmacy department. They developed a preliminary floor plan based on the following functions that the pharmacy would perform: centralized unit dose drug distribution; compounding; bulk and unit dose prepackaging; preparation of sterile products; controlled substance storage; outpatient and employee prescription dispensing; reserve stock storage; purchasing, receiving, and inventory control; drug information services; and administrative services. A final floor plan was designed that incorporated these functions with structural and utility requirements, such as placement of the computer system and dispensing and lighting fixtures. By integrating modern material management concepts with contemporary hospital pharmacy practice, the pharmacy director and the hospital's architects were able to plan and construct a pharmacy that receives, processes, and dispenses medication efficiently.

  3. Hospitals: Soft Target for Terrorism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cauwer, Harald; Somville, Francis; Sabbe, Marc; Mortelmans, Luc J

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the world has been rocked repeatedly by terrorist attacks. Arguably, the most remarkable were: the series of four coordinated suicide plane attacks on September 11, 2001 on buildings in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, USA; and the recent series of two coordinated attacks in Brussels (Belgium), on March 22, 2016, involving two bombings at the departure hall of Brussels International Airport and a bombing at Maalbeek Metro Station located near the European Commission headquarters in the center of Brussels. This statement paper deals with different aspects of hospital policy and disaster response planning that interface with terrorism. Research shows that the availability of necessary equipment and facilities (eg, personal protective clothing, decontamination rooms, antidotes, and anti-viral drugs) in hospitals clearly is insufficient. Emergency teams are insufficiently prepared: adequate and repetitive training remain necessary. Unfortunately, there are many examples of health care workers and physicians or hospitals being targeted in both political or religious conflicts and wars. Many health workers were kidnapped and/or killed by insurgents of various ideology. Attacks on hospitals also could cause long-term effects: hospital units could be unavailable for a long time and replacing staff could take several months, further compounding hospital operations. Both physical and psychological (eg, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) after-effects of a terrorist attack can be detrimental to health care services. On the other hand, physicians and other hospital employees have shown to be involved in terrorism. As data show that some offenders had a previous history with the location of the terror incident, the possibility of hospitals or other health care services being targeted by insiders is discussed. The purpose of this report was to consider how past terrorist incidents can inform current hospital preparedness and disaster response planning

  4. General Considerations on Leadership in the Hospitality Industry. Conceptual Analysis and Practical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Andreia ISPAS

    2010-01-01

    Leadership in the hospitality industry is still an open research field especially in describing the effects of leadership style on hotel employees. The purpose of the paper is to present and analyze the following concepts: leadership and leadership style, hospitality industry; the practical aspects of leadership in the hospitality industry and to identify relevant studies regarding the importance of leadership styles applied in this industry. The research methodology consists of analyzing the...

  5. The Value of Assessment and Accreditation for Hospitality and Tourism Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Richard D., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Graduate education in hospitality is a growing field with a number of different approaches and philosophies which inform the decisions and directions put forth by program administrators. A case study explains the methods and justifications used by one institution to conduct a self assessment to assure high quality graduate hospitality education.…

  6. Designing and Delivering an English for Hospitality Syllabus: A Taiwanese Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shao-Wen

    2009-01-01

    The paper illustrates an English for Specific Purposes design for English listening and speaking for students in hospitality fields, accompanied by an educational inquiry into its implementation in a bid to hold accountability to the course takers. The subject was 82 juniors and seniors at a national hospitality college in Southern Taiwan.…

  7. The interstices of hospitality | Camargo | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. [Hospital hygiene - clothing in hospitals: protection for staff and patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2008-03-01

    Hospital clothing worn by medical personnel in German hospitals can be divided into two groups, work clothing and protective clothing. Work clothing is not changed between patient visits and hence is no measure of infection control. Its function is to protect private clothing and to identify medical personnel. Protective clothing on the other hand should protect staff and patients from nosocomial infections. It has to be changed between patient visits and is especially recommended with invasive procedures and immunocompromised patients.

  9. Happy crisis tests hospitals' PR plan. Septuplets' arrival swamps Iowa hospitals with national, international media. Blank Children's Hospital, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The public relations staff believed the birth of healthy septuplets would become a human interest story for local media. But the staff was stunned at the outpouring of international and national media knocking at their front doors. The staff of both Iowa Methodist Medical Center and Blank Children's Hospital in Des Moines, Iowa, organized a communications plan for 14 official press conferences, constant updates to the media and a website to handle ongoing inquiries from the public. As a result, the story of the McCaughey septuplets was shown in more than 10,000 television stories around the world. The hospitals received more than 36,000 magazine and newspaper articles. The public relations staff not only fielded more than 2,000 phone calls in the days following the Nov. 19 birth, but more than 15 major networks parked their vehicles and satellite dishes in front of the hospital.

  10. A Decomposition of Hospital Profitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Turner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This paper evaluates the drivers of profitability for a large sample of U.S. hospitals. Following a methodology frequently used by financial analysts, we use a DuPont analysis as a framework to evaluate the quality of earnings. By decomposing returns on equity (ROE into profit margin, total asset turnover, and capital structure, the DuPont analysis reveals what drives overall profitability. Methods: Profit margin, the efficiency with which services are rendered (total asset turnover, and capital structure is calculated for 3,255 U.S. hospitals between 2007 and 2012 using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Healthcare Cost Report Information System (CMS Form 2552. The sample is then stratified by ownership, size, system affiliation, teaching status, critical access designation, and urban or non-urban location. Those hospital characteristics and interaction terms are then regressed (OLS against the ROE and the respective DuPont components. Sensitivity to regression methodology is also investigated using a seemingly unrelated regression. Results: When the sample is stratified by hospital characteristics, the results indicate investor-owned hospitals have higher profit margins, higher efficiency, and are substantially more leveraged. Hospitals in systems are found to have higher ROE, margins, and efficiency but are associated with less leverage. In addition, a number of important and significant interactions between teaching status, ownership, location, critical access designation, and inclusion in a system are documented. Many of the significant relationships, most notably not-for-profit ownership, lose significance or are predominately associated with one interaction effect when interaction terms are introduced as explanatory variables. Results are not sensitive to the alternative methodology. Conclusion: The results of the DuPont analysis suggest that although there appears to be convergence in the behavior of

  11. A Decomposition of Hospital Profitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Kevin; Elliott, Michael; Lee, Jen-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This paper evaluates the drivers of profitability for a large sample of U.S. hospitals. Following a methodology frequently used by financial analysts, we use a DuPont analysis as a framework to evaluate the quality of earnings. By decomposing returns on equity (ROE) into profit margin, total asset turnover, and capital structure, the DuPont analysis reveals what drives overall profitability. Methods: Profit margin, the efficiency with which services are rendered (total asset turnover), and capital structure is calculated for 3,255 U.S. hospitals between 2007 and 2012 using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Healthcare Cost Report Information System (CMS Form 2552). The sample is then stratified by ownership, size, system affiliation, teaching status, critical access designation, and urban or non-urban location. Those hospital characteristics and interaction terms are then regressed (OLS) against the ROE and the respective DuPont components. Sensitivity to regression methodology is also investigated using a seemingly unrelated regression. Results: When the sample is stratified by hospital characteristics, the results indicate investor-owned hospitals have higher profit margins, higher efficiency, and are substantially more leveraged. Hospitals in systems are found to have higher ROE, margins, and efficiency but are associated with less leverage. In addition, a number of important and significant interactions between teaching status, ownership, location, critical access designation, and inclusion in a system are documented. Many of the significant relationships, most notably not-for-profit ownership, lose significance or are predominately associated with one interaction effect when interaction terms are introduced as explanatory variables. Results are not sensitive to the alternative methodology. Conclusion: The results of the DuPont analysis suggest that although there appears to be convergence in the behavior of NFP and IO

  12. Usability Briefing for hospital design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronczek-Munter, Aneta

    This PhD thesis is a contribution to an ongoing debate in Denmark about improving the building design processes of complex buildings, especially in relation to the current hospital developments. It provides knowledge about capturing user needs and defines the process model for usability briefing...... for hospital architecture from a user perspective. The thesis is based on comprehensive literature studies, three main case studies at hospitals,numerous expert interviews and workshops. The research results generate a better understanding of how knowledge about user needs, acquired from workshops...

  13. How hospitals confront new technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coye, Molly Joel; Kell, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Hospital technology decision makers now confront a growing pipeline of information technology (IT) and major medical equipment that challenges traditional capital allocation processes. In a highly fragmented industry that is driven by coverage and reimbursement policies set by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and private insurers, the cumulative impact of hospitals' technology investment decisions shapes health care for decades.We propose a framework for the development of a national collaboration for the planning and assessment of emerging technologies, designed to improve the quality and efficiency of hospital decisions. Broader application of technology assessment would restrain inappropriate technology adoption and use.

  14. Brief hospitalizations of elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Sofie; Rasmussen, Søren Wistisen; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crowded departments are a common problem in Danish hospitals, especially in departments of internal medicine, where a large proportion of the patients are elderly. We therefore chose to investigate the number and character of hospitalizations of elderly patients with a duration of less......, swollen or painful leg conditions, dyspnea, suspected parenchyma surgical disease and problems with the urinary system or catheters. The most common diagnoses given at hospital were chronic cardiovascular disease, bacterial infection, symptoms deriving from bone, muscle or connective tissue, liquid...

  15. [Crisis unit at the general hospital: Determinants of further hospitalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norotte, C; Omnès, C; Crozier, C; Verlyck, C; Romanos, M

    2017-10-01

    The availability of short-stay beds for brief admission (less than 72hours) of crisis patients presenting to the emergency room is a model that has gained a growing interest because it allows time for developing alternatives to psychiatric hospitalization and favors a maintained functioning in the community. Still, the determinants influencing the disposition decision at discharge after crisis intervention remain largely unexplored. The primary objective of this study was to determine the factors predicting aftercare dispositions at crisis unit discharge: transfer for further hospitalization or return to the community. Secondary objectives included the description of clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of patients admitted to the crisis unit upon presentation to the emergency room. All patients (n=255) admitted to the short-stay unit of the emergency department of Rambouillet General Hospital during a one-year period were included in the study. Patient characteristics were collected in a retrospective manner from medical records: patterns of referral, acute stressors, presenting symptoms, initial patient demand, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-5) disorders, psychiatric history, and socio-demographic characteristics were inferred. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with hospitalization decision upon crisis intervention at discharge. Following crisis intervention at the short-stay unit, 100 patients (39.2%) required further hospitalization and were transferred. Statistically significant factors associated with a higher probability of hospitalization (P<0.05) included the patient's initial wish to be hospitalized (OR=4.28), the presence of a comorbid disorder (OR=3.43), a referral by family or friends (OR=2.89), a history of psychiatric hospitalization (OR=2.71) and suicidal ideation on arrival in the emergency room (OR=2.26). Conversely, significant factors associated with a lower probability of

  16. Hospital Quality Initiative - Outcome Measures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In the interest of promoting high-quality, patient-centered care and accountability, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and Hospital Quality...

  17. Nigerian Hospital Practice: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Nigerian Hospital Practice Journal serves in enhancing advancement of medicine globally, a medium for disseminating information about current clinical and drug practices in Nigeria and medical science world, and a medium for continued medical education.

  18. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) is part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) long-standing effort to link Medicares payment system to a...

  19. VT - Vermont Hospital Service Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Hospital service areas (HSAs) are organized by towns and are based on inpatient discharges where the diagnosis indicated the need for immediate care. Plurality...

  20. European Hospitality Without a Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Rosello

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available How do European governments conceptualize what they call "hospitality" when they draft immigration laws and when they allow the concepts of asylum, of illegal immigrants, to change according to a constantly evolving political context? What consequences…

  1. Generalist palliative care in hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbæk, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2016-01-01

    Background: It can be challenging to provide generalist palliative care in hospitals, owing to difficulties in integrating disease-orientedtreatment with palliative care and the influences of cultural and organisational conditions. However, knowledge on the interactionsthat occur is sparse. Aim......: To investigate the interactions between organisation and culture as conditions for integrated palliative care in hospital and, ifpossible, to suggest workable solutions for the provision of generalist palliative care. Design: A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was chosen using two independent studies...... hospital with 29 department managements and one hospital management. Results: Two overall themes emerged: (1) ‘generalist palliative care as a priority at the hospital’, suggesting contrasting issues regardingprioritisation of palliative care at different organisational levels, and (2) ‘knowledge and use...

  2. Pain prevalence in hospitalized children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther-Larsen, S; Pedersen, M T; Friis, S M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain management in hospitalized children is often inadequate. The prevalence and main sources of pain in Danish university hospitals is unknown. METHODS: This prospective mixed-method cross-sectional survey took place at four university hospitals in Denmark. We enrolled 570 pediatric...... patients who we asked to report their pain experience and its management during the previous 24 hours. For patients identified as having moderate to severe pain, patient characteristics and analgesia regimes were reviewed. RESULTS: Two hundred and thirteen children (37%) responded that they had experienced...... pain in the previous 24 hours. One hundred and thirty four (24%) indicated moderate to severe pain and 43% would have preferred an intervention to alleviate the pain. In children hospitalized for more than 24 hours, the prevalence of moderate/severe pain was significantly higher compared to children...

  3. Genetic Counseling in Military Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    mother allegedly mistreated for preeclampsia at Tripler Army Medical Center could maintain an action for medical malpractice nothwithstanding Feres.1 2...perinatologists at most military hospitals perform genetic counseling. Due to their primary responsibilities fo management of high risk pregnancies

  4. Hospital Waste Management - Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Edra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of waste management in hospitals is indisputable in preserving the environment and protecting public health, but management models are rarely discussed. This study presents the legal and conceptual frameworks of good waste management practices applicable to hospitals and associated indicators. As a case study, the overall performance of Hospital Centre of São João, in Porto, was analysed based on published reports. Data on the production of waste in their different typologies were collected from 2010 to 2016, enabling a correlation of the waste production with the kg/bed/day indicator. The aim of this study was to gather data and discuss trends in a real scenario of evolution over a six-year period in order to contribute to a future research proposal on indicators that can be used as reference for benchmarking the construction of methodological guides for hospital waste management.

  5. IMPROVING GRAPHIC SKILLS DURING HOSPITALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Afonso Valladares

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Hospitalization may have negative effects on child development. It takes the child off her routine and prevents her from contacts with stimulating environments. The aim of this work was to evaluate the development and quality on drew productions, before and after art therapy intervention, during the hospitalization of 7 to 10 years old children, with infectious diseases. It was proposed a quasi experimental design with a control group (n=9 and a group that was submitted to art therapy intervention (n=10. Results show that these interventions were effective in improving the development and the quality of the drawings. Hospitals can also be stimulating environments for children offering them caring practices that go beyond the disease. KEY WORDS: Art therapy; Pediatric Nursing; Hospitalization.

  6. Aerospace technology and hospital systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The use of aerospace medical techniques to improve the quality of earth health care systems is discussed. Data are focused on physiological measurements and monitoring, medical information management, clean room technology, and reliability and quality assurance for hospital equipment.

  7. National Hospital Discharge Survey: Annual summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Presents statistics on the utilization of non-Federal short-stay hospitals based on data collected through the National Hospital Discharge Survey from a national sample of the hospital records of discharged inpatients...

  8. Single Specialty Hospitals and Service Competition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kathleen Carey; James F. Burgess; Gary J. Young

    2009-01-01

    ...: changes in service provision by general hospitals in local markets. Results suggest that general hospitals are stepping up their own offerings of services that are in direct competition with those of specialty hospitals...

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED SOLID HOSPITAL WASTE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED SOLID HOSPITAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A NIGERIAN TERTIARY HOSPITAL. ... Nigerian Journal of Technology ... A pre-intervention situation analysis was conducted to assess Hospital Waste Management (HWM) practices, solutions were proffered for the observed ...

  10. Air handling units for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, V; Gjestvang, R

    1989-10-01

    Air handling units should provide proper quality and conditioned air to various hospital areas. Unit capacity should be able to meet limited space functionality or load changes as well as any smoke control requirements. System components should be readily accessible and appropriate for spaces served. In summary, engineers should consider the following: Environmental design criteria for area being served Components desired Unit type required Economic issues affecting design. Using this approach, design engineers can design hospital air handling units methodically and logically.

  11. Introduction: Special Issue on Hospitality

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Rios-Morales; Ian Jenkins

    2012-01-01

    In the era of globalization, the economic contribution of the tourism, hospitality and leisure industry to the world’s GDP is significant. Tourism represents one of the main sources of income for many countries; tourism creates jobs, enhances exports and contributes to the economic welfare of a host country. Although the contribution of tourism, hospitality and the leisure industry in the era of globalization has been broadly recognized, there are also numerous challenges that this industry f...

  12. Parenteral nutrition in hospital pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram Gamal; Al-Taweel, Dalal; Matar, Kamal Mohamed; Kombian, Samuel B

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this service. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive, qualitative study about PN practices was conducted from June 2012 to February 2013 in Kuwait. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews with the head total parenteral nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at seven hospitals using a developed questionnaire. The questionnaire obtained information about the PN service at each hospital including the existence of nutritional support teams (NSTs), PN preparation practices, quality controls and guidelines/protocols. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for content. Findings - Seven hospitals in Kuwait provided PN preparation service through TPN units within hospital pharmacies. Functional NSTs did not exist in any of these hospitals. All TPN units used paper-based standard PN order forms for requesting PN. The content of PN order forms and PN formulas labeling information were inconsistent across hospitals. Most of the prepared PN formulas were tailor-made and packed in single compartment bags. Quality controls used included gravimetric analysis and visual inspection of PN formulations, and less consistently reported periodic evaluation of the aseptic techniques. Six TPN units independently developed PN guidelines/protocols. Originality/value - This study revealed variations in many aspects of PN practices among the hospitals in Kuwait and provided recommendations to improve this service. Standardization of PN practices would enhance the quality of care provided to patients receiving PN and facilitate national monitoring. This can be accomplished through the involvement of healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition support working within proactive NSTs.

  13. Hospitality: The conquest of Paradise

    OpenAIRE

    Maximiliano Korstanje

    2008-01-01

    The term hospitality is associated with the industry of tourism. In fact, it is very well considered as a form of relationship between hosts and guest in that modern activity. Nevertheless, its historical root remains occulted in the bottom of darkness. Under that circumstance, ancient history contributes with hard evidence that proves hospitality was present and used as a mechanism to create legitimacy in the conquest of America. That way, Hominem viatores assured that Crown’s boundaries wer...

  14. [Redesigning the hospital discharge process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ramos, M; Flores-Pardo, E; Uris-Sellés, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show that the redesign and planning process of hospital discharge advances the departure time of the patient from a hospital environment. Quasi-experimental study conducted from January 2011 to April 2013, in a local hospital. The cases analysed were from medical and surgical nursing units. The process was redesigned to coordinate all the professionals involved in the process. The hospital discharge improvement process improvement was carried out by forming a working group, the analysis of retrospective data, identifying areas for improvement, and its redesign. The dependent variable was the time of patient administrative discharge. The sample was classified as pre-intervention, inter-intervention, and post-intervention, depending on the time point of the study. The final sample included 14,788 patients after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The mean discharge release time decreased significantly by 50 min between pre-intervention and post-intervention periods. The release time in patients with planned discharge was one hour and 25 min less than in patients with unplanned discharge. Process redesign is a useful strategy to improve the process of hospital discharge. Besides planning the discharge, it is shown that the patient leaving the hospital before 12 midday is a key factor. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Hospital course and discharge criteria for children hospitalized with bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbach, Jonathan M; Clark, Sunday; Piedra, Pedro A; Macias, Charles G; Schroeder, Alan R; Pate, Brian M; Sullivan, Ashley F; Espinola, Janice A; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-04-01

    For children hospitalized with bronchiolitis, there is uncertainty about the expected inpatient clinical course and when children are safe for discharge. Examine the time to clinical improvement, risk of clinical worsening after improvement, and develop discharge criteria. Prospective multiyear cohort study. Sixteen US hospitals. Consecutive hospitalized children age <2 years with bronchiolitis. We defined clinical improvement using: (1) retraction severity, (2) respiratory rate, (3) room air oxygen saturation, and (4) hydration status. After meeting improvement criteria, children were considered clinically worse based on the inverse of ≥1 of these criteria or need for intensive care. Among 1916 children, the median number of days from onset of difficulty breathing until clinical improvement was 4 (interquartile range, 3-7.5 days). Of the total, 1702 (88%) met clinical improvement criteria, with 4% worsening (3% required intensive care). Children who worsened were age <2 months (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.51; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.07-5.94), gestational age <37 weeks (AOR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.13-3.32), and presented with severe retractions (AOR: 5.55; 95% CI: 2.12-14.50), inadequate oral intake (AOR: 2.54; 95% CI: 1.39-4.62), or apnea (AOR: 2.87; 95% CI: 1.45-5.68). Readmissions were similar for children who did and did not worsen. Although children hospitalized with bronchiolitis had wide-ranging recovery times, only 4% worsened after initial improvement. Children who worsened were more likely to be younger, premature infants presenting in more severe distress. For children hospitalized with bronchiolitis, these data may help establish more evidence-based discharge criteria, reduce practice variability, and safely shorten hospital length-of-stay. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Research in Hospitality Management: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Research in Hospitality Management: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Molecular epidemiology and spatiotemporal analysis of hospital-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii infection in a tertiary care hospital in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusri, S; Chongsuvivatwong, V; Rivera, J I; Silpapojakul, K; Singkhamanan, K; McNeil, E; Doi, Y

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a major hospital-acquired pathogen in Thailand that has a negative effect on patient survival. The nature of its transmission is poorly understood. To investigate the genotypic and spatiotemporal pattern of A. baumannii infection at a hospital in Thailand. The medical records of patients infected with A. baumannii at an 800-bed tertiary care hospital in southern Thailand between January 2010 and December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. A. baumannii was identified at the genomospecies level. Carbapenemase genes were identified among carbapenem-resistant isolates associated with A. baumannii infection. A spatiotemporal analysis was performed by admission ward, time of infection and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) groups of A. baumannii. Nine PFGE groups were identified among the 197 A. baumannii infections. All A. baumannii isolates were assigned to International Clonal Lineage II. blaOXA-23 was the most prevalent carbapenemase gene. Outbreaks were observed mainly in respiratory and intensive care units. The association between PFGE group and hospital unit was significant. Spatiotemporal analysis identified 20 clusters of single PFGE group infections. Approximately half of the clusters involved multiple hospital units simultaneously. A. baumannii transmitted both within and between hospital wards. Better understanding and control of the transmission of A. baumannii are needed. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Threats to ultra-high-field MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2009-08-01

    In 2004 the European Commission (EC) adopted a directive restricting occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. This directive (2004/40/CE), which examines the possible health risks of the electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and other devices, concluded that upper limits on radiation and applied electromagnetic fields are necessary to prevent workers from suffering any undue acute health effects. But although not initially intended, the biggest impact of the directive could be on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is used in hospitals worldwide to produce images of unrivalled quality of the brain and other soft tissues.

  19. Hospital automation system RFID-based: technology embedded in smart devices (cards, tags and bracelets).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino, Gustavo H P; Paz de Araujo, Carlos A; Bezerra, Heitor U; Junior, Helio B A; Xavier, Marcelo Araujo; de Souza, Vinicius S V; de M Valentim, Ricardo A A; Morais, Antonio H F; Guerreiro, Ana M G; Brandao, Glaucio B

    2008-01-01

    RFID is a technology being adopted in many business fields, especially in the medical field. This work has the objective to present a system for automation of a hospital clinical analysis laboratory. This system initially uses contactless smart cards to store patient's data and for authentication of hospital employees in the system. The proposed system also uses RFID tags stuck to containers containing patient's collected samples for the correct identification of the patient who gave away the samples. This work depicts a hospital laboratory workflow, presents the system modeling and deals with security matters related to information stored in the smart cards.

  20. Hospitalization costs ofTAVI in one Belgian university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gestel, Raf; De Graeve, Diana; Vrints, Christiaan; Rodrigus, Inez; Bosmans, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Considering the sizeable cost of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and conflicting cost-effectiveness studies, it is useful to gain more insight into the cost structure of the TAVI hospitalization. This study provides such a cost analysis and starts to evaluate options to soften the hospitalization cost burden in order to make TAVI economically more feasible. Costs forTAVI hospitalization in the University Hospital of Antwerp were analysed uni- and bivariately. Graphical and numerical displays of the data are supplemented with the non-parametric Wilcoxon rank sum statistic and Spearman rank rho correlation. Overall, 47 percent of the cost could be attributed to the implanted valve and 21 percent was accounted for by the room costs. Further, costs seemed highly insensitive to pre-existing patient characteristics. Only patients with pulmonary hypertension were characterized with systematically higher costs (Wilcoxon rank sum P-value of 0.049). Complications related to TAVI had a significant upward impact on the costs and there was also evidence for a learning effect on total costs. In general the analyses showed that only limited options remain for cost reduction of the TAVI hospitalization cost. The most promising option is the reduction of the valve price. Avoidance of complications is hard to achieve given the current state of the art although this would significantly reduce overall costs.

  1. Hospital medicine (Part 2): what would improve acute hospital care?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2009-09-01

    There are so many obvious delays and inefficiencies in our traditional system of acute hospital care; it is clear that if outcomes are to be improved prompt accurate assessment immediately followed by competent and efficient treatment is essential. Early warning scores (EWS) help detect acutely ill patients who are seriously ill and likely to deteriorate. However, it is not known if any EWS has universal applicability to all patient populations. The benefit of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) such as Medical Emergency Teams has yet to be proven, possibly because doctors and nurses are reluctant to call the RRS for help. Reconfiguration of care delivery in an Acute Medical Assessment Unit has been suggested as a "proactive" alternative to the "reactive" approach of RRS. This method ensures every patient is in an appropriate and safe environment from the moment of first contact with the hospital. Further research is needed into what interventions are most effective in preventing the deterioration and\\/or resuscitating seriously ill patients. Although physicians expert in hospital care decrease the cost and length of hospitalization without compromising outcomes hospital care will continue to be both expensive and potentially dangerous.

  2. Hospital readmission and parent perceptions of their child's hospital discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jay G; Ziniel, Sonja I; Freeman, Linda; Kaplan, William; Antonelli, Richard; Gay, James; Coleman, Eric A; Porter, Stephanie; Goldmann, Don

    2013-10-01

    To describe parent perceptions of their child's hospital discharge and assess the relationship between these perceptions and hospital readmission. A prospective study of parents surveyed with questions adapted from the care transitions measure, an adult survey that assesses components of discharge care. Participant answers, scored on a 5-point Likert scale, were compared between children who did and did not experience a readmission using a Fisher's exact test and logistic regression that accounted for patient characteristics associated with increased readmission risk, including complex chronic condition and assistance with medical technology. A tertiary-care children's hospital. A total of 348 parents surveyed following their child's hospital discharge between March and October 2010. None. Unplanned readmission within 30 days of discharge. There were 28 children (8.1%) who experienced a readmission. Children had a lower readmission rate (4.4 vs. 11.3%, P = 0.004) and lower adjusted readmission likelihood [odds ratio 0.2 (95% confidence interval 0.1, 0.6)] when their parents strongly agreed (n = 206) with the statement, 'I felt that my child was healthy enough to leave the hospital' from the index admission. Parent perceptions relating to care management responsibilities, medications, written discharge plan, warning signs and symptoms to watch for and primary care follow-up were not associated with readmission risk in multivariate analysis. Parent perception of their child's health at discharge was associated with the risk of a subsequent, unplanned readmission. Addressing concerns with this perception prior to hospital discharge may help mitigate readmission risk in children.

  3. Hospital benchmarking: are U.S. eye hospitals ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korne, Dirk F; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Sol, Kees J C A; Betz, Robert; Thomas, Richard C; Schein, Oliver D; Klazinga, Niek S

    2012-01-01

    Benchmarking is increasingly considered a useful management instrument to improve quality in health care, but little is known about its applicability in hospital settings. The aims of this study were to assess the applicability of a benchmarking project in U.S. eye hospitals and compare the results with an international initiative. We evaluated multiple cases by applying an evaluation frame abstracted from the literature to five U.S. eye hospitals that used a set of 10 indicators for efficiency benchmarking. Qualitative analysis entailed 46 semistructured face-to-face interviews with stakeholders, document analyses, and questionnaires. The case studies only partially met the conditions of the evaluation frame. Although learning and quality improvement were stated as overall purposes, the benchmarking initiative was at first focused on efficiency only. No ophthalmic outcomes were included, and clinicians were skeptical about their reporting relevance and disclosure. However, in contrast with earlier findings in international eye hospitals, all U.S. hospitals worked with internal indicators that were integrated in their performance management systems and supported benchmarking. Benchmarking can support performance management in individual hospitals. Having a certain number of comparable institutes provide similar services in a noncompetitive milieu seems to lay fertile ground for benchmarking. International benchmarking is useful only when these conditions are not met nationally. Although the literature focuses on static conditions for effective benchmarking, our case studies show that it is a highly iterative and learning process. The journey of benchmarking seems to be more important than the destination. Improving patient value (health outcomes per unit of cost) requires, however, an integrative perspective where clinicians and administrators closely cooperate on both quality and efficiency issues. If these worlds do not share such a relationship, the added

  4. The Professionalization of Iranian hospital social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    KHALVATI, MALIHEH; FEKRAZAD, HOSSEIN; RAFATJAH, MARYAM; OSTADHASHEMI, LEILA; KHANKEH, HAMID REZA

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Identity is formed through our understanding of ourselves and what others perceive of our actions and how we do things. Formation of professional identity includes development, advancement and socialization through social learning of specific knowledge and skills obtained within the context of professional roles, new attitudes and values. Methods: This qualitative study used content analysis approach to explain the professionalization process of 22 social workers working in 14 public hospitals in Tehran based on their experiences. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, observation and writing in the field. Results: Eleven categories and three themes of entry into the profession, identity formation, and identity ownership were extracted out of data analysis. Revealing the process, barriers and facilitators of professionalization of hospital social workers was the results of this study. Conclusion: Certain individual characteristics were factors for the tendency of participants to choose this profession. The participants' understanding of their profession was formed, when studying in the university through learning relevant knowledge, skills, views and professional expectations. Achieving a single identity and professional pride and self-esteem are achievements of identity ownership. PMID:29344524

  5. Bourdieu at the bedside: briefing parents in a pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrow, Karen; Hodnett, Ellen; Stremler, Robyn; McKeever, Patricia; Cohen, Eyal

    2014-12-01

    The philosophy of family-centered care (FCC) promotes partnerships between families and staff to plan, deliver, and evaluate services for children and has been officially adopted by a majority of pediatric hospitals throughout North America. However, studies indicated that many parents have continued to be dissatisfied with their decision-making roles in their child's care. This is particularly salient for parents of children with chronic ongoing complex health problems. These children are dependent upon medical technology and require frequent hospitalizations during which parents must contribute to difficult decisions regarding their child's care. Given this clinical issue, an alternative theoretical perspective was explored to redress this problem. Pierre Bourdieu's theoretical concepts of field, capital, and habitus were used to analyze the hierarchical relationships in pediatric acute care hospitals and to design a briefing intervention aimed at improving parents' satisfaction with decision making in that health care setting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Educational Hospital Units of Valencia community: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina PORTOLÉS SOLER

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The functioning and organization of an educational hospital unit of Valencia is described, through observation, field diary and documental analysis (during February to May 2016. Also, it is designed and implemented an educational project through the story The zebra Camila for students of early childhood education hospitalized in the Pediatric Oncology Service. In the project LOMCE objectives are followed, in addition to the Hospital Pedagogy objectives themselves; 12 educational units are proposed, covering all curricular areas of early childhood education, with a variety of activities and resources that can be adapted to the different educational needs of students who are included. Teachers, the kind of students, the areas of activity, methodology and teaching resources are very diverse and are based on health services.

  7. Quality Improvement in Hospitals: Identifying and Understanding Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz M. Mazur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving operational performance in hospitals is complicated, particularly if process improvement requires complex behavioral changes. Using single-loop and double-loop learning theory as a foundation, the purpose of this research is to empirically uncover key improvement behaviors and the factors that may be associated with such behaviors in hospitals. A two-phased approach was taken to collect data regarding improvement behaviors and associated factors, and data analysis was conducted using methods proposed by grounded theorists. The contributions of this research are twofold. First, five key behaviors related to process improvement are identified, namely Quick Fixing, Initiating, Conforming, Expediting, and Enhancing. Second, based on these observed behaviors, a set of force field diagrams is developed to structure and organize possible factors that are important to consider when attempting to change improvement behaviors. This begins to fill the gap in the knowledge about what factors drive effective improvement efforts in hospital settings.

  8. OCCUPATIONAL ROLE AFTER PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GH.R GHASSEMI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Severe Psychiatricillness is accompanied by gross disturbances in patient's occupational role. This study presents a comparative picture of work performance before and after psychiatric hospitalization. Method: Subjects comprised 440 psychiatric admitters from Noor Medical center - Isfahan - Iran, who were followed from November 1999 to November 2000. Their work adjustment was measured by means of Weiss man's index. Data were computer analyzed using SPSS by running paired t- student and ANOVA. Results: Majority of the patients (53 % were without permanent sources of income before psychiatric hospitalization, about 12 percent of those who were working prior to hospitalization lost their job after being discharged from hospital. Better work adjustment before hospitalization was positively correlated with better work adjustment after discharge for working patients (r =0/66. Working ability of the patients after discharge was lesser than before the attack f9r patients with regular and irregular job (P < 001. Discussion: Job loss or poor working ability after psychiatric admission reported by several researchers and has bean confirmed in this study as well. These observatoins have been discussed in view of the current socio economic problems in the society and nature of psychiatric disturbances.

  9. Enterprise resource planning for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Merode, Godefridus G; Groothuis, Siebren; Hasman, Arie

    2004-06-30

    Integrated hospitals need a central planning and control system to plan patients' processes and the required capacity. Given the changes in healthcare one can ask the question what type of information systems can best support these healthcare delivery organizations. We focus in this review on the potential of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems for healthcare delivery organizations. First ERP systems are explained. An overview is then presented of the characteristics of the planning process in hospital environments. Problems with ERP that are due to the special characteristics of healthcare are presented. The situations in which ERP can or cannot be used are discussed. It is suggested to divide hospitals in a part that is concerned only with deterministic processes and a part that is concerned with non-deterministic processes. ERP can be very useful for planning and controlling the deterministic processes.

  10. Hospital admissions following childhood accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, D; Tal, Y; Winter, S T; Jaffe, M

    1982-09-01

    This study comprises 260 children aged less than or equal to 13 yr hospitalized following accidents during a 9-mo period for a total of 923 hospital days. The ratio of boys to girls was 1.8:1. There were 21 road accidents and 104 accidents in the home; 75.4% of the accidents took place after school hours. Half of the admissions were for head trauma; 96 injuries were serious; and 78 patients required general anesthesia. In 67 families, there had been at least one previous childhood accident requiring hospitalization of the cohort child or sibling; factors in this group may have been the child's temperament or tension in the home.

  11. Mobile Robots for Hospital Logistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan

    be and will be automated using mobile robots. This talk consequently addresses the key technical issues of implementing service robots in hospitals. In simple terms, a robotic system for automating hospital logistics has to be reliable, adaptable and scalable. Robots have to be semi-autonomous, and should reliably...... for localization. The system features automatic annotation, which significantly reduces manual work and offer many advantages beyond robotics. A case study on logistics solutions is finally presented. A robotic solution is tested in a hospital to handle the transportation of blood samples between the clinic...... and the lab. Without any environmental modification; it is shown that lab turnover time can be reduced from hours to minutes; by simply replacing the human porter with a mobile robot....

  12. Fluid fragmentation from hospital toilets

    CERN Document Server

    Traverso, G; Lu, C -C; Maa, R; Langer, R; Bourouiba, L

    2013-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections represent significant health and financial burdens to society. Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a particularly challenging bacteria with the potential to cause severe diarrhea and death. One mode of transmission for C. difficile, as well as other pathogens, which has received little attention is the potential air contamination by pathogen-bearing droplets emanating from toilets. In the fluid dynamics video submitted to the APS DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion 2013, we present flow visualizations via high-speed recordings showing the capture of the product of the fluid fragmentation generated by hospital toilet high-pressure flushes. Important quantities of both large and small droplets are observed. We illustrate how high-pressure flushes and cleaning products currently used in hospital toilets result in aggravating, rather than alleviating, the suspension and recirculation of tenacious airborne pathogen-bearing droplets.

  13. Hospitality and its Ambivalences : On Zygmunt Bauman

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welten, R.B.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitality is often understood as an ethical openness towards the other. Hospitality, in this way, is a gift. But is this really the situation of hospitality in the world today? Europeans have created another, bespoke hospitality and they insist on being given a generous welcome all over the world

  14. Magnet hospital characteristics in acute general hospitals in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Maureen; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate characteristics of the nursing practice environment and the impact of organizational structures and processes on nursing in 11 major acute general hospitals in Ireland from the perspective of staff-nurses (n = 368) and Directors of Nursing (n = 10). The study was descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative. The Nursing Work Index-Revised (NWI-R) and an instrument developed by Havens were used and Directors of Nursing supplied hospital documentary evidence of organizational structures and processes. A convenience sample of 368 staff-nurses and 10 Directors of Nursing, participated. Staff-nurses had a moderately positive perception of relationships with doctors (2.77); autonomy in practice (2.56); organizational support (2.51) and control over practice settings (2.35). A significant statistical difference was found between the practice environments in the 11 hospitals, particularly in relation to organizational support (P = 0.001); control over practice setting (P = 0.003); nurse autonomy (P = 0.004) and nurse-doctor relationships (P = 0.024). When comparisons were made with US Magnet hospital research findings, lower scores on all dimensions of professional practice environment were achieved by Irish nurses.

  15. Planning Study Hospital, Cape Town The Hospital Information at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and long-term development. In broader terms the objectives were to formulate practical short- and long-term plans for the development of information systems, and to create management policies intended to guarantee the success of the hospital's data processing function. A synopsis of the methodology of the HIPS and its ...

  16. Hospital Mortality In Alwahda Hospital, Derna, Libya Based On A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    care delivery. Methods: This is a retrospective study evaluating the causes of deaths which occurred during the years 1997-2006 in Alwahda hospital, Derna, Libya. The leading causes of deaths were classified according to the nature of the ...

  17. Absenteeism in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taunton, R L; Perkins, S; Oetker-Black, S; Heaton, R

    1995-09-01

    Lack of standardization in formulas for calculating absenteeism impeded comparison among institutions and comparison to rates reported for the health care industry. Even though illness related benefits, replacement costs for absent employees and attendance incentives absorbed scarce financial resources, more than 40% of hospitals had no standard for excessive absence. Directors of nursing were concerned about staffing and the possibility that employees were tiring to the point of becoming ill. Among directors, concern about absenteeism was greatest in urban hospitals of 100-200 beds.

  18. [Nutritional assessment for hospitalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez Martínez, T; Armero Fuster, M

    1991-01-01

    A review of the following points was performed: Factors favouring the development and presence of malnutrition among hospitalized patients. Useful parameters in nutritional evaluation. Types of malnutrition. The Chang nutritional evaluation protocol is used in our Hospital, which is simple, inexpensive, reliable, specific and easily reproduced. This is based on five variables (three anthropometric and two biochemical), randomized and based on reference tables and values. A study was made on data corresponding to 70 patients, in whom a prevalence of malnutrition was observed in critical patients. The patients were classified based on three different definitive possibilities (Marasmo, Kwashiorkor and combined), and three grades of malnutrition (slight, moderate and severe).

  19. Optics activity for hospitalized children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargallo, Ana; Gómez-Varela, Ana I.; González-Nuñez, Hector; Delgado, Tamara; Almaguer, Citlalli; Cambronero, Ferran; Garcia-Sanchez, Angel; Flores-Arias, Maria T.

    2014-08-01

    USC-OSA is a student chapter whose objective is to bring Optics knowledge closer to the non-optics community. The activity developed at the Hospital school was one of the most important last year. It was consisted in a few Optics experiments and workshops with hospitalized children of different ages and pathologies. The experiments had to be adapted to their physical conditions with the aim of everyone could participate. We think this activity has several benefits including spreading Optics through children meanwhile they have fun and forget their illness for a while.

  20. Hospital en Neuwitteisbach, Alemania Federal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haindl, Friedrich F.

    1975-04-01

    Full Text Available It consists of: the actual hospital, one house for the staff, one service yard and underground garage. The hospital comprises four storeys and two basements, whilst the other building only has three floors. On the ground floor of the hospital are we located: the entrance; the nucleus of vertical communication; work rooms for the doctors and nurses; the administration section; X-ray and cobalt installations; and a small chapel. The three remaining upper floors contain 160 beds distributed over 6 wards and in single, double or triple rooms. Each floor is equipped with a service section. The first basement includes the ambulance entrance, the medical wards of the hospital, the staff dining-room, a kitchen and the heating installation. The second basement is reserved for kitchen storage rooms and the remaining installations of the building. Structure of reinforced concrete and outer walls of brick covered with panels of washed concrete.Está formado por: el hospital propiamente dicho, un edificio destinado a viviendas para el personal, patio de servicio y garaje subterráneo. El hospital consta de cuatro plantas y dos sótanos, mientras que el otro edificio sólo tiene tres plantas. En la planta baja del hospital se encuentran: la entrada; el núcleo de comunicación vertical; las salas de trabajo de médicos y enfermeras; la zona de administración; las instalaciones de rayos X y bomba de cobalto; y una pequeña capilla. En las tres plantas superiores se distribuyen 160 camas repartidas en seis unidades de hospitalización, con habitaciones de 1, 2 ó 3 camas. Cada planta cuenta, además, con una zona de servicio. En el primer sótano se hallan, además de la entrada de ambulancias, los servicios médicos del hospital, los comedores del personal, una cocina, y la instalación de calefacción. El segundo sótano se dedica, en su totalidad, a almacenes de la cocina y del resto de las instalaciones del edificio. Estructura de

  1. Corporate social responsibility in hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Gagić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Responsible management of global hospitality companies increasingly recognizes how important are concerns about the society, the environment as well as all stakeholders in maintaining a good market position. In Serbia, the concept of corporate social responsibility is relatively unknown and insufficiently researched in all business areas, especially in the hospitality industry where small businesses are dominated. The papers task is to present particular activities that demonstrate social responsibility to employees, customers-guests, local communities as well as the environment. The paper aims to highlight the benefits of adopting the principles of corporate social responsibility and innovation applied in catering enterprises as an example of good corporate social responsibility practices.

  2. Hospital readmission and parent perceptions of their child's hospital discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jay G.; Ziniel, Sonja I.; Freeman, Linda; Kaplan, William; Antonelli, Richard; Gay, James; Coleman, Eric A.; Porter, Stephanie; Goldmann, Don

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe parent perceptions of their child's hospital discharge and assess the relationship between these perceptions and hospital readmission. Design A prospective study of parents surveyed with questions adapted from the care transitions measure, an adult survey that assesses components of discharge care. Participant answers, scored on a 5-point Likert scale, were compared between children who did and did not experience a readmission using a Fisher's exact test and logistic regression that accounted for patient characteristics associated with increased readmission risk, including complex chronic condition and assistance with medical technology. Setting A tertiary-care children's hospital. Participants: A total of 348 parents surveyed following their child's hospital discharge between March and October 2010. Intervention None. Main Outcome Measure Unplanned readmission within 30 days of discharge. Results There were 28 children (8.1%) who experienced a readmission. Children had a lower readmission rate (4.4 vs. 11.3%, P = 0.004) and lower adjusted readmission likelihood [odds ratio 0.2 (95% confidence interval 0.1, 0.6)] when their parents strongly agreed (n = 206) with the statement, ‘I felt that my child was healthy enough to leave the hospital’ from the index admission. Parent perceptions relating to care management responsibilities, medications, written discharge plan, warning signs and symptoms to watch for and primary care follow-up were not associated with readmission risk in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Parent perception of their child's health at discharge was associated with the risk of a subsequent, unplanned readmission. Addressing concerns with this perception prior to hospital discharge may help mitigate readmission risk in children. PMID:23962990

  3. Introduction of voluntary environmental management systems into the Spanish hospital network: current state (2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio García Vicente

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals produce vast amounts of waste and are large consumers of energy and natural resources. However, do they worry about environmental health? With this question in mind, and in order to approach hospital environmental practices, the introduction into the Spanish hospital network of the most accepted certified environmental management systems (CEMS, such as ISO 14001 and EMAS, was evaluated so as to obtain a point of reference for environmental practices in our National Health System as no up-to-date, specific official register exists. To this end, a list of hospitals by Spanish Autonomous Community having CEMS in force in 2015 was drawn up using official databases, evaluating information and conducting fieldwork. We found that 18.9 % of hospitals had CEMS (ISO 14001 in all cases: 149 out of 787 hospitals, in the National Hospitals Catalogue, especially in Madrid (40 and Andalusia (37. Eighty-one of the certified hospitals are private. Only 23 had EMAS: 12 are public and 11 private. The resulting “map” shows the main references in order for the need to offer citizens a balance between healthcare and environmental friendliness, to be compared and envisaged based on hospital activity, considering hospitals socially responsible, environmentally friendly organisations, that seek leadership in the field of environmental sustainability together with other sectors (environmental, engineering, industrial.

  4. Institutional profile: Institute of Pharmacogenetics at the University Hospital Essen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siffert, Winfried

    2013-02-01

    Established in 2005, the Institute of Pharmacogenetics at the University Hospital Essen (Essen, Germany), headed by Winfried Siffert, is devoted to the discovery and validation of genetic variants that may impact upon drug responses especially in the field of cardiovascular disorders and cancer. Moreover, the institute provides pharmacogenetic testing for those drugs for which pharmacogenetic testing is recommended in order to prevent adverse drug reactions.

  5. Developing IT Infrastructure for Rural Hospitals: A Case Study of Benefits and Challenges of Hospital-to-Hospital Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Madhu C; Purao, Sandeep; Kelly, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study identifying benefits and challenges of a novel hospital-to-hospital information technology (IT) outsourcing partnership (HHP). The partnership is an innovative response to the problem that many smaller, rural hospitals face: to modernize their IT infrastructure in spite of a severe shortage of resources. The investigators studied three rural hospitals that outsourced their IT infrastructure, through an HHP, to a larger, more technologically advanced hospital in the region. The study design was based on purposive sampling and interviews of senior managers from the four hospitals. The results highlight the HHP's benefits and challenges from both the rural hospitals' and vendor hospital's perspectives. The HHP was considered a success: a key outcome was that it has improved the rural hospitals' IT infrastructure at an affordable cost. The investigators discuss key elements for creating a successful HHP and offer preliminary answers to the question of what it takes for an HHP to be successful.

  6. Hospitality Management: Learning, Doing, Knowing

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Muller

    2016-01-01

    Is there something distinct about the traditional Hospitality Management curriculum? First offered in 1893 at the Ecole Hoteliere Lausanne in Switzerland and launched in the United States at The School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University in 1922, has this course of study evolved over time to focus on both of Meyer's skills - originally based on technical skills but now transforming to emotional skills?

  7. Patient safety in Dutch hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, C.; Cuperus-Bosma, J.; Wal, G. van der

    2005-01-01

    In various studies outside the Netherlands, it has been shown that a substantial number of patients suffer from some kind of harm during their treatment in hospital. The incidence of these so-called adverse events varies between 2.9% and 16.6%; it is estimated that between over a quarter and a half

  8. Displacement Ventilation in Hospital Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.; Sandberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Hospital differ from conventional buildings in terms of ventilation needs. Exhaled infectious droplets or droplet nuclei of an infected patient need to be removed in general wards, waiting areas and isolation rooms to minimize transmission to health-care workers, other patients and visitors...

  9. Enterprise resource planning for hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merode, Godefridus G.; Groothuis, Siebren; Hasman, Arie

    2004-01-01

    Integrated hospitals need a central planning and control system to plan patients' processes and the required capacity. Given the changes in healthcare one can ask the question what type of information systems can best support these healthcare delivery organizations. We focus in this review on the

  10. The Nelson Mandela Children's Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cardiology and the development of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. • Nephrology and renal transplantation: The ... The hospital, when fully functional, will have 24 neonatal and 24 paediatric ICU and ... Imaging: State-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and positron emission tomography- ...

  11. Bibliography for the Hospitality Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Elizabeth A.

    This annotated bibliography is a sample collection of reference materials in the hospitality industry suitable for a small academic library. It is assumed that the library has a general reference collection. Publication dates range from 1992-96, with two publication dates in the 1980s. No periodicals are included. The 41 reference materials are…

  12. SPINE INJURY IN MULAGO HOSPITAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conciu.-riorr.'This study concluded that the initial clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with suspected CSI in iiilulago Hospital was inadequate with sorne injuries being missed alto-getlrer. INTRO DUCTIDN. Cervical Spine injury ECSI} occur in 2-5% oi' all trauma casesii] and in 5-10% of all major trauma cases 12}.

  13. Hospital concessions: flexibility in practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanken, Anneloes; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.; Bult-Spiering, Mirjam; Abel, J.; Barlow, J.; Carthey, J.; Codinhoto, R.; Dewulf, G.; Dilani, A.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade hospitals concessions have been increasingly implemented around the world. Nonetheless, concession arrangements are subject to many criticisms, which are to a large extent related to the issue of flexibility. Several authors have expressed concerns as to whether concession

  14. What is your hospitality quotient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilets, Lyn

    2015-03-01

    In addition to the behind-the-scenes work involved with planning and implementing continuing nursing education activities, there are additional ways we can enhance the learner's experience. This article presents ideas on how to improve your hospitality quotient. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Præhospital ultralyd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognås, Leif Kåre; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Sloth, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Danish anaesthesiologists use ultrasound (US) to examine and treat acutely ill or traumatized patients in the emergency room, operating theatre and intensive care unit. They are also involved in pre-hospital care where US may theoretically be beneficial for both diagnostic and therapeutic purpose...

  16. Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    by the patients in the ward. The project is based on the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703), which is a supplement to the regulation of artificial lighting in workplaces (DS700). The kick-off to the project was reading the DS703, second paragraph, chapter 2 about general requirements for lighting...

  17. University of Benin Teaching Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    110 million with a blindness prevalence rate of 1%. Cataract is responsible ... contribution of teaching hospitals to the prevention of blind- ness. Several factors ... All the adult patients before the age of 40 had extracapsular cataract extraction; those above had intracapsular cataract extraction. The children all had congenital ...

  18. Strategies for hospital staff reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, T P; Hollingsworth, A T

    1986-04-01

    Reduced inpatient census has created an overstaffing problem in many hospitals. Managers, unfamiliar with the layoff process, are now faced with reducing staffing levels. Detailed here are the options available for and the policies, procedures, and implementation of a reduction in force.

  19. Gambella Hospital, South West Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    completed week of gestational age as attributed for nearly 40% of all maternal calculated from the last menstrual period deaths (6). ..... HIV-1 infection, gonorrhea and syphilis at Five Hospital in the city of Addis Ababa: was not found to be significantly different WHO, Multi-center Survey by abortionists, in patients with ...

  20. St Columba's Hospital, Thomastown, Kilkenny.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine C

    2011-03-01

    Movement into or out of hospital is a vulnerable period for medication safety. Reconciling the medication a patient is using before admission with the medication prescribed on discharge, and documenting any changes (medication reconciliation) is recommended to improve safety. The aims of the study were to investigate the factors contributing to medication reconciliation on discharge, and identify the prevalence of non-reconciliation.

  1. Third molar complications requiring hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Martin; Morbach, Thomas; Kleis, Wilfried; Wagner, Wilfried

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe demographic and clinical patterns of subjects hospitalized with complications associated with third molars (M3). The investigation was designed as a prospective cohort study composed of subjects admitted to hospital for management of M3-associated complications. The predictor variable was "clinical status of the M3" defined as (A) prophylactic M3 removal, (B) nonelective M3 removal, or (C) M3 present at the time of admission. Outcome variables were infection parameters, treatment costs, length of hospital stay, and days of disability. Postoperative complications (A and B) were compared to complications based on pericoronitis (C). Complications due to prophylactic removal (A) were compared to those arising from pericoronitis or from the removal of symptomatic teeth (B and C). From January 2003 to December 2004, 45 deep space infections, 6 mandibular fractures, 2 lingual nerve injuries, 1 parapharyngeal tooth luxation, and 1 osteomyelitis were noticed. Fifteen complications resulted from prophylactic surgery (A), 25 from nonelective removal (B), and 15 from pericoronitis (C). Direct treatment costs were 147,000 euro (A: 42,000 euro; B: 74,000 euro; C: 31,000 euro). In 10 of the 15 patients of group C, deep space involvement resulted immediately from the first episode of pericoronitis. Neither clinical markers of infection nor economic parameters showed significant differences between the groups. Within the catchment area of our institution, the majority of third molar-related hospitalizations resulted from diseased third molars or their removal.

  2. Cultural competency assessment tool for hospitals: evaluating hospitals' adherence to the culturally and linguistically appropriate services standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Dreachslin, Janice L; Brown, Julie; Pradhan, Rohit; Rubin, Kelly L; Schiller, Cameron; Hays, Ron D

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. national standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS) in health care provide guidelines on policies and practices aimed at developing culturally competent systems of care. The Cultural Competency Assessment Tool for Hospitals (CCATH) was developed as an organizational tool to assess adherence to the CLAS standards. First, we describe the development of the CCATH and estimate the reliability and validity of the CCATH measures. Second, we discuss the managerial implications of the CCATH as an organizational tool to assess cultural competency. We pilot tested an initial draft of the CCATH, revised it based on a focus group and cognitive interviews, and then administered it in a field test with a sample of California hospitals. The reliability and validity of the CCATH were evaluated using factor analysis, analysis of variance, and Cronbach's alphas. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified 12 CCATH composites: leadership and strategic planning, data collection on inpatient population, data collection on service area, performance management systems and quality improvement, human resources practices, diversity training, community representation, availability of interpreter services, interpreter services policies, quality of interpreter services, translation of written materials, and clinical cultural competency practices. All the CCATH scales had internal consistency reliability of .65 or above, and the reliability was .70 or above for 9 of the 12 scales. Analysis of variance results showed that not-for-profit hospitals have higher CCATH scores than for-profit hospitals in five CCATH scales and higher CCATH scores than government hospitals in two CCATH scales. The CCATH showed adequate psychometric properties. Managers and policy makers can use the CCATH as a tool to evaluate hospital performance in cultural competency and identify and target improvements in hospital policies and practices that undergird the provision

  3. [On hospital emergency department crowding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, Pere; Mòdol, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a range of measures deployed to curb crowding in hospital emergency departments, but as episodes of overcrowding continue to occur the discussion of causes and possible solutions remains open. The problem is universal, and efforts to revamp health care systems as a result of current socioeconomic circumstances have put emergency services in the spotlight. Consensus was recently achieved on criteria that define emergency department overcrowding. The causes are diverse and include both external factors and internal ones, in the form of attributes specific to a department. The factors that have the most impact, however, involve hospital organization, mainly the availability of beds and the difficulty of assigning them to emergency patients requiring admission. Crowding is associated with decreases in most health care quality indicators, as departments see increases in the number of patients waiting, the time until initial processing, and the time until a physician or nurse intervenes. Crowding is also associated with risk for more unsatisfactory clinical outcomes. This situation leads to dissatisfaction all around-of patients, families, and staff-as aspects such as dignity, comfort, and privacy deteriorate. Proposals to remedy the problem include assuring that the staff and structural resources of a facility meet minimum standards and are all working properly, facilitating access to complementary tests, and providing observation areas and short-stay units. The response of hospitals to the situation in emergency departments should include alternatives to conventional admission, through means for rapid diagnosis, day hospitals, and home hospitalization as well as by offering a clear response in cases where admission is needed, granting easier access to beds that are in fact available. For its part, the health system overall, should improve the care of patients with chronic diseases, so that fewer admissions are required. It is also essential to

  4. Hospital Capital Investment During the Great Recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung

    2017-01-01

    Hospital capital investment is important for acquiring and maintaining technology and equipment needed to provide health care. Reduction in capital investment by a hospital has negative implications for patient outcomes. Most hospitals rely on debt and internal cash flow to fund capital investment. The great recession may have made it difficult for hospitals to borrow, thus reducing their capital investment. I investigated the impact of the great recession on capital investment made by California hospitals. Modeling how hospital capital investment may have been liquidity constrained during the recession is a novel contribution to the literature. I estimated the model with California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development data and system generalized method of moments. Findings suggest that not-for-profit and public hospitals were liquidity constrained during the recession. Comparing the changes in hospital capital investment between 2006 and 2009 showed that hospitals used cash flow to increase capital investment by $2.45 million, other things equal.

  5. Electromagnetic fields from two potential fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauca, J.; Doria, R.; Soares, W.

    2012-10-01

    Maxwell electromagnetism is generalized through a model that includes N-potential fields in a same group. Anew rule for the photon field is defined from a fourth interpretation to the light invariance. It becomes a directive particle while others potential fields appears as circumstance particles. Its most primitive coupling is not more with electric charge but with the Noether systemic charge. Studying the case with two potential fields, one derives the corresponding granular and collective electromagnetic fields with antisymmetric and symmetric nature. As a first feature, differently from Maxwell equation such systemic photon field does not follow the expression inversely proportional to the distance. This work calculates the subsequent branch of elecromagnetic fields {→EI-→BI,→e-→b;ɛI,→ɛI,βIij,s,→s,sij}.

  6. [Hospital admissions due to varicella in a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Laura, K P; Periañez Vasco, A; Falcón Neyra, M D; Croche Santander, B

    2014-06-01

    Varicella (chickenpox) can cause serious complications and admission to hospital. Several countries included the varicella vaccine in their immunization schedules. A descriptive and retrospective study of hospitalizations due to varicella and its complications was conducted in a referral center from 2005 to 2011. A total of 1192 children with varicella were seen in the emergency room, of which 99 (8.5%) required admission. The annual incidence of admissions due to varicella and varicella complications was, 19.4 and 15.3 cases per 100,000 children under 14 years, respectively. Complications were more common in children under 5 years (79.5%), and with no underlying disease (78.2%). Infection of skin and soft tissue was the most common complication (62%). The mean hospital stay was 4.5 days (SD 4). Varicella causes high morbidity, and is more frequent in absolute terms in healthy children under 5 years of age. Therefore, routine vaccination recommended by the Immunization Advisory Committee should be mandatory. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Quality indicators for the hospital transfusion chain : A national survey conducted in 100 dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlker-Jansen, Pauline Y.; Janssen, M. P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818208; van Tilborgh-de Jong, A. J W; Schipperus, M. R.; Wiersum-Osselton, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2011 Dutch Blood Transfusion Guideline for hospitals incorporates seven internal quality indicators for evaluation of the hospital transfusion chain. The indicators aim to measure guideline compliance as shown by the instatement of a hospital transfusion committee and transfusion

  8. Mold remediation in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tang G

    2009-01-01

    As occupants in a hospital, patients are susceptible to air contaminants that can include biological agents dispersed throughout the premise. An exposed patient can become ill and require medical intervention. A consideration for patients is that they may have become environmentally sensitive and require placement in an environment that does not compromise their health. Unfortunately, the hospital environment often contains more biological substances than can be expected in an office or home environment. When a hospital also experiences water intrusion such as flooding or water leaks, resulting mold growth can seriously compromise the health of patients and others such as nursing staff and physicians (Burge, Indoor Air and Infectious Disease. Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews, 1980; Lutz et al., Clinical Infectious Diseases 37: 786-793, 2003). Micro-organism growth can propagate if the water is not addressed quickly and effectively. Immunocompromised patients are particularly at risk when subjected to fungal infection such that the US Center for Disease Control issued guideline for building mold in health care facilities (Centers for Disease and Control [CDC], Centers for Disease and Control: Questions and Answers on Stachybotrys chartarum and Other Molds, 2000). This paper is based on mold remediation of one portion of a hospital unit due to water from construction activity and inadequate maintenance, resulting in mold growth. A large proportion of the hospital staff, primarily nurses in the dialysis unit, exhibited health symptoms consistent with mold exposure. Unfortunately, the hospital administrators did not consider the mold risk to be serious and refused an independent consultant retained by the nurse's union to examine the premise (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation [CBC], Nurses file complaints over mold at Foothills. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 2003). The nurse's union managed to have the premise examined by submitting a court order of

  9. [The nursing role in field amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aït-Mohammed, Farid; Waroux, Stanislas; Lefort, Hugues

    2015-03-01

    Field amputation is a surgical procedure which consists in removing one or several limbs of a victim to extricate them from rubble and evacuate them to a hospital. A last resort, it is a rarely-performed procedure, carried out primarily in disaster medicine. A team which worked in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake reports on one such clinical situation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  11. How fields vary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Monika

    2017-04-06

    Field theorists have long insisted that research needs to pay attention to the particular properties of each field studied. But while much field-theoretical research is comparative, either explicitly or implicitly, scholars have only begun to develop the language for describing the dimensions along which fields can be similar to and different from each other. In this context, this paper articulates an agenda for the analysis of variable properties of fields. It discusses variation in the degree but also in the kind of field autonomy. It discusses different dimensions of variation in field structure: fields can be more or less contested, and more or less hierarchical. The structure of symbolic oppositions in a field may take different forms. Lastly, it analyses the dimensions of variation highlighted by research on fields on the sub- and transnational scale. Post-national analysis allows us to ask how fields relate to fields of the same kind on different scales, and how fields relate to fields on the same scale in other national contexts. It allows us to ask about the role resources from other scales play in structuring symbolic oppositions within fields. A more fine-tuned vocabulary for field variation can help us better describe particular fields and it is a precondition for generating hypotheses about the conditions under which we can expect to observe fields with specified characteristics. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  12. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care.

  13. Reasons for discharge delays in teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Soraia Aparecida da; Valácio, Reginaldo Aparecido; Botelho, Flávia Carvalho; Amaral, Carlos Faria Santos

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the causes of delay in hospital discharge of patients admitted to internal medicine wards. We reviewed 395 medical records of consecutive patients admitted to internal medicine wards of two public teaching hospitals: Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais and Hospital Odilon Behrens. The Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol was used to define the moment at which notes in the medical records indicated hospital stay was no longer appropriate and patients could be discharged. The interval between this estimated time and actual discharge was defined as the total number of days of delay in hospital discharge. An instrument was used to systematically categorize reasons for delay in hospital discharge and frequencies were analyzed. Delays in discharge occurred in 60.0% of 207 hospital admissions in the Hospital das Clínicas and in 58.0% of 188 hospital admissions in the Hospital Odilon Behrens. Mean delay per patient was 4.5 days in the former and 4.1 days in the latter, corresponding to 23.0% and 28.0% of occupancy rates in each hospital, respectively. The main reasons for delay in the two hospitals were, respectively, waiting for complementary tests (30.6% versus 34.7%) or for results of performed tests to be released (22.4% versus 11.9%) and medical-related accountability (36.2% versus 26.1%) which comprised delays in discussing the clinical case and in clinical decision making and difficulties in providing specialized consultation (20.4% versus 9.1%). Both hospitals showed a high percentage of delay in hospital discharge. The delays were mainly related to processes that could be improved by interventions by care teams and managers. The impact on mean length of stay and hospital occupancy rates was significant and troubling in a scenario of relative shortage of beds and long waiting lists for hospital admission.

  14. The marketing of partial hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsap, P; Brown, E; Kiser, L; Pruitt, D

    1987-09-01

    Health-care professionals are currently operating in the context of a rapidly changing health-care delivery system, including the move away from inpatient services to outpatient services in order to control costs. Those who practice in partial-hospital settings are in a position to offer effective, cost-efficient services; however, there continue to be obstacles which hinder appropriate utilization of the modality. The development and use of a well-designed marketing plan is one strategy for removing these obstacles. This paper presents a brief overview of the marketing process, ideas for developing a marketing plan, and several examples of specific marketing strategies as well as ways to monitor their effectiveness. Partial-hospital providers must take an active role in answering the calls for alternative sources of psychiatric care. A comprehensive, education-oriented marketing approach will increase the public's awareness of such alternatives and enable programs to survive in a competitive environment.

  15. CURRENT TRENDS IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Batinić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hospitality industry is a complex product-service economic activity which besides accommodation, food and beverages offers a variety of complementary and ancillary services in order to meet modern needs, demands and desires of tourists consumers. Contemporary needs, demands and desires of tourists consumers (increased need for security and preservation of health; emphasis on ecology and healthy food; pure nature stay; growing demand for adventure activities and excitement; convention facilities and incentive offerings; visits to towns, big sports, cultural, religious, business events; new travel motivation have led to the emergence of new trends in hospitality offering design. Wellness and spa hotels, boutique hotels, all inclusive hotels, slow-food restaurants, and wine and lounge bars are just some of the main trends, and successful hoteliers and caterers will examine each of the trends and devise development politics in accordance with the new requirements and global market needs.

  16. Hospital and Community Pharmacists' Perceptions of Which Competences Are Important for Their Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey; Sánchez Pozo, Antonio; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Volmer, Daisy; Hirvonen, Jouni; Bozic, Borut; Skowron, Agnieska; Mircioiu, Constantin; Sandulovici, Roxana; Marcincal, Annie; Koster, Andries; Wilson, Keith A; van Schravendijk, Chris; Frontini, Roberto; Price, Richard; Bates, Ian; De Paepe, Kristien

    2016-06-15

    The objective of the PHAR-QA (Quality assurance in European pharmacy education and training) project was to investigate how competence-based learning could be applied to a healthcare, sectoral profession such as pharmacy. This is the first study on evaluation of competences from the pharmacists' perspective using an improved Delphi method with a large number of respondents from all over Europe. This paper looks at the way in which hospital pharmacists rank the fundamental competences for pharmacy practice. European hospital pharmacists (n = 152) ranked 68 competences for pharmacy practice of two types (personal and patient care), arranged into 13 clusters. Results were compared to those obtained from community pharmacists (n = 258). Generally, hospital and community pharmacists rank competences in a similar way. Nevertheless, differences can be detected. The higher focus of hospital pharmacists on knowledge of the different areas of science as well as on laboratory tests reflects the idea of a hospital pharmacy specialisation. The difference is also visible in the field of drug production. This is a necessary competence in hospitals with requests for drugs for rare diseases, as well as paediatric and oncologic drugs. Hospital pharmacists give entrepreneurship a lower score, but cost-effectiveness a higher one than community pharmacists. This reflects the reality of pharmacy practice where community pharmacists have to act as entrepreneurs, and hospital pharmacists are managers staying within drug budgets. The results are discussed in the light of a "hospital pharmacy" specialisation.

  17. Hospital and Community Pharmacists’ Perceptions of Which Competences Are Important for Their Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the PHAR-QA (Quality assurance in European pharmacy education and training project was to investigate how competence-based learning could be applied to a healthcare, sectoral profession such as pharmacy. This is the first study on evaluation of competences from the pharmacists’ perspective using an improved Delphi method with a large number of respondents from all over Europe. This paper looks at the way in which hospital pharmacists rank the fundamental competences for pharmacy practice. European hospital pharmacists (n = 152 ranked 68 competences for pharmacy practice of two types (personal and patient care, arranged into 13 clusters. Results were compared to those obtained from community pharmacists (n = 258. Generally, hospital and community pharmacists rank competences in a similar way. Nevertheless, differences can be detected. The higher focus of hospital pharmacists on knowledge of the different areas of science as well as on laboratory tests reflects the idea of a hospital pharmacy specialisation. The difference is also visible in the field of drug production. This is a necessary competence in hospitals with requests for drugs for rare diseases, as well as paediatric and oncologic drugs. Hospital pharmacists give entrepreneurship a lower score, but cost-effectiveness a higher one than community pharmacists. This reflects the reality of pharmacy practice where community pharmacists have to act as entrepreneurs, and hospital pharmacists are managers staying within drug budgets. The results are discussed in the light of a “hospital pharmacy” specialisation.

  18. High-level managers' considerations for RFID adoption in hospitals: an empirical study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hui-Min; Lin, I-Chun; Tseng, Ling-Tzu

    2014-02-01

    Prior researches have indicated that an appropriate adoption of information technology (IT) can help hospitals significantly improve services and operations. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is believed to be the next generation innovation technology for automatic data collection and asset/people tracking. Based on the Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE) framework, this study investigated high-level managers' considerations for RFID adoption in hospitals. This research reviewed literature related IT adoption in business and followed the results of a preliminary survey with 37 practical experts in hospitals to theorize a model for the RFID adoption in hospitals. Through a field survey of 102 hospitals and hypotheses testing, this research identified key factors influencing RFID adoption. Follow-up in-depth interviews with three high-level managers of IS department from three case hospitals respectively also presented an insight into the decision of RFID's adoption. Based on the research findings, cost, ubiquity, compatibility, security and privacy risk, top management support, hospital scale, financial readiness and government policy were concluded to be the key factors influencing RFID adoption in hospitals. For practitioners, this study provided a comprehensive overview of government policies able to promote the technology, while helping the RFID solution providers understand how to reduce the IT barriers in order to enhance hospitals' willingness to adopt RFID.

  19. CURRENT TRENDS IN HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Ivica Batinić

    2013-01-01

    Hospitality industry is a complex product-service economic activity which besides accommodation, food and beverages offers a variety of complementary and ancillary services in order to meet modern needs, demands and desires of tourists consumers. Contemporary needs, demands and desires of tourists consumers (increased need for security and preservation of health; emphasis on ecology and healthy food; pure nature stay; growing demand for adventure activities and e...

  20. Hospitality Management: Learning, Doing, Knowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Muller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Is there something distinct about the traditional Hospitality Management curriculum? First offered in 1893 at the Ecole Hoteliere Lausanne in Switzerland and launched in the United States at The School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University in 1922, has this course of study evolved over time to focus on both of Meyer's skills - originally based on technical skills but now transforming to emotional skills?

  1. International Journal of Hospitality Management

    OpenAIRE

    Woo, Gon Kima, 1,; Hyunjung, Limb,; Robert, A. Brymerc, 2,

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how managing online reviews affects hotel performance. An international hotel chain provided the hotel performance data and the online review data. A leading social media firm for the hospitality industry collected the online review data, which the hotel company purchased. The results indicate that overall ratings are the most salient predictor of hotel performance, followed by response to negative comments. The better the overall ratings and the higher the response ra...

  2. Eliminating US hospital medical errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Steinebach, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare costs in the USA have continued to rise steadily since the 1980s. Medical errors are one of the major causes of deaths and injuries of thousands of patients every year, contributing to soaring healthcare costs. The purpose of this study is to examine what has been done to deal with the medical-error problem in the last two decades and present a closed-loop mistake-proof operation system for surgery processes that would likely eliminate preventable medical errors. The design method used is a combination of creating a service blueprint, implementing the six sigma DMAIC cycle, developing cause-and-effect diagrams as well as devising poka-yokes in order to develop a robust surgery operation process for a typical US hospital. In the improve phase of the six sigma DMAIC cycle, a number of poka-yoke techniques are introduced to prevent typical medical errors (identified through cause-and-effect diagrams) that may occur in surgery operation processes in US hospitals. It is the authors' assertion that implementing the new service blueprint along with the poka-yokes, will likely result in the current medical error rate to significantly improve to the six-sigma level. Additionally, designing as many redundancies as possible in the delivery of care will help reduce medical errors. Primary healthcare providers should strongly consider investing in adequate doctor and nurse staffing, and improving their education related to the quality of service delivery to minimize clinical errors. This will lead to an increase in higher fixed costs, especially in the shorter time frame. This paper focuses additional attention needed to make a sound technical and business case for implementing six sigma tools to eliminate medical errors that will enable hospital managers to increase their hospital's profitability in the long run and also ensure patient safety.

  3. Business Intelligence in Hospital Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Achim; Hainc, Nicolin; Boll, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Business intelligence (BI) is a worthwhile investment, and will play a significant role in hospital management in the near future. Implementation of BI is challenging and requires resources, skills, and a strategy, but enables management to have easy access to relevant analysis of data and visualization of important key performance indicators (KPI). Modern BI applications will help to overcome shortages of common "hand-made" analysis, save time and money, and will enable even managers to do "self-service" analysis and reporting.

  4. Hospital treatment of HIV patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, Samuel Olawale

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria has progressed from the stage of inactivity, unconcern, abandonment and neglect to the present stage of holistic care involving treatment of the infection with Highly Active Anti Retroviral Agents, complications of the disease and side effects of antiretroviral therapy as well as that of human behavioural responses towards the disease with hope and promising outcome. The goal of the treatment is to prolong the patient's life while maintaining the best possible quality of health and life. It is now a continuum of care between the hospital and the different sectors of the community. Hospital treatment of patients with HIV-AIDS is complex and yet a simple task if there is healthy interaction of the patients and health care providers in a milieu of well equipped hospital setting with available treatment facilities for proper management of diseases. Similarly, for the care to achieve its goal, it requires a joint participation of the community and the commitment of the government not only on curtailment of the reservoir of HIV infection by antiretroviral therapy but total eradication of diseases, poverty and ignorance in all its entirety.

  5. Welfare standards in hospital mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, Katalin; Canoy, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    There is a broad literature on the consequences of applying different welfare standards in merger control. Total welfare is usually defined as the sum of consumer and provider surplus, i.e., potential external effects are not considered. The general result is then that consumer welfare is a more restrictive standard than total welfare, which is advantageous in certain situations. This relationship between the two standards is not necessarily true when the merger has significant external effects. We model mergers on hospital markets and allow for not-profit-maximizing behavior of providers and mandatory health insurance. Mandatory health insurance detaches the financial and consumption side of health care markets, and the concept consumer in merger control becomes non-evident. Patients not visiting the merging hospitals still are affected by price changes through their insurance premiums. External financial effects emerge on not directly affected consumers. We show that applying a restricted interpretation of consumer (neglecting externality) in health care merger control can reverse the relation between the two standards; consumer welfare standard can be weaker than total welfare. Consequently, applying the wrong standard can lead to both clearing socially undesirable and to blocking socially desirable mergers. The possible negative consequences of applying a simple consumer welfare standard in merger control can be even stronger when hospitals maximize quality and put less weight on financial considerations. We also investigate the implications of these results for the practice of merger control.

  6. Phase Field Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Toshiyuki

    The term phase field has recently become known across many fields of materials science. The meaning of phase field is the spatial and temporal order parameter field defined in a continuum-diffused interface model. By using the phase field order parameters, many types of complex microstructure changes observed in materials science are described effectively. This methodology has been referred to as the phase field method, phase field simulation, phase field modeling, phase field approach, etc. In this chapter, the basic concept and theoretical background for the phase field approach is explained in Sects. 21.1 and 21.2. The overview of recent applications of the phase field method is demonstrated in Sects. 21.3 to 21.6.

  7. Neuritic Patient at Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Putu Dita-Rinjani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Treatment of optic neuritic as recommended by the Optic Neuritic Treatment Trial (ONTT was intravenous methylprednisolon followed by oral prednisone. This study aims to describe  characteristics and response to intravenous methylprednisolon followed by oral prednisone treatment of optic neuritic patient in Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar. Method: This report is an analytical cross sectional study. Data were collected retrospectively from medical report of optic neuritic patient who came to Sanglah General Hospital during a period of January 1st 2010 until December 31st 2011. Patient characteristics were analyzed with descriptive analyses and presented as frequency, percentage, mean and standar deviation. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity improvement after intravenous methylprednisolon followed by oral prednisone treatment were statistically analyzed with Wilcoxon test Results:  Optic neuritic were found in twenty-three patients (33 eyes, majority was in age group of 15-40 years (56.5% with female predominance (65.2% and unilateral involvement was 56.3%. Mean onset patient presented to the hospital was 21.7±2.21 days and the most common symptom was decreasing vision (87.9%.  The majority of patient presented with papillitis (54.5%, totally color blindness found in 39.4% eyes, and the type of visual field defect at presentation was central scotoma (18.2%. All cases show lesion of optic nerve from visual evoked potential (VEP examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI shows normal results (39.1% patient. The mean of pretreatment logMAR visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were significant improve after treatment from 1.59±0.47 to 0.59±0.62 (p=0.0001 and 0.31±0.56 to 1.25±0.56 (p=0.0001, respectively. All cases in this study were idiopathic. Recurrences were seen in 2 eyes and none of patient had clinical features suggestive of multiple sclerosis. Conclusions: Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity improvement

  8. Food production and service in UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Jones, Eleri; Redmond, Elizabeth; Hewedi, Mahmoud; Wingert, Andreas; Gad El Rab, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply value stream mapping holistically to hospital food production/service systems focused on high-quality food. Multiple embedded case study of three (two private-sector and one public-sector) hospitals in the UK. The results indicated various issues affecting hospital food production including: the menu and nutritional considerations; food procurement; food production; foodservice; patient perceptions/expectations. Value stream mapping is a new approach for food production systems in UK hospitals whether private or public hospitals. The paper identifies opportunities for enhancing hospital food production systems. The paper provides a theoretical basis for process enhancement of hospital food production and the provision of high-quality hospital food.

  9. Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Lim...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Limited Data Set This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 hospital outpatient PPS...

  10. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  11. Metadata - National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) is an annual probability survey that collects information on the characteristics of inpatients discharged from non-federal short-stay hospitals in the United States.

  12. Medical Professionals Designing Hospital Management Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg, Vibeke

    especially have been reformed due to the high proportion of resources they absorb and the apparent difficulty of prioritizing and coordinating health care within hospitals. There is abundant research literature on the topic of reforming hospital management models. Lacking from the literature, however......, is insight into how we can understand and explain how medical professionals adapt hospital management over time in relation to changing hospital management models that are global in their influence in hospital organizations. The aim of this dissertation is to understand and explain how medical professionals...... adapt, interpret and negotiate hospital management over time in relation to changing hospital management models in hospital organizations in the Nordic health system context, illustrated by the Danish health system....

  13. Fewer Americans Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_166896.html Fewer Americans Hospitalized for Heart Failure But blacks still face far greater odds than ... HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans hospitalized for heart failure has dropped substantially since 2002, but blacks still ...

  14. At Major Teaching Hospitals, Lower Death Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_165869.html At Major Teaching Hospitals, Lower Death Rates Researchers assess 30-day survival for older ... dies," said lead author Dr. Laura Burke. If death rates at non-teaching hospitals were similar to ...

  15. Enhancing Medicares Hospital Acquired Conditions Policy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The current Medicare policy of non-payment to hospitals for Hospital Acquired Conditions (HAC) seeks to avoid payment for preventable complications identified within...

  16. Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166427.html Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery: Study Screening for ... 9, 2017 FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression affects about one-third of hospital patients and ...

  17. Acute IPPS - Disproportionate Share Hospital - DSH

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — There are two methods for a hospital to qualify for the Medicare DSH adjustment. The primary method is for a hospital to qualify based on a statutory formula that...

  18. Non-VA Hospital System (NVH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) pays for care provided to VA beneficiaries in non-VA hospitals through its contract hospitalization program as mandated by...

  19. Financially fragile rural hospitals: mergers and closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Rural hospitals serve as major sources of health care and employment for their communities, but recently they have been under increased financial stress. What are the causes of this stress, and how have hospitals and their communities responded?

  20. Fast Facts on U.S. Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Action Center Current & Emerging Payment Models Leveraging Technology Quality and Patient Safety Access & Health Coverage Strategic Workforce Compliance Issues for You Small or Rural Hospitals Critical Access Hospitals Long Term Care & Rehabilitation Health ...

  1. Making Hospitals Less Traumatic. Child Life Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, Peggy O.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the importance of child life specialists and programs in helping children cope with the stress and anxiety of hospital experiences. These specialists and programs promote children's growth and development both in the hospital and after returning home. (BB)

  2. Characteristics and outcome among patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Factors associated with survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trpković S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to define factors associated with an improved outcome among patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA using the Utstain style data collection. We examined 200 patients suffering from OHCA in a prospective study in a two years period. We determined survival from cardiac arrest (CA to discharge from hospital and the factors associated with survival. 78% of CA patients had a cardiac aetiology, 65% occurred at home, 3.7% received bystander CPR. 36% were found in VF/VT, 64% in asystole/PEA. 52% of patients were intubated in the field, survival to discharge from hospital was significantly higher among patients who were intubated in the field. The mean response time was 6.6 minutes. 66.7% of patients were given the shock after 4 minutes. 131 (65.5% were pronounced dead in the field, 69 patients were transported to the hospital. 53 (76.8% patients of them died during the transport or in the ED, 7 died after hospital admission and 9 survived to hospital discharge. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that variables significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge were: age, endotracheal intubation in the field and mean response time. The outcome of CPR was better in patients who were younger, who were intubated in the field and when the response time was shorter.

  3. "The Killing Fields" of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This paper points to seemingly contradicted processes of framing innovation, idea generation and killing ideas. It reports from a yearlong innovation project, where health care professionals explored problems and tested ideas for solutions, regarding a future downsizing of the case hospital....... Theories in various ways describe the opening and closing phases of innovation. Exploration and idea generation opens a field of interest, which is then closed by making choices of ideas to further explore in the next opening phase. These choices deliberately kill a lot of ideas. In the innovation project......, however, substantial amounts of relevant ideas got killed during opening phases, where the purpose of activities was framed as idea generation. These ideas were either verbally or silently killed, and some in rather contradicted ways: The design and facilitation of brain storming processes lead...

  4. Recognition of dementia in hospitalized older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Katie; Mezey, Mathy

    2008-01-01

    Many hospital patients with dementia have no documented dementia diagnosis. In some cases, this is because they have never been diagnosed. Recognition of Dementia in Hospitalized Older Adults proposes several approaches that hospital nurses can use to increase recognition of dementia. This article describes the Try This approaches, how to implement them, and how to incorporate them into a hospital's current admission procedures. For a free online video demonstrating the use of these approaches, go to http://links.lww.com/A216.

  5. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    M Adib Hajbaghery; Akbari, H.; GA Mousavi

    2005-01-01

    Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and unt...

  6. Images of hospitality: validation of experiential dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Pijls-Hoekstra, Ruth; Groen, Brenda H.; Galetzka, Mirjam; Pruyn, Adriaan T.H.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitality is a much-researched topic, but its definition is still debated. This paper is part of a larger research project into the perception of hospitality. Previous research using the Delphi-method (hospitality providers and experts) and the Critical Incident Technique (guests and consumers) yielded a concept of hospitality containing nine experiential dimensions. However, verbal methods require respondents to recognize and phrase their experiences, even though part of this experience is...

  7. Current trends in hospital mergers and acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas C; Werling, Krist A; Walker, Barton C; Burgdorfer, Rex J; Shields, J Jordan

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare reform will impact hospital consolidation in three key areas: Payment rates will decrease, indirectly encouraging consolidation by forcing hospitals to find new ways to reduce costs and increase negotiating clout with suppliers and payers. The cost of doing business will increase as hospitals spend more on compliance, technology, and physician employment. The ACO model will encourage hospital network formation by rewarding integrated healthcare systems that can reduce costs and improve quality.

  8. [The challenges and opportunities of implementing outsourcing in private and public hospitals in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Benny; Mizrahi, Ronit; Magnezi, Racheli

    2011-01-01

    Outsourcing is a method that enables an organization to focus on its expertise by transferring its other services to professionals who can fulfill them. In recent years, research has repeatedly shown that health services use a variety of outsourcing companies. To describe the experience acquired using outsourcing in public and private hospitals in Israel, and to present the factors, budgetary parameters, opportunities and problems affecting outsourcing. The questionnaire was sent to 36 hospitals in Israel, constituting 88.2% of all hospitals in Israel--private, public, H.M.O ("Clalit") and governmental. The response to the questionnaire reached 97.2% and revealed the following: 94% of the hospitals use outsourcing services in the following fields: security, cleaning, Laundry service, cafeterias, and I.T.; 42% of the hospitals assign 0-5% of their annual budget for outsourcing contracts. Private hospitals use more outsourcing services than public hospitals. The factors driving outsourcing are: cost restrictions (82.8%), operational flexibility (77%), and focus on the core business (74.2%). The potential advantages of outsourcing are: improvement in services 180.5%), customer satisfaction (72.2%), and cost reduction (69.4%). Difficulties affecting outsourcing are: dependence on external resources (83.3%] and internal organizational resistance (69.4%). The results of the outsourcing are lower costs, reduced number of personnel by 1-10% and high level of satisfaction. It seems that in recent years outsourcing is being used in hospitals and is central to the areas of infrastructure and logistics, as well as legal and medical services. Using outsourcing in hospitals provides opportunities for improved customer satisfaction, better focus for the hospital on its core activities and cost reduction. HospitaLs that succeed in synergetically integrating the external and the internal service providers will flourish. INNOVATION/VALUE: This research exposes, for the first time

  9. Marketing skills for hospital-based laboratory managers in a managed care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchwinski, J; Coggins, F

    1997-01-01

    Managers of hospital-based laboratories have begun to realize the importance of a successful outreach program in protecting against declining inpatient activity. Succeeding in the highly competitive field of outpatient testing requires some new skills and techniques that may not have been apparent when addressing normal inpatient requirements. This article provides an overview of some very basic marketing concepts and attempts to show how they can assist the hospital-based laboratory manager in developing a successful outreach program.

  10. Hospital Managers’ Perception of Recent Health Care Reform in Teaching Hospitals of Qazvin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria Kiaei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background The main purpose of any government from a healthcare reform is to improve the service quality and raised public satisfaction. Objectives As the important role of managerial human resources in any organizational changes, this paper tried to examine the point of view of this group about the recent reform in governmental hospitals of Qazvin. Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in January 2015. The statistical population consisted of 50 executive managers of Qazvin teaching hospitals. The data gathering instrument was a research-made questionnaire with approved reliability and validity (α = 0.84. Data analyse was performed in SPSS version 20 using descriptive and analytic statistics (analysis of variance (ANOVA, Pearson correlation test and one sample t-test. Results A total of 43.2% of managers believed that this reform was a good restrictor for malpractices in healthcare and 31.8% believed that it will not be so useful to improve the society health status. The average score of resource preparation, insurance companies coordination, changing the routine workflows, and finally achieving the goals, had a meaningful difference (P ˂ 0.05 and the average score of these fields were upper than average. Conclusions The findings showed that based on the managers’ point of view, the reform plan was able to achieve its primary goals; however, it could not meet their exceptions in improving the society health status. Therefore, it is necessary to design some interventions for changing this perception.

  11. Developing Marketing Strategies for University Teaching Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Daniel J.

    1980-01-01

    University teaching hospitals face increasing competition from community hospitals, expanding regulation of health care, consumerism, and a declining urban population base. New marketing strategies are seen as ways in which teaching hospitals can achieve better relationships with institutions, practitioners, and surrounding communities and…

  12. Cytogenotoxicity Screening of Untreated Hospital Wastewaters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2005-09-05

    Sep 5, 2005 ... 1999). Hospital wastewater samples are very often different in nature eliciting different effects on biological systems. The aim of the paper was to investigate the potential toxicity and genotoxicity of an untreated hospital wastewaters obtained from a University. Teaching Hospital in the Niger Delta Region of.

  13. Patients who fall in hospital - Contributing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Bright

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective study of the factors which contributed to accidental injuries sustained by those patients who fell in a White provincial hospital in die period 1 January to 30 June 1982. The research study was undertaken by Diploma in Nursing Administration students during their 3-week hospital practice at a White provincial hospital.

  14. Images of hospitality : validation of experiential dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijls-Hoekstra, Ruth; Groen, Brenda H.; Galetzka, Mirjam; Pruyn, Ad T.H.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitality is a much-researched topic, but its definition is still debated. This paper is part of a larger research project into the perception of hospitality. Previous research using the Delphi-method (hospitality providers and experts) and the Critical Incident Technique (guests and consumers)

  15. The visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromie, H.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1989 there has been a burgeoning of the visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals. This paper compares the three organisational models for hospital arts currently operating within the Province and in an overview discusses ways to coordinate working practice for future development of the visual arts in local hospitals. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:8533183

  16. Inappropriate involuntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inappropriate involuntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals. P L van der Merwe, A Allan, M M Allan. Abstract. Background. In order to preserve scarce resources, treabnent in tertiary psychiatric hospitals should be restricted to those whose treatment needs make admission to such hospitals essential. However, anecdotal ...

  17. Images of hospitality: validation of experiential dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijls-Hoekstra, Ruth; Pijls-Hoekstra, Ruth; Groen, Brenda H.; Galetzka, Mirjam; Pruyn, Adriaan T.H.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitality is a much-researched topic, but its definition is still debated. This paper is part of a larger research project into the perception of hospitality. Previous research using the Delphi-method (hospitality providers and experts) and the Critical Incident Technique (guests and consumers)

  18. Health information exchange among US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; DesRoches, Catherine M; Jha, Ashish K

    2011-11-01

    To determine the proportion of US hospitals engaged in health information exchange (HIE) with unaffiliated providers and to identify key hospital-level and market-level factors associated with participating in exchange. Using the 2009 American Hospital Association Information Technology survey, supplemented by Dartmouth Atlas, Area Resource File, and other national data, we examined which hospitals participated in regional efforts to electronically exchange clinical data. We used logistic regression models to determine hospital-level characteristics and market-level characteristics associated with hospitals' likelihood of participating in HIE. We found that 10.7% of US hospitals engaged in HIE with unaffiliated providers. In communities where exchange occurred, for-profit hospitals and those with a small market share were far less likely to engage in HIE than nonprofit hospitals or those with a larger market share. Hospitals in more concentrated markets were more likely to exchange and hospitals in markets with higher Medicare spending were less likely to exchange. At the start of implementation of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, only a small minority of US hospitals electronically exchange clinical data with unaffiliated providers. Health information exchange is a key part of reforming the healthcare system, and factors related to competitiveness may be holding some providers back.

  19. Field Campaign Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, J. W. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Chapman, L. A. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document establishes a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking System and are specifically tailored to meet the scope of each field campaign.

  20. Prescription writing quality in paediatric teaching hospitals in Khartoum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Amira E; Abdelrahman, Sirageldin M K

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to analyze the quality of prescription writing of doctors in outpatient departments of paediatric teaching hospitals in Khartoum. This study is a descriptive cross- sectional, prospective, hospital based study. Nine hundred paediatric prescriptions collected from three paediatric teaching hospitals were analyzed. Three hundred prescriptions were also collected from doctors after giving them a case scenario for which they were asked to write appropriate prescriptions. These prescriptions were also analyzed for their completeness. Inadequate writing of the sex of the patient, weight, and height were notable regarding patient information. Generic names, concentration of the drug and treatment duration of the drug were poorly mentioned. Designation and identification of the prescriber were not adequately mentioned. In the case scenario 65.3 % of doctors wrote low quality prescriptions. Registrars wrote better prescriptions than medical officers who wrote better than house officers. Outpatient department prescriptions were unsatisfactory due to lack of necessary information for the ideal prescription. Also doctors, in response to case scenario, wrote low quality prescriptions. To improve prescription writing skills, we suggest that hospitals should provide standard prescription forms that contain the necessary fields for identification of both, patient and doctor.

  1. [The study of medical supplies automation replenishment algorithm in hospital on medical supplies supplying chain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xi

    2012-07-01

    The thesis aims to study the automation replenishment algorithm in hospital on medical supplies supplying chain. The mathematical model and algorithm of medical supplies automation replenishment are designed through referring to practical data form hospital on the basis of applying inventory theory, greedy algorithm and partition algorithm. The automation replenishment algorithm is proved to realize automatic calculation of the medical supplies distribution amount and optimize medical supplies distribution scheme. A conclusion could be arrived that the model and algorithm of inventory theory, if applied in medical supplies circulation field, could provide theoretical and technological support for realizing medical supplies automation replenishment of hospital on medical supplies supplying chain.

  2. Hospital characteristics and patient populations served by physician owned and non physician owned orthopedic specialty hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan-Sarrazin Mary S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of physician owned specialty hospitals focusing on high margin procedures has generated significant controversy. Yet, it is unclear whether physician owned specialty hospitals differ significantly from non physician owned specialty hospitals and thus merit the additional scrutiny that has been proposed. Our objective was to assess whether physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals and non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals differ with respect to hospital characteristics and patient populations served. Methods We conducted a descriptive study using Medicare data of beneficiaries who underwent total hip replacement (THR (N = 10,478 and total knee replacement (TKR (N = 15,312 in 29 physician owned and 8 non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals during 1999–2003. We compared hospital characteristics of physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals including procedural volumes of major joint replacements (THR and TKR, hospital teaching status, and for profit status. We then compared demographics and prevalence of common comorbid conditions for patients treated in physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals. Finally, we examined whether the socio-demographic characteristics of the neighborhoods where physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals differed, as measured by zip code level data. Results Physician owned specialty hospitals performed fewer major joint replacements on Medicare beneficiaries in 2003 than non physician owed specialty hospitals (64 vs. 678, P Conclusion Physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals differ significantly from non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals and may warrant the additional scrutiny policy makers have proposed.

  3. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Episode-of-Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) Measure 7. Electronic Clinical Quality Measures 8... for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care; Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year... 0938-AR73 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  4. Mobile Technology in Hospital Schools: What Are Hospital Teachers' Professional Learning Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Aidan; Maor, Dorit; McConney, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify hospital teachers' professional learning needs to enable effective use of mobile technology in hospital schools. Hospitalized students cannot attend their regular schools and as a result their educational progress and development can suffer. In an attempt to address this, hospital schools provide learning…

  5. Auch Führen will gelernt sein: Angebot und Nachfrage nach Weiterbildung in Betriebswirtschaftslehre für Krankenhausärzte [Leading does not come naturally: supply and demand for further training in hospital aministration for medical professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lueke, Sven; Fleßa, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    [english] The leadership of departments and hospitals requires qualifications in the fields of personnel and financial management, marketing and strategy, but only few medical experts in leadership positions...

  6. Obesity, hospital services use and costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmann, Nana Bro; Bossen, Kristine Skovgaard; Willaing, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    .5-24.9 kg/m2 were defined as normal weight. Individuals with BMI DESIGN: We undertook a 3-year retrospective study of the relationship between obesity and use of hospital resources. Data on hospital contacts and costs were obtained from The National Patient...... Registry and DRG. Analyses were performed using two-part models and Poisson regression. Outcome variables were costs and hospital contacts. RESULTS: This study has demonstrated that obese individuals have a greater use of hospital services and greater hospital costs compared with normal weight individuals...

  7. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  8. Hospital Infections in Neonatal Intensive Therapy Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cancio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Hospital infections are the most frequent and important complications occurring in hospitalized patients. The concern is greater when the affected hospital infection are neonates admitted to intensive care units where the risk increases due to factors such as prematurity, low birth weight, types of procedures adopted and susceptibility due to their immature immune system. The prevention and control measures involve detection of hospital infection, development of norms of standardization, collaboration with the training of all health professionals, achieving control of antibiotic prescription and technical support for hospital administration. 

  9. Corporate visual identity: a case in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkibay, Sanem; Ozdogan, F Bahar; Ermec, Aysegul

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present a perspective to better understand corporate identity through examining the perceptions of Turkish patients and develop a corporate visual identity scale. While there is no study related to corporate identity research on hospitals in Turkey as a developing country, understanding consumer's perceptions about corporate identity efforts of hospitals could provide different perspectives for recruiters. When the hospitals are considered in two different groups as university and state hospitals, the priority of the characteristics of corporate visual identity may change, whereas the top five characteristics remain the same for all the hospitals.

  10. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  11. The European View of Hospital Undernutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Balknäs, Ulla N.; Camilo, Maria E.

    2003-01-01

    Disease-related undernutrition is significant in European hospitals but is seldom treated or prevented. In 1999, the Council of Europe decided to collect information regarding nutrition programs in hospitals, and for this purpose, a network consisting of national experts from 12 of the Partial...... Agreement member states was established. The aim was to review the current practices in Europe regarding hospital food provision, to highlight deficiencies, and to issue recommendations to improve the nutritional care and support of hospitalized patients. Five major common problems were identified: 1) lack...... is required from national authorities and hospital staff, including managers, to ensure appropriate nutritional care and support....

  12. Patient safety in Dutch hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Cordula Wagner; Jacqueline Cuperus-Bosma; Gerrit van der Wal

    2012-01-01

    In various studies outside the Netherlands, it has been shown that a substantial number of patients suffer from some kind of harm during their treatment in hospital. The incidence of these so-called adverse events varies between 2.9% and 16.6%; it is estimated that between over a quarter and a half of these are considered to be avoidable.

    Preventable adverse events can be considered to be a starting point for interventions to increase patient safety. In response to ...

  13. Antifungal therapy in European hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarb, P; Amadeo, B; Muller, A

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification for 'antimycotics for systemic use' (J02) 2009 version was used. Demographic data and information about indications and diagnoses were collected in 2008 and 2009. From 99,053 patients, 29,324 (29.6%) received antimicrobials. Antifungals represented 1529...... of 40,878 (3.7%) antimicrobials. Antifungals were mainly (54.2%) administered orally. Hospital-acquired infections represented 44.5% of indications for antifungals followed by medical prophylaxis at 31.2%. The site of infection was not defined in 36.0% of cases but the most commonly targeted sites were...

  14. La universidad viene al hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Casana, Noemí L.; Simonetti, Estela; Sisu, María Guadalupe; Marini, María Alicia

    2016-01-01

    La Cátedra de Pediatria “B” con sede en el Hospital Zonal Especializado “Dr. Noel H. Sbarra” desarrolla un programa que abarca la enseñanza de la pediatría, fortaleciendo el compromiso con la prevención y promoción de la salud del niñ@ en su “Desarrollo Integral” que incluye desarrollo, crecimiento y ambiente, la interacción del ser humano con ese ambiente, y dentro del ambiente la relación con otros y con la cultura circundante. El desarrollo integral, ofrece una mirada holística involucr...

  15. Hubble Systems Optimize Hospital Schedules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Don Rosenthal, a former Ames Research Center computer scientist who helped design the Hubble Space Telescope's scheduling software, co-founded Allocade Inc. of Menlo Park, California, in 2004. Allocade's OnCue software helps hospitals reclaim unused capacity and optimize constantly changing schedules for imaging procedures. After starting to use the software, one medical center soon reported noticeable improvements in efficiency, including a 12 percent increase in procedure volume, 35 percent reduction in staff overtime, and significant reductions in backlog and technician phone time. Allocade now offers versions for outpatient and inpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, interventional radiology, nuclear medicine, Positron Emission Tomography (PET), radiography, radiography-fluoroscopy, and mammography.

  16. [Dialogical leadership in hospitals institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amestoy, Simone Coelho; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Waterkemper, Roberta; Heidman, Ivonete Teresinha Schülter; Boehs, Astrid Egged; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is make a theorical-reflection about the importance of using dialogical leadership in hospital institutions through Freirean referencial. The dialogical leadership pattern differs from the coercive and autocratic methods, for being reasoned on the establishment of an efficient communicational process, able to stimulate autonomy, co-responsibility and appreciation of each member from nurse team. The dialogical leadership, unlike the directive one, is a management instrument, that pursuits to minimize the conflicts and stimulate the formation of healthy interpersonal relationships, which can contribute to the improvement of organizational atmosphere and quality care provided to health services users.

  17. The Mozzafari Hospital of Shiraz, Persia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshani, Alireza; Bosmia, Anand N; Ahmadi, Aida; Adloo, Sara; Tubbs, R Shane; Bayazidi, Ali; Golshani, Amir-Hossin; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-05-01

    This article discusses three significant hospitals that were constructed in medieval Persia, specifically in the city of Shiraz, which is located in central present-day Iran. The first of these three hospitals is the Azodi Hospital, which was constructed during the Buyid dynasty. The second hospital was constructed during the Salghurid dynasty and is referred to as the Mozzafari Hospital by a primary source written by Qutb al-Din Shirazi, a physician who worked there. The third hospital is also referred to as the Mozzafari Hospital and was constructed during the Mozzafarid dynasty. Recent efforts have yielded archaeological evidence that marks the location in present-day Shiraz of this third hospital or an area south of its location. The evidence consists of the gravesite for Seyed Sharaf al-Din Jorjani, a prominent theologian who was employed by Shah Shoja of the Mozzafarid dynasty in the fourteenth century CE. at the compound containing the third hospital. The gravesite for Sharaf al-Din Jorjani in present-day Shiraz marks the site of the remains of the Mozzafari Hospital built during the reign of Shah Shoja of the Mozzafarid dynasty or an area south of Shah Shoja's Mozzafari Hospital.

  18. Psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doongaji D

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was undertaken to compare the patterns of psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals in Bombay viz. the King Edward Memorial Hospital (64 cases and the Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre (62 cases. It was observed that depressive symptoms were the most common presenting symptoms in these patients attending either of the hospitals. Similarly, the commonest diagnoses were depression and organic mental disorder. Attempted suicide with organophosphorous compounds was the commonest reason for hospitalization at K.E.M. Hospital (p less than 0.001. A significant number of these patients were females (p less than 0.05. The psychiatric referrals at Jaslok had been hospitalized mainly for suspected medical or neurological illness (p less than 0.001. These patients belonged to higher economic strata and hence had a better paying capacity compared to patients at KEM hospital, a significant number of whom were unemployed (p less than 0.001. The duration of pre-referred illness of patients and their stay at Jaslok hospital were longer as compared to those at KEM Hospital (p less than 0.01. The number of non-relevant special investigations carried out on patients in Jaslok was more (p less than 0.01. Further analysis of diagnoses revealed that a significant number of patients at KEM Hospital were admitted as primary psychiatric illness (p less than 0.05.

  19. Hospitalization and aesthetic health in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Hilary; Donnellan, Claire; O'Neill, Desmond

    2015-02-01

    To assess the impact of hospitalization on arts engagement among older people; and to assess perceptions of whether hospitals are aesthetically deprived environments. A Survey of Aesthetic and Cultural Health was developed to explore the role of aesthetics before, during and after hospital. Study participants were n = 150 hospital in-patients aged >65. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Attendance at arts events was an important part of life for this sample and a large drop off was noted in continuation of these activities in the year post-hospital stay. Physical health issues were the main causes but also loss of confidence and transport issues. Film, dance, and music were the most popular arts for this sample prior to hospital stay. Noise pollution caused by other patients, lack of control over TV/radio, and access to receptive arts in hospital (reading and listening to music) were important issues for patients in hospital. This study identifies a trend for decreasing exposure to arts beginning with a hospital stay and concludes that older people may need encouragement to resume engagement in arts following a hospital stay. There is relatively limited evidence regarding the nature of, and potential benefit from, aesthetics in healthcare and limited studies with rigorous methodology, and further research is needed to understand the aesthetic preferences of older people in hospital. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Hospital-based Health Technology Assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadil, Martin; Rogalewicz, Vladimír; Kubátová, Ivana; Matloňová, Veronika; Salačová, Kristýna

    Hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA) consists in implementation of assessment activities "in" or "for" hospitals; hence, it covers processes and methods supporting organization and execution of health technology assessment (HTA) at the level of individual hospitals. This process is multidisciplinary, systematic and evidence-based.HB-HTA objectives and methods differ from the classic utilization of HTA at the national regulator level. Most experience and information concerning HB-HTA has originated in two large recent projects: activities of the HB-HTA Interest Group of the HTAi international association established in 2006, and the AdHopHTA European research project (20122015).This paper describes four basic organizational models of HB-HTA, their characteristics and utilization in various countries and hospital types. Results of the AdHopHTA project are analyzed, and recommendations for HB-HTA implementation in Czech hospitals are formulated.Key words: hospital-based HTA, medical device, implementation, hospital strategy.

  1. Spatial analysis of drug-related hospital admissions: an auto-Gaussian model to estimate the hospitalization rates in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Colasante

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to evaluate, even if partially, how much the drug use phenomenon impacts on the Italian National Heatlh System throughout the estimation at local level (Local Health Unit of the hospitalization rate caused by substance use and abuse such as opiates, barbiturates-sedativeshypnotics, cocaine and cannabis, and keeping in mind the phenomenon distribution in the space and so the fact that what happens in a specific area depends on what is happening in the neighbourhoods close to it (spatial autocorrelation.

    Methods: Data from hospital discharge database were provided by the Ministry of Health and an auto- Gaussian model was fitted. The spatial trend can be a function of other explanatory variables or can simply be modeled as a function of spatial location. Both models were fitted and compared using the number of subjects kept in charge by Drug Addiction Services and the number of beds held by hospitals as covariates.

    Results: Concerning opiates use related hospitalizations, results show areas where the phenomenon was less prominent in 2001 (Lombardy, part of Liguria, Umbria, part of Latium, Campania, Apulia and Sicily. In the following years, the hospitalization rates increased in some areas, such as the north of Apulia, part of Campania and Latium. A dependence of the opiates related hospitalization rates on the rate of subjects kept in charge by the Drug Addiction Services is highlighted. Concerning barbiturates-sedatives-hypnotics consumption, the best model is the one without covariates and estimated hospitalization rates are lower then 3 per thousand. The model with only the covariate “rate of subjects kept in charge by Drug Addiction Services” has been used both for cocaine and cannabis. In these two cases, more than a half of the Local Health Units report hospitalization rates lower than 0.5 per thousand

  2. Organizational decision to adopt hospital information system: an empirical investigation in the case of Malaysian public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Hossein; Nilashi, Mehrbakhsh; Ibrahim, Othman

    2015-03-01

    This study mainly integrates the mature Technology-Organization-Environment (TOE) framework and recently developed Human-Organization-Technology (HOT) fit model to identify factors that affect the hospital decision in adopting Hospital Information System (HIS). Accordingly, a hybrid Multi-Criteria-Decision-Making (MCDM) model is used to address the dependence relationships of factors with the aid of Analytic Network Processes (ANP) and Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL) approaches. The initial model of the study is designed by considering four main dimensions with 13 variables as organizational innovation adoption factors with respect to HIS. By using DEMATEL, the interdependencies strength among the dimensions and variables are tested. The ANP method is then adopted in order to determine the relative importance of the adoption factors, and is used to identify how these factors are weighted and prioritized by the public hospital professionals, who are wholly familiar with the HIS and have years of experience in decision making in hospitals' Information System (IS) department. The results of this study indicate that from the experts' viewpoint "Perceived Technical Competence" is the most important factor in the Human dimension. In the Technology dimension, the experts agree that the "Relative Advantage" is more important in relation to the other factors. In the Organization dimension, "Hospital Size" is considered more important rather than others. And, in the Environment dimension, according to the experts judgment, "Government Policy" is the most important factor. The results of ANP survey from experts also reveal that the experts in the HIS field believed that these factors should not be overlooked by managers of hospitals and the adoption of HIS is more related to more consideration of these factors. In addition, from the results, it is found that the experts are more concerned about Environment and Technology for the adoption HIS. The

  3. Engineering field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Baden Fuller, A J

    2014-01-01

    Engineering Field Theory focuses on the applications of field theory in gravitation, electrostatics, magnetism, electric current flow, conductive heat transfer, fluid flow, and seepage.The manuscript first ponders on electric flux, electrical materials, and flux function. Discussions focus on field intensity at the surface of a conductor, force on a charged surface, atomic properties, doublet and uniform field, flux tube and flux line, line charge and line sink, field of a surface charge, field intensity, flux density, permittivity, and Coulomb's law. The text then takes a look at gravitation

  4. Guest loyalty in hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagić Snježana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of competition in the hospitality sector has created the need to retain guests and prevent them from switching company due to better offer or saturation. Loyal customers are a valuable asset for catering companies, not only because of the awareness of the effects of customer loyalty. They tend to spread word-of-mouth advertising, more tolerant to price changes, as well as they casually create a linkage to their friends, relatives, colleagues, and other probable consumers and thus enable businesses to uphold a guest's base. By recognizing loyalty guests' importance, the global hospitality industry created monetary and non-monetary rewards for loyal visitors, delayed gratification (points collection and immediate rewards, as well as numerous other reward systems that try to keep them. To win customer loyalty, together with all benefits arising from it, caterers need to become familiar with factors, which determine guests' loyalty. The paper will show the results of research regarding the impact of the service quality and guests' satisfaction to their loyalty. Many authors have confirmed that employees' satisfaction affected customers' satisfaction, so this paper will give an answer does it influence on customers' loyalty as well.

  5. Mesiodens: A Hospital Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Senchhema; Dikshit, Parajeeta; Gupta, Sujaya

    2017-09-08

     Background: A mesiodens, is the most frequent supernumerary tooth present in the maxillary central incisor region. This study is conducted to know the radiographic characteristics and management of mesiodens in children visiting hospital. A cross-sectional retrospective data collection was done from hospital dental records of children who visited the institution from December 2015-December 2016. Radiographic characteristic of mesiodens including the number, shape, position, direction of crown and complication caused by mesiodens were recorded. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS v.20.0. Out of 1871 dental records, it was found that 40 children had 53 mesiodens, with male female ratio of 3:1 and most of them were discovered at 8 years. Majority of mesiodens, 54.7% were erupted, conical, palatally placed with 77.3% vertically directed crown.Complications associated with it were crowding followed by diastema and delayed eruption. Among 40 children, one had three mesiodens, eleven had two mesiodens and rest had one each. Radiographically fully formed tooth was seen in 29 mesiodens. Immature apex was seen in 38 central incisors associated with mesiodens. Management undertaken was simple/surgical extraction and only few cases were kept for periodic observation. Periodic radiographs act as an important tool for clinicians in detecting and managing mesiodens.

  6. [Usage of antibiotics in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternák, G; Almási, I

    1996-12-29

    The authors publish the results of a survey conducted among hospital records of patients discharged from eight inpatient's institutes between 1-31st of January 1995 to gather information on the indications and usage of antibiotics. The institutes were selected from different part of the country to represent the hospital structure as much as possible. Data from the 13,719 documents were recorded and analysed by computer program. It was found that 27.6% of the patients (3749 cases) received antibiotic treatment. 407 different diagnosis and 365 different surgical procedures (as profilaxis) were considered as indications of antibiotic treatment (total: 4450 indications for 5849 antibiotic treatment). The largest group of patients receiving antibiotics was of antibiotic profilaxis (24.56%, 1093 cases), followed by lower respiratory tract infections (19.89%, 849 cases), uroinfections (10.53%, 469 cases) and upper respiratory tract infections. Relatively large group of patients belonged to those who had fever or subfebrility without known reason (7.35%, 327 cases) and to those who did not have any proof in their document indicating the reasons of antibiotic treatment (6.4%, 285 cases). We can not consider the antibiotic indications well founded in those groups of patients (every sixth or every fifth cases). The most frequently used antibiotics were of [2-nd] generation cefalosporins. The rate of nosocomial infections were found as 6.78% average. The results are demonstrated on diagrams and table.

  7. [Balance of power in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameyer, A

    2000-08-01

    It is known that there is a large extent of working dissatisfaction within some professional groups of the health service system. Especially in the hospital sector, many "struggles for power" take place. Unfortunately, these struggles are often only examined with regard to individual points of view without considering the system-oriented background. The following text will reflect the discussion in social sciences as to the distribution of power within the health service system. The double meaning of the distribution of power will be explained and, by means of decisive phenomenons, the development of cost and efficiency structures on the one hand as well as the development of health political processes in decision-making on the other hand will be described. In the section "The Hospital in the 20th Century", the structures that still can be widely found nowadays will be specified and examined as to aspects in behavioural sciences. Finally, as a logical consequence, an urgently needed reorientation from administration towards management will be pointed out.

  8. Bronchiolitis Care in the Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Jennifer Orr; Lo, Huay-Ying; Wu, Susan

    2017-08-16

    Viral bronchiolitis is a common cause of hospitalization in young children, but despite a variety of therapeutic options, the mainstay of treatment remains supportive care. To examine the most recent evidence for supportive care measures and pharmacologic options in the treatment of bronchiolitis in the hospital setting Methods: MEDLINE search with expert medical librarian for publications on management and therapies for bronchiolitis Results: Evidence does not support the use of bronchodilators, racemic epinephrine, deep suctioning, systemic corticosteroids, or antibiotics in the absence of a concomitant bacterial infection, as these treatments do not change the course of illness or shorten length of stay (LOS). Nebulized hypertonic saline is not routinely recommended, though it may provide some benefit for patients with anticipated prolonged LOS. Continuous pulse oximetry should not be routinely used in stable patients as it may be associated with longer LOS. Supplemental oxygen should be used to maintain oxyhemoglobin concentrations >90%, a level lower than what many clinicians may have used previously. Current evidence suggests high-flow nasal cannula may reduce intubation rate, but its effect on LOS is unclear. Intravenous or nasogastric tube hydration should be used when oral hydration is not sufficient. Overall, bronchiolitis remains a self-limited disease whose mainstay of therapy is supportive care. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. [Prospective study in 2 hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Buñuales, M T; Martínez-Sáenz, M S; González-Diego, P; Vallejo-García, M; Gallardo-Anciano, J; Cestafe-Martínez, A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to know the incidence rate of medication reconciliation at admission and discharge in patients of La Rioja and to improve the patient safety on medication reconciliation. An observational prospective study, part of the Joint Action PaSQ, Work Package 5, European Union Network for Patient Safety and Quality of Care. The study has taken into account the definitions of the Institute for Safe Medication Practices. Any unintended discrepancy in medication between chronic treatment and the treatment prescribed in the hospital was considered as a reconciliation error. A total of 750 patients were included, 9 (1.2%) of whom showed at least one discrepancy. The patients had a total of 3,156 mediations registered: 2,313 prescriptions (73.4%) showed no differences, while 821 prescriptions (26%) were intended discrepancies and 21 prescriptions (0.6%) unintended discrepancies were considered by the physician as reconciliation errors. A percentage of 1.2 of the patients, which represents 0.6% of the medicines (one in 166 medications registered) had reconciliation errors during their hospital stay. A proceeding has been implemented by means of the physician doing the medication reconciliation and reviewing it with the help of a medication reconciliation form. The medication reconciliation is a priority strategic objective to improve the safety of patients. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical features and epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization and infection in Spanish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Cisneros, Jose M; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Ribera, Anna; Vila, Jordi; Pascual, Alvaro; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Bou, German; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the clinical features and the epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in Spanish hospitals. Prospective multicenter cohort study. Twenty-seven general hospitals and one paraplegic center in Spain. All cases of A. baumannii colonization or infection detected by clinical samples during November 2000 were included. Isolates were identified using phenotypic and genotypic methods. The molecular relatedness of the isolates was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Twenty-five (89%) of the hospitals had 221 cases (pooled rate in general hospitals, 0.39 case per 1,000 patient-days; range, 0 to 1.17). The rate was highest in intensive care units (ICUs). Only 3 cases were pediatric. The mean age of the patients in the general hospitals was 63 years; 69% had a chronic underlying disease and 80% had previously received antimicrobial treatment. Fifty-three percent of the patients had an infection (respiratory tract, 51%; surgical site, 16%; and urinary tract, 11%). Crude mortality was higher in infected than in colonized patients (27% vs 10%; relative risk, 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 2.0; P = .003). Molecular analysis disclosed 79 different clones. In most hospitals, a predominant epidemic clone coexisted with other sporadic clones. Imipenem resistance was present in 39% of the hospitals. A. baumannii was present in most participating Spanish hospitals (particularly in ICUs) with different rates among them. The organisms mainly affected predisposed patients; half of them were only colonized. Epidemic and sporadic clones coexisted in many centers.

  11. Hospital standardized mortality ratio: consequences of adjusting hospital mortality with indirect standardization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice E Pouw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR is developed to evaluate and improve hospital quality. Different methods can be used to standardize the hospital mortality ratio. Our aim was to assess the validity and applicability of directly and indirectly standardized hospital mortality ratios. METHODS: Retrospective scenario analysis using routinely collected hospital data to compare deaths predicted by the indirectly standardized case-mix adjustment method with observed deaths. Discharges from Dutch hospitals in the period 2003-2009 were used to estimate the underlying prediction models. We analysed variation in indirectly standardized hospital mortality ratios (HSMRs when changing the case-mix distributions using different scenarios. Sixty-one Dutch hospitals were included in our scenario analysis. RESULTS: A numerical example showed that when interaction between hospital and case-mix is present and case-mix differs between hospitals, indirectly standardized HSMRs vary between hospitals providing the same quality of care. In empirical data analysis, the differences between directly and indirectly standardized HSMRs for individual hospitals were limited. CONCLUSION: Direct standardization is not affected by the presence of interaction between hospital and case-mix and is therefore theoretically preferable over indirect standardization. Since direct standardization is practically impossible when multiple predictors are included in the case-mix adjustment model, indirect standardization is the only available method to compute the HSMR. Before interpreting such indirectly standardized HSMRs the case-mix distributions of individual hospitals and the presence of interactions between hospital and case-mix should be assessed.

  12. Managing hospitals in turbulent times: do organizational changes improve hospital survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Y; Alexander, J A

    1999-10-01

    To examine (1) the degree to which organizational changes affected hospital survival; (2) whether core and peripheral organizational changes affected hospital survival differently; and (3) how simultaneous organizational changes affected hospital survival. AHA Hospital Surveys, the Area Resource File, and the AHA Hospital Guides, Part B: Multihospital Systems. The study employed a longitudinal panel design. We followed changes in all community hospitals in the continental United States from 1981 through 1994. The dependent variable, hospital closure, was examined as a function of multiple changes in a hospital's core and peripheral structures as well as the hospital's organizational and environmental characteristics. Cox regression models were used to test the expectations that core changes increased closure risk while peripheral changes decreased such risk, and that simultaneous core and peripheral changes would lead to higher risk of closure. Results indicated more peripheral than core changes in community hospitals. Overall, findings contradicted our expectations. Change in specialty, a core change, was beneficial for hospitals, because it reduced closure risk. The two most frequent peripheral changes, downsizing and leadership change, were positively associated with closure. Simultaneous organizational changes displayed a similar pattern: multiple core changes reduced closure risk, while multiple peripheral changes increased the risk. These patterns held regardless of the level of uncertainty in hospital environments. Organizational changes are not all beneficial for hospitals, suggesting that hospital leaders should be both cautious and selective in their efforts to turn their hospitals around.

  13. Use of complementary and alternative medicine at Norwegian and Danish hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, little is known about whether CAM is offered in hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe to what extent CAM is offered in Norwegian and Danish hospitals and investigate possible changes in Norway since 2001. Methods A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. The questionnaire was sent to the person responsible for the clinical activity, typically the medical director. 99 hospitals in the authority (85%) in Norway and 126 in Denmark (97%) responded. Given contact persons were interviewed. Results CAM is presently offered in about 50% of Norwegian hospitals and one-third of Danish hospitals. In Norway CAM was offered in 50 hospitals, 40 of which involved acupuncture. 19 hospitals gave other alternative therapies like biofeedback, hypnosis, cupping, ear-acupuncture, herbal medicine, art therapy, homeopathy, reflexology, thought field therapy, gestalt therapy, aromatherapy, tai chi, acupressure, yoga, pilates and other. 9 hospitals offered more than one therapy form. In Denmark 38 hospitals offered acupuncture and one Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Light Therapy. The most commonly reported reason for offering CAM was scientific evidence in Denmark. In Norway it was the interest of a hospital employee, except for acupuncture where the introduction is more often initiated by the leadership and is more based on scientific evidence of effect. All persons (except one) responsible for the alternative treatment had a medical or allied health professional background and their education/training in CAM treatment varied substantially. Conclusions The extent of CAM being offered has increased substantially in Norway during the first decade of the 21st century. This might indicate a shift in attitude regarding CAM within the conventional health care system. PMID

  14. Use of complementary and alternative medicine at Norwegian and Danish hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Launsø Laila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have found that a high proportion of the population in western countries use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. However, little is known about whether CAM is offered in hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe to what extent CAM is offered in Norwegian and Danish hospitals and investigate possible changes in Norway since 2001. Methods A one-page questionnaire was sent to all included hospitals in both countries. The questionnaire was sent to the person responsible for the clinical activity, typically the medical director. 99 hospitals in the authority (85% in Norway and 126 in Denmark (97% responded. Given contact persons were interviewed. Results CAM is presently offered in about 50% of Norwegian hospitals and one-third of Danish hospitals. In Norway CAM was offered in 50 hospitals, 40 of which involved acupuncture. 19 hospitals gave other alternative therapies like biofeedback, hypnosis, cupping, ear-acupuncture, herbal medicine, art therapy, homeopathy, reflexology, thought field therapy, gestalt therapy, aromatherapy, tai chi, acupressure, yoga, pilates and other. 9 hospitals offered more than one therapy form. In Denmark 38 hospitals offered acupuncture and one Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Light Therapy. The most commonly reported reason for offering CAM was scientific evidence in Denmark. In Norway it was the interest of a hospital employee, except for acupuncture where the introduction is more often initiated by the leadership and is more based on scientific evidence of effect. All persons (except one responsible for the alternative treatment had a medical or allied health professional background and their education/training in CAM treatment varied substantially. Conclusions The extent of CAM being offered has increased substantially in Norway during the first decade of the 21st century. This might indicate a shift in attitude regarding CAM within the conventional

  15. Preoperative depression and hospital length of stay in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerper, L F; Spies, C D; Buspavanich, P; Balzer, F; Salz, A L; Tafelski, S; Lau, A; Weiß-Gerlach, E; Neumann, T; Glaesmer, H; Wernecke, K D; Brähler, E; Krampe, H

    2014-09-01

    The association of depression and hospital length of stay (LOS) has rarely been examined in surgical patients outside of cardiovascular surgery. This study investigates whether clinically significant preoperative depression shows an independent association with LOS in patients from various surgical fields after adjusting for age, gender and important somatic factors. A total of 2624 surgical patients were included in this prospective observational study. Data were collected before the preoperative anesthesiological examination within a computer-assisted psychosocial self-assessment including screening for depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CES-D). Data on peri- and postoperative somatic parameters were obtained from the electronic patient management system of the hospital six months after the preoperative assessment. LOS of patients with clinically significant depression (N.=296; median: 5 days, interquartile range: 3-8 days) was longer than LOS of patients without depression (N.=2328; median: 4 days, interquartile range: 2-6 days) (Psurgical field and POSSUM operative severity rating. Data suggest that the association of depression and LOS is independent of the impact of age, gender, surgical field, preoperative physical health, severity of medical comorbidity and extent of surgical procedure. Integration of depression therapy into routine care of surgical patients might be an option to improve outcomes.

  16. Validation of a proposal for evaluating hospital infection control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiane Pavanello Rodrigues; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida

    2011-02-01

    To validate the construct and discriminant properties of a hospital infection prevention and control program. The program consisted of four indicators: technical-operational structure; operational prevention and control guidelines; epidemiological surveillance system; and prevention and control activities. These indicators, with previously validated content, were applied to 50 healthcare institutions in the city of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the hospitals and indicator scores, and Cronbach's α coefficient was used to evaluate the internal consistency. The discriminant validity was analyzed by comparing indicator scores between groups of hospitals: with versus without quality certification. The construct validity analysis was based on exploratory factor analysis with a tetrachoric correlation matrix. The indicators for the technical-operational structure and epidemiological surveillance presented almost 100% conformity in the whole sample. The indicators for the operational prevention and control guidelines and the prevention and control activities presented internal consistency ranging from 0.67 to 0.80. The discriminant validity of these indicators indicated higher and statistically significant mean conformity scores among the group of institutions with healthcare certification or accreditation processes. In the construct validation, two dimensions were identified for the operational prevention and control guidelines: recommendations for preventing hospital infection and recommendations for standardizing prophylaxis procedures, with good correlation between the analysis units that formed the guidelines. The same was found for the prevention and control activities: interfaces with treatment units and support units were identified. Validation of the measurement properties of the hospital infection prevention and control program indicators made it possible to develop a tool for evaluating these programs

  17. Cosmological magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic fields are observed on nearly all scales in the Universe, from stars and galaxies up to galaxy clusters and even beyond. The origin of cosmic magnetic fields is still an open question, however a large class of models puts its origin in the very early Universe. A magnetic dynamo amplifying an initial seed magnetic field could explain the present day strength of the galactic magnetic field. However, it is still an open problem how and when this initial magnetic field was created. Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a window to the early Universe and might therefore be able to tell us whether cosmic magnetic fields are of a primordial cosmological origin and at the same time constrain its parameters. We will give an overview of the observational evidence of large-scale magnetic fields, describe generation mechanisms of primordial magnetic fields and possible imprints in the CMB.

  18. Terahertz field induced electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strikwerda, Andrew; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    We report the first observation of THz-field-induced electromigration in sub-wavelength metallic gap structures after exposure to intense single-cycle, sub-picosecond electric field transients of amplitude up to 400 kV/cm....

  19. Magnetic Field Grid Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Properties Calculator will computes the estimated values of Earth's magnetic field(declination, inclination, vertical component, northerly...

  20. EARNINGS MANAGEMENT IN U.S. HOSPITALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gang Nathan

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the hospital management practices of manipulating financial earnings within the bounds of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). We conduct regression analyses that relate earnings management to hospital characteristics to assess the economic determinants of hospital earnings management behavior. From the CMS Cost Reports we collected hospital financial data of all U.S. hospitals that request reimbursement from the federal government for treating Medicare patients, and regress discretionary accruals on hospital size, profitability, asset liquidity, operating efficiency, labor cost, and ownership. Hospitals with higher profit margin, current ratio, working capital, days of patient receivables outstanding and total wage are associated with more earnings management, whereas those with larger size and higher debt level, asset turnover, days cash on hand, fixed asset age are associated with lower level of earnings manipulation. Additionally, managers of non-profit hospitals are more likely to undertake some form of window-dressing by manipulating accounting accruals without changing business models or pricing strategies than their public hospital counterparts. We provide direct evidence of the use of discretionary accruals to manage financial earnings among U.S. hospitals and the finding has profound policy implications in terms of assessing the pervasiveness of accounting manipulation and the overall integrity of financial reporting in this very special public and quasi-public service sector.

  1. The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich; Fassbender, Klaus; Hussain, M Shazam; Ebinger, Martin; Turc, Guillaume; Uchino, Ken; Davis, Stephen; Alexandrov, Anne; Grotta, James

    2017-12-01

    Background The PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization was formed in 2016 as an international consortium of medical practitioners involved in pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute stroke. Aims PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization's mission is to improve stroke outcomes by supporting research and advocacy for pre-hospital stroke treatment in Mobile Stroke Units. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will provide a platform to enhance collaborative research across the spectrum of acute stroke management in the pre-hospital setting. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization will also facilitate the appropriate proliferation and distribution of Mobile Stroke Units by providing a forum for professional communication, resource for public education, and stimulus for government, industry, and philanthropic support. Summary of review In this "white paper", we describe the evidence supporting pre-hospital stroke treatment, progress to date, practical issues such as application in various environments and staffing, planned research initiatives, and organizational structure. Conclusions PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization is not-for-profit, with membership open to anyone involved (or hoping to become involved) in pre-hospital stroke care. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization has a Steering Committee comprised of members from Europe, U.S., Canada, Australia, and other regions having a Mobile Stroke Unit in operation. PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization convenes satellite meetings for membership at the International Stroke Conference and European Stroke Congress each year to address the PRE-hospital Stroke Treatment Organization mission. The first research collaborations agreed upon are to: (1) develop a list of common data elements to be collected by all Mobile Stroke Unit programs and entered into a common research database, and (2) develop a protocol for investigating the natural history of hyper-acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

  2. Electric Field Imaging Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcutt, Terrence; Hughitt, Brian; Burke, Eric; Generazio, Edward

    2016-01-01

    NDE historically has focused technology development in propagating wave phenomena with little attention to the field of electrostatics and emanating electric fields. This work is intended to bring electrostatic imaging to the forefront of new inspection technologies, and new technologies in general. The specific goals are to specify the electric potential and electric field including the electric field spatial components emanating from, to, and throughout volumes containing objects or in free space.

  3. The politics of local hospital reform: a case study of hospital reorganization following the 2002 Norwegian hospital reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background The Norwegian hospital reform of 2002 was an attempt to make restructuring of hospitals easier by removing politicians from the decision-making processes. To facilitate changes seen as necessary but politically difficult, the central state took over ownership of the hospitals and stripped the county politicians of what had been their main responsibility for decades. This meant that decisions regarding hospital structure and organization were now being taken by professional administrators and not by politically elected representatives. The question raised here is whether this has had any effect on the speed of restructuring of the hospital sector. Method The empirical part is a case study of the restructuring process in Innlandet Hospital Trust (IHT), which was one of the largest enterprise established after the hospital reform and where the vision for restructuring was clearly set. Different sources of qualitative data are used in the analysis. These include interviews with key actors, observational data and document studies. Results The analysis demonstrates how the new professional leaders at first acted in accordance with the intentions of the hospital reform, but soon chose to avoid the more ambitious plans for restructuring the hospital structure and in fact reintroduced local politics into the decision-making process. The analysis further illustrates how local networks and engagement of political representatives from all levels of government complicated the decision-making process surrounding local structural reforms. Local political representatives teamed up with other actors and created powerful networks. At the same time, national politicians had incentives to involve themselves in the processes as supporters of the status quo. Conclusion Because of the incentives that faced political actors and the controversial nature of major hospital reforms, the removal of local politicians and the centralization of ownership did not necessarily facilitate

  4. Beyond the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilleør, Helene Bie; Larsen, Anna Folke

    In this paper, we estimate the impact of a farmer field school intervention among small scale farmers in Northers Tanzania. Unlike previous farmer field school evaluations, we go beyond the immediate agricultural impact and estimate the impact of farmer field school participation in the pre-speci...

  5. Dialogue, Field, and Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    "The Journal of Educational Administration and History" has played an important role as a site for analyses that seek to expand both the academic and the ethical/political concerns of the field. A key word here is field. What counts as the field? What are its boundaries? Who is inside and who is outside? How has that changed over time?…

  6. Politics of aviation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivent, Jacques

    1922-01-01

    In short, the "politics of aviation" lies in a few propositions: the need of having as large a number of fields as possible and of sufficient area; the utilization of the larger part of the existing military fields; the selection of uncultivated or unproductive fields, whenever technical conditions permit; ability to disregard (save in exceptional cases) objections of an agricultural nature.

  7. Adherence to hospital drug formularies and cost of drugs in hospitals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plet, H. T.; Hallas, J.; Kjeldsen, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate adherence rates to hospital drug formularies (HDFs) and cost of drugs in hospitals. METHODS: Data on drugs used during 2010 were analyzed for ten hospitals (two hospitals from each of the five regions), constituting 30 % of hospitals and 45 % of hospital beds in Denmark......, we also identified the drugs constituting 90 % of the volume (= DU90%) and the adherence to the HDF in this segment (Index of Adherence). RESULTS: Substances used by hospitals varied between 598 and 1,093. The proportion of used substances that were on the HDF varied between 14 % and 44 %. University....... Drug use data from individual hospitals were retrieved from the hospital pharmacies. Adherence to the HDFs was analyzed for selected substances characterised by extensive use both in primary and secondary sectors (ATC codes A10, B03, C03, C07, C08, C09, C10, J01, N02, N05 and R03). Within each group...

  8. Field-improvised war surgery in Kosovo: use of kitchen utensils as surgical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Besim; Singh, Karan P; Muzina, Rubina; Lu, Yan; Flaherty, Devin

    2008-06-01

    After years of conflict between Serbia and neighboring Kosovo, a full-blown war started in March 1999 when the Serbian and Yugoslav armies began a statewide military crackdown against ethnic Albanians and the Kosovo Liberation Army. Most ethnic Albanians were displaced to Macedonia or Albania. Some, however, found refuge in the Molopolce mountain region of Kosovo among military personnel, thus necessitating the creation of a field medical facility. Patient treatment at the field-improvised Nerodime Military Hospital, and the management of work took place under very difficult conditions including a chronic lack of appropriate medical equipment. Improvised lifesaving surgeries were performed with kitchen utensils serving as retractors at the field hospital. This article compares the treatment of patients between the two hospitals, and is the first article to date describing the war experience in general at the field hospitals in Kosovo.

  9. Performance of in-hospital mortality prediction models for acute hospitalization: Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motomura Noboru

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective In-hospital mortality is an important performance measure for quality improvement, although it requires proper risk adjustment. We set out to develop in-hospital mortality prediction models for acute hospitalization using a nation-wide electronic administrative record system in Japan. Methods Administrative records of 224,207 patients (patients discharged from 82 hospitals in Japan between July 1, 2002 and October 31, 2002 were randomly split into preliminary (179,156 records and test (45,051 records groups. Study variables included Major Diagnostic Category, age, gender, ambulance use, admission status, length of hospital stay, comorbidity, and in-hospital mortality. ICD-10 codes were converted to calculate comorbidity scores based on Quan's methodology. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was then performed using in-hospital mortality as a dependent variable. C-indexes were calculated across risk groups in order to evaluate model performances. Results In-hospital mortality rates were 2.68% and 2.76% for the preliminary and test datasets, respectively. C-index values were 0.869 for the model that excluded length of stay and 0.841 for the model that included length of stay. Conclusion Risk models developed in this study included a set of variables easily accessible from administrative data, and still successfully exhibited a high degree of prediction accuracy. These models can be used to estimate in-hospital mortality rates of various diagnoses and procedures.

  10. The effects of health information technology adoption and hospital-physician integration on hospital efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Na-Eun; Chang, Jongwha; Atems, Bebonchu

    2014-11-01

    To determine the impact of health information technology (HIT) adoption and hospital-physician integration on hospital efficiency. Using 2010 data from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) annual survey, the AHA IT survey, supplemented by the CMS Case Mix Index, and the US Census Bureau's small area income and poverty estimates, we examined how the adoption of HIT and employment of physicians affected hospital efficiency and whether they were substitutes or complements. The sample included 2173 hospitals. We employed a 2-stage approach. In the first stage, data envelopment analysis was used to estimate technical efficiency of hospitals. In the second stage, we used instrumental variable approaches, notably 2-stage least squares and the generalized method of moments, to examine the effects of IT adoption and integration on hospital efficiency. We found that HIT adoption and hospital-physician integration, when considered separately, each have statistically significant positive impacts on hospital efficiency. Also, we found that hospitals that adopted HIT with employed physicians will achieve less efficiency compared with hospitals that adopted HIT without employed physicians. Although HIT adoption and hospital-physician integration both seem to be key parts of improving hospital efficiency when one or the other is utilized individually, they can hurt hospital efficiency when utilized together.

  11. Eucharistic Hospitality : Reconsidering the Terminology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casadei, Giulia; Wouda, Fokke

    2016-01-01

    Giulia Casadei MA and Fokke Wouda MA work on PhD projects about Eucharistic sharing in ecumenical relations; a pressing, yet controversial topic in Roman Catholic ecumenical engagement. As they both encounter questions concerning the terminology of this field, they decided on writing an article

  12. Comparative Assessment of Patients’ Rights Observance in the Hospitalization Wards of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences’ Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sharifi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients are one of the most vulnerable social groups. Respecting patients’ rights will lead in advantages like “decrease in hospitalization time” and “increase in patients’ satisfaction”. This study is performed to assess the patients' rights observance in the hospitalization wards of educational hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive-cross sectional study 137 medical student (intern were selected by convenience sampling method. We used a questionnaire with 12 questions. Reliability of questionnaire was confirmed by experts of the field and validity was confirmed by Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient (81%. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (v21 using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and Tukey test. Findings: In this study the observance rate of patients’ rights was at a good level in 41.6% of cases, at an average level in 55.5% of cases and at a low level in 2.9% of cases. There was a significant difference between several hospitalization wards in the observance rate of patients’ rights. (p = 0.001. The observance rate of patients’ rights in infectious disease ward and gynecology ward was at a lower level in comparison with other wards. Conclusion: The observance rate of patients’ rights was at an average to good level in most of hospitalization ward. However this observance rate is at a low level in some wards. More studies about the causes of these differences can help us in planning about improvement of patients’ rights observance.

  13. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    Aims It is a challenge for health professionals to involve patients with aphasia (PWAs) in their own treatment, care and rehabilitation. Disrupted communication may also influence patient safety and lead to social isolation. In order to increase health care professionals’ ability to engage PWAs i...... hospital staff’s confidence and self-assessed ability to communicate with PWAs....... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... immediately before course attendance and 3-6 months afterwards. Results Self-rated knowledge of aphasia had significantly improved when assessed 3-6 months after the course and improvement was seen for all groups of health professionals. Comfort and ease in communicating with PWA and ability to solve problems...

  14. Identifying patient risks during hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Ferreira Lima

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the risks reported at a public institution andto know the main patient risks from the nursing staff point of view.Methods: A retrospective, descriptive and exploratory study. Thesurvey was developed at a hospital in the city of Taboão da Serra, SãoPaulo, Brazil. The study included all nurses working in care areas whoagreed to participate in the study. At the same time, sentinel eventsoccurring in the period from July 2006 to July 2007 were identified.Results: There were 440 sentinel events reported, and the main risksincluded patient falls, medication errors and pressure ulcers. Sixty-fivenurses were interviewed. They also reported patient falls, medicationerrors and pressure ulcers as the main risks. Conclusions: Riskassessment and implementation of effective preventive actions arenecessary to ensure patient’s safety. Involvement of a multidisciplinaryteam is one of the steps for a successful process.

  15. [Hospital detention in tuberculosis control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalbí, Joan R; Rodríguez-Campos, Mònica; Orcau, Àngels; Espachs, M Àngels; Salamero, Marta; Maldonado, José; Caylà, Joan A

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the actions of public health services of the city of Barcelona to prevent tuberculosis transmission by noncompliant smear-positive patients by using the possibilities of Spanish Law 3/1986. The actions were based on a resolution of the health authorities on the need to locate such patients and to detain them in hospitals to provide treatment. This involved police cooperation, informing noncompliant patients, and requesting ratification from the Administrative Court. The article describes the process and the characteristics of the cases involved. Over nine years, from July 2006 to June 2015, the law was used in only twelve cases. The authors conclude that the criteria of prudence and proportionality were used in the application of the law, which resulted in the treatment of patients who posed a risk to their environment, reducing the transmission of infection. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Randomised controlled trial of effectiveness of Leicester hospital at home scheme compared with hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A; Parker, H; Wynn, A; Jagger, C; Spiers, N; Jones, J; Parker, G

    1999-12-11

    To compare effectiveness of patient care in hospital at home scheme with hospital care. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Leicester hospital at home scheme and the city's three acute hospitals. 199 consecutive patients referred to hospital at home by their general practitioner and assessed as being suitable for admission. Six of 102 patients randomised to hospital at home refused admission, as did 23 of 97 allocated to hospital. Hospital at home or hospital inpatient care. Mortality and change in health status (Barthel index, sickness impact profile 68, EuroQol, Philadelphia geriatric morale scale) assessed at 2 weeks and 3 months after randomisation. The main process measures were service inputs, discharge destination, readmission rates, length of initial stay, and total days of care. Hospital at home group and hospital group showed no significant differences in health status (median scores on sickness impact profile 68 were 29 and 30 respectively at 2 weeks, and 24 and 26 at 3 months) or in dependency (Barthel scores 15 and 14 at 2 weeks and 16 for both groups at 3 months). At 3 months' follow up, 26 (25%) of hospital at home group had died compared with 30 (31%) of hospital group (relative risk 0. 82 (95% confidence interval 0.52 to 1.28)). Hospital at home group required fewer days of treatment than hospital group, both in terms of initial stay (median 8 days v 14.5 days, P=0.026) and total days of care at 3 months (median 9 days v 16 days, P=0.031). Hospital at home scheme delivered care as effectively as hospital, with no clinically important differences in health status. Hospital at home resulted in significantly shorter lengths of stay, which did not lead to a higher rate of subsequent admission.

  17. Patient safety in Dutch hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordula Wagner

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    In various studies outside the Netherlands, it has been shown that a substantial number of patients suffer from some kind of harm during their treatment in hospital. The incidence of these so-called adverse events varies between 2.9% and 16.6%; it is estimated that between over a quarter and a half of these are considered to be avoidable.

    Preventable adverse events can be considered to be a starting point for interventions to increase patient safety. In response to this, a study was initiated in Dutch hospitals investigating the nature and extent of adverse events and their causes. Lessons learnt will be discussed within the European Research Network on Quality in Health Care (ENQual, where researchers and policy makers come together to exchange knowledge and experiences. Two important goals of the Dutch study are to reach a consensus on basic concepts and to improve research methodology. An unintended event resulting in harm caused by healthcare is called an adverse event in international literature. Preventable adverse events are especially important for prevention, in these cases the harm can be attributed to unintended events in the care process, caused by insufficient action according to professional standards and failures within the care system. Most adverse events, caused as they may seem by human action or failing to act at first sight, are often partly caused by a care process that has not been properly organized. Uniform concepts are needed in order to facilitate European comparisons, which would allow, for example, the comparison of Dutch research results with those from other countries, and the identification of specific concepts. One of the six action areas of the WHO’s World Alliance for Patient Safety is the development of a ‘patient safety taxonomy’.

  18. Hospitals, market share, and consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, David M; Scott Morton, Fiona

    2013-11-13

    A large reduction in use of inpatient care combined with the incentives in the Affordable Care Act is leading to significant consolidation in the hospital industry. What was once a set of independent hospitals having arms-length relationships with physicians and clinicians who provide ambulatory care is becoming a small number of locally integrated health systems, generally built around large, prestigious academic medical centers. The typical region in the United States has 3 to 5 consolidated health systems, spanning a wide range of care settings, and a smaller fringe of health care centers outside those systems. Consolidated health systems have advantages and drawbacks. The advantages include the ability to coordinate care across different practitioners and sites of care. Offsetting this is the potential for higher prices resulting from greater market power. Market power increases because it is difficult for insurers to bargain successfully with one of only a few health systems. Antitrust authorities are examining these consolidated systems as they form, but broad conclusions are difficult to draw because typically the creation of a system will generate both benefit and harm and each set of facts will be different. Moreover, the remedies traditionally used (eg, blocking the transaction or requiring that the parties divest assets) by antitrust authorities in cases of net harm are limited. For this reason, local governments may want to introduce new policies that help ensure consumers gain protection in the event of consolidation, such as insurance products that charge consumers more for high-priced clinicians and health care centers, bundling payments to clinicians and health care organizations to eliminate the incentives of big institutions to simply provide more care, and establishing area-specific price or spending targets.

  19. How does wireless phones effect communication and treatment in hospitals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Bettina Sletten

    phones can compromise patient safety, both by disturbing the practitioners’ concentration, causing mistakes, and by transporting bacteria between patients. This qualitative Ph.D.-study wishes to further investigate the effect of wireless phones on communication and treatment in hospital units, using...... considerations into values versus reality. Furthermore the study will investigate, how practitioners can stay attentive, and manage the balance between accessibility and presence. The study will be situated within the field of discourse studies, with nexus analysis as its primary theoretical and methodological...

  20. The architecture of enterprise hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin; Zhao, Chenhui; An, Jiye

    2005-01-01

    Because of the complexity of the hospital environment, there exist a lot of medical information systems from different vendors with incompatible structures. In order to establish an enterprise hospital information system, the integration among these heterogeneous systems must be considered. Complete integration should cover three aspects: data integration, function integration and workflow integration. However most of the previous design of architecture did not accomplish such a complete integration. This article offers an architecture design of the enterprise hospital information system based on the concept of digital neural network system in hospital. It covers all three aspects of integration, and eventually achieves the target of one virtual data center with Enterprise Viewer for users of different roles. The initial implementation of the architecture in the 5-year Digital Hospital Project in Huzhou Central hospital of Zhejiang Province is also described.

  1. FOUNDING OF THE DISTRICT HOSPITAL IN NIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misa Zivic

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available After the liberation of Nis from the Turks which took place on January 11th, 1878, there were two military hospitals: one was next to The Skull Tower and the other on the road to Leskovac and there was Islahana the civil institution which was not the forerunner of the district hospital in Nis. At first, they founded the military hospital in Nis in 1878 and then they founded The District Hospital on July 17th in 1881. The first director of the District hospital was Anton Zajicek. He is also the first graduated medical doctor in Nis. The District Hospital was situated on the left bank of the Nisava river in a private house.

  2. All-Round Marketing Increases Hospital Popularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziqi, Tao

    2015-06-01

    Xuzhou Center Hospital is in a competing medical market in Xuzhou city. This hospital has been dedicating to improve the medical skills and provide professional and individualized service to the patients in order to improve the patient's experience and increase the patient's satisfaction. On the other side, this hospital has provided an all-round marketing campaign to build up the social influence and public reputation through public-praise marketing, web marketing, media marketing, and scholar marketing. Besides, this hospital has been cooperating with foreign medical institutions and inviting foreign medical specialists to academic communication. With the combined effects of improving medical service and all-round marketing, the hospital's economic performance has been enhanced significantly and laid a solid foundation for its ambition to become the first-class hospital in Huaihai Economic Zone.

  3. Evaluation of Nigerian hospital meal carts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayodeji, Sesan P.; Adeyeri, Michael K.; Omoniyi, Olaoluwa

    2015-03-01

    Hospital meal carts are used to deliver meals, drugs and some other materials to patients in the hospital environment. These carts which are moved manually by operators, the health workers, mostly do not comply with ergonomics guidelines and physical requirements of the equipment users in terms of anthropometry data of the region thus increasing the risk of musculoskeletal disorder among the meal cart users. This study carried out ergonomic evaluation of the available meal carts in some western Nigeria hospitals. A well-structured questionnaire has two major segments: Operational survey and biomechanical survey, which were administered to the health workers using hospital meal carts in some hospitals in southwestern Nigeria, and physical assessment, which was undertaken to collect data for the ergonomic evaluation. The responses from the questionnaires show that some areas on the existing hospital meal carts are of concern to the users which need to be improved upon.

  4. The European view of hospital undernutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Anne M; Balknäs, Ulla N; Camilo, Maria E; Fürst, Peter; Gentile, Maria G; Hasunen, Kaija; Jones, Liz; Jonkers-Schuitema, Cora; Keller, Ulrich; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Mikkelsen, Bent E; Pavcic, Marusa; Schauder, Peter; Sivonen, Lauri; Zinck, Orla; Øien, Henriette; Ovesen, Lars

    2003-06-01

    Disease-related undernutrition is significant in European hospitals but is seldom treated or prevented. In 1999, the Council of Europe decided to collect information regarding nutrition programs in hospitals, and for this purpose, a network consisting of national experts from 12 of the Partial Agreement member states was established. The aim was to review the current practices in Europe regarding hospital food provision, to highlight deficiencies, and to issue recommendations to improve the nutritional care and support of hospitalized patients. Five major common problems were identified: 1) lack of clearly defined responsibilities, 2) lack of sufficient education, 3) lack of influence and knowledge of the patients, 4) lack of cooperation between different staff groups, and 5) lack of involvement from the hospital management. To solve the problems highlighted, a combined timely and concerted effort is required from national authorities and hospital staff, including managers, to ensure appropriate nutritional care and support.

  5. Field emission electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    This book is dedicated to field emission electronics, a promising field at the interface between “classic” vacuum electronics and nanotechnology. In addition to theoretical models, it includes detailed descriptions of experimental and research techniques and production technologies for different types of field emitters based on various construction principles. It particularly focuses on research into and production of field cathodes and electron guns using recently developed nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes. Further, it discusses the applications of field emission cathodes in new technologies such as light sources, flat screens, microwave and X-ray devices.

  6. Medical tourism private hospitals: focus India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Billie Ann

    2010-01-01

    This article examines demand factors for sophisticated medical treatments offered by private hospitals operating in India. Three types of medical tourism exist: Outbound, Inbound, and Intrabound. Increased profitability and positive growth trends by private hospital chains can be attributed to rising domestic income levels within India. Not all of the chains examined were financially solvent. Some of the hospital groups in this sample that advertised directly to potential Inbound medical tourists appear to be experiencing negative cash flows.

  7. Market orientation in the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuian, S N; Abdul-Gader, A

    1997-01-01

    Using the more recent methodological developments in the assessment of the unidemensionality, reliability, and validity, the authors developed and examined a scale of market orientation for the hospital industry. The scale is based on a clear definition of the content of the construct of market orientation in the hospital industry. To this end, a national random sample of 237 hospital administrators was used. In addition to the support for the reliability and validity, the scale promises parsimony, pragmatism, and wide-ranging applicability.

  8. Sustainable Design for Hospitals in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, Po-Han; Kan, Meng-Shen; Chang, Luh-Maan

    2015-01-01

    —This Hospitals consume large amounts of energy due to its operation characteristic. The HVAC system designed in hospital buildings runs 24 hours and has special air supply requirements. This study aims to evaluate the energy-saving efficiency of HVAC system by studying two Taiwan’s green hospital buildings. Results show 39.3% energy saving efficiency based on integrating VFD (Variable Frequency Drive) chiller, VAV (Variable Air Volume) system and VWV (Variable Water Volume) system for an exi...

  9. Abuse in Hospital-Based Birth Settings?

    OpenAIRE

    Hodges, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Are laboring and birthing women treated abusively in the hospital? Although seldom recognized as abuse or violence against women, bullying and medical treatments under false pretenses, even in a hospital, constitute abuse and a basic human rights issue that needs attention. Naming the problem is a first step. The power of medical authority, the lack of accountability in the hospital hierarchical system, policies and protocols, and expectations of compliancy all make an environment ripe for ab...

  10. Grey’s Hospital, Pietermaritzburg 1855 - 1985

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer G Duckworth

    1985-09-01

    Full Text Available The first matron of Grey’s Hospital, Mrs Isabella O ’Hara, was appointed in October 1855 and she presided over a temporary hospital which was established in a house until such time as the hospital building should be ready. The patients were mainly lunatics and destitute people who had until then been accommodated in a room at the goal. The sick were usually cared for in their homes.

  11. Comprehensive care for seniors in hospital

    OpenAIRE

    HRÁDKOVÁ, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the issue of Comprehensive care for seniors in hospital. The conception of this thesis is theoretically-empirical. The theoretical part is focused on the characteristics of old-age and changes that accompany it, on the concept of comprehensive care, workers who participate in complex care and comprehensive care in hospital reception and hospitalization. Subsequently, it is oriented towards peculiarities concerning communication with seniors, the nurse´s role in...

  12. Profiling Interfacility Transfers for Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenthal, JL; Hilton, JF; Teufel, RJ; Romano, PS; Kaiser, SV; Okumura, MJ

    2016-01-01

    Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics. BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The hospital-to-hospital transfer of pediatric patients is a common practice that is poorly understood. To better understand this practice, we examined a national database to profile pediatric interfacility transfers. METHODS: We used the 2012 Kids' Inpatient Database to examine characteristics of hospitalized pediatric patients ( < 21 years; excluding pregnancy diagnoses) with a transfer admission source. We pe...

  13. Classical field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Classical field theory, which concerns the generation and interaction of fields, is a logical precursor to quantum field theory, and can be used to describe phenomena such as gravity and electromagnetism. Written for advanced undergraduates, and appropriate for graduate level classes, this book provides a comprehensive introduction to field theories, with a focus on their relativistic structural elements. Such structural notions enable a deeper understanding of Maxwell's equations, which lie at the heart of electromagnetism, and can also be applied to modern variants such as Chern–Simons and Born–Infeld. The structure of field theories and their physical predictions are illustrated with compelling examples, making this book perfect as a text in a dedicated field theory course, for self-study, or as a reference for those interested in classical field theory, advanced electromagnetism, or general relativity. Demonstrating a modern approach to model building, this text is also ideal for students of theoretic...

  14. Readiness for hospital discharge: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Eileen Catherine; Wills, Teresa; Coffey, Alice

    2017-11-01

    To report on an analysis on the concept of 'readiness for hospital discharge'. No uniform operational definition of 'readiness for hospital discharge' exists in the literature; therefore, a concept analysis is required to clarify the concept and identify an up-to-date understanding of readiness for hospital discharge. Clarity of the concept will identify all uses of the concept; provide conceptual clarity, an operational definition and direction for further research. Literature review and concept analysis. A review of literature was conducted in 2016. Databases searched were: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Full Text (H.W. Wilson) and SocINDEX with Full Text. No date limits were applied. Identification of the attributes, antecedents and consequences of readiness for hospital discharge led to an operational definition of the concept. The following attributes belonging to 'readiness for hospital discharge' were extracted from the literature: physical stability, adequate support, psychological ability, and adequate information and knowledge. This analysis contributes to the advancement of knowledge in the area of hospital discharge, by proposing an operational definition of readiness for hospital discharge, derived from the literature. A better understanding of the phenomenon will assist healthcare professionals to recognize, measure and implement interventions where necessary, to ensure patients are ready for hospital discharge and assist in the advancement of knowledge for all professionals involved in patient discharge from hospital. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Bridging the Gap in Hospital Preparedness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adwell, James P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a baseline measurement tool by assessing individual attitudes regarding hospital preparedness, departmental preparedness, and preparedness through education and training...

  16. Developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dychtwald, K; Zitter, M

    1988-09-01

    The initial stages of developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals are explored in this excerpt from the book, The Role of the Hospital in an Aging Society: A Blueprint for Action. The elderly have unique perceptual, cognitive, social, and psychological needs and preferences, and a marketing strategy for eldercare services must reflect these factors, as well as the financial role of third-party payers and the decision-making influence of families and physicians. Among the elements the hospital must address when developing a marketing strategy are market selection and segmentation, targeting markets with specific services, pricing, and positioning the hospital for a maximum share of the eldercare market.

  17. Microbial contamination of hospital reusable cleaning towels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes, Laura Y; Gerba, Charles P; Weart, Ilona; Engelbrecht, Kathleen; Koenig, David W

    2013-10-01

    Hospital cleaning practices are critical to the prevention of nosocomial infection transmission. To this end, cloth towels soaked in disinfectants are commonly used to clean and disinfect hospital surfaces. Cloth cleaning towels have been linked to an outbreak of Bacillus cereus and have been shown to reduce the effectiveness of commonly used quaternary ammonium disinfectants. Thus, it is important to determine whether the reuse of cloth towels increases the risk of pathogen transmission in hospitals. The goal of this project was to determine the effects of laundry and cleaning practices commonly used in hospitals for washing, storage, and disinfection of cloth cleaning towels on their microbial loads. Our results indicate that cloth towels used for cleaning hospital rooms contained high numbers of microbial contaminants. In this case, hospital laundering practices appear insufficient to remove microbial contaminants and may even add contaminants to the towels. Furthermore, it has been previously reported that towels can interfere with the action of common hospital disinfectants. Either independently or in combination, these 2 factors may increase the risk for transmission of pathogens in hospitals. These observations indicate the need to critically reevaluate current hospital cleaning practices associated with reuse of cloth towels. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The changing power equation in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, J M; Rayburn, L G

    1997-01-01

    This research traces the origins, development, and reasons for change in the power equation in the U.S. hospitals between physicians, administrators and accountants. The paper contains three major sections: a review of the literature concerning authority, power, influence, and institutional theory; a review of the development of the power of professions, especially physicians, accounting and healthcare administrators, and the power equilibrium of a hospital; and, a discussion of the social policy implications of the power struggle. The basis for physicians' power derives from their legal ability to act on which others are dependent, such as choosing which hospital to admit patients, order tests and procedures for their patients. The Federal Government's prospective payment system and the hospitals' related case-mix accounting systems appear to influence the power structure in hospitals by redistributing that power. The basis of the accountants' power base is control of financial information. Accountants have a definite potential for influencing which departments receive financial resources and for what purpose. This moves hospital accountants into the power equation. The basis of the hospital administrators' power is their formal authority in the organization. Regardless of what actions federal government agencies, hospital accountants, or hospital administrators take, physicians are expected to remain the dominant factor in the power equation. Without major environmental changes to gain control of physician services, only insignificant results in cost containment will occur.

  19. Korean hospital design, state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chang-Ho

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the architectural characteristics and trends and suggests some tasks for better hospitals. Hospital design has been improved qualitatively in architectural form and interior. Although overall forms of most buildings have a vertical concept, horizontal concept hospitals have been attempted. In ward plan, various shapes have appeared and interior space has been more dynamic. Special clinics and centres have been established and operated to meet the high level of patients' demand. Suggestions for better hospital could be the increase of private rooms, decreasing the size of the nursing unit, the use of the horizontal concept, supplement of safety-privacy-hygiene, and some sensory factors.

  20. The Life Saving Effects of Hospital Proximity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertoli, Paola; Grembi, Veronica

    We assess the lifesaving effect of hospital proximity using data on fatality rates of road-traffic accidents. While most of the literature on this topic is based on changes in distance to the nearest hospital triggered by hospital closures and use OLS estimates, our identification comes from......) increases the fatality rate by 13.84% on the sample average. This is equal to a 0.92 additional death per every 100 accidents. We show that OLS estimates provide a downward biased measure of the real effect of hospital proximity because they do not fully solve spatial sorting problems. Proximity matters...